Science.gov

Sample records for callosum fractional anisotropy

  1. Reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior corpus callosum is associated with reduced speech fluency in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Civier, Oren; Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that severely limits one's ability to communicate. White matter anomalies were reported in stuttering, but their functional significance is unclear. We analyzed the relation between white matter properties and speech fluency in adults who stutter (AWS). We used diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics, and examined group differences as well as correlations with behavioral fluency measures. We detected a region in the anterior corpus callosum with significantly lower fractional anisotropy in AWS relative to controls. Within the AWS group, reduced anisotropy in that region is associated with reduced fluency. A statistically significant interaction was found between group and age in two additional regions: the left Rolandic operculum and the left posterior corpus callosum. Our findings suggest that anterior callosal anomaly in stuttering may represent a maladaptive reduction in interhemispheric inhibition, possibly leading to a disadvantageous recruitment of right frontal cortex in speech production. PMID:25728013

  2. Fractional Anisotropy in Corpus Callosum Is Associated with Facilitation of Motor Representation during Ipsilateral Hand Movements

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Yi; Wang, Ray-Yau; Roberts, R. Edward; Wu, Yu-Te; Lu, Chia-Feng; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Yang, Yea-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Background Coactivation of primary motor cortex ipsilateral to a unilateral movement (M1ipsilateral) has been observed, and the magnitude of activation is influenced by the contracting muscles. It has been suggested that the microstructural integrity of the callosal motor fibers (CMFs) connecting M1 regions may reflect the observed response. However, the association between the structural connectivity of CMFs and functional changes in M1ipsilateral remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between functional changes within M1ipsilateral during unilateral arm or leg movements and the microstructure of the CMFs connecting both homotopic representations (arm or leg). Methods Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess changes in motor evoked potentials (MEP) in an arm muscle during unilateral movements compared to rest in fifteen healthy adults. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was then used to identify regions of M1 associated with either arm or leg movements. Diffusion-weighted imaging data was acquired to generate CMFs for arm and leg areas using the areas of activation from the functional imaging as seed masks. Individual values of regional fractional anisotropy (FA) of arm and leg CMFs was then calculated by examining the overlap between CMFs and a standard atlas of corpus callosum. Results The change in the MEP was significantly larger in the arm movement compared to the leg movement. Additionally, regression analysis revealed that FA in the arm CMFs was positively correlated with the change in MEP during arm movement, whereas a negative correlation was observed during the leg movement. However, there was no significant relationship between FA in the leg CMF and the change in MEP during the movements. Conclusions These findings suggest that individual differences in interhemispheric structural connectivity may be used to explain a homologous muscle-dominant effect within M1ipsilateral hand representation during unilateral movement with topographical specificity. PMID:25118828

  3. Reduced Fractional Anisotropy of Corpus Callosum Modulates Inter-Hemispheric Resting State Functional Connectivity in Migraine Patients without Aura

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai; Qin, Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; Liu, Jixin; Yang, Xuejuan; von Deneen, Karen M.; Liang, Fanrong; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the corpus callosum (CC) in migraine patients without aura. Abnormalities in white matter integrity, particularly in the CC, may affect inter-hemispheric resting state functional connectivity (RSFC). Unfortunately, relatively little is known about the alterations in functional interactions between the cerebral hemispheres during resting state in migraine patients without aura, and even less about how the inter-hemispheric RSFC are affected by the abnormalities of the CC. Methods and findings Twenty-one migraine patients without aura and 21 healthy controls participated in this study, age-, sex-, and education-matched. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was employed to investigate the white matter alterations of the CC. Meanwhile, voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) was used to compare the inter-hemispheric RSFC differences between the patients and controls. TBSS analysis revealed reduced FA values in the genu and the splenium of CC in patient group. VMHC analysis showed decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in migraine patients without aura relative to that of the controls. Furthermore, in migraine patients without aura, the reduced FA values of the genu of CC correlated with the decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that the migraine patients without aura showed reduced FA values of the genu of CC and decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. The correlation between the above structural and functional changes suggested that the reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) of CC modulates inter-hemispheric VMHC in migraine patients without aura. Our results demonstrated that the VMHC alterations of ACC can reflect the FA changes of the genu of CC in migraine patients without aura. PMID:23029036

  4. Multimodal white matter imaging to investigate reduced fractional anisotropy and its age-related decline in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Chiappelli, Joshua; Wright, Susan N.; Rowland, Laura M.; Patel, Benish; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Nugent, Katie; McMahon, Robert P.; Carpenter, William T.; Muellerklein, Florian; Sampath, Hemalatha; Hong, L. Elliot

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) of water diffusion and its elevated aging-related decline in schizophrenia patients may be caused by elevated hyperintensive white matter (HWM) lesions, by reduced permeability-diffusivity index (PDI), or both. We tested this hypothesis in 40/30 control/patient participants. FA values for the corpus callosum were calculated from high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Whole-brain volume of HWM lesions was quantified by 3D-T2w-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging. PDI for corpus callosum was ascertained using multi b-value diffusion imaging (15 b-shells with 30 directions per shell). Patients had significantly lower corpus callosum FA values, and there was a significant age-by-diagnosis interaction. Patients also had significantly reduced PDI but no difference in HWM volume. PDI and HWM volume were significant predictors of FA and captured the diagnosis-related variance. Separately, PDI robustly explained FA variance in schizophrenia patients, but not in controls. Conversely, HWM volume made equally significant contributions to variability in FA in both groups. The diagnosis-by-age effect of FA was explained by a PDI-by-diagnosis interaction. Post hoc testing showed a similar trend for PDI of gray mater. Our study demonstrated that reduced FA and its accelerated decline with age in schizophrenia were explained by pathophysiology indexed by PDI, rather than HWM volume. PMID:24909602

  5. Cosmic ray anisotropy in fractional differential models of anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaikin, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy is considered in two versions of the fractional differential model for anomalous diffusion. The simplest problem of cosmic ray propagation from a point instantaneous source in an unbounded medium is used as an example to show that the transition from the standard diffusion model to the Lagutin-Uchaikin fractional differential model (with characteristic exponent α = 3/5 and a finite velocity of free particle motion), which gives rise to a knee in the energy spectrum at 106 GeV, increases the anisotropy coefficient only by 20%, while the anisotropy coefficient in the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model (with exponents α = 0.3 and β = 0.8, a long stay of particles in traps, and an infinite velocity of their jumps) is close to one. This is because the parameters of the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model have been chosen improperly.

  6. Cosmic ray anisotropy in fractional differential models of anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, V. V.

    2013-06-15

    The problem of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy is considered in two versions of the fractional differential model for anomalous diffusion. The simplest problem of cosmic ray propagation from a point instantaneous source in an unbounded medium is used as an example to show that the transition from the standard diffusion model to the Lagutin-Uchaikin fractional differential model (with characteristic exponent {alpha} = 3/5 and a finite velocity of free particle motion), which gives rise to a knee in the energy spectrum at 10{sup 6} GeV, increases the anisotropy coefficient only by 20%, while the anisotropy coefficient in the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model (with exponents {alpha} = 0.3 and {beta} = 0.8, a long stay of particles in traps, and an infinite velocity of their jumps) is close to one. This is because the parameters of the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model have been chosen improperly.

  7. Fractional anisotropy in individuals with schizophrenia and their nonpsychotic siblings

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Michael P.; Akhter, Kazi D.; Csernansky, John G.; Mori, Susumu; Barch, Deanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) was examined in a priori selected fiber tracts in individuals with schizophrenia (n=25) and their non-psychotic siblings (n=29) versus controls (n=35). FA was reduced in a portion of the fornix in individuals with schizophrenia (although this did not survive correction for the number of tracts investigated). FA in the siblings did not differ from that in controls in any of the investigated tracts. PMID:25453989

  8. Kurtosis fractional anisotropy, its contrast and estimation by proxy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion kurtosis observed with diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) may vary with direction. This directional variation is summarized in the scalar kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA). Recent studies suggest that kurtosis anisotropy offers microstructural contrast not contained in other commonly used dMRI markers. We compare KFA to other dMRI contrasts in fixed rat brain and in human brain. We then investigate the observed contrast differences using data obtained in a physical phantom and simulations based on data from the phantom, rat spinal cord, and human brain. Lastly, we assess a strategy for rapid estimation of a computationally modest KFA proxy by evaluating its correlation to true KFA for varying number of sampling directions and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We also map this proxy’s b-value dependency. We find that KFA supplements the contrast of other dMRI metrics – particularly fractional anisotropy (FA) which vanishes in near orthogonal fiber arrangements where KFA does not. Simulations and phantom data support this interpretation. KFA therefore supplements FA and could be useful for evaluation of complex tissue arrangements. The KFA proxy is strongly correlated to true KFA when sampling is performed along at least nine directions and SNR is high. PMID:27041679

  9. Kurtosis fractional anisotropy, its contrast and estimation by proxy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion kurtosis observed with diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) may vary with direction. This directional variation is summarized in the scalar kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA). Recent studies suggest that kurtosis anisotropy offers microstructural contrast not contained in other commonly used dMRI markers. We compare KFA to other dMRI contrasts in fixed rat brain and in human brain. We then investigate the observed contrast differences using data obtained in a physical phantom and simulations based on data from the phantom, rat spinal cord, and human brain. Lastly, we assess a strategy for rapid estimation of a computationally modest KFA proxy by evaluating its correlation to true KFA for varying number of sampling directions and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We also map this proxy's b-value dependency. We find that KFA supplements the contrast of other dMRI metrics - particularly fractional anisotropy (FA) which vanishes in near orthogonal fiber arrangements where KFA does not. Simulations and phantom data support this interpretation. KFA therefore supplements FA and could be useful for evaluation of complex tissue arrangements. The KFA proxy is strongly correlated to true KFA when sampling is performed along at least nine directions and SNR is high. PMID:27041679

  10. Microscopic diffusion anisotropy in the human brain: reproducibility, normal values, and comparison with the fractional anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Marco; Brassen, Stefanie; Finsterbusch, Jrgen

    2015-04-01

    Human neuroimaging of tissue microstructure, such as axonal density and integrity, is key in clinical and neuroscience research. Most studies rely on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the measures derived from it, most prominently fractional anisotropy (FA). However, FA also depends on fiber orientation distribution, a more macroscopic tissue property. Recently introduced measures of so-called microscopic diffusion anisotropy, diffusion anisotropy on a cellular or microscopic level, overcome this limitation because they are independent of the orientation distributions of axons and fibers. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of two measures of microscopic diffusion anisotropy I(MA) and MA indices, for human neuroscience and clinical research. Both indices reflect the eccentricity of the cells but while I(MA) also depends on the cell size, MA is independent of the cell size and, like FA, scaled between 0 and 1. In whole-brain measurements of a group of 19 healthy volunteers, we measured average values and variability, evaluated their reproducibility, both within and between sessions, and compared MA to FA values in selected regions-of-interest (ROIs). The within- and between-session comparison did not show substantial differences but the reproducibility was much better for the MA than I(MA) (coefficient of variation between sessions 10.5% vs. 28.9%). The reproducibility was less for MA than FA overall, but comparable in the defined ROIs and the average group sizes required for between-group comparisons was similar (about 60 participants for a relative difference of 5%). Group-averaged values of MA index were generally larger and showed less variation across white-matter brain ROIs than FA (mean standard deviation of seven ROIs 0.83 0.10 vs. 0.58 0.13). Even in some gray-matter ROIs, MA values comparable to those of white matter ROIs were observed. Furthermore, the within-group variation of the values in white matter ROIs was lower for the MA compared to the FA (mean standard deviation over volunteers 0.038 vs. 0.049) which could be due to significant variability in the distribution of fiber orientation contributing to FA. These results indicate that MA (i) should be preferred to I(MA), (ii) has a reproducibility and group-size requirements comparable to those of FA; (iii) is less sensitive to the fiber orientation distribution than FA; and (iv) could be more sensitive to differences or changes of the tissue microstructure than FA. R1.1. PMID:25595503

  11. Tractography of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) corpus callosum using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Platas-Neri, Diana; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia; de Celis Alonso, Benito; da Celis Alonso, Benito; de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Muñoz-Delgado, Jairo; Phillips, Kimberley A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the organization, connectivity and microstructure of the corpus callosum of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging were obtained from three subjects using a 3T Philips scanner. We hypothesized that the arrangement of fibers in spider monkeys would be similar to that observed in other non-human primates. A repeated measure (n = 3) of fractional anisotropy values was obtained of each subject and for each callosal subdivision. Measurements of the diffusion properties of corpus callosum fibers exhibited a similar pattern to those reported in the literature for humans and chimpanzees. No statistical difference was reached when comparing this parameter between the different CC regions (p = 0.066). The highest fractional anisotropy values corresponded to regions projecting from the corpus callosum to the posterior cortical association areas, premotor and supplementary motor cortices. The lowest fractional anisotropy corresponded to projections to motor and sensory cortical areas. Analyses indicated that approximately 57% of the fibers projects to the frontal cortex and 43% to the post-central cortex. While this study had a small sample size, the results provided important information concerning the organization of the corpus callosum in spider monkeys. PMID:25693078

  12. Tractography of the Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) Corpus Callosum Using Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Platas-Neri, Diana; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia; da Celis Alonso, Benito; de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Muñoz-Delgado, Jairo; Phillips, Kimberley A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the organization, connectivity and microstructure of the corpus callosum of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging were obtained from three subjects using a 3T Philips scanner. We hypothesized that the arrangement of fibers in spider monkeys would be similar to that observed in other non-human primates. A repeated measure (n = 3) of fractional anisotropy values was obtained of each subject and for each callosal subdivision. Measurements of the diffusion properties of corpus callosum fibers exhibited a similar pattern to those reported in the literature for humans and chimpanzees. No statistical difference was reached when comparing this parameter between the different CC regions (p = 0.066). The highest fractional anisotropy values corresponded to regions projecting from the corpus callosum to the posterior cortical association areas, premotor and supplementary motor cortices. The lowest fractional anisotropy corresponded to projections to motor and sensory cortical areas. Analyses indicated that approximately 57% of the fibers projects to the frontal cortex and 43% to the post-central cortex. While this study had a small sample size, the results provided important information concerning the organization of the corpus callosum in spider monkeys. PMID:25693078

  13. White Matter Fractional Anisotropy Correlates With Speed of Processing and Motor Speed in Young Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Aukema, Eline J.; Oudhuis, Nienke; Vos, Frans M.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether childhood medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy (WMFA) and whether WMFA is related to the speed of processing and motor speed. Methods and Materials: For this study, 17 patients (6 medulloblastoma, 5 ALL treated with high-dose methotrexate (MTX) (4 x 5 g/m{sup 2}) and 6 with low-dose MTX (3 x 2 g/m{sup 2})) and 17 age-matched controls participated. On a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed, and WMFA values were calculated, including specific regions of interest (ROIs), and correlated with the speed of processing and motor speed. Results: Mean WMFA in the patient group, mean age 14 years (range 8.9 - 16.9), was decreased compared with the control group (p = 0.01), as well as WMFA in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciliculus (IFO) (p = 0.03) and in the genu of the corpus callosum (gCC) (p = 0.01). Based on neurocognitive results, significant positive correlations were present between processing speed and WMFA in the splenium (sCC) (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and the body of the corpus callosum (bCC) (r = 0.52, p = 0.03), whereas the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p < 0.05). Conclusions: White matter tracts, using a 3.0-T MRI scanner, show impairment in childhood cancer survivors, medulloblastoma survivors, and also those treated with high doses of MTX. In particular, white matter tracts in the sCC, bCC and right IFO are positively correlated with speed of processing and motor speed.

  14. Permeability–diffusivity modeling vs. fractional anisotropy on white matter integrity assessment and application in schizophrenia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, P.; Chiappelli, J.; Hong, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) assumes a single pool of anisotropically diffusing water to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and is commonly used to ascertain white matter (WM) deficits in schizophrenia. At higher b-values, diffusion-signal decay becomes bi-exponential, suggesting the presence of two, unrestricted and restricted, water pools. Theoretical work suggests that semi-permeable cellular membrane rather than the presence of two physical compartments is the cause. The permeability–diffusivity (PD) parameters measured from bi-exponential modeling may offer advantages, over traditional DTI-FA, in identifying WM deficits in schizophrenia. Methods Imaging was performed in N = 26/26 patients/controls (age = 20–61 years, average age = 40.5 ± 12.6). Imaging consisted of fifteen b-shells: b = 250–3800 s/mm2 with 30 directions/shell, covering seven slices of mid-sagittal corpus callosum (CC) at 1.7 × 1.7 × 4.6 mm. 64-direction DTI was also collected. Permeability–diffusivity-index (PDI), the ratio of restricted to unrestricted apparent diffusion coefficients, and the fraction of unrestricted compartment (Mu) were calculated for CC and cingulate gray matter (GM). FA values for CC were calculated using tract-based-spatial-statistics. Results Patients had significantly reduced PDI in CC (p ≅ 10− 4) and cingulate GM (p = 0.002), while differences in CC FA were modest (p ≅ .03). There was no group-related difference in Mu. Additional theoretical-modeling analysis suggested that reduced PDI in patients may be caused by reduced cross-membrane water molecule exchanges. Conclusion PDI measurements for cerebral WM and GM yielded more robust patient–control differences than DTI-FA. Theoretical work offers an explanation that patient–control PDI differences should implicate abnormal active membrane permeability. This would implicate abnormal activities in ion-channels that use water as substrate for ion exchange, in cerebral tissues of schizophrenia patients. PMID:24179845

  15. Concomitant Fractional Anisotropy and Volumetric Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Cross-Sectional Evidence for Progressive Neurologic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Jan S.; Weber, Bernd; Deppe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and associated hippocampal sclerosis (TLEhs) there are brain abnormalities extending beyond the presumed epileptogenic zone as revealed separately in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies. However, little is known about the relation between macroscopic atrophy (revealed by volumetric MRI) and microstructural degeneration (inferred by DTI). Methodology/Principal Findings For 62 patients with unilateral TLEhs and 68 healthy controls, we determined volumes and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) of ipsilateral and contralateral brain structures from T1-weighted and DTI data, respectively. We report significant volume atrophy and FA alterations of temporal lobe, subcortical and callosal regions, which were more diffuse and bilateral in patients with left TLEhs relative to right TLEhs. We observed significant relationships between volume loss and mean FA, particularly of the thalamus and putamen bilaterally. When corrected for age, duration of epilepsy was significantly correlated with FA loss of an anatomically plausible route - including ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus and temporal lobe white matter, the thalamus bilaterally, and posterior regions of the corpus callosum that contain temporal lobe fibres - that may be suggestive of progressive brain degeneration in response to recurrent seizures. Conclusions/Significance Chronic TLEhs is associated with interrelated DTI-derived and volume-derived brain degenerative abnormalities that are influenced by the duration of the disorder and the side of seizure onset. This work confirms previously contradictory findings by employing multi-modal imaging techniques in parallel in a large sample of patients. PMID:23071638

  16. Increased Regional Fractional Anisotropy in Highly Screened Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Daniel J.; Ryan, Matthew; Rimrodt, Sheryl L.; Cutting, Laurie E.; Denckla, Martha B.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Mahone, E. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected at 3.0 Tesla from 16 children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 16 typically developing controls, ages 9 to 14 years. Fractional anisotropy images were calculated and normalized by linear transformation. Voxel-wise and atlas-based region-of-interest analyses were performed. Using voxel-wise analysis, fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly increased in the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group in the right superior frontal gyrus and posterior thalamic radiation, and left dorsal posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus, and parahippocampal gyrus. No regions showed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Region-of-interest analysis revealed increased fractional anisotropy in the left sagittal stratum, that is, white matter that connects the temporal lobe to distant cortical regions. Only fractional anisotropy in the left sagittal stratum was significantly associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptom severity. Several recent studies have reported pathological increases in fractional anisotropy in other conditions, highlighting the relevance of diffusion tensor imaging in identifying atypical white matter structure associated with neurodevelopmental processes. PMID:21628699

  17. Interleukin-6, Age, and Corpus Callosum Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bettcher, Brianne M.; Watson, Christa L.; Walsh, Christine M.; Lobach, Iryna V.; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Joshua W.; Green, Ralph; Patel, Nihar; Dutt, Shubir; Busovaca, Edgar; Rosen, Howard J.; Yaffe, Kristine; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of inflammation to deleterious aging outcomes is increasingly recognized; however, little is known about the complex relationship between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and brain structure, or how this association might change with increasing age. We examined the association between IL-6, white matter integrity, and cognition in 151 community dwelling older adults, and tested whether age moderated these associations. Blood levels of IL-6 and vascular risk (e.g., homocysteine), as well as health history information, were collected. Processing speed assessments were administered to assess cognitive functioning, and we employed tract-based spatial statistics to examine whole brain white matter and regions of interest. Given the association between inflammation, vascular risk, and corpus callosum (CC) integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA) of the genu, body, and splenium represented our primary dependent variables. Whole brain analysis revealed an inverse association between IL-6 and CC fractional anisotropy. Subsequent ROI linear regression and ridge regression analyses indicated that the magnitude of this effect increased with age; thus, older individuals with higher IL-6 levels displayed lower white matter integrity. Finally, higher IL-6 levels were related to worse processing speed; this association was moderated by age, and was not fully accounted for by CC volume. This study highlights that at older ages, the association between higher IL-6 levels and lower white matter integrity is more pronounced; furthermore, it underscores the important, albeit burgeoning role of inflammatory processes in cognitive aging trajectories. PMID:25188448

  18. Interleukin-6, age, and corpus callosum integrity.

    PubMed

    Bettcher, Brianne M; Watson, Christa L; Walsh, Christine M; Lobach, Iryna V; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Patel, Nihar; Dutt, Shubir; Busovaca, Edgar; Rosen, Howard J; Yaffe, Kristine; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of inflammation to deleterious aging outcomes is increasingly recognized; however, little is known about the complex relationship between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and brain structure, or how this association might change with increasing age. We examined the association between IL-6, white matter integrity, and cognition in 151 community dwelling older adults, and tested whether age moderated these associations. Blood levels of IL-6 and vascular risk (e.g., homocysteine), as well as health history information, were collected. Processing speed assessments were administered to assess cognitive functioning, and we employed tract-based spatial statistics to examine whole brain white matter and regions of interest. Given the association between inflammation, vascular risk, and corpus callosum (CC) integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA) of the genu, body, and splenium represented our primary dependent variables. Whole brain analysis revealed an inverse association between IL-6 and CC fractional anisotropy. Subsequent ROI linear regression and ridge regression analyses indicated that the magnitude of this effect increased with age; thus, older individuals with higher IL-6 levels displayed lower white matter integrity. Finally, higher IL-6 levels were related to worse processing speed; this association was moderated by age, and was not fully accounted for by CC volume. This study highlights that at older ages, the association between higher IL-6 levels and lower white matter integrity is more pronounced; furthermore, it underscores the important, albeit burgeoning role of inflammatory processes in cognitive aging trajectories. PMID:25188448

