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Sample records for callosum fractional anisotropy

  1. Reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior corpus callosum is associated with reduced speech fluency in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Civier, Oren; Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that severely limits one's ability to communicate. White matter anomalies were reported in stuttering, but their functional significance is unclear. We analyzed the relation between white matter properties and speech fluency in adults who stutter (AWS). We used diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics, and examined group differences as well as correlations with behavioral fluency measures. We detected a region in the anterior corpus callosum with significantly lower fractional anisotropy in AWS relative to controls. Within the AWS group, reduced anisotropy in that region is associated with reduced fluency. A statistically significant interaction was found between group and age in two additional regions: the left Rolandic operculum and the left posterior corpus callosum. Our findings suggest that anterior callosal anomaly in stuttering may represent a maladaptive reduction in interhemispheric inhibition, possibly leading to a disadvantageous recruitment of right frontal cortex in speech production. PMID:25728013

  2. Altered Fractional Anisotropy in Early Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Silky; Mehta, Hasit; Fekete, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease best known for chorea. The disorder includes numerous other clinical features including mood disorder, eye movement abnormalities, cognitive disturbance, pendular knee reflexes, motor impersistence, and postural instability. We describe a mild case of HD early in the disease course with depression and subtle neurological manifestations. In addition, we review MRI and diffusion tensor imaging features in this patient. The bicaudate ratio, a measure of caudate atrophy, was increased. Fractional anisotropy values of the bilateral caudate and putamen were increased, signifying neurodegeneration of these structures in HD. PMID:23525910

  3. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION WHITE MATTER FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY CORRELATES WITH SPEED

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    CLINICAL INVESTIGATION WHITE MATTER FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY CORRELATES WITH SPEED OF PROCESSING medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p White matter tracts, using

  4. Cosmic ray anisotropy in fractional differential models of anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, V. V.

    2013-06-15

    The problem of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy is considered in two versions of the fractional differential model for anomalous diffusion. The simplest problem of cosmic ray propagation from a point instantaneous source in an unbounded medium is used as an example to show that the transition from the standard diffusion model to the Lagutin-Uchaikin fractional differential model (with characteristic exponent {alpha} = 3/5 and a finite velocity of free particle motion), which gives rise to a knee in the energy spectrum at 10{sup 6} GeV, increases the anisotropy coefficient only by 20%, while the anisotropy coefficient in the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model (with exponents {alpha} = 0.3 and {beta} = 0.8, a long stay of particles in traps, and an infinite velocity of their jumps) is close to one. This is because the parameters of the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model have been chosen improperly.

  5. Tractography of the Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) Corpus Callosum Using Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Platas-Neri, Diana; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia; da Celis Alonso, Benito; de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Muñoz-Delgado, Jairo; Phillips, Kimberley A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the organization, connectivity and microstructure of the corpus callosum of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging were obtained from three subjects using a 3T Philips scanner. We hypothesized that the arrangement of fibers in spider monkeys would be similar to that observed in other non-human primates. A repeated measure (n = 3) of fractional anisotropy values was obtained of each subject and for each callosal subdivision. Measurements of the diffusion properties of corpus callosum fibers exhibited a similar pattern to those reported in the literature for humans and chimpanzees. No statistical difference was reached when comparing this parameter between the different CC regions (p = 0.066). The highest fractional anisotropy values corresponded to regions projecting from the corpus callosum to the posterior cortical association areas, premotor and supplementary motor cortices. The lowest fractional anisotropy corresponded to projections to motor and sensory cortical areas. Analyses indicated that approximately 57% of the fibers projects to the frontal cortex and 43% to the post-central cortex. While this study had a small sample size, the results provided important information concerning the organization of the corpus callosum in spider monkeys. PMID:25693078

  6. White Matter Fractional Anisotropy Correlates With Speed of Processing and Motor Speed in Young Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Aukema, Eline J.; Oudhuis, Nienke; Vos, Frans M.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether childhood medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy (WMFA) and whether WMFA is related to the speed of processing and motor speed. Methods and Materials: For this study, 17 patients (6 medulloblastoma, 5 ALL treated with high-dose methotrexate (MTX) (4 x 5 g/m{sup 2}) and 6 with low-dose MTX (3 x 2 g/m{sup 2})) and 17 age-matched controls participated. On a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed, and WMFA values were calculated, including specific regions of interest (ROIs), and correlated with the speed of processing and motor speed. Results: Mean WMFA in the patient group, mean age 14 years (range 8.9 - 16.9), was decreased compared with the control group (p = 0.01), as well as WMFA in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciliculus (IFO) (p = 0.03) and in the genu of the corpus callosum (gCC) (p = 0.01). Based on neurocognitive results, significant positive correlations were present between processing speed and WMFA in the splenium (sCC) (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and the body of the corpus callosum (bCC) (r = 0.52, p = 0.03), whereas the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p < 0.05). Conclusions: White matter tracts, using a 3.0-T MRI scanner, show impairment in childhood cancer survivors, medulloblastoma survivors, and also those treated with high doses of MTX. In particular, white matter tracts in the sCC, bCC and right IFO are positively correlated with speed of processing and motor speed.

  7. Gene Effects Mapped Using Fractional and Geodesic Anisotropy in Diffusion Tensor Images of 92

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    questions using a DTI dataset of 92 healthy young adult twins. Several twin studies have examined how genesGene Effects Mapped Using Fractional and Geodesic Anisotropy in Diffusion Tensor Images of 92 the eigenvalues of the local diffusion tensor, is sensitive to the effects of aging and neurodegenerative disease

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging in the corpus callosum in children after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Chu, Zili; Bigler, Erin D; Hunter, Jill V; Fearing, Michael A; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Scheibel, Randall S; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S

    2006-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recent imaging technique that assesses the microstructure of the cerebral white matter (WM) based on anisotropic diffusion (i.e., water molecules move faster in parallel to nerve fibers than perpendicular to them). Fractional anisotropy (FA), which ranges from 0 to 1.0, increases with myelination of WM tracts and is sensitive to diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, previous DTI studies of pediatric TBI were case reports without detailed outcome measures. Using mean FA derived from DTI fiber tractography, we compared DTI findings of the corpus callosum for 16 children who were at least 1 year (mean 3.1 years) post-severe TBI and individually matched, uninjured children. Interexaminer and intraexaminer reliability in measuring FA was satisfactory. FA was significantly lower in the patients for the genu, body, and splenium of the corpus callosum. Higher FA was related to increased cognitive processing speed and faster interference resolution on an inhibition task. In the TBI patients, higher FA was related to better functional outcome as measured by the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). FA also increased as a function of the area of specific regions of the corpus callosum such as the genu and splenium, and FA in the splenium was reduced with greater volume of lesions in this region. DTI may be useful in identifying biomarkers related to DAI and outcome of TBI in children. PMID:17020479

  9. Connecting fractional anisotropy from medical images with mechanical anisotropy of a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced constitutive model for brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-01-01

    Brain tissue modelling has been an active area of research for years. Brain matter does not follow the constitutive relations for common materials and loads applied to the brain turn into stresses and strains depending on tissue local morphology. In this work, a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced anisotropic law is used for computational brain injury prediction. Thanks to a fibre-reinforcement dispersion parameter, this formulation accounts for anisotropic features and heterogeneities of the tissue owing to different axon alignment. The novelty of the work is the correlation of the material mechanical anisotropy with fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor images. Finite-element (FE) models are used to investigate the influence of the fibre distribution for different loading conditions. In the case of tensile–compressive loads, the comparison between experiments and simulations highlights the validity of the proposed FA–k correlation. Axon alignment affects the deformation predicted by FE models and, when the strain in the axonal direction is large with respect to the maximum principal strain, decreased maximum deformations are detected. It is concluded that the introduction of fibre dispersion information into the constitutive law of brain tissue affects the biofidelity of the simulations. PMID:24258158

  10. Corpus Callosum Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Volume Measures Are Associated With Disease Severity in Pediatric Niemann-Pick Disease Type C1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ryan; Apkarian, Kalyna; Jung, Eun Sol; Yanjanin, Nicole; Yoshida, Shoko; Mori, Susumu; Park, Jina; Gropman, Andrea; Baker, Eva H.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Niemann-Pick disease type C1 is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. Without a highly effective treatment, biomarkers of severity would be beneficial for prognostication and testing new interventions. Diffusion tensor imaging has shown microstructural abnormalities in adults with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. This is the first study to apply diffusion tensor imaging and volume analysis to evaluate the corpus callosum in a pediatric and adolescent population of patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. We hypothesized that the callosal fractional anisotropy, volume, and cross-sectional area will negatively correlate with NPC severity score. METHODS Thirty-nine individuals with Niemann-Pick disease type C1 aged 1–21.9 years (mean = 11.1; S.D. = 6.1), and each received one magnetic resonance imaging examination. Severity score were obtained by examination and clinical observation. An atlas-based automated approach was used to measure fractional anisotropy, cross-sectional area, and volume. For comparative analysis and validation of this atlas-based approach, one midsagittal image was chosen and the corpus callosum manually traced to obtain cross-sectional area. Statistical analyses were applied to study the relationships between imaging and clinical severity. RESULTS For patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C1, lower corpus callosum fractional anisotropy, volume, and cross-sectional area significantly correlate with higher severity score. Severity subdomain analysis revealed ambulation, speech, seizures, and incontinence have the strongest relationships with callosal measures. Comparison of atlas-based processing and manual tracing techniques demonstrated validity for the automated method. CONCLUSIONS For individuals with Niemann-Pick disease type C1, the corpus callosum measures correlate with clinical severity. These findings reveal promise for the discovery of new imaging biomarkers for this disorder. PMID:25194719

  11. A NOVEL APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN THE ESCAPE FRACTION AND DUST CONTENT AT HIGH REDSHIFT USING THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Elizabeth R.; Dole, Herve; Iliev, Ilian T.

    2013-02-10

    The Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) provides an opportunity to constrain many properties of the high-redshift (z > 6) stellar population as a whole. This background, specifically from 1 to 200 {mu}m, should contain information about the era of reionization and the stars that are responsible for these ionizing photons. In this paper, we look at the fractional anisotropy ({delta}I/I) of this high-redshift population, where {delta}I is the ratio of the magnitude of the fluctuations and I is the mean intensity. We show that this can be used to constrain the escape fraction of the population as a whole, because the magnitude of the fluctuations of the CIB depends on the escape fraction, while the mean intensity does not. This results in lower values of the escape fraction producing higher values of the fractional anisotropy. This difference is predicted to be larger at longer wavelength bands (above 10 {mu}m), albeit it is also much harder to observe in that range. We show that the fractional anisotropy can also be used to separate a dusty from a dust-free population. Finally, we discuss the constraints provided by current observations on the CIB fractional anisotropy.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging and myelin composition analysis reveal abnormal myelination in corpus callosum of canine mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, James M; Nestrasil, Igor; Chen, Steven; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Le, Steven Q; Jens, Jacqueline K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Vondrak, Kristen N; Yee, Jennifer K; Vite, Charles H; Elashoff, David; Duan, Lewei; Wang, Raymond Y; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guzman, Miguel A; Shapiro, Elsa G; Dickson, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    Children with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) develop hyperintense white matter foci on T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are associated clinically with cognitive impairment. We report here a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tissue evaluation of white matter in a canine model of MPS I. We found that two DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity) and radial diffusivity (which reflects degree of myelination) were abnormal in the corpus callosum of MPS I dogs compared to carrier controls. Tissue studies of the corpus callosum showed reduced expression of myelin-related genes and an abnormal composition of myelin in MPS I dogs. We treated MPS I dogs with recombinant alpha-l-iduronidase, which is the enzyme that is deficient in MPS I disease. The recombinant alpha-l-iduronidase was administered by intrathecal injection into the cisterna magna. Treated dogs showed partial correction of corpus callosum myelination. Our findings suggest that abnormal myelination occurs in the canine MPS I brain, that it may underlie clinically-relevant brain imaging findings in human MPS I patients, and that it may respond to treatment. PMID:26222335

  13. Not lesser but Greater fractional anisotropy in adolescents with alcohol use disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Valerie A.; Greenstein, David; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Ferrett, Helen; Cuzen, Natalie; Stein, Dan J.; Fein, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to examine white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in a sample of adolescents with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and no psychiatric or substance co-morbidity. Methods Fifty adolescents with AUD and fifty non-alcohol abusing controls matched on gender and age were studied with DTI, neurocognitive testing, and a clinical assessment that included measures of alcohol use and childhood trauma. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were computed, registered to a common template, and voxel-wise statistical analysis used to assess group differences. Associations between regions of altered WM microstructure and clinical or neurocognitive measures were also assessed. Results Compared with controls, adolescent drinkers without co-morbid substance abuse or externalizing disorder, showed 1) no regions of significantly lower FA, 2) increased FA in WM tracts of the limbic system; 3) no MD differences; and 4) within the region of higher FA in AUD, there were no associations between FA and alcohol use, cognition, or trauma. Discussion The most important observation of this study is our failure to observe significantly smaller FA in this relatively large alcohol abuse/dependent adolescent sample. Greater FA in the limbic regions observed in this study may index a risk for adolescent AUD instead of a consequence of drinking. Drinking behavior may be reinforced in those with higher FA and perhaps greater myelination in these brain regions involved in reward and reinforcement. PMID:24179831

  14. Reduced Fractional Anisotropy in the Visual Limbic Pathway of Young Adults Witnessing Domestic Violence in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeewook; Jeong, Bumseok; Polcari, Ann; Rohan, Michael L.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    Witnessing domestic violence (WDV) is a traumatic childhood experience associated with increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and reduced IQ scores. Specific affects of WDV on brain development have not been assessed. We sought to ascertain whether WDV was associated with abnormalities in white matter (WM) tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty subjects who witnessed domestic violence (16F/ 4M, mean age 22.4±2.48 yrs) but were not physically or sexually abused were compared to 27 healthy controls (19F/ 8M, 21.9±1.97 yrs) without exposure to trauma or Axis I and II disorders. DTI images were acquired with a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), covaried by age, gender, parental education, perceived financial sufficiency, IQ and degree of exposure to parental verbal aggression were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), which projects FA values onto an alignment-invariant fiber tract representation. FA values in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus of left lateral occipital lobe were significantly lower (p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparison) in the WDV group. FA values correlated inversely with ratings of depression, anxiety, somatization, ‘limbic irritability’ and neuropsychological measures of processing speed. Measures of radial but not axial diffusivity were affected suggesting alterations in myelination. Degree of FA reduction was associated with duration of witnessing interparental verbal aggression and with exposure between ages 7 – 13 years. The inferior longitudinal fasciculus connects occipital and temporal cortex and is the main component of the visual–limbic pathway that subserves emotional, learning and memory functions that are modality specific to vision. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in fiber pathways that convey the adverse experience to frontal, temporal or limbic regions. PMID:21985907

  15. Classical disconnection studies of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Glickstein, Mitchell; Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    The corpus callosum is one of the most prominent fiber systems of the mammalian brain. Early reports of animals in which the callosum was cut, often confused the effects attributable to callosum damage with those caused by lesions of other brain structures. Early clinical reports also failed to establish the role of the callosum in humans. Two sorts of evidence began to reveal the functions of the corpus callosum. People with callosal damage cannot read text presented in the left visual field, and animals in which the callosum is divided, and sensory input restricted to one hemisphere, fail to show interhemispheric transfer of learning. These functional findings are consistent with anatomical and physiological studies of the role of the corpus callosum in communication between the hemispheres. PMID:18603234

  16. Genetics of Microstructure of the Corpus Callosum in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kanchibhotla, Sri C.; Mather, Karen A.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Zhuang, Lin; Schofield, Peter R.; Kwok, John B. J.; Ames, David; Wright, Margaret J.; Trollor, Julian N.; Wen, Wei; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2014-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on corpus callosum (CC) microstructure in a community sample of older adult twins. Analyses were undertaken in 284 healthy older twins (66% female; 79 MZ and 63 DZ pairs) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The average age of the sample was 69.82 (SD?=?4.76) years. Brain imaging scans were collected and DTI measures were estimated for the whole CC as well as its five subregions. Parcellation of the CC was performed using Analyze. In addition, white matter lesion (WMLs) burden was estimated. Heritability and genetic correlation analyses were undertaken using the SOLAR software package. Age, sex, scanner, handedness and blood pressure were considered as covariates. Heritability (h2) analysis for the DTI metrics of whole CC, indicated significant h2 for fractional anisotropy (FA) (h2?=?0.56; p?=?2.89×10?10), mean diffusivity (MD) (h2?=?0.52; p?=?0.30×10?6), radial diffusivity (RD) (h2?=?0.49; p?=?0.2×10?6) and axial diffusivity (AD) (h2?=?0.37; p?=?8.15×10?5). We also performed bivariate genetic correlation analyses between (i) whole CC DTI measures and (ii) whole CC DTI measures with total brain WML burden. Across the DTI measures for the whole CC, MD and RD shared 84% of the common genetic variance, followed by MD- AD (77%), FA - RD (52%), RD - AD (37%) and FA – MD (11%). For total WMLs, significant genetic correlations indicated that there was 19% shared common genetic variance with whole CC MD, followed by CC RD (17%), CC AD (16%) and CC FA (5%). Our findings suggest that the CC microstructure is under moderate genetic control. There was also evidence of shared genetic factors between the CC DTI measures. In contrast, there was less shared genetic variance between WMLs and the CC DTI metrics, suggesting fewer common genetic variants. PMID:25514436

  17. Corpus Callosum Volume and Neurocognition in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keary, Christopher J.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Bansal, Rahul; Goradia, Dhruman; Fedorov, Serguei; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2009-01-01

    The corpus callosum has recently been considered as an index of interhemispheric connectivity. This study applied a novel volumetric method to examine the size of the corpus callosum in 32 individuals with autism and 34 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls and to investigate the relationship between this structure and cognitive measures linked to…

  18. Genetics of microstructure of the corpus callosum in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kanchibhotla, Sri C; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Zhuang, Lin; Schofield, Peter R; Kwok, John B J; Ames, David; Wright, Margaret J; Trollor, Julian N; Wen, Wei; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2014-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on corpus callosum (CC) microstructure in a community sample of older adult twins. Analyses were undertaken in 284 healthy older twins (66% female; 79 MZ and 63 DZ pairs) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The average age of the sample was 69.82 (SD?=?4.76) years. Brain imaging scans were collected and DTI measures were estimated for the whole CC as well as its five subregions. Parcellation of the CC was performed using Analyze. In addition, white matter lesion (WMLs) burden was estimated. Heritability and genetic correlation analyses were undertaken using the SOLAR software package. Age, sex, scanner, handedness and blood pressure were considered as covariates. Heritability (h(2)) analysis for the DTI metrics of whole CC, indicated significant h(2) for fractional anisotropy (FA) (h(2)?=?0.56; p?=?2.89×10(-10)), mean diffusivity (MD) (h(2)?=?0.52; p?=?0.30×10(-6)), radial diffusivity (RD) (h(2)?=?0.49; p?=?0.2×10(-6)) and axial diffusivity (AD) (h(2)?=?0.37; p?=?8.15×10(-5)). We also performed bivariate genetic correlation analyses between (i) whole CC DTI measures and (ii) whole CC DTI measures with total brain WML burden. Across the DTI measures for the whole CC, MD and RD shared 84% of the common genetic variance, followed by MD-AD (77%), FA-RD (52%), RD-AD (37%) and FA-MD (11%). For total WMLs, significant genetic correlations indicated that there was 19% shared common genetic variance with whole CC MD, followed by CC RD (17%), CC AD (16%) and CC FA (5%). Our findings suggest that the CC microstructure is under moderate genetic control. There was also evidence of shared genetic factors between the CC DTI measures. In contrast, there was less shared genetic variance between WMLs and the CC DTI metrics, suggesting fewer common genetic variants. PMID:25514436

  19. Individual differences in regional prefrontal gray matter morphometry and fractional anisotropy are associated with different constructs of executive function.

    PubMed

    Smolker, H R; Depue, B E; Reineberg, A E; Orr, J M; Banich, M T

    2015-05-01

    Although the relationship between structural differences within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) has been widely explored in cognitively impaired populations, little is known about this relationship in healthy young adults. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), surface-based morphometry (SBM), and fractional anisotropy (FA) we determined the association between regional PFC grey matter (GM) morphometry and white matter tract diffusivity with performance on tasks that tap different aspects of EF as drawn from Miyake et al.'s three-factor model of EF. Reductions in both GM volume (VBM) and cortical folding (SBM) in the ventromedial PFC (vmPFC), ventrolateral PFC (vlPFC), and dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) predicted better common EF, shifting-specific, and updating-specific performance, respectively. Despite capturing different components of GM morphometry, voxel- and surface-based findings were highly related, exhibiting regionally overlapping relationships with EF. Increased white matter FA in fiber tracts that connect the vmPFC and vlPFC with posterior regions of the brain also predicted better common EF and shifting-specific performance, respectively. These results suggest that the neural mechanisms supporting distinct aspects of EF may differentially rely on distinct regions of the PFC, and at least in healthy young adults, are influenced by regional morphometry of the PFC and the FA of major white matter tracts that connect the PFC with posterior cortical and subcortical regions. PMID:24562372

  20. Facial emotion recognition in agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired social functioning is a common symptom of individuals with developmental disruptions in callosal connectivity. Among these developmental conditions, agenesis of the corpus callosum provides the most extreme and clearly identifiable example of callosal disconnection. To date, deficits in nonliteral language comprehension, humor, theory of mind, and social reasoning have been documented in agenesis of the corpus callosum. Here, we examined a basic social ability as yet not investigated in this population: recognition of facial emotion and its association with social gaze. Methods Nine individuals with callosal agenesis and nine matched controls completed four tasks involving emotional faces: emotion recognition from upright and inverted faces, gender recognition, and passive viewing. Eye-tracking data were collected concurrently on all four tasks and analyzed according to designated facial regions of interest. Results Individuals with callosal agenesis exhibited impairments in recognizing emotions from upright faces, in particular lower accuracy for fear and anger, and these impairments were directly associated with diminished attention to the eye region. The callosal agenesis group exhibited greater consistency in emotion recognition across conditions (upright vs. inverted), with poorest performance for fear identification in both conditions. The callosal agenesis group also had atypical facial scanning (lower fractional dwell time in the eye region) during gender naming and passive viewing of faces, but they did not differ from controls on gender naming performance. The pattern of results did not differ when taking into account full-scale intelligence quotient or presence of autism spectrum symptoms. Conclusions Agenesis of the corpus callosum results in a pattern of atypical facial scanning characterized by diminished attention to the eyes. This pattern suggests that reduced callosal connectivity may contribute to the development and maintenance of emotion processing deficits involving reduced attention to others' eyes. PMID:25705318

  1. Heritability of fractional anisotropy in human white matter: a comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI data.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Marcus, Daniel; Winkler, Anderson; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Patel, Binish; Behrens, Timothy; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Eddie; Ugurbil, Kamil; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Brouwer, Rachel M; Landman, Bennett; Lemaitre, Hervé; den Braber, Anouk; Zwiers, Marcel P; Ritchie, Stuart; van Hulzen, Kimm; Almasy, Laura; Curran, Joanne; deZubicaray, Greig I; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; Mitchell, Braxton; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles; Starr, John; Sussmann, Jessika; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wright, Margie; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, Rene; de Geus, Eco J C; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad; van 't Ent, Dennis; Bastin, Mark E; McIntosh, Andrew; Deary, Ian J; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Blangero, John; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Van Essen, David C

    2015-05-01

    The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) reconstruction in 481 HCP subjects (194/287 M/F) consisting of 57/60 pairs of mono- and dizygotic twins, and 246 siblings. FA measurements were derived using (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) ENIGMA DTI protocols and heritability estimates were calculated using the SOLAR-Eclipse imaging genetic analysis package. We compared heritability estimates derived from HCP data to those publicly available through the ENIGMA-DTI consortium, which were pooled together from five-family based studies across the US, Europe, and Australia. FA measurements from the HCP cohort for eleven major white matter tracts were highly heritable (h(2)=0.53-0.90, p<10(-5)), and were significantly correlated with the joint-analytical estimates from the ENIGMA cohort on the tract and voxel-wise levels. The similarity in regional heritability suggests that the additive genetic contribution to white matter microstructure is consistent across populations and imaging acquisition parameters. It also suggests that the overarching genetic influence provides an opportunity to define a common genetic search space for future gene-discovery studies. Uniquely, the measurements of additive genetic contribution performed in this study can be repeated using online genetic analysis tools provided by the HCP ConnectomeDB web application. PMID:25747917

  2. Heterogeneity of Fractional Anisotropy and Mean Diffusivity Measurements by In Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Normal Human Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro F.; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Ismail, Tevfik; Kilner, Philip J.; Gatehouse, Peter D.; de Silva, Ranil; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Giannakidis, Archontis; Firmin, David N.; Pennell, Dudley J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac diffusion tensor imaging (cDTI) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance has the potential to assess microstructural changes through measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). However, normal variation in regional and transmural FA and MD is not well described. Methods Twenty normal subjects were scanned using an optimised cDTI sequence at 3T in systole. FA and MD were quantified in 3 transmural layers and 4 regional myocardial walls. Results FA was higher in the mesocardium (0.46 ±0.04) than the endocardium (0.40 ±0.04, p?0.001) and epicardium (0.39 ±0.04, p?0.001). On regional analysis, the FA in the septum was greater than the lateral wall (0.44 ±0.03 vs 0.40 ±0.05 p = 0.04). There was a transmural gradient in MD increasing towards the endocardium (epicardium 0.87 ±0.07 vs endocardium 0.91 ±0.08×10-3 mm2/s, p = 0.04). With the lateral wall (0.87 ± 0.08×10-3 mm2/s) as the reference, the MD was higher in the anterior wall (0.92 ±0.08×10-3 mm2/s, p = 0.016) and septum (0.92 ±0.07×10-3 mm2/s, p = 0.028). Transmurally the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was greatest in the mesocardium (14.5 ±2.5 vs endocardium 13.1 ±2.2, p<0.001; vs epicardium 12.0 ± 2.4, p<0.001) and regionally in the septum (16.0 ±3.4 vs lateral wall 11.5 ± 1.5, p<0.001). Transmural analysis suggested a relative reduction in the rate of change in helical angle (HA) within the mesocardium. Conclusions In vivo FA and MD measurements in normal human heart are heterogeneous, varying significantly transmurally and regionally. Contributors to this heterogeneity are many, complex and interactive, but include SNR, variations in cardiac microstructure, partial volume effects and strain. These data indicate that the potential clinical use of FA and MD would require measurement standardisation by myocardial region and layer, unless pathological changes substantially exceed the normal variation identified. PMID:26177211

  3. Age at First Exposure to Football Is Associated with Altered Corpus Callosum White Matter Microstructure in Former Professional Football Players.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Julie M; Koerte, Inga K; Muehlmann, Marc; Pasternak, Ofer; Bourlas, Alexandra P; Baugh, Christine M; Giwerc, Michelle Y; Zhu, Anni; Coleman, Michael J; Bouix, Sylvain; Fritts, Nathan G; Martin, Brett M; Chaisson, Christine; McClean, Michael D; Lin, Alexander P; Cantu, Robert C; Tripodis, Yorghos; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-11-15

    Youth football players may incur hundreds of repetitive head impacts (RHI) in one season. Our recent research suggests that exposure to RHI during a critical neurodevelopmental period prior to age 12 may lead to greater later-life mood, behavioral, and cognitive impairments. Here, we examine the relationship between age of first exposure (AFE) to RHI through tackle football and later-life corpus callosum (CC) microstructure using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty retired National Football League (NFL) players, ages 40-65, were matched by age and divided into two groups based on their AFE to tackle football: before age 12 or at age 12 or older. Participants underwent DTI on a 3 Tesla Siemens (TIM-Verio) magnet. The whole CC and five subregions were defined and seeded using deterministic tractography. Dependent measures were fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. Results showed that former NFL players in the AFE <12 group had significantly lower FA in anterior three CC regions and higher radial diffusivity in the most anterior CC region than those in the AFE ?12 group. This is the first study to find a relationship between AFE to RHI and later-life CC microstructure. These results suggest that incurring RHI during critical periods of CC development may disrupt neurodevelopmental processes, including myelination, resulting in altered CC microstructure. PMID:26200068

  4. Corpus Callosum Morphometrics in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger-Megiddo, Inbal; Shaw, Dennis W. W.; Friedman, Seth D.; Sparks, Bobbi F.; Artru, Alan A.; Giedd, Jay N.; Dawson, Geraldine; Dager, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed digital corpus callosum cross sectional areas in 3-4 year olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to typically developing (TD) and developmentally delayed (DD) children. Though not different in absolute size compared to TD, ASD callosums were disproportionately small adjusted for increased ASD cerebral volume. ASD…

  5. Maximum Principal Strain and Strain Rate Associated with Concussion Diagnosis Correlates with Changes in Corpus Callosum White Matter Indices

    PubMed Central

    MCALLISTER, THOMAS W.; FORD, JAMES C.; JI, SONGBAI; BECKWITH, JONATHAN G.; FLASHMAN, LAURA A.; PAULSEN, KEITH; GREENWALD, RICHARD M.

    2014-01-01

    On-field monitoring of head impacts, combined with finite element (FE) biomechanical simulation, allow for predictions of regional strain associated with a diagnosed concussion. However, attempts to correlate these predictions with in vivo measures of brain injury have not been published. This article reports an approach to and preliminary results from the correlation of subject-specific FE model-predicted regions of high strain associated with diagnosed concussion and diffusion tensor imaging to assess changes in white matter integrity in the corpus callosum (CC). Ten football and ice hockey players who wore instrumented helmets to record head impacts sustained during play completed high field magnetic resonance imaging preseason and within 10 days of a diagnosed concussion. The Dartmouth Subject-Specific FE Head model was used to generate regional predictions of strain and strain rate following each impact associated with concussion. Maps of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and median diffusivity (MD) were generated for the CC of each athlete to correlate strain with change in FA and MD. Mean and maximum strain rate correlated with change in FA (Spearman ? = 0.77, p = 0.01; 0.70, p = 0.031), and there was a similar trend for mean and maximum strain (0.56, p = 0.10; 0.6, p = 0.07), as well as for maximum strain with change in MD (?0.63, p = 0.07). Change in MD correlated with injury-to-imaging interval (? = ?0.80, p = 0.006) but change in FA did not (? = 0.18, p = 0.62). These results provide preliminary confirmation that model-predicted strain and strain rate in the CC correlate with changes in indices of white matter integrity. PMID:21994062

  6. Relationship between Stereoscopic Vision, Visual Perception, and Microstructure Changes of Corpus Callosum and Occipital White Matter in the 4-Year-Old Very Low Birth Weight Children

    PubMed Central

    Kwinta, Przemko; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Le?niak, Anna; Klimek, Ma?gorzata; Karcz, Paulina; Durlak, Wojciech; Nitecka, Magdalena; Dutkowska, Gra?yna; Kubatko-Zieli?ska, Anna; Romanowska-Dixon, Bo?ena; Pietrzyk, Jacek Józef

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To assess the relationship between stereoscopic vision, visual perception, and microstructure of the corpus callosum (CC) and occipital white matter, 61 children born with a mean birth weight of 1024?g (SD 270?g) were subjected to detailed ophthalmologic evaluation, Developmental Test of Visual Perception (DTVP-3), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at the age of 4. Results. Abnormal stereoscopic vision was detected in 16 children. Children with abnormal stereoscopic vision had smaller CC (CC length: 53 ± 6?mm versus 61 ± 4?mm; p < 0.01; estimated CC area: 314 ± 106?mm2 versus 446 ± 79?mm2; p < 0.01) and lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in CC (FA value of rostrum/genu: 0.7 ± 0.09 versus 0.79 ± 0.07; p < 0.01; FA value of CC body: 0.74 ± 0.13 versus 0.82 ± 0.09; p = 0.03). We found a significant correlation between DTVP-3 scores, CC size, and FA values in rostrum and body. This correlation was unrelated to retinopathy of prematurity. Conclusions. Visual perceptive dysfunction in ex-preterm children without major sequelae of prematurity depends on more subtle changes in the brain microstructure, including CC. Role of interhemispheric connections in visual perception might be more complex than previously anticipated. PMID:26451381

  7. Fractional anisotropy shows differential reduction in frontal-subcortical fiber bundles—A longitudinal MRI study of 76 middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Vik, Alexandra; Hodneland, Erlend; Haász, Judit; Ystad, Martin; Lundervold, Astri J.; Lundervold, Arvid

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the frontal- and white matter (WM) retrogenesis hypotheses and the assumptions that fronto-striatal circuits are especially vulnerable in normal aging, the goal of the present study was to identify fiber bundles connecting subcortical nuclei and frontal areas and obtain site-specific information about age related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes. Multimodal magnetic resonance image acquisitions [3D T1-weighted and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)] were obtained from healthy older adults (N = 76, range 49–80 years at inclusion) at two time points, 3 years apart. A subset of the participants (N = 24) was included at a third time-point. In addition to the frontal-subcortical fibers, the anterior callosal fiber (ACF) and the corticospinal tract (CST) was investigated by its mean FA together with tract parameterization analysis. Our results demonstrated fronto-striatal structural connectivity decline (reduced FA) in normal aging with substantial inter-individual differences. The tract parameterization analysis showed that the along tract FA profiles were characterized by piece-wise differential changes along their extension rather than being uniformly affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study detecting age-related changes in frontal-subcortical WM connections in normal aging. PMID:26029102

  8. Effects of SNR on the Accuracy and Reproducibility of DTI-derived Fractional Anisotropy, Mean Diffusivity, and Principal Eigenvector Measurements at 1.5T

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; Landman, Bennett A.; Jones, Craig K.; Smith, Seth A.; Prince, Jerry L.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop an experimental protocol to calculate the precision and accuracy of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and the orientation of the principal eigenvector (PEV) as a function of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in vivo. Materials and Methods A healthy male volunteer was scanned in three separate scanning sessions, yielding a total of 45 DTI scans. To provide FA, MD, and PEV as a function of SNR, sequential scans from a scan session were grouped into non-intersecting sets. Analysis of the accuracy and precision of the DTI-derived contrasts was done in both a voxel-wise and ROI-based manner. Results An upward bias of FA and no significant bias in MD were present as SNR decreased, confirming results from simulation-based studies. Notably, while the precision of the PEV became worse at low SNR, no bias in the PEV orientation was observed. Overall, an accurate and precise quantification of FA values in GM requires substantially more SNR than the quantification of WM FA values Conclusion This study provides guidance for FA, MD, and PEV quantification and a means to investigate the minimal detectable differences within and across scan sessions as a function of SNR. PMID:17729339

  9. Evolution of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy in the Cerebrum of Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia over the First Month of Life.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Saskia; Boudes, Elodie; Benseler, Anouk; Gilbert, Guillaume; Saint-Martin, Christine; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evolution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) over the first month of life in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia and to compare it with that of healthy newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were enrolled prospectively; and the presence and extent of brain injury were scored on each MRI. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in the basal ganglia, in the white matter and in the cortical grey matter. Sixty-one asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia had a total of 126 ADC and FA maps. Asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury eventually had significantly decreased ADC values on days 2-3 of life and decreased FA values around day 10 and 1 month of life compared with those not developing brain injury. Despite hypothermia treatment, asphyxiated newborns may develop brain injury that still can be detected with advanced neuroimaging techniques such as DWI and DTI as early as days 2-3 of life. A study of ADC and FA values over time may aid in the understanding of how brain injury develops in these newborns despite hypothermia treatment. PMID:26229690

  10. Evolution of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy in the Cerebrum of Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia over the First Month of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Saskia; Boudes, Elodie; Benseler, Anouk; Gilbert, Guillaume; Saint-Martin, Christine; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evolution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) over the first month of life in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia and to compare it with that of healthy newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were enrolled prospectively; and the presence and extent of brain injury were scored on each MRI. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in the basal ganglia, in the white matter and in the cortical grey matter. Sixty-one asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia had a total of 126 ADC and FA maps. Asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury eventually had significantly decreased ADC values on days 2-3 of life and decreased FA values around day 10 and 1 month of life compared with those not developing brain injury. Despite hypothermia treatment, asphyxiated newborns may develop brain injury that still can be detected with advanced neuroimaging techniques such as DWI and DTI as early as days 2-3 of life. A study of ADC and FA values over time may aid in the understanding of how brain injury develops in these newborns despite hypothermia treatment. PMID:26229690

  11. Morphometric Changes of the Corpus Callosum in Congenital Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Campana, Serena; Collins, D. Louis; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Sartori, Giuseppe; Pietrini, Pietro; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual deprivation at birth on the development of the corpus callosum in a large group of congenitally blind individuals. We acquired high-resolution T1-weighted MRI scans in 28 congenitally blind and 28 normal sighted subjects matched for age and gender. There was no overall group effect of visual deprivation on the total surface area of the corpus callosum. However, subdividing the corpus callosum into five subdivisions revealed significant regional changes in its three most posterior parts. Compared to the sighted controls, congenitally blind individuals showed a 12% reduction in the splenium, and a 20% increase in the isthmus and the posterior part of the body. A shape analysis further revealed that the bending angle of the corpus callosum was more convex in congenitally blind compared to the sighted control subjects. The observed morphometric changes in the corpus callosum are in line with the well-described cross-modal functional and structural neuroplastic changes in congenital blindness. PMID:25255324

  12. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: comparing meta and mega analytical approaches for data pooling

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Mandl, René C.; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Hong, L. Elliot; Landman, Bennett A.; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Olvera, Rene L.; Peterson, Charles P.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wright, Susan N.; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Blangero, John; van ’t Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9–85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large “mega-family”. We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  13. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: Comparing meta and megaanalytical approaches for data pooling.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E; Mandl, René C; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M; Curran, Joanne E; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Hong, L Elliot; Landman, Bennett A; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna M; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles P; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Toga, Arthur W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wright, Margaret J; Wright, Susan N; Bastin, Mark E; McIntosh, Andrew M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Williamson, Douglas E; Blangero, John; van 't Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C

    2014-07-15

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9-85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large "mega-family". We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  14. Quantitative analysis of the myelin g-ratio from electron microscopy images of the macaque corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Stikov, Nikola; Campbell, Jennifer S.W.; Stroh, Thomas; Lavelée, Mariette; Frey, Stephen; Novek, Jennifer; Nuara, Stephen; Ho, Ming-Kai; Bedell, Barry J.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Leppert, Ilana R.; Boudreau, Mathieu; Narayanan, Sridar; Duval, Tanguy; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Picard, Paul-Alexandre; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Pike, G. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We provide a detailed morphometric analysis of eight transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) obtained from the corpus callosum of one cynomolgus macaque. The raw TEM images are included in the article, along with the distributions of the axon caliber and the myelin g-ratio in each image. The distributions are analyzed to determine the relationship between axon caliber and g-ratio, and compared against the aggregate metrics (myelin volume fraction, fiber volume fraction, and the aggregate g-ratio), as defined in the accompanying research article entitled ‘In vivo histology of the myelin g-ratio with magnetic resonance imaging’ (Stikov et al., NeuroImage, 2015). PMID:26217818

  15. Quantitative analysis of mouse corpus callosum from electron microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    West, Kathryn L.; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Carson, Robert P.; Does, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides morphometric analysis of 72 electron microscopy images from control (n=4) and hypomyelinated (n=2) mouse corpus callosum. Measures of axon diameter and g-ratio were tabulated across all brains from two regions of the corpus callosum and a non-linear relationship between axon diameter and g-ratio was observed. These data are related to the accompanying research article comparing multiple methods of measuring g-ratio entitled ‘A revised model for estimating g-ratio from MRI’ (West et al., NeuroImage, 2015). PMID:26504893

  16. Quantitative analysis of mouse corpus callosum from electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    West, Kathryn L; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Carson, Robert P; Does, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    This article provides morphometric analysis of 72 electron microscopy images from control (n=4) and hypomyelinated (n=2) mouse corpus callosum. Measures of axon diameter and g-ratio were tabulated across all brains from two regions of the corpus callosum and a non-linear relationship between axon diameter and g-ratio was observed. These data are related to the accompanying research article comparing multiple methods of measuring g-ratio entitled 'A revised model for estimating g-ratio from MRI' (West et al., NeuroImage, 2015). PMID:26504893

  17. Evaluation of normal appearing spinal cord by diffusion tensor imaging, fiber tracking, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement in 13 dogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging offers plenty of new opportunities in the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique sensitive to the random motion of water providing information about tissue architecture. We applied DTI to normal appearing spinal cords of 13 dogs of different breeds and body weights in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The aim was to study fiber tracking (FT) patterns by tractography and the variations of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) observed in the spinal cords of dogs with different sizes and at different locations (cervical and thoracolumbar). For that reason we added a DTI sequence to the standard clinical MR protocol. The values of FA and ADC were calculated by means of three regions of interest defined on the cervical or the thoracolumbar spinal cord (ROI 1, 2, and 3). Results The shape of the spinal cord fiber tracts was well illustrated following tractography and the exiting nerve roots could be differentiated from the spinal cord fiber tracts. Routine MR scanning times were extended for 8 to 12 min, depending on the size of the field of view (FOV), the slice thickness, and the size of the interslice gaps. In small breed dogs (?25 kg body weight) the traceable fiber length was about 5 vertebral bodies which took 10 to 12 min scanning time. FA and ADC values showed mean values of 0.447 (FA), and 0.560?×?10-3 mm2/s (ADC), respectively without any differences detected with regard to different dog sizes and spinal cord 45 segments examined. Conclusion FT is suitable for the graphical depiction of the canine spinal cord and the exiting nerve roots. The FA and ADC values offer an objective measure for evaluation of the spinal cord fiber integrity in dogs. PMID:23618404

  18. Depressive symptoms related to low fractional anisotropy of white matter underlying the right ventral anterior cingulate in older adults with atherosclerotic vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bijanki, Kelly R.; Matsui, Joy T.; Mayberg, Helen S.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Arndt, Stephan; Johnson, Hans J.; Nopoulos, Peg; Paradiso, Sergio; McCormick, Laurie M.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Epping, Eric A.; Moser, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to characterize the relationship between integrity of the white matter underlying the ventral anterior cingulate (vAC) and depressive symptoms in older adults with atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD), a condition associated with preferential degeneration of the white matter. The vAC was defined as including white matter underlying ventral Brodmann Area 24 and Brodmann Area 25, corresponding with the “subcallosal” and “subgenual” cingulate respectively. This region of interest was chosen based on the preponderance of evidence that the white matter in the region plays a critical role in the manifestation of depressive symptoms. Participants had current unequivocal diagnoses of AVD and were between 55 and 90 years-old. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was used as an index of white matter integrity and organization. Whole-brain mean diffusivity (MD) was used as an index of global white matter lesion burden. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) Depression Scale. Depressive symptoms were significantly related to low FA in the right vAC (r = -0.356, df = 30, p = 0.045) but not the left vAC (r = 0.024, df = 30, p = 0.896) after controlling for total brain MD (a statistical control for global white matter lesion burden). Further, depressive symptoms were significantly related to low FA in the right vAC (r = -0.361, df = 31, p = 0.039), but not the left vAC (r = 0.259, df = 31, p = 0.145) when controlled for the contralateral vAC FA. The correlation coefficients for this follow-up analysis were found to be significantly different between left and right vAC (Z = 2.310, p = 0.021). Poor white matter health in the vAC may be a biological mechanism for depressive symptoms in older adults with vascular disease. Further studies may corroborate that the right vAC plays a unique role in depressive symptom manifestation in cases where the white matter is preferentially affected, as is the case in AVD. This could lead to future targeting of the region for somatic antidepressant treatment, as well as the development of a precise approach for patients with white matter damage, which could produce significant improvement in quality of life, medical morbidity, and mortality. PMID:26236221

  19. On Automating and Standardising Corpus Callosum Analysis in Brain MRI

    E-print Network

    Estimation The human brain consists on a coarse level of the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem. Most prominent is the cerebrum which is divided into hemispheres connected by a nervous fibre bundle; the corpus callosum. The surface partitioning this approximate bilateral symmetry of the cerebrum is typically denoted

  20. Positive correlations between corpus callosum thickness and intelligence

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    Positive correlations between corpus callosum thickness and intelligence Eileen Luders,a Katherine the presence and direction of correlations between intelligence and callosal thickness at high spatial callosal morphology and intelligence measures (full-scale, perfor- mance, and verbal). These relationships

  1. Commissurotomy of the Corpus Callosum and the Remedial Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Elaine

    Testimony presented at a congressional hearing on illiteracy (March 1986) indicated that good readers use their myelinated corpus callosum fibers (which connect the left and right hemispheres of the brain) at millisecond speeds to coordinate the two brain hemispheres. Students taught using the whole-word recognition method (also called the…

  2. Corpus Callosum Differences Associated with Persistent Stuttering in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Ai Leen; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Olivero, William; Ambrose, Nicoline G.; Sharma, Harish; Chang, Soo-Eun; Loucks, Torrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated anatomical differences in speech-relevant brain regions of adults who stutter (AWS) compared to normally fluent adults (NFA). The present study focused on the region of the corpus callosum (CC) which is involved in interhemispheric processing between the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Two-dimensional…

  3. Perspectives on Dichotic Listening and the Corpus Callosum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musiek, Frank E.; Weihing, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The present review summarizes historic and recent research which has investigated the role of the corpus callosum in dichotic processing within the context of audiology. Examination of performance by certain clinical groups, including split brain patients, multiple sclerosis cases, and other types of neurological lesions is included. Maturational,…

  4. Autism Traits in Individuals with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Yolanda C.; Hinkley, Leighton B. N.; Bukshpun, Polina; Strominger, Zoe A.; Wakahiro, Mari L. J.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Jeremy, Rita J.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Marco, Elysa J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have numerous etiologies, including structural brain malformations such as agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC). We sought to directly measure the occurrence of autism traits in a cohort of individuals with AgCC and to investigate the neural underpinnings of this association. We screened a large AgCC cohort (n =…

  5. The Microstructural Status of the Corpus Callosum Is Associated with the Degree of Motor Function and Neurological Deficit in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fanrong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Human neuroimaging studies and animal models have suggested that white matter damage from ischemic stroke leads to the functional and structural reorganization of perilesional and remote brain regions. However, the quantitative relationship between the transcallosal tract integrity and clinical motor performance score after stroke remains unexplored. The current study employed a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the relationship between white matter diffusivity changes and the clinical scores in stroke patients. Probabilistic fiber tracking was also used to identify structural connectivity patterns in the patients. Thirteen ischemic stroke patients and fifteen healthy control subjects participated in this study. TBSS analyses showed that the corpus callosum (CC) and bilateral corticospinal tracts (CST) in the stroke patients exhibited significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and increased axial and radial diffusivity compared with those of the controls. Correlation analyses revealed that the motor and neurological deficit scores in the stroke patients were associated with the value of diffusivity indices in the CC. Compared with the healthy control group, probabilistic fiber tracking analyses revealed that significant changes in the inter-hemispheric fiber connections between the left and right motor cortex in the stroke patients were primarily located in the genu and body of the CC, left anterior thalamic radiation and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, bilateral CST, anterior/superior corona radiate, cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus, strongly suggesting that ischemic induces inter-hemispheric network disturbances and disrupts the white matter fibers connecting motor regions. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that DTI-derived measures in the CC can be used to predict the severity of motor skill and neurological deficit in stroke patients. Changes in structural connectivity pattern tracking between the left and right motor areas, particularly in the body of the CC, might reflect functional reorganization and behavioral deficit. PMID:25875333

  6. Cortical modeling and analysis 1093 Figure 17.10: Corpus callosum in Alzheimer's disease. Midsagittal corpus callosum bound-

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    . Midsagittal corpus callosum bound- aries were averaged from patients with Alzheimer's disease and from elderly a focal shape inflection in the Alzheimer's patients relative to normal elderly subjects of the same age in the parametric space indirectly specifies a correspondence field in 3D, which drives one cortical surface

  7. Frontal White Matter Anisotropy and Antidepressant Remission in Late-Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Payne, Martha E.; MacFall, James R.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Krishnan, K. Ranga; Doraiswamy, P. Murali

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Neuroanatomic features associated with antidepressant treatment outcomes in older depressed individuals are not well established. This study used diffusion tensor imaging to examine frontal white matter structure in depressed subjects undergoing a 12-week trial of sertraline. We hypothesized that remission would be associated with higher frontal anisotropy measures, and failure to remit with lower anisotropy. Methods 74 subjects with Major Depressive Disorder and age 60 years or older were enrolled in a twelve-week open-label trial of sertraline and completed clinical assessments and 1.5T magnetic resonance brain imaging. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were measured in regions of interest placed in the white matter of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and corpus callosum. Differences in ADC and FA values between subjects who did and did not remit to treatment over the study period were assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidity and baseline depression severity. Results Subjects who did not remit to sertraline exhibited higher FA values in the superior frontal gyri and anterior cingulate cortices bilaterally. There were no statistically significant associations between ADC measures and remission. Conclusions Failure to remit to sertraline is associated with higher frontal FA values. Functional imaging studies demonstrate that depression is characterized by functional disconnection between frontal and limbic regions. Those individuals where this disconnection is related to structural changes as detected by DTI may be more likely to respond to antidepressants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00339066 PMID:18813343

  8. Solar wind turbulence: anisotropy, anisotropy, anisotropy!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, R.; Forman, M. A.; Summerlin, E. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Salem, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulence heats the solar wind as it expands away from the Sun, but where and how does heating of ions and electrons occur? In order to understand this we must first look at the fluctuations making up the cascade, the properties and anisotropies of which will determine whether ions or electrons are heated and whether field-parallel or -perpendicular heating will occur, all of which amounts to a lot of different anisotropies! With this in mind, we present a review of recent advances in the observation of plasma turbulence in the solar wind and comparison with simulations; which features of solar wind turbulence are well reproduced and which need to be captured better? The first anisotropy is that of the fluctuations making up the turbulent cascade itself, fluctuations are known to be highly transverse, meaning that the perpendicular magnetic field components are dominant over the field-parallel component. The second anisotropy is that of the scaling of amplitude towards smaller scales with steeper spectra parallel to the local magnetic field direction. Observations of the anisotropy of the full power spectral tensor will be discussed, in particular with reference to Alfvenic and pseudo-Alfvenic fluctuations (effectively two different polarizations of Alfven waves), the next step beyond the traditional "slab + 2D" approach to incompressible MHD turbulence. The third anisotropy is that of the ion and electron distributions. Both sets of charged particles frequently show non-Maxwellian distributions with higher temperatures found either perpendicular to or parallel to the magnetic field direction. Proton distributions often show beams and the heavier alpha particles are often hotter than the protons. Localized structures such as current sheets and magnetic discontinuities are shown to be sites of intense and anisotropic heating. Small scale fluctuations filling the space between such discontinuities may also dissipate energy into ions and electrons, either through electric fields intrinsic to the modes generated by the turbulence or through resonant or stochastic processes. Observations show that kinetic Alfven waves are the dominant mode.