  19. Bridging the hemispheres in meditation: thicker callosal regions and enhanced fractional anisotropy (FA) in long-term practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen; Phillips, Owen R; Clark, Kristi; Kurth, Florian; Toga, Arthur W; Narr, Katherine L

    2012-05-15

    Recent findings suggest a close link between long-term meditation practices and the structure of the corpus callosum. Prior analyses, however, have focused on estimating mean fractional anisotropy (FA) within two large pre-defined callosal tracts only. Additional effects might exist in other, non-explored callosal regions and/or with respect to callosal attributes not captured by estimates of FA. To further explore callosal features in the framework of meditation, we analyzed 30 meditators and 30 controls, carefully matched for sex, age, and handedness. We applied a multimodal imaging approach using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in combination with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Callosal measures of tract-specific FA were complemented with other global (segment-specific) estimates as well as extremely local (point-wise) measures of callosal micro- and macro-structure. Callosal measures were larger in long-term meditators compared to controls, particularly in anterior callosal sections. However, differences achieved significance only when increasing the regional sensitivity of the measurement (i.e., using point-wise measures versus segment-specific measures) and were more prominent for microscopic than macroscopic characteristics (i.e., callosal FA versus callosal thickness). Thicker callosal regions and enhanced FA in meditators might indicate greater connectivity, possibly reflecting increased hemispheric integration during cerebral processes involving (pre)frontal regions. Such a brain organization might be linked to achieving characteristic mental states and skills as associated with meditation, though this hypothesis requires behavioral confirmation. Moreover, longitudinal studies are required to address whether the observed callosal effects are induced by meditation or constitute an innate prerequisite for the start or successful continuation of meditation. PMID:22374478

  20. Segmented corpus callosum diffusivity correlates with the Expanded Disability Status Scale score in the early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros Rimkus, Carolina; de Faria Junqueira, Thiago; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Otaduy, Maria Concepción García; da Costa Leite, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize the microscopic damage to the corpus callosum in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with diffusion tensor imaging and to investigate the correlation of this damage with disability. The diffusion tensor imaging parameters of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity provide information about the integrity of cell membranes, offering two more specific indices, namely the axial and radial diffusivities, which are useful for discriminating axon loss from demyelination. METHOD: Brain magnetic resonance imaging exams of 30 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were acquired in a 3T scanner. The axial diffusivities, radial diffusivities, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity of five segments of the corpus callosum, correlated to the Expanded Disability Status Scale score, were obtained. RESULTS: All corpus callosum segments showed increased radial diffusivities and mean diffusivity, as well as decreased fractional anisotropy, in the relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis group. The axial diffusivity was increased in the posterior midbody and splenium. The Expanded Disability Status Scale scores correlated more strongly with axial diffusivities and mean diffusivity, with an isolated correlation with radial diffusivities in the posterior midbody of the corpus callosum. There was no significant correlation with lesion loads. CONCLUSION: Neurological dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis can be influenced by commissural disconnection, and the diffusion indices of diffusion tensor imaging are potential biomarkers of disability that can be assessed during follow-up. PMID:24037007

  1. Bilingual Corpus Callosum Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Porter E., III.; Kennedy, Teresa J.; Armstrong, Terry A.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to produce midsagittal images of the corpus callosum of 19 right-handed adult male and female subjects. The preliminary findings of this study indicate that significant adaptation in the anterior midbody of the corpus callosum has occurred to accommodate multiple language capacity in bilingual individuals…

  2. Case Series: Fractional Anisotropy Profiles of the Cerebellar Peduncles in Adolescents Born Preterm With Ventricular Dilation.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Leitner, Yael; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Yeom, Kristen W; Feldman, Heidi M

    2016-03-01

    This case series assesses white matter microstructure of the cerebellar peduncles in 4 adolescents born preterm with enlarged ventricles and reduced white matter volume in the cerebrum but no apparent injury to the cerebellum. Subjects (ages 12-17 years, gestational age 26-32 weeks, birth weight 825-2211 g) were compared to a normative sample of 19 full-term controls (9-17 years, mean gestational age 39 weeks, mean birth weight 3154 g). Tract profiles for each of the cerebellar peduncles were generated by calculating fractional anisotropy at 30 points along the central portion of each tract. One or more case subjects exhibited higher fractional anisotropy beyond the 90th percentile in the inferior, middle, and superior cerebellar peduncles. Findings demonstrate that differences in cerebellar white matter microstructure can be detected in the absence of macrostructural cerebellar abnormalities. PMID:26116381

  3. Vestibular Loss and Balance Training Cause Similar Changes in Human Cerebral White Matter Fractional Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Nadine; Hüfner, Katharina; Stephan, Thomas; Linn, Jennifer; Kremmyda, Olympia; Brandt, Thomas; Flanagin, Virginia L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss suffer from severe balance deficits during normal everyday movements. Ballet dancers, figure skaters, or slackliners, in contrast, are extraordinarily well trained in maintaining balance for the extreme balance situations that they are exposed to. Both training and disease can lead to changes in the diffusion properties of white matter that are related to skill level or disease progression respectively. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to compare white matter diffusivity between these two study groups and their age- and sex-matched controls. We found that vestibular patients and balance-trained subjects show a reduction of fractional anisotropy in similar white matter tracts, due to a relative increase in radial diffusivity (perpendicular to the main diffusion direction). Reduced fractional anisotropy was not only found in sensory and motor areas, but in a widespread network including long-range connections, limbic and association pathways. The reduced fractional anisotropy did not correlate with any cognitive, disease-related or skill-related factors. The similarity in FA between the two study groups, together with the absence of a relationship between skill or disease factors and white matter changes, suggests a common mechanism for these white matter differences. We propose that both study groups must exert increased effort to meet their respective usual balance requirements. Since balance training has been shown to effectively reduce the symptoms of vestibular failure, the changes in white matter shown here may represent a neuronal mechanism for rehabilitation. PMID:24776524

  4. New Non-Linear Color Look-Up Table for Visualization of Brain Fractional Anisotropy Based on Normative Measurements – Principals and First Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Jiří; Rulseh, Aaron M.; Komárek, Arnošt; Latnerová, Iva; Rusina, Robert; Brožová, Hana; Vymazal, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) is the most commonly used quantitative measure of diffusion in the brain. Changes in FA have been reported in many neurological disorders, but the implementation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in daily clinical practice remains challenging. We propose a novel color look-up table (LUT) based on normative data as a tool for screening FA changes. FA was calculated for 76 healthy volunteers using 12 motion-probing gradient directions (MPG), a subset of 59 subjects was additionally scanned using 30 MPG. Population means and 95% prediction intervals for FA in the corpus callosum, frontal gray matter, thalamus and basal ganglia were used to create the LUT. Unique colors were assigned to inflection points with continuous ramps between them. Clinical use was demonstrated on 17 multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients compared to 13 patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and 17 healthy subjects. Four blinded radiologists classified subjects as MSA/non-MSA. Using only the LUT, high sensitivity (80%) and specificity (84%) were achieved in differentiating MSA subjects from PD subjects and controls. The LUTs generated from 12 and 30 MPG were comparable and accentuate FA abnormalities. PMID:23990954

  5. Corpus Callosum Pathology as a Potential Surrogate Marker of Cognitive Impairment in Diffuse Axonal Injury.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Ueda, Keita; Sugihara, Genichi; Yassin, Walid; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is a major form of traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological assessments and high-resolution structural MRI were conducted using T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. This study included 10 patients with diffuse axonal injury (all men, mean age 30.8±10.5 years) and 12 age- and sex-matched normal control participants. Patients with diffuse axonal injury had widespread volume reductions and lower fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum (CC) compared with controls. Furthermore, cognitive processing speed was associated with reductions in white matter volume and fractional anisotropy in the CC. These findings suggest that CC pathology may be a potential surrogate marker of the cognitive deficits in these patients. PMID:26569151

  6. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants. PMID:26129977

  7. Age-Associated Alterations in Corpus Callosum White Matter Integrity in Bipolar Disorder Assessed Using Probabilistic Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Toteja, Nitin; Cokol, Perihan Guvenek; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Kafantaris, Vivian; Peters, Bart D.; Burdick, Katherine E.; John, Majnu; Malhotra, Anil K.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Atypical age-associated changes in white matter integrity may play a role in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder, but no studies have examined the major white matter tracts using nonlinear statistical modeling across a wide age range in this disorder. The goal of this study was to identify possible deviations in the typical pattern of age-associated changes in white matter integrity in patients with bipolar disorder across the age range of 9 to 62 years. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 57 (20M/37F) patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 57 (20M/37F) age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were computed for the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, two projection tracts, and five association tracts using probabilistic tractography. Results Overall, patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher mean diffusivity compared to healthy volunteers across all tracts (while controlling for the effects of age and age2). In addition, there were greater age-associated increases in mean diffusivity in patients compared to healthy volunteers within the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum beginning in the second and third decades of life. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence for alterations in the typical pattern of white matter development in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy volunteers. Changes in white matter development within the corpus callosum may lead to altered inter-hemispheric communication that is considered integral to the neurobiology of the disorder. PMID:25532972

  8. Segmentation of the Canine Corpus Callosum using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, T.T.; Calabrese, E.; White, L.E.; Chen, S.D.; Platt, S.R.; Provenzale, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background We set out to determine functional white matter (WM) connections passing through the canine corpus callosum useful for subsequent studies of canine brains that serve as models for human WM pathway disease. Based on prior studies, we anticipated that the anterior corpus callosum would send projections to the anterior cerebral cortex while progressively posterior segments would send projections to more posterior cortex. Methods A post mortem canine brain was imaged using a 7T MRI producing 100 micron isotropic resolution DTI analyzed by tractography. Using ROIs within cortical locations, which were confirmed by a Nissl stain that identified distinct cortical architecture, we successfully identified 6 important WM pathways. We also compared fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) in tracts passing through the genu and splenium. Results Callosal fibers were organized based upon cortical destination, i.e. fibers from the genu project to the frontal cortex. Histologic results identified the motor cortex based on cytoarchitectonic criteria that allowed placement of ROIs to discriminate between frontal and parietal lobes. We also identified cytoarchitecture typical of the orbital frontal, anterior frontal, and occipital regions and placed ROIs accordingly. FA, ADC, RD and AD values were all higher in posterior corpus callosum fiber tracts. Conclusions Using 6 cortical ROIs, we identified 6 major white matter tracts that reflect major functional divisions of the cerebral hemispheres and we derived quantitative values that can be used for study of canine models of human WM pathological states. PMID:24370161

  9. Corpus Callosum Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Volume Measures Are Associated With Disease Severity in Pediatric Niemann-Pick Disease Type C1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ryan; Apkarian, Kalyna; Jung, Eun Sol; Yanjanin, Nicole; Yoshida, Shoko; Mori, Susumu; Park, Jina; Gropman, Andrea; Baker, Eva H.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Niemann-Pick disease type C1 is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. Without a highly effective treatment, biomarkers of severity would be beneficial for prognostication and testing new interventions. Diffusion tensor imaging has shown microstructural abnormalities in adults with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. This is the first study to apply diffusion tensor imaging and volume analysis to evaluate the corpus callosum in a pediatric and adolescent population of patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. We hypothesized that the callosal fractional anisotropy, volume, and cross-sectional area will negatively correlate with NPC severity score. METHODS Thirty-nine individuals with Niemann-Pick disease type C1 aged 1–21.9 years (mean = 11.1; S.D. = 6.1), and each received one magnetic resonance imaging examination. Severity score were obtained by examination and clinical observation. An atlas-based automated approach was used to measure fractional anisotropy, cross-sectional area, and volume. For comparative analysis and validation of this atlas-based approach, one midsagittal image was chosen and the corpus callosum manually traced to obtain cross-sectional area. Statistical analyses were applied to study the relationships between imaging and clinical severity. RESULTS For patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C1, lower corpus callosum fractional anisotropy, volume, and cross-sectional area significantly correlate with higher severity score. Severity subdomain analysis revealed ambulation, speech, seizures, and incontinence have the strongest relationships with callosal measures. Comparison of atlas-based processing and manual tracing techniques demonstrated validity for the automated method. CONCLUSIONS For individuals with Niemann-Pick disease type C1, the corpus callosum measures correlate with clinical severity. These findings reveal promise for the discovery of new imaging biomarkers for this disorder. PMID:25194719

  10. Apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of newly diagnosed grade II gliomas†

    PubMed Central

    Khayal, Inas S.; McKnight, Tracy R.; McGue, Colleen; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Cha, Soonmee; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing between low-grade oligodendrogliomas (ODs) and astrocytomas (AC) is of interest for defining prognosis and stratifying patients to specific treatment regimens. The purpose of this study was to determine if the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion imaging can help to differentiate between newly diagnosed grade II OD and AC subtypes and to evaluate the ADC and FA values for the mixed population of oligoastrocytomas (OA). Fifty-three patients with newly diagnosed grade II gliomas were studied using a 1.5T whole body scanner (23 ODs, 16 ACs, and 14 OAs). The imaging protocol included post-gadolinium T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images, and either three and/or six directional diffusion imaging sequence with b = 1000 s/mm2. Diffusion-weighted images were analyzed using in-house software to calculate maps of ADC and for six directional acquisitions, FA. The intensity values were normalized by values from normal appearing white matter (NAWM) to generate maps of normalized apparent diffusion coefficient (nADC) and normalized fractional anisotropy (nFA). The hyperintense region in the T2 weighted image was defined as the T2All region. A Mann–Whitney rank-sum test was performed on the 25th, median, and 75th nADC and nFA among the three subtypes. Logistic regression was performed to determine how well the nADC and nFA predict subtype. Lesions diagnosed as being OD had significantly lower nADC and significantly higher nFA, compared to AC. The nADC and nFA values individually classified the data with an accuracy of 87%. Combining the two did not enhance the classification. The patients with OA had nADC and nFA values between those of OD and AC. This suggests that ADC and FA may be helpful in directing tissue sampling to the most appropriate regions for taking biopsies in order to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:19125391

  11. Apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of newly diagnosed grade II gliomas.

    PubMed

    Khayal, Inas S; McKnight, Tracy R; McGue, Colleen; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Chang, Susan M; Cha, Soonmee; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-05-01

    Distinguishing between low-grade oligodendrogliomas (ODs) and astrocytomas (AC) is of interest for defining prognosis and stratifying patients to specific treatment regimens. The purpose of this study was to determine if the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion imaging can help to differentiate between newly diagnosed grade II OD and AC subtypes and to evaluate the ADC and FA values for the mixed population of oligoastrocytomas (OA). Fifty-three patients with newly diagnosed grade II gliomas were studied using a 1.5T whole body scanner (23 ODs, 16 ACs, and 14 OAs). The imaging protocol included post-gadolinium T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images, and either three and/or six directional diffusion imaging sequence with b = 1000 s/mm(2). Diffusion-weighted images were analyzed using in-house software to calculate maps of ADC and for six directional acquisitions, FA. The intensity values were normalized by values from normal appearing white matter (NAWM) to generate maps of normalized apparent diffusion coefficient (nADC) and normalized fractional anisotropy (nFA). The hyperintense region in the T2 weighted image was defined as the T2All region. A Mann-Whitney rank-sum test was performed on the 25th, median, and 75th nADC and nFA among the three subtypes. Logistic regression was performed to determine how well the nADC and nFA predict subtype. Lesions diagnosed as being OD had significantly lower nADC and significantly higher nFA, compared to AC. The nADC and nFA values individually classified the data with an accuracy of 87%. Combining the two did not enhance the classification. The patients with OA had nADC and nFA values between those of OD and AC. This suggests that ADC and FA may be helpful in directing tissue sampling to the most appropriate regions for taking biopsies in order to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:19125391

  12. Fractional anisotropy of the fornix and hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Kejal

    2014-01-01

    Decrease in the directionality of water diffusion measured with fractional anisotropy (FA) on diffusion tensor imaging has been linked to loss of myelin and axons in the white matter. Fornix FA is consistently decreased in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, decreased fornix FA is one of the earliest MRI abnormalities observed in cognitively normal individuals who are at an increased risk for AD, such as in pre-symptomatic carriers of familial AD mutations and in pre-clinical AD. Reductions of FA at these early stages, which predicted the decline in memory function. Fornix carries the efferent projections from the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and subiculum, connecting these structures to the septal nuclei, anterior thalamic nucleus, mammillary bodies, and medial hypothalamus. Fornix also carries the afferent cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the medial septal nuclei and the adjacent diagonal band back to the medial temporal lobe, interconnecting the core limbic structures. Because fornix carries the axons projecting from the hippocampus, integrity of the fornix is in-part linked to the integrity of the hippocampus. In keeping with that, fornix FA is reduced in subjects with hippocampal atrophy, correlating with memory function. The literature on FA reductions in the fornix in the clinical spectrum of AD from pre-symptomatic carriers of familial AD mutations to pre-clinical AD, MCI, and dementia stages is reviewed. PMID:25431558

  13. Fractional anisotropy in white matter tracts of very-low-birth-weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Lequin, Maarten; van Pul, Carola; Buijs, Jan; Conneman, Nikk; van Goudoever, Johannes; Govaert, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background Advances in neonatal intensive care have not yet reduced the high incidence of neurodevelopmental disability among very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. As neurological deficits are related to white-matter injury, early detection is important. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could be an excellent tool for assessment of white-matter injury. Objective To provide DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) reference values for white-matter tracts of VLBW infants for clinical use. Materials and methods We retrospectively analysed DTI images of 28 VLBW infants (26–32 weeks gestational age) without evidence of white-matter abnormalities on conventional MRI sequences, and normal developmental outcome (assessed at age 1–3 years). For DTI an echoplanar sequence with diffusion gradient (b = 1,000 s/mm2) applied in 25 non-collinear directions was used. We measured FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of different white-matter tracts in the first 4 days of life. Results A statistically significant correlation was found between gestational age and FA of the posterior limb of the internal capsule in VLBW infants (r = 0.495, P<0.01). Conclusion Values of FA and ADC were measured in white-matter tracts of VLBW infants. FA of the pyramidal tracts measured in the first few days after birth is related to gestational age. PMID:17909782

  14. Enlarged Thalamic Volumes and Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Thalamic Radiations in Veterans with Suicide Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B.; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide. PMID:23964245

  15. Reduced fractional anisotropy in the visual limbic pathway of young adults witnessing domestic violence in childhood.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeewook; Jeong, Bumseok; Polcari, Ann; Rohan, Michael L; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-16

    Witnessing domestic violence (WDV) is a traumatic childhood experience associated with increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and reduced IQ scores. Specific affects of WDV on brain development have not been assessed. We sought to ascertain whether WDV was associated with abnormalities in white matter (WM) tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty subjects who witnessed domestic violence (16F/4M, mean age 22.4 ± 2.48 years) but were not physically or sexually abused were compared to 27 healthy controls (19F/8M, 21.9 ± 1.97 years) without exposure to trauma or Axis I and II disorders. DTI images were acquired with a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), covaried by age, gender, parental education, perceived financial sufficiency, IQ and degree of exposure to parental verbal aggression were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), which projects FA values onto an alignment-invariant fiber tract representation. FA values in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus of left lateral occipital lobe were significantly lower (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparison) in the WDV group. FA values correlated inversely with ratings of depression, anxiety, somatization, 'limbic irritability' and neuropsychological measures of processing speed. Measures of radial but not axial diffusivity were affected suggesting alterations in myelination. Degree of FA reduction was associated with duration of witnessing interparental verbal aggression and with exposure between ages 7 and 13 years. The inferior longitudinal fasciculus connects occipital and temporal cortex and is the main component of the visual-limbic pathway that subserves emotional, learning and memory functions that are modality specific to vision. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in fiber pathways that convey the adverse experience to frontal, temporal or limbic regions. PMID:21985907

  16. Fractional Anisotropy of Cerebral White Matter and Thickness of Cortical Gray Matter across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    P., Kochunov; DC, Glahn; J., Lancaster; P.M., Thompson; V., Kochunov; B., Rogers; P., Fox; J., Blangero; D.E., Williamson

    2011-01-01

    We examined age trajectories of fractional anisotropy (FA) of cerebral white matter (WM) and thickness of cortical gray matter (GM) in 1,031 healthy human subjects (aged 11-90 years). Whole-brain FA and GM thickness values followed quadratic trajectories with age but the relationship between them was linear, indicating that a putative biological mechanism may explain the non-linearity of their age trajectories. Inclusion of the FA values into the quadratic model of the whole-brain and regional GM thickness changes with age made the effect of the age2 term no longer significant for the whole-brain GM thickness and greatly reduced its significance for regional GM thickness measurements. The phylogenetic order of cerebral myelination helped to further explain the intersubject variability in GM thickness. FA values for the early maturing WM were significantly better (p=10−6) at explaining variability in GM thickness in maturing (aged 11-20) subjects than FA values for the late maturing WM. The opposite trend was observed for aging subjects (aged 40-90) where FA values for the late maturing WM were better (p=10−16) at explaining the variability in GM thickness. We concluded that the non-linearity of the age trajectory for GM thickness, measured from T1-weighted MRI, was partially explained by the heterogeneity and the heterochronicity of the age-related changes in the microintegrity of cerebral WM. We consider these findings as the evidence that the measurements of age-related changes in GM thickness and FA are driven, in part, by a common biological mechanism, presumed to be related to changes in cerebral myelination. PMID:21640837

  17. Fractional anisotropy asymmetry and the side of seizure origin for partial onset-temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Xue, Zhong; Dulay, Mario F; Verma, Amit; Karmonik, Christof; Grossman, Robert G; Wong, Stephen T