  9. Microstructural Integrity of the Corpus Callosum Linked with Neuropsychological Performance in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryer, Susanna L.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has revealed microstructural aspects of adolescent brain development, the cognitive correlates of which remain relatively uncharacterized. Methods: DTI was used to assess white matter microstructure in 18 typically developing adolescents (ages 16-18). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusion (MD)…

  10. Corpus Callosum and Prefrontal Functions in Adolescents with History of Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narberhaus, Ana; Segarra, Dolors; Caldu, Xavier; Gimenez, Monica; Pueyo, Roser; Botet, Francesc; Junque, Carme

    2008-01-01

    Very preterm (VPT) birth can account for thinning of the corpus callosum and poorer cognitive performance. Research findings about preterm and VPT adolescents usually describe a small posterior corpus callosum, although our research group has also found reductions of the anterior part, specifically the genu. The aim of the present study was to…

  11. Distinct regional atrophy in the corpus callosum of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    Distinct regional atrophy in the corpus callosum of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy Bernd epilepsy on the thickness of the corpus callosum (CC) in a large sample of well-characterized patients (n are differentially affected depending on the affected hemisphere and age of epilepsy onset. Overall, we observed

  12. FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY REDUCTIONS OF DEEP WHITE MATTER IN VELOCARDIOFACIAL SYNDROME Lucia, D.,1 Bobrow, L.,1 Kikinis, Z.,1 Ballinger, T.,1 Alvarado, J.,1 Finn, C.,2 Kucherlapati, R.,3 Shenton, M.E.,1,4 Kubicki, M.1,4

    E-print Network

    ) is associated with a deletion on chromosome 22. This deletion includes approximately 30 genes, and though symptoms vary widely in type and severity, individuals with VCFS do share some characteristic abnormalities to detect differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), which can indicate abnormalities in white matter. White

  13. MRI evaluation of pathologies affecting the corpus callosum: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Aamish Z; Joshi, Priscilla C; Kelkar, Abhimanyu B; Mahajan, Mangal S; Ghawate, Amit S

    2013-01-01

    The corpus callosum is a midline cerebral structure and has a unique embryological development pattern. In this article, we describe the pathophysiology and present imaging findings of various typical/atypical conditions affecting the corpus callosum. Since many of these pathologies have characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their therapeutic approaches are poles apart, ranging from medical to surgical, the neuroradiologist should be well aware of them. PMID:24604936

  14. MRI and MR spectroscopy findings of a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis affecting the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet; S???rc?, Ahmet; Yak?nc?, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, slowly progressive, fatal, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease that is seen mostly in children and young adolescents, and primarily affects the parieto-occipital lobes. The corpus callosum, cerebellum and basal ganglia are less frequently involved. MR spectroscopy (MRS) may illustrate the pathophysiological features of SSPE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of MRS findings of corpus callosum involvement in a stage 3 SSPE case. PMID:26163552

  15. Diffusion Tensor Quantification and Cognitive Correlates of the Macrostructure and Microstructure of the Corpus Callosum in Typically Developing Children and Dyslexics

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Molfese, David L.; Walimuni, Indika S.; Stuebing, Karla K.; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methods such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), can offer insights into structure/function relationships in human developmental brain disorders. In this report, we quantified macrostructural and microstructural attributes of the corpus callosum (CC) in children with dyslexia and typically developing readers of comparable age and gender. Diffusion anisotropy, mean, radial and axial diffusivities of cross-sectional CC sub-regions were computed using a validated DTI methodology. The normalized posterior CC area was enlarged in children with dyslexia compared to typically developing children. Moreover, the callosal microstructural attributes, such as mean diffusivity of the posterior middle sector of the CC, significantly correlated with measures of word reading and reading comprehension. Reading group differences in FA, MD, and RD were observed in the posterior CC (CC5). This study demonstrates the utility of regional DTI measurements of the CC in understanding the neurobiology of reading disorders. PMID:22411286

  16. Magnetic resonance findings of the corpus callosum in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  17. Magnetic Resonance Findings of the Corpus Callosum in Canine and Feline Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  18. Structural changes of the corpus callosum in tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Diesch, Eugen; Schummer, Verena; Kramer, Martin; Rupp, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In tinnitus, several brain regions seem to be structurally altered, including the medial partition of Heschl's gyrus (mHG), the site of the primary auditory cortex. The mHG is smaller in tinnitus patients than in healthy controls. The corpus callosum (CC) is the main interhemispheric commissure of the brain connecting the auditory areas of the left and the right hemisphere. Here, we investigate whether tinnitus status is associated with CC volume. Methods: The midsagittal cross-sectional area of the CC was examined in tinnitus patients and healthy controls in which an examination of the mHG had been carried out earlier. The CC was extracted and segmented into subregions which were defined according to the most common CC morphometry schemes introduced by Witelson (1989) and Hofer and Frahm (2006). Results: For both CC segmentation schemes, the CC posterior midbody was smaller in male patients than in male healthy controls and the isthmus, the anterior midbody, and the genou were larger in female patients than in female controls. With CC size normalized relative to mHG volume, the normalized CC splenium was larger in male patients than male controls and the normalized CC splenium, the isthmus and the genou were larger in female patients than female controls. Normalized CC segment size expresses callosal interconnectivity relative to auditory cortex volume. Conclusion: It may be argued that the predominant function of the CC is excitatory. The stronger callosal interconnectivity in tinnitus patients, compared to healthy controls, may facilitate the emergence and maintenance of a positive feedback loop between tinnitus generators located in the two hemispheres. PMID:22470322

  19. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial…

  20. Volatiles emitted from single flower buds of the lilium longiflorum × L. callosum interspecific hybrid and its parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was initiated to analyze the volatiles emitted from a single flower bud of Lilium longiflorum Thunb., L. callosum Sieb. et Zucc., and interspecific hybrids of L. longiflorum × L. callosum (L. longi × L. cal IH). Volatiles, collected automatically every 6-hour intervals at 20oC before ...

  1. Decomposition of brain diffusion imaging data uncovers latent schizophrenias with distinct patterns of white matter anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Arnedo, Javier; Mamah, Daniel; Baranger, David A; Harms, Michael P; Barch, Deanna M; Svrakic, Dragan M; de Erausquin, Gabriel A; Cloninger, C Robert; Zwir, Igor

    2015-10-15

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) analysis of diffusion tensor-images (DTI) has yielded inconsistent abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ). Inconsistencies may arise from averaging heterogeneous groups of patients. Here we investigate whether SZ is a heterogeneous group of disorders distinguished by distinct patterns of FA reductions. We developed a Generalized Factorization Method (GFM) to identify biclusters (i.e., subsets of subjects associated with a subset of particular characteristics, such as low FA in specific regions). GFM appropriately assembles a collection of unsupervised techniques with Non-negative Matrix Factorization to generate biclusters, rather than averaging across all subjects and all their characteristics. DTI tract-based spatial statistics images, which output is the locally maximal FA projected onto the group white matter skeleton, were analyzed in 47 SZ and 36 healthy subjects, identifying 8 biclusters. The mean FA of the voxels of each bicluster was significantly different from those of other SZ subjects or 36 healthy controls. The eight biclusters were organized into four more general patterns of low FA in specific regions: 1) genu of corpus callosum (GCC), 2) fornix (FX)+external capsule (EC), 3) splenium of CC (SCC)+retrolenticular limb (RLIC)+posterior limb (PLIC) of the internal capsule, and 4) anterior limb of the internal capsule. These patterns were significantly associated with particular clinical features: Pattern 1 (GCC) with bizarre behavior, pattern 2 (FX+EC) with prominent delusions, and pattern 3 (SCC+RLIC+PLIC) with negative symptoms including disorganized speech. The uncovered patterns suggest that SZ is a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be distinguished by different patterns of FA reductions associated with distinct clinical features. PMID:26151103

  2. The gene responsible for a severe form of peripheral neuropathy and agenesis of the corpus callosum maps to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Casaubon, L.K.; Melanson, M.; Marineau, C. |

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genealogical studies in a large number of affected French Canadian individuals suggest that ACCPN results from a single founder mutation. A genomewide search using 120 microsatellite DNA markers in 14 French Canadian families allowed the mapping of the ACCPN gene to a 5-cM region on chromosome 15q13-q15 that is flanked by markers D15S1040 and D15S118. A maximum two-point LOD score of 11.1 was obtained with the marker D15S971 at a recombination fraction of 0. Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium support a founder effect. These findings are the first step in the identification of the gene responsible for ACCPN, which may shed some light on the numerous conditions associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy or agenesis of the corpus callosum. 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Moebius syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant and agenesis of corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    John, Jomol Sara; Vanitha, R.

    2013-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder. The most frequent mode of presentation is facial diplegia with bilateral lateral rectus palsy, but there are variations. Here, we report a rare case of Moebius syndrome in a 15-month-old child with unilateral facial palsy, bilateral abducens nerve palsy with Dandy Walker variant, and complete agenesis of corpus callosum. PMID:24470815

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Shape of the Corpus Callosum in Patients with Autism and Comparison Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Elnakib, Ahmed; Switala, Andrew E.; Williams, Emily L.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Conturo, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that the corpus callosum in patients with autism is reduced in size. This study attempts to elucidate the nature of this morphometric abnormality by analyzing the shape of this structure in 17 high-functioning patients with autism and an equal number of comparison participants matched for age, sex, IQ, and handedness. The…

  5. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  6. AUTOMATIC CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF CORPUS CALLOSUM SUBDIVISIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: A DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING STUDY

    E-print Network

    an important role in relaying sensory, cognitive, and motor information throughout the brain. While MRI studies, and 12 normal controls, mean age 40, were scanned on a 3T magnet using a high resolution DTI protocol. DT for the Corpus Callosum. Figure 6 DTI ACQUSITION: · 3 Tesla GE system (General Electric Medical Systems

  7. Corpus Callosum Size is Linked to Dichotic Deafness and Hemisphericity, Not Sex or Handedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Bruce E.; Rafto, Stein E.

    2006-01-01

    Individuals differ in the number of corpus callosum (CC) nerve fibers interconnecting their cerebral hemispheres by about threefold. Early reports suggested that males had smaller CCs than females. This was often interpreted to support the concept that the male brain is more "lateralized" or "specialized," thus accounting for presumed male…

  8. A Two-Year Longitudinal MRI Study of the Corpus Callosum in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of literature has identified size reductions of the corpus callosum (CC) in autism. However, to our knowledge, no published studies have reported on the growth of CC volumes in youth with autism. Volumes of the total CC and its sub-divisions were obtained from 23 male children with autism and 23 age- and gender-matched controls at…

  9. Reduced White Matter Connectivity in the Corpus Callosum of Children with Tourette Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Gruner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid; Hirsch, Jochen G.; Xu, Dongrong; Bansal, Ravi; Hammar, Asa; Lundervold, Astri J.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lie, Stein Atle; Gass, Achim; Peterson, Bradley S.; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Background: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects, and these anatomical features have been understood to…

  10. Quantitative Analysis of the Shape of the Corpus Callosum in Autistic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Elnakib, Ahmed; Switala, Andrew E.; Williams, Emily L.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Conturo, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that the corpus callosum in patients with autism is reduced in size. This study attempts to elucidate the nature of this morphometric abnormality by analyzing the shape of this structure in 17 high-functioning patients with autism and an equal number of comparison participants matched for age, sex, IQ, and handedness. The corpus callosum was segmented from T1 weighted images acquired with a Siemens 1.5 T scanner. Transformed coordinates of the curvilinear axis were aggregated into a parametric map and compared across series to derive regions of statistical significance. Our results indicate that in subjects with autism reduction in size of the corpus callosum occurs over all of its subdivisions (genu, body, splenium) with a small area of overgrowth at its caudal pole. Since the commisural fibers that traverse the different anatomical compartments of the corpus callosum originate in disparate brain regions our results suggest the presence of widely distributed cortical abnormalities in people with autism. PMID:21363871

  11. The indusium griseum and the longitudinal striae of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Fathalla, Hussein; Cusimano, Michael D; Tschabitscher, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In the eighteenth century, Lancisi described the indusium griseum (IG) and the longitudinal striae (LS) of the corpus callosum. The IG is a thin neuronal lamina above the corpus callosum, covered on each side of the midline by the medial and lateral LS. The medial LS (nerves of Lancisi) and lateral LS are two pairs of myelinated fiber bands found in the gray matter of the IG on the dorsal aspect of the corpus callosum. Embryologically, the IG and LS are dorsal remnants of the archicortex of the hippocampus and fornix and thus they are considered components of the limbic system. Recent studies using immunohistochemistry reported that acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine and GABA neurons innervate the IG. Newer imaging techniques, such as high field MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, provide new tools for studying these structures, whose true function remains still unclear. The present paper reviews the history of the discovery of the IG and LS of the corpus callosum, with a holistic overview on these interesting structures from the anatomical, embryological, neurochemical, radiological and clinical perspective. PMID:25091482

  12. Hallermann-Streiff syndrome associated with complete agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Sigirci, Ahmet; Alkan, Alpay; Bicak, Ugur; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2005-08-01

    Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is a rare clinical entity with unknown etiology characterized by a birdlike face, microphthalmia, a beaked nose, hypotrichosis, and proportional small stature. We present a 4-year-old boy in whom magnetic resonance imaging showed complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, which has not been presented in the literature. PMID:16225817

  13. MRI findings of coexistence of ectopic neurohypophysis, corpus callosum dysgenesis, and periventricular neuronal heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Harun; Sayl?k, Metin; Akdeniz, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic neurohypophysis is a pituitary gland abnormality, which can accompany growth hormone deficiency associated with dwarfism. Here we present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a rare case of ectopic neurohypophysis, corpus callosum dysgenesis, and periventricular neuronal heterotopia coexisting, with a review of the literature. PMID:24987569

  14. MRI Findings of Coexistence of Ectopic Neurohypophysis, Corpus Callosum Dysgenesis, and Periventricular Neuronal Heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Harun; Sayl?k, Metin; Akdeniz, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic neurohypophysis is a pituitary gland abnormality, which can accompany growth hormone deficiency associated with dwarfism. Here we present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a rare case of ectopic neurohypophysis, corpus callosum dysgenesis, and periventricular neuronal heterotopia coexisting, with a review of the literature. PMID:24987569

  15. Association of type I neurons positive for NADPH-diaphorase with blood vessels in the adult monkey corpus callosum

    E-print Network

    Rockland, Kathleen

    Sagittal sections through the corpus callosum of adult macaque monkeys (n = 7) reveal a subpopulation of neurons positive for NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHd). These are sparsely distributed, with 2–12 neurons scored over the ...

  16. Developmental Changes in the Corpus Callosum from Infancy to Early Adulthood: A Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka-Arakawa, Megumi M.; Matsui, Mie; Tanaka, Chiaki; Uematsu, Akiko; Uda, Satoshi; Miura, Kayoko; Sakai, Tomoko; Noguchi, Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has reported on the development trajectory of the corpus callosum morphology. However, there have been only a few studies that have included data on infants. The goal of the present study was to examine the morphology of the corpus callosum in healthy participants of both sexes, from infancy to early adulthood. We sought to characterize normal development of the corpus callosum and possible sex differences in development. We performed a morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of 114 healthy individuals, aged 1 month to 25 years old, measuring the size of the corpus callosum. The corpus callosum was segmented into seven subareas of the rostrum, genu, rostral body, anterior midbody, posterior midbody, isthmus and splenium. Locally weighted regression analysis (LOESS) indicated significant non-linear age-related changes regardless of sex, particularly during the first few years of life. After this increase, curve slopes gradually became flat during adolescence and adulthood in both sexes. Age of local maximum for each subarea of the corpus callosum differed across the sexes. Ratios of total corpus callosum and genu, posterior midbody, as well as splenium to the whole brain were significantly higher in females compared with males. The present results demonstrate that the developmental trajectory of the corpus callosum during early life in healthy individuals is non-linear and dynamic. This pattern resembles that found for the cerebral cortex, further suggesting that this period plays a very important role in neural and functional development. In addition, developmental trajectories and changes in growth do show some sex differences. PMID:25790124

  17. Early suppressive antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection is associated with measurable changes in the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean G; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Wu, Ying; Bhatia, Ramona; Kettering, Casey S; Gao, Yi; Li, Suyang; Hutten, Ryan; Ragin, Ann B

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of early suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) on brain structure and neurocognitive outcomes. We conducted an observational study of subjects within 1 year of HIV infection. Ten ART-naïve and 10 ART-suppressed individuals were matched for age and infection duration and age-matched to 10 HIV-seronegative controls. Quantitative brain imaging and neurocognitive data were analyzed. Subjects on suppressive ART had diminished corpus callosum structural integrity on macromolecular and microstructural imaging, higher cerebrospinal fluid percent, higher depression scores, and lower functional performance. Early suppressive ART may alter the trajectory of neurological progression of HIV infection, particularly in the corpus callosum. PMID:24965253

  18. Individual differences in brain asymmetries and fiber composition in the human corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Aboitiz, F; Scheibel, A B; Fisher, R S; Zaidel, E

    1992-12-11

    There have been several recent reports concerning individual differences in the gross morphometry of the human corpus callosum. However, no studies exist on individual differences in the fiber composition of the corpus callosum. Here we report for the first time the relation of fiber composition in specific callosal segments (as seen in light microscopy) to anatomical asymmetries in language-gifted cortex, as a function of sex. We found a significant negative correlation between Sylvian fissure asymmetries and the total numbers of fibers in the isthmus of males, and in the anterior splenium of females. In addition, a population of relatively large fibers (between 1 micron and 3 microns in diameter) in the isthmus showed a strong negative correlation with perisylvian asymmetries only in males. These findings suggest a sex-dependent, pathway-specific decrease in interhemispheric connectivity with increasing lateralization. PMID:1486478

  19. Agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with spinal open neural tube defect

    PubMed Central

    Elgamal, Essam A.; Elwatidy, Sherif M.; Alhabib, Amro F.; Jamjoom, Zain B.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence and clinical implications of agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) in spinal open neural tube defects (SONTD). Methods: All cases of SONTD registered at the Spina Bifida Clinic in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between 1995 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed, and mid-sagittal MRI of the corpus callosum (CC) area was analyzed in each case. Neurodevelopmental outcome was classified as poor in children with seizures, severe neurodevelopmental impairment, or death. Results: Thirty-eight patients (45.8%) with ACC were identified among 83 cases with SONTD. Patients’ age ranged between one and 16 years. Total ACC was found in 10 patients, partial ACC in 25, and in 3 patients, the CC was hypoplastic. Active hydrocephalus was an associated finding in 9 out of 10 patients with total ACC, 22 out of 25 with partial ACC, and in all patients with hypoplasia of the CC. Thirteen patients (34.2%) had normal intellectual function, whereas 24 patients presented with learning disability, epilepsy, or poor intellectual function; and one patient died of respiratory failure. Conclusion: Agenesis of the corpus callosum is found in a significant portion of patients with SONTD. When associated with hydrocephalus, its presence affects neuro-developmental outcome. PMID:25551114

  20. Functional topography of the corpus callosum investigated by DTI and fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Fabri, Mara; Pierpaoli, Chiara; Barbaresi, Paolo; Polonara, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    This short review examines the most recent functional studies of the topographic organization of the human corpus callosum, the main interhemispheric commissure. After a brief description of its anatomy, development, microstructure, and function, it examines and discusses the latest findings obtained using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography (DTT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), three recently developed imaging techniques that have significantly expanded and refined our knowledge of the commissure. While DTI and DTT have been providing insights into its microstructure, integrity and level of myelination, fMRI has been the key technique in documenting the activation of white matter fibers, particularly in the corpus callosum. By combining DTT and fMRI it has been possible to describe the trajectory of the callosal fibers interconnecting the primary olfactory, gustatory, motor, somatic sensory, auditory and visual cortices at sites where the activation elicited by peripheral stimulation was detected by fMRI. These studies have demonstrated the presence of callosal fiber tracts that cross the commissure at the level of the genu, body, and splenium, at sites showing fMRI activation. Altogether such findings lend further support to the notion that the corpus callosum displays a functional topographic organization that can be explored with fMRI. PMID:25550994

  1. Pediatric neurofunctional intervention in agenesis of the corpus callosum: a case report?

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sheila Cristina da Silva; Queiroz, Ana Paula Adriano; Niza, Nathália Tiepo; da Costa, Letícia Miranda Resende; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a clinical report pre- and post-neurofunctional intervention in a case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. Case description: Preterm infant with corpus callosum agenesis and hypoplasia of the cerebellum vermis and lateral ventricles, who, at the age of two years, started the proposed intervention. Functional performance tests were used such as the neurofunctional evaluation, the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Gross Motor Function Classification System. In the initial evaluation, absence of equilibrium reactions, postural transfers, deficits in manual and trunk control were observed. The intervention was conducted with a focus on function, prioritizing postural control and guidance of the family to continue care in the home environment. After the intervention, there was an improvement of body reactions, postural control and movement acquisition of hands and limbs. The intervention also showed improvement in functional performance. Comments: Postural control and transfers of positions were benefited by the neurofunction intervention in this case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. The approach based on function with activities that involve muscle strengthening and balance reactions training, influenced the acquisition of a more selective motor behavior. PMID:25479858

  2. Clinical, genetic and imaging findings identify new causes for corpus callosum development syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Timothy J.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Barkovich, A. James

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest fibre tract in the brain, connecting the two cerebral hemispheres, and thereby facilitating the integration of motor and sensory information from the two sides of the body as well as influencing higher cognition associated with executive function, social interaction and language. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a common brain malformation that can occur either in isolation or in association with congenital syndromes. Understanding the causes of this condition will help improve our knowledge of the critical brain developmental mechanisms required for wiring the brain and provide potential avenues for therapies for callosal agenesis or related neurodevelopmental disorders. Improved genetic studies combined with mouse models and neuroimaging have rapidly expanded the diverse collection of copy number variations and single gene mutations associated with callosal agenesis. At the same time, advances in our understanding of the developmental mechanisms involved in corpus callosum formation have provided insights into the possible causes of these disorders. This review provides the first comprehensive classification of the clinical and genetic features of syndromes associated with callosal agenesis, and provides a genetic and developmental framework for the interpretation of future research that will guide the next advances in the field. PMID:24477430

  3. Agenesis and Dysgenesis of the Corpus Callosum: Clinical, Genetic and Neuroimaging Findings in a Series of 41 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schell-Apacik, Chayim Can; Wagner, Kristina; Bihler, Moritz; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Heinrich, Uwe; Klopocki, Eva; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Muenke, Maximilian; von Voss, Hubertus

    2009-01-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is among the most frequent human brain malformations with an incidence of 0.5–70 in 10,000. It is a heterogeneous condition, for which several different genetic causes are known, for example, ACC as part of monogenic syndromes or complex chromosomal rearrangements. We systematically evaluated the data of 172 patients with documented corpus callosum abnormalities in the records, and 23 patients with chromosomal rearrangements known to be associated with corpus callosum changes. All available neuroimaging data, including CT and MRI, were re-evaluated following a standardized protocol. Whenever feasible chromosome and subtelomere analyses as well as molecular genetic testing were performed in patients with disorders of the corpus callosum in order to identify a genetic diagnosis. Our results showed that 41 patients with complete absence (agenesis of the corpus callosum—ACC) or partial absence (dysgenesis of the corpus callosum—DCC) were identified. Out of these 28 had ACC, 13 had DCC. In 11 of the 28 patients with ACC, the following diagnoses could be established: Mowat–Wilson syndrome (n = 2), Walker–Warburg syndrome (n = 1), oro-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (n = 1), and chromosomal rearrangements (n = 7), including a patient with an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation, which led to the disruption and a predicted loss of function in the FOXG1B gene. The cause of the ACC in 17 patients remained unclear. In 2 of the 13 patients with DCC, unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements could be detected (n = 2), while the cause of DCC in 11 patients remained unclear. In our series of cases a variety of genetic causes of disorders of the corpus callosum were identified with cytogenetic anomalies representing the most common underlying etiology. PMID:18792984

  4. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  5. Magnetic multilayer interface anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ni/Mo and Ni/V multilayer magnetic anisotropy has been investigated as a function of Ni layer thickness, frequency and temperature. Variable frequency ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show, for the first time, significant frequency dependence associated with the multilayer magnetic anisotropy. The thickness dependence allows one to extract the interface contribution from the total anisotropy. Temperature dependent FMR (9 GHz) and room temperature magnetization indicate that strain between Ni and the non-magnetic layers is contributing significantly to the source of the interface anisotropy and the state of the interfacial magnetization. In order to examine the interface properties of other transition metal multilayer systems, investigations on Fe/Cu are underway and CoCr/Ag is being proposed. ESR measurements have been reported on Gd substituted YBaCuO superconductors and a novel quasi-equilibrium method has been developed to determine quickly and precisely the ransition temperature.

  6. Severe psychiatric disturbance and abnormalities of the corpus callosum: review and case series.

    PubMed Central

    David, A S; Wacharasindhu, A; Lishman, W A

    1993-01-01

    The association between developmental defects of the corpus callosum and major psychiatric disturbance is discussed with a review of published cases. Seven new cases are presented, of which four had clear psychotic symptoms, two receiving a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Of the remainder, one had a developmental disorder affecting social interaction and speech which could be classed as Asperger's syndrome, one had a personality disorder with depressive and conversion symptoms, and the last was an adolescent boy with severe behavioural problems. The difficulties in determining the precise relevance of the callosal anomalies to these clinical manifestations are discussed especially since the prevalence of such anomalies in the population is uncertain. Images PMID:8429328

  7. The corpus callosum in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and other CNS demyelinating and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Reddel, Stephen W; Miller, David H; Chataway, Jeremy; Riminton, D Sean; Barnett, Yael; Masters, Lynette; Barnett, Michael H; Hardy, Todd A

    2015-12-01

    Lesions in the corpus callosum (CC) are important radiological clues to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS), but may also occur in other neuroinflammatory and non-neuroinflammatory conditions. In this article, we discuss the radiological features of lesions within the CC in MS and other central nervous system inflammatory and acquired demyelinating diseases. An understanding of the appearance and location of lesions in the CC is important not only for accurate diagnosis and treatment of these various conditions, but as it also provides insights into pathogenesis. PMID:25857658

  8. Magnetic multilayer interface anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Ni/Mo and Ni/V multilayer magnetic anisotropy has been investigated as a function of Ni layer thickness, frequency and temperature. Variable frequency ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show, for the first time, significant frequency dependence associated with the multilayer magnetic anisotropy. The thickness dependence allows one to extract the interface contribution from the total anisotropy. Temperature dependant FMR (9 GHz) and room temperature magnetization indicate that strain between Ni and the non-magnetic layers if contributing significantly to the source of the interface anisotropy and the state of the interfacial magnetization. In order to examine the interface properties of other transition metal multilayer systems, investigations on Fe/Cu are underway and CoCr/Ag is being proposed. ESR measurements have been reported on Gd substituted YBaCuO superconductors and a novel quasi-equilibrium method has been developed to determine quickly and precisely the transition temperature. During the next project the P.I. proposes to (1) extend the variable frequency FMR measurements to low temperature, where extremely large interface anisotropies are known to obtain in Ni/Mo and Ni/V and are proposed to exist in Ni/W; (2) obtain accurate dc anisotropies via a novel, variable temperature torque magnetometer currently under construction; (3) expand upon his initial findings in Fe/Cu multilayer investigations; (4) begin anisotropy investigations on Co/Ag and CoCr/Ag multilayers where the easy magnetization direction depends upon the Cr concentration; (4) make and characterize Bi based superconductors according to resistivity, thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power and construct YBaCuO based superconducting loop-gap'' resonators for use in his magnetic resonance work. 2 figs.

  9. Magnetic multilayer interface anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ni/Mo and Ni/V multilayer magnetic anisotropy has been investigated as a function of Ni layer thickness, frequency and temperature. Variable frequency ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show, for the first time, significant frequency dependence associated with the multilayer magnetic anisotropy. The thickness dependence allows one to extract the interface contribution from the total anisotropy. Temperature dependent FMR (9 GHz) and room temperature magnetization indicate that strain between Ni and the non-magnetic layers is contributing significantly to the source of the interface anisotropy and the state of the interfacial magnetization. In order to examine the interface properties of other transition metal multilayer systems, investigations on Fe/Cu are underway and CoCr/Ag is being proposed. ESR measurements have been reported on Gd substituted YBaCuO superconductors and a novel quasi-equilibrium method has been developed to determine quickly and precisely the transition temperature. During the next project period the P.I. proposes to (1) extend the variable frequency FMR measurements to low temperature, where extremely large interface anisotropies are known to obtain in Ni/Mo and Ni/V and are proposed to exist in Ni/W; (2) obtain accurate dc anisotropies via a novel, variable temperature torque magnetometer currently under construction; (3) expand upon his initial findings in Fe/Cu multilayer investigations; (4) begin anisotropy investigations on Co/Ag and CoCr/Ag multilayers where the easy magnetization direction depends upon the Cr concentration; (4) make and characterize Bi based superconductors according to resistivity, thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power and construct YBaCuO based superconducting loop-gap'' resonators for use in his magnetic resonance work.

  10. Unmyelinated Axons Show Selective Rostrocaudal Pathology in the Corpus Callosum Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Thomas M.; Smith, Terry L.; Williamson, Judy C.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal injury is consistently observed following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prior research has extensively characterized the post-TBI response in myelinated axons. Despite evidence that unmyelinated axons comprise a numerical majority of cerebral axons, pathological changes in unmyelinated axons following TBI have not been systematically studied. To identify morphological correlates of functional impairment of unmyelinated fibers following TBI, we assessed ultrastructural changes in corpus callosum axons. Adult rats received moderate fluid percussion TBI, which produced diffuse injury with no contusion. Cross-sectional areas of 13,797 unmyelinated, and 3,278 intact myelinated axons were stereologically measured at survival intervals from 3 hours to 15 days post-injury. The mean caliber of unmyelinated axons was significantly reduced at 3 to 7 days, and recovered by 15 days, but the time course of this shrinkage varied among the genu, mid-callosum and splenium. Relatively large unmyelinated axons appeared to be particularly vulnerable. Injury-induced decreases in unmyelinated fiber density were also observed but they were more variable than caliber reductions. By contrast, no significant morphometric changes were observed in myelinated axons. The finding of a preferential vulnerability in unmyelinated axons has implications for current concepts of axonal responses following TBI and for development of specifically targeted therapies. PMID:22318124

  11. Propagation of Epileptiform Events across the Corpus Callosum in a Cingulate Cortical Slice Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Quach-Wong, Bonnie; Sonnenfeld, Julian; Aaron, Gloster

    2012-01-01

    We report on a novel mouse in vitro brain slice preparation that contains intact callosal axons connecting anterior cingulate cortices (ACC). Callosal connections are demonstrated by the ability to regularly record epileptiform events between hemispheres (bilateral events). That the correlation of these events depends on the callosum is demonstrated by the bisection of the callosum in vitro. Epileptiform events are evoked with four different methods: (1) bath application of bicuculline (a GABA-A antagonist); (2) bicuculline+MK801 (an NMDA receptor antagonist), (3) a zero magnesium extracellular solution (0Mg); (4) focal application of bicuculline to a single cortical hemisphere. Significant increases in the number of epileptiform events, as well as increases in the ratio of bilateral events to unilateral events, are observed during bath applications of bicuculline, but not during applications of bicuculline+MK-801. Long ictal-like events (defined as events >20 seconds) are only observed in 0Mg. Whole cell patch clamp recordings of single neurons reveal strong feedforward inhibition during focal epileptiform events in the contralateral hemisphere. Within the ACC, we find differences between the rostral areas of ACC vs. caudal ACC in terms of connectivity between hemispheres, with the caudal regions demonstrating shorter interhemispheric latencies. The morphologies of many patch clamped neurons show callosally-spanning axons, again demonstrating intact callosal circuits in this in vitro preparation. PMID:22363643

  12. Shape analysis of corpus callosum in autism subtype using planar conformal mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Duan, Ye; Yin, Xiaotian; Gu, Xianfeng; Karsch, Kevin; Miles, Judith

    2009-02-01

    A number of studies have documented that autism has a neurobiological basis, but the anatomical extent of these neurobiological abnormalities is largely unknown. In this study, we aimed at analyzing highly localized shape abnormalities of the corpus callosum in a homogeneous group of autism children. Thirty patients with essential autism and twenty-four controls participated in this study. 2D contours of the corpus callosum were extracted from MR images by a semiautomatic segmentation method, and the 3D model was constructed by stacking the contours. The resulting 3D model had two openings at the ends, thus a new conformal parameterization for high genus surfaces was applied in our shape analysis work, which mapped each surface onto a planar domain. Surface matching among different individual meshes was achieved by re-triangulating each mesh according to a template surface. Statistical shape analysis was used to compare the 3D shapes point by point between patients with autism and their controls. The results revealed significant abnormalities in the anterior most and anterior body in essential autism group.

  13. Corpus Callosum Size, Reaction Time Speed and Variability in Mild Cognitive Disorders and in a Normative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstey, Kaarin J.; Mack, Holly A.; Christensen, Helen; Li, Shu-Chen; Reglade-Meslin, Chantal; Maller, Jerome; Kumar, Rajeev; Dear, Keith; Easteal, Simon; Sachdev, Perminder

    2007-01-01

    Intra-individual variability in reaction time increases with age and with neurological disorders, but the neural correlates of this increased variability remain uncertain. We hypothesized that both faster mean reaction time (RT) and less intra-individual RT variability would be associated with larger corpus callosum (CC) size in older adults, and…

  14. Functional Analysis of Genes Implicated in Down Syndrome: 2. Laterality and Corpus Callosum Size in Mice Transpolygenic

    E-print Network

    Smith, Desmond J.

    Functional Analysis of Genes Implicated in Down Syndrome: 2. Laterality and Corpus Callosum Size in Mice Transpolygenic for Down Syndrome Chromosomal Region )1 (DCR-1) Pierre L. Roubertoux,1,3,7 Zoe in Down syndrome (DS). We investigated common genetic correlates of these components of the syndrome

  15. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Ferrara, L. M.; de Erausquin, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, severe, and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Indices commonly derived from DTI include (1) mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (2) fractional anisotropy (FA) or relative anisotropy (RA), (3) axial diffusivity, and (4) radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes (OLG), and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased FA in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding. PMID:23483798

  16. Dipole shear anisotropy logging

    SciTech Connect

    Esmersoy, C.; Kane, M.; Koster, K.; Williams, M.; Boyd, A.

    1994-12-31

    Sonic-scale shear anisotropy of formations are obtained from dipole-shear measurements acquired by orthogonal source and receiver pairs. These measurements resemble miniature 4-component shear VSP surveys inside the borehole. Data from two orthogonal sources and an array of orthogonal receivers are processed providing three main logs; the fast and slow shear slownesses, and the fast shear polarization angle. Potential applications include: shale anisotropy for better seismic models, maximum stress and fracture/microcrack strike direction for horizontal well drilling and fracture height and azimuth determination in hydraulic fracturing.

  17. [Case of suspected multiple sclerosis with transcallosal lesions involving the upper surface of the corpus callosum].

    PubMed

    Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Oya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Harumasa; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Ogawa, Masafumi; Kawai, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    A 26-year-old woman noticed gradually progressive, right lower leg weakness over a 1.5-month period. Neurological examination revealed right hemiparesis with slightly increased deep tendon reflexes, Babinski's sign on the right side, loss of position sense in the right leg, and slight loss of superficial sensation in the right toes. MR FLAIR images showed a high intensity area measuring 5 x 2 x 3 cm in the left frontal lobe, extending to the outer surface of the body of the corpus callosum and the adjacent right cingulate gyrus. Gadolinium enhancement was seen along the cortex and the outer surface of the body of the corpus callosum. CSF findings showed no pleocytosis, a protein content of 32 mg/dl, a sugar level of 85 mg/dl, and an IgG index of 0.46. The biopsy specimen obtained from the superior frontal gyrus showed perivascular cuffing of T-lymphocytes and some B-lymphocytes, as well as multiple small foci of demyelination. Starting on the second day of admission, the patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (1,000 mg/day for 3 days); she was then switched to oral prednisolone (20 mg/day). Thereafter, the patient had two clinical relapses: one was due to a lesion in the dorsal part of the medulla oblongata associated with a disturbance of deep sensation in both hands, and the other was due to a lesion involving the right internal capsule, the globus pallidus, and the caudate nucleus associated with left facial nerve palsy. Visual evoked potentials suggested a demyelinating lesion in the right optic nerve. We suspected a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis based on the presence of more than two clinical episodes of neurological deficits with identifiable lesions on MRI. Multiple sclerosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions located in the outer part of the corpus callosum and transcallosal bilateral hemispheres on MRI, even though inner callosal lesions are common in multiple sclerosis. PMID:18540378

  18. CMB ANISOTROPIES: AN OVERVIEW

    E-print Network

    Douglas Scott

    1995-02-02

    A brief outline of the current status of CMB anisotropies and what they might mean, heavily biased towards the perspective of Berkeley theorists. Based on a talk presented at the 17th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics held in Munich, December 1994.

  19. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    E-print Network

    J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

    2009-08-03

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  20. Acoustical anisotropy of Cotton Valley shale

    SciTech Connect

    Fosaya, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    The dynamic elastic stiffnesses of transversely isotropic Cotton Valley silty shale were computed from ultrasonic-frequency compressionaland shear-wave velocity measurements. The measurements were made in three oriented right cylinders of fully water-saturated shale. Confining pressure was varied to 1100 bars for a constant pore pressure of 50 bars. All velocities and corresponding elastic stiffnesses increased with differential pressure in a manner that suggested continuous closure of pores and cracks and increasing alignment of platy clay particles with pressure. In addition, elastic anisotropy was found to increase with stress level, evidently approaching the intrinsic anisotropy of the zero-porosity, statistically weighted, aggregated volume fraction of the dominant clay mineral. Expressions for the elastic stiffnesses were derived for the boundary-value problem of plane strain, the conditions for which are approximated by wave-propagation measurements using an ultrasonic-frequency, pulse-transmission technique.

  1. Magnetic anisotropy of chloritoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerinck, Tom; Debacker, Timothy; Sintubin, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is commonly used as a petrofabric tool. Whereas qualitative relationships between AMS and the petrofabric are well established, quantitative correlations are often ambiguous. For a quantitative interpretation of the paramagnetic component of a rock's AMS, the mineral source(s) of the paramagnetic fabric and their intrinsic contribution(s) should be understood. This requires knowledge about the intrinsic AMS of the rock-forming, paramagnetic minerals. For this study, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of monoclinic chloritoid, a relatively common mineral in aluminium-rich, metapelitic rocks, has been determined for the first time by measuring the high-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (HF-AMS) on a collection of single crystals, collected from different tectonometamorphic settings worldwide. Magnetic remanence experiments, i.e. (a) alternating-field (AF) demagnetization of a 1 T isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and a 200 mT anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and (b) low-temperature cycling of a room temperature saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (RT-SIRM), show that all specimens contain ferromagnetic (s.l.) impurities, being mainly magnetite. The determined HF-AMS ellipsoids have a highly oblate shape with the minimum susceptibility direction subparallel to the crystallographic c-axis of chloritoid. In the basal plane of chloritoid, however, the HF-AMS can be considered isotropic. The paramagnetic Curie temperature (?), which has been determined parallel and perpendicular to the basal plane, indicates a weak antiferromagnetic interaction in the direction of the crystallographic c-axis and a ferromagnetic interaction within the basal plane. The degree of anisotropy is found to be 1.48, which is significantly higher than the anisotropy of most paramagnetic silicates, i.e. the Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and the mafic silicates pyroxene, orthopyroxene, amphibole and olive, and even well above the frequently used upper limit (i.e. 1.35) for the paramagnetic contribution to AMS in siliciclastic rocks. As a consequence, chloritoid-bearing metapelites with a pronounced mineral alignment can have a higher degree of anisotropy than expected, without a significant contribution of strongly anisotropic, ferromagnetic (s.l.) minerals. The newly discovered magnetocrystalline anisotropy of chloritoid thus calls for a revised approach of magnetic fabric interpretations in chloritoid-bearing rocks.