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a fractional anisotropy asymmetry (FAA) method to detect the asymmetry of white matter (WM) integrity and its correlation with the side of seizure origin for partial onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using diffusion tensor image (DTI). In this study, FAA analysis is applied to 30 patients of partial TLE (15 left, 15 right) and 14 matched normal controls. Specifically, after registering all the images with the JHU-DTI-MNI template the average FA value of each FA skeleton section is calculated using the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Then, FAA is calculated to quantify the WM diffusivity asymmetry of the corresponding region-pairs between the left and right hemispheres. Using FAA the regional asymmetry contributing significantly to the group differences of controls and left/right TLE, as well as the left and right TLE, is identified. As a comparison, the ROI-based average FA values for WM and corresponding FAAs are also calculated. TBSS-based analysis reflects the average of local maximal FA values along the white matter skeleton sections, and ROI-based analysis shows the average of WM FA values within each anatomical region. The FAA statistical results indicated that the FA values of anatomical region-pairs are asymmetric in the ipsilateral hemisphere with seizure origin against the contralateral hemisphere. Particularly, FAA values within the temporal lobe (superior, middle, and inferior temporal WM) are significantly different between the left and right TLE patients, consistently found from both analysis methods. The study suggests that FAA values can be potentially used to identify the seizures of origin of TLE and to help understand the relationship between fiber tracts with the side of seizure origin of TLE. PMID:25037096

  18. Reduced Fractional Anisotropy in the Visual Limbic Pathway of Young Adults Witnessing Domestic Violence in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeewook; Jeong, Bumseok; Polcari, Ann; Rohan, Michael L.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    Witnessing domestic violence (WDV) is a traumatic childhood experience associated with increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and reduced IQ scores. Specific affects of WDV on brain development have not been assessed. We sought to ascertain whether WDV was associated with abnormalities in white matter (WM) tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty subjects who witnessed domestic violence (16F/ 4M, mean age 22.4±2.48 yrs) but were not physically or sexually abused were compared to 27 healthy controls (19F/ 8M, 21.9±1.97 yrs) without exposure to trauma or Axis I and II disorders. DTI images were acquired with a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), covaried by age, gender, parental education, perceived financial sufficiency, IQ and degree of exposure to parental verbal aggression were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), which projects FA values onto an alignment-invariant fiber tract representation. FA values in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus of left lateral occipital lobe were significantly lower (p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparison) in the WDV group. FA values correlated inversely with ratings of depression, anxiety, somatization, ‘limbic irritability’ and neuropsychological measures of processing speed. Measures of radial but not axial diffusivity were affected suggesting alterations in myelination. Degree of FA reduction was associated with duration of witnessing interparental verbal aggression and with exposure between ages 7 – 13 years. The inferior longitudinal fasciculus connects occipital and temporal cortex and is the main component of the visual–limbic pathway that subserves emotional, learning and memory functions that are modality specific to vision. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in fiber pathways that convey the adverse experience to frontal, temporal or limbic regions. PMID:21985907

  19. Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy Values in the Developing Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Provenzale, James M.; Isaacson, Jared; Chen, Steven; Stinnett, Sandra; Liu, Chunlei

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of our study was to correlate decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) in various white matter (WM) regions using diffusion tenor imaging (DTI) within the first year of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed DTI on 53 infants and measured FA and ADC within 10 WM regions important in brain development. For each region, we calculated the slope of ADC as a function of FA, the correlation coefficient (r) and correlation of determination (r2). We performed a group analysis of r values and r2 values for six WM regions primarily composed of crossing fibers and four regions primarily having parallel fibers. Upon finding that a strong correlation of FA with age existed, we adjusted for age and calculated partial correlation coefficients. RESULTS Slopes of FA versus ADC ranged from −1.00711 to −1.67592 (p < 0.05); r values ranged from −0.81 to −0.50 and r2 values from 0.25 to 0.66. The four greatest r2 values were within WM regions having large numbers of crossing fibers and the three lowest r2 values were in regions having predominantly parallel fibers. After adjusting for age, slopes ranged from −1.08095 to 0.09612 (p < 0.05 in five cases); partial correlation coefficients ranged from −0.49 to 0.03 and r2 values from 0.31 to 0.79. The highest partial correlation coefficients were then relatively equally distributed between the two types of WM regions. CONCLUSION In various regions, FA and ADC evolved with differing degrees of correlation. We found a strong influence of age on the relationship between FA and ADC. PMID:21098179

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging and myelin composition analysis reveal abnormal myelination in corpus callosum of canine mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, James M; Nestrasil, Igor; Chen, Steven; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Le, Steven Q; Jens, Jacqueline K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Vondrak, Kristen N; Yee, Jennifer K; Vite, Charles H; Elashoff, David; Duan, Lewei; Wang, Raymond Y; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guzman, Miguel A; Shapiro, Elsa G; Dickson, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    Children with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) develop hyperintense white matter foci on T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are associated clinically with cognitive impairment. We report here a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tissue evaluation of white matter in a canine model of MPS I. We found that two DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity) and radial diffusivity (which reflects degree of myelination) were abnormal in the corpus callosum of MPS I dogs compared to carrier controls. Tissue studies of the corpus callosum showed reduced expression of myelin-related genes and an abnormal composition of myelin in MPS I dogs. We treated MPS I dogs with recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase, which is the enzyme that is deficient in MPS I disease. The recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase was administered by intrathecal injection into the cisterna magna. Treated dogs showed partial correction of corpus callosum myelination. Our findings suggest that abnormal myelination occurs in the canine MPS I brain, that it may underlie clinically-relevant brain imaging findings in human MPS I patients, and that it may respond to treatment. PMID:26222335

  1. Tractography of the Corpus Callosum in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Owen; Sanchez-Castaneda, Cristina; Elifani, Francesca; Maglione, Vittorio; Di Pardo, Alba; Caltagirone, Carlo; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Sabatini, Umberto; Di Paola, Margherita

    2013-01-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in presymptomatic and symptomatic Huntington’s disease (HD) subjects using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) methods. The largest white matter tract, the corpus callosum (CC), has been shown to be particularly vulnerable; however, little work has been done to investigate the regional specificity of tract abnormalities in the CC. Thus, this study examined the major callosal tracts by applying DTI-based tractography. Using TrackVis, a previously defined region of interest tractography method parcellating CC into seven major tracts based on target region was applied to 30 direction DTI data collected from 100 subjects: presymptomatic HD (Pre-HD) subjects (n = 25), HD patients (n = 25) and healthy control subjects (n = 50). Tractography results showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) across broad regions of the CC in Pre-HD subjects. Similar though more severe deficits were seen in HD patients. In Pre-HD and HD, callosal FA and RD were correlated with Disease Burden/CAG repeat length as well as motor (UHDRSI) and cognitive (URDRS2) assessments. These results add evidence that CC pathways are compromised prior to disease onset with possible demyelination occurring early in the disease and suggest that CAG repeat length is a contributing factor to connectivity deficits. Furthermore, disruption of these callosal pathways potentially contributes to the disturbances of motor and cognitive processing that characterize HD. PMID:24019913

  2. Intercentre reproducibility of cardiac apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor cardiac magnetic resonance (DT-CMR) enables probing of the microarchitecture of the myocardium, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) reported in healthy volunteers have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to validate a stimulated-echo diffusion sequence using phantoms, and to assess the intercentre reproducibility of in-vivo diffusion measures using the sequence. Methods and results A stimulated-echo, cardiac-gated DT-CMR sequence with a reduced-field-of-view, single-shot EPI readout was used at two centres with 3T MRI scanners. Four alkane phantoms with known diffusivities were scanned at a single centre using a stimulated echo sequence and a spin-echo Stejskal-Tanner diffusion sequence. The median (maximum, minimum) difference between the DT-CMR sequence and Stejskal-Tanner sequence was 0.01 (0.04, 0.0006) 10-3mm2/s (2%), and between the DT-CMR sequence and literature diffusivities was 0.02 (0.05, 0.006) 10-3mm2/s (4%). The same ten healthy volunteers were scanned using the DT-CMR sequence at the two centres less than seven days apart. Average ADC and FA were calculated in a single mid-ventricular, short axis slice. Intercentre differences were tested for statistical significance at the p??0.05), and only the diastolic ADC showed a statistically significant, but numerically small, difference of 0.07 10-3mm2/s (p?=?0.047). The intercentre, intrasubject coefficients of variance were: systolic ADC 7%, FA 6%; diastolic ADC 7%, FA 3%. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the accuracy of a stimulated-echo DT-CMR sequence in phantoms, and demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining reproducible ADC and FA in healthy volunteers at separate centres with well-matched sequences and processing. PMID:24886285

  3. MRI of the Corpus Callosum in Multiple Sclerosis: Association with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, A.; Smith, S. A.; Gordon-Lipkin, E. M.; Harrison, D. M.; Shiee, N.; Pham, D. L.; Caffo, B. S.; Calabresi, P. A.; Reich, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammatory demyelination and axon damage in the corpus callosum are prominent features of multiple sclerosis (MS) and may partially account for impaired performance on complex tasks. Objective To characterize quantitative callosal MRI abnormalities and their association with disability. Methods In 69 participants with MS and 29 healthy volunteers, lesional and extralesional callosal MRI indices were estimated via diffusion tensor tractography. Expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and MS functional composite (MSFC) scores were recorded in 53 of the participants with MS. Results All tested callosal MRI indices were diffusely abnormal in MS. EDSS score was correlated only with age (r=0.51). Scores on the overall MSFC and its paced serial auditory addition test (PASAT) and 9-hole peg test components were correlated with callosal fractional anisotropy (r=0.27, 0.35, 0.31, respectively) and perpendicular diffusivity (r=−0.29, −0.30, and −0.31) but not with overall callosal volume or callosal lesion volume; the PASAT score was more weakly correlated with callosal magnetization-transfer ratio (r=0.21). Anterior callosal abnormalities were associated with impaired PASAT performance and posterior abnormalities with slow performance on the 9-hole peg test. Conclusion Abnormalities in the corpus callosum can be assessed with quantitative MRI and are associated with cognitive and complex upper-extremity dysfunction in MS. PMID:20142309

  4. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    PubMed

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (<1%). These findings confirm that BV/TV and fabric anisotropy are the best determinants of trabecular bone stiffness and show, against common belief, that other morphological variables do not bring any further contribution. These overall conclusions remain to be confirmed for specific bone diseases and postelastic properties. PMID:25529534

  5. Conduct disorder in females is associated with reduced corpus callosum structural integrity independent of comorbid disorders and exposure to maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Lindner, P; Savic, I; Sitnikov, R; Budhiraja, M; Liu, Y; Jokinen, J; Tiihonen, J; Hodgins, S

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype and genotype of conduct disorder (CD) differ in males and females. Abnormalities of white matter integrity have been reported among males with CD and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Little is known about white matter integrity in females with CD. The present study aimed to determine whether abnormalities of white matter are present among young women who presented CD before the age of 15, and whether abnormalities are independent of the multiple comorbid disorders and experiences of maltreatment characterizing females with CD that may each in themselves be associated with alterations of the white matter. Three groups of women, aged on average 24 years, were scanned using diffusion tensor imaging and compared: 28 with prior CD, three of whom presented ASPD; a clinical comparison (CC) group of 15 women with no history of CD but with similar proportions who presented alcohol dependence, drug dependence, anxiety disorders, depression disorders and physical and sexual abuse as the CD group; and 24 healthy women. Whole-brain, tract-based spatial statistics were computed to investigate differences in fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Compared with healthy women, women with prior CD showed widespread reductions in axial diffusivity primarily in frontotemporal regions. After statistically adjusting for comorbid disorders and maltreatment, group differences in the corpus callosum body and genu (including forceps minor) remained significant. Compared with the CC group, women with CD showed reduced fractional anisotropy in the body and genu of the corpus callosum. No differences were detected between the CD and healthy women in the uncinate fasciculus. PMID:26784968

  6. Early Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Patients With Neuropsychological Impairment Are Associated With Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Liou, Michelle; Kuo, Duen-Pang; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ma, Hsin I; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the reactive changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived diffusion metrics of the anterior thalamic nucleus (AN), a relaying center for the Papez circuit, in early idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients with memory impairment, as well as its correlation with the patients' neuropsychological performances. In total, 28 probable iNPH patients with symptom onset within 1 year and 17 control subjects were prospectively recruited between 2010 and 2013 for this institutional review board-approved study. Imaging studies including DTI and a neuropsychological assessment battery were performed in all subjects. Diffusion metrics were measured from the region of the AN using tract-deterministic seeding method by reconstructing the mammillo-thalamo-cingulate connections within the Papez circuit. Differences in diffusion metrics and memory assessment scores between the patient and control group were examined via the Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between diffusion metrics of AN and neuropsychological tests within the patient group. We discovered that early iNPH patients exhibited marked elevations in fractional anisotropy, pure diffusion anisotropy, and axial diffusivity (all P < 0.01), as well as lower neuropsychological test scores including verbal and nonverbal memory (all P < 0.05) compared with normal control. Spearman rank correlation analyses did not disclose significant correlations between AN diffusion metrics and neuropsychological test scores in the patient group, whereas ranked scatter plots clearly demonstrated a dichotic sample distribution between patient and control samples. In summary, our study highlighted the potential compensatory role of the AN by increasing thalamocortical connectivity within the Papez circuit because memory function declines in early iNPH when early shunt treatment may potentially reverse the memory deficits. PMID:27175677

  7. Early musical training and white-matter plasticity in the corpus callosum: evidence for a sensitive period.

    PubMed

    Steele, Christopher J; Bailey, Jennifer A; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2013-01-16

    Training during a sensitive period in development may have greater effects on brain structure and behavior than training later in life. Musicians are an excellent model for investigating sensitive periods because training starts early and can be quantified. Previous studies suggested that early training might be related to greater amounts of white matter in the corpus callosum, but did not control for length of training or identify behavioral correlates of structural change. The current study compared white-matter organization using diffusion tensor imaging in early- and late-trained musicians matched for years of training and experience. We found that early-trained musicians had greater connectivity in the posterior midbody/isthmus of the corpus callosum and that fractional anisotropy in this region was related to age of onset of training and sensorimotor synchronization performance. We propose that training before the age of 7 years results in changes in white-matter connectivity that may serve as a scaffold upon which ongoing experience can build. PMID:23325263

  8. Corpus callosum atrophy correlates with gray matter atrophy in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C.; Ceccarelli, Antonia; Arora, Ashish; Jackson, Jonathan; Bakshi, Sonya; Kim, Gloria; Miller, Jennifer; Tauhid, Shahamat; von Gizycki, Christian; Bakshi, Rohit; Neema, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Objective Atrophy of the corpus callosum is a recognized characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe a new reliable method for measuring corpus callosum atrophy and correlate this with global cerebral atrophy measures. Methods Whole brain 3T MRI was performed in 38 relapsing-remitting MS subjects and 21 healthy controls (HC). Brain global gray and white matter volumes were segmented with SPM8. The contour of the corpus callosum was outlined on the midline of 3D T1-weighted images by a semi-automated edge-detection technique to determine the corpus callosum area (CCA). Normalized CCA was correlated with other brain atrophy measures in MS subjects. Results CCA was disproportionately lower in MS subjects vs. HC (20.1% mean decrease, p<0.001), with a large effect size (d=0.62) when compared with global atrophy measures. In MS subjects, CCA correlated with brain parenchymal fraction (r=0.55, p<0.001) and gray matter fraction (r=0.45, p=0.005) but not white matter fraction (r=0.18, p=0.29). An inverse correlation with FLAIR hyperintense lesion volume (r=−0.40, p=0.01) was detected for CCA. Conclusion Measurement of atrophy of the corpus callosum can have sensitivity as a useful imaging biomarker in patients with MS, even in patients with low disability levels. Both gray and white matter involvement in MS contribute to corpus callosum atrophy. PMID:24816394

  9. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally. PMID:26438160

  10. Fractional anisotropy in the supplementary motor area correlates with disease duration and severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Abe, Takashi; Izumi, Yuishin; Harada, Masafumi; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder with upper and lower motor neuron signs. There are no biomarkers to track disease progression. To address this issue, we investigated regions in which fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from diffusion weighted images correlated with both disease severity and duration in ALS patients. Fourteen patients with ALS were enrolled in this study. Voxel-based analysis revealed volume of interests (VOIs) showing significant correlation. Finally, Spearman rank correlation coefficient was assessed between FA value in each VOI and disease severity or duration. In the VOI of left supplementary motor area (SMA), FA value significantly correlated with disease severity and duration both (disease severity, rho = 0.59, p = 0.025; disease duration, rho = -0.69, p = 0.006). The present finding suggested the possibility that the abnormality in motor-related region including SMA could be a candidate for a biomarker to track disease progression. PMID:26809951

  11. Individual differences in regional prefrontal gray matter morphometry and fractional anisotropy are associated with different constructs of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Smolker, H. R.; Reineberg, A. E.; Orr, J. M.; Banich, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the relationship between structural differences within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) has been widely explored in cognitively impaired populations, little is known about this relationship in healthy young adults. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), surface-based morphometry (SBM), and fractional anisotropy (FA) we determined the association between regional PFC grey matter (GM) morphometry and white matter tract diffusivity with performance on tasks that tap different aspects of EF as drawn from Miyake et al.’s three-factor model of EF. Reductions in both GM volume (VBM) and cortical folding (SBM) in the ventromedial PFC (vmPFC), ventrolateral PFC (vlPFC), and dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) predicted better common EF, shifting-specific, and updating-specific performance, respectively. Despite capturing different components of GM morphometry, voxel- and surface-based findings were highly related, exhibiting regionally overlapping relationships with EF. Increased white matter FA in fiber tracts that connect the vmPFC and vlPFC with posterior regions of the brain also predicted better common EF and shifting-specific performance, respectively. These results suggest that the neural mechanisms supporting distinct aspects of EF may differentially rely on distinct regions of the PFC, and at least in healthy young adults, are influenced by regional morphometry of the PFC and the FA of major white matter tracts that connect the PFC with posterior cortical and subcortical regions. PMID:24562372

  12. Automated assessment of the quality of diffusion tensor imaging data using color cast of color-encoded fractional anisotropy images.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaofu; Liu, Wei; Li, Xuzhou; Li, Qingli; Liu, Feng; Rauh, Virginia A; Yin, Dazhi; Bansal, Ravi; Duan, Yunsuo; Kangarlu, Alayar; Peterson, Bradley S; Xu, Dongrong

    2014-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data often suffer from artifacts caused by motion. These artifacts are especially severe in DTI data from infants, and implementing tight quality controls is therefore imperative for DTI studies of infants. Currently, routine procedures for quality assurance of DTI data involve the slice-wise visual inspection of color-encoded, fractional anisotropy (CFA) images. Such procedures often yield inconsistent results across different data sets, across different operators who are examining those data sets, and sometimes even across time when the same operator inspects the same data set on two different occasions. We propose a more consistent, reliable, and effective method to evaluate the quality of CFA images automatically using their color cast, which is calculated on the distribution statistics of the 2D histogram in the color space as defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) on lightness and a and b (LAB) for the color-opponent dimensions (also known as the CIELAB color space) of the images. Experimental results using DTI data acquired from neonates verified that this proposed method is rapid and accurate. The method thus provides a new tool for real-time quality assurance for DTI data. PMID:24637081

  13. Aberrant Global and Regional Topological Organization of the Fractional Anisotropy-weighted Brain Structural Networks in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Huai; Yao, Zhi-Jian; Qin, Jiao-Long; Yan, Rui; Hua, Ling-Ling; Lu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most previous neuroimaging studies have focused on the structural and functional abnormalities of local brain regions in major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, the exactly topological organization of networks underlying MDD remains unclear. This study examined the aberrant global and regional topological patterns of the brain white matter networks in MDD patients. Methods: The diffusion tensor imaging data were obtained from 27 patients with MDD and 40 healthy controls. The brain fractional anisotropy-weighted structural networks were constructed, and the global network and regional nodal metrics of the networks were explored by the complex network theory. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, the brain structural network of MDD patients showed an intact small-world topology, but significantly abnormal global network topological organization and regional nodal characteristic of the network in MDD were found. Our findings also indicated that the brain structural networks in MDD patients become a less strongly integrated network with a reduced central role of some key brain regions. Conclusions: All these resulted in a less optimal topological organization of networks underlying MDD patients, including an impaired capability of local information processing, reduced centrality of some brain regions and limited capacity to integrate information across different regions. Thus, these global network and regional node-level aberrations might contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of MDD from the view of the brain network. PMID:26960371

  14. Thalamic fractional anisotropy predicts accrual of cerebral white matter damage in older subjects with small-vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Michele; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik; Skudlarski, Pawel; Pearlson, Godfrey D; White, William B; Wolfson, Leslie; Guttmann, Charles RG

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and lacunes are magnetic resonance imaging hallmarks of cerebral small-vessel disease, which increase the risk of stroke, cognitive, and mobility impairment. Although most studies of cerebral small-vessel disease have focused on white matter abnormalities, the gray matter (GM) is also affected, as evidenced by frequently observed lacunes in subcortical GM. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle neurodegenerative changes in deep GM structures. We explored the relationship between baseline DTI characteristics of the thalamus, caudate, and putamen, and the volume and subsequent accrual of WMHs over a 4-year period in 56 community-dwelling older (⩾75 years) individuals. Baseline thalamic fractional anisotropy (FA) was an independent predictor of WMH accrual. WMH accrual also correlated with baseline lacune count and baseline WMH volume, the latter showing the strongest predictive power, explaining 27.3% of the variance. The addition of baseline thalamic FA in multivariate modeling increased this value by 70%, which explains 46.5% of the variance in WMH accrual rate. Thalamic FA might serve as a novel predictor of cerebral small-vessel disease progression in clinical settings and trials. Furthermore, our findings point to the possibility of a causal relationship between thalamic damage and the accrual of WMHs. PMID:24824915

  15. Conditional Tat protein brain expression in the GT-tg bigenic mouse induces cerebral fractional anisotropy abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Amanda N.; Liu, Xiaoxu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Paris, Jason J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral white matter changes including tissue water diffusion abnormalities detected with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) are commonly found in humans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, as well as in animal models of the disorder. The severities of some of these abnormalities have been reported to correlate with measures of disease progression or severity, or with the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Accordingly, DTI may be a useful translational biomarker. HIV-Tat protein appears to be an important factor in the viral pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurotoxicity. We previously reported cerebral gray matter density reductions in the GT-tg bigenic mouse treated with doxycycline (Dox) to conditionally induce Tat protein expression. Presently, we administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dox (100 mg/kg/day) for 7 days to GT-tg mice to determine whether induction of conditional Tat expression led to the development of cerebral DTI abnormalities. Perfused and fixed brains from eight GT-tg mice administered Dox and eight control mice administered saline i.p. were extracted and underwent DTI scans on a 9.4 Tesla scanner. A whole brain analysis detected fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in several areas including insular and endopiriform regions, as well as within the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to Tat protein is sufficient to induce FA abnormalities, and further support the use of the GT-tg mouse to model some effects of HIV. PMID:25619988