  2. A solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsch, P.; Funk, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of the cosmic ray (CR) anisotropy are widely advertised as a means of finding nearby sources. This idea has recently gained currency after the discovery of a rise in the positron fraction and is the goal of current experimental efforts, e.g., with AMS-02 on the International Space Station. Yet, even the anisotropy observed for hadronic CRs is not understood, in the sense that isotropic diffusion models overpredict the dipole anisotropy in the TeV-PeV range by almost two orders of magnitude. Here, we consider two additional effects normally not considered in isotropic diffusion models: anisotropic diffusion due to the presence of a background magnetic field and intermittency effects of the turbulent magnetic fields. We numerically explore these effect by tracking test-particles through individual realisations of the turbulent field. We conclude that a large misalignment between the CR gradient and the background field can explain the observed low level of anisotropy.

  3. Transient Lesion in the Splenium of the Corpus Callosum in Acute Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Sammet, Christina L.; Golay, Xavier; Van Cauteren, Marc; Lekprasert, Varinee; Tangpukdee, Noppadon; Krudsood, Srivicha; Leowattana, Wattana; Wilairatana, Polrat; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; DeLaPaz, Robert L.; Brown, Truman R.; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria have no evident neurologic disorder, vital organ dysfunction, or other severe manifestations of infection. Nonetheless, parasitized erythrocytes cytoadhere to the endothelium throughout their microvasculature, especially within the brain. We aimed to determine if 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging studies could detect evidence of cerebral abnormalities in these patients. Within 24 hours of admission, initial magnetic resonance imaging examinations found a lesion with restricted water diffusion in the mid-portion of the splenium of the corpus callosum of 4 (40%) of 10 male patients. The four patients who had a splenial lesion initially had evidence of more severe hemolysis and thrombocytopenia than the six patients who had no apparent abnormality. Repeat studies four weeks later found no residua of the lesions and resolution of the hematologic differences. These observations provide evidence for acute cerebral injury in the absence of severe or cerebral malaria. PMID:24615139

  4. A Two-Year Longitudinal MRI Study of the Corpus Callosum in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has identified size reductions of the corpus callosum (CC) in autism. However, to our knowledge, no published studies have reported on the growth of CC volumes in youth with autism. Volumes of the total CC and its sub-divisions were obtained from 23 male children with autism and 23 age-matched male controls at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Persistent reductions in total CC volume were observed in participants with autism relative to controls. Only the rostral body sub-division showed a normalization of size over time. Persistent reductions are consistent with the diagnostic stability and life-long impairment observed in many individuals with autism. Multimodal imaging studies are needed to identify specific fiber tracks contributing to CC reductions. PMID:22350341

  5. Associated Anisotropy Decays of Ethidium Bromide Interacting with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Sabnis, Sarika; Singhal, Preeti; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2015-01-01

    Ethidium Bromide (EB) is a commonly used dye in a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) study. Upon an intercalation, this dye significantly increases its brightness and fluorescence lifetime. In this report we have studied the time-resolved fluorescence properties of EB existing simultaneously in free and DNA-bound forms in the solution. Fluorescence intensity decays were fitted globally to a double exponential model with lifetimes corresponding to free (1.6ns) and bound (22ns) forms, and molar fractions were determined for all used solutions. Anisotropy decays displayed characteristic time dependence with an initial rapid decline followed by recovery and slow decay. The short-lived fraction associated with free EB molecules decreases faster than long-lived fraction associated with EB bound to DNA. Consequently, contribution from fast rotation leads to initial rapid decay in anisotropy. On the other hand bound fraction, due to slow rotation helps recover anisotropy in time. This effect of associated anisotropy decays in systems such as EB free/EB-DNA is clearly visible in a wide range of concentrations, and should be taken into account in polarization assays and biomolecule dynamics studies.

  6. Quarkonium dissociation by anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Mariano Chernicoff; Daniel Fernandez; David Mateos; Diego Trancanelli

    2013-01-25

    We compute the screening length for quarkonium mesons moving through an anisotropic, strongly coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma by means of its gravity dual. We present the results for arbitrary velocities and orientations of the mesons, as well as for arbitrary values of the anisotropy. The anisotropic screening length can be larger or smaller than the isotropic one, and this depends on whether the comparison is made at equal temperatures or at equal entropy densities. For generic motion we find that: (i) mesons dissociate above a certain critical value of the anisotropy, even at zero temperature; (ii) there is a limiting velocity for mesons in the plasma, even at zero temperature; (iii) in the ultra-relativistic limit the screening length scales as $(1-v^2)^\\epsilon$ with \\epsilon =1/2, in contrast with the isotropic result \\epsilon =1/4.

  7. Anisotropy in OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callens, M. K.; Yokoyama, D.; Neyts, K.

    2015-09-01

    Small-molecule OLEDs, deposited by thermal evaporation, allow for precise control over layer thicknesses. This enables optimisation of the optical behaviour of the stack which ultimately determines the outcoupling efficiency. In terms of optical outcoupling there are limits to the efficiency by which the generated electromagnetic radiation can be extracted from the stack. These limitations are linked to the refractive indices of the individual layers. Values for maximum outcoupling efficiency are sometimes calculated under the implicit assumptions that the OLED stack is planar, that all layers are isotropic with a certain refractive index and that the emitters are not preferentially oriented. In reality it is known that these assumptions are not always valid, be it intentional or unintentional. In our work we transcend these limiting assumptions and look at different forms of anisotropy in OLEDs. Anisotropy in OLEDs comes in three distinct flavours; 1. Geometrical anisotropy, as for example in gratings, lenses or other internal or external scattering centres, 2. Anisotropic emitters, where the orientation significantly influences the direction in which radiation is emitted and 3. Anisotropic optical materials, where their anisotropic nature breaks the customary assumption of isotropic OLED materials. We investigate the effect of these anisotropic features on the outcoupling efficiency and ultimately, on the external quantum efficiency (EQE).

  8. Effects of Severing the Corpus Callosum on Electrical and BOLD Functional Connectivity and Spontaneous Dynamic Activity in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Matthew E.; Thompson, Garth J.; Pan, Wen-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional networks, defined by synchronous spontaneous blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) oscillations between spatially distinct brain regions, appear to be essential to brain function and have been implicated in disease states, cognitive capacity, and sensing and motor processes. While the topographical extent and behavioral function of these networks has been extensively investigated, the neural functions that create and maintain these synchronizations remain mysterious. In this work callosotomized rodents are examined, providing a unique platform for evaluating the influence of structural connectivity via the corpus callosum on bilateral resting state functional connectivity. Two experimental groups were assessed, a full callosotomy group, in which the corpus callosum was completely sectioned, and a sham callosotomy group, in which the gray matter was sectioned but the corpus callosum remained intact. Results indicated a significant reduction in interhemispheric connectivity in the full callosotomy group as compared with the sham group in primary somatosensory cortex and caudate-putamen regions. Similarly, electrophysiology revealed significantly reduced bilateral correlation in band limited power. Bilateral gamma Band-limited power connectivity was most strongly affected by the full callosotomy procedure. This work represents a robust finding indicating the corpus callosum's influence on maintaining integrity in bilateral functional networks; further, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electrophysiological connectivity share a similar decrease in connectivity as a result of the callosotomy, suggesting that fMRI-measured functional connectivity reflects underlying changes in large-scale coordinated electrical activity. Finally, spatiotemporal dynamic patterns were evaluated in both groups; the full callosotomy rodents displayed a striking loss of bilaterally synchronous propagating waves of cortical activity. PMID:24117343

  9. Anterior interhemispheric calcified lipoma together with subcutaneous lipoma and agenesis of corpus callosum: a rare manifestation of midline craniofacial dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Omer; Karakas, Ekrem; Boyac?, Fat?ma Nurefsan; Celik, Bahattin; Cullu, Nesat

    2013-07-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND) or craniofacial dysraphism includes a variety of craniofacial defects. FNDs are rarely associated with intracranial lipoma. The majority of intracranial lipomas are incidentally identified on radiological examinations. They are commonly accompanied by other congenital intracranial malformations. Moreover, they are rarely associated with subcutaneous lipoma. We present a rare case of midline craniofacial dysraphism with interhemispheric calcified lipoma together with subcutaneous lipoma and agenesis of the corpus callosum. PMID:23504434

  10. Ion Temperature Anisotropy across Reconnection Exhaust Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection redistributes energy by releasing magnetic energy into plasma kinetic energy - high speed bulk flows, heating, and particle acceleration. In the magnetotail, most of the released energy appears to go into ion heating. However, previous observations and simulations show that this heating is anisotropic with the plasma temperature parallel to the magnetic field generally increasing more than the perpendicular temperature. Simulations and theory indicate that this temperature anisotropy can balance part of the magnetic tension force that accelerates the jet, and may even exceed it leading to firehose instability.Here we report the results of a new study of ion temperature anisotropy in reconnection exhausts generated by anti-parallel reconnection. We have examined ARTEMIS dual-spacecraft observations of long-duration magnetotail exhausts at lunar distances in conjunction with Particle-In-Cell simulations. In particular, we have studied spatial variations in the ion temperature anisotropy across the outflows far away (>100 ion inertial lengths) from the X-line. A consistent pattern is found in both the spacecraft data and the simulations: whilst the total temperature profile across the exhaust is flat, near the exhaust boundaries the parallel temperature dominates. A consequence of this is that firehose threshold is greatly exceeded in a significant fraction of the exhaust. In contrast, the perpendicular temperature dominates at the neutral plane (|BX| < 0.1 B0), indicating that, despite the turbulence and the large distance to the X-line, particles undergo Speiser-like motion (rather than isotropization by scattering). We also analyse the characteristics of the particle distributions leading to these anisotropies at different distances from the mid-plane.

  11. Anisotropy in a Nonsingular Bounce

    E-print Network

    Yi-Fu Cai; Robert Brandenberger; Patrick Peter

    2013-01-27

    Following recent claims relative to the question of large anisotropy production in regular bouncing scenarios, we study the evolution of such anisotropies in a model where an Ekpyrotic phase of contraction is followed by domination of a Galileon-type Lagrangian which generates a non-singular bounce. We show that the anisotropies decrease during the phase of Ekpyrotic contraction (as expected) and that they can be constrained to remain small during the non-singular bounce phase (a non-trivial result). Specifically, we derive the e-folding number of the phase of Ekpyrotic contraction which leads to a present-day anisotropy in agreement with current observational bounds.

  12. Partial agenesis of the corpus callosum in spina bifida meningomyelocele and potential compensatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hannay, H. Julia; Dennis, Maureen; Kramer, Larry; Blaser, Susan; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2009-01-01

    After a review of Arthur Benton’s conceptual and methodological contributions to the understanding of normal and pathological development, we discuss agenesis of the corpus callosum (CC), criteria for potential neuroanatomical compensatory mechanisms in CC agenesis, and the results of an examination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of the CC in 193 children with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM). There were 26 CC regional patterns. Although complete agenesis did not occur, partial agenesis was observed in 102 children and within 15 CC regional patterns. Only 4.1% had a normal CC. Quantitative assessment of the area of the CC in 26 NC children and 68 children with SBM revealed that all subgroups with CC anomalies had smaller areas than did a subgroup with a normal CC. Areas were especially small in rostral/splenial agenesis and splenial agenesis but larger with rostral agenesis. Subgroups with normal/hypoplastic regions or complete hypoplasia also had CC areas that were smaller than normal but larger than the areas for the splenial agenesis groups. The relative rarity of anterior commissure enlargement (3.1%) and longitudinal bundles of Probst (0.1%) suggest that these particular fiber tract anomalies are unlikely candidates for structural compensatory mechanisms. The hippocampal commissure, enlarged in 13%, may be a more promising candidate. Overall, however, the functionality of anomalous fiber tracts and commissures in SBM is yet to be determined. PMID:19052950

  13. Dehydration-Induced Anorexia Reduces Astrocyte Density in the Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder associated with severe weight loss as a consequence of voluntary food intake avoidance. Animal models such as dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) mimic core features of the disorder, including voluntary reduction in food intake, which compromises the supply of energy to the brain. Glial cells, the major population of nerve cells in the central nervous system, play a crucial role in supplying energy to the neurons. The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest white matter tract in mammals, and more than 99% of the cell somata correspond to glial cells in rodents. Whether glial cell density is altered in anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate glial cell density in the three main regions of the CC (genu, body, and splenium) in a murine model of DIA. The astrocyte density was significantly reduced (~34%) for the DIA group in the body of the CC, whereas in the genu and the splenium no significant changes were observed. DIA and forced food restriction (FFR) also reduced the ratio of astrocytes to glial cells by 57.5% and 22%, respectively, in the body of CC. Thus, we conclude that DIA reduces astrocyte density only in the body of the rat CC. PMID:26090235

  14. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-05-27

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  15. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E. J.; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  16. Light microscopic identification of immature glial cells in semithin sections of the developing mouse corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R R

    1976-01-01

    Four distinct types of glial cell were recognized in the corpus callosum of young postnatal mice: the early glioblast; the small glioblast; the large glioblast; and the young astrocyte. As well as these, mature microglia could be recognized from birth. In semithin, toluidine blue stained sections early glioblasts had large, fair to moderately stained nuclei, and a thin rim of pale cytoplasm; small glioblasts had small, dark nuclei and a rim of darkly stained cytoplasm; large glioblasts had moderately unevenly stained nuclei and a thin rim of moderately stained cytoplasm; and young astrocytes had fairly small nuclei, moderately stained cytoplasm, and one or more processes, which could usually be seen extending for 5 mum or more from the perikaryon. Differential glial counts using the criteria described above, in conjunction with electron microscopic analysis, suggested that early glioblasts gave rise to small glioblasts and large glioblasts; that small glioblasts gave rise directly to astrocytes, large glioblasts, oligodendrocytes and possibly microglia; that large glioblasts formed oligodendrocytes only, and might be immature light oligodendrocytes; and that part of the microglial population might arise from vascular pericytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:795801

  17. Inter-hemispheric Functional Connectivity Changes with Corpus Callosum Morphology in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Giancarlo; Luders, Eileen; Tomasevic, Leo; Lupoi, Domenico; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Rossini, Paolo M.; Filippi, Maria M.; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects myelin sheaths within the central nervous system, concurring to cause brain atrophy and neurodegeneration as well as gradual functional disconnections. To explore early signs of altered connectivity in MS from a structural and functional perspective, the morphology of corpus callosum (CC) was correlated with a dynamic inter-hemispheric connectivity index. Twenty mildly disabled patients affected by a relapsing-remitting (RR) form of MS (EDSS ? 3.5) and 15 healthy subjects underwent structural MRI to measure CC thickness over 100 sections and electroencephalography to assess a spectral coherence index between primary regions devoted to hand control, at rest and during an isometric handgrip. In patients, an overall CC atrophy was associated with increased lesion load. A less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence during movement was associated with CC atrophy in sections interconnecting homologous primary motor areas (anterior mid-body). In healthy controls, less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence at rest was associated with a thinner CC splenium. Our data suggest that in mildly disabled RR-MS patients a covert impairment may be detected in the correlation between the structural (CC thickness) and functional (inter-hemispheric coherence) measures of homologous networks, whereas these two counterparts do not yet differ individually from controls. PMID:24486438

  18. Inter-hemispheric functional connectivity changes with corpus callosum morphology in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zito, G; Luders, E; Tomasevic, L; Lupoi, D; Toga, A W; Thompson, P M; Rossini, P M; Filippi, M M; Tecchio, F

    2014-04-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects myelin sheaths within the central nervous system, concurring to cause brain atrophy and neurodegeneration as well as gradual functional disconnections. To explore early signs of altered connectivity in MS from a structural and functional perspective, the morphology of corpus callosum (CC) was correlated with a dynamic inter-hemispheric connectivity index. Twenty mildly disabled patients affected by a relapsing-remitting (RR) form of MS (EDSS?3.5) and 15 healthy subjects underwent structural MRI to measure CC thickness over 100 sections and electroencephalography to assess a spectral coherence index between primary regions devoted to hand control, at rest and during an isometric handgrip. In patients, an overall CC atrophy was associated with increased lesion load. A less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence (IHCoh) during movement was associated with CC atrophy in sections interconnecting homologous primary motor areas (anterior mid-body). In healthy controls, less efficacious IHCoh at rest was associated with a thinner CC splenium. Our data suggest that in mildly disabled RR-MS patients a covert impairment may be detected in the correlation between the structural (CC thickness) and functional (IHCoh) measures of homologous networks, whereas these two counterparts do not yet differ individually from controls. PMID:24486438

  19. Orodental manifestations in cases with partial agenesis of corpus callosum-rare phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Bhambal, Annette M.; Bhambal, Ajay; Nair, Preeti; Bhambal, Sheela S.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the associated signs and symptoms of patients with partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. The orodental manifestations of such cases have been given special weightage which will prove to be of great help to oral physician when encountered with such cases. Case details Two siblings, aged 14 and 16 years, reported with a chief complaint of severe crowding of teeth with mouth breathing habit. They were low birth-weight babies and had been born to non-consanguinous parents. The distinguishing features of these children were craniofacial abnormalities, delayed developmental milestones, mild mental retardation and abnormal gait. The nosological features and the clinical manifestations of this syndrome and the plausible autosomal recessive inheritance of this rare syndrome have been elicited. The diagnosis was based on characteristic phenotype, in particular striking craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities and neuroimaging. Conclusion It is a challenge for healthcare professionals to help these youths to maximize their potential as human beings and help them achieve a meaningful adulthood. On the other hand, diagnosing such cases can be a challenge to dentistry. A systematic protocol, if adhered, can lead to a more appropriate diagnosis. Managing such cases in a clinical setup involves a multispeciality and interdisciplinary approach. PMID:26258024

  20. The corpus callosum in primates: processing speed of axons and the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kimberley A; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Smaers, Jeroen B; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Jacobs, Bob; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-11-01

    Interhemispheric communication may be constrained as brain size increases because of transmission delays in action potentials over the length of axons. Although one might expect larger brains to have progressively thicker axons to compensate, spatial packing is a limiting factor. Axon size distributions within the primate corpus callosum (CC) may provide insights into how these demands affect conduction velocity. We used electron microscopy to explore phylogenetic variation in myelinated axon density and diameter of the CC from 14 different anthropoid primate species, including humans. The majority of axons were less than 1 µm in diameter across all species, indicating that conduction velocity for most interhemispheric communication is relatively constant regardless of brain size. The largest axons within the upper 95th percentile scaled with a progressively higher exponent than the median axons towards the posterior region of the CC. While brain mass among the primates in our analysis varied by 97-fold, estimates of the fastest cross-brain conduction times, as conveyed by axons at the 95th percentile, varied within a relatively narrow range between 3 and 9 ms across species, whereas cross-brain conduction times for the median axon diameters differed more substantially between 11 and 38 ms. Nonetheless, for both size classes of axons, an increase in diameter does not entirely compensate for the delay in interhemispheric transmission time that accompanies larger brain size. Such biophysical constraints on the processing speed of axons conveyed by the CC may play an important role in the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry. PMID:26511047

  1. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    E-print Network

    Durrer, Ruth

    Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations Ruth Durrer and Mairi, Switzerland Abstract We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed pertur- bations the perturbation equations on super- horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds

  2. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert H.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters—flow rate and vibration strength—this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows.

  3. Fractionalized gapless quantum vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2015-05-01

    The standard theoretical approach to gapless spin liquid phases of two-dimensional frustrated quantum antiferromagnets invokes the concept of fermionic slave particles into which the spin fractionalizes. As an alternate we explore different kinds of gapless spin liquid phases in frustrated quantum magnets with X Y anisotropy where the vortex of the spin fractionalizes into gapless itinerant fermions. The resulting gapless fractionalized vortex liquid phases are studied within a slave particle framework that is dual to the usual one. We demonstrate the stability of some such phases and describe their properties. We give an explicit construction in an X Y -spin-1 system on triangular lattice, and interpret it as a critical phase in the vicinity of spin-nematic states.

  4. Linking strain anisotropy and plasticity in copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son

    2015-05-01

    The elastic anisotropy of copper leads to significant variation in the x-ray elastic constants (XEC), which link diffraction-based strain measurements to stress. An accurate depiction of the mechanical response in copper thin films requires a determination of an appropriate grain interaction model that lies between Voigt and Reuss limits. It is shown that the associated XEC weighting fraction, x*, between these limits provides a metric by which strain anisotropy can be quantified. Experimental values of x*, as determined by a linear regression scheme of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections, reveal the degree of strain anisotropy and its dependence on plastic deformation induced during in-situ and ex-situ thermal treatments.

  5. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, E.M. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on a study to quantify the reflectance anisotropy of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for grasslands. PAR falls in the wavelength range 0.4 to 0.7[mu]m. The study looks at the variation of PAR with illumination and vegetative canopy conditions. It uses bidirectional reflectance distribution function data, and measures of anisotropy derived from reflectance factor and reflectance fraction data to aid in the analysis. The data used for this analysis came from an intense effort mounted to measure diurnal changes in the anisotropy of surface reflectance from prairie grassland as a function of the vegetative canopy.

  6. White Matter Integrity Measured by Fractional Anisotropy Correlates Poorly with Actual Individual Fiber Anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    microstructure, such as fiber connectivity and integrity in the healthy and diseased brain. To date, most, including fibers crossing or mixing. The tensor distribution function (TDF) can be used to reconstruct- optimal when used to detect disease processes that affect myelination. Analysis of the TDFs revealed

  7. Macroscopic model with anisotropy based on micro-macro informations

    E-print Network

    Nishant Kumar; Stefan Luding; Vanessa Magnanimo

    2015-06-15

    Physical experiments can characterize the elastic response of granular materials in terms of macroscopic state-variables, namely volume (packing) fraction and stress, while the microstructure is not accessible and thus neglected. Here, by means of numerical simulations, we analyze dense, frictionless, granular assemblies with the final goal to relate the elastic moduli to the fabric state, i.e., to micro-structural averaged contact network features as contact number density and anisotropy. The particle samples are first isotropically compressed and later quasi-statically sheared under constant volume (undrained conditions). From various static, relaxed configurations at different shear strains, now infinitesimal strain steps are applied to "measure" the effective elastic response; we quantify the strain needed so that plasticity in the sample develops as soon as contact and structure rearrangements happen. Because of the anisotropy induced by shear, volumetric and deviatoric stresses and strains are cross-coupled via a single anisotropy modulus, which is proportional to the product of deviatoric fabric and bulk modulus (i.e. the isotropic fabric). Interestingly, the shear modulus of the material depends also on the actual stress state, along with the contact configuration anisotropy. Finally, a constitutive model based on incremental evolution equations for stress and fabric is introduced. By using the previously measured dependence of the stiffness tensor (elastic moduli) on the microstructure, the theory is able to predict with good agreement the evolution of pressure, shear stress and deviatoric fabric (anisotropy) for an independent undrained cyclic shear test, including the response to reversal of strain.

  8. Anisotropy and AVO from walkaways

    SciTech Connect

    Leaney, W.S.

    1994-12-31

    A multi-offset VSP or ``walkaway`` is a wide aperture borehole seismic experiment ideal for studying angle-dependent wave propagation. In this paper, two aspects of elastic wave propagation are studied with walkaways: anisotropy (transverse isotropy) and AVO (amplitude variation with offset). Anisotropy is measured from walkaway data using extracted vertical and horizontal phase slownesses. Results are shown for a Java Sea walkaway data set and tabulated for walkaways from different locations. The anisotropy measurements are classified using Schoenberg`s parameters of ellipticity and anellipticity. Shale anisotropy is found to be significant and variable. Anisotropic AVO is studied on Ostrander`s shale-sand model and through the computation of anisotropic ray-trace synthetics. The ratio of ellipticity to anellipticity is found to be a good measure of shale anisotropy in the context of AVO. Depending on the ``flavor`` of shale anisotropy, AVO can be significantly reduced or exaggerated. The AVO response of a reservoir sequence can also be measured (as opposed to modeled) with a properly designed walkaway. The results of processing a walkaway for AVO are shown. Such a seismic experiment is arguably the best way to determine the AVO response of a reservoir or reservoir sequence. Together, these two new applications of walkaways -- to measure anisotropy and AVO -- can be used to: (1) Establish the viability of using AVO to map a reservoir. (2) Reduce the risk involved with the added cost of AVO studies. (3) Improve the reliability of AVO interpretations.

  9. Progesterone Enhanced Remyelination in the Mouse Corpus Callosum after Cuprizone Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Hedayatpour, Azim; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Kafami, Laya; Khallaghi, Behzad; Malek, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Progesterone as a sex steroid hormone is thought to affect and prevent demyelination, but its role in promoting myelin repair is far less investigated. In this study, remyelinating potential of progesterone in corpus callosum was evaluated on an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this experimental study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 0.2% (w/w) cuprizone in ground breeder chow ad libitum for 6 weeks. At day zero, after cuprizone removal, mice were divided randomly into two groups: (a) placebo group, which received saline pellet implant, (b) progesterone group, which received progesterone pellet implant. Some mice of the same age were fed with their normal diet to serve as the healthy control group. Two weeks after progesterone administration, Myelin content was assessed by Luxol-fast blue staining. The myelin basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) expression were assessed using Western blot analysis and the changes in the number of oligodendrocytes and oligodendroglial progenitor cells were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Results: Luxol-fast blue staining revealed enhanced remyelination in the progesterone group when compared with the placebo group. Densitometry measurements of immunoblots demonstrated that MBP and PLP proteins contents were significantly increased in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Flow cytometry and IHC analysis showed increases in Olig2 and O4 cells in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion: Overall, our results indicate that progesterone treatment can stimulate myelin production and that it may provide a feasible and practical way for remyelination in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26538779

  10. Abnormalities of the Corpus Callosum in Non-Psychotic high-risk offspring of schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, A.; Bhojraj, TS; Prasad, K; Kulkarni, S; Montrose, D; Eack, S; Keshavan, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the structure of the corpus callosum (CC) have been observed in schizophrenia. Offspring of schizophrenia parents have 10–15 times higher risk for developing schizophrenia. We examined CC volume in offspring at genetic high risk (HR) subjects. Since the sub regions of CC are topographically mapped to cortical brain regions, we hypothesized that HR subjects may show a decrement in total volume and differential volume decreases in sub-regions of CC. The offspring of schizophrenia parents (HR; n=70; 36 males) and healthy volunteers with no family or personal history of psychotic disorders (HC; n=73; 37 males) matched for age, gender and education were selected for the study. Magnetic resonance images were collected using a GE 1.5T scanner and processed using Freesurfer image analysis software. The CC was divided into five neuroanatomically based partitions. The volume of total CC and the five sub-regions were measured blind to clinical information. Covarying intra cranial volume, HR subjects had significantly reduced total CC, more prominently observed in the anterior splenium. An age-related increase in CC volume was found in the anterior and posterior splenium of healthy controls but not in HR subjects. The volume reduction was greater in male than female HR subjects. The volume reduction in the CC may reflect a reduction in axonal fibers crossing the hemispheres and/or myelination between the left and right temporo-parietal cortices. The absence of an age-related volume increase suggests an abnormal developmental trajectory that may underlie susceptibility to schizophrenia. PMID:21145214

  11. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor-Mediated Axonal Injury in Adult Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Jianuo; Fox, Howard S.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Damage to white matter such as corpus callosum (CC) is a pathological characteristic in many brain disorders. Glutamate (Glut) excitotoxicity through AMPA receptors on oligodendrocyte (OL) was previously considered as a mechanism for white matter damage. Recent studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed on myelin sheath of neonatal rat OL processes and that activation of these receptors mediated demyelization. Whether NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic axonal injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of NMDARs in the adult rat CC and their distributions in myelinated nerve fibers and OL somata by means of immunocytochemical staining and Western blot. Incubation of the CC slices with Glut or NMDA induced axonal injury as revealed by analyzing amplitude of CC fiber compound action potentials (CAPs) and input–output response. Both Glut and NMDA decreased the CAP amplitude and input–output responses, suggesting an involvement of NMDARs in Glut- and NMDA-induced axonal injury. The involvement of NMDAR in Glut-induced axonal injury was further assayed by detection of ?-amyloid precursor protein (?-APP) in the CC axonal fibers. Treatment of the CC slices with Glut resulted in ?-APP accumulation in the CC fibers as detected by Western blot, reflecting an impairment of axonal transport function. This injurious effect of Glut on CC axonal transport was significantly blocked by MK801. Taken together, these results show that NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic activity in adult CC slices in vitro. PMID:23161705

  12. Permeability anisotropy and resistivity anisotropy of mechanically compressed mudrocks

    E-print Network

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Permeability anisotropy (the ratio of the horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important parameter used in sedimentary basin models and geotechnical design to model fluid flow, locate hydrocarbon reserves and estimate ...

  13. Rare association of thin corpus callosum with infantile tremor syndrome in a 5.5-month-old infant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Sharma, Deepti; Kumar, Romal; Ranjan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Infantile tremor syndrome (ITS) is a clinical disorder characterized by coarse tremors, anemia and regression of motor and mental milestones, presenting in malnourished children aged between 5 months and 3 years. Few reports of neuroimaging abnormalities in children with ITS are present. The most common finding of neuroimaging in ITS is cerebral atrophy with ex-vacuo enlargement of ventricles and subarachnoid space, some recent reports also showed pontine myelinolysis and cerebral hyperintensities. We did not find any report of thin corpus callosum associated with ITS in the literature. PMID:26557175

  14. Fractional Derivatives and Fractional Mechanics Danny Vance

    E-print Network

    Morrow, James A.

    to the fractional damped harmonic oscil- lator problem. Contents 1 Basic Fractional Operators 1 1.1 The Fractional Damped Oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1. Basic Fractional Operators 1.1. The FractionalFractional Derivatives and Fractional Mechanics Danny Vance June 2, 2014 Abstract This paper

  15. Temperature dependent magnetization in Co-base nanowire arrays: Role of crystalline anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, L. G.; Vázquez, M.; Vega, V.; García, J.; Rosa, W. O.; del Real, R. P.; Prida, V. M.

    2012-04-01

    Co, Co(1-x)Pdx, and Co(1-y)Niy nanowire arrays have been prepared by electrochemical template-assisted growth. Hcp, fcc or both phases are detected in Co nanowires depending on their length (300 nm to 40 ?m) and on the content of Pd (0 ? x ? 0.4) and Ni (0 ? y ? 0.8). Their magnetic behavior has been studied under longitudinal and perpendicular applied fields. The effective magnetic anisotropy is mostly determined by the balance between the shape and the crystalline terms, the latter depending on the fractional volume of hcp phase with strong perpendicular anisotropy and fcc phase with weaker longitudinal anisotropy. The temperature dependence of remanence and coercivity and the eventual observation of compensation temperature is interpreted as due to the different temperature dependence of shape and hcp crystalline anisotropy. Optimum longitudinal magnetic anisotropy is achieved in low Pd-content CoPd nanowires and in short Co nanowires.

  16. Wind anisotropies and GRB progenitors

    E-print Network

    Georges Meynet; Andre Maeder

    2007-01-17

    We study the effect of wind anisotropies on the stellar evolution leading to collapsars. Rotating models of a 60 M$_\\odot$ star with $\\Omega/\\Omega_{\\rm crit}=0.75$ on the ZAMS, accounting for shellular rotation and a magnetic field, with and without wind anisotropies, are computed at $Z$=0.002 until the end of the core He-burning phase. Only the models accounting for the effects of the wind anisotropies retain enough angular momentum in their core to produce a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB). The chemical composition is such that a type Ic supernova event occurs. Wind anisotropies appear to be a key physical ingredient in the scenario leading to long GRBs.

  17. Chemical shift anisotropy selective inversion

    E-print Network

    Caporini, Marc A.

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) is used in solid-state NMR to remove the broadening effects of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). In this work we investigate a technique that can reintroduce the CSA in order to selectively ...

  18. Permeability anisotropy of resedimented mudrocks

    E-print Network

    Nordquist, Taylor James

    2015-01-01

    Permeability anisotropy (ratio of horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important but uncertain parameter used in characterizing underground formations. While it is a fairly unknown parameter, it is integral for the ...

  19. The Physics of CMBR Anisotropies

    E-print Network

    Kandaswamy Subramanian

    2004-11-02

    The observed structures in the universe are thought to have arisen from gravitational instability acting on small fluctuations generated in the early universe. These spatial fluctuations are imprinted on the CMBR as angular anisotropies. The physics which connects initial fluctuations in the early universe to the observed anisotropies is fairly well understood, since for most part it involves linear perturbation theory. This makes CMBR anisotropies one of the cleanest probes of the initial fluctuations, various cosmological parameters governing their evolution and also the geometry of the universe. We review here in a fairly pedagogical manner the physics of the CMBR anisotropies and explain the role they play in probing cosmological parameters, especially in the light of the latest observations from the WMAP satellite.

  20. Neutrino Anisotropies after Planck

    E-print Network

    Gerbino, Martina; Said, Najla

    2013-01-01

    We present new constraints on the rest-frame sound speed, c_eff^2, and the viscosity parameter, c_vis^2, of the Cosmic Neutrino Background from the recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite. While broadly consistent with the ex- pectations of c_eff^2 = c_vis^2 = 1/3 in the standard scenario, the Planck dataset hints for a higher value of the viscosity parameter, with c_vis^2 = 0.60 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l., and a lower value of the sound speed, with c_eff^2 = 0.304 +/- 0.013 at 68% c.l.. We find a correlation between the neutrino parameters and the lensing amplitude of the temperature power spectrum A_L. When the latter parameter is allowed to vary, we find a better consistency with the standard model with c_vis^2 = 0.51 +/- 0.22, c_eff^2 = 0.311 +/- 0.019 and A_L = 1.08 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l.. This result indicates that the anomalous large value of A_L measured by Planck could be connected to non-standard neutrino properties. Including additional datasets ...

  1. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-08-01

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(?)F{sup 2} model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton ? and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(?)F{sup 2} model.

  2. Laboratory seismic anisotropy in mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, B. S. G.; Herwegh, M.; Hirt, A. M.; Ebert, A.; Linckens, J.; Precigout, J.; Leiss, B.; Walter, J. M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic strain is often accommodated along narrow zones in the Earth's crust and upper mantle, and these high-strain zones represent an important mechanical and rheological component in geodynamics. In outcrop we observe the intense deformation along and across these structures. But at depth, in the mid and lower crust, and in the mantle, we are dependent on geophysical methods for analysis of structures, such as seismic reflection and refraction surveys. A natural progression has therefore been to understand the remote geophysical signal in terms of laboratory ultrasonic pulse transmission measurements on rock cores, collected in the field or from borehole drill core. Here we first present a brief review that consider key studies in the area of laboratory seismic measurements in strongly anisotropic rocks, ranging from calcite mylonites to metapelites. In the second part we focus attention on ongoing research projects targetting laboratory seismic anisotropy in mylonitized rocks, and associated challenges. Measurements of compressional (P) and shear (S) waves were made at high confining pressure (up to 5 kbar). Mineral texture analysis was performed with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron texture diffraction to determine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). So-called "rock-recipe" models are used to calculate seismic anisotropy, which consider the elastic properties of minerals that constitutes the rock, and their respective CPO. However, the outcome of such models do not always simply correspond to the measured seismic anisotropy. Differences are attributed to several factors, such as grain boundaries, mineral microstructures including shape-preferred orientation (SPO), micro-cracks and pores, and grain-scale stress-strain conditions. We highlight the combination of these factors in case studies on calcite and peridotite mylonites. In calcite mylonites, sampled in the Morcles nappe shear zone, the measured seismic anisotropy generally match the calculated seismic anisotropy. However, anisotropy may be reinforced by the contribution of grain-boundary effects and calcite SPO, as is indicated by microCT imaging and SEM analysis. This is evident in one case where the measured P wave anisotropy exceeded the calculated anisotropy by more than 5%, and by ~4 % higher shear-wave splitting. An even greater discrepancy can be found when comparing measured and calculated seismic anisotropy in mylonitized peridotites from shear zones in the Lanzo (Italy) and Ronda (Spain) massifs. This is in part related to serpentinization of olivine, which remains a challenge for laboratory measurements of peridotites. Highest values of calculated anisotropy, for both the calcite and peridotite mylonites, are found in near monomineralic specimens (i.e., 8 - 10% P wave anisotropy). In comparison, polymineralic specimens have calculated P wave anisotropy ranging between <2 - 5%. In contrast, the laboratory measured seismic anisotropy do not display a simple relationship as a function of mono- versus polymineralic composition. Seismic properties and anisotropy are discussed in light of conditions and mechanisms of deformation, and the possible role and influence of second-phase minerals. Laboratory measurements offers a venue for exploring the relationship between deformation and seismic anisotropy. Such investigation may, in combination with high-resolution geophysical methods and increasingly sophisticated numerical models, yield further insight on remote active deformation in the mid and lower crust, and in the upper mantle.

  3. Characteristics of diffusion-tensor imaging for healthy adult rhesus monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxiang; Pu, Jun; Fan, Yaodong; Niu, Xiaoqun; Yu, Danping; Zhang, Yanglin

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-tensor imaging can be used to observe the microstructure of brain tissue. Fractional sotropy reflects the integrity of white matter fibers. Fractional anisotropy of a young adult brain is low in gray matter, high in white matter, and highest in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Thus, we selected the anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, head of the caudate nucleus, semioval center, thalamus, and corpus callosum (splenium and genu) as regions of interest when using diffusion-tensor imaging to observe fractional anisotropy of major white matter fiber tracts and the deep gray matter of healthy rhesus monkeys aged 4–8 years. Results showed no laterality ferences in fractional anisotropy values. Fractional anisotropy values were low in the head of date nucleus and thalamus in gray matter. Fractional anisotropy values were highest in the splenium of corpus callosum in the white matter, followed by genu of the corpus callosum and the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Fractional anisotropy values were lowest in the semioval center and posterior limb of internal capsule. These results suggest that fractional anisotropy values in major white matter fibers and the deep gray matter of 4–8-year-old rhesus monkeys are similar to those of healthy young people. PMID:25206616

  4. A T1 and DTI fused 3D corpus callosum analysis in pre- vs. post-season contact sports players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yi; Law, Meng; Shi, Jie; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Sports related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide public health issue, and damage to the corpus callosum (CC) has been considered as an important indicator of TBI. However, contact sports players suffer repeated hits to the head during the course of a season even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, and less is known about their effect on callosal anatomy. In addition, T1-weighted and diffusion tensor brain magnetic resonance images (DTI) have been analyzed separately, but a joint analysis of both types of data may increase statistical power and give a more complete understanding of anatomical correlates of subclinical concussions in these athletes. Here, for the first time, we fuse T1 surface-based morphometry and a new DTI analysis on 3D surface representations of the CCs into a single statistical analysis on these subjects. Our new combined method successfully increases detection power in detecting differences between pre- vs. post-season contact sports players. Alterations are found in the ventral genu, isthmus, and splenium of CC. Our findings may inform future health assessments in contact sports players. The new method here is also the first truly multimodal diffusion and T1-weighted analysis of the CC, and may be useful to detect anatomical changes in the corpus callosum in other multimodal datasets.

  5. Lissencephaly with agenesis of corpus callosum and rudimentary dysplastic cerebellum: a subtype of lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hajime; Chute, Dennis J; Fink, James; Villablanca, Pablo; Vinters, Harry V

    2004-01-01

    Lissencephaly with agenesis of the corpus callosum and rudimentary dysplastic cerebellum may represent a subset of lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) of unknown etiology, one that is distinct from other types of LCH. We present a detailed neuropathological description of an autopsy brain from a 7-day-old neonate born at 38-gestational weeks, presenting with this malformation. The brain was severely hydrocephalic and totally agyric. The corpus callosum was absent and deep gray matter structures indistinct. A rudimentary dysplastic cerebellum, dysplastic olivary nuclei and nearly complete absence of corticospinal tracts were also noted. Microscopic examination revealed various types of dysplastic and malformative features throughout the brain in addition to the classic four-layered neocortical structure characteristic of type I lissencephaly. Unique features in the present case were (1) bilateral periventricular undulating cortical ribbon-like structures mimicking fused gyri and sulci, associated with aberrant reelin expression, (2) large dysplastic neocortical neurons positive for phosphorylated neurofilament, calbindin-D28K, tuberin, hamartin, doublecortin, LIS1, reelin and Dab1, (3) derangement of radial glial fibers, and (4) disorganized cerebellar cortex and heterotopic gray matter composed exclusively of granule cells in the cerebellar deep white matter. The clinicopathological features in the present case are suggestive of a distinct category of lissencephaly with cerebellar involvement. We suggest a possible classification of this unique case among the LCH syndromes. PMID:14566414

  6. A T1 and DTI fused 3D Corpus Callosum analysis in pre- vs. post-season contact sports players

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Yi; Law, Meng; Shi, Jie; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Sports related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide public health issue, and damage to the corpus callosum (CC) has been considered as an important indicator of TBI. However, contact sports players suffer repeated hits to the head during the course of a season even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, and less is known about their effect on callosal anatomy. In addition, T1-weighted and diffusion tensor brain magnetic resonance images (DTI) have been analyzed separately, but a joint analysis of both types of data may increase statistical power and give a more complete understanding of anatomical correlates of subclinical concussions in these athletes. Here, for the first time, we fuse T1 surface-based morphometry and a new DTI analysis on 3D surface representations of the CCs into a single statistical analysis on these subjects. Our new combined method successfully increases detection power in detecting differences between pre- vs. post-season contact sports players. Alterations are found in the ventral genu, isthmus, and splenium of CC. Our findings may inform future health assessments in contact sports players. The new method here is also the first truly multimodal diffusion and T1-weighted analysis of the CC in TBI, and may be useful to detect anatomical changes in the corpus callosum in other multimodal datasets. PMID:26412925

  7. Fractional damped oscillators and fractional forced oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang; Jung, Min

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we use fractional calculus to discuss fractional mechanics, where the time derivative is replaced with the fractional derivative of order ?. We deal with the motion of a body in a resisting medium where the retarding force is assumed to be proportional to the fractional velocity that is obtained by applying the fractional derivative to the position. The fractional oscillator problem, the fractional oscillator problem with resistance and the fractional forced oscillator problem are also studied

  8. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  9. Abnormal Corpus Callosum Connectivity, Socio-Communicative Deficits, and Motor Deficits in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanaie, Ryuzo; Mohri, Ikuko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Tachibana, Masaya; Matsuzaki, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Norihiko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    In addition to social and communicative deficits, many studies have reported motor deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the macro and microstructural properties of the corpus callosum (CC) of 18 children with ASD and 12 typically developing controls using diffusion tensor imaging tractography. We aimed to explore…

  10. 3D Pre-vs. Post-Season Comparisons of Surface and Relative Pose of the Corpus Callosum in Contact Sport Athletes

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yalin

    3D Pre- vs. Post-Season Comparisons of Surface and Relative Pose of the Corpus Callosum in Contact to repeated hits to the head throughout the season, and we hypothesize that these have an influence on white changes between 9 pre-season and 9 post-season contact sport athlete MRIs. All the data are fed

  11. Magnetic anisotropy data of CH2NCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.

    This document is part of Subvolume C `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Anisotropy of Organic Compounds' of Volume 27 `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Anisotropy' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group II Molecules and Radicals.

  12. Blindness, dancing extremities, and corpus callosum and brain stem involvement: an unusual presentation of fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Gupta, Pankaj; Vyas, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with acute visual loss followed 2 weeks later with loss of speech and audition, fulminant neuroregression, and choreo-athetoid movements of extremities. Fundus showed bilateral chorioretinitis. Electroencephalography showed periodic complexes. Measles antibody titers were elevated in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid, consistent with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Neuroimaging showed discontiguous involvement of splenium of the corpus callosum and ventral pons with sparing of cortical white matter. Our case highlights the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Pediatricians need to be aware that necrotizing chorioretinitis in a child and/or atypical brain stem changes could be the heralding feature of this condition in endemic countries. PMID:24700664

  13. Trisomy 8 syndrome owing to isodicentric 8p chromosomes: regional assignment of a presumptive gene involved in corpus callosum development.