  16. Performance asymmetries in tool use are associated with corpus callosum integrity in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kimberley A; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Barrett, Elizabeth; Hopkins, William D

    2013-02-01

    The authors examined the relationship of corpus callosum (CC) morphology and organization to hand preference and performance on a motor skill task in chimpanzees. Handedness was assessed using a complex tool use task that simulated termite fishing. Chimpanzees were initially allowed to perform the task wherein they could choose which hand to use (preference measure), then they were required to complete trials using each hand (performance measure). Two measures were used to assess the CC: midsagittal area obtained from in vivo magnetic resonance images and density of transcallosal connections as determined by fractional anisotropy values obtained from diffusion tensor imaging. The authors hypothesized that chimpanzees would perform better on their preferred hand compared to the nonpreferred hand, and that strength of behavioral lateralization (rather the direction) on this task would be negatively correlated to regions of the CC involved in motor processing. Results indicate that the preferred hand was the most adept hand. Performance asymmetries correlated with fractional anisotropy measures but not area measures of the CC. PMID:23398443

  17. Corpus Callosum Volume and Neurocognition in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keary, Christopher J.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Bansal, Rahul; Goradia, Dhruman; Fedorov, Serguei; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2009-01-01

    The corpus callosum has recently been considered as an index of interhemispheric connectivity. This study applied a novel volumetric method to examine the size of the corpus callosum in 32 individuals with autism and 34 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls and to investigate the relationship between this structure and cognitive measures linked to…

  18. Heritability of fractional anisotropy in human white matter: a comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI data.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Marcus, Daniel; Winkler, Anderson; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Patel, Binish; Behrens, Timothy; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Eddie; Ugurbil, Kamil; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Brouwer, Rachel M; Landman, Bennett; Lemaitre, Hervé; den Braber, Anouk; Zwiers, Marcel P; Ritchie, Stuart; van Hulzen, Kimm; Almasy, Laura; Curran, Joanne; deZubicaray, Greig I; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; Mitchell, Braxton; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles; Starr, John; Sussmann, Jessika; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wright, Margie; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, Rene; de Geus, Eco J C; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad; van 't Ent, Dennis; Bastin, Mark E; McIntosh, Andrew; Deary, Ian J; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Blangero, John; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Van Essen, David C

    2015-05-01

    The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) reconstruction in 481 HCP subjects (194/287 M/F) consisting of 57/60 pairs of mono- and dizygotic twins, and 246 siblings. FA measurements were derived using (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) ENIGMA DTI protocols and heritability estimates were calculated using the SOLAR-Eclipse imaging genetic analysis package. We compared heritability estimates derived from HCP data to those publicly available through the ENIGMA-DTI consortium, which were pooled together from five-family based studies across the US, Europe, and Australia. FA measurements from the HCP cohort for eleven major white matter tracts were highly heritable (h(2)=0.53-0.90, p<10(-5)), and were significantly correlated with the joint-analytical estimates from the ENIGMA cohort on the tract and voxel-wise levels. The similarity in regional heritability suggests that the additive genetic contribution to white matter microstructure is consistent across populations and imaging acquisition parameters. It also suggests that the overarching genetic influence provides an opportunity to define a common genetic search space for future gene-discovery studies. Uniquely, the measurements of additive genetic contribution performed in this study can be repeated using online genetic analysis tools provided by the HCP ConnectomeDB web application. PMID:25747917

  19. Genetics of Microstructure of the Corpus Callosum in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kanchibhotla, Sri C.; Mather, Karen A.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Zhuang, Lin; Schofield, Peter R.; Kwok, John B. J.; Ames, David; Wright, Margaret J.; Trollor, Julian N.; Wen, Wei; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2014-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on corpus callosum (CC) microstructure in a community sample of older adult twins. Analyses were undertaken in 284 healthy older twins (66% female; 79 MZ and 63 DZ pairs) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The average age of the sample was 69.82 (SD = 4.76) years. Brain imaging scans were collected and DTI measures were estimated for the whole CC as well as its five subregions. Parcellation of the CC was performed using Analyze. In addition, white matter lesion (WMLs) burden was estimated. Heritability and genetic correlation analyses were undertaken using the SOLAR software package. Age, sex, scanner, handedness and blood pressure were considered as covariates. Heritability (h2) analysis for the DTI metrics of whole CC, indicated significant h2 for fractional anisotropy (FA) (h2 = 0.56; p = 2.89×10−10), mean diffusivity (MD) (h2 = 0.52; p = 0.30×10−6), radial diffusivity (RD) (h2 = 0.49; p = 0.2×10−6) and axial diffusivity (AD) (h2 = 0.37; p = 8.15×10−5). We also performed bivariate genetic correlation analyses between (i) whole CC DTI measures and (ii) whole CC DTI measures with total brain WML burden. Across the DTI measures for the whole CC, MD and RD shared 84% of the common genetic variance, followed by MD- AD (77%), FA - RD (52%), RD - AD (37%) and FA – MD (11%). For total WMLs, significant genetic correlations indicated that there was 19% shared common genetic variance with whole CC MD, followed by CC RD (17%), CC AD (16%) and CC FA (5%). Our findings suggest that the CC microstructure is under moderate genetic control. There was also evidence of shared genetic factors between the CC DTI measures. In contrast, there was less shared genetic variance between WMLs and the CC DTI metrics, suggesting fewer common genetic variants. PMID:25514436

  20. Structure, Integrity, and Function of the Hypoplastic Corpus Callosum in Spina Bifida Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Jennifer T.; Hasan, Khader; Hannay, H. Julia; Dennis, Maureen; Jockell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies of people with complete or partial hypogenesis of the corpus callosum (CC), little is understood about the hypoplastic CC in which all structures are present but thinned. Spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM) is a model organism for such studies because many have either a hypogenetic or hypoplastic CC. We used diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) to evaluate the hypoplastic CC in SBM and its relation to interhemispheric functions and intelligence quotient (IQ). Participants were individuals with SBM and an intact or hypoplastic CC (n=28), who were compared to a typically developing comparison group (n=32). Total and regional DTT volume and integrity measures (fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity) of the CC were related to measures of intelligence (IQ), bimanual motor functioning, and dichotic auditory performance. As predicted, DTT showed variations in volume and integrity that were maximized in the entire CC and the posterior CC. IQ correlated with entire CC volume, anterior and posterior regional CC volumes, and also with measures of integrity. Bimanual motor functioning correlated with the anterior and posterior volumes of the CC but not with any integrity measures. Axial diffusivity in the posterior CC was negatively correlated with right ear dichotic listening performance. The hypoplastic CC is not macrostructurally or microstructurally intact in SBM, even when it appears radiologically intact. Both volume and integrity of the posterior regions were related to reductions in IQ and to interhemispheric processing. These findings may transfer to other disorders characterized by a hypoplastic CC. PMID:25014561

  1. A comparative diffusion tensor imaging study of corpus callosum subregion integrity in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Kale Edmiston, Elliot; Chen, Kaiyuan; Tang, Yanqing; Ouyang, Xuan; Jiang, Yifeng; Fan, Guoguang; Ren, Ling; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Yifang; Jiang, Wenyan; Liu, Zhening; Xu, Ke; Wang, Fei

    2014-01-30

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have provided evidence for corpus callosum (CC) white matter abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SZ). These findings include alterations in shape, volume, white matter intensity and structural integrity compared to healthy control populations. Although CC alterations are implicated in both SZ and BD, no study of which we are aware has investigated callosal subregion differences between these two patient populations. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess CC integrity in patients with BD (n=16), SZ (n=19) and healthy controls (HC) (n=24). Fractional anisotropy (FA) of CC subregions was measured using region of interest (ROI) analysis and compared in the three groups. Significant group differences of FA values were revealed in five CC subregions, including the anterior genu, middle genu, posterior genu, posterior body and anterior splenium. FA values of the same subregions were significantly reduced in patients with SZ compared with HC. FA values were also significantly reduced in patients with BD compared to the HC group in the same subregions, excepting the middle genu. No significant difference was found between patient groups in any region. Most of the alterations in CC subregions were present in both the BD and SZ groups. These results imply an overlap in potential pathology, possibly relating to risk factors common to both disorders. The one region that differed between patient groups, the middle genu area, may serve as an illness marker and is perhaps involved in the different cognitive impairments observed in BD and SZ. PMID:24300086

  2. Watershed-based segmentation of the corpus callosum in diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro; Rittner, Leticia; Appenzeller, Simone; Lapa, Aline; Lotufo, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is one of the most important white matter structures of the brain, interconnecting the two cerebral hemispheres, and is related to several neurodegenerative diseases. Since segmentation is usually the first step for studies in this structure, and manual volumetric segmentation is a very time-consuming task, it is important to have a robust automatic method for CC segmentation. We propose here an approach for fully automatic 3D segmentation of the CC in the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor images. The method uses the watershed transform and is performed on the fractional anisotropy (FA) map weighted by the projection of the principal eigenvector in the left-right direction. The section of the CC in the midsagittal slice is used as seed for the volumetric segmentation. Experiments with real diffusion MRI data showed that the proposed method is able to quickly segment the CC without any user intervention, with great results when compared to manual segmentation. Since it is simple, fast and does not require parameter settings, the proposed method is well suited for clinical applications.

  3. Altered White Matter Microstructure in the Corpus Callosum in Huntington’s Disease: implications for cortical “disconnection”

    PubMed Central

    Diana Rosas, H; Lee, Stephanie Y; Bender, Alexander; Zaleta, Alexandra K; Vange, Mark; Yu, Peng; Fischl, Bruce; Pappu, Vasanth; Cha, Jang-Ho; Salat, David H; Hersch, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is the major conduit for information transfer between the cerebral hemispheres and plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information between homologous cortical regions. The majority of fibers that make up the CC arise from large pyramidal neurons in layers III and V, which project contra-laterally. These neurons degenerate in Huntington’s disease (HD) in a topographically and temporally selective way. Since any focus of cortical degeneration could be expected to secondarily de-afferent homologous regions of cortex, we hypothesized that regionally selective cortical degeneration would be reflected in regionally selective degeneration of the CC. We used conventional T1-weighted, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and a modified corpus callosum segmentation scheme to examine the CC in healthy controls, huntingtin gene-carriers and symptomatic HD subjects. We measured mid-sagittal callosal cross-sectional thickness and several DTI parameters, including fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the degree of white matter organization, radial diffusivity, a suggested index of myelin integrity, and axial diffusivity, a suggested index of axonal damage of the CC. We found a topologically selective pattern of alterations in these measures in pre-manifest subjects that were more extensive in early symptomatic HD subjects and that correlated with performance on distinct cognitive measures, suggesting an important role of for disrupted inter-hemispheric transfer in the clinical symptoms of HD. Our findings provide evidence for early degeneration of commissural pyramidal neurons in the neocortex, loss of cortico-cortical connectivity, and functional compromise of associative cortical processing. PMID:19850138

  4. Facial emotion recognition in agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired social functioning is a common symptom of individuals with developmental disruptions in callosal connectivity. Among these developmental conditions, agenesis of the corpus callosum provides the most extreme and clearly identifiable example of callosal disconnection. To date, deficits in nonliteral language comprehension, humor, theory of mind, and social reasoning have been documented in agenesis of the corpus callosum. Here, we examined a basic social ability as yet not investigated in this population: recognition of facial emotion and its association with social gaze. Methods Nine individuals with callosal agenesis and nine matched controls completed four tasks involving emotional faces: emotion recognition from upright and inverted faces, gender recognition, and passive viewing. Eye-tracking data were collected concurrently on all four tasks and analyzed according to designated facial regions of interest. Results Individuals with callosal agenesis exhibited impairments in recognizing emotions from upright faces, in particular lower accuracy for fear and anger, and these impairments were directly associated with diminished attention to the eye region. The callosal agenesis group exhibited greater consistency in emotion recognition across conditions (upright vs. inverted), with poorest performance for fear identification in both conditions. The callosal agenesis group also had atypical facial scanning (lower fractional dwell time in the eye region) during gender naming and passive viewing of faces, but they did not differ from controls on gender naming performance. The pattern of results did not differ when taking into account full-scale intelligence quotient or presence of autism spectrum symptoms. Conclusions Agenesis of the corpus callosum results in a pattern of atypical facial scanning characterized by diminished attention to the eyes. This pattern suggests that reduced callosal connectivity may contribute to the development and maintenance of emotion processing deficits involving reduced attention to others' eyes. PMID:25705318

  5. Corpus Callosum Area in Children and Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigge, Molly B. D.; Lange, Nicholas; Bigler, Erin D.; Merkley, Tricia L.; Neeley, E. Shannon; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated findings of abnormal corpus callosum structure in autism, the developmental trajectories of corpus callosum growth in the disorder have not yet been reported. In this study, we examined corpus callosum size from a developmental perspective across a 30-year age range in a large cross-sectional sample of individuals with autism

  6. Corpus Callosum Area in Children and Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigge, Molly B. D.; Lange, Nicholas; Bigler, Erin D.; Merkley, Tricia L.; Neeley, E. Shannon; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated findings of abnormal corpus callosum structure in autism, the developmental trajectories of corpus callosum growth in the disorder have not yet been reported. In this study, we examined corpus callosum size from a developmental perspective across a 30-year age range in a large cross-sectional sample of individuals with autism…

  7. White matter fractional anisotropy over two time points in early onset schizophrenia and adolescent cannabis use disorder: A naturalistic diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Katherine A; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2015-04-30

    Recurrent exposure to cannabis in adolescence increases the risk for later development of psychosis, but there are sparse data regarding the impact of cannabis use on brain structure during adolescence. This pilot study investigated the effect of cannabis use disorder (CUD) upon white matter fractional anisotropy (WM FA) values in non-psychotic treatment-seeking adolescents relative to adolescents with early onset schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (EOSS) and to healthy control (HC) participants. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography methods were used to examine fractional anisotropy (FA) of the cingulum bundle, superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), corticospinal tract (CST), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and uncinate fasciculus in adolescents with EOSS (n=34), CUD (n=19) and HC (n=29). Participants received DTI and substance use assessments at baseline and at 18-month follow-up. Using multivariate analysis of variance, a significant main effect of diagnostic group was observed. Post-hoc testing revealed that adolescents with CUD showed an altered change in FA values in the left ILF and in the left IFOF (trend level) compared with HC adolescents. Greater consumption of cannabis during the inter-scan interval predicted a greater decrease in left ILF FA in CUD. These preliminary longitudinal data suggest that heavy cannabis use during adolescence, or some factor associated with cannabis use, is associated with an altered change in WM FA values in a fiber bundle that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of EOSS (i.e., the left ILF). Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical significance of these findings. PMID:25779033

  8. Plasticity of Interhemispheric Temporal Lobe White Matter Pathways Due to Early Disruption of Corpus Callosum Development in Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Kailyn A; Juranek, Jenifer; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Hannay, H Julia; Cirino, Paul T; Dennis, Maureen; Kramer, Larry A; Fletcher, Jack M

    2016-04-01

    Spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM) is commonly associated with anomalous development of the corpus callosum (CC) because of congenital partial hypogenesis and hydrocephalus-related hypoplasia. It represents a model disorder to examine the effects of early disruption of CC neurodevelopment and the plasticity of interhemispheric white matter connections. Diffusion tensor imaging was acquired on 76 individuals with SBM and 27 typically developing individuals, aged 8-36 years. Probabilistic tractography was used to isolate the interhemispheric connections between the posterior superior temporal lobes, which typically traverse the posterior third of the CC. Early disruption of CC development resulted in restructuring of interhemispheric connections through alternate commissures, particularly the anterior commissure (AC). These rerouted fibers were present in people with SBM and both CC hypoplasia and hypogenesis. In addition, microstructural integrity was reduced in the interhemispheric temporal tract in people with SBM, indexed by lower fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and higher radial diffusivity. Interhemispheric temporal tract volume was positively correlated with total volume of the CC, such that more severe underdevelopment of the CC was associated with fewer connections between the posterior temporal lobes. Therefore, both the macrostructure and microstructure of this interhemispheric tract were reduced, presumably as a result of more extensive CC malformation. The current findings suggest that early disruption in CC development reroutes interhemispheric temporal fibers through both the AC and more anterior sections of the CC in support of persistent hypotheses that the AC may serve a compensatory function in atypical CC development. PMID:26798959

  9. Age at First Exposure to Football Is Associated with Altered Corpus Callosum White Matter Microstructure in Former Professional Football Players.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Julie M; Koerte, Inga K; Muehlmann, Marc; Pasternak, Ofer; Bourlas, Alexandra P; Baugh, Christine M; Giwerc, Michelle Y; Zhu, Anni; Coleman, Michael J; Bouix, Sylvain; Fritts, Nathan G; Martin, Brett M; Chaisson, Christine; McClean, Michael D; Lin, Alexander P; Cantu, Robert C; Tripodis, Yorghos; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-11-15

    Youth football players may incur hundreds of repetitive head impacts (RHI) in one season. Our recent research suggests that exposure to RHI during a critical neurodevelopmental period prior to age 12 may lead to greater later-life mood, behavioral, and cognitive impairments. Here, we examine the relationship between age of first exposure (AFE) to RHI through tackle football and later-life corpus callosum (CC) microstructure using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty retired National Football League (NFL) players, ages 40-65, were matched by age and divided into two groups based on their AFE to tackle football: before age 12 or at age 12 or older. Participants underwent DTI on a 3 Tesla Siemens (TIM-Verio) magnet. The whole CC and five subregions were defined and seeded using deterministic tractography. Dependent measures were fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. Results showed that former NFL players in the AFE <12 group had significantly lower FA in anterior three CC regions and higher radial diffusivity in the most anterior CC region than those in the AFE ≥12 group. This is the first study to find a relationship between AFE to RHI and later-life CC microstructure. These results suggest that incurring RHI during critical periods of CC development may disrupt neurodevelopmental processes, including myelination, resulting in altered CC microstructure. PMID:26200068

  10. A DTI study on the corpus callosum of treatment-naïve boys with 'pure' Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Nicole; Luehr, Ina; Sender, Jennifer; Ehrlich, Stefan; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Roessner, Veit

    2016-01-30

    Disturbances in the corpus callosum (CC) indicating altered interhemispheric connectivity have been associated with Tourette syndrome (TS). The objective of the present study was to refine knowledge about interhemispheric connectivity in TS by analyzing four different diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters in a very homogeneous group of treatment-naïve boys with pure TS in comparison to male healthy controls (HC). Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AD) and mean diffusivity (MD) of five CC-segments were assessed from DTI of 26 treatment-naïve boys with pure TS and 24 HC. We observed no group differences in both FA and RD. However, we found a significant effect for AD and a trend for MD, being both reduced in boys with TS in comparison to HC. Moreover, a negative correlation between AD and the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale total score was observed. Reduced AD of the CC in treatment-naïve boys with pure TS in comparison to HC may indicate that significant alterations in white matter microstructure of the CC contribute to tic symptomatology per se and seem not to be related to confounders such as consequences of long-term medication, tic performance or tic suppression. PMID:26747579

  11. Mild Cognitive Impairment is Associated With White Matter Integrity Changes in Late-Myelinating Regions Within the Corpus Callosum.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Nikki H; Salat, David H; Kuhn, Taylor P; Foley, Jessica M; Price, Jenessa S; Westlye, Lars T; Esterman, Michael S; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Leritz, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    Degenerative brain changes in Alzheimer's disease may occur in reverse order of normal brain development based on the retrogenesis model. This study tested whether evidence of reverse myelination was observed in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using a data-driven analytic approach based on life span developmental data. Whole-brain high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging scans were obtained for 31 patients with MCI and 79 demographically matched healthy older adults. Comparisons across corpus callosum (CC) regions of interest (ROIs) showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the body but not in the genu or splenium; early-, middle-, and late-myelinating ROIs restricted to the CC revealed decreased FA in late- but not early- or middle-myelinating ROIs. Voxelwise group differences revealed areas of lower FA in MCI, but whole-brain differences were equally distributed across early-, middle-, and late-myelinating regions. Overall, results within the CC support the retrogenesis model, although caution is needed when generalizing these results beyond the CC. PMID:25904759

  12. Effects of SNR on the Accuracy and Reproducibility of DTI-derived Fractional Anisotropy, Mean Diffusivity, and Principal Eigenvector Measurements at 1.5T

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; Landman, Bennett A.; Jones, Craig K.; Smith, Seth A.; Prince, Jerry L.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop an experimental protocol to calculate the precision and accuracy of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and the orientation of the principal eigenvector (PEV) as a function of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in vivo. Materials and Methods A healthy male volunteer was scanned in three separate scanning sessions, yielding a total of 45 DTI scans. To provide FA, MD, and PEV as a function of SNR, sequential scans from a scan session were grouped into non-intersecting sets. Analysis of the accuracy and precision of the DTI-derived contrasts was done in both a voxel-wise and ROI-based manner. Results An upward bias of FA and no significant bias in MD were present as SNR decreased, confirming results from simulation-based studies. Notably, while the precision of the PEV became worse at low SNR, no bias in the PEV orientation was observed. Overall, an accurate and precise quantification of FA values in GM requires substantially more SNR than the quantification of WM FA values Conclusion This study provides guidance for FA, MD, and PEV quantification and a means to investigate the minimal detectable differences within and across scan sessions as a function of SNR. PMID:17729339

  13. Fractional anisotropy shows differential reduction in frontal-subcortical fiber bundles—A longitudinal MRI study of 76 middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Vik, Alexandra; Hodneland, Erlend; Haász, Judit; Ystad, Martin; Lundervold, Astri J.; Lundervold, Arvid

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the frontal- and white matter (WM) retrogenesis hypotheses and the assumptions that fronto-striatal circuits are especially vulnerable in normal aging, the goal of the present study was to identify fiber bundles connecting subcortical nuclei and frontal areas and obtain site-specific information about age related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes. Multimodal magnetic resonance image acquisitions [3D T1-weighted and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)] were obtained from healthy older adults (N = 76, range 49–80 years at inclusion) at two time points, 3 years apart. A subset of the participants (N = 24) was included at a third time-point. In addition to the frontal-subcortical fibers, the anterior callosal fiber (ACF) and the corticospinal tract (CST) was investigated by its mean FA together with tract parameterization analysis. Our results demonstrated fronto-striatal structural connectivity decline (reduced FA) in normal aging with substantial inter-individual differences. The tract parameterization analysis showed that the along tract FA profiles were characterized by piece-wise differential changes along their extension rather than being uniformly affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study detecting age-related changes in frontal-subcortical WM connections in normal aging. PMID:26029102