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Floridia, G; Uccellatore, F; Mingarelli, R; Danesino, C; Dallapiccola, B; Zuffardi, O

    1994-01-01

    Two patients with trisomy 8 syndrome owing to an isodicentric 8p;8p chromosome are described. Case 1 had a 46,XX/46,XX,-8,+idic(8)(p23) karyotype while case 2, a male, had the same abnormal karyotype without evidence of mosaicism. In situ hybridisation, performed in case 1, showed that the isochromosome was asymmetrical. Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), which is a feature of trisomy 8 syndrome, was found in both patients. Although ACC is associated with aneuploidies for different chromosomes, a review of published reports indicates that, when associated with chromosome 8, this defect is the result of duplication of a gene located within 8p21-pter. Molecular analysis in one of our patients led us to exclude the distal 23 Mb of 8p from this ACC region. Images PMID:8014974

  14. Sgk1 regulates desmoglein 1 expression levels in oligodendrocytes in the mouse corpus callosum after chronic stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Keiko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Ishikawa, Toshiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shimizu, Shoko; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-08-14

    Major depression, one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, is thought to be a multifactorial disease related to both genetic and environmental factors. However, the genes responsible for and the pathogenesis of major depression at the molecular level remain unclear. Recently, we reported that stressed mice with elevated plasma corticosterone levels show upregulation and activation of serum glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) in oligodendrocytes. Active Sgk1 causes phosphorylation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (Ndrg1), and phospho-Ndrg1 increases the expression of N-cadherin, ?-catenin, and ?-catenin in oligodendrocytes. This activation of the Sgk1 cascade results in morphological changes in the oligodendrocytes of nerve fiber bundles, such as those present in the corpus callosum. However, little is known about the molecular functions of the traditional and/or desmosomal cadherin superfamily in oligodendrocytes. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the functions of the desmosomal cadherin superfamily in oligodendrocytes. Desmoglein (Dsg) 1, Dsg2, and desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) were found to be expressed in the corpus callosum of mouse brain, and the expression of a subtype of Dsg1, Dsg1c, was upregulated in oligodendrocytes after chronic stress exposure. Furthermore, Dsg1 proteins were localized around the plasma membrane regions of oligodendrocytes. A study in primary oligodendrocyte cultures also revealed that chronic upregulation of Sgk1 by dexamethasone administration is involved in upregulation of Dsg1c mRNA. These results may indicate that chronic stress induced Sgk1 activation in oligodendrocytes, which increases Dsg1 expression near the plasma membrane. Thus, Dsg1 upregulation may be implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the morphological changes in oligodendrocytes in response to chronic stress exposure. PMID:26043694

  15. Anisotropy of machine building materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the anisotropy of elastic and strength characteristics of various structural materials, including pressure worked metals and alloys, laminated fiberglass plastics, and laminated wood plastics, are correlated and classified. Strength criteria under simple and complex stresses are considered as applied to anisotropic materials. Practical application to determining the strength of machine parts and structural materials is discussed.

  16. MAXIMA: Observations of CMB Anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Bahman Rabii

    2003-02-07

    This document describes the Millimeter Anisotropy eXperiment IMaging Array (MAXIMA), a balloon-borne experiment measuring the temperature anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on angular scales of 10 arcminutes to 5 degrees. MAXIMA maps the CMB using 16 bolometric detectors observing in spectral bands centered at 150 GHz, 230 GHz, and 410 GHz, with 10 arcminute resolution at all frequencies. The combined receiver sensitivity to CMB anisotropy is 40 micro-K*(sec^0.5). During two flights with a total of 8.5 hours of CMB observations, 300 square degrees of the sky were mapped. MAXIMA data are used to discriminate between cosmological models and to determine cosmological parameters; results are presented from the 1998 flight. The angular power spectrum derived from these data shows a narrow peak near l=200, and is consistent with inflationary Big Bang models. Cosmological parameters are estimated, including total density Omega(total)=0.9(-0.16,+0.18), baryon density Omega(b)h^2=0.033(+/-0.013), and power spectrum normalization C(10)=690(-125,+200) micro-K^2. The final chapter is a discussion CMB polarization anisotropy, including an overview of MAXIPOL, the polarization sensitive follow-up to MAXIMA.

  17. Ion temperature anisotropy across a magnetotail reconnection jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; McFadden, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    A significant fraction of the energy released by magnetotail reconnection appears to go into ion heating, but this heating is generally anisotropic. We examine ARTEMIS dual-spacecraft observations of a long-duration magnetotail exhaust generated by antiparallel reconnection in conjunction with particle-in-cell simulations, showing spatial variations in the anisotropy across the outflow far (>100di) downstream of the X line. A consistent pattern is found in both the spacecraft data and the simulations: While the total temperature across the exhaust is rather constant, near the boundaries Ti,|| dominates. The plasma is well above the firehose threshold within patchy spatial regions at |BX|?[0.1,0.5]B0, suggesting that the drive for the instability is strong and the instability is too weak to relax the anisotropy. At the midplane (|BX|?0.1B0), Ti,?>Ti,|| and ions undergo Speiser-like motion despite the large distance from the X line.

  18. The microwave background anisotropies: observations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation-fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 microK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1 degrees and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe--the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  19. Anisotropy of transcallosal motor fibres indicates functional impairment in children with periventricular leukomalacia

    E-print Network

    -based hand motor test. RESULTS Fractional anisotropy was lower in children with bilateral spastic CP / PVL | MAXIMILIAN REISER1 | MAREK KUBICKI2 | MARTHA E SHENTON2,6 | BIRGIT ERTL-WAGNER1 | FLORIAN HEINEN3 1 Institute of TCMF is consistent with impairment of hand motor function in children with bilateral spastic CP / PVL

  20. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  1. Quasi-Long-Range Order in Random-Anisotropy Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Ronald

    1998-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to study a discretized Heisenberg ferromagnet (FM) with random anisotropy on simple cubic lattices. The spin variable on each site is chosen from the twelve [110] directions. The random anisotropy has infinite strength and a random direction on a fraction x of the sites of the lattice, and is zero on the remaining sites. In most respects, the behavior of this model is qualitatively similar to that of the corresponding random-field model,(R. Fisch, Phys. Rev. B 57, XXX (Jan. 1, 1998).) except that one needs a substantially larger value of x to get a comparable result for the random anisotropy, as compared to the random field. Due to the discretization, for small x at low temperature there is a [110] FM phase. For x>0 there is an intermediate phase between the paramagnet and the ferromagnet, which is characterized by a |k|-3 divergence of the magnetic structure factor S(k) for small k, but no true FM order. At the transition between the paramagnetic and quasi-long-range ordered phases S(k) diverges as |k|-2. For x close to 1 the low temperature form of S(k) can be fit by a Lorentzian with a correlation length estimated to be 11 ± 1 at x=1.0 and 25 ± 5 at x=0.75.

  2. Nonlinear CMB temperature anisotropy from gravitational perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xian

    2010-11-15

    Nonlinear CMB temperature anisotropies up to the third order on large scales are calculated. On large scales and in the Sachs-Wolfe limit, we give the explicit expression for the observed temperature anisotropy in terms of the primordial curvature perturbation up to the third order. We derived the final bispectrum and trispectrum of anisotropies and the corresponding nonlinear parameters, in which the contributions to the observed non-Gaussianity from primordial perturbations and from the nonlinear mapping from primordial curvature perturbation to the temperature anisotropy are transparently separated.

  3. Corpus Callosum Segment Circumference Is Associated With Response Control in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Melanie A.; Crocetti, Deana; Mahone, E. Mark; Denckla, Martha B.; Suskauer, Stacy J.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2010-01-01

    Response control is impaired in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given the corpus callosum's role in response control, we compared callosal morphology in 64 children with ADHD and 64 typically developing children, aged 7 to 13 years, and investigated the relationships between callosal morphology and response control. Area and circumference of 5 callosal segments (genu, rostral body, midbody, isthmus, and splenium) were normalized for cerebral volume and examined for correlation with mean reaction time, intrasubject variability, and/or commission error rate from a go/no-go task. There were no between-group differences in segment areas or circumferences. Reaction time correlated with midbody circumference for boys with ADHD and isthmus circumference for girls with ADHD. For the entire cohort, rostral body circumference correlated with intra-subject variability. Impaired response control in ADHD is associated with anomalies in frontal interhemispheric connections. Future studies examining callosal shape will illuminate the anatomic basis of correlations between callosal segment circumference and response control. PMID:20139403

  4. [Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with corpus callosum agenesis, PTCH1 mutation and absence of basal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mazzuoccolo, Luis D; Martínez, María Florencia; Muchnik, Carolina; Azurmendi, Pablo J; Stengel, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, mainly due to PTCH1 gene mutations, that comprises a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The presence of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is a cardinal sign in NBCCS, therefore cases in which BCCs are absent entails a delay in the diagnosis.We present a 14 years old boy with a clinical diagnosis of NBCCS by the presence of odontogenic cysts, hypertelorism, macrocephaly, and corpus callosum agenesia, but with absence of skin lesions. His 43 years old mother has NBCCS diagnosis and no history of BCCs. For a deeper study, PTCH1 mutation screening from peripheral blood samples were performed by both bidirectional sequencing and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) techniques. The proband and his mother carry 25 pb duplication in exon 10 (c.1375dupl25bp) that causes a reading frameshift with a premature stop codon. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that this mutation results in a truncated protein shorter than normal. Our results suggest that complete clinical and genealogical studies accompanied by genetic analysis are essential in the early detection of the NBCCS cases such the one presented here. PMID:25188659

  5. Reduced corpus-callosum volume in posttraumatic stress disorder highlights the importance of interhemispheric connectivity for associative memory.

    PubMed

    Saar-Ashkenazy, Rotem; Cohen, Jonathan E; Guez, Jonathan; Gasho, Chris; Shelef, Ilan; Friedman, Alon; Shalev, Hadar

    2014-02-01

    Memory deficits are a common complaint of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite vivid trauma-related memory, previous studies report memory impairment for nontrauma-related stimuli when compared to controls, specifically in associative memory (Guez et al., 2011). Healthy individuals show hemispheric memory asymmetry with left-prefrontal lateralization of encoding and right-prefrontal lateralization of episodic retrieval, suggesting a role for interhemispheric communication in memory-related tasks (Gazzaniga, ; Ringo, Doty, Demeter, & Simard, ). Because brain magnetic resonance imaging (bMRI) studies in PTSD patients report volume changes in various regions, including white matter and corpus callosum (CC), we aimed to test the relationship between memory deficits and CC volume in PTSD patients. We probed for specific alterations in associative memory in PTSD and measured the volume of subportions within the CC employing bMRI. Our main finding was a reduction in CC white-matter volume in PTSD patients, as compared to controls, t(35) = -2.7, p = .010, that was correlated with lower associative performance (r = .76, p = .003). We propose that CC volume reduction is a substrate for the associative memory deficits found in PTSD. PMID:24473965

  6. Lipoma in the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Epileptic Seizures Associated with Expanding Perifocal Edema: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuga, Michiyasu; Yamamoto, Yohei; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Yuichi; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of a patient with lipoma presenting with epileptic seizures associated with expanding perifocal edema. The patient was a 48-year-old man who presented with loss of consciousness and convulsions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a calcified mass in the corpus callosum with perifocal edema causing mass effect. An interhemispheric approach was used to biopsy the mass lesion. Histological examination revealed typical adipose cells, along with hamartomatous components. These components contained neurofilament and S-100-positive structures showing marked calcification. Fibrous cells immunoreactive for ?-smooth muscle actin and epithelial membrane antigen proliferated with focal granulomatous inflammatory changes. MIB-1 index was approximately 5% in immature cells observed in granulomatous areas. We thus suspected a coexisting neoplastic component. The residual lesion persisted in a dormant state for 2 years following biopsy. Surgical resection of a lipoma is extremely difficult and potentially dangerous. However, in the present case, the lesion was accompanied by atypical, expanding, and perifocal edema. Surgical treatment was inevitable for the purpose of histological confirmation, considering differential diagnoses such as dermoid, epidermoid, and glioma. In the end, anticonvulsant therapy proved effective for controlling epileptic seizures. PMID:26078892

  7. SLC1A4 mutations cause a novel disorder of intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, spasticity and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Marek-Yagel, D; Eyal, E; Barel, O; Oz Levi, D; Hoffmann, C; Ruzzo, E K; Ganelin-Cohen, E; Lancet, D; Pras, E; Rechavi, G; Nissenkorn, A; Anikster, Y; Goldstein, D B; Ben Zeev, B

    2015-10-01

    Two unrelated patients, presenting with significant global developmental delay, severe progressive microcephaly, seizures, spasticity and thin corpus callosum (CC) underwent trio whole-exome sequencing. No candidate variant was found in any known genes related to the phenotype. However, crossing the data of the patients illustrated that they both manifested pathogenic variants in the SLC1A4 gene which codes the ASCT1 transporter of serine and other neutral amino acids. The Ashkenazi patient is homozygous for a deleterious missense c.766G>A, p.(E256K) mutation whereas the Ashkenazi-Iraqi patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and a nonsense c.945delTT, p.(Leu315Hisfs*42) mutation. Structural prediction demonstrates truncation of significant portion of the protein by the nonsense mutation and speculates functional disruption by the missense mutation. Both mutations are extremely rare in general population databases, however, the missense mutation was found in heterozygous mode in 1:100 Jewish Ashkenazi controls suggesting a higher carrier rate among Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that SLC1A4 is the disease causing gene of a novel neurologic disorder manifesting with significant intellectual disability, severe postnatal microcephaly, spasticity and thin CC. The role of SLC1A4 in the serine transport from astrocytes to neurons suggests a possible pathomechanism for this disease and implies a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26138499

  8. Measured anisotropy in Pierre Shale

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Martineau-Nicoletis, L.; Monash, C.

    1983-10-01

    The five elastic coefficients which characterize a transversely isotropic medium have been measured for the Pierre Shale. The first-arrival times deduced from two closely spaced vertical seismic profiles provide values of magnitude and direction of the phase velocity at a given depth for different locations of the sources. From these velocities, it can be estimated that the five elastic coefficients by assuming that the P- and SV-wave velocities have only a small dependence on the angle of propagation. On the other hand, it is shown that the accuracy in the difference between the directions of propagation and particle motion is not sufficient to determine the anisotropy.

  9. Fractional Modified Special Relativity

    E-print Network

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2011-03-31

    Fractional calculus represents a natural tool for describing relativistic phenomena in pseudo-Euclidean space-time. In this study, Fractional modified special relativity is presented. We obtain fractional generalized relation for the time dilation.

  10. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  11. Azimuthal Anisotropy Measurements by STAR

    E-print Network

    Li Yi for STAR collaboration

    2014-02-27

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy ($v_{2}$) at midrapidity ($|\\eta|<1.0$) in Au+Au collision at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive $v_{2}$ is mainly due to the average $p_{T}$ increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy ($v_{3}$) measurements highly depend on measurment methods; $v_{3}$ is strongly dependent on $\\Delta\\eta$. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants $v_{2}\\lbrace{2}\\rbrace$ and $v_{2}\\lbrace{4}\\rbrace$ for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity $\\eta$ about mid-rapidty, the $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and independent components are seperated using $v_{2}\\lbrace2\\rbrace$ and $v_{2}\\lbrace{4}\\rbrace$.

  12. AVO and anisotropy from logs and walkaways

    SciTech Connect

    Leaney, S.W.; Borland, W.E. )

    1994-07-01

    AVO (amplitude versus offset) is the seismic technique used for mapping lithology, and modeling is an important step for successful AVO interpretations. Shear velocity measurements are essential, since AVO attempts to exploit the elastic (as opposed to acoustic) nature of seismic wave propagation. A property of seismic wave propagation not often considered is anisotropy. This is probably because the magnitude of the anisotropy has been difficult to measure, and its effect on AVO is not widely known. New technology is helping to improve AVO modeling. Dipole source shear logging tools can now measure very slow shear velocities, increasing the range of applicability of AVO, and new borehole seismic techniques can measure anisotropy. When integrated, these new measurements provide more detailed information about the elastic moduli that govern wave propagation, and bring the possibility for greater reliability in AVO interpretation. Two examples of ray-trace AVO synthetics are shown to illustrate typical AVO responses and the importance of shear velocity information. An overview of anisotropy is given and a new technique to estimate anisotropy from walkaway surveys (multi-offset VSPs) is described. The log and walkaway measurements are then integrated to study the impact of anisotropy on AVO. First, the effect of anisotropy on Ostrander's shale-sand model is investigated, and second, isotropic and anisotropic ray-trace synthetics are compared. The effect of anisotropy on AVO is found to be significant and may be lead to misinterpretations of AVO anomalies.

  13. Acoustic axes in triclinic anisotropy Vclav Vavrycuka

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Acoustic axes in triclinic anisotropy Václav Vavrycuka Geophysical Institute, Academy of Sciences May 2005 Calculation of acoustic axes in triclinic elastic anisotropy is considerably more complicated. In this way we obtain 16 isolated acoustic axes, which can run in real or complex directions. The real

  14. The influence of magnetic aftereffects on the magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, A.; Mashukova, A.

    2012-04-01

    There were investigated the time dependences of the magnetic anisotropy characteristics of artificial depositions received in the geomagnetic field. The content of magnetite in the nonmagnetic matrix of kaolin did not exceed 1%. The Co content in the grains of magnetite Fe3 O4 was 0.0018%. The viscous magnetization was created in the depositions with grain sizes of Fe3O4 in micrometers (0 ÷ 8), (9 ÷ 16), (17 ÷ 32), (33 ÷ 64), (65 ÷ 100), (101 ÷ 150). The X-ray method of direct pole figures indicates that the intensity of the ordering of the ferromagnetic grains in the depositions depends strongly on the grain size in the above-mentioned ranges, getting reduced from 1.9 to 1.1. Compared with the characteristics received immediately after drying the samples and after holding them for two years in the earth's magnetic field in the direction of In, one could observe increase in all the characteristics of the magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude Hd of the magnetic field having the periodicity change of Hd 2? to ? increases. This indicates the stabilization of the new domain structure. The increase in the uniaxial anisotropy constant (K) is associated with the emergence of the large induced anisotropy due to the diffusion of Co ions. It was found out that the constant K decreases markedly with increasing particle size in the range from 8 mm to 40 microns. Based on the results of the X-ray analysis by using the method direct pole figures, it may be explained by the creation of the axial texture in the depositions with grains having the size less than 40 microns. The intensity of more than 40 microns decreases insignificantly - from 1.3 to 1.1. After creating the viscous magnetization in two years, the constant K has increased by 1.5 - 2 times. The influence of the magnetic after-effects on K in strong magnetic fields denotes the diffusion nature of the viscous magnetization. The losses of the rotational magnetic hysteresis (W) also rise in the presence of the structural defects and internal stresses. The value of the maximum loss (Wm) increases the more the smaller the grain size Fe3O4.The greatest influence of magnetic viscosity is exercised on the depositions having d < 40 microns. It is shown that there is a correlation between the dependence of the temporal variation of Wm and the dependence of the coefficients of the magnetic viscosity on the ferromagnetic grain size. The magnitude of the magnetic field (HW), corresponding to the maximum losses and characterizing the beginning of the transition of the spins from the connection with the crystal lattice to the connection with the external magnetic field, does not change. So, the magnetic field HW can be considered as an indicator of the composition of the ferromagnetic fraction. Depending on the composition of the ferromagnetic, value HW has a wide range of values. For the depositions, containing magnetite grains, the value of HW makes up 1.8 kOe, and for the grains of hematite it is 9 kOe. Thus, the contribution to the effective anisotropy of rocks containing large particles of the ferromagnetic fraction, can not be explained by the energy of crystallographic anisotropy. Diffusion magnetic anisotropy is a widely spread phenomenon in the rocks.

  15. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  16. Neoclassical study of temperature anisotropy in NSTX experiments using the GTC-NEO particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David; Ethier, Stephane; Wang, Weixing

    2012-10-01

    Ion thermal transport in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) is often observed to be close to the neoclassical level. This makes self-consistent neoclassical simulations carried out with the GTC-NEO particle code highly relevant for studying transport-related issues in NSTX. GTC-NEO, which now treats multiple species of ion impurities[1], takes as input the experimental profiles from NSTX discharges and calculates fully non-local, self-consistent neoclassical fluxes and radial electric field. Given that the fraction of trapped particles is high in spherical tokamaks, one remarkable question is that of possible temperature anisotropy, which cannot be determined experimentally with the current diagnostics. Some experimental measurements assume the temperature anisotropy for the interpolation of raw data from diagnostics. This work describes new numerical diagnostics and computational improvements that were implemented in GTC-NEO to enable the study of temperature anisotropy.

  17. Unfolding Fraction Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyberg, Terry; Whitney, Stephanie R.; Cramer, Kathleen A.; Monson, Debra S.; Leavitt, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding fractions, in general, and understanding how to multiply fractions, in particular. To move past this potential problem area, students need to develop a deeper understanding of multiplication and connect the ideas to fractions. In this article, the authors share their insights into teaching fraction

  18. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  19. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  20. Negative Associations between Corpus Callosum Midsagittal Area and IQ in a Representative Sample of Healthy Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ganjavi, Hooman; Lewis, John D.; Bellec, Pierre; MacDonald, Penny A.; Waber, Deborah P.; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Documented associations between corpus callosum size and cognitive ability have heretofore been inconsistent potentially owing to differences in sample characteristics, differing methodologies in measuring CC size, or the use of absolute versus relative measures. We investigated the relationship between CC size and intelligence quotient (IQ) in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development sample, a large cohort of healthy children and adolescents (aged six to 18, n?=?198) recruited to be representative of the US population. CC midsagittal area was measured using an automated system that partitioned the CC into 25 subregions. IQ was measured using the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). After correcting for total brain volume and age, a significant negative correlation was found between total CC midsagittal area and IQ (r?=??0.147; p?=?0.040). Post hoc analyses revealed a significant negative correlation in children (age<12) (r?=??0.279; p?=?0.004) but not in adolescents (age?12) (r?=??0.005; p?=?0.962). Partitioning the subjects by gender revealed a negative correlation in males (r?=??0.231; p?=?0.034) but not in females (r?=?0.083; p?=?0.389). Results suggest that the association between CC and intelligence is mostly driven by male children. In children, a significant gender difference was observed for FSIQ and PIQ, and in males, a significant age-group difference was observed for FSIQ and PIQ. These findings suggest that the correlation between CC midsagittal area and IQ may be related to age and gender. PMID:21625542

  1. Segmentation and Analysis of Corpus Callosum in Alzheimer MR Images using Total Variation Based Diffusion Filter and Level Set Method.

    PubMed

    Anandh, K R; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer?s Disease (AD) is a common form of dementia that affects gray and white matter structures of brain. Manifestation of AD leads to cognitive deficits such as memory impairment problems, ability to think and difficulties in performing day to day activities. Although the etiology of this disease is unclear, imaging biomarkers are highly useful in the early diagnosis of AD. Magnetic resonance imaging is an indispensible non-invasive imaging modality that reflects both the geometry and pathology of the brain. Corpus Callosum (CC) is the largest white matter structure as well as the main inter-hemispheric fiber connection that undergoes regional alterations due to AD. Therefore, segmentation and feature extraction are predominantly essential to characterize the CC atrophy. In this work, an attempt has been made to segment CC using edge based level set method. Prior to segmentation, the images are pre-processed using Total Variation (TV) based diffusion filtering to enhance the edge information. Shape based geometric features are extracted from the segmented CC images to analyze the CC atrophy. Results show that the edge based level set method is able to segment CC in both the normal and AD images. TV based diffusion filtering has performed uniform region specific smoothing thereby preserving the texture and small scale details of the image. Consequently, the edge map of CC in both the normal and AD are apparently sharp and distinct with continuous boundaries. This facilitates the final contour to correctly segment CC from the nearby structures. The extracted geometric features such as area, perimeter and minor axis are found to have the percentage difference of 5.97%, 22.22% and 9.52% respectively in the demarcation of AD subjects. As callosal atrophy is significant in the diagnosis of AD, this study seems to be clinically useful. PMID:25996739

  2. Proteomics of the corpus callosum unravel pivotal players in the dysfunction of cell signaling, structure, and myelination in schizophrenia brains.

    PubMed

    Saia-Cereda, Verônica M; Cassoli, Juliana S; Schmitt, Andrea; Falkai, Peter; Nascimento, Juliana M; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is an incurable and debilitating mental disorder that may affect up to 1% of the world population. Morphological, electrophysiological, and neurophysiological studies suggest that the corpus callosum (CC), which is the largest portion of white matter in the human brain and responsible for inter-hemispheric communication, is altered in schizophrenia patients. Here, we employed mass spectrometry-based proteomics to investigate the molecular underpinnings of schizophrenia. Brain tissue samples were collected postmortem from nine schizophrenia patients and seven controls at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Because the CC has a signaling role, we collected cytoplasmic (soluble) proteins and submitted them to nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS). Proteomes were quantified by label-free spectral counting. We identified 5678 unique peptides that corresponded to 1636 proteins belonging to 1512 protein families. Of those proteins, 65 differed significantly in expression: 28 were upregulated and 37 downregulated. Our data increased significantly the knowledge derived from an earlier proteomic study of the CC. Among the differentially expressed proteins are those associated with cell growth and maintenance, such as neurofilaments and tubulins; cell communication and signaling, such as 14-3-3 proteins; and oligodendrocyte function, such as myelin basic protein and myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Additionally, 30 of the differentially expressed proteins were found previously in other proteomic studies in postmortem brains; this overlap in findings validates the present study and indicates that these proteins may be markers consistently associated with schizophrenia. Our findings increase the understanding of schizophrenia pathophysiology and may serve as a foundation for further treatment strategies. PMID:26232077

  3. The Ciliogenic Transcription Factor RFX3 Regulates Early Midline Distribution of Guidepost Neurons Required for Corpus Callosum Development

    PubMed Central

    Benadiba, Carine; Magnani, Dario; Niquille, Mathieu; Morlé, Laurette; Valloton, Delphine; Nawabi, Homaira; Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Otsmane, Belkacem; Reith, Walter; Theil, Thomas; Hornung, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is the major commissure that bridges the cerebral hemispheres. Agenesis of the CC is associated with human ciliopathies, but the origin of this default is unclear. Regulatory Factor X3 (RFX3) is a transcription factor involved in the control of ciliogenesis, and Rfx3–deficient mice show several hallmarks of ciliopathies including left–right asymmetry defects and hydrocephalus. Here we show that Rfx3–deficient mice suffer from CC agenesis associated with a marked disorganisation of guidepost neurons required for axon pathfinding across the midline. Using transplantation assays, we demonstrate that abnormalities of the mutant midline region are primarily responsible for the CC malformation. Conditional genetic inactivation shows that RFX3 is not required in guidepost cells for proper CC formation, but is required before E12.5 for proper patterning of the cortical septal boundary and hence accurate distribution of guidepost neurons at later stages. We observe focused but consistent ectopic expression of Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) at the rostro commissural plate associated with a reduced ratio of GLIoma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3) repressor to activator forms. We demonstrate on brain explant cultures that ectopic FGF8 reproduces the guidepost neuronal defects observed in Rfx3 mutants. This study unravels a crucial role of RFX3 during early brain development by indirectly regulating GLI3 activity, which leads to FGF8 upregulation and ultimately to disturbed distribution of guidepost neurons required for CC morphogenesis. Hence, the RFX3 mutant mouse model brings novel understandings of the mechanisms that underlie CC agenesis in ciliopathies. PMID:22479201

  4. Radiologic Determination of Corpus Callosum Injury in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Shin; Yang, Jin Seo; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Suk Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of corpus callosum injury (CCI) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) using brain MRI. We also performed a review of the clinical characteristics associated with this injury. Methods A total of 356 patients in the study were diagnosed with TBI, with 94 patients classified as having mild TBI. We included patients with mild TBI for further evaluation if they had normal findings via brain computed tomography (CT) scans and also underwent brain MRI in the acute phase following trauma. As assessed by brain MRI, CCI was defined as a high-signal lesion in T2 sagittal images and a corresponding low-signal lesion as determined by axial gradient echo (GRE) imaging. Based on these criteria, we divided patients into two groups for further analysis : Group I (TBI patients with CCI) and Group II (TBI patients without CCI). Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled in this study (including 16 patients in Group I and 40 patients in Group II). Analysis of clinical symptoms revealed a significant difference in headache severity between groups. Over 50% of patients in Group I experienced prolonged neurological symptoms including dizziness and gait disturbance and were more common in Group I than Group II (dizziness : 37 and 12% in Groups I and II, respectively; gait disturbance : 12 and 0% in Groups I and II, respectively). Conclusion The incidence of CCI in patients with mild TBI was approximately 29%. We suggest that brain MRI is a useful method to reveal the cause of persistent symptoms and predict clinical prognosis. PMID:26361529

  5. Modest thyroid hormone insufficiency during development induces a cellular malformation in the corpus callosum: a model of cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jeffrey H; Gilbert, Mary E

    2007-06-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that subtle decreases in maternal thyroid hormone during gestation can impact fetal brain development. The present study examined the impact of graded levels of thyroid hormone insufficiency on brain development in rodents. Maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency was induced by exposing timed-pregnant dams to propylthiouracil (PTU) at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 10 ppm in the drinking water from gestational d 6 through weaning on postnatal d 30. An examination of Nissl-stained sections of the brains from developmentally hypothyroid offspring killed on postnatal d 23 revealed the presence of a heretofore unreported bilateral cellular malformation, a heterotopia, positioned within the white matter of the corpus callosum of both hemispheres. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine that this heterotopia primarily consists of neurons born between gestational d 17-19 and exhibits a dose-dependent increase in size with decreases in thyroid hormone levels. Importantly, this structural abnormality is evident at modest levels of maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency ( approximately 45% reductions in T(4) with no change in T(3)), persists in adult offspring despite a return to normal hormonal status, and is dramatically reduced in size with prenatal thyroid hormone replacement. Developmental exposure to methimazole, another goitrogen, also induced formation of this heterotopia. Whereas the long-term consequence of this cortical malformation on brain function remains to be determined, the presence of the heterotopia underscores the critical role thyroid hormone plays in brain development during the prenatal period and provides a new model in which to study mechanisms of cortical development and cortical dysplasia. PMID:17317780

  6. Corpus callosum area in patients with bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Samuel; d’Albis, Marc-Antoine; McDonald, Colm; Linke, Julia; Wessa, Michèle; Phillips, Mary; Delavest, Marine; Emsell, Louise; Versace, Amelia; Almeida, Jorge; Mangin, Jean-François; Poupon, Cyril; Le Dudal, Katia; Daban, Claire; Hamdani, Nora; Leboyer, Marion; Houenou, Josselin

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported MRI abnormalities of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), although only a few studies have directly compared callosal areas in psychotic versus nonpsychotic patients with this disorder. We sought to compare regional callosal areas in a large international multicentre sample of patients with BD and healthy controls. Methods We analyzed anatomic T1 MRI data of patients with BD-I and healthy controls recruited from 4 sites (France, Germany, Ireland and the United States). We obtained the mid-sagittal areas of 7 CC subregions using an automatic CC delineation. Differences in regional callosal areas between patients and controls were compared using linear mixed models (adjusting for age, sex, handedness, brain volume, history of alcohol abuse/dependence, lithium or antipsychotic medication status, symptomatic status and site) and multiple comparisons correction. We also compared regional areas of the CC between patients with BD with and without a history of psychotic features. Results We included 172 patients and 146 controls in our study. Patients with BD had smaller adjusted mid-sagittal CC areas than controls along the posterior body, the isthmus and the splenium of the CC. Patients with a positive history of psychotic features had greater adjusted area of the rostral CC region than those without a history of psychotic features. Limitations We found small to medium effect sizes, and there was no calibration technique among the sites. Conclusion Our results suggest that BD with psychosis is associated with a different pattern of interhemispheric connectivity than BD without psychosis and could be considered a relevant neuroimaging subtype of BD. PMID:26151452

  7. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  8. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challinor, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  9. Anisotropy in Pulsar Interstellar Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    2006-12-01

    Pulsar observers have to contend with several effects of propagation through the ionized interstellar medium. I review those effects and how they can be used to study the interstellar plasma. Pulsars are normally observed under conditions of strong scintillation and show both diffractive and refractive effects. I emphasize the diffractive scintillation as exhibited in the dynamic spectrum and in its converse -- pulse broadening. From Parkes observations of the pulse broadening of PSR J1644-45, I estimate the inner scale in an interstellar region of strong plasma turbulence to be about 100 km. I discuss the representation of dynamic spectra in terms of their ``secondary spectra'' and show how the arcs, that are often revealed, are related to both angular broadening and pulse broadening. Anisotropy in the scattering both changes the scattered pulse shape but also enhances the visibility of the arcs.

  10. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-01

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  11. Fractional incompressible stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayin, Selcuk S.; Krisch, Jean P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions and/or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density and equation of state. The fractional objects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

  12. Galaxy cluster baryon fractions revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-11-20

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot-gas components for 12 galaxy clusters and groups at z ? 0.1 with M = 1-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ?}. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM-Newton X-ray data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component—intracluster medium, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies—for each system. We recover a mean relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass, M{sub ?}?M{sub 500}{sup ?0.52±0.04}, that is 1? shallower than in our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot-gas components is a strong function of M {sub 500}; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within a sphere of radius r {sub 500} scale as f{sub ?}?M{sub 500}{sup ?0.45±0.04} and f{sub gas}?M{sub 500}{sup 0.26±0.03}, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the brightest cluster galaxy and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. Studies that fail to fully account for intracluster stars typically underestimate the normalization of the stellar baryon fraction versus M {sub 500} relation by ?25%. Our derived stellar baryon fractions are also higher, and the trend with halo mass weaker, than those derived from recent halo occupation distribution and abundance matching analyses. One difference from our previous work is the weak, but statistically significant, dependence here of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass: f{sub bary}?M{sub 500}{sup 0.16±0.04}. For M {sub 500} ? 2 × 10{sup 14}, the total baryon fractions within r {sub 500} are on average 18% below the universal value from the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) analysis, or 7% below for the cosmological parameters from the Planck analysis. In the latter case, the difference between the universal value and cluster baryon fractions is less than the systematic uncertainties associated with the M {sub 500} determinations. The total baryon fractions exhibit significant scatter, particularly at M {sub 500} < 2 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ?} where they range from 60%-90%, or 65%-100%, of the universal value for WMAP7 and Planck, respectively. The ratio of the stellar-to-gas mass within r {sub 500} (M {sub *}/M {sub gas}), a measure of integrated star-formation efficiency, strongly decreases with increasing M {sub 500}. This relation is tight, with an implied intrinsic scatter of 12%. The fact that this relation remains tight at low mass implies that the larger scatter in the total baryon fractions at these masses arises from either true scatter in the total baryon content or observational scatter in M {sub 500} rather than late-time physical processes such as redistribution of gas to beyond r {sub 500}. If the scatter in the baryon content at low mass is physical, then our results imply that in this mass range, the integrated star-formation efficiency rather than the baryon fraction that is constant at fixed halo mass.

  13. Imprint of a 2 Million Year Old Source on the Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, V.; Kachelrieß, M.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2015-08-01

    We study numerically the anisotropy of the cosmic-ray (CR) flux emitted by a single source calculating the trajectories of individual CRs. We show that the contribution of a single source to the observed anisotropy is determined solely by the fraction the source contributes to the total CR intensity, its age, and its distance and does not depend on the CR energy at late times. Therefore, the observation of a constant dipole anisotropy indicates that a single source dominates the CR flux in the corresponding energy range. A natural explanation for the plateau between 2-20 TeV observed in the CR anisotropy is thus the presence of a single, nearby source. For the source age of 2 Myr, as suggested by the explanation of the antiproton and positron data from PAMELA and AMS-02 through a local source, we determine the source distance as ˜200 pc. Combined with the contribution of the global CR sea calculated in the escape model, we can explain qualitatively the data for the dipole anisotropy. Our results suggest that the assumption of a smooth CR source distribution should be abandoned between ?200 GeV and 1 PeV.

  14. Grain size dependence of coercivity in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular films with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Dongsheng; Ge, Shihui; Zhou, Xueyun; Zuo, Huaping

    2010-04-01

    Excellent soft magnetic properties and appropriate uniaxial magnetic anisotropy field have been achieved in a wide metal volume fraction (x) range for as-deposited (Fe65Co35)x(SiO2)1-x granular films fabricated by magnetron sputtering. With decreasing x from 0.86 to 0.53, the coercive force of easy axis Hce decreases clearly and shows the minimum value (Hce=0.85 Oe) at x =0.53. More importantly, not only nanoscale grain-size D contributing to small coercivity is proved, but also a D3 dependence of Hce is observed in the range of 0.53anisotropy model of Suzuki and Herzer, the grain-size D dependence of coercivity Hce in our metal-insulator granular film system was analyzed. Analyze results indicate that strong coherent uniaxial anisotropy which dominates over the random anisotropy ?K1? of magnetic grains obtained by the random anisotropy model can be responsible for the D3 dependence of the coercivity Hce. In addition, in the range of 0.42

  15. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: emami@ipm.ir

    2014-05-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent ?N mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations.

  16. Anisotropy of Manganese-Substituted Cobalt Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Yevgen; Paulsen, Jason

    2005-03-01

    Study of the anisotropy of magnetostrictive cobalt ferrite composites and its temperature dependence helps better understand the magnetomechanical properties, which will allow tuning the properties of the materials for magnetoelastic stress and torque sensors applications. We have investigated the temperature dependence of anisotropy of Mn-substituted cobalt ferrite CoMnxFe2-xO4 (0 <= x <= 0.8). Magnetization measurements of the hysteresis loops were made at temperatures over the range 200-300 K using a SQUID magnetometer. To determine the anisotropy constant K1, the high field regime of the loops was fitted using the law of approach approximation M(T) = Ms.(1-?K1^2/H^2), where ? = 8/105 ?0-2Ms-2 for the samples which have spinel structure and cubic anisotropy. It was found that anisotropy decreases with increasing Mn content and with increasing temperature for all compositions. However, at higher temperatures the anisotropy of the Mn-substituted specimens converges to approximately the same value K1=200 kJ/m^3. The pure cobalt ferrite sample appears to have considerably higher anisotropy K1 than the Mn-substituted samples over the whole temperature range.

  17. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy constant in CoFe2O4 nanoparticles examined by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sunghyun

    2015-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy constant of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles is determined based on the measurements of SQUID magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Under an intuitive assumption that the superparamagnetic fraction of the cumulative area in the particle size distribution at a temperature is equal to the doublet fraction in the Mössbauer spectra at that temperature, we are able to get a relation between r and T B, from which the temperature dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy constant is determined. The resultant magnetic anisotropy constant increases markedly with decreasing temperature from 2.0 ×105 J/m 3 at 300 K to 8.3 ×106 J/m 3 at 125 K.

  18. Mechanical anisotropy of the Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Noel, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    Three series of measurements were performed on oriented cores of several Yucca Mountain tuffs to determine the importance of mechanical anisotropy in the intact rock. Outcrop and drillhole samples were tested for acoustic velocities, linear compressibilities, and strengths in different orientations. The present data sets are preliminary, but suggest the tuffs are transversely anisotropic for these mechanical properties. The planar fabric that produces the anisotropy is believed to be predominantly the result of the preferred orientation of shards and pumice fragments. The potential of significant anisotropy has direct relevance to the formulation of constitutive formulation and the analyses of an underground opening within the Yucca Mountain.

  19. Mapping Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropies of White Matter in vivo in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Vikram, Deepti S; Lim, Issel Anne L; Jones, Craig K; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance phase- or frequency- shift images acquired at high field show contrast related to magnetic susceptibility differences between tissues. Such contrast varies with the orientation of the organ in the field, but the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has made it possible to reproducibly image the intrinsic tissue susceptibility contrast. However, recent studies indicate that magnetic susceptibility is anisotropic in brain white matter and, as such, needs to be described by a symmetric second-rank tensor (?¯¯). To fully determine the elements of this tensor, it would be necessary to acquire frequency data at six or more orientations. Assuming cylindrical symmetry of the susceptibility tensor in myelinated white matter fibers, we propose a simplified method to reconstruct the susceptibility tensor in terms of a mean magnetic susceptibility, MMS = (?? + 2??)/3 and a magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, MSA = ?? ? ??, where ?? and ?? are susceptibility parallel and perpendicular to the white matter fiber direction, respectively. Computer simulations show that with a practical head rotation angle of around 20°–30°, four head orientations suffice to reproducibly reconstruct the tensor with good accuracy. We tested this approach on whole brain 1×1×1 mm3 frequency data acquired from five healthy subjects at 7 T. The frequency information from phase images collected at four head orientations was combined with the fiber direction information extracted from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to map the white matter susceptibility tensor. The MMS and MSA were quantified for regions in several large white matter fiber structures, including the corona radiata, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. MMS ranged from ?0.037 to ?0.053 ppm (referenced to CSF being about zero). MSA values could be quantified without the need for a reference and ranged between 0.004 and 0.029 ppm, in line with the expectation that the susceptibility perpendicular to the fiber is more diamagnetic than the one parallel to it. PMID:22561358

  20. Seismic body-wave anisotropy beneath continents 

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jasbinder

    1983-01-01

    A search for the effects of anisotropy on seismic body-waves predicted by theory is described. Preliminary studies were based on long-period data from the WWSSN, HGLP and SRO networks. These showed that data from the ...

  1. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  2. Anisotropy and relaxation in nematic liquid crystals

    E-print Network

    Segatti, Antonio

    the attenuation to vary strongly with the angle between the sound-wave propagation direction and the direction facts / 1 : Anisotropy Paolo Biscari Pavia, Mar 2014 3/25 #12;Experimental facts / 2 : Attenuation

  3. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  4. Fractional Classical Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Nick Laskin

    2013-02-03

    Fractional classical mechanics has been introduced and developed as a classical counterpart of the fractional quantum mechanics. Lagrange, Hamilton and Hamilton-Jacobi frameworks have been implemented for the fractional classical mechanics. The Lagrangian of fractional classical mechanics has been introduced, and equation of motion has been obtained. Fractional oscillator model has been launched and solved in 1D case. A new equation for the period of oscillations of fractional classical oscillator has been found. The interplay between the energy dependency of the period of classical oscillations and the non-equidistant distribution of the energy levels for fractional quantum oscillator has been discussed. We discuss as well, the relationships between new equations of fractional classical mechanics and the well-known fundamental equations of classical mechanics.

  5. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies in the timescape cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazer, M. Ahsan; Wiltshire, David L.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the timescape cosmology: a potentially viable alternative to homogeneous isotropic cosmologies without dark energy. We exploit the fact that the timescape cosmology is extremely close to the standard cosmology at early epochs to adapt existing numerical codes to produce CMB anisotropy spectra, and to match these as closely as possible to the timescape expansion history. A variety of matching methods are studied and compared. We perform Markov chain Monte Carlo analyses on the parameter space, and fit CMB multipoles 50 ???2500 to the Planck satellite data. Parameter fits include a dressed Hubble constant, H0=61.0 km sec-1 Mpc-1 (±1.3 % stat) (±8 % sys), and a present void volume fraction fv 0=0.627 (±2.3 % stat) (±13 % sys). We find best fit likelihoods which are comparable to that of the best fit ? CDM cosmology in the same multipole range. In contrast to earlier results, the parameter constraints afforded by this analysis no longer admit the possibility of a solution to the primordial lithium abundance anomaly. This issue is related to a strong constraint between the ratio of baryonic to nonbaryonic dark matter and the ratio of heights of the second and third acoustic peaks, which cannot be changed as long as the standard cosmology is assumed up to the surface of last scattering. These conclusions may change if backreaction terms are also included in the radiation-dominated primordial plasma.

  6. Photoionization affected by chemical anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, V. S.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic constants of rhodamine 3B quenching by N,N-dimethyl aniline were extracted from the very beginning of the quenching kinetics, recently studied in a few solvents of different viscosities. They were well fitted with the conventional kinetic constant definition, provided the radial distribution function of simple liquids was ascribed to the reactant pair distribution and the contact electron transfer rate was different in all the cases. This difference was attributed to the chemical anisotropy averaging by the rotation of reactants, which is the faster in solvents of lower viscosity. With the proper choice of a space dependent encounter diffusion, the whole quenching kinetics was well fitted with an encounter theory, using the Marcus [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 43, 679 (1965)] transfer rate instead of the contact Collins-Kimball [J. Colloid. Sci. 4, 425 (1949)] approximation. Not only the beginning and middle part of the quenching were equally well fitted, but the long time (Markovian) rate constant was also found to be the same as previously obtained. Moreover, the concentration dependencies of the fluorescence quantum yield and the Stern-Volmer constant were specified and await their experimental verification.

  7. Self-referential and social cognition in a case of autism and agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While models of autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are emerging at the genetic level of analysis, clear models at higher levels of analysis, such as neuroanatomy, are lacking. Here we examine agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) as a model at the level of neuroanatomy that may be relevant for understanding self-referential and social-cognitive difficulties in ASC. Methods We examined performance on a wide array of tests in self-referential and social-cognitive domains in a patient with both AgCC and a diagnosis of ASC. Tests included a depth-of-processing memory paradigm with self-referential and social-cognitive manipulations, self-report measures of self-consciousness, alexithymia, and empathy, as well as performance measures of first-person pronoun usage and mentalizing ability. The performance of the AgCC patient was compared to a group of individuals with ASC but without AgCC and with neurotypical controls. These comparison groups come from a prior study where group differences were apparent across many measures. We used bootstrapping to assess whether the AgCC patient exhibited scores that were within or outside the 95% bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap confidence intervals observed in both comparison groups. Results Within the depth-of-processing memory paradigm, the AgCC patient showed decreased memory sensitivity that was more extreme than both comparison groups across all conditions. The patient’s most pronounced difficulty on this task emerged in the social-cognitive domain related to information-processing about other people. The patient was similar to the ASC group in benefiting less from self-referential processing compared to the control group. Across a variety of other self-referential (i.e. alexithymia, private self-consciousness) and social-cognitive measures (i.e. self-reported imaginative and perspective-taking subscales of empathy, mentalizing), the AgCC patient also showed more extreme scores than those observed for both of the comparison groups. However, the AgCC patient scored within the range observed in the comparison groups on measures of first-person pronoun usage and self-reported affective empathy subscales. Conclusions We conclude that AgCC co-occurring with a diagnosis of ASC may be a relevant model at the level of neuroanatomy for understanding mechanisms involved in self-referential and high-level social-cognitive difficulties in ASC. PMID:23171505

  8. Fractional Adomian Decomposition Method

    E-print Network

    Guo-cheng Wu; Ji-Huan He

    2013-04-24

    A fractional Adomian decomposition method for fractional nonlinear differential equations is proposed. The iteration procedure is based on Jumarie's fractional derivative. An example is given to elucidate the solution procedure, and the results are compared with the exact solution, revealing high accuracy and efficiency.