  14. Tract-specific fractional anisotropy predicts cognitive outcome in a community sample of middle-aged participants with white matter lesions

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; Bargalló, Núria; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Barrios, Maite; Cáceres, Cynthia; Toran, Pere; Alzamora, Maite; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) have been consistently related to cognitive dysfunction but the role of white matter (WM) damage in cognitive impairment is not fully determined. Diffusion tensor imaging is a promising tool to explain impaired cognition related to WMLs. We investigated the separate association of high-grade periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) with fractional anisotropy (FA) in middle-aged individuals. We also assessed the predictive value to cognition of FA within specific WM tracts associated with high-grade WMLs. One hundred participants from the Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study were divided into groups based on low- and high-grade WMLs. Voxel-by-voxel FA were compared between groups, with separate analyses for high-grade PVHs and DWMHs. The mean FA within areas showing differences between groups was extracted in each tract for linear regression analyses. Participants with high-grade PVHs and participants with high-grade DWMHs showed lower FA in different areas of specific tracts. Areas showing decreased FA in high-grade DWMHs predicted lower cognition, whereas areas with decreased FA in high-grade PVHs did not. The predictive value to cognition of specific WM tracts supports the involvement of cortico-subcortical circuits in cognitive deficits only in DWMHs. PMID:24549185

  15. Adding insult to injury: childhood and adolescent risk factors for psychosis predict lower fractional anisotropy in the superior longitudinal fasciculus in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    DeRosse, Pamela; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Peters, Bart D.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Szeszko, Philip R.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies provide strong support for demographic and environmental risk factors in psychotic disorders, few data examine how these risk factors relate to the putative aberrant neurodevelopment associated with illness. The present study examined how the accumulation of risk factors including low IQ, low parental socioeconomic status, history of adolescent cannabis use and childhood trauma, and high levels of subclinical psychotic-like experiences contributed to aberrant neurodevelopmental outcomes in 112 otherwise healthy adults recruited from the community. Participants were studied with diffusion tensor imaging, and voxel-wise statistical analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) using tract-based spatial statistics was used to examine the relation between cumulative risk (CR) for psychosis and white matter (WM) integrity across the whole brain. Analyses revealed that higher CR was significantly associated with lower FA in a cluster in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. These results suggest that risk factors previously associated with psychotic disorders are associated with WM integrity even in otherwise healthy adults and may provide insight into how previously identified risk factors contribute to the structural brain abnormalities associated with psychotic illness. Prospective longitudinal studies examining the effect of risk factors on the developmental trajectory of brain WM are warranted. PMID:25277095

  16. Multi-channel registration of fractional anisotropy and T1-weighted images in the presence of atrophy: application to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Eloy; Schneider, Torben; Modat, Marc; Daga, Pankaj; Muhlert, Nils; Chard, Declan; Ourselin, Sebastien; Lladó, Xavier; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia Gandini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Co-registration of structural T1-weighted (T1w) scans and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived fractional anisotropy (FA) maps to a common space is of particular interest in neuroimaging, as T1w scans can be used for brain segmentation while DTI can provide microstructural tissue information. While the effect of lesions on registration has been tackled and solutions are available, the issue of atrophy is still open to discussion. Multi-channel (MC) registration algorithms have the advantage of maintaining anatomical correspondence between different contrast images after registration to any target space. In this work, we test the performance of an MC registration approach applied to T1w and FA data using simulated brain atrophy images. Experimental results are compared with a standard single-channel registration approach. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations are presented, showing that the MC approach provides better alignment with the target while maintaining better T1w and FA co-alignment. PMID:26727703

  17. Evolution of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy in the Cerebrum of Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia over the First Month of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Saskia; Boudes, Elodie; Benseler, Anouk; Gilbert, Guillaume; Saint-Martin, Christine; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evolution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) over the first month of life in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia and to compare it with that of healthy newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were enrolled prospectively; and the presence and extent of brain injury were scored on each MRI. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in the basal ganglia, in the white matter and in the cortical grey matter. Sixty-one asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia had a total of 126 ADC and FA maps. Asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury eventually had significantly decreased ADC values on days 2-3 of life and decreased FA values around day 10 and 1 month of life compared with those not developing brain injury. Despite hypothermia treatment, asphyxiated newborns may develop brain injury that still can be detected with advanced neuroimaging techniques such as DWI and DTI as early as days 2-3 of life. A study of ADC and FA values over time may aid in the understanding of how brain injury develops in these newborns despite hypothermia treatment. PMID:26229690

  18. Infarction of the Corpus Callosum: A Retrospective Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu-meng; Qin, Hua-min; Wu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Xiao; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Boltze, Johannes; Wang, Su-ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate patients with ischemic infarctions in the territory of the corpus callosum to advance our understanding of this rare stroke subtype by providing comprehensive descriptive and epidemiological data. Methods From January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2014, all cases of acute ischemic stroke diagnosed by clinical manifestation and diffusion weighted imaging in Dalian Municipal Central Hospital were investigated. The patients presenting with corpus callosum infarctions were selected and further allocated into genu and/or body and splenium infarction groups. Proportion, lesion patterns, clinical features, risk factors and etiology of corpus callosum infarction were analyzed. Results Out of 1,629 cases, 59 patients (3.6%) with corpus callosum infarctions were identified by diffusion weighted imaging, including 7 patients who had ischemic lesions restricted to the corpus callosum territory. Thirty six patients had lesions in the splenium (61.0%). Corpus callosum infarction patients suffered from a broad spectrum of symptoms including weakness and/or numbness of the limbs, clumsy speech, and vertigo, which could not be explained by lesions in corpus callosum. A classical callosal disconnection syndrome was found in 2 out of all patients with corpus callosum infarctions. Statistical differences in the risk factor and infarct pattern between the genu and/or body group and splenium group were revealed. Conclusion Corpus callosum infarction and the callosal disconnection syndrome were generally rare. The most susceptible location of ischemic corpus callosum lesion was the splenium. Splenium infarctions were often associated with bilateral cerebral hemisphere involvement (46.2%). The genu and/or body infarctions were associated with atherosclerosis. The most common cause of corpus callosum infarction probably was embolism. PMID:25785450

  19. Corpus Callosum Morphometrics in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger-Megiddo, Inbal; Shaw, Dennis W. W.; Friedman, Seth D.; Sparks, Bobbi F.; Artru, Alan A.; Giedd, Jay N.; Dawson, Geraldine; Dager, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed digital corpus callosum cross sectional areas in 3-4 year olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to typically developing (TD) and developmentally delayed (DD) children. Though not different in absolute size compared to TD, ASD callosums were disproportionately small adjusted for increased ASD cerebral volume. ASD…

  20. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: Comparing meta and megaanalytical approaches for data pooling.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E; Mandl, René C; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M; Curran, Joanne E; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Hong, L Elliot; Landman, Bennett A; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna M; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles P; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Toga, Arthur W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wright, Margaret J; Wright, Susan N; Bastin, Mark E; McIntosh, Andrew M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Williamson, Douglas E; Blangero, John; van 't Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C

    2014-07-15

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9-85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large "mega-family". We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  1. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: comparing meta and mega analytical approaches for data pooling

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Mandl, René C.; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Hong, L. Elliot; Landman, Bennett A.; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Olvera, Rene L.; Peterson, Charles P.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wright, Susan N.; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Blangero, John; van ’t Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9–85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large “mega-family”. We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  2. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  3. Corpus callosum involvement and postoperative outcomes of patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Ting; Wu, Tai-Wei Erich; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chang, Chen-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Pai, Ping-Ching; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Corpus callosum involvement is associated with poorer survival in high grade glioma (HGG), but the prognostic value in low grade glioma (LGG) is unclear. To determine the prognostic impact of corpus callosum involvement on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG and LGG, the records of 233 glioma patients treated from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to identify corpus callosum involvement. Age, sex, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale, postoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and extent of resection (EOR) were evaluated with respect to PFS and OS. The incidence of corpus callosum involvement was similar among HGG (14%) and LGG (14.5%). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS and OS were significantly shorter in both WHO grade II and grade IV glioma with corpus callosum involvement (both, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that grade II glioma with corpus callosum involvement have shorter PFS (p=0.03), while EOR, instead of corpus callosum involvement (p=0.16), was an independent factor associated with PFS in grade IV glioma (p<0.05). Corpus callosum involvement was no longer significantly associated with OS after adjusting age, gender, EOR, preoperative and postoperative performance status (p=0.16, 0.17 and 0.56 in grade II, III and IV gliomas, respectively). Corpus callosum involvement happened in both LGG and HGG, and is associated with lower EOR and higher postoperative ECOG score both in LGG and HGG. Corpus callosum involvement tends to be an independent prognostic factor for PFS in LGG, but not for OS in LGG or in HGG. PMID:26033546

  4. Age-related decline in the microstructural integrity of white matter in children with early- and continuously-treated PKU: a DTI study of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    White, Desiree A; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Nardos, Binyam; Shimony, Joshua S; Archer, Rebecca; Snyder, Abraham Z; Moinuddin, Asif; Grange, Dorothy K; Steiner, Robert D; McKinstry, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Structural, volumetric, and microstructural abnormalities have been reported in the white matter of the brain in individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU). Very little research, however, has been conducted to investigate the development of white matter in children with PKU, and the developmental trajectory of their white matter microstructure is unknown. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to examine the development of the microstructural integrity of white matter across six regions of the corpus callosum in 34 children (7-18 years of age) with early- and continuously-treated PKU. Comparison was made with 61 demographically-matched healthy control children. Two DTI variables were examined: mean diffusivity (MD) and relative anisotropy (RA). RA was comparable to that of controls across all six regions of the corpus callosum. In contrast, MD was restricted for children with PKU in anterior (i.e., genu, rostral body, anterior midbody) but not posterior (posterior midbody, isthmus, splenium) regions of the corpus callosum. In addition, MD restriction became more pronounced with increasing age in children with PKU in the two most anterior regions of the corpus callosum (i.e., genu, rostral body). These findings point to an age-related decrement in the microstructural integrity of the anterior white matter of the corpus callosum in children with PKU. PMID:20123469

  5. Influence of Corpus Callosum Damage on Cognition and Physical Disability in Multiple Sclerosis: A Multimodal Study

    PubMed Central

    Llufriu, Sara; Blanco, Yolanda; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Sepulveda, Maria; Falcon, Carles; Berenguer, Joan; Bargallo, Nuria; Villoslada, Pablo; Graus, Francesc; Valls-Sole, Josep; Saiz, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Background Corpus callosum (CC) is a common target for multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. We investigated the influence of CC damage on physical disability and cognitive dysfunction using a multimodal approach. Methods Twenty-one relapsing-remitting MS patients and 13 healthy controls underwent structural MRI and diffusion tensor of the CC (fractional anisotropy; mean diffusivity, MD; radial diffusivity, RD; axial diffusivity). Interhemisferic transfer of motor inhibition was assessed by recording the ipsilateral silent period (iSP) to transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated cognitive function using the Brief Repeatable Battery and physical disability using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the MS Functional Composite (MSFC) z-score. Results The iSP latency correlated with physical disability scores (r ranged from 0.596 to 0.657, P values from 0.004 to 0.001), and with results of visual memory (r = −0.645, P = 0.002), processing speed (r = −0.51, P = 0.018) and executive cognitive domain tests (r = −0.452, P = 0.039). The area of the rostrum correlated with the EDSS (r = −0.442, P = 0.045). MD and RD correlated with cognitive performance, mainly with results of visual and verbal memory tests (r ranged from −0.446 to −0.546, P values from 0.048 to 0.011). The iSP latency correlated with CC area (r = −0.345, P = 0.049), volume (r = −0.401, P = 0.002), MD (r = 0.404, P = 0.002) and RD (r = 0.415, P = 0.016). Conclusions We found evidence for structural and microstructural CC abnormalities associated with impairment of motor callosal inhibitory conduction in MS. CC damage may contribute to cognitive dysfunction and in less extent to physical disability likely through a disconnection mechanism. PMID:22606347

  6. Maximum Principal Strain and Strain Rate Associated with Concussion Diagnosis Correlates with Changes in Corpus Callosum White Matter Indices

    PubMed Central

    MCALLISTER, THOMAS W.; FORD, JAMES C.; JI, SONGBAI; BECKWITH, JONATHAN G.; FLASHMAN, LAURA A.; PAULSEN, KEITH; GREENWALD, RICHARD M.

    2014-01-01

    On-field monitoring of head impacts, combined with finite element (FE) biomechanical simulation, allow for predictions of regional strain associated with a diagnosed concussion. However, attempts to correlate these predictions with in vivo measures of brain injury have not been published. This article reports an approach to and preliminary results from the correlation of subject-specific FE model-predicted regions of high strain associated with diagnosed concussion and diffusion tensor imaging to assess changes in white matter integrity in the corpus callosum (CC). Ten football and ice hockey players who wore instrumented helmets to record head impacts sustained during play completed high field magnetic resonance imaging preseason and within 10 days of a diagnosed concussion. The Dartmouth Subject-Specific FE Head model was used to generate regional predictions of strain and strain rate following each impact associated with concussion. Maps of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and median diffusivity (MD) were generated for the CC of each athlete to correlate strain with change in FA and MD. Mean and maximum strain rate correlated with change in FA (Spearman ρ = 0.77, p = 0.01; 0.70, p = 0.031), and there was a similar trend for mean and maximum strain (0.56, p = 0.10; 0.6, p = 0.07), as well as for maximum strain with change in MD (−0.63, p = 0.07). Change in MD correlated with injury-to-imaging interval (ρ = −0.80, p = 0.006) but change in FA did not (ρ = 0.18, p = 0.62). These results provide preliminary confirmation that model-predicted strain and strain rate in the CC correlate with changes in indices of white matter integrity. PMID:21994062

  7. Corpus Callosum Diffusion and Language Lateralization in Patients with Brain Tumors: A DTI and fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tantillo, Gabriella; Peck, Kyung K.; Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Lyo, John K.; Chou, Joanne F.; Young, Robert J.; Brennan, Nicole Petrovich; Holodny, Andrei I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Examining how left-hemisphere brain tumors might impact both the microstructure of the corpus callosum (CC) as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) values in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as well as cortical language lateralization measured with functional MRI (fMRI). METHODS fMRI tasks (phonemic fluency and verb generation) were performed in order to detect activation in Broca’s and Wernicke’s area. Twenty patients with left-hemisphere brain tumors were investigated. fMRI results were divided into left dominant (LD), right dominant (RD), or codominant (CD) for language function. DTI was performed to generate FA maps in the anterior and posterior CC. FA values were correlated with the degree of language dominance. RESULTS Patients who were LD or RD for language in Broca’s area had lower FA in the anterior CC than those who were CD for language (median for CD = .72, LD = .66, RD = .65, P < .09). Lateralized versus CD group level analysis also showed that CD patients had higher FA in the anterior CC than patients who displayed strong lateralization in either hemisphere (median for CD = .72, lateralized = .65, P < .05). CONCLUSION Our preliminary observations indicate that the greater FA in CD patients may reflect a more directional microstructure for the CC in this region, suggesting a greater need for interhemispheric transfer of information. Because brain tumors can cause compensatory codominance, our findings may suggest a mechanism by which interhemispheric transfer is facilitated during plasticity in the presence of a tumor. PMID:26258653

  8. Corpus callosum damage predicts disability progression and cognitive dysfunction in primary-progressive MS after five years.

    PubMed

    Bodini, Benedetta; Cercignani, Mara; Khaleeli, Zhaleh; Miller, David H; Ron, Maria; Penny, Sophie; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2013-05-01

    We aim to identify specific areas of white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM), which predict disability progression and cognitive dysfunction after five years in patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Thirty-two patients with early PPMS were assessed at baseline and after five years on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and EDSS step-changes were calculated. At year five, a subgroup of 25 patients and 31 healthy controls underwent a neuropsychological assessment. Baseline imaging consisted of dual-echo (proton density and T2-weighted), T1-weighted volumetric, and diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were created, and fed into tract-based spatial statistics. To compensate for the potential bias introduced by WM lesions, the T1 volumes underwent a lesion-filling procedure before entering a voxel-based morphometry protocol. To investigate whether FA and GM volume predicted EDSS step-changes over five years and neuropsychological tests scores at five years, voxelwise linear regression analyses were performed. Lower FA in the splenium of the corpus callosum (CC) predicted a greater progression of disability over the follow-up. Lower FA along the entire CC predicted worse verbal memory, attention and speed of information processing, and executive function at five years. GM baseline volume did not predict any clinical variable. Our findings highlight the importance of damage to the interhemispheric callosal pathways in determining physical and cognitive disability in PPMS. Disruption of these pathways, which interconnect motor and cognitive networks between the two hemispheres, may result in a disconnection syndrome that contributes to long-term physical and cognitive disability. PMID:22328451

  9. Working Memory and Corpus Callosum Microstructural Integrity after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Diffusion Tensor Tractography Study

    PubMed Central

    Treble, Amery; Hasan, Khader M.; Iftikhar, Amal; Stuebing, Karla K.; Kramer, Larry A.; Cox, Charles S.; Swank, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Deficits in working memory (WM) are a common consequence of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are believed to contribute to difficulties in a range of cognitive and academic domains. Reduced integrity of the corpus callosum (CC) after TBI may disrupt the connectivity between bilateral frontoparietal neural networks underlying WM. In the present investigation, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of eight callosal subregions (CC1–CC8) was examined in relation to measures of verbal and visuospatial WM in 74 children sustaining TBI and 49 typically developing comparison children. Relative to the comparison group, children with TBI demonstrated poorer visuospatial WM, but comparable verbal WM. Microstructure of the CC was significantly compromised in brain-injured children, with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher axial and radial diffusivity metrics in all callosal subregions. In both groups of children, lower FA and/or higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal cortical regions predicted poorer verbal WM, whereas higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal, as well as temporal, cortical regions predicted poorer visuospatial WM. DTI metrics, especially radial diffusivity, in predictive callosal subregions accounted for significant variance in WM over and above remaining callosal subregions. Reduced microstructural integrity of the CC, particularly in subregions connecting parietal and temporal cortices, may act as a neuropathological mechanism contributing to long-term WM deficits. The future clinical use of neuroanatomical biomarkers may allow for the early identification of children at highest risk for WM deficits and earlier provision of interventions for these children. PMID:23627735

  10. Relationship between Stereoscopic Vision, Visual Perception, and Microstructure Changes of Corpus Callosum and Occipital White Matter in the 4-Year-Old Very Low Birth Weight Children

    PubMed Central

    Kwinta, Przemko; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Leśniak, Anna; Klimek, Małgorzata; Karcz, Paulina; Durlak, Wojciech; Nitecka, Magdalena; Dutkowska, Grażyna; Kubatko-Zielińska, Anna; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena; Pietrzyk, Jacek Józef

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To assess the relationship between stereoscopic vision, visual perception, and microstructure of the corpus callosum (CC) and occipital white matter, 61 children born with a mean birth weight of 1024 g (SD 270 g) were subjected to detailed ophthalmologic evaluation, Developmental Test of Visual Perception (DTVP-3), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at the age of 4. Results. Abnormal stereoscopic vision was detected in 16 children. Children with abnormal stereoscopic vision had smaller CC (CC length: 53 ± 6 mm versus 61 ± 4 mm; p < 0.01; estimated CC area: 314 ± 106 mm2 versus 446 ± 79 mm2; p < 0.01) and lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in CC (FA value of rostrum/genu: 0.7 ± 0.09 versus 0.79 ± 0.07; p < 0.01; FA value of CC body: 0.74 ± 0.13 versus 0.82 ± 0.09; p = 0.03). We found a significant correlation between DTVP-3 scores, CC size, and FA values in rostrum and body. This correlation was unrelated to retinopathy of prematurity. Conclusions. Visual perceptive dysfunction in ex-preterm children without major sequelae of prematurity depends on more subtle changes in the brain microstructure, including CC. Role of interhemispheric connections in visual perception might be more complex than previously anticipated. PMID:26451381

  11. Evaluation of normal appearing spinal cord by diffusion tensor imaging, fiber tracking, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement in 13 dogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging offers plenty of new opportunities in the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique sensitive to the random motion of water providing information about tissue architecture. We applied DTI to normal appearing spinal cords of 13 dogs of different breeds and body weights in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The aim was to study fiber tracking (FT) patterns by tractography and the variations of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) observed in the spinal cords of dogs with different sizes and at different locations (cervical and thoracolumbar). For that reason we added a DTI sequence to the standard clinical MR protocol. The values of FA and ADC were calculated by means of three regions of interest defined on the cervical or the thoracolumbar spinal cord (ROI 1, 2, and 3). Results The shape of the spinal cord fiber tracts was well illustrated following tractography and the exiting nerve roots could be differentiated from the spinal cord fiber tracts. Routine MR scanning times were extended for 8 to 12 min, depending on the size of the field of view (FOV), the slice thickness, and the size of the interslice gaps. In small breed dogs (< 15 kg body weight) the fibers could be tracked over a length of approximately 10 vertebral bodies with scanning times of about 8 min, whereas in large breed dogs (> 25 kg body weight) the traceable fiber length was about 5 vertebral bodies which took 10 to 12 min scanning time. FA and ADC values showed mean values of 0.447 (FA), and 0.560 × 10-3 mm2/s (ADC), respectively without any differences detected with regard to different dog sizes and spinal cord 45 segments examined. Conclusion FT is suitable for the graphical depiction of the canine spinal cord and the exiting nerve roots. The FA and ADC values offer an objective measure for evaluation of the spinal cord fiber integrity in dogs. PMID:23618404

  12. Depressive symptoms related to low fractional anisotropy of white matter underlying the right ventral anterior cingulate in older adults with atherosclerotic vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bijanki, Kelly R.; Matsui, Joy T.; Mayberg, Helen S.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Arndt, Stephan; Johnson, Hans J.; Nopoulos, Peg; Paradiso, Sergio; McCormick, Laurie M.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Epping, Eric A.; Moser, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to characterize the relationship between integrity of the white matter underlying the ventral anterior cingulate (vAC) and depressive symptoms in older adults with atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD), a condition associated with preferential degeneration of the white matter. The vAC was defined as including white matter underlying ventral Brodmann Area 24 and Brodmann Area 25, corresponding with the “subcallosal” and “subgenual” cingulate respectively. This region of interest was chosen based on the preponderance of evidence that the white matter in the region plays a critical role in the manifestation of depressive symptoms. Participants had current unequivocal diagnoses of AVD and were between 55 and 90 years-old. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was used as an index of white matter integrity and organization. Whole-brain mean diffusivity (MD) was used as an index of global white matter lesion burden. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) Depression Scale. Depressive symptoms were significantly related to low FA in the right vAC (r = -0.356, df = 30, p = 0.045) but not the left vAC (r = 0.024, df = 30, p = 0.896) after controlling for total brain MD (a statistical control for global white matter lesion burden). Further, depressive symptoms were significantly related to low FA in the right vAC (r = -0.361, df = 31, p = 0.039), but not the left vAC (r = 0.259, df = 31, p = 0.145) when controlled for the contralateral vAC FA. The correlation coefficients for this follow-up analysis were found to be significantly different between left and right vAC (Z = 2.310, p = 0.021). Poor white matter health in the vAC may be a biological mechanism for depressive symptoms in older adults with vascular disease. Further studies may corroborate that the right vAC plays a unique role in depressive symptom manifestation in cases where the white matter is preferentially affected, as is the case in AVD. This could lead to future targeting of the region for somatic antidepressant treatment, as well as the development of a precise approach for patients with white matter damage, which could produce significant improvement in quality of life, medical morbidity, and mortality. PMID:26236221

  13. Solar wind turbulence: anisotropy, anisotropy, anisotropy!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, R.; Forman, M. A.; Summerlin, E. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Salem, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulence heats the solar wind as it expands away from the Sun, but where and how does heating of ions and electrons occur? In order to understand this we must first look at the fluctuations making up the cascade, the properties and anisotropies of which will determine whether ions or electrons are heated and whether field-parallel or -perpendicular heating will occur, all of which amounts to a lot of different anisotropies! With this in mind, we present a review of recent advances in the observation of plasma turbulence in the solar wind and comparison with simulations; which features of solar wind turbulence are well reproduced and which need to be captured better? The first anisotropy is that of the fluctuations making up the turbulent cascade itself, fluctuations are known to be highly transverse, meaning that the perpendicular magnetic field components are dominant over the field-parallel component. The second anisotropy is that of the scaling of amplitude towards smaller scales with steeper spectra parallel to the local magnetic field direction. Observations of the anisotropy of the full power spectral tensor will be discussed, in particular with reference to Alfvenic and pseudo-Alfvenic fluctuations (effectively two different polarizations of Alfven waves), the next step beyond the traditional "slab + 2D" approach to incompressible MHD turbulence. The third anisotropy is that of the ion and electron distributions. Both sets of charged particles frequently show non-Maxwellian distributions with higher temperatures found either perpendicular to or parallel to the magnetic field direction. Proton distributions often show beams and the heavier alpha particles are often hotter than the protons. Localized structures such as current sheets and magnetic discontinuities are shown to be sites of intense and anisotropic heating. Small scale fluctuations filling the space between such discontinuities may also dissipate energy into ions and electrons, either through electric fields intrinsic to the modes generated by the turbulence or through resonant or stochastic processes. Observations show that kinetic Alfven waves are the dominant mode.

  14. Prosody meets syntax: the role of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Sammler, Daniela; Kotz, Sonja A; Eckstein, Korinna; Ott, Derek V M; Friederici, Angela D

    2010-09-01

    Contemporary neural models of auditory language comprehension proposed that the two hemispheres are differently specialized in the processing of segmental and suprasegmental features of language. While segmental processing of syntactic and lexical semantic information is predominantly assigned to the left hemisphere, the right hemisphere is thought to have a primacy for the processing of suprasegmental prosodic information such as accentuation and boundary marking. A dynamic interplay between the hemispheres is assumed to allow for the timely coordination of both information types. The present event-related potential study investigated whether the anterior and/or posterior portion of the corpus callosum provide the crucial brain basis for the online interaction of syntactic and prosodic information. Patients with lesions in the anterior two-thirds of the corpus callosum connecting orbital and frontal structures, or the posterior third of the corpus callosum connecting temporal, parietal and occipital areas, as well as matched healthy controls, were tested in a paradigm that crossed syntactic and prosodic manipulations. An anterior negativity elicited by a mismatch between syntactically predicted phrase structure and prosodic intonation was analysed as a marker for syntax-prosody interaction. Healthy controls and patients with lesions in the anterior corpus callosum showed this anterior negativity demonstrating an intact interplay between syntax and prosody. No such effect was found in patients with lesions in the posterior corpus callosum, although they exhibited intact, prosody-independent syntactic processing comparable with healthy controls and patients with lesions in the anterior corpus callosum. These data support the interplay between the speech processing streams in the left and right hemispheres via the posterior portion of the corpus callosum, building the brain basis for the coordination and integration of local syntactic and prosodic features during auditory speech comprehension. PMID:20802205

  15. Morphometric Changes of the Corpus Callosum in Congenital Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Campana, Serena; Collins, D. Louis; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Sartori, Giuseppe; Pietrini, Pietro; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual deprivation at birth on the development of the corpus callosum in a large group of congenitally blind individuals. We acquired high-resolution T1-weighted MRI scans in 28 congenitally blind and 28 normal sighted subjects matched for age and gender. There was no overall group effect of visual deprivation on the total surface area of the corpus callosum. However, subdividing the corpus callosum into five subdivisions revealed significant regional changes in its three most posterior parts. Compared to the sighted controls, congenitally blind individuals showed a 12% reduction in the splenium, and a 20% increase in the isthmus and the posterior part of the body. A shape analysis further revealed that the bending angle of the corpus callosum was more convex in congenitally blind compared to the sighted control subjects. The observed morphometric changes in the corpus callosum are in line with the well-described cross-modal functional and structural neuroplastic changes in congenital blindness. PMID:25255324

  16. Corpus callosum in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen

    2013-10-01

    The overarching objective of the thesis was to investigate the morphological changes in the corpus callosum (CC) in aging and dementia in relation to its role in cognitive and motor decline. The CC is the largest white matter tract in the brain, containing upwards of 200 million axons, and is believed important for communication and interaction between the two cerebral hemispheres. Historically, the role of white matter, including the CC, in relation to cognitive function has often been eclipsed by the predominance of the cortex, and led to a "corticocentric" view of the brain and cognitive function. However, from the 1960s and onwards, the role of lesions in the white matter in the appearence of cognitive deficits and diseases such as dementia has become increasingly evident. Many studies have indicated that AD is associated with CC atrophy, but the precise pattern of subregional CC atrophy in different disease stages remains undetermined. In study I, we establish that atrophy is present primarily in the posterior CC early in AD, and that atrophy of the CC is associated with faster disease progression. This finding supports a model where posterior atrophy is the earliest changes in the CC in AD patients, with atrophy of anterior CC being a later pathological event. To further elucidate the role of CC atrophy in dementia, we examined a population of 329 elderly subjects, and found that a higher rate of tissue loss in posterior CC is associated with an increased risk of dementia. This study represents the first to examine CC in elderly subjects longitudinally. In the same cohort, we investigated whether impairment in specific cognitive domains was associated with CC tissue loss. Previous studies had shown that processing speed and executive functions may be particularly reliant on the CC. Our findings indicated that CC tissue loss leads to selective impairment of processing speed but not memory or executive function deficits. Finally, CC tissue loss was also associated with impairment of motor function. Overall, the present findings confirm and extend the role of the CC in dementia and age-associated cognitive and motor deficits. PMID:24083533

  17. Quantitative assessment of diffusional kurtosis anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Glenn, G Russell; Helpern, Joseph A; Tabesh, Ali; Jensen, Jens H

    2015-04-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) measures the diffusion and kurtosis tensors to quantify restricted, non-Gaussian diffusion that occurs in biological tissue. By estimating the kurtosis tensor, DKI accounts for higher order diffusion dynamics, when compared with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and consequently can describe more complex diffusion profiles. Here, we compare several measures of diffusional anisotropy which incorporate information from the kurtosis tensor, including kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA) and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), with the diffusion tensor-derived fractional anisotropy (FA). KFA and GFA demonstrate a net enhancement relative to FA when multiple white matter fiber bundle orientations are present in both simulated and human data. In addition, KFA shows net enhancement in deep brain structures, such as the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, where FA indicates low anisotropy. Thus, KFA and GFA provide additional information relative to FA with regard to diffusional anisotropy, and may be particularly advantageous for the assessment of diffusion in complex tissue environments. PMID:25728763

  18. Quantitative analysis of the myelin g-ratio from electron microscopy images of the macaque corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Stikov, Nikola; Campbell, Jennifer S.W.; Stroh, Thomas; Lavelée, Mariette; Frey, Stephen; Novek, Jennifer; Nuara, Stephen; Ho, Ming-Kai; Bedell, Barry J.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Leppert, Ilana R.; Boudreau, Mathieu; Narayanan, Sridar; Duval, Tanguy; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Picard, Paul-Alexandre; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Pike, G. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We provide a detailed morphometric analysis of eight transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) obtained from the corpus callosum of one cynomolgus macaque. The raw TEM images are included in the article, along with the distributions of the axon caliber and the myelin g-ratio in each image. The distributions are analyzed to determine the relationship between axon caliber and g-ratio, and compared against the aggregate metrics (myelin volume fraction, fiber volume fraction, and the aggregate g-ratio), as defined in the accompanying research article entitled ‘In vivo histology of the myelin g-ratio with magnetic resonance imaging’ (Stikov et al., NeuroImage, 2015). PMID:26217818

  19. Quantitative analysis of the myelin g-ratio from electron microscopy images of the macaque corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Stikov, Nikola; Campbell, Jennifer S W; Stroh, Thomas; Lavelée, Mariette; Frey, Stephen; Novek, Jennifer; Nuara, Stephen; Ho, Ming-Kai; Bedell, Barry J; Dougherty, Robert F; Leppert, Ilana R; Boudreau, Mathieu; Narayanan, Sridar; Duval, Tanguy; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Picard, Paul-Alexandre; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Pike, G Bruce

    2015-09-01

    We provide a detailed morphometric analysis of eight transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) obtained from the corpus callosum of one cynomolgus macaque. The raw TEM images are included in the article, along with the distributions of the axon caliber and the myelin g-ratio in each image. The distributions are analyzed to determine the relationship between axon caliber and g-ratio, and compared against the aggregate metrics (myelin volume fraction, fiber volume fraction, and the aggregate g-ratio), as defined in the accompanying research article entitled 'In vivo histology of the myelin g-ratio with magnetic resonance imaging' (Stikov et al., NeuroImage, 2015). PMID:26217818

  20. Perspectives on Dichotic Listening and the Corpus Callosum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musiek, Frank E.; Weihing, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The present review summarizes historic and recent research which has investigated the role of the corpus callosum in dichotic processing within the context of audiology. Examination of performance by certain clinical groups, including split brain patients, multiple sclerosis cases, and other types of neurological lesions is included. Maturational,…

  1. Autism Traits in Individuals with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Yolanda C.; Hinkley, Leighton B. N.; Bukshpun, Polina; Strominger, Zoe A.; Wakahiro, Mari L. J.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Jeremy, Rita J.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Marco, Elysa J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have numerous etiologies, including structural brain malformations such as agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC). We sought to directly measure the occurrence of autism traits in a cohort of individuals with AgCC and to investigate the neural underpinnings of this association. We screened a large AgCC cohort (n =…

  2. Parenting, corpus callosum, and executive function in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kok, Rianne; Lucassen, Nicole; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Roza, Sabine J; Govaert, Paul; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2014-01-01

    In this longitudinal population-based study (N = 544), we investigated whether early parenting and corpus callosum length predict child executive function abilities at 4 years of age. The length of the corpus callosum in infancy was measured using postnatal cranial ultrasounds at 6 weeks of age. At 3 years, two aspects of parenting were observed: maternal sensitivity during a teaching task and maternal discipline style during a discipline task. Parents rated executive function problems at 4 years of age in five domains of inhibition, shifting, emotional control, working memory, and planning/organizing, using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Version. Maternal sensitivity predicted less executive function problems at preschool age. A significant interaction was found between corpus callosum length in infancy and maternal use of positive discipline to determine child inhibition problems: The association between a relatively shorter corpus callosum in infancy and child inhibition problems was reduced in children who experienced more positive discipline. Our results point to the buffering potential of positive parenting for children with biological vulnerability. PMID:24028215

  3. Corpus callosum in sexually dimorphic and nondimorphic primates.

    PubMed

    Holloway, R L; Heilbroner, P

    1992-03-01

    The midsagittal area and other morphological measures were taken on the corpus callosum of four different species of primate: Macaca mulatta, M. fascicularis, Callithrix jacchus, and Saguinus oedipus. The first two species are strongly dimorphic, whereas the New World forms show little dimorphism with regard to overall body size, canines, and brain weight. Neither total corpus callosal area (TOTALCC), or other parts of the corpus callosum (CC) showed any significant sexual dimorphism in any of the primate species sampled. Only in M. mulatta did a sexual dimorphism appear to be significant. In males of this species, the dorsoventral width of the splenium was larger than in females. In addition, the anterior commissure (ANTCOMM) evinced no sexual dimorphism in the different species. Brain weight was significantly dimorphic in only M. mulatta, and when ratio data were used to correct for brain weight, no significant differences were found in the corpus callosum. This is in contrast to Homo sapiens, where the relative size of the CC has been reported to be larger in females, and particularly so in the posterior, or splenial portion of the CC. Correlation coefficients were calculated for the various variables within each species. In general, most of the callosal measures are significantly inter-correlated, although the exact pattern varies for each species. Thus, unlike Homo sapiens, or pongids such as Gorilla and Pan, neither New nor Old World monkeys show any striking evidence for sexual dimorphism in the corpus callosum. PMID:1562061

  4. Corpus Callosum Anatomy in Chronically Treated and Stimulant Naive ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnoebelen, Sarah; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Pliszka, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of chronic stimulant treatment on corpus callosum (CC) size in children with ADHD using volumetric and area measurements. Previously published research indicated possible medication effects on specific areas of the CC. Method: Measurements of the CC from anatomical MRIs were obtained from children aged 9-16 in…

  5. Corpus Callosum Differences Associated with Persistent Stuttering in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Ai Leen; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Olivero, William; Ambrose, Nicoline G.; Sharma, Harish; Chang, Soo-Eun; Loucks, Torrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated anatomical differences in speech-relevant brain regions of adults who stutter (AWS) compared to normally fluent adults (NFA). The present study focused on the region of the corpus callosum (CC) which is involved in interhemispheric processing between the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Two-dimensional…

  6. Agenesis of the corpus callosum. An autopsy study in fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kidron, Debora; Shapira, Daniel; Ben Sira, Liat; Malinger, Gustavo; Lev, Dorit; Cioca, Andreea; Sharony, Reuven; Lerman Sagie, Tally

    2016-02-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum is currently diagnosed prenatally with ultrasound and MRI. While the diagnostic aspects of callosal defects are widely addressed, anatomo-histological data from fetal autopsies are sparse. Callosal defects were present in 50 fetal autopsies. Four distinct groups of complete, partial, hypoplastic, and mixed defects were determined by the gross and histologic details of the corpus callosum. These details helped to rule out other midline defects such as holoprosencephaly. Additional autopsy findings enabled specific diagnoses and suggested etiopathogeneses. Hypoplastic and mixed defects were associated with more abnormalities of the cerebral hemispheres and internal organs. The four groups did not differ according to gender, external dysmorphism, or cerebellar and brainstem anomalies. Defects were classified as syndromic (68 %), encephaloclastic (8 %), undetermined (14 %), or isolated (10 %) based on the autopsy findings. Isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum was diagnosed in only 10 % of the cases in this series, compared to higher numbers diagnosed by prenatal ultrasonography and MRI. Therefore, the autopsy, through its detailed, careful evaluation of external, as well as gross and histological internal features, can elucidate the etiopathogenesis of agenesis of the corpus callosum and suggest specific diagnoses which cannot be ascertained by prenatal imaging. PMID:26573426

  7. Longitudinal Changes in the Corpus Callosum following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Trevor C.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Li, Xiaoqi; Merkley, Tricia L.; Yallampalli, Ragini; McCauley, Stephen R.; Schnelle, Kathleen P.; Vasquez, Ana C.; Chu, Zili; Hanten, Gerri; Hunter, Jill V.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) is a documented consequence of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), which has been expressed as volume loss using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Other advanced imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have also detected white matter microstructural alteration following TBI in the CC. The manner and degree to which macrostructural changes such as volume and microstructural changes develop over time following pediatric TBI, and their relation to a measure of processing speed is the focus of this longitudinal investigation. As such, DTI and volumetric changes in the CC in participants with TBI and a comparison group at approximately 3 and 18 months after injury as well as their relation to processing speed were determined. Methods Forty-eight children and adolescents aged 717 years who sustained either complicated mild or moderate-to-severe TBI (n = 23) or orthopedic injury (OI; n = 25) were studied. The participants underwent brain MRI and were administered the Eriksen flanker task at both time points. Results At 3 months after injury, there were significant group differences in DTI metrics in the total CC and its subregions (genu/anterior, body/central and splenium/posterior), with the TBI group demonstrating significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in comparison to the OI group. These group differences were also present at 18 months after injury in all CC subregions, with lower FA and a higher ADC in the TBI group. In terms of longitudinal changes in DTI, despite the group difference in mean FA, both groups generally demonstrated a modest increase in FA over time though this increase was only significant in the splenium/posterior subregion. Interestingly, the TBI group also generally demonstrated ADC increases from 3 to 18 months though the OI group demonstrated ADC decreases over time. Volumetrically, the group differences at 3 months were marginal for the midanterior and body/central subregions and total CC. However, by 18 months, the TBI group demonstrated a significantly decreased volume in all subregions except the splenium/posterior area relative to the OI group. Unlike the OI group, which showed a significant volume increase in subregions of the CC over time, the TBI group demonstrated a significant and consistent volume decrease. Performance on a measure of processing speed did not differentiate the groups at either visit, and only the OI group showed significantly improved performance over time. Processing speed was related to FA in the splenium/posterior and total CC only in the TBI group on both occasions, with a stronger relation at 18 months. Conclusion In response to TBI, macrostructural volume loss in the CC occurred over time; yet, at the microstructural level, DTI demonstrated both indicators of continued maturation and development even in the damaged CC, as well as evidence of potential degenerative change. Unlike volumetrics, which likely reflects the degree of overall neuronal loss and axonal damage, DTI may reflect some aspects of postinjury maturation and adaptation in white matter following TBI. Multimodality imaging studies may be important to further understand the long-term consequences of pediatric TBI. PMID:20948181

  8. Agenesis of the corpus callosum and autism: a comprehensive comparison

    PubMed Central

    Corsello, Christina; Kennedy, Daniel P.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum, with its ∼200 million axons, remains enigmatic in its contribution to cognition and behaviour. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a congenital condition in which the corpus callosum fails to develop; such individuals exhibit localized deficits in non-literal language comprehension, humour, theory of mind and social reasoning. These findings together with parent reports suggest that behavioural and cognitive impairments in subjects with callosal agenesis may overlap with the profile of autism spectrum disorders, particularly with respect to impairments in social interaction and communication. To provide a comprehensive test of this hypothesis, we directly compared a group of 26 adults with callosal agenesis to a group of 28 adults with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder but no neurological abnormality. All participants had full-scale intelligence quotient scores >78 and groups were matched on age, handedness, and gender ratio. Using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule together with current clinical presentation to assess autistic symptomatology, we found that 8/26 (about a third) of agenesis subjects presented with autism. However, more formal diagnosis additionally involving recollective parent-report measures regarding childhood behaviour showed that only 3/22 met complete formal criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (parent reports were unavailable for four subjects). We found no relationship between intelligence quotient and autism symptomatology in callosal agenesis, nor evidence that the presence of any residual corpus callosum differentiated those who exhibited current autism spectrum symptoms from those who did not. Relative to the autism spectrum comparison group, parent ratings of childhood behaviour indicated children with agenesis were less likely to meet diagnostic criteria for autism, even for those who met autism spectrum criteria as adults, and even though there was no group difference in parent report of current behaviours. The findings suggest two broad conclusions. First, they support the hypothesis that congenital disruption of the corpus callosum constitutes a major risk factor for developing autism. Second, they quantify specific features that distinguish autistic behaviour associated with callosal agenesis from autism more generally. Taken together, these two findings also leverage specific questions for future investigation: what are the distal causes (genetic and environmental) determining both callosal agenesis and its autistic features, and what are the proximal mechanisms by which absence of the callosum might generate autistic symptomatology? PMID:24771497

  9. Agenesis of the corpus callosum and autism: a comprehensive comparison.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lynn K; Corsello, Christina; Kennedy, Daniel P; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    The corpus callosum, with its ∼200 million axons, remains enigmatic in its contribution to cognition and behaviour. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a congenital condition in which the corpus callosum fails to develop; such individuals exhibit localized deficits in non-literal language comprehension, humour, theory of mind and social reasoning. These findings together with parent reports suggest that behavioural and cognitive impairments in subjects with callosal agenesis may overlap with the profile of autism spectrum disorders, particularly with respect to impairments in social interaction and communication. To provide a comprehensive test of this hypothesis, we directly compared a group of 26 adults with callosal agenesis to a group of 28 adults with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder but no neurological abnormality. All participants had full-scale intelligence quotient scores >78 and groups were matched on age, handedness, and gender ratio. Using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule together with current clinical presentation to assess autistic symptomatology, we found that 8/26 (about a third) of agenesis subjects presented with autism. However, more formal diagnosis additionally involving recollective parent-report measures regarding childhood behaviour showed that only 3/22 met complete formal criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (parent reports were unavailable for four subjects). We found no relationship between intelligence quotient and autism symptomatology in callosal agenesis, nor evidence that the presence of any residual corpus callosum differentiated those who exhibited current autism spectrum symptoms from those who did not. Relative to the autism spectrum comparison group, parent ratings of childhood behaviour indicated children with agenesis were less likely to meet diagnostic criteria for autism, even for those who met autism spectrum criteria as adults, and even though there was no group difference in parent report of current behaviours. The findings suggest two broad conclusions. First, they support the hypothesis that congenital disruption of the corpus callosum constitutes a major risk factor for developing autism. Second, they quantify specific features that distinguish autistic behaviour associated with callosal agenesis from autism more generally. Taken together, these two findings also leverage specific questions for future investigation: what are the distal causes (genetic and environmental) determining both callosal agenesis and its autistic features, and what are the proximal mechanisms by which absence of the callosum might generate autistic symptomatology? PMID:24771497