  9. Tailoring magnetic anisotropy gradients by ion bombardment for domain wall positioning in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matczak, Micha?; Szyma?ski, Bogdan; Ku?wik, Piotr; Urbaniak, Maciej; Stobiecki, Feliks; Kurant, Zbigniew; Maziewski, Andrzej; Lengemann, Daniel; Ehresmann, Arno

    2014-08-01

    Graded anisotropy magnetic materials possess a coercive field changing laterally with position. A simple fabrication procedure to produce such an anisotropy gradient in a polycrystalline Au/Co layer system without lateral thickness variation and with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, prototypical for a large variety of thin film systems, is shown. The procedure uses light-ion bombardment without the use of a mask. Magnetization reversal in this polycrystalline layer system takes place by unidirectional movement of a single domain wall only in regions with larger anisotropies and anisotropy gradients. In this anisotropy/anisotropy gradient regime, the domain wall is oriented perpendicular to the coercive field gradient, and it can be positioned along the gradient by an appropriate magnetic field pulse. For smaller anisotropies/anisotropy gradients, the natural anisotropy fluctuations of the polycrystalline layer system induce magnetization reversal dominated by domain nucleation.

  10. Introducing anisotropic Minkowski functionals and quantitative anisotropy measures for local structure analysis in biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; De, Titas; Lochmüller, Eva; Eckstein, Felix; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of Minkowski Functionals to characterize local structure in different biological tissue types has been demonstrated in a variety of medical image processing tasks. We introduce anisotropic Minkowski Functionals (AMFs) as a novel variant that captures the inherent anisotropy of the underlying gray-level structures. To quantify the anisotropy characterized by our approach, we further introduce a method to compute a quantitative measure motivated by a technique utilized in MR diffusion tensor imaging, namely fractional anisotropy. We showcase the applicability of our method in the research context of characterizing the local structure properties of trabecular bone micro-architecture in the proximal femur as visualized on multi-detector CT. To this end, AMFs were computed locally for each pixel of ROIs extracted from the head, neck and trochanter regions. Fractional anisotropy was then used to quantify the local anisotropy of the trabecular structures found in these ROIs and to compare its distribution in different anatomical regions. Our results suggest a significantly greater concentration of anisotropic trabecular structures in the head and neck regions when compared to the trochanter region (p < 10-4). We also evaluated the ability of such AMFs to predict bone strength in the femoral head of proximal femur specimens obtained from 50 donors. Our results suggest that such AMFs, when used in conjunction with multi-regression models, can outperform more conventional features such as BMD in predicting failure load. We conclude that such anisotropic Minkowski Functionals can capture valuable information regarding directional attributes of local structure, which may be useful in a wide scope of biomedical imaging applications.

  11. Measurement of structural anisotropy in femoral trabecular bone using clinical-resolution CT images.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Mariana E; Zysset, Philippe K; Pahr, Dieter H; Wolfram, Uwe; Larsson, David; Pandy, Marcus G

    2013-10-18

    Discrepancies in finite-element model predictions of bone strength may be attributed to the simplified modeling of bone as an isotropic structure due to the resolution limitations of clinical-level Computed Tomography (CT) data. The aim of this study is to calculate the preferential orientations of bone (the principal directions) and the extent to which bone is deposited more in one direction compared to another (degree of anisotropy). Using 100 femoral trabecular samples, the principal directions and degree of anisotropy were calculated with a Gradient Structure Tensor (GST) and a Sobel Structure Tensor (SST) using clinical-level CT. The results were compared against those calculated with the gold standard Mean-Intercept-Length (MIL) fabric tensor using micro-CT. There was no significant difference between the GST and SST in the calculation of the main principal direction (median error=28°), and the error was inversely correlated to the degree of transverse isotropy (r=-0.34, p<0.01). The degree of anisotropy measured using the structure tensors was weakly correlated with the MIL-based measurements (r=0.2, p<0.001). Combining the principal directions with the degree of anisotropy resulted in a significant increase in the correlation of the tensor distributions (r=0.79, p<0.001). Both structure tensors were robust against simulated noise, kernel sizes, and bone volume fraction. We recommend the use of the GST because of its computational efficiency and ease of implementation. This methodology has the promise to predict the structural anisotropy of bone in areas with a high degree of anisotropy, and may improve the in vivo characterization of bone. PMID:24007613

  12. Preferred Orientations and Anisotropy in Shales: Callovo-Oxfordian Shale (France) and Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)

    SciTech Connect

    Wenk, H.-R.; Voltolini, M.; Mazurek, M.; Van Loon, L.R.; Vinsot, A.

    2009-06-30

    Anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks is receiving increasing attention. Seismic anisotropy is essential in the prospecting for petroleum deposits. Anisotropy of diffusion has become relevant for environmental contaminants, including nuclear waste. In both cases, the orientation of component minerals is a critical ingredient and, largely because of small grain size and poor crystallinity, the orientation distribution of clay minerals has been difficult to quantify. A method is demonstrated that relies on hard synchrotron X-rays to obtain diffraction images of shales and applies the crystallographic Rietveld method to deconvolute the images and extract quantitative information about phase fractions and preferred orientation that can then be used to model macroscopic physical properties. The method is applied to shales from European studies which investigate the suitability of shales as potential nuclear waste repositories (Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory near Bure, France, and Benken borehole and Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland). A Callovo-Oxfordian shale from Meuse/Haute-Marne shows a relatively weak alignment of clay minerals and a random distribution for calcite. Opalinus shales from Benken and Mont Terri show strong alignment of illite-smectite, kaolinite, chlorite, and calcite. This intrinsic contribution to anisotropy is consistent with macroscopic physical properties where anisotropy is caused both by the orientation distribution of crystallites and high-aspect-ratio pores. Polycrystal elastic properties are obtained by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution and polyphase properties by averaging over all phases. From elastic properties we obtain anisotropies for p waves ranging from 7 to 22%.

  13. Velocity anisotropy in tidally limited star clusters

    E-print Network

    Tiongco, Maria; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We explore the long-term evolution of the anisotropy in the velocity space of star clusters starting with different structural and kinematical properties. We show that the evolution of the radial anisotropy strength and its radial variation within a cluster contain distinct imprints of the cluster initial structural properties, dynamical history, and of the external tidal field of its host galaxy. Initially isotropic and compact clusters with small initial values of the ratio of the half-mass to Jacobi radius, $r_h/r_J$, develop a strong radial anisotropy during their long-term dynamical evolution. Many clusters, if formed with small values of $r_h/r_J$, should now be characterized by a significant radial anisotropy increasing with the distance from the cluster centre, reaching its maximum at a distance between 0.2 $r_J$ and 0.4 $r_J$, and then becoming more isotropic or mildly tangentially anisotropic in the outermost regions. A similar radial variation of the anisotropy can also result from an early violent...

  14. ANISOTROPY FACTORS FOR A 252Cf SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Bogard, James S

    2009-01-01

    A new 252Cf source has been procured for use at the Dosimetry Applications and Research (DOSAR) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This source was encapsulated by the Californium Facility at ORNL, however, the encapsulation differs from previous designs designated as SR-Cf-100. The new encapsulation, designated SR-Cf-3000, has a similar cylindrical radius to the previous generation, but is 1.6 cm longer. Since the encapsulation geometries differ the amount of internal scattering of neutrons will also differ leading to changes in anisotropy factors between the two designs. Additionally, the different encapsulations will affect the absorbed dose and dose equivalent delivered per neutron emitted by the source since both the quantity and energy distribution of the emitted neutrons will vary with irradiation angle. This work presents the fluence anisotropy factors for the SR-Cf-3000 series encapsulation as well as absorbed dose and dose equivalent values calculated for various angles of irradiation. The fluence anisotropy factors vary from a maximum of 1.037 to a minimum of 0.641 for irradiation angles perpendicular and parallel to the source axis, respectively. Anisotropy in absorbed dose varied from a maximum of 1.033 to a minimum of 0.676 while anisotropy of dose equivalent varied from 1.035 to 0.657.

  15. Preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy in shales.

    SciTech Connect

    Lonardelli, I.; Wenk, H.-R.; Ren, Y.; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2007-03-01

    Anisotropy in shales is becoming an important issue in exploration and reservoir geophysics. In this study, the crystallographic preferred orientation of clay platelets that contributes to elastic anisotropy was determined quantitatively by hard monochromatic X-ray synchrotron diffraction in two different shales from drillholes off the coast of Nigeria. To analyze complicated diffraction images with five different phases (illite/smectite, kaolinite, quartz, siderite, feldspar) and many overlapping peaks, we applied a methodology based on the crystallographic Rietveld method. The goal was to describe the intrinsic physical properties of the sample (phase composition, crystallographic preferred orientation, crystal structure, and microstructure) and compute macroscopic elastic properties by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution for each phase. Our results show that elastic anisotropy resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of the clay particles can be determined quantitatively. This provides a possible way to compare measured seismic anisotropy and texture-derived anisotropy and to estimate the contribution of the low-aspect ratio pores aligned with bedding.

  16. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  17. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Peloso, Marco; Ricciardone, Angelo; Unal, Caner

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ``solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F2 gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  18. Ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Carbary, J.F.; Krimigis, S.M.; Keath, E.P.; Gloeckler, G.; Axford, W.I.; Armstrong, T.P.

    1981-09-30

    We present results from the Voyager 1 and 2 low-energy charged particle measurement of ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere (R> or approx. =20 R/sub J/). Theses anisotropies represent the first observed from an instrument rotating in the spin plane of Jupiter. For the several ion species ivestigated the first-order anisotropies are all strongly in the corotational sense throughout most of the Jovian magnestophere and out to the magnetopause on the dayside. There is some evidence for a small component of outward flow in the corotating region. Beyond approx.130--150 R/sub J/ along the Voyager outbound trajectories the anisotropies indicate a magnetospheric wind flowing outward from Jupiter. The change corotational to tailward flow on the nightside occurs well inside the magnetopause. The anisotropy amplitudes increase linearly with radial distance and, in the disc regions, decrease with distance from the magnetodisc mid-plane. In one case examined in detail using separtely identified H, He, and O/S ions the convection speed at 58 R/sub J/ is found to agree with the corotation speed (..cap omega..R) to within approx.3%. A linear Compton-Getting analysis reveals that the convective speeds in the dayside magnetosphere are in agreement with rigid corotation whenever the plasma flow direction is approximately in the corotation sense, while at other times the convection speeds are substantially less than corotation.

  19. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  20. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  1. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-print Network

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  2. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    E-print Network

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  3. Fractionation: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Nazanin; Jalian, H Ray; Petelin, Anthony; Zachary, Christopher

    2012-06-01

    The development of fractional photothermolysis is a milestone in the history of laser technology and cutaneous resurfacing. Based on the concept that skin is treated in a fractional manner, where narrow cylinders of tissue are thermally heated and normal adjacent skin is left unaffected, the fractional devices have shown effectiveness in treating a variety of conditions. Since its development, we are becoming more adept at using optimal parameters to induce near carbon dioxide laser benefits with a much more comfortable postoperative period and fewer complications. The future remains bright for fractionated laser devices and with new devices and wavelengths, the applications of this technology continue to grow. PMID:22640430

  4. Anisotropy in nonprimordial cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, C.J.

    1982-05-15

    In the standard cosmological model, large-scale anisotropy in microwave background temperature is generally attributed to primordial fluctuations. However, anisotropy may also be produced by radiation emitted inhomogeneously at relatively recent epochs (z< or approx. =200) and thermalized by grains or molecules. This hypothesis predicts a white noise angular distribution of deltaT/T on large scales, with amplitude determined by the inhomogeneity of the sources of radiation, and a smooth distribution below an angle theta/sub 1/roughly-equal3/sup 0/--15/sup 0/ where scattering becomes important. The angular scale of the smoothing may increase with frequency if dust or molecular opacity dominates over Thomson scattering. Nonstandard big bangs or theories of galaxy formation which have smooth initial conditions may be tested by current observations of anisotropy at roughly-equal6/sup 0/ and roughly-equal90/sup 0/.

  5. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ? B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ? B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ? B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  6. Anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the angular anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on both small and large angular scales are presented, and the effect of massive neutrinos on both the background radiation anisotropy and on the galaxy correlation function over very large scales is reviewed. Current observations show that the quadrupole anisotropy provides the greatest constraint on theory, and the values for the gravitational potential fluctuations indicate that small amplitude but sufficiently large-scale density fluctuations, both at the present epoch and on the surface of last scattering, can produce significant large angular scale variations in the radiation temperature. Most importantly, it is proposed that the quadrupole moment is most simply and elegantly interpreted in terms of the density fluctuations on very large scales whose presence is inferred from the requirement that an initial fluctuation spectrum is required in order for structure to develop.

  7. Psychophysics and the anisotropy of time.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin

    2015-12-15

    In psychophysics, experimental control over the presented stimuli is an important prerequisite. Due to the anisotropy of time, this prerequisite is not given in psychophysical experiments on time perception. Many important factors (e.g., the direction of perceived time flow) cannot be manipulated in timing experiments. The anisotropy of time is a peculiarity, which distinguishes the time dimension from other perceptual qualities. Here I summarize the anisotropy-related differences between the perception of time and the perception of other qualities. It is discussed to what extent these differences might affect results and interpretations in psychophysical experiments. In conclusion, I argue for a 'view from nowhen' on the psychophysical study of time perception. PMID:26121957

  8. Cosmic-Ray Transport and Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Peter L.; Becker Tjus, Julia; Seo, Eun-Suk; Mandelartz, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at ~10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

  9. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT AND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; Becker Tjus, Julia; Mandelartz, Matthias; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-05-10

    We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at {approx}10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

  10. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  11. Heterogeneity and anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The lithospheric mantle is intrinsically heterogeneous and anisotropic. These two properties govern the repartition of deformation, controlling intraplate strain localization and development of new plate boundaries. Geophysical and geological observations provide clues on the types, ranges, and characteristic length scales of heterogeneity and anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic tomography points to variations in geothermal gradient and hence in rheological behavior at scales of hundreds of km. Seismic anisotropy data substantiate anisotropic physical properties consistent at scales of tens to hundreds of km. Receiver functions imply lateral and vertical heterogeneity at scales < 10 km, which might record gradients in composition or anisotropy. Observations on naturally deformed peridotites establish that compositional heterogeneity and Crystal Preferred Orientations (CPOs) are ubiquitous from the mm to the km scales. These data allow discussing the processes that produce/destroy heterogeneity and anisotropy and constraining the time scales over which they are active. This analysis highlights: (i) the role of deformation and reactive percolation of melts and fluids in producing compositional and structural heterogeneity and the feedbacks between these processes, (ii) the weak mechanical effect of mineralogical variations, and (iii) the low volumes of fine-grained microstructures and difficulty to preserve them. In contrast, olivine CPO and the resulting anisotropy of mechanical and thermal properties are only modified by deformation. Based on this analysis, we propose that strain localization at the plate scale is, at first order, controlled by large-scale variations in thermal structure and in CPO-induced anisotropy. In cold parts of the lithospheric mantle, grain size reduction may contribute to strain localization, but the low volume of fine-grained domains limits this effect.

  12. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Assess Brain Structural Abnormalities in the Murine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII Model

    PubMed Central

    Poptani, Harish; Kumar, Manoj; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Kim, Sungheon; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Li, Joel; Parente, Michael K; Wolfe, John H.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (?MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed to characterize brain structural abnormalities in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). ?MRI demonstrated a decrease in the volume of anterior commissure and corpus callosum and a slight increase in the volume of the hippocampus in MPS VII vs. wild-type mice. DTI indices were analyzed in gray and white matter. In vivo and ex vivo DTI demonstrated significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, external capsule and hippocampus in MPS VII vs. control brains. Significantly increased mean diffusivity was also found in the anterior commissure and corpus callosum from ex-vivo DTI. Significantly reduced linear anisotropy was observed from the hippocampus from in-vivo DTI, whereas significantly decreased planar anisotropy and spherical anisotropy were observed in the external capsule from only ex-vivo DTI. There were corresponding morphological differences in the brains of MPS VII mice by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Luxol fast blue staining demonstrated less intense staining of the corpus callosum and external capsule; myelin abnormalities in the corpus callosum were also demonstrated quantitatively in toluidine blue-stained sections and confirmed by electron microscopy. These results demonstrate the potential for ?MRI and DTI for quantitative assessment of brain pathology in murine models of brain diseases. PMID:24335527

  13. Weak Elastic Anisotropy in Global Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the major features of the Earth's interior were discovered using the concepts of isotropic seismology; however, subtle features require more realistic concepts. Although the importance of anisotropy has been known for over 50 years, only in the last decade has the increasing quality and quantity of data forced the wide recognition that anisotropyis crucial for accurate descriptions of upper mantle structure. The persistence of the "plume hypothesis", in spite of abundant evidence to the contrary, is partly based on the neglect of anisotropy, sparse and biased ray coverage, and the misuse of Occam's razor. Whereas isotropic inversion of teleseismic near-vertical travel-time datasets suggests the presence of deep vertical zones of low velocity (interpreted as mantle plumes), anisotropic inversion of data having a range of polarizations and directions of approach suggests instead shallow zones of relatively high anisotropy. This raises the possibility that current understanding of manyof the subtle features of Earth structure could be erroneous, caused by over-simplified analysis. The simplest plausible anisotropic model is that of polar anisotropy ("VTI" [sic!]), with a radial symmetry axis. The essential idea which makes anisotropic seismology feasible is the recognition that, in the Earth, the anisotropy is almost invariably weak, and the anisotropic equations (linearized in appropriately chosen small parameters) are quite simple (see below). These equations show that, to first order, the anisotropic variation of velocity is not governed by the individual Cab , but rather by the combinations of parameters given above. Hence, inversions should seek these combinations, rather than the individual moduli. The Rayleigh velocity VR is a simple function of VS0 and the P- and SV- anisotropies. The Love velocity VL is a complicated function of VS0 and the SH anisotropy ?. The simplest plausible model of azimuthal anisotropy is orthorhombic (not ("HTI" [sic!]), which may be analyzed as a simple generalization of the foregoing. Along the two principle azimuths, the velocities are exactly those of two (different) polar anisotropic media, which may be simplified as above. At other azimuths, a 9th (?-like) parameter is required. The VR-VL discrepancy is best described in these terms.

  14. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Price, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  15. Effects of anisotropy on dynamic tensile behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Schifert, S.K.; Davidson, R.F.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A stability analysis for an anisotropic stretching rod is presented. We consider the particular case of a rapidly stretching titanium jet using a continuum code to examine anisotropic plastic response in the finite-neck regime. It was found that the classical analysis (yield strength is inversely proportional to stability) is insufficient; anisotropic jets can be more or less stable than their maximum or minimum yield strengths, depending on initial perturbations and the orientation of the anisotropy. One particular anisotropy -- with the weak direction along the jet axis -- appears to be generally stabilizing. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Ion anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations in Earth's magnetosheath have delineated several different kinds of magnetic fluctuation spectra below the proton cyclotron frequency. This paper provides a theoretical interpretation for some of these observations describing solutions of the linear Vlasov dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic instabilities for particle distributions which model those observed in the magnetosheath. This model yields three growing modes: the proton cyclotron anisotropy the helium cyclotron anisotropy, and the mirror instabilities. The results show very good agreement with the observations of mirror-like and proton-cyclotron-like events. This agreement with observations implies that the transition between cyclotron and mirror fluctuation dominance is consistent with linear theory.

  17. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  18. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  19. Hot Ideas for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the equivalence in relation to fractions is centrally important. Students need many experiences of flexibly combining simple fractions in ways that reinforce equivalences among them. This article presents several ideas that are contributed by a range of people. They are designed to help students to develop understandings of…

  20. Paper Folding Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a paper folding activity that can be used for teaching fractions. This activity can be used to describe areas of folded polygons in terms of a standard unit of measure. A paper folding fractions worksheet and its corresponding solutions are also presented in this article. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems…

  2. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives. PMID:20590323

  3. Magnetic anisotropy data of C3H2NCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.

    This document is part of Subvolume C `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Anisotropy of Organic Compounds' of Volume 27 `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Anisotropy' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group II Molecules and Radicals.

  4. Elastic and viscous anisotropy in Earth's mantle : observations and implications

    E-print Network

    Lev, Einat

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis I address the topic of anisotropy - the directional dependence of physical properties of rocks - from two complementary angles: I use seismic anisotropy to detect deformation in the mantle, and I demonstrate ...

  5. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti?i?, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohá?ová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Aüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.

    2011-06-01

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 × 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  6. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore »values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  7. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  8. Variable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle

    E-print Network

    Garnero, Ed

    in the Dµ layer. The Dµ layer is located at the base of Earth_s silicate lower mantle, where it meets the liquid iron outer core. The Dµ layer plays a critical role in Earth_s dynamical evolution because it actsVariable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle Edward J. Garnero,1 * Vale´rie Maupin,2

  9. Magnetic anisotropy of strained epitaxial manganite films

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. V. Borisenko, I. V.; Klimov, A. A.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Petrzhik, A. M.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2011-05-15

    The in-plane magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) films is studied at room temperature by the following three independent techniques: magnetooptical Kerr effect, ferromagnetic resonance at a frequency of 9.61 GHz, and recording of absorption spectra of electromagnetic radiation at a frequency of 290.6 MHz. The films are deposited onto NdGaO{sub 3} (NGO) substrates in which the (110)NGO plane is tilted at an angle of 0-25.7 Degree-Sign to the substrate plane. The uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced by the strain of the film is found to increase with the tilt angle of the (110)NGO plane. A model is proposed to describe the change in the magnetic anisotropy energy with the tilt angle. A sharp increase in the radio-frequency absorption in a narrow angular range of a dc magnetic field near a hard magnetization axis is detected The anisotropy parameters of the LSMO films grown on (110)NGO, (001)SrTiO{sub 3}, and (001)[(LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3} + (Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}] substrates are compared.

  10. Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis.

  11. Magnetic Anisotropy in UMn2Ge2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Morgann; de Lozanne, Alex; Baumbach, Ryan; Kim, Jeehoon; Bauer, Eric; Thompson, Joe; Ronning, Filip

    2015-03-01

    UMn2Ge2, a permanent magnet, is a ternary intermetallic compound with a tetragonal crystal structure of type ThCr2Si2 and with space group I4/mmm. Local U and Mn moments in UMn2Ge2 order on their respective sublattices at temperatures near 100 and 380 K, respectively. Previous x-ray diffraction, Kerr rotation angle, and SQUID magnetometry data support the commonly accepted notion that U moments order at low temperature and align Mn moments along the c-axis, introducing anisotropy. Previous results obtained using a multi-mode atomic force microscope in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) mode indeed confirmed that UMn2Ge2 displays uniaxial anisotropy with an easy axis coinciding with the c-axis of the material. However, the branching domains in UMn2Ge2 consistent with uniaxial anisotropy were observed all the way up to room temperature by MFM. This indicates that the effect of uranium moments on the magnetic microstructure of UMn2Ge2 is not limited to low temperatures near the ordering temperature of the uranium sublattice. We further investigate closure domains in the surface of UMn2Ge2 and report on characteristics and signatures of anisotropy revealed by the orientation and periodic structures of closure domains. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0810119.

  12. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  13. Knitted Patterns as a Model for Anisotropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepic, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropy is a difficult concept, although it is often met in everyday life. This paper describes a simple model--knitted patterns--having anisotropic elastic properties. The elastic constant is measured for the force applied in different directions with respect to the knitting direction. It is also shown that the deformation of the knitted…

  14. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  15. Anisotropy of Arrival Directions of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-print Network

    Anisotropy of Arrival Directions of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Chad Barrett Finley Submitted;ABSTRACT Anisotropy of Arrival Directions of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Chad Barrett Finley This thesis investigates the origins of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by searching for evidence of small-scale anisotropy

  16. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub-threshold nerve propagation. By expanding the range of mathematical operations to include fractional calculus, we can develop new and potentially useful functional relationships for modeling complex biological systems in a direct and rigorous manner. PMID:15248549

  17. Mantle Anisotropy Beneath China: Measurements and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wu, J.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the mantle beneath mainland China was studied using data from the China Digital Seismograph Network (CDSN) by Zheng & Gao (1994), and later by using data from more stations and different seismograph networks. The present study utilizes data from the recently-completed China National Seismograph Network (CNSN) from 2001 to 2005 to further improve the coverage of anisotropy measurements, and to search for the existence of complex anisotropy beneath stations with sufficient azimuthal coverage of the events. China is an ideal locale for studying the formation of mantle anisotropy by various mechanisms, such as continental collision along the Himalayas, slab-subducting beneath its eastern region, and continental splitting in the vicinity of the Shanxi and other rifts. Using data recorded over the past five years by the 48 stations in CNSN, this study obtains seismic anisotropic parameters (fast polarization directions and time delays) of split shear-waves. In addition, we use hundreds of events recorded by stations in the Global Seismograph Network (GSN) to detect and analyze complex anisotropy. Our results can be well-explained by coherent deformation of the lithosphere in the past or current orogenic belt, or by asthenospheric flow induced by subducting oceanic slabs. The measurements suggest that the western limit of the approximately westward asthenospheric flow induced by the subducting Pacific slab is consistent with the western boundary of the recent sedimentary basins in eastern China, suggesting that there is a possible connection between the formation of the large sedimentary basins and the slab, which is deflected horizontally in the mantle transition zone, as revealed by recent seismic tomographic studies. This study is supported by NSFC.

  18. The microwave background anisotropies:?Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation—fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 ?K fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1° and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe—the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  19. Plagioclase preferred orientation and induced seismic anisotropy in mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Shao, Tongbin; Salisbury, Matthew H.; Sun, Shengsi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Changxing; Liang, Fenghua; Satsukawa, Takako

    2014-11-01

    Fractional crystallization and crystal segregation controlled by settling or floating of minerals during the cooling of magma can lead to layered structures in mafic and ultramafic intrusions in continental and oceanic settings in the lower crust. Thus, the seismic properties and fabrics of layered intrusions must be calibrated to gain insight into the origin of seismic reflections and anisotropy in the deep crust. To this end, we have measured P and S wave velocities and anisotropy in 17 plagioclase-rich mafic igneous rocks such as anorthosite and gabbro at hydrostatic pressures up to 650 MPa. Anorthosites and gabbroic anorthosites containing >80 vol% plagioclase and gabbros consisting of nearly equal modal contents of plagioclase and pyroxene display distinctive seismic anisotropy patterns: Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ? 1 and Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ? 1 for anorthosites while 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ? 1 and 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ? 1 for gabbros. Amphibolites lie in the same domain as gabbros, but show a significantly stronger tendency of Vp(X) > Vp(Y) than the gabbros. Laminated anorthosites with Vp(X) ? Vp(Y) ? Vp(Z) display a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of plagioclase whose (010) planes and [100] and [001] directions parallel to the foliation. For the gabbros and amphibolites characterized by Vp(X) ? Vp(Y) > Vp(Z) and Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), respectively, pyroxene and amphibole play a dominant role over plagioclase in the formation of seismic anisotropy. The Poisson's ratio calculated using the average P and S wave velocities from the three principal propagation-polarization directions (X, Y, and Z) of a highly anisotropic anorthosite cannot represent the value of a true isotropic equivalent. The CPO-induced anisotropy enhances and decreases the foliation-normal incidence reflectivity at gabbro-peridotite and anorthosite-peridotite interfaces, respectively.

  20. Aspects of anisotropic fractional quantum Hall effect in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, Areg; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2015-10-01

    We have analyzed the effects of the anisotropic energy bands of phosphorene on magnetoroton branches for electrons and holes in the two Landau levels close to the band edges. We have found that the fractional quantum Hall effect gap in the lowest (highest) Landau level in the conduction (valence) band is slightly larger than that for conventional semiconductor systems and therefore the effect should be experimentally observable in phosphorene. We also found that the magnetoroton mode for both electrons and holes consists of two branches with two minima due to the anisotropy. Most importantly, in the long-wavelength limit a second mode with upward dispersion, well separated from the magnetoroton mode was found to appear, that is entirely a consequence of the anisotropy in the system. These novel features of the collective mode, unique to phosphorene, can be observed in resonant inelastic light-scattering experiments.

  1. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  2. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  3. Calculus of variations with fractional derivatives and fractional integrals

    E-print Network

    Ricardo Almeida; Delfim F. M. Torres

    2009-07-06

    We prove Euler-Lagrange fractional equations and sufficient optimality conditions for problems of the calculus of variations with functionals containing both fractional derivatives and fractional integrals in the sense of Riemann-Liouville.

  4. Magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial Cu/Ni/Cu nanolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, E. S.; O'Handley, R. C.; Ross, C. A.

    2004-06-01

    Continuous nickel films grown pseudoepitaxially between copper layers have been shown to have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to large magnetoelastic and interface magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies. These Cu/Ni/Cu films with tNi=6.9 nm have been patterned into lines approximately 200 nm wide using interferometric lithography and ion milling. Torque magnetometer measurements show the anisotropy of the nanolines to be significantly different from that of the continuous films. The magnetoelastic anisotropy (favoring perpendicular magnetization) decreases in the patterned films due to strain relaxation at the line edges. Although the anisotropy change for this line width is most likely due to shape anisotropy, we anticipate observation of magnetoelastic anisotropy due to strain relief at the edges of the lines at narrower line widths in future work.

  5. PROBING THE PULSAR ORIGIN OF THE ANOMALOUS POSITRON FRACTION WITH AMS-02 AND ATMOSPHERIC CHERENKOV TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2013-07-20

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the positron fraction rise is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for detecting such an anisotropy. Specifically, we show that much of the proton and {gamma}-ray background which affects measurements of the cosmic-ray electron-positron spectrum with ACTs may be controlled in the search for anisotropies. We conclude that observations using archival ACT data could already constrain or substantiate the pulsar origin of the positron anomaly, while upcoming instruments (such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array) will provide strong constraints on the source of the rising positron fraction.

  6. Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background: Theory

    E-print Network

    Scott Dodelson

    1997-02-14

    Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I ouline some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The specturm of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

  7. Induced electronic anisotropy in bismuth thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Albert D.; Yao, Mengliang; Katmis, Ferhat; Li, Mingda; Tang, Shuang; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Opeil, Cyril; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-08-01

    We use magneto-resistance measurements to investigate the effect of texturing in polycrystalline bismuth thin films. Electrical current in bismuth films with texturing such that all grains are oriented with the trigonal axis normal to the film plane is found to flow in an isotropic manner. By contrast, bismuth films with no texture such that not all grains have the same crystallographic orientation exhibit anisotropic current flow, giving rise to preferential current flow pathways in each grain depending on its orientation. Extraction of the mobility and the phase coherence length in both types of films indicates that carrier scattering is not responsible for the observed anisotropic conduction. Evidence from control experiments on antimony thin films suggests that the anisotropy is a result of bismuth's large electron effective mass anisotropy.

  8. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-17

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above T(C) and up to T*?200-225?°C. Above T*, however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization. PMID:26230825

  9. Friction anisotropy with respect to topographic orientation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  10. Tailored magnetic anisotropy in an amorphous trilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yu; Barsukov, I.; Spasova, M.; Lindner, J.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Raanaei, H.; Hjoervarsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    An amorphous Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm)/Al{sub 70}Zr{sub 30}(3 nm)/Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm) trilayer system has been investigated using in-plane and out-of-plane angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance at different frequencies. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial, retaining its value of (2.9 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 3} J/m{sup 3} for each magnetic layer, whereas its direction was tailored independently in an arbitrary manner by applying an external magnetic field during the film deposition. The perpendicular anisotropy constant, supposed to reflect the interface quality, is nearly identical for both layers. Furthermore, the magnetic layers act independently upon each other due to the absence of interlayer coupling.

  11. Induced electronic anisotropy in bismuth thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Albert D.; Yao, Mengliang; Opeil, Cyril; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Li, Mingda; Tang, Shuang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-08-11

    We use magneto-resistance measurements to investigate the effect of texturing in polycrystalline bismuth thin films. Electrical current in bismuth films with texturing such that all grains are oriented with the trigonal axis normal to the film plane is found to flow in an isotropic manner. By contrast, bismuth films with no texture such that not all grains have the same crystallographic orientation exhibit anisotropic current flow, giving rise to preferential current flow pathways in each grain depending on its orientation. Extraction of the mobility and the phase coherence length in both types of films indicates that carrier scattering is not responsible for the observed anisotropic conduction. Evidence from control experiments on antimony thin films suggests that the anisotropy is a result of bismuth's large electron effective mass anisotropy.

  12. Destabilization of TAE modes by particle anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.V.; Berk, H.L.

    1998-10-20

    Plasmas heated by ICRF produce energetic particle distribution functions which are sharply peaked in pitch-angle, and the authors show that at moderate toroidal mode numbers, this anisotropy is a competitive and even dominant instability drive when compared with the universal instability drive due to spatial gradient. The universal drive, acting along, destabilizes only co-propagating waves (i.e., waves propagating in the same toroidal direction as the diamagnetic flow of the energetic particles), but stabilizes counter-propagating waves (i.e., waves propagating in the opposite toroidal direction as the diamagnetic flow of the energetic particles). Nonetheless, the authors show that in a tokamak, it is possible that particle anisotropy can produce a larger linear growth rate for counter-propagating waves, and provide a mechanism for preferred destabilization of the counter-propagating TAE modes that are sometimes experimentally observed.

  13. Anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.

    1998-02-01

    Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I online some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The spectrum of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

  14. Cosmic-ray streaming and anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Gleeson, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the differential current densities and anisotropies that exist in the interplanetary cosmic-ray gas, and in particular with a correct formulation and simple interpretation of the momentum equation that describes these on a local basis. Two examples of the use of this equation in the interpretation of previous data are given. It is demonstrated that in interplanetary space, the electric-field drifts and convective flow parallel to the magnetic field of cosmic-ray particles combine as a simple convective flow with the solar wind, and that there exist diffusive currents and transverse gradient drift currents. Thus direct reference to the interplanetary electric-field drifts is eliminated, and the study of steady-state and transient cosmic-ray anisotropies is both more systematic and simpler.

  15. Mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence for mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones whose interpretation remains elusive. In this study I estimate the strain-induced mid mantle fabric and associated seismic anisotropy developing in 3D petrological-thermo-mechanical subduction models where the slab is either stagnating over the 660 km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle. The modelling of synthetic lattice-preferred-orientation (LPO) development of wadsleyite and perovskite has been calibrated with results from deformational experiments and ab-initio atomic scale models, and the single crystal elastic tensor of the different mineral phases is scaled by local P-T conditions. The lower transition zone (ringwoodite + garnet) is assumed to be isotropic. Mid mantle fabric develops in proximity of the subducting slab where deformation and stresses are high, except at depths where upwelling or downwelling material undergoes phase transformations, yielding to LPO reset. The upper transition zone (wadsleyite + garnet) is characterized by weak transverse isotropy (2-3%) with symmetry axes oriented and fast S wave polarized dip-normal. A slightly stronger transverse isotropy develops in the lower mantle (perovskite + periclase), where the symmetry axes, the polarization of the fast S wave and the maximum Vp and dVs are parallel to the slab dip and subduction direction. For stagnating slab models this translates into negative and positive radial anisotropy in the upper transition zone and lower mantle back-arc, respectively, minimum delay times for vertically travelling shear waves and large shear wave splitting for waves propagating horizontally in the lower mantle. These results may help in reconciling the seismic anisotropy patterns observed in some subduction zones with subduction-induced deformation, such as those measured in the mid mantle between the Australian plate and the New Hebrides-Tonga-Kermadec trenches that I interpret as related to stagnating portions of the subducted Pacific plate.

  16. Micromagnetics of shape anisotropy based permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bance, Simon; Fischbacher, Johann; Schrefl, Thomas; Zins, Inga; Rieger, Gotthard; Cassignol, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    In the search for rare-earth free permanent magnets, various ideas related to shape anisotropy are being pursued. In this work we assess the limits of shape contributions to the reversal stability using micromagnetic simulations. In a first series of tests we altered the aspect ratio of single phase prolate spheroids from 1 to 16. Starting with a sphere of radius 4.3 times the exchange length Lex we kept the total magnetic volume constant as the aspect ratio was modified. For a ferromagnet with zero magnetocrystalline anisotropy the maximum coercive field reached up to 0.5 times the magnetization Ms. Therefore, in materials with moderate uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the addition of shape anisotropy could even double the coercive field. Interestingly due to non-uniform magnetization reversal there is no significant increase of the coercive field for an aspect ratio greater than 5. A similar limit of the maximum aspect ratio was observed in cylinders. The coercive field depends on the wire diameter. By decreasing the wire diameter from 8.7Lex to 2.2Lex the coercive field increased by 40%. In the cylinders nucleation of a reversed domain starts at the corners at the end. Smoothing the edges can improve the coercive field by about 10%. In further simulations we compacted soft magnetic cylinders into a bulk-like arrangement. Misalignment and magnetostatic interactions cause a spread of 0.1Ms in the switching fields of the rods. Comparing the volume averaged hysteresis loops computed for isolated rods and the hysteresis loop computed for interacting rods, we conclude that magnetostatic interactions reduce the coercive field by up to 20%.

  17. Series expansion in fractional calculus and fractional differential equations

    E-print Network

    Ming-Fan Li; Ji-Rong Ren; Tao Zhu

    2009-10-30

    Fractional calculus is the calculus of differentiation and integration of non-integer orders. In a recently paper (Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2756-2778), the Fundamental Theorem of Fractional Calculus is highlighted. Based on this theorem, in this paper we introduce fractional series expansion method to fractional calculus. We define a kind of fractional Taylor series of an infinitely fractionally-differentiable function. Further, based on our definition we generalize hypergeometric functions and derive corresponding differential equations. For finitely fractionally-differentiable functions, we observe that the non-infinitely fractionally-differentiability is due to more than one fractional indices. We expand functions with two fractional indices and display how this kind of series expansion can help to solve fractional differential equations.

  18. Both Rare and De Novo Copy Number Variants Are Prevalent in Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum but Not in Cerebellar Hypoplasia or Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Fernandez, Liliana; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Rider, Eric; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari; Christian, Susan L.; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Sullivan, Christopher T.; Sudi, Jyotsna; Herriges, Michael J.; Paciorkowski, Alexander R.; Barkovich, A. James; Glessner, Joseph T.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dobyns, William B.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2013-01-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), cerebellar hypoplasia (CBLH), and polymicrogyria (PMG) are severe congenital brain malformations with largely undiscovered causes. We conducted a large-scale chromosomal copy number variation (CNV) discovery effort in 255 ACC, 220 CBLH, and 147 PMG patients, and 2,349 controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC, but unexpectedly not CBLH or PMG patients, had rare genic CNVs over one megabase (p?=?1.48×10?3; odds ratio [OR]?=?3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.89–5.39). Rare genic CNVs were those that impacted at least one gene in less than 1% of the combined population of patients and controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC but not CBLH or PMG patients had rare CNVs impacting over 20 genes (p?=?0.01; OR?=?2.95; 95% CI?=?1.69–5.18). Independent qPCR confirmation showed that 9.4% of ACC patients had de novo CNVs. These, in comparison to inherited CNVs, preferentially overlapped de novo CNVs previously observed in patients with autism spectrum disorders (p?=?3.06×10?4; OR?=?7.55; 95% CI?=?2.40–23.72). Interestingly, numerous reports have shown a reduced corpus callosum area in autistic patients, and diminished social and executive function in many ACC patients. We also confirmed and refined previously known CNVs, including significantly narrowing the 8p23.1-p11.1 duplication present in 2% of our current ACC cohort. We found six novel CNVs, each in a single patient, that are likely deleterious: deletions of 1p31.3-p31.1, 1q31.2-q31.3, 5q23.1, and 15q11.2-q13.1; and duplications of 2q11.2-q13 and 11p14.3-p14.2. One ACC patient with microcephaly had a paternally inherited deletion of 16p13.11 that included NDE1. Exome sequencing identified a recessive maternally inherited nonsense mutation in the non-deleted allele of NDE1, revealing the complexity of ACC genetics. This is the first systematic study of CNVs in congenital brain malformations, and shows a much higher prevalence of large gene-rich CNVs in ACC than in CBLH and PMG. PMID:24098143

  19. The Nature versus Nurture of Anisotropies

    E-print Network

    Wayne Hu

    1994-06-28

    With the rapidly growing number of cosmic microwave background measurements on various scales, there is real hope that the number of acceptable models for structure formation will be limited to a very few in the near future. Yet any given model can always be saved by introducing and tuning extraneous free parameters. To better understand this question of ``nature versus nurture'' for temperature fluctuations, it is useful to know not only the general features of anisotropy predictions but also their causes. Extracting the physical content of our other works, we present here a {\\it simple} account of cosmic microwave background anisotropies on all scales. In particular, we show that analytic approximations can trace the structure of the so-called ``Doppler peaks,'' which arise due to the {\\it adiabatic} oscillations in the photon-baryon fluid. We also show how the finite thickness of the last scattering surface and the Silk damping mechanism can be described in a unified way by photon diffusion. In order to present a specific example, we focus on comparing the primordial isocurvature baryon (PIB) model with the standard cold dark matter model (CDM). In particular, we explain why PIB generically predicts larger {\\it non}-oscillatory anisotropies from the 1$^\\circ$ to 10$^\\circ$ scale which may already be in conflict with experiments.

  20. Engineering Functional Anisotropy in Fibrocartilage Neotissues

    PubMed Central

    MacBarb, R.F.; Chen, A.L.; Hu, J.C.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The knee meniscus, intervertebral disc, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc all possess complex geometric shapes and anisotropic matrix organization. While these characteristics are imperative for proper tissue function, they are seldom recapitulated following injury or disease. Thus, this study’s objective was to engineer fibrocartilages that capture both gross and molecular structural features of native tissues. Self-assembled TMJ discs were selected as the model system, as the disc exhibits a unique biconcave shape and functional anisotropy. To drive anisotropy, 50:50 co-cultures of meniscus cells and articular chondrocytes were grown in biconcave, TMJ-shaped molds and treated with two exogenous stimuli: biomechanical (BM) stimulation via passive axial compression and bioactive agent (BA) stimulation via chondroitinase-ABC and transforming growth factor-?1. BM+BA synergistically increased Col/WW, Young’s modulus, and ultimate tensile strength 5.8-fold, 14.7-fold, and 13.8-fold that of controls, respectively; it also promoted collagen fibril alignment akin to native tissue. Finite element analysis found BM stimulation to create direction-dependent strains within the neotissue, suggesting shape plays an essential role toward driving in vitro anisotropic neotissue development. Methods used in this study offer insight on the ability to achieve physiologic anisotropy in biomaterials through the strategic application of spatial, biomechanical, and biochemical cues. PMID:24075479

  1. Fractional vortices and lumps

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Minoru; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Vinci, Walter

    2009-08-15

    We study what might be called fractional vortices, vortex configurations with the minimum winding from the viewpoint of their topological stability, but which are characterized by various notable substructures in the transverse energy distribution. The fractional vortices occur in diverse Abelian or non-Abelian generalizations of the Higgs model. The global and local features characterizing these are studied, and we identify the two crucial ingredients for their occurrence--the vacuum degeneracy leading to nontrivial vacuum moduli M, and the BPS nature of the vortices. Fractional vortices are further classified into two kinds. The first type of such vortices appear when M has orbifold Z{sub n} singularities; the second type occurs in systems in which the vacuum moduli space M possesses either a deformed geometry or some singularity. These general features are illustrated with several concrete models.

  2. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the liquid phase. Release fractions are commonly used to make conservative estimates of emissions from processes. Usually, rather gross assumptions are made in such estimates, such as the total failure of abatement equipment and the use of maximum inventory values. Consequently, it is common practice to report bounding release fraction values with single digit accuracy. The release fractions for the top of the unventilated tank ranged from 9 x 10{sup -7} to 8 x 10{sup -5} depending on the process simulated.

  3. Relaxation Equations: Fractional Models

    E-print Network

    Ester C. F. A. Rosa; E. Capelas de Oliveira

    2015-10-06

    The relaxation functions introduced empirically by Debye, Cole-Cole, Cole-Davidson and Havriliak-Negami are, each of them, solutions to their respective kinetic equations. In this work, we propose a generalization of such equations by introducing a fractional differential operator written in terms of the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative of order $\\gamma$, $0 equations, the Laplace transform methodology is introduced and the corresponding solutions are then presented, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. In the case in which the derivative's order is $\\gamma=1$, the traditional relaxation functions are recovered. Finally, we presente some 2D graphs of these function.

  4. Anisotropies observed within ejecta during solar particle onsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    1995-01-01

    The observation of solar energetic particle onsets within ejecta material suggests that the magnetic field topology of these ejecta is more likely to be that of a 'magnetic bottle' rooted at the Sun than that of a detached plasmoid-like structure. Another possibility is that only open field lines are present. We examine the anisotropies of particle onsets which onset inside ejecta material. A striking feature of a significant fraction of these events is that they show, at onset, strong flows from the east of the Sun, in contrast to the flows from the west usually observed at the onset of solar particle events outside of ejecta. This observation confirms that magnetic field lines can be strongly distorted inside ejecta so as to lie nearly opposite to the Parker spiral direction. This conclusion is fully consistent with the presence of looped magnetic structures in ejecta. If only open field lines are present, it is unclear how these large field line distortions could have been produced.

  5. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Sebastian; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and FA. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompensated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to 65 and 35 per cent of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence for the existence of universal profiles from the radially averaged profiles for density, velocity and FA. This requires that the radial coordinate is normalized to the effective radius of each void. Put together, all these results show that the FA is a reliable tracer for voids, which can be used in complementarity to other existing methods and tracers.

  6. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Eiichiro; Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Science Team

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the fossil light of the Big Bang, is the oldest light that one can ever hope to observe in our Universe. The CMB provides us with a direct image of the Universe when it was still an "infant" - 380,000 years old. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the microwave sky in five frequency bands for nine years since 2001, creating a full-sky CMB map with the unprecedented precision. The WMAP data have enabled us to obtain a wealth of cosmological information, such as the composition, age, geometry, and history of the Universe. Yet, can we go further and learn about the primordial universe, when it was much younger than 380,000 years old, perhaps as young as a tiny fraction of a second? If so, this gives us a hope to test competing theories about the origin of the Universe at ultra high energies. In this talk, we will review the physics of CMB and the WMAP mission, present the basic results from nine years of observations, and discuss their cosmological implications.

  7. Fractional charge search

    SciTech Connect

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour.

  8. Fractionation of Soil Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the qualitative and quantitative information provided by soil phosphorus (P) fractionation methods is important for addressing agronomic and water quality problems, as well as evaluating P biogeochemistry in extreme environments. This chapter provides a schematic overview of and ...

  9. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  10. Fractionally charged quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fractionally charged quasiparticles were proposed by Laughlin to explain the fractional quantum Hall effect. Flowing in one-dimensional-like strips along the edges of the sample the quasiparticles are expected to condense to a chiral Luttinger liquid (CLL). Adding a backscattering impurity in the path of the quasiparticles induces correlation among the scattering events at sufficiently low temperatures, hence leading to highly non-linear I-V characteristic and non-Poissonian shot noise. Moreover, a sufficiently strong backscatterer induces bunching of the backscattered quasiparticles with a super Poissonian shot noise corresponding to stochastic transfer of electrons. Diluting the impinging quasiparticle beam mimics an increased temperature. For example, correlation among scattering events in dilute beams relaxes and bunching ceased altogether. At finite temperature and fractionally charged quasiparticles are found to traverse almost opaque barriers. Turning to the extremely low-temperature regime ( ?9 mK) we found unexpected results. At higher order fractions, ?= p/ m with p>1, and very weak backscattering potential a spontaneous bunching of quasiparticles to q= ?e took place, namely, at ?=2/5, q=2 e/5 and at ?=3/7, q?3 e/7. As the temperature increases bunching ceased and the scattered charge was again the familiar Laughlin's quasiparticle q= e/ m independent of p.

  11. Fractions through Fruit Salad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Lisa

    1987-01-01

    The mathematics concept of fractions was taught to a group of learning disabled, dyslexic, and multiply handicapped students (15-20 years old) by preparing a fruit salad. Enthusiastic student participation and enhanced knowledge illustrated the effectiveness of employing several sensory modes in learning activities. (CB)

  12. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  13. [Left-sided metamorphopsia of the face and simple objects caused by an infarction at the right side of the splenium of the corpus callosum].

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Akiko; Narita, Tomoko; Gondo, Yuichiro; Nakane, Shunya; Fukudome, Takayasu; Matsuo, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman noticed that people's eyes and the right nasal foramens located in her left visual field looked smaller than those observed in the right. The woman reported no change in shape regarding facial outlines or scenic objects. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an acute infarction of the right side of the splenium of the corpus callosum. Close examination revealed that her metamorphopsia affected the left side of her visual field, especially influencing facial components, particularly the eye. The woman had similar reactions to photographs of several kinds of animals, realistic portraits of humans, and caricatured humans. Meanwhile, presentings caricature human face at a 90° rotation elicited metamorphopsia in eyebrows located on the left side of a picture, but not the eyes. She also reported a change of shape or color tone for geometric objects. The patient's only symptom was metamorphopsia, and she did not show any other neurological defects such as callosal disconnection syndrome. Furthermore, objects that were affected by the patient's metamorphopsia (e.g. facial component especially the eye, and simple geometric figures) may be easy images to use in order to detect this type of distorted vision. PMID:26004257

  14. 3D pre- versus post-season comparisons of surface and relative pose of the corpus callosum in contact sport athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yi; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wilkins, Bryce; Hwang, Darryl; Tsao, Sinchai; Wang, Yalin; Law, Meng; Leporé, Natasha

    2014-03-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussive injury affects 1.7 million Americans annually, of which 300,000 are due to recreational activities and contact sports, such as football, rugby, and boxing[1]. Finding the neuroanatomical correlates of brain TBI non-invasively and precisely is crucial for diagnosis and prognosis. Several studies have shown the in influence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the integrity of brain WM [2-4]. The vast majority of these works focus on athletes with diagnosed concussions. However, in contact sports, athletes are subjected to repeated hits to the head throughout the season, and we hypothesize that these have an influence on white matter integrity. In particular, the corpus callosum (CC), as a small structure connecting the brain hemispheres, may be particularly affected by torques generated by collisions, even in the absence of full blown concussions. Here, we use a combined surface-based morphometry and relative pose analyses, applying on the point distribution model (PDM) of the CC, to investigate TBI related brain structural changes between 9 pre-season and 9 post-season contact sport athlete MRIs. All the data are fed into surface based morphometry analysis and relative pose analysis. The former looks at surface area and thickness changes between the two groups, while the latter consists of detecting the relative translation, rotation and scale between them.

  15. Adult-onset deficiency in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I alters oligodendrocyte turnover in the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Sonntag, William E; Riddle, David R

    2009-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study, we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury. PMID:19115393

  16. Increased corpus callosum volume in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is associated with neurocognitive deficits and genetic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Shashi, Vandana; Francis, Alan; Hooper, Stephen R; Kranz, Peter G; Zapadka, Michael; Schoch, Kelly; Ip, Edward; Tandon, Neeraj; Howard, Timothy D; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with neurocognitive impairments. The neural substrates of cognitive impairments in 22q11DS remain poorly understood. Because the corpus callosum (CC) is found to be abnormal in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, we obtained volumetric measurements of the CC and its subregions, examined the relationship between these regions and neurocognition and selected genotypes within candidate genes in the 22q11.2 interval in 59 children with 22q11DS and 53 control subjects. The total CC, splenium and genu were significantly larger in children with 22q11DS and the enlargement was associated with better neurocognitive functioning in the 22q11DS group, suggestive of a compensatory increase in the CC volumes. The expected age-related increase in the volume of the CC was not seen in children with 22q11DS, indicative of dysmaturation of the CC in these children. The increased volumes in the genu, splenium and total CC in the 22q11DS group were associated with polymorphisms within the candidate genes: COMT (rs4680), ZDHHC8 (rs175174) and UFD1L (rs5992403). These findings indicate that alterations in the CC volume in children with 22q11DS are associated with cognition and specific genotypes in the 22q11.2 interval. PMID:22763378

  17. Competing magnetic anisotropies in obliquely deposited thin permalloy film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Izotov, A. V.; Solovev, P. N.

    2016-01-01

    Distribution of the magnetic anisotropy in thin film prepared by thermal vacuum oblique deposition of permalloy with small off-normal angle of incident in the presence of an external magnetic field has been studied by ferromagnetic resonance technique. On local area of the sample, a mutual compensation of near orthogonal in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropies induced by oblique deposition and by applied magnetic field has been found. Moreover, in addition to the uniaxial (twofold) magnetic anisotropy, fourfold and sixfold magnetic anisotropies have been observed in the sample. To explain the obtained high-order anisotropies, we assumed that the sample has exchange coupled adjacent regions or phases with different parameters of magnetic anisotropy. The results of the micromagnetic analysis of a two-layer model of the sample confirm the hypothesis.

  18. What is a fractional derivative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the concepts underlying the formulation of operators capable of being interpreted as fractional derivatives or fractional integrals. Two criteria for required by a fractional operator are formulated. The Grünwald-Letnikov, Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives and the Riesz potential are accessed in the light of the proposed criteria. A Leibniz rule is also obtained for the Riesz potential.

  19. Creating, Naming, and Justifying Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Daniel; Gaskin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    For students to develop meaningful conceptions of fractions and fraction operations, they need to think of fractions in terms other than as just whole-number combinations. In this article, we suggest two powerful images for thinking about fractions that move beyond whole-number reasoning. (Contains 5 figures.)

  20. Young Children's Notations for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizuela, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the kinds of notations young children make for fractional numbers. The extant literature in the area of fractional numbers acknowledges children's difficulties in conceptualizing fractional numbers. Some of the research suggests possibly delaying an introduction to conventional notations for algorithms and fractions until…

  1. Investigating preferential flow processes in soils using anisotropy in electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hazaimay, S.; Huisman, J. A.; Zimmermann, E.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Macropores occupy a small volume fraction of the pore space in the vadose zone. Water and solutes can quickly bypass the vadose zone through these macropores in a process known as macropore preferential flow. In the last few decades, many efforts were made to improve understanding the macropore preferential flow processes because of their importance in transporting agrochemicals and contaminants to the groundwater. Unfortunately, very few measurement methods provide insights into these preferential flow processes. In this context, the objective of this study is to evaluate whether anisotropy in electrical resistivity can be used to identify the existence of flow in macropores and perhaps even to characterize the exchange between macropores and bulk soil. In a first step, infiltration into a soil column with an artificial macropore was simulated using the HYDRUS software package that solves the pseudo three-dimensional axisymmetric Richards equation. The simulated temporal development of the resistivity anisotropy was obtained by solving the Poisson equation in MATLAB after converting the simulated water content distributions to electrical resistivity distributions. At the beginning of the simulation, a small anisotropy ratio was simulated because of the presence of the empty ('deactivated') macropore in the moist matrix. As soon as the infiltration process started, macropore flow occurred and both the horizontal and vertical resistivity decreased strongly. However, the vertical and horizontal resistivity reacted differently because of the presence of the conductive ('activated') macropore, which led to anisotropy in the resistivity. As soon as infiltration into the macropore stopped, water re-distributed from the macropore to the matrix domain and contrasts in electrical resistivity decreased within the column. To verify the simulation results in the laboratory, we measured the temporal dynamics of the anisotropy in resistivity during water infiltration into a soil column of 9 cm diameter and 40 cm length with an artificial macropore of 2 cm diameter in the center of the column. The first experimental results confirmed that the anisotropy in electrical resistivity can indeed be used to identify and perhaps even quantify macropore flow.

  2. Mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the ion cyclotron anisotropy and the mirror instabilities are investigated using one-dimensional hybrid simulations. It is found that, for moderate values of the ion beta and the proton temperature anisotropy, the two instabilities produce similar levels of turbulence. For high values of beta or temperature anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability produces higher fluctuation levels of turbulence than does the mirror instability.

  3. Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background

    SciTech Connect

    Ölmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X. E-mail: mandic@physics.umn.edu

    2012-07-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

  4. Texture and anisotropy analysis of a laminated lower crust: a neutron diffraction study of felsic granulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Perez, J.; Gomez Barreiro, J.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Castiñeiras Garcia, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Wenk, H.; Alvarez Valero, A.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative fabric analyses of high-P and high-T tectonites were done with HIPPO, a Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer at Los Alamos National Lab. Samples were collected in the Sobrado unit (NW Spain), a tectonic stack of highly deformed slices of metabasites, paragneisses and ultramafic rocks. Metamorphism ranges from granulites on top, to eclogites at the bottom of the unit. The ensemble represents and excellent example of laminated lower crust. The alternation of mechanically contrasted lithologies and/or the development of crystal preferred orientation might result into anisotropy. We explore the contribution of crystallographic preferred orientation or texture to the seismic anisotropy of the lower crust. Since strain partitioning occurred between mechanically strong and weak lithologies, a higher crystal preferred orientation is expected along the weak levels: the metasediments. TOF neutron diffraction experiments were conducted in HIPPO (LANSCE) with high-P and high-T mylonitic felsic paragneisses. Quantitative texture analysis of neutron data was accomplished by using the Rietveld method, with E-WIMW algorithm, implemented in the program package MAUD (Material Analysis Using Diffraction; Lutterotti, 1999). The orientation distribution function (ODF) for each mineral was calculated in MAUD and then processed in BEARTEX (Wenk et al. 1998). Selected pole figures were plotted for major components, quartz, plagioclase and biotite (first setting in monoclinic crystals). Texture patterns are compatible with non-coaxial progressive deformation and discussed accordingly in terms of dislocation activity. Besides, seismic waves velocities were computed from the texture data in BEARTEX. Calculated velocities and anisotropy were based on ODF, volume fraction of each mineral and their single-crystal elastic constant. Kinematic and mechanical implications are discussed in terms of the regional geology. The correlation of texture, mineral composition and seismic anisotropy in the model is also presented.

  5. THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph; Santos, Mario G.

    2012-09-01

    A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

  6. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer. PMID:24033332

  7. Anisotropy of Atmospheric Surface Layer Turbulence During the MATERHORN Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipp, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    LES models are capable of capturing anisotropic turbulence, however little is currently known about the actual anisotropy in the atmospheric surface layer. It is known that atmospheric motion is anisotropic at large scales and becomes more isotropic as the scales of motion diminish in size, but quantifiable analysis has not been extensively carried out. Multiresolution decomposition of MATERHORN sonic anemometer data is used to separate the turbulence into different scales of motion. Reynolds stress tensor analysis is then used to determine the anisotropy characteristics of each scale. Flow from some directions exhibits a narrow range of anisotropy characteristics, while the anisotropy for flow from other directions not predictable.

  8. Magnetic Anisotropy of a Three-Dimensional Honeycomb Iridate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modic, Kimberly; McDonald, Ross; Shekter, Arkady; Analytis, James; Ramshaw, Brad

    2015-03-01

    We present the magnetic anisotropy of a 3-dimensional honeycomb iridate, where the large spin-orbit coupling of iridium provides the possibility for exotic magnetic ground states. A complete angular dependence of magnetic torque provides evidence for highly spin-anisotropic exchange interactions at low temperature. An extension of these measurements to high magnetic fields shows that the magnetic anisotropy switches sign at 50 T and becomes five times larger than the anisotropy at low fields. The anisotropy continues to increase up to the largest applied fields suggesting the presence of new magnetically ordered states.

  9. Unidirectional anisotropy in ultrathin transition-metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Oepen, H.-P.; Kirschner, J.

    1998-11-01

    Unidirectional magnetic anisotropies in low-symmetry magnetic thin films such as cobalt on vicinal copper surfaces are investigated. Possible explanations of the observed uniaxial anisotropies are competing anisotropy (CA) coefficients and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions. Unidirectional CA is an interesting mechanism occurring in low-symmetry magnets and involves neither antiferromagnetic exchange nor spin canting. It is visible in the easy-cone regime and decides, for example, whether the preferential magnetization direction points up or down a stepped surface. In the case of Co/Cu(11n) films, however, the anisotropy direction speaks in favor of DM-type interactions.

  10. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Mota, David F.; Arroja, Frederico E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ?{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ? k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ?{sub 2} = ?{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ?{sub 2} = ?{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  11. Anisotropy due to Brans-Dicke Theory

    E-print Network

    Seokcheon Lee

    2008-11-11

    It is well known that the viscous Bianchi type-I metric of the Kasner form is not able to describe an anisotropic universe, which satisfies the second law of thermodynamics and the dominant energy condition in Einstein's theory of gravity. We investigate this problem in Brans-Dicke theory of gravity using the Bianchi type-I metric with the perfect fluid. We show that it is possible to have the dominant energy condition and the growth of entropy in this model. Also we apply this model to explain the anomaly concerning the low quadrupole amplitude of the angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropy observed in WMAP data.

  12. Anisotropy due to Brans-Dicke Theory

    E-print Network

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the viscous Bianchi type-I metric of the Kasner form is not able to describe an anisotropic universe, which satisfies the second law of thermodynamics and the dominant energy condition in Einstein's theory of gravity. We investigate this problem in Brans-Dicke theory of gravity using the Bianchi type-I metric with the perfect fluid. We show that it is possible to have the dominant energy condition and the growth of entropy in this model. Also we apply this model to explain the anomaly concerning the low quadrupole amplitude of the angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropy observed in WMAP data.

  13. Seismic anisotropy above a subducting plate

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, X.R.; Meyer, R.P. ); Schneider, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Shear-wave splitting observed in northeastern Colombia has provided evidence of seismic anisotropy in a shear zone immediately above a subducting plate. In an upper mantle composed mainly of olivine (57%) and orthopyroxene (17%), the splitting can be interpreted by wave propagation in an anisotropic medium of orthorhombic symmetry that results from alignment of these intrinsically anisotropic minerals. The mechanism of alignment is most likely the shearing associated with the subduction, aided by fluids migrating from the subducting plate when the plate exceeds 100 km in depth.

  14. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  15. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  16. Anisotropy of the erbium dodecaboride thermionic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronovich, Daniel; Taran, Anatoliy; Shitsevalova, Natalya; Levchenko, Anna; Filipov, Volodymyr

    2012-11-01

    There were studied temperature dependences of the ErB12 (100), (110) and (111) electron work functions in the temperature range T = (1200 ÷ 1800) K at pressure p < 10-4 Pa and found their anisotropy. Graphical modeling of the ErB12 (100), (110) and (111) crystallographic planes was performed. The calculated reticular densities for two ion types (B, Er) in these planes have showed that decreasing of electron work function of the ErB12 planes in row (100) ? (110) ? (111) correlates with the decreasing of the surface B/Er ratio in the same row.

  17. High Magnetic Anisotropy Materials Takao Suzuki

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    High Magnetic Anisotropy Materials Takao Suzuki MINT Center MINT Seminar (2/6/2015) 1 #12;Contents. m-DO19 (Co-Ni)3Pt 6. m-DO19 Fe3Pt 7. Low Temperature Phase (LTP) MnBi 8. Summary MINT Seminar (2-CoFeSiB K (erg/cc) 102~3 106 107~8 H M HC Magnetic Materials MINT Seminar (2/6/2015) 3 a-TbFeCo, CoCrPt, Fe

  18. Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy

    DOEpatents

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

  19. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  20. Coronary fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Shantouf, Ronney S; Mehra, Anil

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article presents the basic definitions and concepts of fractional flow reserve (FFR), a focused understanding of the need for hyperemia during assessment, key clinical studies supporting its use, and an introduction to newer noninvasive methods using FFR CT. CONCLUSION. Although it is still a new procedure, FFR CT may prove to be of tremendous use as the computational processing improves to reduce calculation times and enhance accuracy. PMID:25714310

  1. Caputo standard ?-family of maps: fractional difference vs. fractional.

    PubMed

    Edelman, M

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the author compares behaviors of systems which can be described by fractional differential and fractional difference equations using the fractional and fractional difference Caputo standard ?-Families of maps as examples. The author shows that properties of fractional difference maps (systems with falling factorial-law memory) are similar to the properties of fractional maps (systems with power-law memory). The similarities (types of attractors, power-law convergence of trajectories, existence of cascade of bifurcations and intermittent cascade of bifurcations type trajectories, and dependence of properties on the memory parameter ?) and differences in properties of falling factorial- and power-law memory maps are investigated. PMID:24985451

  2. Foam fractionation applications.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, B

    2012-10-15

    Biotechnological downstream processing faces several challenges, such as dilute product streams and contained target products which are sensitive to heat, oxidation, other chemicals, etc. State-of-the-art separation methods, e.g. chromatography, are not always the best option due to variable yield losses and high costs. Foam fractionation appears as a promising alternative unit operation in biotechnological downstream processing. From its applications in metal industry and on fish farms, it was developed further towards the recovery of phytonutrients, metabolites and proteins. However, no large scale applications of foam fractionation in biotechnological downstream processing exist yet. This is due to the complexity of various biotechnological media, which makes a universalized approach for systematic process design of protein separations difficult. Ongoing research in the fields of process engineering, surface chemistry and protein chemistry can help to close this gap. Although many different substances, such as detergents, have been separated or recovered using foam fractionation, this review focuses mainly on biotechnological applications, more specifically on protein separation. PMID:22484126

  3. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility of Igneous Rocks: Lessons From Obsidians and Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2013-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of igneous rocks differs from that of other lithologies in several aspects that are related to their characteristics of emplacement history. Nevertheless, within the group of igneous rocks there are also differences on emplacement mechanisms that can lead to specific and distinctive AMS signatures. In this work, a review of the most important emplacement regimes is made, paying special attention to the extreme conditions represented by obsidians and pyroclastic deposits. These two extreme emplacement regimes are controlled mainly by the viscosity of the fluid phase, but the differences in AMS signatures also includes other differences in the nature of the ferromagnetic grains that are present in the rocks during emplacement. For example, the results of this work indicate that the AMS can be associated to a population of ferromagnetic minerals of a submicroscopic size, despite of which it can be very well defined and yield large degrees of anisotropy. It is suggested that the AMS associated to such population of small grains might indeed be the origin of the AMS of other igneous rocks that have an optically observable fraction of mineral grains, although until present it had been overlooked in most instances. As it had been suggested before, use of tests designed to identify the contribution of a superparamagnetic fraction (SP) in the magnetic properties of a rock can help us to identify the presence of such a SP-related AMS in other cases.

  4. Dark matter annihilation or unresolved astrophysical sources? Anisotropy probe of the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Narumoto, Takuro; Totani, Tomonori

    2007-03-15

    The origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) is a longstanding mystery in high-energy astrophysics. Possible candidates include ordinary astrophysical objects such as unresolved blazars, as well as more exotic processes such as dark matter annihilation. While it would be difficult to distinguish them from the mean intensity data alone, one can use anisotropy data instead. We investigate the CGB anisotropy both from unresolved blazars and dark matter annihilation (including contributions from dark matter substructures), and we find that the angular power spectra from these sources are very different. We then focus on detectability of dark matter annihilation signals using the anisotropy data by treating the unresolved blazar component as a known background. We find that the dark matter signature should be detectable in the angular power spectrum of the CGB from two-year all-sky observations with the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), as long as the dark matter annihilation contributes to a reasonable fraction, e.g., > or approx. 0.3, of the CGB at around 10 GeV. We conclude that the anisotropy measurement of the CGB with GLAST should be a powerful tool for revealing the CGB origin, and potentially for the first detection of dark matter annihilation.

  5. Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy of magnetite (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, K.; Verre, R.; Mauit, O.; Sofin, R. G. S.; Farrell, L.; Byrne, C.; Smith, C. M.; McGilp, J. F.; Shvets, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) has been used to measure the optical anisotropies of bulk and thin-film Fe3O4(110) surfaces. The spectra indicate that small shifts in energy of the optical transitions, associated with anisotropic strain or electric field gradients caused by the (110) surface termination or a native oxide layer, are responsible for the strong signal observed. The RAS response was then measured as a function of temperature. A distinct change in the RAS line-shape amplitude was observed in the spectral range from 0.8 to 1.6 eV for temperatures below the Verwey transition of the crystal. Finally, thin-film magnetite was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(110) substrates. Changes in the RAS spectra were found for different film thickness, suggesting that RAS can be used to monitor the growth of magnetite (110) films in situ. The thickness dependence of the RAS is discussed in terms of various models for the origin of the RAS signal.

  6. The nature versus nurture of anisotropies

    E-print Network

    Hu, W

    1994-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of cosmic microwave background measurements on various scales, there is real hope that the number of acceptable models for structure formation will be limited to a very few in the near future. Yet any given model can always be saved by introducing and tuning extraneous free parameters. To better understand this question of ``nature versus nurture'' for temperature fluctuations, it is useful to know not only the general features of anisotropy predictions but also their causes. Extracting the physical content of our other works, we present here a {\\it simple} account of cosmic microwave background anisotropies on all scales. In particular, we show that analytic approximations can trace the structure of the so-called ``Doppler peaks,'' which arise due to the {\\it adiabatic} oscillations in the photon-baryon fluid. We also show how the finite thickness of the last scattering surface and the Silk damping mechanism can be described in a unified way by photon diffusion. In order to pr...

  7. Anisotropy and Heterogeneity Interaction in Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.

    2009-04-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous on many different scales and deformation may introduce a coexistence of heterogeneity and anisotropy in shear zones. A competent inclusion embedded in a laminated matrix is a typical example. Indisputably, the presence of a mechanical heterogeneity leads to a flow perturbation and consequently to a deflection of the lamination in its vicinity. Assuming a passive response of the matrix phase, the pattern formation around rigid objects has been modeled in two and three dimensions using analytical solutions. Yet, the laminas may be mechanically distinct, leading to an effectively anisotropic rheology of the matrix. The feedback of an evolving matrix structure on the inclusion motion cannot be precluded in this case. In our study elliptical inclusions of varying aspect ratios are embedded in a laminated linear viscous host and subject to a large simple shear deformation in finite element numerical simulations. Increasing the viscosity ratio of the weak and strong lamina significantly changes the pattern characteristics in the matrix. The structural evolution around an inclusion proves to have a major impact on the inclusion motion, leading to the stabilization of elongated inclusions at antithetic orientations. We provide a comparison of two different modeling approaches. In the first approach discrete layers are introduced in the matrix and the large strain evolution of individual minute layers is resolved. Next, the matrix is modeled as an anisotropic medium using an evolving director field that locally describes the anisotropy direction. The length scale of layering can be restored in this model using the micropolar medium formulation.

  8. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy window functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Lloyd

    1999-11-01

    The primary results of most observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are estimates of the angular power spectrum averaged through some broadband, called band powers. These estimates are used to produce constraints on cosmological parameters due to all CMB observations. Essential to this estimation of cosmological parameters is the calculation of the expected band power for a given experiment, given a theoretical power spectrum. Here we derive the ``band power'' window function which should be used for this calculation and point out that it is not equivalent to the window function used to calculate the variance. This important distinction has been absent from much of the literature: the variance window function is often used as the band power window function. We discuss the validity of this assumed equivalence and the role of window functions for experiments that constrain the power in multiple bands, and summarize a prescription for reporting experimental results. The analysis methods detailed here are applied in a companion paper to three years of data from the medium scale anisotropy measurement.

  9. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  10. Calculation of Chemical Shift Anisotropy in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sishi; Case, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual peptide groups in proteins must exhibit some variation in the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of their constituent atoms, but not much is known about the extent or origins of this dispersion. Direct spectroscopic measurement of CSA remains technically challenging, and theoretical methods can help to overcome these limitations by estimating shielding tensors for arbitrary structures. Here we use an automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach to compute 15N, 13C? and 1H chemical shift tensors for human ubiquitin and the GB1 and GB3 fragments of staphylococcal protein G. The average and range of variation of the anisotropies is in good agreement with experimental estimates from solid-state NMR, and the variation among residues is somewhat smaller than that estimated from solution-state measurements. Hydrogen-bond effects account for much of the variation, both between helix and sheet regions, and within elements of secondary structure, but other effects (including variations in torsion angles) may play a role as well. PMID:21866436

  11. Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings

    E-print Network

    Jon Urrestilla; Neil Bevis; Mark Hindmarsh; Martin Kunz; Andrew R. Liddle

    2008-07-11

    We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background CMB anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter mu, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard BPS semilocal strings resemble global textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l = 10 is reproduced if Gmu = 5.3x10^{-6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is Gmu<2.0x10^{-6} when CMB data, Hubble Key Project and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis data are used (c.f. Gmu<0.9x10^{-6} for cosmic strings). We additionally carry out a Bayesian model comparison of several models with and without defects, showing models with defects are neither conclusively favoured nor disfavoured at present.

  12. Topological signatures in CMB temperature anisotropy maps

    E-print Network

    W. S. Hipolito-Ricaldi; G. I. Gomero

    2005-10-19

    We propose an alternative formalism to simulate CMB temperature maps in $\\Lambda$CDM universes with nontrivial spatial topologies. This formalism avoids the need to explicitly compute the eigenmodes of the Laplacian operator in the spatial sections. Instead, the covariance matrix of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the temperature anisotropies is expressed in terms of the elements of the covering group of the space. We obtain a decomposition of the correlation matrix that isolates the topological contribution to the CMB temperature anisotropies out of the simply connected contribution. A further decomposition of the topological signature of the correlation matrix for an arbitrary topology allows us to compute it in terms of correlation matrices corresponding to simpler topologies, for which closed quadrature formulae might be derived. We also use this decomposition to show that CMB temperature maps of (not too large) multiply connected universes must show ``patterns of alignment'', and propose a method to look for these patterns, thus opening the door to the development of new methods for detecting the topology of our Universe even when the injectivity radius of space is slightly larger than the radius of the last scattering surface. We illustrate all these features with the simplest examples, those of flat homogeneous manifolds, i.e., tori, with special attention given to the cylinder, i.e., $T^1$ topology.

  13. Velocity anisotropy in filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Ji, Wei-Guang; Li, Hua-Bai

    2015-08-01

    The complex interplay between turbulence, magnetic fields, and self-gravity leads to the formation of filamentary molecular clouds out of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). One avenue of studying this interplay is by analyzing statistical features derived from observations, where the interpretation of these features is greatly facilitated by comparisons with numerical simulations. Here we focus on the statistical anisotropy present in synthetic maps of velocity centroid data, which we derive from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating patch of ISM. We study how the orientation and magnitude of the velocity anisotropy correlate with the magnetic field and with the filamentary structure of the generated cloud, thereby highlighting whether turbulence, magnetic field, or self-gravity is the dynamically dominant force. The simulations explore various conditions of the ISM, a range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, as well as the effect of the turbulence driving mode (solenoidal or compressive). Finally, we compare our simulation results with recent analysis of observational data from the Ophiuchus region.

  14. Anisotropy in thin Canning sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, D. W. A.

    2003-03-01

    The in-plane anisotropy of ductile sheet metal may be characterised by r-values within a uniform tensile strain range. In iow ductiiity material, tensile failure occurs by the formation of an inciined groove within which the plasticity is localised. Under these conditions, where lateral and axial displacements cannot determine an r-value reliably, the inclination of the local groove is used. Anisotropy is characterised from an orthotropic yield criterion within three r-values, found from tension tests at 0^{circ}, 45^{circ} and 90^{circ} to the roll. Application to bi-axial stress states are made from elliptical bulge forming. The theory may reprcduce the pressure-height curves and pole strain paths provided an equivalence exists between flow curves from tension and bulge tests. Otherwise, the circular bulge test is better for providing the hardening parameters and fracture strain for use in in biaxial stress applications. There appears to be no advantage in using other non-quadratic yield criteria except by the addition of linear and cubic terms.

  15. Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings

    SciTech Connect

    Urrestilla, Jon; Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R E-mail: n.bevis@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: martin.kunz@physics.unige.ch

    2008-07-15

    We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter {mu}, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) semilocal strings resemble global textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l=10 is reproduced if G{mu} = 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is G{mu}<2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} when CMB, Hubble key project and big bang nucleosynthesis data are used (cf G{mu}<0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} for cosmic strings). We additionally carry out a Bayesian model comparison of several models with and without defects, showing that models with defects are neither conclusively favoured nor disfavoured at present.

  16. Body Fractions: A Physical Approach to Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Many students experience great difficulty understanding the meaning of fractions. For many students who have spent their early mathematics lessons focusing on counting (whole) numbers, recognising that there are many numbers between those whole numbers called fractional numbers, is quite revolutionary. The foundation of understanding fractions is…

  17. Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic UNLP, 11 Octubre de 2012

    E-print Network

    Santos, Juan

    Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media UNLP, 11 Octubre de 2012 . Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media ­ p. #12;Fractured media. I Fractures are common in the earth's crust due to different factors, for instance, tectonic stresses and natural or artificial hydraulic fracturing caused

  18. Mechanical anisotropy of the human knee articular cartilage in compression

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    to determine possible anisotropy in Young's modulus, E, aggre- gate modulus, H a , Poisson's ratio, n cartilage, cartilage mechanics, anisotropy, modulus, permeability NOTATION E Young's modulus H a aggregate modulus K hydraulic permeability n Poisson's ratio 1 INTRODUCTION Articular cartilage is structurally

  19. THE ANISOTROPY OF LOW PRANDTL NUMBER TURBULENT CONVECTION

    E-print Network

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    THE ANISOTROPY OF LOW PRANDTL NUMBER TURBULENT CONVECTION KRIST ' OF PETROVAY Department in particular. The model is then applied to the case of low Prandtl number thermal convection. The energy S but it rather saturates to a relatively moderate finite asymptotic value. Key words: Anisotropy, convection

  20. OBSERVATIONAL SCAN-INDUCED ARTIFICIAL COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hao; Li Tipei E-mail: litp@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2011-05-10

    Reliably detecting the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is of great importance in understanding the birth and evolution of the universe. One of the difficulties in CMB experiments is the domination of measured CMB anisotropy maps by the Doppler dipole moment from the motion of the antenna relative to the CMB. For each measured temperature, the expected dipole component has to be calculated separately and then subtracted from the data. A small error in dipole direction, antenna pointing direction, sidelobe pickup contamination, and/or timing synchronism can introduce a significant deviation in the dipole-cleaned CMB temperature. After a full-sky observational scan, the accumulated deviations will be structured with a pattern closely correlated with the observation pattern with artificial anisotropies, including artificial quadrupole, octupole, etc., on large scales in the final CMB map. Such scan-induced anisotropies on large scales can be predicted by the true dipole moment and observational scan scheme. Indeed, the expected scan-induced quadrupole pattern of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission is perfectly in agreement with the published WMAP quadrupole. With the scan strategy of the Planck mission, we predict that scan-induced anisotropies will also produce an artificially aligned quadrupole. The scan-induced anisotropy is a common problem for all sweep missions and, like the foreground emissions, has to be removed from observed maps. Without doing so, CMB maps from COBE, WMAP, and Planck are not reliable for studying the CMB anisotropy.

  1. Studying the Interstellar Magnetic Field from Anisotropies in Velocity Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  2. Semi-analytic solution for thermoelastic problem with cubic anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Huang, Huaxiong

    . The thermal stress experienced by the crystal during growth could lead to the generation of structural defects: Crystals, Cubic anisotropy, Thermoelasticity, Stress PACS: 61.50.A 1 Introduction Directional growth-analytic thermal stress computation for single crystals with cubic anisotropy is developed, by introducing a new

  3. Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies Wayne Hu1,2,3

    E-print Network

    Hu, Wayne

    1 Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies Wayne Hu1,2,3 and Scott Dodelson2,3 1 Center 60637 KEYWORDS: background radiation, cosmology, theory, dark matter, early universe ABSTRACT: Cosmic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 1 INTRODUCTION The field of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies has dramatically

  4. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  5. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W. (Richland, WA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA)

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  6. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  7. Structural integrity of the corpus callosum predicts long-term transfer of fluid intelligence-related training gains in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dominik; Fischer, Florian Udo; Fesenbeckh, Johanna; Yakushev, Igor; Lelieveld, Irene Maria; Scheurich, Armin; Schermuly, Ingrid; Zschutschke, Lisa; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Although cognitive training usually improves cognitive test performance, the capability to transfer these training gains into respective or functionally related cognitive domains varies significantly. Since most studies demonstrate rather limited transfer effects in older adults, aging might be an important factor in transfer capability differences. This study investigated the transfer capability of logical reasoning training gains to a measure of Fluid Intelligence (Gf) in relation to age, general intelligence, and brain structural integrity as measured by diffusion tensor imaging. In a group of 41 highly educated healthy elderly, 71% demonstrated successful transfer immediately after a 4-week training session (i.e. short-term transfer). In a subgroup of 22% of subjects transfer maintained over a 3-month follow-up period (i.e. long-term transfer). While short-term transfer was not related to structural integrity, long-term transfer was associated with increased structural integrity in corpus and genu of the corpus callosum. Since callosal structural integrity was also related to age (in the present and foregoing studies), previously observed associations between age and transfer might be moderated by the structural integrity. Surprisingly, age was not directly associated with transfer in this study which could be explained by the multi-dependency of the structural integrity (modulating factors beside age, e.g. genetics). In this highly educated sample, general intelligence was not related to transfer suggesting that high intelligence is not sufficient for transfer in normal aging. Further studies are needed to reveal the interaction of transfer, age, and structural integrity and delineate mechanisms of age-dependent transfer capabilities. PMID:22965837

  8. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Sep 29,2015 The ejection fraction ( ... below you agree to the Terms and Conditions Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  9. Primordial statistical anisotropy generated at the end of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Soda, Jiro E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We present a new mechanism for generating primordial statistical anisotropy of curvature perturbations. We introduce a vector field which has a non-minimal kinetic term and couples with a waterfall field in a hybrid inflation model. In such a system, the vector field gives fluctuations of the end of inflation and hence induces a subcomponent of curvature perturbations. Since the vector has a preferred direction, the statistical anisotropy could appear in the fluctuations. We present the explicit formula for the statistical anisotropy in the primordial power spectrum and the bispectrum of curvature perturbations. Interestingly, there is the possibility that the statistical anisotropy does not appear in the power spectrum but does appear in the bispectrum. We also find that the statistical anisotropy provides the shape dependence to the bispectrum.

  10. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy at a Molecule-Metal Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, K.; Bellec, A.; Repain, V.; Chacon, C.; Girard, Y.; Garreau, Y.; Lagoute, J.; Rousset, S.; Breitwieser, R.; Hu, Yu-Cheng; Chao, Yen Cheng; Pai, Woei Wu; Li, D.; Smogunov, A.; Barreteau, C.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that a C60 overlayer enhances the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a Co thin film, inducing an inverse spin reorientation transition from in plane to out of plane. The driving force is the C60/Co interfacial magnetic anisotropy that we have measured quantitatively in situ as a function of the C60 coverage. Comparison with state-of-the-art ab initio calculations show that this interfacial anisotropy mainly arises from the local hybridization between C60 pz and Co dz2 orbitals. By generalizing these arguments, we also demonstrate that the hybridization of C60 with a Fe(110) surface decreases the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results open the way to tailor the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in organic-material-ferromagnet systems.

  11. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  12. Partial Fractions Distinct Linear Factors

    E-print Network

    Yengulalp, Lynne

    Write the appropriate partial fractions decomposition, using the variables A, B and C. = + + Step 3 of the integrand. Step 2 Write the appropriate partial fractions decomposition, using the numerators A, B and Cx the denominator of the integrand. Step 2 Write the appropriate partial fractions decomposition, using

  13. Partial Fractions Distinct Linear Factors

    E-print Network

    Yengulalp, Lynne

    the appropriate partial fractions decomposition, using the variables A and B. 1 2x2 + 7x - 4 = A 2x - 1 + B x + 4 + x = x(x3 + 1) = x(x + 1)(x2 - x + 1) Step 2 Write the appropriate partial fractions decomposition + 1) Step 2 Write the appropriate partial fractions decomposition, using the numerators A and Bx + C

  14. Effect of anisotropy in explosive fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of rocks at large deformations is characterized, including the effects of crack growth when unstable, the effects of anisotropy, the distinction between open and closed cracks, the influence of crack intersections, the role of pore pressure, and a calculation of permeability. The theory is quite general, and is intended for use in a computer program rather than as a vehicle for obtaining analytic results. When a spherical explosive charge is embedded in oil shale it produces an aspirin-shaped cavity at late times as a result of the bedded structure of the rock. In this paper a calculation of the cavity produced by a spherical explosive is compared with a radiograph, showing remarkable agreement between the two. The shape of the cavity is explained by the behavior of cracks lying in the bedding planes.

  15. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  16. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (?=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (?=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (?=7.4° ) than for continental lithosphere (?=14.7° ). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS=4 mm a-1, ?=29° ) and Eurasia (vRMS=3 mm a-1, ?=33° ), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ˜5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. We will investigate if these relationships still hold with the new expanded data set and with the alternative set of relative plate angular velocities. We have found systematic differences between the SKS orientations and our predicted plate motion azimuths underneath the Arabia plate, which suggests to us either plate-scale mantle flow process not directly associated with that plate's absolute motion or intrinsic lithospheric anisotropy. We will discuss more of such discrepancies underneath other plates using the enlarged data set.

  17. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Müller, W-C

    2011-08-26

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, nonaxisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range nonaxisymmetry is reproduced by a "fly through" sampling of a direct numerical simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, fly through sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in nonaxisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed nonaxisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself. PMID:21929247

  18. Adaptive mapping functions to the azimuthal anisotropy of the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegout, P.; Biancale, R.; Soudarin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The anisotropy of propagation of radio waves used by global navigation satellite systems is investigated using high-resolution observational data assimilations produced by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecast. The geometry and the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere are built introducing accurate geodetic heights and continuous formulations of the refractivity and its gradient. Hence the realistic ellipsoidal shape of the refractivity field above the topography is properly represented. Atmospheric delays are obtained by ray-tracing through the refractivity field, integrating the eikonal differential system. Ray-traced delays reveal the anisotropy of the atmosphere. With the aim to preserve the classical mapping function strategy, mapping functions can evolve to adapt to high-frequency atmospheric fluctuations and to account for the anisotropy of propagation by fitting at each site and time the zenith delays and the mapping functions coefficients. Adaptive mapping functions (AMF) are designed with coefficients of the continued fraction form which depend on azimuth. The basic idea is to expand the azimuthal dependency of the coefficients in Fourier series introducing a multi-scale azimuthal decomposition which slightly changes the elevation functions with the azimuth. AMF are used to approximate thousands of atmospheric ray-traced delays using a few tens of coefficients. Generic recursive definitions of the AMF and their partial derivatives lead to observe that the truncation of the continued fraction form at the third term and the truncation of the azimuthal Fourier series at the fourth term are sufficient in usual meteorological conditions. Delays' and elevations' mapping functions allow to store and to retrieve the ray-tracing results to solve the parallax problem at the observation level. AMF are suitable to fit the time-variable isotropic and anisotropic parts of the ray-traced delays at each site at each time step and to provide GPS range corrections at the measurement level with millimeter accuracy at low elevation. AMF to the azimuthal anisotropy of the neutral atmosphere are designed to adapt to complex weather conditions by adaptively changing their truncations.

  19. Charged particle anisotropies in Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, T.S.; Chenette, D.L.; Simpson, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    We report observations of anisotropies and pitch angle distributions for 0.5-1.8 MeV protons, 7--17 MeV electrons and > or approx. =3.4 MeV electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere made with the University of Chicago experiments on Pioneer 11. In the outer magnetosphere (L>6) there is clear evidence for corotation of the proton flux, and the proton pitch angle distribution shows maximum flux perpendicular to the magnetic field ('pancake' distribution). Observed changes in the amplitude and shape of the pitch angle distributions suggest the existence of significant temporal variations in the outer magnetosphere. From L=6 to L=4, the proton intensity decreased by more than two orders of magnitude, and the pitch angle distribution shifted to a 'dumbbell' form (maximum flux parallel to magnetic field). The shift in pitch angle distribution most likely results from preferential absorption of large pitch angle particles by the tenuous E- ring found in the equatorial plane out to at least R=5 R/sub s/. For L<4, the proton intensity increased inwards, implying an inner edge for the E ring at Rapprox. =4 R/sub s/. Except for regions where the flux was reduced by satellite absorption, the pitch angle distributions remained dumbbell. In absorption regions, pancake distributions were found. The observations are consistent with the suggestion by McKibben and Simpson (this issue) that inward diffusion and acceleration at Saturn may proceed primarily via large, infrequent disturbances. Electron anisotropies were measurable only for L< or approx. =4.5, and the pitch angle distributions were found to be pancake for the entire region L<4.5, suggesting that the absorbing particles in the E ring have radii that lie between the range of approx.10 MeV proton and approx.10 MeV electrons, or of the order of millimeters.

  20. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  1. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26621372

  2. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles. PMID:20866180

  3. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  4. Fractional Chemotaxis Diffusion Equations

    E-print Network

    Langlands, T A M

    2010-01-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modelling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macro-molecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using Continuous Time Random Walk master equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macro-molecular crowding or other obstacles.

  5. Stress-induced upper crustal anisotropy in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Sheehan, Anne; Shearer, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We use an automated method to analyze shear wave splitting from local earthquakes recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network between 2000 and 2005. The observed fast directions of upper crustal anisotropy generally are consistent with the direction of maximum horizontal compression ?Hmax, suggesting that one major mechanism of anisotropy in the top 20 km of crust under southern California is regional stress. However, at other stations, fast directions are aligned with the trends of regional faulting and local alignment of anisotropic bedrock. Splitting delay times range widely within 0.2 s. These upper crustal anisotropy observations, together with previous studies of SKS shear wave splitting, surface waves, and receiver functions, suggest different mechanisms of anisotropy at different depths under southern California. Anisotropy in the upper crust appears to be in response to the current horizontal maximum compression ?Hmax, which differs from the cause of anisotropy in the lower crust and mantle. We also explore possible temporal variations in upper crustal anisotropy associated with preearthquake stress changes or stress changes excited by surface waves of great earthquakes but do not observe any clear temporal variations in fast directions or time delays.

  6. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  7. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  8. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  9. Fractional Calculus: Integral and Differential Equations of Fractional Order

    E-print Network

    Rudolf Gorenflo; Francesco Mainardi

    2008-05-25

    We introduce the linear operators of fractional integration and fractional differentiation in the framework of the Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus. Particular attention is devoted to the technique of Laplace transforms for treating these operators in a way accessible to applied scientists, avoiding unproductive generalities and excessive mathematical rigor. By applying this technique we shall derive the analytical solutions of the most simple linear integral and differential equations of fractional order. We show the fundamental role of the Mittag-Leffler function, whose properties are reported in an ad hoc Appendix. The topics discussed here will be: (a) essentials of Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus with basic formulas of Laplace transforms, (b) Abel type integral equations of first and second kind, (c) relaxation and oscillation type differential equations of fractional order.