  10. Prenatal PCB exposure, the corpus callosum, and response inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Paul; Fitzgerald, Susan; Reihman, Jacqueline; Gump, Brooks; Lonky, Edward; Darvill, Thomas; Pagano, Jim; Hauser, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The present study reports the association between prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the corpus callosum, and response inhibition in children who are 4.5 years old. Children (n = 189) enrolled in the Oswego study were tested using a continuous performance test. We measured (square millimeters) the splenium of the corpus callosum, a pathway implicated in the regulation of response inhibition, using magnetic resonance imaging. Results indicated a dose-dependent association between cord blood PCBs and errors of commission. Splenium size but not other brain areas predicted errors of commission (r(2) = 0.20), with smaller size associated with more errors of commission. There was an interaction between splenium size and PCB exposure. The smaller the splenium, the larger the association between PCBs and errors of commission. If the association between PCBs and response inhibition is indeed causal, then children with suboptimal development of the splenium are particularly vulnerable to these effects. These data await replication. PMID:14527849

  11. Autism traits in individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yolanda C.; Hinkley, Leighton B. N.; Bukshpun, Polina; Strominger, Zoe A.; Wakahiro, Mari L. J.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Jeremy, Rita J.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Marco, Elysa J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have numerous etiologies, including structural brain malformations such as agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC). We sought to directly measure the occurrence of autism traits in a cohort of individuals with AgCC and to investigate the neural underpinnings of this association. We screened a large AgCC cohort (n = 106) with the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) and found that 45% of children, 35% of adolescents, and 18% of adults exceeded the predetermined autism-screening cut-off. Interestingly, performance on the AQ’s imagination domain was inversely correlated with magnetoencephalography measures of resting-state functional connectivity in the right superior temporal gyrus. Individuals with AgCC should be screened for ASD and disorders of the corpus callosum should be considered in autism diagnostic evaluations as well. PMID:23054201

  12. Microstructural Integrity of the Corpus Callosum Linked with Neuropsychological Performance in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryer, Susanna L.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has revealed microstructural aspects of adolescent brain development, the cognitive correlates of which remain relatively uncharacterized. Methods: DTI was used to assess white matter microstructure in 18 typically developing adolescents (ages 16-18). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusion (MD)…

  13. Microstructural Integrity of the Corpus Callosum Linked with Neuropsychological Performance in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryer, Susanna L.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has revealed microstructural aspects of adolescent brain development, the cognitive correlates of which remain relatively uncharacterized. Methods: DTI was used to assess white matter microstructure in 18 typically developing adolescents (ages 16-18). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusion (MD)

  14. Anterior commissure versus corpus callosum: A quantitative comparison across mammals.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2016-04-01

    Mammals rely on two major pathways to transfer information between the two hemispheres of the brain: the anterior commissure and the corpus callosum. Metatheria and monotremes rely exclusively on the anterior commissure for interhemispheric transfer between the isocortices and olfactory allocortices of each side, whereas Eutheria use a combination of the anterior commissure and an additional pathway exclusive to Eutheria, the corpus callosum. Midline cross-sectional area of the anterior commissure and corpus callosum were measured in a range of mammals from all three infraclasses and plotted against brain volume to determine how midline anterior commissure area and its size relative to the corpus callosum vary with brain size and taxon. In Metatheria, the square root of anterior commissure area rises in almost direct proportion with the cube root of brain volume (i.e. the ratio of the two is relatively constant), whereas among Eutheria the ratio of the square root of anterior commissure area to the cube root of brain volume declines slightly with increasing brain size. The total of isocortical and olfactory allocortical commissure area rises more rapidly with increasing brain volume among Eutheria than among Metatheria. This means that the midline isocortical and olfactory allocortical commissural area of metatherians with large brains (about 70ml) is only about 50% of that among eutherians with similarly sized brains. On the other hand, isocortical and olfactory allocortical commissural area is similar in Metatheria and Eutheria at brain volumes around 1ml. Among the Eutheria, some groups make less use of the anterior commissure pathway than do others: soricomorphs, rodents and cetaceans have smaller anterior commissures for their brain size than do afrosoricids, erinaceomorphs and proboscideans. The findings suggest that use of the anterior commissural route for isocortical commissural connections may have placed limitations on interhemispheric transfer of information among the metatherians, but only when brain size reaches 50ml or more. PMID:26961186

  15. Statistical shape analysis of the corpus callosum in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shantanu H.; Narr, Katherine L.; Philips, Owen R.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Woods, Roger P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical shape-analysis framework for characterizing and comparing morphological variation of the corpus callosum. The midsagittal boundary of the corpus callosum is represented by a closed curve and analyzed using an invariant shape representation. The shape space of callosal curves is endowed with a Riemannian metric. Shape distances are given by the length of shortest paths (geodesics) that are invariant to shape-confounding transformations. The statistical framework enables computation of shape averages and covariances on the shape space in an intrinsic manner (unique to the shape space). The statistical framework makes use of the tangent principal component approach to achieve dimension reduction on the space of corpus callosum shapes. The advantages of this approach are – it is fully automatic, invariant, and avoids the use of landmarks to define shapes. We applied our method to determine the effects of sex, age, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-related genetic liability on callosal shape in a large sample of patients and controls and their first-degree relatives (N=218). Results showed significant age, sex, and schizophrenia effects on both global and local callosal shape structure. PMID:23000788

  16. Agenesis of the corpus callosum and the establishment of handedness.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Silvia; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this study was to check whether an isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum, detected in utero with ultrasound recording, would impair the early development of unimanual and bimanual handedness. Twelve infants with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum, either total (TACC) or partial (PACC) were tested for handedness at the end of their first year, and were compared to infants with typical development (TD), matched for age and sex. A majority of infants showed right-handedness at the unimanual grasping tasks, with no significant difference between the TD and ACC groups. When the object was presented to the left, the TACC infants were more likely to grasp the object with their right hand (with or without the left hand) than both the TD and the PACC infants who used mostly the ipsilateral left hand. The only significant difference between TD and ACC infants concerned bimanual coordination, as less ACC infants (especially TACC) succeeded at the bimanual task, compared with TD infants. In addition, the strategy of the former tended to be less right-handed than that of the latter. Our results confirm the role of the CC in bimanual coordination, indicating that the early emergence of bimanual coordination and, if confirmed, bimanual handedness, are likely to be delayed in the absence of corpus callosum, especially if agenesis is total. They do not support the idea that the CC is necessary for the early onset of handedness. PMID:16886185

  17. Statistical shape analysis of the corpus callosum in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shantanu H; Narr, Katherine L; Philips, Owen R; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Asarnow, Robert F; Toga, Arthur W; Woods, Roger P

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical shape-analysis framework for characterizing and comparing morphological variation of the corpus callosum. The midsagittal boundary of the corpus callosum is represented by a closed curve and analyzed using an invariant shape representation. The shape space of callosal curves is endowed with a Riemannian metric. Shape distances are given by the length of shortest paths (geodesics) that are invariant to shape-confounding transformations. The statistical framework enables computation of shape averages and covariances on the shape space in an intrinsic manner (unique to the shape space). The statistical framework makes use of the tangent principal component approach to achieve dimension reduction on the space of corpus callosum shapes. The advantages of this approach are - it is fully automatic, invariant, and avoids the use of landmarks to define shapes. We applied our method to determine the effects of sex, age, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-related genetic liability on callosal shape in a large sample of patients and controls and their first-degree relatives (N=218). Results showed significant age, sex, and schizophrenia effects on both global and local callosal shape structure. PMID:23000788

  18. Corpus callosum thickness in children: an MR pattern-recognition approach on the midsagittal image.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; Pillay, Tanyia; Gabuza, Lungile; Mahomed, Nasreen; Naidoo, Jaishree; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; du Plessis, Vicci; Prabhu, Sanjay P

    2015-02-01

    Thickening of the corpus callosum is an important feature of development, whereas thinning of the corpus callosum can be the result of a number of diseases that affect development or cause destruction of the corpus callosum. Corpus callosum thickness reflects the volume of the hemispheres and responds to changes through direct effects or through Wallerian degeneration. It is therefore not only important to evaluate the morphology of the corpus callosum for congenital anomalies but also to evaluate the thickness of specific components or the whole corpus callosum in association with other findings. The goal of this pictorial review is raise awareness that the thickness of the corpus callosum can be a useful feature of pathology in pediatric central nervous system disease and must be considered in the context of the stage of development of a child. Thinning of the corpus callosum can be primary or secondary, and generalized or focal. Primary thinning is caused by abnormal or failed myelination related to the hypomyelinating leukoencephalopathies, metabolic disorders affecting white matter, and microcephaly. Secondary thinning of the corpus callosum can be caused by diffuse injury such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy, hydrocephalus, dysmyelinating conditions and demyelinating conditions. Focal disturbance of formation or focal injury also causes localized thinning, e.g., callosal dysgenesis, metabolic disorders with localized effects, hypoglycemia, white matter injury of prematurity, HIV-related atrophy, infarction and vasculitis, trauma and toxins. The corpus callosum might be too thick because of a primary disorder in which the corpus callosum finding is essential to diagnosis; abnormal thickening can also be secondary to inflammation, infection and trauma. PMID:25173405

  19. Corpus Callosum and Prefrontal Functions in Adolescents with History of Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narberhaus, Ana; Segarra, Dolors; Caldu, Xavier; Gimenez, Monica; Pueyo, Roser; Botet, Francesc; Junque, Carme

    2008-01-01

    Very preterm (VPT) birth can account for thinning of the corpus callosum and poorer cognitive performance. Research findings about preterm and VPT adolescents usually describe a small posterior corpus callosum, although our research group has also found reductions of the anterior part, specifically the genu. The aim of the present study was to…

  20. Histological correlation of diffusional kurtosis and white matter modeling metrics in cuprizone-induced corpus callosum demyelination.

    PubMed

    Falangola, Maria F; Guilfoyle, David N; Tabesh, Ali; Hui, Edward S; Nie, Xingju; Jensen, Jens H; Gerum, Scott V; Hu, Caixia; LaFrancois, John; Collins, Heather R; Helpern, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    The cuprizone mouse model is well established for studying the processes of both demyelination and remyelination in the corpus callosum, and it has been utilized together with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate myelin and axonal pathology. Although some underlying morphological mechanisms contributing to the changes in diffusion tensor (DT) metrics have been identified, the understanding of specific associations between histology and diffusion measures remains limited. Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an extension of DTI that provides metrics of diffusional non-Gaussianity, for which an associated white matter modeling (WMM) method has been developed. The main goal of the present study was to quantitatively assess the relationships between diffusion measures and histological measures in the mouse model of cuprizone-induced corpus callosum demyelination. The diffusional kurtosis (DK) and WMM metrics were found to provide additional information that enhances the sensitivity to detect the morphological heterogeneity in the chronic phase of the disease process in the rostral segment of the corpus callosum. Specifically, in the rostral segment, axonal water fraction (d = 2.6; p < 0.0001), radial kurtosis (d = 2.0; p = 0.001) and mean kurtosis (d = 1.5; p = 0.005) showed the most sensitivity between groups with respect to yielding statistically significant p values and high Cohen's d values. These results demonstrate the ability of DK and WMM metrics to detect white mater changes and inflammatory processes associated with cuprizone-induced demyelination. They also validate, in part, the application of these new WMM metrics for studying neurological diseases, as well as helping to elucidate their biophysical meaning. PMID:24890981

  1. Verbal learning and memory in agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Roger L.; Paul, Lynn K.; Brown, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The role of interhemispheric interactions in the encoding, retention, and retrieval of verbal memory can be clarified by assessing individuals with complete or partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC), but who have normal intelligence. This study assessed verbal learning and memory in AgCC using the California Verbal Learning Test—Second Edition (CVLT-II). Twenty-six individuals with AgCC were compared to 24 matched controls on CVLT-II measures, as well as Donders’ four CVLT-II factors (i.e., Attention Span, Learning Efficiency, Delayed Memory, and Inaccurate Memory). Individuals with AgCC performed significantly below healthy controls on the Delayed Memory factor, confirmed by significant deficits in short and long delayed free recall and cued recall. They also performed less well in original learning. Deficient performance by individuals with AgCC during learning trials, as well as deficits in all forms of delayed memory, suggest that the corpus callosum facilitates interhemispheric elaboration and encoding of verbal information. PMID:24933663

  2. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [{+-} SD] age = 12.1 {+-} 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 {+-} 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p}, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p} between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA{sub f/p} of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity.

  3. An MRI review of acquired corpus callosum lesions.

    PubMed

    Renard, Dimitri; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Campello, Chantal; Bouly, Stephane; Le Floch, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric; Waconge, Anne; Taieb, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    Lesions of the corpus callosum (CC) are seen in a multitude of disorders including vascular diseases, metabolic disorders, tumours, demyelinating diseases, trauma and infections. In some diseases, CC involvement is typical and sometimes isolated, while in other diseases CC lesions are seen only occasionally in the presence of other typical extra-callosal abnormalities. In this review, we will mainly discuss the MRI characteristics of acquired lesions involving the CC. Identification of the origin of the CC lesion depends on the exact localisation of the lesion(s) inside the CC, presence of other lesions seen outside the CC, signal changes on different MRI sequences, evolution over time of the radiological abnormalities, history and clinical state of the patient, and other radiological and non-radiological examinations. PMID:24563521

  4. Axon position within the corpus callosum determines contralateral cortical projection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Wen, Yunqing; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-Nan; Liu, Lu; Richards, Linda J; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2013-07-16

    How developing axons in the corpus callosum (CC) achieve their homotopic projection to the contralateral cortex remains unclear. We found that axonal position within the CC plays a critical role in this projection. Labeling of nearby callosal axons in mice showed that callosal axons were segregated in an orderly fashion, with those from more medial cerebral cortex located more dorsally and subsequently projecting to more medial contralateral cortical regions. The normal axonal order within the CC was grossly disturbed when semaphorin3A/neuropilin-1 signaling was disrupted. However, the order in which axons were positioned within the CC still determined their contralateral projection, causing a severe disruption of the homotopic contralateral projection that persisted at postnatal day 30, when the normal developmental refinement of contralateral projections is completed in wild-type (WT) mice. Thus, the orderly positioning of axons within the CC is a primary determinant of how homotopic interhemispheric projections form in the contralateral cortex. PMID:23812756

  5. MRI evaluation of pathologies affecting the corpus callosum: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Aamish Z; Joshi, Priscilla C; Kelkar, Abhimanyu B; Mahajan, Mangal S; Ghawate, Amit S

    2013-01-01

    The corpus callosum is a midline cerebral structure and has a unique embryological development pattern. In this article, we describe the pathophysiology and present imaging findings of various typical/atypical conditions affecting the corpus callosum. Since many of these pathologies have characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their therapeutic approaches are poles apart, ranging from medical to surgical, the neuroradiologist should be well aware of them. PMID:24604936

  6. Segmentation of corpus callosum using diffusion tensor imaging: validation in patients with glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) method for segmenting corpus callosum in normal subjects and brain cancer patients with glioblastoma. Methods Nineteen patients with histologically confirmed treatment naïve glioblastoma and eleven normal control subjects underwent DTI on a 3T scanner. Based on the information inherent in diffusion tensors, a similarity measure was proposed and used in the proposed algorithm. In this algorithm, diffusion pattern of corpus callosum was used as prior information. Subsequently, corpus callosum was automatically divided into Witelson subdivisions. We simulated the potential rotation of corpus callosum under tumor pressure and studied the reproducibility of the proposed segmentation method in such cases. Results Dice coefficients, estimated to compare automatic and manual segmentation results for Witelson subdivisions, ranged from 94% to 98% for control subjects and from 81% to 95% for tumor patients, illustrating closeness of automatic and manual segmentations. Studying the effect of corpus callosum rotation by different Euler angles showed that although segmentation results were more sensitive to azimuth and elevation than skew, rotations caused by brain tumors do not have major effects on the segmentation results. Conclusions The proposed method and similarity measure segment corpus callosum by propagating a hyper-surface inside the structure (resulting in high sensitivity), without penetrating into neighboring fiber bundles (resulting in high specificity). PMID:22591335

  7. SELECTIVELY DIMINISHED CORPUS CALLOSUM FIBERS IN CONGENITAL CENTRAL HYPOVENTILATION SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a condition associated with mutations in the PHOX2B gene, is characterized by loss of breathing drive during sleep, insensitivity to CO2 and O2, and multiple somatomotor, autonomic, neuropsychological, and ophthalmologic deficits, including impaired intrinsic and extrinsic eye muscle control. Brain structural studies show injury in peri-callosal regions and the corpus callosum (CC), which has the potential to affect functions disturbed in the syndrome; however, the extent of CC injury in CCHS is unclear. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based fiber tractography procedures display fiber directional information and allow quantification of fiber integrity. We performed DTI in 13 CCHS children (age, 18.2±4.7 years; 8 male) and 31 control (17.4±4.9 years; 18 male) subjects using a 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner; CC fibers were assessed globally and regionally with tractography procedures, and fiber counts and densities compared between groups using analysis-of-covariance (covariates; age and sex). Global CC evaluation showed reduced fiber counts and densities in CCHS over control subjects (CCHS vs controls; fiber-counts, 4490±854 vs 5232±777, p<0.001; fiber-density, 10.0±1.5 vs 10.8±0.9 fibers/mm2, p<0.020), and regional examination revealed that these changes are localized to callosal axons projecting to prefrontal (217±47 vs 248±32, p<0.005), premotor (201±51 vs 241±47, p<0.012), parietal (179±64 vs 238±54, p<0.002), and occipital regions (363±46 vs 431±82, p<0.004). Corpus callosum fibers in CCHS are compromised in motor, cognitive, speech, and ophthalmologic regulatory areas. The mechanisms of fiber injury are unclear, but may result from hypoxia or perfusion deficits accompanying the syndrome, or from consequences of PHOX2B action. PMID:21256194

  8. Anisotropy of Iron-Series Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2010-03-01

    Element-strategic considerations have sparked renewed interest in rare-earth-free permanent magnets, but the prediction of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy from the atomic structure is still in its infancy, and there are no rules predicting the d anisotropy as function of the atomic structure. We have obtained tight-binding estimates for a variety of clusters and etxtended structures of different symmetry and d-band filling. A expected, the anisotropy strongly oscillates as a function of the d-band filling. Our calculations indicate that nearly filled d bands tend to yield anisotropy parallel to the pair axis. Sites with trigonal symmetry support bigger anisotropies than cubic and tetragonal environments, but this is a crystal- field effect similar to that in BaFe12O19 rather than a band-structure effect. Shape anisotropy is important in alnico- type nanostructured permanent magnets. We find a maximum of the energy product as a function of packing fraction, namely a maximum value of μoMs^2/12 realized at a volume fraction of 2/3. For Fe65Co35, this yields an upper limit of 390 kJ/m^3 [49 MGOe].

  9. Agenesis of the corpus callosum: a clinical approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Elizabeth Emma; Mowat, David

    2014-06-01

    This review article aims to guide the clinician in establishing a diagnosis in patients with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), presenting antenatally or postnatally. ACC may be isolated, or occur in association with other neuroanatomical lesions and/or congenital anomalies, and has many different genetic causes. Neuropsychological outcome varies considerably from normal to profound intellectual disability depending on the etiology. Approximately 25% of individuals with antenatally diagnosed apparently isolated ACC have intellectual disability. Subtle neurological, social, and learning deficits may still occur in those with normal intelligence and longitudinal neurocognitive follow-up is recommended for all children with ACC. The finding of ACC should prompt detailed clinical assessment in order to determine and manage the underlying condition. It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to ACC in the vast majority of cases. Less commonly ACC can result from antenatal infections, vascular or toxic insults, and it is increasingly recognized that ACC, particularly isolated ACC, may be due to an interaction of a number of "modifier" genetic and environmental factors. There are a large number of genetic conditions in which ACC may be a feature. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm to help guide the clinician towards diagnosis, to provide outcome advice and to aid in genetic counseling. PMID:24866859

  10. Genetic Contributions to the Midsagittal Area of the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Barrett, Elizabeth A.; Glahn, David C; Kochunov, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The degree to which genes and environment determine variations in brain structure and function is fundamentally important to understanding normal and disease-related patterns of neural organization and activity. We studied genetic contributions to the midsagittal area of the corpus callosum (CC) in pedigreed baboons (68 males/112 females) to replicate findings of high genetic contribution to area of the CC, reported in humans, and to determine if the heritability of the CC midsaggital area in adults was modulated by fetal development rate. Measurements of callosal area were obtained from high-resolution MRI scans. Heritability was estimated from pedigree based maximum likelihood estimation of genetic and non-genetic variance components as implemented in SOLAR. Our analyses revealed significant heritability for the total area of the CC and all of its subdivisions, with h2 = 0.46 for the total CC and h2 = .54, .37, .62, .56, and 0.29 for genu, anterior midbody, medial midbody, posterior midbody and splenium, respectively. Genetic correlation analysis demonstrated that the individual subdivisions shared between 41% and 98% of genetic variability. Combined with previous research reporting high heritability of other brain structures in baboons, these results reveal a consistent pattern of high heritability for brain morphometric measures in baboons. PMID:22856367

  11. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation for standardized MR brain scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Li; Novak, Carol L.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) brain scanning is often planned manually with the goal of aligning the imaging plane with key anatomic landmarks. The planning is time-consuming and subject to inter- and intra- operator variability. An automatic and standardized planning of brain scans is highly useful for clinical applications, and for maximum utility should work on patients of all ages. In this study, we propose a method for fully automatic planning that utilizes the landmarks from two orthogonal images to define the geometry of the third scanning plane. The corpus callosum (CC) is segmented in sagittal images by an active shape model (ASM), and the result is further improved by weighting the boundary movement with confidence scores and incorporating region based refinement. Based on the extracted contour of the CC, several important landmarks are located and then combined with landmarks from the coronal or transverse plane to define the geometry of the third plane. Our automatic method is tested on 54 MR images from 24 patients and 3 healthy volunteers, with ages ranging from 4 months to 70 years old. The average accuracy with respect to two manually labeled points on the CC is 3.54 mm and 4.19 mm, and differed by an average of 2.48 degrees from the orientation of the line connecting them, demonstrating that our method is sufficiently accurate for clinical use.