  10. Positron fraction in cosmic rays and models of cosmic-ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, R.; Burch, B.

    2010-07-15

    The positron fraction observed by PAMELA and other experiments up to {approx}100 GeV is analyzed in terms of models of cosmic-ray propagation. It is shown that generically we expect the positron fraction to reach {approx}0.6 at energies of several TeV, and its energy dependence bears an intimate but subtle connection with that of the boron to carbon ratio in cosmic rays. The observed positron fraction can be fit in a model that assumes a significant fraction of the boron below {approx}10 GeV is generated through spallation of cosmic-ray nuclei in a cocoonlike region surrounding the sources, and the positrons of energy higher than a few GeV are almost exclusively generated through cosmic-ray interactions in the general interstellar medium. Such a model is consistent with the bounds on cosmic-ray anisotropies and other observations.

  11. Solitary structures with ion and electron thermal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusroo, Murchana; Bora, Madhurjya P.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electrostatic solitary structures is analysed for a magnetised plasma with ion and electron thermal anisotropies. The ion thermal anisotropy is modelled with the help of the Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) double adiabatic equations of state while the electrons are treated as inertia-less species with an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. A negative electron thermal anisotropy ?ft({{T}e\\bot}/{{T}e\\parallel}>1\\right) is found to help form large amplitude solitary structures which are in agreement with observational data.

  12. Statistical anisotropies in gravitational waves in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

  13. Thinning and flow of Tibetan crust constrained by seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nikolai M; Ritzwoller, Michael H; Molnar, Peter; Levin, Vadim

    2004-07-01

    Intermediate-period Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Tibet indicate marked radial anisotropy within the middle-to-lower crust, consistent with a thinning of the middle crust by about 30%. The anisotropy is largest in the western part of the plateau, where moment tensors of earthquakes indicate active crustal thinning. The preferred orientation of mica crystals resulting from the crustal thinning can account for the observed anisotropy. The middle-to-lower crust of Tibet appears to have thinned more than the upper crust, consistent with deformation of a mechanically weak layer that flows as if confined to a channel. PMID:15247475

  14. Small-scale Anisotropies of Cosmic Rays from Relative Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus; Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small-scale structure can naturally arise from cosmic ray scattering in local turbulent magnetic fields that distort a global dipole anisotropy set by diffusion. We study this effect in terms of the power spectrum of cosmic ray arrival directions and show that the strength of small-scale anisotropies is related to properties of relative diffusion. We provide a formalism for how these power spectra can be inferred from simulations and motivate a simple analytic extension of the ensemble-averaged diffusion equation that can account for the effect.

  15. Cellular automaton modeling of alloy solidification using local anisotropy rules

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, R.E.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The evolution of dendritic morphology is simulated for a binary alloy using a two-dimensional cellular automaton growth algorithm. Solute diffusion is modeled with an alternate-direction implicit finite difference technique. Interface curvature and kinetic anisotropy are implemented through configurational terms which are incorporated into the growth potential used by the automaton. The weighting of the anisotropy term is explored and shown to be essential for overcoming grid-induced anisotropy, permitting more realistic development of dendritic morphologies. Dendritic structures are generated for both uniform and directional cooling conditions.

  16. Solitary structures with ion and electron thermal anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Khusroo, Murchana

    2015-01-01

    Formation of electrostatic solitary structures are analysed for a magnetised plasma with ion and electron thermal anisotropies. The ion thermal anisotropy is modelled with the help of the Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) double adiabatic equations of state while the electrons are treated as inertia-less species with an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. A negative electron thermal anisotropy $(T_{e\\perp}/T_e{\\parallel}>1)$ is found to help form large amplitude solitary structures which are in agreement with observational data.

  17. Long Term Variation of Cosmic Ray Anisotropy and Soalr Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richharia, M. K.; Shrivastava, S. K.; Jain, Alka; Jain, Manju

    The cosmic Ray CR intensity data recorded with Goose Bay Neutron Monitoring station have been investigate on 60 quietest days QD in a year for studying the variation in tri-diurnal and quart diurnal anisotropy during solar cycle 21 and 22 It has been observed that in spite of abrupt change in the amplitude and phase of tri-diurnal and quart diurnal anisotropy in CR intensity the amplitude is quite significant throughout period of investigation The tri-diurnal anisotropy clearly shows 11 year type of variation at Mid latitude neutron monitoring station

  18. Dynamical fractional chaotic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Schmitz, Kai; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-12-01

    Chaotic inflation based on a simple monomial scalar potential, V (? )??p, is an attractive large-field model of inflation capable of generating a sizable tensor-to-scalar ratio r . Therefore, assuming that future cosmic microwave background observations will confirm the large r value reported by BICEP2, it is important to determine what kind of dynamical mechanism could possibly endow the inflaton field with such a simple effective potential. In this paper, we answer this question in the context of field theory, i.e. in the framework of dynamical chaotic inflation, where strongly interacting supersymmetric gauge dynamics around the scale of grand unification dynamically generate a fractional power-law potential via the quantum effect of dimensional transmutation. In constructing explicit models, we significantly extend our previous work, as we now consider a large variety of possible underlying gauge dynamics and relax our conditions on the field content of the model. This allows us to realize almost arbitrary rational values for the power p in the inflaton potential. The present paper may hence be regarded as a first step toward a more complete theory of dynamical chaotic inflation.

  19. Incompressible Stars and Fractional Derivatives

    E-print Network

    Bayin, S S

    2014-01-01

    Fractional calculus is an effective tool in incorporating the effects of non-locality and memory into physical models. In this regard, successful applications exist rang- ing from signal processing to anomalous diffusion and quantum mechanics. In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density, gravitational field and equation of state. The fractional ob- jects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

  20. Method development for VOST Fractionator

    SciTech Connect

    St. Germain Wickham, M.E.; Cummins, S.B.; Radolovich, G. )

    1994-01-01

    A VOST Fractionator was designed and tested to fractionate an original VOST sample into two samples: one large and one small sample. The device allows for quantitation of high levels of compounds in the small fraction and trace levels in the large fraction. Several preliminary validation samples were prepared, split, and analyzed to test the feasibility of the VOST Fractionator. These validation samples contained 40,000 ng of three terpene compounds and 100 ng of 42 other volatile target analytes. Analyte recoveries ranged from 70 to 130 percent, except for five water-soluble compounds. Recovery for the terpene compounds was 110 to 118 percent. Precision for triplicate spiked samples was less than 30 percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) for most compounds. Results indicate that the VOST Fractionator accurately splits the sample and allows quantitation of extremely high levels of compounds without sacrificing sensitivity for trace compounds. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  2. Listing Unique Fractional Factorial Designs 

    E-print Network

    Shrivastava, Abhishek Kumar

    2011-02-22

    , 2-level regular fractional factorial designs and 2-level regular fractional factorial split-plot designs, and provide discussions for extensions, with graph models, for more general classes of designs. v To my parents vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I find myself... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 IV.4. New candidate defining word reduction method . . . . 56 IV.5. Final algorithm for generating design catalogs . . . . . 58 IV.6. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 V GENERATING CATALOGS OF FRACTIONAL FACTO- RIAL SPLIT...

  3. Fractional (Chern and topological) insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, Titus; Chamon, Claudio; Iadecola, Thomas; Santos, Luiz H.; Mudry, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    We review various features of interacting Abelian topological phases of matter in two spatial dimensions, placing particular emphasis on fractional Chern insulators (FCIs) and fractional topological insulators (FTIs). We highlight aspects of these systems that challenge the intuition developed from quantum Hall physics—for instance, FCIs are stable in the limit where the interaction energy scale is much larger than the band gap, and FTIs can possess fractionalized excitations in the bulk despite the absence of gapless edge modes.

  4. Fractional Schrödinger equation in optics.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-03-15

    In quantum mechanics, the space-fractional Schrödinger equation provides a natural extension of the standard Schrödinger equation when the Brownian trajectories in Feynman path integrals are replaced by Levy flights. Here an optical realization of the fractional Schrödinger equation, based on transverse light dynamics in aspherical optical cavities, is proposed. As an example, a laser implementation of the fractional quantum harmonic oscillator is presented in which dual Airy beams can be selectively generated under off-axis longitudinal pumping. PMID:25768196

  5. Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mulleregan, Alice; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel; Ogetree, D.F.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Brenner, J.; Dubois, J.M.

    2008-06-25

    We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested both in nanometer size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) tips as well as in macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disc tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

  6. Full-wave multiscale anisotropy tomography in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Pin; Zhao, Li; Hung, Shu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the spatial variation of anisotropy in the upper mantle is important for characterizing the lithospheric deformation and mantle flow dynamics. In this study, we apply a full-wave approach to image the upper-mantle anisotropy in Southern California using 5954 SKS splitting data. Three-dimensional sensitivity kernels combined with a wavelet-based model parameterization are adopted in a multiscale inversion. Spatial resolution lengths are estimated based on a statistical resolution matrix approach, showing a finest resolution length of ~25 km in regions with densely distributed stations. The anisotropic model displays structural fabric in relation to surface geologic features such as the Salton Trough, the Transverse Ranges, and the San Andreas Fault. The depth variation of anisotropy does not suggest a lithosphere-asthenosphere decoupling. At long wavelengths, the fast directions of anisotropy are aligned with the absolute plate motion inside the Pacific and North American plates.

  7. Analysis of Frequency-Dependent Anisotropy in VSP Data 

    E-print Network

    Maultzsch, Sonja

    The use of seismic anisotropy for the characterization of fracture systems in the subsurface is based upon equivalent medium theories that describe the average elastic response of a fractured material in the long wavelength ...

  8. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-08-24

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  9. Primordial Statistical Anisotropies: The Effective Field Theory Approach

    E-print Network

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the effective field theory of primordial statistical anisotropies generated during anisotropic inflation involving a background $U(1)$ gauge field. Besides the usual Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of time diffeomorphism we have two additional Goldstone bosons associated with the breaking of spatial diffeomorphisms. We further identify these two new Goldstone bosons with the expected two transverse degrees of the $U(1)$ gauge field fluctuations. Upon defining the appropriate unitary gauge, we present the most general quadratic action which respects the remnant symmetry in the unitary gauge. The interactions between various Goldstone bosons leads to statistical anisotropy in curvature perturbation power spectrum. Calculating the general results for power spectrum anisotropy, we recover the previously known results in specific models of anisotropic inflation. In addition, we present novel results for statistical anisotropy in models with non-trivial sound speed for inflaton ...

  10. Small-scale anisotropies of cosmic rays from relative diffusion

    E-print Network

    Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small scale structure is reflecting the local, turbulent magnetic field in the presence of a global dipole anisotropy in cosmic rays as determined by diffusion. This effect is analogous to weak gravitational lensing of temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background. We show that the non-trivial power spectrum in this setup can be related to the properties of relative diffusion and we study the convergence of the angular power spectrum to a steady-state as a function of backtracking time. We also determine the steady-state solution in an analytical approach based on a modified BGK ansatz. A rigorous mathematical treatment of the generation of small scale anisotropies will help in unraveling the structure of the local magnetic field through cosmic ray anisotropies.

  11. Large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Wilson, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    Inhomogeneities in the large-scale distribution of matter inevitably lead to the generation of large-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation. The dipole, quadrupole, and higher order fluctuations expected in an Einstein-de Sitter cosmological model have been computed. The dipole and quadrupole anisotropies are comparable to the measured values, and impose important constraints on the allowable spectrum of large-scale matter density fluctuations. A significant dipole anisotropy is generated by the matter distribution on scales greater than approximately 100 Mpc. The large-scale anisotropy is insensitive to the ionization history of the universe since decoupling, and cannot easily be reconciled with a galaxy formation theory that is based on primordial adiabatic density fluctuations.

  12. Current sheets and pressure anisotropy in the reconnection exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Le, A.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Egedal, J.; Ng, J.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Liu, Y.-H.

    2014-01-15

    A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the exhaust during anti-parallel reconnection in the collisionless regime contains a current sheet extending 100 inertial lengths from the X line. The current sheet is supported by electron pressure anisotropy near the X line and ion anisotropy farther downstream. Field-aligned electron currents flowing outside the magnetic separatrices feed the exhaust current sheet and generate the out-of-plane, or Hall, magnetic field. Existing models based on different mechanisms for each particle species provide good estimates for the levels of pressure anisotropy. The ion anisotropy, which is strong enough to reach the firehose instability threshold, is also important for overall force balance. It reduces the outflow speed of the plasma.

  13. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  14. Changes in Seismic Anisotropy Across the Transition Zone Boundaries (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2013-12-01

    We used a dataset composed of the fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps determined by Visser et al. (2008), which provides resolution of SV waves azimuthal anisotropy to much greater depths than in previous studies. In the uppermost mantle, our degree 20 model displays a complex pattern of seismic anisotropy that generally agrees with previously published global models. A global change in fast axes was detected around 80 km and 230 km depth, which we attribute to the average signatures of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and bottom of the asthenosphere, respectively. More interestingly, our results unravel the presence of 1% anisotropy in the transition zone, challenging common views of mantle deformation mechanisms, and reveals a striking correlation between changes in anisotropy amplitudes and the fast axes direction where upper mantle phase transitions are known to occur. Several synthetic and statistical tests demonstrated that transition zone anisotropy is required by the overtone data. In addition, predictions of shear-wave splitting based on our 3-D model yielded delay times that were in better agreement with the data than estimates from previous models, demonstrating that deep upper mantle anisotropy is required to explain shear-wave splitting data as well. Our model can be interpreted in terms of olivine lattice preferred orientation (LPO) in the upper mantle associated to horizontal shear deformation down to at least the bottom of the asthenosphere. At larger depths, the interpretation of our results is more difficult because it is highly dependent on mineral physics analyses and on radial anisotropy models, which are both associated with large uncertainties. The newly found relation between anisotropy changes and phase transformations gives new insight on the nature of the mantle transition zone and suggests that the anisotropy originates from the LPO of anisotropic material. Possible explanations for our findings include recrystallization during phase transformations, or changes in the slip system across the transition zone boundaries, which in turn could be explained by changes in the water content of mantle material, consistent with the idea that the transition zone acts as a water filter. Advances toward a better understanding of Earth's convective pattern will require stronger constraints on the effects of pressure, melting, water content, deformation mechanisms and slip systems of transition zone materials. Our current and future work includes obtaining new global models of radial anisotropy and SH waves azimuthal anisotropy by adding Love wave higher mode phase velocity maps. These new models will help further constrain the nature of the transition zone and its role in the thermochemical evolution of our planet.

  15. Fractional Method of Characteristics for Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    E-print Network

    Guo-cheng Wu

    2010-07-10

    The method of characteristics has played a very important role in mathematical physics. Preciously, it was used to solve the initial value problem for partial differential equations of first order. In this paper, we propose a fractional method of characteristics and use it to solve some fractional partial differential equations.

  16. Fractional martingales and characterization of the fractional Brownian motion

    E-print Network

    Hu, Yaozhong; Nualart, David; Song, Jian

    2009-11-19

    In this paper we introduce the notion of fractional martingale as the fractional derivative of order ? of a continuous local martingale, where ??(?½, ½), and we show that it has a nonzero finite variation of order 2/(1+2?), under some integrability...

  17. Experimental test of the viscous anisotropy hypothesis for partially molten rocks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Kohlstedt, David L; Katz, Richard F; Takei, Yasuko

    2015-10-13

    Chemical differentiation of rocky planets occurs by melt segregation away from the region of melting. The mechanics of this process, however, are complex and incompletely understood. In partially molten rocks undergoing shear deformation, melt pockets between grains align coherently in the stress field; it has been hypothesized that this anisotropy in microstructure creates an anisotropy in the viscosity of the aggregate. With the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity, continuum, two-phase-flow models reproduce the emergence and angle of melt-enriched bands that form in laboratory experiments. In the same theoretical context, these models also predict sample-scale melt migration due to a gradient in shear stress. Under torsional deformation, melt is expected to segregate radially inward. Here we present torsional deformation experiments on partially molten rocks that test this prediction. Microstructural analyses of the distribution of melt and solid reveal a radial gradient in melt fraction, with more melt toward the center of the cylinder. The extent of this radial melt segregation grows with progressive strain, consistent with theory. The agreement between theoretical prediction and experimental observation provides a validation of this theory. PMID:26417107

  18. Loop quantum cosmology: Anisotropies and inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    In this dissertation we extend the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology from the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times to cosmological models which allow anisotropies and inhomogeneities. Specifically, we consider the cases of the homogeneous but anisotropic Bianchi type I, II and IX models with a massless scalar field as well as the vacuum, inhomogeneous, linearly polarized Gowdy T3 model. For each case, we derive the Hamiltonian constraint operator and study its properties. In particular, we show how in all of these models the classical big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved due to quantum gravity effects. Since the Bianchi models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz conjecture regarding the nature of generic space-like singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of the Bianchi cosmologies are likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of such singularities in quantum gravity. In addition, the results obtained here provide an important step toward the full loop quantization of cosmological space-times that allow generic inhomogeneities; this would provide falsifiable predictions that could be compared to observations.

  19. Solution to the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Funk, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the standard diffusive picture for transport of cosmic rays (CRs), a gradient in the CR density induces a typically small, dipolar anisotropy in their arrival directions. This is being widely advertised as a tool for finding nearby sources. However, the predicted dipole amplitude at TeV and PeV energies exceeds the measured one by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we critically examine the validity of this prediction, which is based on averaging over an ensemble of turbulent magnetic fields. We focus on (1) the deviations of the dipole in a particular random realization from the ensemble average, and (2) the possibility of a misalignment between the regular magnetic field and the CR gradient. We find that if the field direction and the gradient direction are close to ˜90 ° , the dipole amplitude is considerably suppressed and can be reconciled with observations, which sheds light on a long-standing problem. Furthermore, we show that the dipole direction in general does not coincide with the gradient direction, thus hampering the search for nearby sources.

  20. Solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy problem.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Philipp; Funk, Stefan

    2015-01-16

    In the standard diffusive picture for transport of cosmic rays (CRs), a gradient in the CR density induces a typically small, dipolar anisotropy in their arrival directions. This is being widely advertised as a tool for finding nearby sources. However, the predicted dipole amplitude at TeV and PeV energies exceeds the measured one by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we critically examine the validity of this prediction, which is based on averaging over an ensemble of turbulent magnetic fields. We focus on (1) the deviations of the dipole in a particular random realization from the ensemble average, and (2) the possibility of a misalignment between the regular magnetic field and the CR gradient. We find that if the field direction and the gradient direction are close to ?90°, the dipole amplitude is considerably suppressed and can be reconciled with observations, which sheds light on a long-standing problem. Furthermore, we show that the dipole direction in general does not coincide with the gradient direction, thus hampering the search for nearby sources. PMID:25635539

  1. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Translational Anisotropy and Rotational Diffusion of Gold Nanorods in Colloidal Sphere Solutions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Sharmine; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2015-08-18

    We studied the translational and rotational diffusion of gold nanorods within a rod/sphere composite liquid using fluctuation correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The nanorods of length L ? 60 nm and diameter d ? 17 nm were used at a fixed concentration of ?1 pM. The concentration of colloidal Ludox spheres (size ? 26 nm) was varied up to a volume fraction of ? = 0.3 or approximately 7 spheres/L(3). Our experiments showed significant translational anisotropy as the sphere concentration was increased. The translational diffusion parallel to the rod axis (D(T?)) followed very close to the bulk viscosity of the solution. However, the diffusion normal to the rod axis (D(T?)) experienced a significantly higher frictional force. For volume fraction ? > 0.1 a slightly modified caging theory by Pecora and Deutch could explain the rotational diffusion of the rods very well. At low volume fraction the agreement is poor, which we interpreted as modification of the local ordering of the spheres, which can affect the rod rotation. PMID:26211935

  3. On the Near-surface Seismic Anisotropy of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Gung, Y.; Liang, W.; Huang, T.; Chen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the near-surface azimuthal seismic anisotropy (<400m) of Taiwan by examining the noise-derived empirical Green's functions (EGFs) using station pairs between those of island-wide CWBSN (Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network) borehole seismic array and their corresponding overhead surface stations. It is well known that seismic anisotropy may provide unique structure information other than those constrained by isotropic seismic tomography. The studies of the crustal anisotropy beneath the island of Taiwan have been conducted by using shear-wave splitting and surface waves. Results from shear wave splitting (Chang et al., 2009) show that the fast axis changes from NNE-SSW in the Central Range and Western Foothills to E-W direction in the Western Plains (WP), arguing that different mechanisms across the Deformation Font are responsible for this anisotropy variation. The E-W anisotropy pattern in the WP is, however, not clearly shown in our recent anisotropy tomography using noise-derived broad-band (5-20 seconds) Rayleigh waves (Huang et al., 2012). One possibility to reconcile the discrepancy between the two studies is that the observed E-W oriented anisotropy in the WP is mainly caused by the very near-surface structure. Taking advantage of high-quality data recorded from the newly deployed CWBSN borehole vertical array in Taiwan, we are able to derive very high frequency (>30 hz) EGFs for the near-surface structure. We study the properties of azimuthal anisotropy between the borehole depths to surface by examining the EGFs obtained at varying directions mapping from two horizontal components of each station pair. We report the preliminary results and discuss their tectonic implications.

  4. The large-scale anisotropy with the PAMELA calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krut'kov, S.; Kvashnin, A.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S.; Sarkar, R.; Simon, M.; Scotti, V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The large-scale anisotropy (or the so-called star-diurnal wave) has been studied using the calorimeter of the space-born experiment PAMELA. The cosmic ray anisotropy has been obtained for the Southern and Northern hemispheres simultaneously in the equatorial coordinate system for the time period 2006-2014. The dipole amplitude and phase have been measured for energies 1-20 TeV n-1.

  5. Partial Fractions Partial fractions is the opposite of adding fractions over a common denominator. It applies to integrals

    E-print Network

    Ikenaga, Bruce

    will become important in Step 3. Step 3. Obtain the partial fractions decomposition for the fraction7-19-2005 Partial Fractions Partial fractions is the opposite of adding fractions over a common. This is the heart of the partial fractions method. It is basically a lot of algebra, but it's sufficiently

  6. Origin of Seismic Anisotropy in Oceanic Plates and Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten; Conrad, Clinton; Schaeffer, Andrew; Lebedev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy is strongest in Earth's thermo-mechanical boundary layers where anisotropy should be straightforward to relate to mantle flow. However, both frozen-in and active mantle convection scenarios have been invoked, and no simple, global relationships exist. We show that lattice preferred orientation (LPO) inferred from mantle flow computations, in fact, produces a plausible global background model for asthenospheric azimuthal anisotropy underneath oceanic lithosphere. The same is not true for absolute plate motion (APM) models, unless reference frames are adjusted. A ~200 km thick layer where the flow model LPO matches observations from tomography lies just below the ~1200C isotherm of a half-space cooling model, indicating strong temperature-dependence of the processes that control the development of azimuthal anisotropy. We infer that the depth extent of shear, and hence the thickness of a relatively strong oceanic lithosphere, can be mapped this way. Radial anisotropy does not appear to conform to this background model, and ocean-basin specific deviations from the half-space cooling pattern are found in all of the surface wave models we considered. We discuss an expanded, comprehensive analysis of anisotropy and how results pertain to boundary layer dynamics.

  7. Anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. D.; Spence, P.; Waterman, S.; Sommer, J. Le; Molines, J.-M.; Lilly, J. M.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    The anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean is examined in geostrophic surface velocities derived from satellite observations and in the horizontal velocities of a 1/12° global ocean model. Eddy anisotropy is of oceanographic interest as it is through anisotropic velocity fluctuations that the eddy and mean-flow fields interact dynamically. This study is timely because improved observational estimates of eddy anisotropy will soon be available with Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) altimetry data. We find there to be good agreement between the characteristics and distributions of eddy anisotropy from the present satellite observations and model ocean surface. In the model, eddy anisotropy is found to have significant vertical structure and is largest close to the ocean bottom, where the anisotropy aligns with the underlying isobaths. The highly anisotropic bottom signal is almost entirely contained in the barotropic variability. Upper-ocean variability is predominantly baroclinic and the alignment is less sensitive to the underlying bathymetry. These findings offer guidance for introducing a parameterization of eddy feedbacks, based on the eddy kinetic energy and underlying bathymetry, to operate on the barotropic flow and better account for the effects of barotropic Reynolds stresses unresolved in coarse-resolution ocean models.

  8. Primordial Statistical Anisotropies: The Effective Field Theory Approach

    E-print Network

    Ali Akbar Abolhasani; Mohammad Akhshik; Razieh Emami; Hassan Firouzjahi

    2015-11-10

    In this work we present the effective field theory of primordial statistical anisotropies generated during anisotropic inflation involving a background $U(1)$ gauge field. Besides the usual Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of time diffeomorphism we have two additional Goldstone bosons associated with the breaking of spatial diffeomorphisms. We further identify these two new Goldstone bosons with the expected two transverse degrees of the $U(1)$ gauge field fluctuations. Upon defining the appropriate unitary gauge, we present the most general quadratic action which respects the remnant symmetry in the unitary gauge. The interactions between various Goldstone bosons leads to statistical anisotropy in curvature perturbation power spectrum. Calculating the general results for power spectrum anisotropy, we recover the previously known results in specific models of anisotropic inflation. In addition, we present novel results for statistical anisotropy in models with non-trivial sound speed for inflaton fluctuations. Also we identify the interaction which leads to birefringence-like effects in anisotropic power spectrum in which the speed of gauge field fluctuations depends on the direction of the mode propagation and the two polarization of gauge field fluctuations contribute differently in statistical anisotropy. As another interesting application, our EFT approach naturally captures interactions generating parity violating statistical anisotropies.

  9. Energetic Electrons in Dipolarization Events: Spatial Properties and Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Runov, A.; Hesse, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection, flow bursts, and dipolarization, we further investigate the acceleration of electrons to suprathermal energies. Particular emphasis is on spatial properties and anisotropies as functions of energy and time. The simulation results are compared with Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. The test particle approach successfully reproduces several observed injection features and puts them into a context of spatial maps of the injection region(s): a dominance of perpendicular anisotropies farther down the tail and closer to the equatorial plane, an increasing importance of parallel anisotropy closer to Earth and at higher latitudes, a drop in energy fluxes at energies below approximately 10 keV, coinciding with the plasma density drop, together with increases at higher energy, a triple peak structure of flux increases near 0 deg, 90 deg, and 180 deg, and a tendency of flux increases to extend to higher energy closer to Earth and at lower latitudes. We identified the plasma sheet boundary layers and adjacent lobes as a main source region for both increased and decreased energetic electron fluxes, related to the different effects of adiabatic acceleration at high and low energies. The simulated anisotropies tend to exceed the observed ones, particularly for perpendicular fluxes at high energies. The most plausible reason is that the MHD simulation lacks the effects of anisotropy-driven microinstabilities and waves, which would reduce anisotropies.

  10. Colossal anisotropy of the magnetic properties of doped lithium nitrodometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Antropov, Vladimir P; Antonov, Victor N

    2014-09-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the electronic structure and physical properties of doped lithium nitridometalates Li2(Li1?xMx)N (LiMN) with M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The diverse properties include the equilibrium magnetic moments, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-optical Kerr spectra, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We explain the colossal magnetic anisotropy in LiFeN by its unique electronic structure which ultimately leads to a series of unusual physical properties. The most unique property is a complete suppression of relativistic effects and freezing of orbital moments for in-plane orientation of the magnetization. This leads to the colossal spatial anisotropy of many magnetic properties including energy, Kerr, and dichroism effects. LiFeN is identified as an ultimate single-ion anisotropy system where a nearly insulating state can be produced by a spin orbital coupling alone. A very nontrivial strongly fluctuating and sign changing character of the magnetic anisotropy with electronic 3d-atomic doping is predicted theoretically. A large and highly anisotropic Kerr effect due to the interband transitions between atomic-like Fe 3d bands is found for LiFeN. A giant anisotropy of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism for the Fe K spectrum and a very weak one for the Fe L2,3 spectra in LiFeN are also predicted.

  11. Electronic nematic phase transition in the presence of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamase, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We study the phase diagram of electronic nematic instability in the presence of x y anisotropy. While a second-order transition cannot occur in this case, mean-field theory predicts that a first-order transition occurs near Van Hove filling and its phase boundary forms a wing structure, which we term a Griffiths wing, referring to his original work of He3-He4 mixtures. When crossing the wing, the anisotropy of the electronic system exhibits a discontinuous change, leading to a metanematic transition, i.e., the analog to a metamagnetic transition in a magnetic system. The upper edge of the wing corresponds to a critical end line. It shows a nonmonotonic temperature dependence as a function of the external anisotropy and vanishes at a quantum critical end point for a strong anisotropy. The mean-field phase diagram is found to be very sensitive to fluctuations of the nematic order parameter, yielding a topologically different phase diagram. The Griffiths wing is broken into two pieces. A tiny wing appears close to zero anisotropy and the other is realized for a strong anisotropy. Consequently three quantum critical end points are realized. We discuss that these results can be related to various materials including a cold atom system.

  12. Energetic electrons in dipolarization events: Spatial properties and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Runov, A.; Hesse, M.

    2014-05-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection, flow bursts, and dipolarization, we further investigate the acceleration of electrons to suprathermal energies. Particular emphasis is on spatial properties and anisotropies as functions of energy and time. The simulation results are compared with Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. The test particle approach successfully reproduces several observed injection features and puts them into a context of spatial maps of the injection region(s): a dominance of perpendicular anisotropies farther down the tail and closer to the equatorial plane, an increasing importance of parallel anisotropy closer to Earth and at higher latitudes, a drop in energy fluxes at energies below ˜10keV, coinciding with the plasma density drop, together with increases at higher energy, a triple peak structure of flux increases near 0°, 90°, and 180°, and a tendency of flux increases to extend to higher energy closer to Earth and at lower latitudes. We identified the plasma sheet boundary layers and adjacent lobes as a main source region for both increased and decreased energetic electron fluxes, related to the different effects of adiabatic acceleration at high and low energies. The simulated anisotropies tend to exceed the observed ones, particularly for perpendicular fluxes at high energies. The most plausible reason is that the MHD simulation lacks the effects of anisotropy-driven microinstabilities and waves, which would reduce anisotropies.

  13. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

  14. Transport Anisotropy and Impurity Scattering in Ge at Millikelvin Temperatures: Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, E.; Domange, J.; Dumoulin, L.; Marnieros, S.; Broniatowski, A.

    2012-06-01

    Anisotropy effects in hot carrier transport have been investigated in germanium crystals at mK temperatures in the electric field range pertaining to the operation of the Edelweiss dark matter detectors. Comparative measurements have been made on n-type specimens of different impurity contents, both ultra-pure ( N d - N a <1010 cm-3) and doped to 1011 cm-3. At relatively high field intensities (?5 V/cm), similar features of electron and hole transport are observed independent of the concentration of electrically active impurities. Differences appear at lower field (down to a fraction of a V/cm) with regard to electron straggling especially, dependent on crystal purity. These experiments demonstrate the importance on carrier transport of impurity scattering at low field, whereas phonon scattering becomes the dominant factor at higher field intensities.

  15. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  16. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  17. Galaxy Cluster Baryon Fractions, Cluster Surveys and Cosmology

    E-print Network

    Joseph J. Mohr; Zoltan Haiman; Gilbert P. Holder

    2000-04-18

    The properties of nearby galaxy clusters limit the range of cosmological parameters consistent with our universe. We describe the limits which arise from studies of the intracluster medium (ICM) mass fraction fICM and consideration of the possible sources of systematic error: Omega_M0. We then discuss future galaxy cluster surveys which will probe the abundance of galaxy clusters to intermediate and high redshift. We investigate the sensitivity of these surveys to the cosmological density parameter Omega_M and the equation of state parameter w of any quintessence component. In particular, we show that cluster survey constraints from a proposed large solid angle X-ray survey are comparable in precision and complementary in nature to constraints expected from future CMB anisotropy and SNe Ia studies.

  18. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the ? effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the ? effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the ?×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for ?. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  19. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mild to severe, depending on associated brain abnormalities. Intelligence may be normal with mild compromise of skills ... Although many children with the disorder have average intelligence and lead normal lives, neuropsychological testing reveals subtle ...

  20. Enhanced resolution of fluorescence anisotropy decays by simultaneous analysis of progressively quenched samples. Applications to anisotropic rotations and to protein dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, J R; Cherek, H; Gryczynski, I; Joshi, N; Johnson, M L

    1987-01-01

    Enhanced resolution of rapid and complex anisotropy decays was obtained by measurement and analysis of data from progressively quenched samples. Collisional quenching by acrylamide was used to vary the mean decay time of indole or of the tryptophan fluorescence from melittin. Anisotropy decays were obtained from the frequency-response of the polarized emission at frequencies from 4 to 2,000 MHz. Quenching increases the fraction of the total emission, which occurs on the subnanosecond timescale, and thereby provides increased information on picosecond rotational motions or local motions in proteins. For monoexponential subnanosecond anisotropy decays, enhanced resolution is obtained by measurement of the most highly quenched samples. For complex anisotropy decays, such as those due to both local motions and overall protein rotational diffusion, superior resolution is obtained by simultaneous analysis of data from quenched and unquenched samples. We demonstrate that measurement of quenched samples greatly reduces the uncertainty of the 50-ps correlation time of indole in water at 20 degrees C, and allows resolution of the anisotropic rotation of indole with correlation times of 140 and 720 ps. The method was applied to melittin in the monomeric and tetrameric forms. With increased quenching, the anisotropy data showed decreasing contributions from overall protein rotation and increased contribution from picosecond tryptophan motions. The tryptophan residues in both the monomeric and the tetrameric forms of melittin displayed substantial local motions with correlation times near 0.16 and 0.06 ns, respectively. The amplitude of the local motion is twofold less in the tetramer. These highly resolved anisotropy decays should be valuable for comparison with molecular dynamics simulations of melittin. PMID:3593873

  1. Seismic anisotropy changes across upper mantle phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kaiqing; Beghein, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    The mantle transition zone is believed to play an important role in the thermochemical evolution of our planet and in its deep water cycle. Constraining mantle flow at these depths can help elucidate its nature and better understand mantle dynamics and the history of plate tectonics. Seismic anisotropy, i.e., the directional dependence of seismic wave velocity, provides us with the most direct constraints on mantle deformation. Its detection below ˜250km depth is challenging, and it is often assumed that the deep upper mantle is seismically isotropic due to a change in mantle deformation mechanism. Here, we present a global model of azimuthal anisotropy for the top 1000 km of the mantle. We used a dataset composed of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps, which provides resolution of azimuthal anisotropy to much greater depths than in previous studies. Our model unravels the presence of significant anisotropy in the transition zone, challenging common views of mantle deformation mechanisms, and reveals a striking correlation between changes in anisotropy amplitudes and in the fast direction of wave propagation where upper mantle phase transitions occur. The newly found relation between anisotropy changes and phase transformations gives new insight on the nature of the MTZ and suggests that the anisotropy originates from the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic material. While the interpretation of our results in terms of mantle deformation is not straightforward due to many possible scenarios, possible explanations for our findings include recrystallization during phase transformations, or changes in the slip system across the MTZ boundaries, which in turn could be explained by changes in the water content of mantle material, consistent with the idea that the transition zone acts as a water filter.

  2. Anisotropy spectra for enantiomeric differentiation of biomolecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Evans, A C; Meinert, C; Bredehöft, J H; Giri, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Meierhenrich, U J

    2013-01-01

    All biopolymers are composed of homochiral building blocks, and both D-sugars and L-amino acids uniquely constitute life on Earth. These monomers were originally enantiomerically differentiated under prebiotic conditions. Particular progress has recently been made in support of the photochemical model for this differentiation: the interaction of circularly polarized light with racemic molecules is currently thought to have been the original source for life's biological homochirality. The differential asymmetric photoreactivity of particular small molecules can be characterized by both circular dichroism and anisotropy spectroscopy. Anisotropy spectroscopy, a novel derivative of circular dichroism spectroscopy, records the anisotropy factor g = ??/? as a function of the wavelength. Anisotropy spectroscopy promisingly affords the wavelength-dependent determination of the enantiomeric excess (ee) inducible into chiral organic molecules by photochemical irradiation with circularly polarized light. Anisotropy spectra of small molecules therefore provide unique means for characterizing the different photochemical behaviors between enantiomers upon exposure to various wavelengths of circularly polarized light. This chapter will: (1) present the theory and configuration of anisotropy spectroscopy; (2) explain experimentally recorded anisotropy spectra of selected chiral biomolecules such as amino acids; and (3) discuss the relevance of these spectra for the investigation of the origin of the molecular homochirality observed in living organisms. This review describes a new chiroptical technique that is of significance for advances in asymmetric photochemistry and that is also highly relevant for the European Space Agency Rosetta Mission, which will determine enantiomeric excesses (ees) in chiral organic molecules in cometary ices when it lands on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. PMID:23839281

  3. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin E-mail: mishak@utdallas.edu

    2014-03-01

    The study of relativistic, higher order, and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are thus naturally included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of such clusters. The resulting relative difference in various geometries can be as large as approximately 2%, 8%, and 24% in the measure of convergence (1??) for levels of anisotropy of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, as a fraction of total cluster mass. For the total magnitude of shear, the relative difference can grow near the center of the structure to be as large as 15%, 32%, and 44% for the same levels of anisotropy, averaged over the two extreme geometries. The convergence is impacted most strongly for rays which pass in directions along the axis of maximum dipole anisotropy in the structure, while the shear is most strongly impacted for rays which pass in directions orthogonal to this axis, as expected. The rich features found in the lensing signal due to anisotropic substructure are nearly entirely lost when one treats the cluster in the traditional FLRW lensing framework. These effects due to anisotropic structures are thus likely to impact lensing measurements and must be fully examined in an era of precision cosmology.

  4. Fractional Schrödinger equation in optics

    E-print Network

    Stefano Longhi

    2015-01-09

    In quantum mechanics, the space-fractional Schr\\"{o}dinger equation provides a natural extension of the standard Schr\\"{o}dinger equation when the Brownian trajectories in Feynman path integrals are replaced by Levy flights. Here an optical realization of the fractional Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, based on transverse light dynamics in aspherical optical cavities, is proposed. As an example a laser implementation of the fractional quantum harmonic oscillator is presented, in which dual Airy beams can be selectively generated under off-axis longitudinal pumping.

  5. Anisotropie magnetique du La2NiMnO6 multiferroique par magnetometrie statique et spectroscopie de resonance ferromagnetique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, Dany

    In this research, magnetic properties of thin films composed of both double- (La2NiMnO6 or LNMOo) and simple-perovskites (LaNi0.5Mn0.5O3 ou LNMOd) are studied. This mixt phase (LNMOm) possesses two magnetic transitions; one for each phase present. It has previously been shown that this phase possesses a higher Curie temperature than LNMOo, approaching room temperature. This property makes room temperature ferromagnetic resonance measurements possible. Angular FMR measurement has already been achieved, but the magnetic anisotropy resulting isn’t completely understood. The goal of this study is to increase our understanding of this anisotropy to get new informations on the structure of the samples. To achieve this goal, thin films of LNMOm have been deposited by PLD on three different substrates; LSAT(001), LSAT(011) and LSAT(111). LSAT has been chosen for his insulating properties limiting the losses in the microwave cavities used for FMR measurements and for his very smooth surface. One sample of LNMOm on LAO(001) was also fabricated by Mangala Singh from the laboratoire des matériaux quantiques during a summer internship of the author. Some of the results obtained on this sample were used in this work. The samples were first characterized using static magnetometry. All samples possess two magnetic transitions, one at low temperature corresponding to the disordered phase and one at high temperature corresponding to the ordered phase. The temperature of these transitions were obtained with precision using the inflection point method. The high temperature transition was then confirmed using magnetocaloric effect, which gave the exact same values. The transition temperature of the ordered phase of all samples was between 268 and 271 K, while the transition of the disordered phase was between 60 and 110 K. A third transition at really low temperature was observed on some samples. The volume and volumic fraction of the ordered and disordered phases were approximated by comparing the saturated magnetization of each sample with the expected values at different temperatures. Finally, thermomagnetic processes were observed in all samples. These measurements suggests a more complex microstructure in the sample on LSAT(111) than in the sample on LSAT(011) which is consistent with the anisotropy observed by FMR spectroscopy. FMR characterization has then been performed. The magnetic anisotropy of the different samples was studied at 24 GHz and at room temperature. All samples possess two groups of peaks wich are attributed to different parts of the thin film, a wetting film and a region in which the strains are relaxed. The dominant source of anisotropy seems to be magnetostatic, produced by the shape of ordered clusters in the disordered matrix. Four anisotropy axis were observed on the sample grown on LSAT(001), which is consistent with a monoclinic crystalline structure inducing preferential growth orientations in four directions. Weak cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy has been observed for the wetting film. This anisotropy suggest a rotation of 45° between the lattice of the substrate and the lattice of the film. Measurements at different frequencies allowed us to compare a curve of the anisotropy field in function of the resonance field with a curve of magnetization in function of the applied magnetic field. Comparison of these curves allowed us to determine a shape factor of the ordered clusters of approximately 1, corresponding to very flat ellipsoid. Different measurements allowed us to get a g-factor of approximately 2, corresponding to that of a free spin. Finally, temperature dependence of resonance field and full width at half maximum are shown. The variation of these parameters corresponds to the expected behavior.

  6. Bound Pool Fractions Complement Diffusion Measures to Describe White Matter Micro and Macrostructure

    PubMed Central

    Stikov, Nikola; Perry, Lee M.; Mezer, Aviv; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Wandell, Brian A.; Pauly, John M.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion imaging and bound pool fraction (BPF) mapping are two quantitative magnetic resonance imaging techniques that measure microstructural features of the white matter of the brain. Diffusion imaging provides a quantitative measure of the diffusivity of water in tissue. BPF mapping is a quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) technique that estimates the proportion of exchanging protons bound to macromolecules, such as those found in myelin, and is thus a more direct measure of myelin content than diffusion. In this work, we combine BPF estimates of macromolecular content with measurements of diffusivity within human white matter tracts. Within the white matter, the correlation between BPFs and diffusivity measures such as fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity was modest, suggesting that diffusion tensor imaging and bound pool fractions are complementary techniques. We found that several major tracts have high BPF, suggesting a higher density of myelin in these tracts. We interpret these results in the context of a quantitative tissue model. PMID:20828622

  7. Origin of azimuthal seismic anisotropy in oceanic plates and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-09-01

    Seismic anisotropy is ubiquitous in the Earth's mantle but strongest in its thermo-mechanical boundary layers. Azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere can be imaged by surface waves and should be particularly straightforward to relate to well-understood plate kinematics and large-scale mantle flow. However, previous studies have come to mixed conclusions as to the depth extent of the applicability of paleo-spreading and mantle flow models of anisotropy, and no simple, globally valid, relationships exist. Here, we show that lattice preferred orientation (LPO) inferred from mantle flow computations produces a plausible global background model for asthenospheric anisotropy underneath oceanic lithosphere. The same is not true for absolute plate motion (APM) models. A ˜200 km thick layer where the flow model LPO matches observations from tomography lies just below the ˜1200 °C isotherm of a half-space cooling model, indicating strong temperature-dependence of the processes that control the development of azimuthal anisotropy. We infer that the depth extent of shear, and hence the thickness of a relatively strong oceanic lithosphere, can be mapped this way. These findings for the background model, and ocean-basin specific deviations from the half-space cooling pattern, are found in all of the three recent and independent tomographic models considered. Further exploration of deviations from the background model may be useful for general studies of oceanic plate formation and dynamics as well as regional-scale tectonic analyses.

  8. Anisotropy of magnetoviscous effect in structure-forming ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Sreekumari, Aparna; Ilg, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    The magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with change in magnetic field strength, and the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with orientation of magnetic field, have been a focus of interest for four decades. A satisfactory understanding of the microscopic origin of anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in magnetic fluids is still a matter of debate and a field of intense research. Here, we present an extensive simulation study to understand the relation between the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect and the underlying change in microstructures of ferrofluids. Our results indicate that field-induced chainlike structures respond very differently depending on their orientation relative to the direction of an externally applied shear flow, which leads to a pronounced anisotropy of viscosity. In this work, we focus on three exemplary values of dipolar interaction strengths which correspond to weak, intermediate, and strong interactions between dipolar colloidal particles. We compare our simulation results with an experimental study on cobalt-based ferrofluids as well as with an existing theoretical model called the chain model. A nonmonotonic behavior in the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is observed with increasing dipolar interaction strength and is explained in terms of microstructure formation. PMID:26274161

  9. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  10. Anisotropy of magnetoviscous effect in structure-forming ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumari, Aparna; Ilg, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    The magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with change in magnetic field strength, and the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with orientation of magnetic field, have been a focus of interest for four decades. A satisfactory understanding of the microscopic origin of anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in magnetic fluids is still a matter of debate and a field of intense research. Here, we present an extensive simulation study to understand the relation between the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect and the underlying change in microstructures of ferrofluids. Our results indicate that field-induced chainlike structures respond very differently depending on their orientation relative to the direction of an externally applied shear flow, which leads to a pronounced anisotropy of viscosity. In this work, we focus on three exemplary values of dipolar interaction strengths which correspond to weak, intermediate, and strong interactions between dipolar colloidal particles. We compare our simulation results with an experimental study on cobalt-based ferrofluids as well as with an existing theoretical model called the chain model. A nonmonotonic behavior in the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is observed with increasing dipolar interaction strength and is explained in terms of microstructure formation.

  11. Characterising gravitational wave stochastic background anisotropy with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    E-print Network

    Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Trevor Sidery; Ilya Mandel; Alberto Vecchio

    2013-09-07

    Detecting a stochastic gravitational wave background, particularly radiation from individually unresolvable super-massive black hole binary systems, is one of the primary targets for Pulsar Timing Arrays. Increasingly more stringent upper limits are being set on these signals under the assumption that the background radiation is isotropic. However, some level of anisotropy may be present and the characterisation of the power at different angular scales carries important information. We show that the standard analysis for isotropic backgrounds can be generalised in a conceptually straightforward way to the case of generic anisotropic background radiation by decomposing the angular distribution of the gravitational wave power on the sky into multipole moments. We introduce the concept of generalised overlap reduction functions which characterise the effect of the anisotropy multipoles on the correlation of the timing residuals from the pulsars timed by a Pulsar Timing Array. In a search for a signal characterised by a generic anisotropy, the generalised overlap reduction functions play the role of the so-called Hellings and Downs curve used for isotropic radiation. We compute the generalised overlap reduction functions for a generic level of anisotropy and Pulsar Timing Array configuration. We also provide an order of magnitude estimate of the level of anisotropy that can be expected in the background generated by super-massive black hole binary systems.

  12. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    E-print Network

    Hou, Han Wei

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate ...

  13. Aspects of superconductivity and fractionalization

    E-print Network

    Raut, Dinesh V

    2005-01-01

    Since their discovery in mid 80's, a complete theory of high temperature superconductors is yet to take its final shape. Theory of fractionalization attempts to explain the phenomenon by assuming that the electron is split ...

  14. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  15. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

  16. Enhancement of rotatable anisotropy in ferrite doped FeNi thin film with oblique sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Jiang, Changjun; Zhao, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Rotatable anisotropy of stripe domain (SD) was investigated in a ferrite doped FeNi thin film with different oblique angles. Rotation of SD under an in-plane magnetic field was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting the existence of rotatable anisotropy. A rotatable anisotropy field Hrot was derived from the fitting curves of the in-plane resonance field versus the angle between the orientation of easy axis and applied field. As the oblique angle increases, an increase of Hrot from 305 Oe to 468 Oe was observed and the perpendicular anisotropy increased as well, indicating a correlation between rotatable anisotropy and perpendicular anisotropy.

  17. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    E-print Network

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006- 2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  18. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  19. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system. PMID:11537194

  20. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-09-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  1. Myelination and long diffusion times alter diffusion-tensor-imaging contrast in myelin-deficient shiverer mice

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Govind; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Low, Hoi Pang; Billings-Gagliardi, Susan; Schwartz, William J.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using variable diffusion times (tdiff) was performed to investigate wild-type (wt) mice, myelin-deficient shiverer (shi) mutant mice and shi mice transplanted with wt neural precursor cells that differentiate and function as oligodendrocytes. At tdiff = 30 ms, the diffusion anisotropy “volume ratio” (VR), diffusion perpendicular to the fibers (??), and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (?D?) of the corpus callosum of shi mice were significantly higher than those of wt mice by 12 ± 2%, 13 ± 2%, and 10 ± 1%, respectively; fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative anisotropy (RA) were lower by 10 ± 1% and 11 ± 3%, respectively. Diffusion parallel to the fibers (?//) was not statistically different between shi and wt mice. Normalized T2-weighted signal intensities showed obvious differences (27 ± 4%) between wt and shi mice in the corpus callosum but surprisingly did not detect transplant-derived myelination. In contrast, diffusion anisotropy maps detected transplant-derived myelination in the corpus callosum and its spatial distribution was consistent with the donor-derived myelination determined by immunohistochemical staining. Anisotropy indices (except ?//) in the corpus callosum showed strong tdiff dependence (30–280 ms), and the differences in ?? and VR between wt and shi mice became significantly larger at longer tdiff, indicative of improved DTI sensitivity at long tdiff. In contrast, anisotropy indices in the hippocampus showed very weak tdiff dependence and were not significantly different between wt and shi mice across different tdiff. This study provides insights into the biological signal sources and measurement parameters influencing DTI contrast, which could lead to developing more sensitive techniques for detection of demyelinating diseases. PMID:16023870

  2. The First Billion Years project: the escape fraction of ionizing photons in the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Khochfar, Sadegh; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    Protogalaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionizing photons needed to reionize the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionizing photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form, by computing escape fractions in more than 75 000 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the First Billion Years project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the gas column density in a radius of 10 pc around the stellar populations, causing a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with M200 ? 108 M? results in low column densities that can be penetrated by radiation from young stars (age <5 Myr). In haloes with M200 ? 108 M? supernova feedback is important, but only ˜30 per cent of the haloes in this mass range have an escape fraction higher than 1 per cent. We find a large range of escape fractions in haloes with similar properties, caused by different distributions of the dense gas in the halo. This makes it very hard to predict the escape fraction on the basis of halo properties and results in a highly anisotropic escape fraction. The strong mass dependence, the large spread and the large anisotropy of the escape fraction may strongly affect the topology of reionization and is something current models of cosmic reionization should strive to take into account.

  3. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Yekaterina Rokhlenko; Kai Zhang; Manesh Gopinadhan; Steve R. Larson; Pawel W. Majewski; Kevin G. Yager; Padma Gopalan; Corey S. O'Hern; Chinedum O. Osuji

    2015-09-03

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using \\textit{in situ} X-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, $\\Delta\\chi$, that drives alignment, and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding $\\Delta\\chi\\approx 2\\times10^{-8}$. From field-dependent scattering data we estimate grains of $\\approx1.2$ $\\mu$m are present during alignment. These results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  4. Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J??J?). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

  5. Anisotropy of photon production: initial eccentricity or magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir

    2013-05-10

    Recent measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of direct photons in heavy-ion collisions at the energies of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider show that it is of the same order as the hadronic one. This finding appears to contradict the expected dominance of photon production from a quark-gluon plasma at an early stage of a heavy-ion collision. A possible explanation of the strong azimuthal anisotropy of the photons, given recently, is based on the presence of a large magnetic field in the early phase of a collision. In this Letter, we propose a method to experimentally measure the degree to which a magnetic field in heavy-ion collisions is responsible for the observed anisotropy of photon production. The experimental test proposed in this Letter may potentially change our understanding of the nonequilibrium stage and possible thermalization in heavy-ion collisions. PMID:23705700

  6. Interfaces anisotropy in single crystal V/Fe/V trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, D.; Lytvynenko, Ia.; Hauet, T.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Andrieu, S.; Montaigne, F.

    2014-12-01

    The value and sign of V/Fe interface anisotropy are investigated. Epitaxial V/Fe/V/Au layers with different iron thicknesses were grown on single-crystalline (001) MgO substrate by ultra-high vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetometry was used to measure magnetization and out-of-plane anisotropy field. From these values, we quantify the number of dead layers due to V/Fe or Fe/V interfaces, and compare it with the literature. We deduce that dead layers occur mostly at the bottom V/Fe interface. An average value for V/Fe and Fe/V interface anisotropy around 0±0.1 erg/cm2 (mJ/m2) was thus deduced.

  7. Fire Hose instability driven by alpha particle temperature anisotropy

    E-print Network

    Matteini, Lorenzo; Schwartz, Steven; Landi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, the instability can be triggered also when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies both of them can drive the instability, and we observe generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in...

  8. Curvature and anisotropy estimation through the CRS approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shibo; Stovas, Alexey

    2015-12-01

    Multiparameter stacking is a crucial tool to get a high-quality time image of the subsurface, which can provide a basis for many important applications. We analyse the CRS approximation for a circular reflector embedded into effective anisotropic media. In this case, the CRS attributes depend on both reflector curvature and anisotropy parameters. We consider the effective anisotropic model from two anisotropic cases—elliptical isotropic and transversely isotropic with vertical symmetry axis—and one vertically heterogeneous isotropic case, i.e. two-layer model. By performing a sensitivity analysis, we show how the estimates depend on anisotropy parameters. We convert the CRS attributes into parameters for the isotropic model and analyse these estimates’ behaviour along the seismic line. From this behaviour, we estimate both structure and anisotropy parameters.

  9. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of cobalt doped titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bin; Feng, Min; Zuo, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we predict that the magnetic anisotropy energy of Co-doped TiO2 sensitively depends on carrier accumulation. This magnetoelectric phenomenon provides a potential route to a direct manipulation of the magnetization direction in diluted magnetic semiconductor by external electric-fields. We calculate the band structures and reveal the origin of the carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy energy in k-space. It is shown that the carrier accumulation shifts the Fermi energy, and consequently, regulates the competing contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy. The calculations provide an insight to understanding this magnetoelectric phenomenon, and a straightforward way to search prospective materials for electrically controllable spin direction of carriers. PMID:25510846

  10. Advanced magnetic anisotropy determination through isothermal remanent magnetization of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillion, A.; Tamion, A.; Tournus, F.; Gaier, O.; Bonet, E.; Albin, C.; Dupuis, V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a theoretical framework enabling the simulation of isothermal remanence magnetization (IRM) curves, based on the Stoner-Wohlfarth model combined with the Néel macrospin relaxation time description. We show how low temperature IRM curves, which have many advantages compared to hysteresis loops, can be efficiently computed for realistic assemblies of magnetic particles with both a size and anisotropy constant distribution, and a biaxial anisotropy. The IRM curves, which probe the irreversible switching provoked by an applied field, are shown to be complementary to other usual measurements (in particular low-field susceptibility curves where a thermal switching is involved). As an application, the experimental IRM curve of Co clusters embedded in a carbon matrix is analyzed. We demonstrate how powerful such an analysis can be, which in the present case allows us to put into evidence an anisotropy constant dispersion among the Co nanoparticles.

  11. Large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3-K cosmic background radiation are reported. A dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz flown aboard a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude on 11 flights between December 1976 and May 1978 measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the Northern Hemisphere. Measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fitted by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 3.6 + or - 0.5 mK, corresponding to a velocity of 360 + or - 50 km/s toward the direction 11.2 + or - 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 deg + or - 8 deg declination.

  12. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-print Network

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  13. Large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1981-03-01

    Results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3-K cosmic background radiation are reported. A dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz flown aboard a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude on 11 flights between December 1976 and May 1978 measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the Northern Hemisphere. Measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fitted by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 3.6 + or - 0.5 mK, corresponding to a velocity of 360 + or - 50 km/s toward the direction 11.2 + or - 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 deg + or - 8 deg declination.

  14. Observational Constraints on Microwave Anisotropy from Point Sources

    E-print Network

    Eric Gawiser; Andrew Jaffe; Joseph Silk

    1998-11-10

    Applying basic physical principles to recent observational results, we derive upper and lower limits on microwave anisotropy from point sources over the range of frequencies 10-1000 GHz. We examine the level of noise in the observations as a possible indication of source confusion at subarcminute scales. We also derive an upper limit on microwave anisotropy caused by the sources responsible for the Far-Infrared Background radiation detected in FIRAS data. Our upper limit on point source confusion of DeltaT/T=10^{-5} for a 10' beam at 100 GHz would cause severe foreground contamination for CMB anisotropy observations, although the actual contamination level is probably much lower. This upper limit constrains the long-feared possibility of an undetected population of sources with emission peaking near 100 GHz. Source detections closer to 100 GHz are needed to improve our knowledge of galaxy evolution at high redshift and to predict the level of point source confusion.

  15. UNDERSTANDING TeV-BAND COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, Martin; Eichler, David E-mail: eichler@bgu.ac.il

    2013-03-20

    We investigate the temporal and spectral correlations between flux and anisotropy fluctuations of TeV-band cosmic rays in light of recent data taken with IceCube. We find that for a conventional distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the dipole anisotropy is higher than observed, even if source discreteness is taken into account. Moreover, even for a shallow distribution of galactic cosmic-ray sources and a reacceleration model, fluctuations arising from source discreteness provide a probability only of the order of 10% that the cosmic-ray anisotropy limits of the recent IceCube analysis are met. This probability estimate is nearly independent of the exact choice of source rate, but generous for a large halo size. The location of the intensity maximum far from the Galactic Center is naturally reproduced.

  16. Optical anisotropy in bismuth titanate: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Amritendu; Prasad, Rajendra; Auluck, Sushil; Garg, Ashish

    2014-04-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigation of anisotropy in optical properties and their origin in the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases of bismuth titanate. Room temperature ellipsometric measurements performed on pulsed laser deposited bismuth titanate thin films of different orientations show anisotropy in the dielectric and optical constants. Subsequent first-principles calculations performed on the ground state structures of ferroelectric and high temperature paraelectric phases of bismuth titanate show that the material demonstrates anisotropic optical behavior in both ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. We further show that O 2p to Ti 3d transition is the primary origin of optical property of the material while optical anisotropy results from the asymmetrically oriented Ti-O bonds in TiO6 octahedra in the unit cell.

  17. Constraining depth of anisotropy in the Amazon region (Northern Brasil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Irene; Willy Corrêa Rosa, João; Bokelmann, Götz

    2014-05-01

    Seismic data recorded between November 2009 and September 2013, at the permanent station PTGA of the Brazilian seismic network were used to constrain the depth of anisotropy in the lithosphere beneath the station. 90 receiver functions (RF) have been computed, covering the backazimuthal directions from 0° to 180°. Both radial (R) and transverse (T) components of the RF contain useful information about the subsurface structure. The isotropic part of the seismic velocity profile at depth mainly affects the R-RF component, while anisotropy and dipping structures produce P-to-S conversion recorded on the T-RF component (Levin and Park, 1998; Savage, 1998). The incoming (radially polarized) S waves, when passing through an anisotropic crust, splits and part of it is projected onto the transverse component. The anisotropy symmetry orientations (?) can be estimated by the polarity change of the observed phases. The arrival times of the phases is related to the depth of the conversion. Depth and ? are estimated by isolating phases at certain arrival times. SKS shear-wave splitting results from previous studies in this area (Krüger et al., 2002, Rosa et al., 2014), suggest the presence of anisotropy in the mantle with orientation of the fast splitting axis (about E-W) following major deep tectonic structures. The observed splitting orientation correlates well with the current South America plate motion (i.e. relative to mesosphere), and with observed aeromagnetic trends. This similarity leaves open the possibility of a linkage between the upper mantle fabric imaged by shear wave splitting analysis and the lower crustal structure imaged by aeromagnetometry. In this study we unravel, from RF data, two layers in which anisotropy concentrates, i.e. the lower crust and the upper mantle. Lower crustal and upper mantle anisotropy retrieved by RFs give some new hints in order to interpret the previously observed anisotropic orientations from SKS and the aeromagnetic anomalies.

  18. Fire Hose Instability Driven by Alpha Particle Temperature Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Hellinger, P.; Schwartz, S. J.; Landi, S.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  19. Seismic anisotropy in granite at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, G.M.; Crampin, S.; Young, R.P.

    2000-05-01

    The Shear-Wave Experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory was probably the first controlled-source shear-wave survey in a mine environment. Taking place in conjunction with the excavation of the Mine-by test tunnel at 420 m depth, the shear-wave experiment was designed to measure the in situ anisotropy of the rockmass and to use shear waves to observe excavation effects using the greatest variety of raypath directions of any in situ shear-wave survey to date. Inversion of the shear-wave polarizations shows that the anisotropy of the in situ rockmass is consistent with hexagonal symmetry with an approximate fabric orientation of strike 023{degree} and dip 35{degree}. The in situ anisotropy is probably due to microcracks with orientations governed by the in situ stress field and to mineral alignment within the weak gneissic layering. However, there is no unique interpretation as to the cause of the in situ anisotropy as the fabric orientation agrees approximately with both the orientation expected from extensive-dilatancy anisotropy and that of the gneissic layering. Eight raypaths with shear waves propagating wholly or almost wholly through granodiorite, rather than granite, do not show the expected shear-wave splitting and indicate a lower in situ anisotropy, which may be due to the finer grain size and/or the absence of gneissic layering within the granodiorite. These results suggest that shear waves may be used to determine crack and mineral orientations and for remote monitoring of a rockmass. This has potential applications in mining and waste monitoring.

  20. Finite driving rate and anisotropy effects in landslide modeling

    E-print Network

    Piegari, E; Maio, R D; Milano, L; Nicodemi, M

    2006-01-01

    In order to characterize landslide frequency-size distributions and individuate hazard scenarios and their possible precursors, we investigate a cellular automaton where the effects of a finite driving rate and the anisotropy are taken into account. The model is able to reproduce observed features of landslide events, such as power-law distributions, as experimentally reported. We analyze the key role of the driving rate and show that, as it is increased, a crossover from power-law to non power-law behaviors occurs. Finally, a systematic investigation of the model on varying its anisotropy factors is performed and the full diagram of its dynamical behaviors is presented.

  1. Finite driving rate and anisotropy effects in landslide modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Piegari, E.; Cataudella, V.; Di Maio, R.; Milano, L.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-02-15

    In order to characterize landslide frequency-size distributions and individuate hazard scenarios and their possible precursors, we investigate a cellular automaton where the effects of a finite driving rate and the anisotropy are taken into account. The model is able to reproduce observed features of landslide events, such as power-law distributions, as experimentally reported. We analyze the key role of the driving rate and show that, as it is increased, a crossover from power-law to non-power-law behaviors occurs. Finally, a systematic investigation of the model on varying its anisotropy factors is performed and the full diagram of its dynamical behaviors is presented.

  2. Enhanced magnetic anisotropy in cobalt-carbide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gendy, AA; Qian, MC; Huba, ZJ; Khanna, SN; Carpenter, EE

    2014-01-13

    An outstanding problem in nano-magnetism is to stabilize the magnetic order in nanoparticles at room temperatures. For ordinary ferromagnetic materials, reduction in size leads to a decrease in the magnetic anisotropy resulting in superparamagnetic relaxations at nanoscopic sizes. In this work, we demonstrate that using wet chemical synthesis, it is possible to stabilize cobalt carbide nanoparticles which have blocking temperatures exceeding 570 K even for particles with magnetic domains of 8 nm. First principles theoretical investigations show that the observed behavior is rooted in the giant magnetocrystalline anisotropies due to controlled mixing between C p- and Co d-states. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  3. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    SciTech Connect

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Gangloff, John J. Jr.; Li Chunyu; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2009-08-17

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle array with perpendicular crystal magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haginoya, Chiseki; Heike, Seiji; Ishibashi, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Kimio; Koike, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Jiro; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki

    1999-06-01

    By using electron beam lithography, a continuous CoCrPt film with a perpendicular crystal magnetic anisotropy has been patterned into a magnetic nanoparticle array of 29 Gdot/in.2 with a 150 nm period, an 80 nm diameter, and a 44 nm height. Studies of magnetic properties using a magnetic force microscope and a vibrating sample magnetometer show that this patterning increases the remanent-to-saturation magnetization ratio from 0.2 of the continuous film to 1 of the particles, and that each particle has a single magnetic domain with perpendicular anisotropy. The application of this array to future high density magnetic recording media is discussed.

  5. Random-anisotropy Blume-Emery-Griffiths model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Swift, Michael R.; Toigo, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    The results are described of studies of a random-anisotropy Blume-Emery-Griffiths spin-1 Ising model using mean-field theory, transfer-matrix calculations, and position-space renormalization-group calculations. The interplay between the quenched randomness of the anisotropy and the annealed disorder introduced by the spin-1 model leads to a rich phase diagram with a variety of phase transitions and reentrant behavior. The results may be relevant to the study of the phase separation of He-3 - He-4 mixtures in porous media in the vicinity of the superfluid transition.

  6. Anisotropy of MHD Turbulence at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zikanov, O.; Vorobev, A.; Thess, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Knaepen, B.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in MHD flows are known to become dimensionally anisotropic under the action of a sufficiently strong magnetic field. We consider the technologically relevant case of low magnetic Reynolds number and apply the method of DNS of forced flow in a periodic box to generate velocity fields. The analysis based on different anisotropy characteristics shows that the dimensional anisotropy is virtually scale-independent. We also find that, except for the case of very strong magnetic field, the flow is componentally isotropic. Its kinetic energy is practically uniformly distributed among the velocity components.

  7. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings

    E-print Network

    B. Allen; R. R. Caldwell; E. P. S. Shellard; A. Stebbins; S. Veeraraghavan

    1994-07-14

    We report on a current investigation of the anisotropy pattern induced by cosmic strings on the cosmic microwave background radiation (MBR). We have numerically evolved a network of cosmic strings from a redshift of $Z = 100$ to the present and calculated the anisotropies which they induce. Based on a limited number of realizations, we have compared the results of our simulations with the observations of the COBE-DMR experiment. We have obtained a preliminary estimate of the string mass-per-unit-length $\\mu$ in the cosmic string scenario.

  8. Modified temperature-anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Schlickeiser, R; Michno, M J; Ibscher, D; Lazar, M; Skoda, T

    2011-11-11

    The proton and electron temperature anisotropies in the solar wind are constrained by the instability thresholds for temperature-anisotropy-driven kinetic plasma instabilities. The modifications to the marginal instability conditions from accounting for the influence of damping connected with the collisional effects in the solar wind plasma are calculated for right- and left-handed polarized parallel propagating Alfvén waves and mirror and firehose fluctuations. These modifications provide tighter threshold constraints compared to the marginal thresholds but do not fully explain the observations at small values of the parallel plasma beta. PMID:22181719

  9. Magnetic anisotropy of transition-metal thin films: Convergence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, Št.?pán; Dorantes-Dávila, J.; Pastor, G. M.; Dreyssé, Hugues

    1994-07-01

    On the basis of extended recursion-scheme calculations and general analysis we show that the instabilities and oscillations of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) curve result from numerical inaccuracies. We explain how to obtain quickly convergent results within the tight-binding recursion method. For an Fe(001) monolayer we find a negligible MAE, for a Co(111) monolayer the in-plane anisotropy is preferred whereas for a Co(111) bilayer the result is sensitive to the choice of parameters. Crystal-field effects are also discussed.

  10. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jason

    2013-05-15

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  11. Elastic anisotropy in hcp metals at high pressure and the sound wave anisotropy of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Merkel, Sébastien; Farber, Daniel L.

    2006-12-01

    We compare the elastic anisotropy in hcp metals at high pressure obtained by radial diffraction measurements with those determined by other experiments and calculations. Our analysis demonstrates that in non-hydrostatically compressed hcp metals the assumption of a single uniform macroscopic stress applied to all grains in the polycrystal for the inversion of the lattice strain equations is violated due to plastic deformation. In addition, the derived apparent moduli and elastic anisotropy differ significantly from those derived from single crystals. We propose that for cobalt, rhenium and iron, the elastic anisotropy in the meridian plane is best described by a sigmoidal shape for the longitudinal velocity, with the fastest direction along the c-axis. Based on these results, we suggest that preferential alignment of the c-axis of iron crystallites along the Earth's rotation axis is the most plausible explanation for the observed P-wave travel time anomalies in the inner core.

  12. Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data 

    E-print Network

    Qian, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

  13. RESEARCH PAPER Stress-induced anisotropy in granular materials: fabric, stiffness,

    E-print Network

    Salzman, Daniel

    RESEARCH PAPER Stress-induced anisotropy in granular materials: fabric, stiffness, and permeability arrangement (fabric) and of the material's strength, incremental stiffness, and permeability. Thirteen measures of fabric anisotropy are developed, which are arranged in four categories: as preferred orien

  14. On Fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  15. Elastic anisotropy modeling of Kimmeridge shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, Roman N.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Matthies, Siegfried; Wirth, Richard

    2013-08-01

    of elastic properties in clay-rich sedimentary rocks has been of long-standing interest. These rocks are cap rocks of oil and gas reservoirs, as well as seals for carbon sequestration. Elasticity of shales has been approached by direct velocity measurements and by models based on microstructures. Here we are revisiting the classical Kimmeridge shale studied by Hornby (1998) by first quantifying microstructural features such as phase volume fractions, grain shapes and grain orientations, and pore distributions with advanced analytical methods and then using this information in different models to explain bulk elastic properties. It is shown that by application of a self-consistent algorithm based on Eshelby's (1957) model of inclusions in a homogeneous medium, it is possible to explain most experimental elastic constants, though some discrepancies remain which may be due to the interpretation of experimental data. Using a differential effective medium approach, an almost perfect agreement with experimental stiffness coefficients can be obtained, though the physical basis of this method may be questionable. The influence of single crystal elastic properties, grain shapes, preferred orientation, and volume and shapes of pores on elastic properties of shale is explored.

  16. Erdélyi-Kober Fractional Diffusion

    E-print Network

    Gianni Pagnini

    2011-12-05

    The aim of this Short Note is to highlight that the {\\it generalized grey Brownian motion} (ggBm) is an anomalous diffusion process driven by a fractional integral equation in the sense of Erd\\'elyi-Kober, and for this reason here it is proposed to call such family of diffusive processes as {\\it Erd\\'elyi-Kober fractional diffusion}. The ggBm is a parametric class of stochastic processes that provides models for both fast and slow anomalous diffusion. This class is made up of self-similar processes with stationary increments and it depends on two real parameters: $0 diffusion stochastic processes when $0 < \\alpha=\\beta <1$, and the standard Brownian motion when $\\alpha=\\beta=1$. In the ggBm framework, the Mainardi function emerges as a natural generalization of the Gaussian distribution recovering the same key role of the Gaussian density for the standard and the fractional Brownian motion.

  17. Fractionalization of holographic Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Huijse, Liza

    2012-10-01

    Zero temperature states of matter at finite charge density are holographically described by a spacetime with an asymptotic electric flux. This flux can be sourced either by explicit charged matter fields in the bulk, by an extremal black hole horizon, or by a combination of the two. We refer to these as mesonic, fully fractionalized and partially fractionalized phases of matter, respectively. By coupling a charged fluid of fermions to an asymptotically AdS4 Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory, we exhibit quantum phase transitions between all three of these phases. The onset of fractionalization can be either a first order or continuous phase transition. In the latter case, at the quantum critical point the theory displays an emergent Lifshitz scaling symmetry in the IR.

  18. Impact of textural anisotropy on syn-kinematic partial melting of natural gneisses: an experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, Anne-Céline; Trap, Pierre; Arbaret, Laurent; Champallier, Rémi; Fauconnier, Julien; Labrousse, Loic; Prouteau, Gaëlle

    2015-04-01

    Partial melting of continental crust is a strong weakening process controlling its rheological behavior and ductile flow of orogens. This strength weakening due to partial melting is commonly constrained experimentally on synthetic starting material with derived rheological law. Such analog starting materials are preferentially used because of their well-constrained composition to test the impact of melt fraction, melt viscosity and melt distribution upon rheology. In nature, incipient melting appears in particular locations where mineral and water contents are favorable, leading to stromatic migmatites with foliation-parallel leucosomes. In addition, leucosomes are commonly located in dilatants structural sites like boudin-necks, in pressure shadows, or in fractures within more competent layers of migmatites. The compositional layering is an important parameter controlling melt flow and rheological behavior of migmatite but has not been tackled experimentally for natural starting material. In this contribution we performed in-situ deformation experiments on natural rock samples in order to test the effect of initial gneissic layering on melt distribution, melt flow and rheological response. In-situ deformation experiments using a Paterson apparatus were performed on two partially melted natural gneissic rocks, named NOP1 & PX28. NOP1, sampled in the Western Gneiss Region (Norway), is biotite-muscovite bearing gneiss with a week foliation and no gneissic layering. PX28, sampled from the Sioule Valley series (French Massif Central), is a paragneiss with a very well pronounced layering with quartz-feldspar-rich and biotite-muscovite-rich layers. Experiments were conducted under pure shear condition at axial strain rate varying from 5*10-6 to 10-3 s-1. The main stress component was maintained perpendicular to the main plane of anisotropy. Confining pressure was 3 kbar and temperature ranges were 750°C and 850-900°C for NOP1 and PX28, respectively. For the 750°C experiments NOP1 was previously hydrated at room pressure and temperature. According to melt fraction, deformation of partially molten gneiss induced different strain patterns. For low melt fraction, at 750°C, deformation within the initially isotropic gneiss NOP1 is localized along large scales shear-zones oriented at about 60° from main stress component ?1. In these zones quartz grains are broken and micas are sheared. Melt is present as thin film (?20 µm) at muscovite-quartz grain boundaries and intrudes quartz aggregates as injections parallel to ?1. For higher melt fraction, at 850°C, deformation is homogeneously distributed. In the layered gneiss PX28, deformation is partitioned between mica-rich and quartz-rich layers. For low melt fraction, at 850°C, numerous conjugate shear-bands crosscut mica-rich layers. Melt is present around muscovite grains and intrudes quartz grains in the favor of fractures. For high melt fractions, at 900°C, melt assisted creep within mica-rich layers is responsible for boudinage of the quartz-feldspar rich layers. Melt-induced veining assists the transport of melt toward inter-boudin zones. Finite strain pattern and melt distribution after deformation of PX28 attest for appearance of strong pressure gradients leading to efficient melt flow. The subsequent melt redistribution strongly enhance strain partitioning and strength weakening, as shown by differential stress vs. strain graphs. Our experiments have successfully reproduced microstructures commonly observed in migmatitic gneisses like boudinage of less fertile layers. Comparison between non-layered and layered gneisses attest for strong influence of compositional anisotropies inherited from the protolith upon melt distribution and migmatite strength.

  19. Fractional derivatives in Dengue epidemics

    E-print Network

    Pooseh, Shakoor; Torres, Delfim F M

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the use of fractional calculus, i.e., the use of integrals and derivatives of non-integer (arbitrary) order, in epidemiology. The proposed approach is illustrated with an outbreak of dengue disease, which is motivated by the first dengue epidemic ever recorded in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of west Africa, in 2009. Numerical simulations show that in some cases the fractional models fit better the reality when compared with the standard differential models. The classical results are obtained as particular cases by considering the order of the derivatives to take an integer value.

  20. Echo of the Big Bang Anisotropies in the

    E-print Network

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    7/1/2009 1 Echo of the Big Bang Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background Age of Precision Cosmology #12;7/1/2009 2 Cosmic Microwave Background Echo of the Big Bang Nobelprijs Natuurkunde 2006 COBE Big Bang at a redshift z=1089 (ie. expansion factor a(t)=1/1089) 7) Following the - Decoupling

  1. Large-scale microwave anisotropy from gravitating seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1992-01-01

    Topological defects could have seeded primordial inhomogeneities in cosmological matter. We examine the horizon-scale matter and geometry perturbations generated by such seeds in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. Evolving particle horizons generally lead to perturbations around motionless seeds, even when there are compensating initial underdensities in the matter. We describe the pattern of the resulting large angular scale microwave anisotropy.

  2. Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    Dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations are affected by processes such as mergers, accretion and the gravitational interaction with baryonic matter. Typically the analysis of dark matter haloes is performed in spherical or elliptical bins and the velocity distributions are often assumed to be constant within those bins. However, the velocity anisotropy, which describes differences between the radial and tangential velocity dispersion, has recently been show to have a strong dependence on direction in the triaxial halos formed in cosmological simulations. In this study we derive properties of particles in cones parallel or perpendicular to the collision axis of merger remnants. We find that the velocity anisotropy has a strong dependence on direction. The finding that the direction-dependence of the velocity anisotropy of a halo depends on the merger history, explains the existence of such trends in cosmological simulations. It also explains why a large diversity is seen in the velocity anisotropy profiles in the outer parts of high-resolution simulations of cosmological haloes.

  3. Advanced MHD models of anisotropy, flow and chaotic fields

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    Advanced MHD models of anisotropy, flow and chaotic fields M. J. Hole1, M. Fitzgerald1, G. Dennis1 pinches Highlight some recent progress Future directions · Conclusions #12;· Pressure different parallel, pressure" #12;· Pressure different parallel and perpendicular to field due mainly to directed neutral beam

  4. Origin of Azimuthal Seismic Anisotropy in Oceanic Plates and Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is strongest in Earth's thermo-mechanical boundarylayers where azimuthal anisotropy should be straightforward to relateto mantle flow. However, both frozen-in and active mantle convectionscenarios have been invoked, and no simple, global relationshipsexist. We show that lattice preferred orientation (LPO) inferred frommantle flow computations, in fact, produces a plausible globalbackground model for asthenospheric anisotropy underneath oceaniclithosphere. The same is not true for absolute plate motion (APM)models. A ~200 km thick layer where the flow model LPO matchesobservations from tomography lies just below the ~1200C isotherm of ahalf-space cooling model, indicating strong temperature-dependence ofthe processes that control the development of azimuthal anisotropy. Weinfer that the depth extent of shear, and hence the thickness of arelatively strong oceanic lithosphere, can be mapped this way. Thesefindings for the background model, and ocean-basin specific deviationsfrom the half-space cooling pattern, are found in all of the threerecent surface wave models we considered. Further exploration ofdeviations from the background model may be useful for general studiesof oceanic plate formation and dynamics as well as regional-scaletectonic analyses.

  5. Anisotropy is Everywhere, to See, to Measure, and to Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Nick; Quadros, Eda

    2015-07-01

    Anisotropy is everywhere. Isotropy is rare. Round stones are collectors' items, and any almost cubic blocks are photographed, as they are the exception. The reasons for rock masses to frequently exhibit impressive degrees of anisotropy, with properties varying with direction of observation and measurement, are clearly their varied geological origins. Origins may provide distinctive bedding cycles in sedimentary rocks, distinctive flows and flow-tops in basalts, foliation in gneisses, schistosity in schists and cleavage in slates, and faults through all the above. We can add igneous dykes, sills, weathered horizons, and dominant joint sets. Each of the above are rich potential or inevitable sources of velocity, modulus, strength and permeability anisotropy—and inhomogeneity. The historic and present-day stress anisotropy provides a wealth of effects concerning the preferentially oriented jointing, with its reduced roughness and greater continuity. High stress may also have induced oriented micro-cracks. All the above reinforce disbelief in the elastic-isotropic-continuum or intact-medium-based assumptions promoted by commercial software companies and used by so many for modelling rock masses. RQD and Q are frequently anisotropic as well, and Q is anisotropic not just because of RQD. The authors, therefore, question whether the a priori assumption of homogeneous-isotropic-elastic behaviour has any significant place in the scientific practice of realistic rock mechanics.

  6. Anisotropy of thermal diffusivity in the upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, A; Gibert, B; Seipold, U; Mainprice, D

    2001-06-14

    Heat transfer in the mantle is a key process controlling the Earth's dynamics. Upper-mantle mineral phases, especially olivine, have been shown to display highly anisotropic thermal diffusivity at ambient conditions, and seismic anisotropy data show that preferred orientations of olivine induced by deformation are coherent at large scales (>50 km) in the upper mantle. Thus heat transport in the upper mantle should be anisotropic. But the thermal anisotropy of mantle minerals at high temperature and its relationship with deformation have not been well constrained. Here we present petrophysical modelling and laboratory measurements of thermal diffusivity in deformed mantle rocks between temperatures of 290 and 1,250 K that demonstrate that deformation may induce a significant anisotropy of thermal diffusivity in the uppermost mantle. We found that heat transport parallel to the flow direction is up to 30 per cent faster than that normal to the flow plane. Such a strain-induced thermal anisotropy implies that the upper-mantle temperature distribution, rheology and, consequently, its dynamics, will depend on deformation history. In oceans, resistive drag flow would result in lower vertical diffusivities in both the lithosphere and asthenosphere and hence in less effective heat transfer from the convective mantle. In continents, olivine orientations frozen in the lithosphere may induce anisotropic heating above mantle plumes, favouring the reactivation of pre-existing structures. PMID:11459053

  7. Anisotropy in inflation with non-minimal coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Jin, Zhuang-wei E-mail: jinzw@pku.edu.cn

    2014-09-01

    We study a new anisotropic inflation model, with an inflaton field nonminimally coupled with the gravity and a vector field. We find that the anisotropic attractor solution exists not only in the weak curvature coupling limit, but more interestingly in the strong curvature coupling limit as well. We show that in the strong curvature coupling limit, the contribution from the anisotropy is greatly suppressed.

  8. Mathematical modelling of anisotropy in brous connective tissue

    E-print Network

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    Mathematical modelling of anisotropy in ®brous connective tissue Luke Olsen a , Philip K. Maini a present two modelling frameworks for studying dynamic anistropy in connective tissue, motivated background The term `®brous connective tissue' denotes a wide class of supporting tis- sues within

  9. Diamagnetic Anisotropy: Two Iron Complexes as Laboratory Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ignacio; Sanchez, Jorge Fernando Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    There are relatively few experiments describing the NMR properties of bis(amine) iron(II) phthalocyanine complexes. Several features make this experiment attractive: First, it nicely illustrates the diamagnetic anisotropy phenomena, providing both students and teachers an opportunity to gain insight into aspects such as phase correction and…

  10. Sensitivity of Simulated Anisotropy to Initial Texture Definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Necker, C.T.; Tome, C.N.; Jean-Prost, F.; Korzekwa, D.A.

    1999-08-01

    Free compression tests were performed on 0.040 inch thick 5754 aluminum sheet stock producing a slight in-plane anisotropy. A visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) deformation modeling code was used to model the mechanical properties and resultant deformation textures. Calculations using a discretized description of the initial texture simulated the deformation texture very closely. Simulation of the mechanical properties were also captured nicely with one exception. The direction of simulated in-plane anisotropy was reversed from the experimental results. Simulation of the impact of various texture components on the anisotropy indicted that the shift of texture toward stronger brass, {l_brace}110{r_brace}<112>, and Goss, {l_brace}110{r_brace}<001>, components led to the reversal of anisotropy. The simulated deformation texture was more intense than the experimental texture in the brass and Goss positions. This result suggests that the more intense simulated texture components may be responsible for the reversal of an isotropy.

  11. Azimuthal anisotropy in the D0000 layer beneath the Caribbean

    E-print Network

    Garnero, Ed

    American broadband recording stations. Prior studies of deep mantle anisotropy in this region have structure of the lowermost mantle is of central importance in efforts to quantify the deep mantle dynamical the CMB in many regions [e.g., Garnero et al., 1998], large low shear velocity provinces [e.g., Wen et al

  12. A CMB Gibbs Sampler for Localized Secondary Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Philip; Wehus, Ingunn K.; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Fuskeland, Unni; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Jewell, Jeffrey B.

    2015-07-01

    In addition to primary fluctuations, cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. However, secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (TSZ-KSZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB. We develop a Bayesian formalism to rigorously characterize anisotropies that are localized on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalized to estimate the properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally tractable using a simple implementation based on the existing Commander component separation code and discuss how other types of secondary anisotropy can be accommodated within our framework.

  13. Seismic anisotropy of the Victoria Land region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, S.; Pondrelli, S.; Danesi, S.; Morelli, A.

    2010-07-01

    We present shear wave splitting results obtained from the analysis of core-refracted teleseismic phases recorded by permanent and temporary seismographic stations located in the Victoria Land region (Antarctica). We use an eigenvalue technique to isolate the rotated and shifted shear wave particle motion, to determine the best splitting parameters. Average values show clearly that dominant fast axis direction is NE-SW oriented, in accordance with previous measurements obtained around this zone. Only two stations, OHG and STAR, show different orientations, with N-S and NNW-SSE main directions. On the basis of the periodicity of single shear wave splitting measurements with respect to backazimuths of events under study, we infer the presence of lateral and vertical changes in the deep anisotropy direction. To test this hypothesis we model waveforms using a cross-convolution technique for the cases of one and two anisotropic layers. We obtain a significant improvement on the misfit in the double layer case for the two stations. For stations where a multilayer structure does not fit, we investigate lateral anisotropy changes at depth through Fresnel zone computation. We find that anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) is considerably different from that beneath the Ross Sea. This feature influences the measurement distribution for the two permanent stations TNV and VNDA. Our results show a dominant NE-SW direction over the entire region, however other anisotropy directions are present and maybe interpreted in the context of regional tectonics.

  14. Constraints on Average Radial Anisotropy in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampert, J.; De Wit, R. W. L.; Kaeufl, P.; Valentine, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying uncertainties in seismological models is challenging, yet ideally quality assessment is an integral part of the inverse method. We invert centre frequencies for spheroidal and toroidal modes for three parameters of average radial anisotropy, density and P- and S-wave velocities in the lower mantle. We adopt a Bayesian machine learning approach to extract the information on the earth model that is available in the normal mode data. The method is flexible and allows us to infer probability density functions (pdfs), which provide a quantitative description of our knowledge of the individual earth model parameters. The parameters describing shear- and P-wave anisotropy show little deviations from isotropy, but the intermediate parameter ? carries robust information on negative anisotropy of ~1% below 1900 km depth. The mass density in the deep mantle (below 1900 km) shows clear positive deviations from existing models. Other parameters (P- and shear-wave velocities) are close to PREM. Our results require that the average mantle is about 150K colder than commonly assumed adiabats and consist of a mixture of about 60% perovskite and 40% ferropericlase containing 10-15% iron. The anisotropy favours a specific orientation of the two minerals. This observation has important consequences for the nature of mantle flow.

  15. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2015-03-15

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  16. Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, V.; Hoversten, G.M.; Key, K.; Chen, J.

    2011-10-01

    A combination of 1D and 3D forward and inverse solutions is used to quantify the sensitivity and resolution of conventional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected using a horizontal electric dipole source to transverse electrical anisotropy located in a deep-water exploration reservoir target. Since strongly anisotropic shale layers have a vertical resistivity that can be comparable to many reservoirs, we examine how CSEM can discriminate confounding shale layers through their characteristically lower horizontal resistivity. Forward modeling demonstrates that the sensitivity to reservoir level anisotropy is very low compared to the sensitivity to isotropic reservoirs, especially when the reservoir is deeper than about 2 km below the seabed. However, for 1D models where the number of inversion parameters can be fixed to be only a few layers, both vertical and horizontal resistivity of the reservoir can be well resolved using a stochastic inversion. We find that the resolution of horizontal resistivity increases as the horizontal resistivity decreases. We show that this effect is explained by the presence of strong horizontal current density in anisotropic layers with low horizontal resistivity. Conversely, when the reservoir has a vertical to horizontal resistivity ratio of about 10 or less, the current density is vertically polarized and hence has little sensitivity to the horizontal resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy estimates from 3D inversion for 3D targets suggest that resolution of reservoir level anisotropy for 3D targets will require good a priori knowledge of the background sediment conductivity and structural boundaries.

  17. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-print Network

    Juan E. Santos

    2014-05-29

    show that fractures induce strong seismic velocity and Q anisotropy, both for qP and qSV waves, enhanced either by patchy .... Case 2: A brine-CO2 patchy saturated sample without fractures. Case 3: A ..... unsaturated hydraulic conductivity.

  18. Strong magneto-crystalline anisotropy in transition metal intercalated dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loganathan, Vaideesh; Nevidomskyy, Andriy; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2015-03-01

    A figure of merit for hard ferromagnets is proportional to the magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE), which measures the energy cost of deviations from easy-axis magnetization. Materials containing elements with strong spin-orbit coupling and large ordered moment have been found to be strongly anisotropic. Due to the scarce availability of rare earths, hard magnets without rare earths are desirable, and intercalated metal dichalcogenides, A0 . 25 MS2 (A=Fe,Mn; M=Ta,Nb), are one such candidate. We have performed first-principles LDA+U calculations on these materials. The MAE was calculated using two approaches, from the total energy difference between easy and hard magnetic directions using the non-collinear method; and using the torque method. Along with a saturated moment of 4 ?B , we find MAE of about 10meV. This corresponds to an anisotropy field of about 60 T, comparable to those of rare-earth magnets. Substitution of Ta with Nb yields minor change in MAE, suggesting that the spin-orbit coupling effect contributes less to the anisotropy than the crystal structure. We find that the MAE in Fe intercalated compounds strongly depends on the value of the Hubbard U. We also study the effect on MAE of lattice strain, which can be used to tune the anisotropy.

  19. FIELD EVALUATION OF DIPOLE METHOD TO MEASURE AQUIFER ANISOTROPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate size of a three-dimensional groundwater circulation cell surrounding a vertical circulation well (VCW) is a strong function of the aquifer hydraulic anisotropy, the ratio of the hydraulic conductivity in the horizontal direction to that in the vertical direction. In ...

  20. Mechanical anisotropy of nanostructured parylene films during sliding contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Eric; Demirel, Melik C.; Wahl, Kathryn J.

    2010-02-01

    Microscale sliding friction experiments were performed on nanostructured poly-chloro-p-xylylene (PPX-Cl, a.k.a, parylene) films. Oblique-angle vapour-phase deposition resulted in nanostructured columnar films tilted 57°-63° relative to the surface. The mechanical response to sliding was studied relative to the film structural anisotropy by examining contact friction and deformation in three sliding orientations: 'with', 'against' and 'perpendicular' to the tilt axis of the columns. Friction coefficients were uniformly high (0.5-1.5) for all orientations. Neither frictional anisotropy nor depth hysteresis was observed for sliding perpendicular to the column tilt axis. However, sliding 'with' and 'against' the column tilt axis resulted in measurable friction anisotropy as well as depth hysteresis, with larger contact depths and higher friction coefficients for sliding 'with' the column tilt. In comparison, planar films did not exhibit either frictional anisotropy or depth hysteresis. The depth hysteresis during sliding parallel to the tilt axis is attributed to the lateral force contribution to the total contact loading. Contacts formed when the sliding orientation was perpendicular to the column tilt axis were nominally Hertzian, allowing estimation of elastic moduli of the films from the load-displacement data during sliding. These films may have applications in the area of tissue engineering for directional cell sheet growth, MEMS developments for directional microfluidic pumps and sensors for deformation induced detection.