  12. Decomposition of brain diffusion imaging data uncovers latent schizophrenias with distinct patterns of white matter anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Arnedo, Javier; Mamah, Daniel; Baranger, David A; Harms, Michael P; Barch, Deanna M; Svrakic, Dragan M; de Erausquin, Gabriel A; Cloninger, C Robert; Zwir, Igor

    2015-10-15

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) analysis of diffusion tensor-images (DTI) has yielded inconsistent abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ). Inconsistencies may arise from averaging heterogeneous groups of patients. Here we investigate whether SZ is a heterogeneous group of disorders distinguished by distinct patterns of FA reductions. We developed a Generalized Factorization Method (GFM) to identify biclusters (i.e., subsets of subjects associated with a subset of particular characteristics, such as low FA in specific regions). GFM appropriately assembles a collection of unsupervised techniques with Non-negative Matrix Factorization to generate biclusters, rather than averaging across all subjects and all their characteristics. DTI tract-based spatial statistics images, which output is the locally maximal FA projected onto the group white matter skeleton, were analyzed in 47 SZ and 36 healthy subjects, identifying 8 biclusters. The mean FA of the voxels of each bicluster was significantly different from those of other SZ subjects or 36 healthy controls. The eight biclusters were organized into four more general patterns of low FA in specific regions: 1) genu of corpus callosum (GCC), 2) fornix (FX)+external capsule (EC), 3) splenium of CC (SCC)+retrolenticular limb (RLIC)+posterior limb (PLIC) of the internal capsule, and 4) anterior limb of the internal capsule. These patterns were significantly associated with particular clinical features: Pattern 1 (GCC) with bizarre behavior, pattern 2 (FX+EC) with prominent delusions, and pattern 3 (SCC+RLIC+PLIC) with negative symptoms including disorganized speech. The uncovered patterns suggest that SZ is a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be distinguished by different patterns of FA reductions associated with distinct clinical features. PMID:26151103

  13. Velocity anisotropy in tidally limited star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-02-01

    We explore the long-term evolution of the anisotropy in the velocity space of star clusters starting with different structural and kinematical properties. We show that the evolution of the radial anisotropy strength and its radial variation within a cluster contain distinct imprints of the cluster initial structural properties, dynamical history, and of the external tidal field of its host galaxy. Initially isotropic and compact clusters with small initial values of the ratio of the half-mass to Jacobi radius, rh/rJ, develop a strong radial anisotropy during their long-term dynamical evolution. Many clusters, if formed with small values of rh/rJ, should now be characterized by a significant radial anisotropy increasing with the distance from the cluster centre, reaching its maximum at a distance between 0.2 rJ and 0.4 rJ, and then becoming more isotropic or mildly tangentially anisotropic in the outermost regions. A similar radial variation of the anisotropy can also result from an early violent relaxation phase. In both cases, as a cluster continues its evolution and loses mass, the anisotropy eventually starts to decrease and the system evolves towards an isotropic velocity distribution. However, in order to completely erase the strong anisotropy developed by these compact systems during their evolution, they must be in the advanced stages of their evolution and lose a large fraction of their initial mass. Clusters that are initially isotropic and characterized by larger initial values of rh/rJ, on the other hand, never develop a significant radial anisotropy.

  14. Anatomic variation of the corpus callosum in persons with gender dysphoria.

    PubMed

    Emory, L E; Williams, D H; Cole, C M; Amparo, E G; Meyer, W J

    1991-08-01

    Previous postmortem anatomical studies have demonstrated differences between male and female in the size and shape of the splenium of the corpus callosum. The current study using the magnetic resonance imager compares the corpus callosum in 20 transsexuals and 40 controls to determine if the anatomic variance is related to anatomic sex or gender identity. No statistical differences were found in the cross-sectional areas of the entire corpus callosum, regardless of genetic sex or gender. However, the genetic males did have a larger whole-brain cross-sectional area. Also, even though there was a wide range of differences in shape and size in the splenium, the study found no significant differences between the sexes or between transsexual patients of either sex and the controls. PMID:1953331

  15. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial…

  16. Volatiles emitted from single flower buds of the lilium longiflorum × L. callosum interspecific hybrid and its parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was initiated to analyze the volatiles emitted from a single flower bud of Lilium longiflorum Thunb., L. callosum Sieb. et Zucc., and interspecific hybrids of L. longiflorum × L. callosum (L. longi × L. cal IH). Volatiles, collected automatically every 6-hour intervals at 20oC before ...

  17. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial

  18. The Brain Connection: The Corpus Callosum is Larger in Left-Handers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witelson, Sandra F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the neurobiological basis for functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, indicating that the size of the corpus callosum is correlated with the neurophysiological measure of hand preference. In postmortem examinations of 42 subjects there were no sex differences, but mixed-handers had significantly larger total areas of the…

  19. Microinjection of l-arginine into corpus callosum cause reduction in myelin concentration and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kouhsar, Samaneh Sheikhi; Karami, Manizheh; Tafreshi, Azita Parvaneh; Roghani, Mehrdad; Nadoushan, Mohammad-Reza Jalali

    2011-05-25

    Role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammationary diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed previously. We sought to examine if NO plays centrally a key role in MS related phenomena; demyelination or neuroinflammation. Female Wistar rats (weighing 200-250 g) were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus and received injections of l-arginine aimed at corpus callosum (AP: 1.2, L: ±1.8, V: 3.2). The drug (50-200 μg/rat) was microinjected intra-corpus callosum repeatedly (3-5 times/each per day). Control groups solely received saline (1 μg/rat) into the corpus callosum. The animals were tested for the novelty seeking behavior using the conditioning task. Memory impairment was examined using the shuttle box and Y-maze. l-NAME was pre-injected to l-arginine to involve the NO. All animals' brains were also processed for histological evaluation. l-arginine produced significant changes in the novelty seeking behavior but not in the memory formation, evidenced by passive avoidance and alternation behaviors. Pre-injection of l-NAME reversed the response to l-arginine. Present study further revealed a prominent inflammation as well as myelin elimination in the l-arginine treated rats' brains. These data suggest that the NO infusion in the myelin rich areas such as corpus callosum may lead to MS signs centrally. PMID:21447326

  20. Congenital and acquired abnormalities of the corpus callosum: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide spectrum of lesions in the corpus callosum, both congenital and acquired: developmental abnormalities, phakomatoses, neurometabolic disorders, demyelinating diseases, infection and inflammation, vascular lesions, neoplasms, traumatic and iatrogenic injury, and others. Cases include fetuses, children, and adults with rich iconography from the authors' own archive. PMID:24027754

  1. Corpus Callosum Size is Linked to Dichotic Deafness and Hemisphericity, Not Sex or Handedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Bruce E.; Rafto, Stein E.

    2006-01-01

    Individuals differ in the number of corpus callosum (CC) nerve fibers interconnecting their cerebral hemispheres by about threefold. Early reports suggested that males had smaller CCs than females. This was often interpreted to support the concept that the male brain is more "lateralized" or "specialized," thus accounting for presumed male…

  2. A Two-Year Longitudinal MRI Study of the Corpus Callosum in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of literature has identified size reductions of the corpus callosum (CC) in autism. However, to our knowledge, no published studies have reported on the growth of CC volumes in youth with autism. Volumes of the total CC and its sub-divisions were obtained from 23 male children with autism and 23 age- and gender-matched controls at…

  3. Quantitative Analysis of the Shape of the Corpus Callosum in Patients with Autism and Comparison Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Elnakib, Ahmed; Switala, Andrew E.; Williams, Emily L.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Conturo, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that the corpus callosum in patients with autism is reduced in size. This study attempts to elucidate the nature of this morphometric abnormality by analyzing the shape of this structure in 17 high-functioning patients with autism and an equal number of comparison participants matched for age, sex, IQ, and handedness. The…

  4. Reduced White Matter Connectivity in the Corpus Callosum of Children with Tourette Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Gruner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid; Hirsch, Jochen G.; Xu, Dongrong; Bansal, Ravi; Hammar, Asa; Lundervold, Astri J.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lie, Stein Atle; Gass, Achim; Peterson, Bradley S.; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Background: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects, and these anatomical features have been understood to…

  5. Social and Behavioral Problems of Children with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badaruddin, Denise H.; Andrews, Glena L.; Bolte, Sven; Schilmoeller, Kathryn J.; Schilmoeller, Gary; Paul, Lynn K.; Brown, Warren S.

    2007-01-01

    Archival data from a survey of parent observations was used to determine the prevalence of social and behavioral problems in children with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Parent observations were surveyed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for 61 children with ACC who were selected from the archive based on criteria of motor…

  6. Quantitative Analysis of the Shape of the Corpus Callosum in Patients with Autism and Comparison Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Elnakib, Ahmed; Switala, Andrew E.; Williams, Emily L.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Conturo, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that the corpus callosum in patients with autism is reduced in size. This study attempts to elucidate the nature of this morphometric abnormality by analyzing the shape of this structure in 17 high-functioning patients with autism and an equal number of comparison participants matched for age, sex, IQ, and handedness. The

  7. Reduced White Matter Connectivity in the Corpus Callosum of Children with Tourette Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Gruner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid; Hirsch, Jochen G.; Xu, Dongrong; Bansal, Ravi; Hammar, Asa; Lundervold, Astri J.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lie, Stein Atle; Gass, Achim; Peterson, Bradley S.; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Background: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects, and these anatomical features have been understood to

  8. Congenital and Acquired Abnormalities of the Corpus Callosum: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide spectrum of lesions in the corpus callosum, both congenital and acquired: developmental abnormalities, phakomatoses, neurometabolic disorders, demyelinating diseases, infection and inflammation, vascular lesions, neoplasms, traumatic and iatrogenic injury, and others. Cases include fetuses, children, and adults with rich iconography from the authors' own archive. PMID:24027754

  9. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  10. A Two-Year Longitudinal MRI Study of the Corpus Callosum in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of literature has identified size reductions of the corpus callosum (CC) in autism. However, to our knowledge, no published studies have reported on the growth of CC volumes in youth with autism. Volumes of the total CC and its sub-divisions were obtained from 23 male children with autism and 23 age- and gender-matched controls at

  11. The gene responsible for a severe form of peripheral neuropathy and agenesis of the corpus callosum maps to chromosome 15q.

    PubMed Central

    Casaubon, L. K.; Melanson, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Marineau, C.; Andermann, E.; Andermann, F.; Weissenbach, J.; Prvost, C.; Bouchard, J. P.; Mathieu, J.; Rouleau, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genealogical studies in a large number of affected French Canadian individuals suggest that ACCPN results from a single founder mutation. A genomewide search using 120 microsatellite DNA markers in 14 French Canadian families allowed the mapping of the ACCPN gene to a 5-cM region on chromosome 15q13-q15 that is flanked by markers D15S1040 and D15S118. A maximum two-point LOD score of 11.1 was obtained with the marker D15S971 at a recombination fraction of 0. Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium support a founder effect. These findings are the first step in the identification of the gene responsible for ACCPN, which may shed some light on the numerous conditions associated with the progressive peripheral neuropathy or agenesis of the corpus callosum. PMID:8554065

  12. The gene responsible for a severe form of peripheral neuropathy and agenesis of the corpus callosum maps to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Casaubon, L.K.; Melanson, M.; Marineau, C. |

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genealogical studies in a large number of affected French Canadian individuals suggest that ACCPN results from a single founder mutation. A genomewide search using 120 microsatellite DNA markers in 14 French Canadian families allowed the mapping of the ACCPN gene to a 5-cM region on chromosome 15q13-q15 that is flanked by markers D15S1040 and D15S118. A maximum two-point LOD score of 11.1 was obtained with the marker D15S971 at a recombination fraction of 0. Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium support a founder effect. These findings are the first step in the identification of the gene responsible for ACCPN, which may shed some light on the numerous conditions associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy or agenesis of the corpus callosum. 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Hippocampal commissure defects in crosses of four inbred mouse strains with absentcorpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, M. O.; Bailoo, Jeremy D.; Jordan, R. L.; Wahlsten, D.

    2012-01-01

    It is known that four common inbred mouse strains show defects of the forebrain commissures. The BALB/cJ strain has a low frequency of abnormally small corpus callosum, while the 129 strains have many animals with deficient corpus callosum. The I/LnJ and BTBR T+ tf/J strains never have a corpus callosum, while half of I/LnJ and almost all BTBR show severely reduced size of the hippocampal commissure. Certain of the F1 hybrid crosses among these strains are known to be less severely abnormal than the inbred parents, suggesting the parent strains have different genetic causes of commissure defects. In this study, all hybrid crosses among the four strains were investigated. The BTBR x I/Ln hybrid expressed almost no defects of the hippocampal commissure, unlike its inbred parent strains. Numerous 3-way crosses among the four strains yielded many mice with no corpus callosum and severely reduced hippocampal commissure, which shows that the phenotypic defect can result from several different combinations of genetic alleles. The F2 and F3 hybrid crosses of BTBR and I/LnJ had almost 100% absence of the corpus callosum but about 50% frequency of deficient hippocampal commissure. The 4-way hybrid cross among all four abnormal strains involved highly fertile parents and yielded a very wide phenotypic range of defects from almost no hippocampal commissure to totally normal forebrain commissures. The F2 and F3 crosses as well as the 4-way cross provide excellent material for studies of genetic linkage and behavioral consequences of commissure defects. PMID:22537318

  14. Cognitive impairments associated with corpus callosum infarction: a ten cases study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Du, Xiangnan; Song, Haiqing; Zhang, Qian; Jia, Jianping; Xiao, Tianyi; Wu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cognitive impairment is associated with corpus callosum infarctions. Ten corpus callosum infarction patients were enrolled in this study. Their emotions, cognitive and language abilities, memory, comprehensive perception were assessed using the Chinese version of following measures: Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), World Health Organization-University of California-Los Angeles Auditory Verbal Learning Test (WHO-UCLA AVLT), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Span subtest and so on. The same measurements were performed on healthy control participants as contrast for analysis. Infarction most frequently occurred in the body and/or splenium of the corpus callosum. The scores of the most cognitive tests in the corpus callosum infarction patients were significantly worse than those of the control participants (P<0.05). Except for the naming ability, the patients showed significantly poorer performance at the overall level of MMSE than the controls did (P<0.05). Consistently, the results of MoCA suggested a significant reduction in visuospatial abilities of execution, orientation, attention, calculation, delayed memory, language, and repetition capabilities in the patients with respect to the control (P<0.05). In addition, the scores in the case group were significantly worse than those in the control group in the auditory word learning test, digital span and Rey complex figure test (P<0.05). Corpus callosum infarction can cause cognitive dysfunction, which poses obstacles to memory in the acute phase, accompanied by different degrees of decline in visuospatial abilities, attention and calculating abilities. PMID:26885171

  15. Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy 3 is Associated with Agenesis and Hypoplasia of the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Michelle S.; Roldan, Ashley N.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD) is a dominantly inherited disorder of the corneal endothelium that has been associated with mutations in the zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 gene (ZEB1) gene in approximately one-third of affected families. While the corneal dystrophies have traditionally been considered isolated disorders of the corneal endothelium, we have recently identified two cases of maldevelopment of the corpus callosum in unrelated individuals with PPCD. The proband of the first family was diagnosed shortly after birth with agenesis of the corpus callosum and several other developmental abnormalities. Karyotype, FISH and whole genome copy number variant analyses were normal. She was subsequently diagnosed with PPCD, prompting screening of the ZEB1 gene, which identified a novel deletion (c.449delG; p.(Gly150Alafs*36)) present in the heterozygous state that was not identified in either unaffected parent. The proband of the second family was diagnosed several months after birth with thinning of the corpus callosum and PPCD. Whole genome copy number variant analysis revealed a 1.79 Mb duplication of 17q12 in the proband and her father and brother, neither of whom had PPCD. ZEB1 sequencing identified a novel deletion (c.1913-1914delCA; p.(Ser638Cysfs*5)) present in the heterozygous state, which was also identified in the proband’s affected mother. Thus, we report the first two cases of the association of PPCD with a developmental abnormality of the brain, in this case maldevelopment of the corpus callosum. Keywords: agenesis, corpus callosum, PPCD3, ZEB1, ZEB2, corneal dystrophy PMID:24780443

  16. Cognitive impairments associated with corpus callosum infarction: a ten cases study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Du, Xiangnan; Song, Haiqing; Zhang, Qian; Jia, Jianping; Xiao, Tianyi; Wu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cognitive impairment is associated with corpus callosum infarctions. Ten corpus callosum infarction patients were enrolled in this study. Their emotions, cognitive and language abilities, memory, comprehensive perception were assessed using the Chinese version of following measures: Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), World Health Organization-University of California-Los Angeles Auditory Verbal Learning Test (WHO-UCLA AVLT), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Span subtest and so on. The same measurements were performed on healthy control participants as contrast for analysis. Infarction most frequently occurred in the body and/or splenium of the corpus callosum. The scores of the most cognitive tests in the corpus callosum infarction patients were significantly worse than those of the control participants (P<0.05). Except for the naming ability, the patients showed significantly poorer performance at the overall level of MMSE than the controls did (P<0.05). Consistently, the results of MoCA suggested a significant reduction in visuospatial abilities of execution, orientation, attention, calculation, delayed memory, language, and repetition capabilities in the patients with respect to the control (P<0.05). In addition, the scores in the case group were significantly worse than those in the control group in the auditory word learning test, digital span and Rey complex figure test (P<0.05). Corpus callosum infarction can cause cognitive dysfunction, which poses obstacles to memory in the acute phase, accompanied by different degrees of decline in visuospatial abilities, attention and calculating abilities. PMID:26885171

  17. Anisotropy in Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baberschke, Klaus

    The enormous research on magnetic properties of ultrathin films and nanostructures produces also new activities in the fundamental understanding of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and the anisotropy of the orbital magnetic momentapprox 0.05\\ Å. This small change in structure and symmetry increa ses the MAE by several orders of magnitude and lifts the quenching of the orbital moment. Increases of 20-30 % of the orbital moment mu _{L} are observed. This experimental finding is confirmed by full relativistic ab initio calculations. Various experiments deliver the full temperature dependence of all MAE contributions. The temperature dependence remains a challenge for the theory in itine rant magnetism.

  18. Anisotropy across Superplume Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Sdiff data sets are presented for paths that run parallel to the African and the Pacific superplume boundaries. Objective clustering of waveforms illustrates sharp changes across these boundaries. The African plume shows a sharp offset in travel times in the SHdiff phase, while a more gradual offset towards slower arrivals is seen in the case of the Pacific superplume. Additionally, Pdiff phases display no offset around the African plume and a weak one around the Pacific plume. Here we focus mainly on another striking feature observed in both cases: outside of the superplume the Sdiff particle motion is strongly elliptical, but becomes linear within the superplume (first noticed by To et al. 2005 in the African superplume case). For the African plume we argue that these observations of delayed SV at large distances (~120 degrees) are indicative of the occurrence of azimuthal anisotropy. The SV arrivals have similar polarity as SH, opposite from what their radiation pattern predicts. Azimuthal anisotropy causes SH energy to be converted to SV (Maupin, 1994), explaining the travel time, polarity and amplitude. Forward modeling through different isotropic and anisotropic models supports this statement, although there are trade-offs between direction and magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy. The strong elliptical particle motions are also observed outside the Pacific plume, but at shorter distances (95-105 degrees). Elliptical motions can occur in the absence of anisotropy when strong velocity deviations or layering occurs close to the CMB, which, based on velocity profiles with depth in global tomographic models would be more likely within the superplume rather than on the fast side. The elliptical particle motions here can be modelled with a simple transverse isotropic model with VSH>VSV, but azimuthal anisotropy cannot be ruled out. The complexities within the Pacific superplume, including strong amplitude drop and existence of a post-cursor, are likely caused by an ultra low velocity zone (Cottaar and Romanowicz, this meeting) and make it difficult to constrain anisotropy within the Pacific superplume. Notably, however, in both cases, elliptical particle motions become more linear, and thus anisotropy decreases, from the fast side towards the slow side across superplume boundaries. Possibly this is caused by a rotation in the deformational regime, causing rotation of the pre-existing anisotropic fast directions. Forward modeling of deformation using tracers in mantle convection models, considering different mineral physics scenarios (Wenk et al., 2011) suggest that the boundaries in anisotropy from downwellings to upwellings can be sharp, and could possibly contribute to explaining the sharp boundary in VSH, in addition to effects of lateral variations in temperature and composition. Moreover the model for post-perovskite with (001)-slip predicts anti-correlation between S and P wave anisotropy. Variation in VPH due to anisotropy would then be anti-correlated with the variation caused by temperature, and this could explain the lack of correlation in the variations of VSH and VPH across the superplume boundary. Our modeling shows that care must be taken when computing R=dlnVs/dlnVp in the presence of anisotropy.

  19. Shape analysis of corpus callosum in phenylketonuria using a new 3D correspondence algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Christ, Shawn E.; Karsch, Kevin; Peck, Dawn; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    Statistical shape analysis of brain structures has gained increasing interest from neuroimaging community because it can precisely locate shape differences between healthy and pathological structures. The most difficult and crucial problem is establishing shape correspondence among individual 3D shapes. This paper proposes a new algorithm for 3D shape correspondence. A set of landmarks are sampled on a template shape, and initial correspondence is established between the template and the target shape based on the similarity of locations and normal directions. The landmarks on the target are then refined by iterative thin plate spline. The algorithm is simple and fast, and no spherical mapping is needed. We apply our method to the statistical shape analysis of the corpus callosum (CC) in phenylketonuria (PKU), and significant local shape differences between the patients and the controls are found in the most anterior and posterior aspects of the corpus callosum.

  20. Age at developmental cortical injury differentially Alters corpus callosum volume in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Threlkeld, Steven W; Rosen, Glenn D; Fitch, R Holly

    2007-01-01

    Background Freezing lesions to developing rat cortex induced between postnatal day (P) one and three (P1 – 3) lead to malformations similar to human microgyria, and further correspond to reductions in brain weight and cortical volume. In contrast, comparable lesions on P5 do not produce microgyric malformations, nor the changes in brain weight seen with microgyria. However, injury occurring at all three ages does lead to rapid auditory processing deficits as measured in the juvenile period. Interestingly, these deficits persist into adulthood only in the P1 lesion case [1]. Given prior evidence that early focal cortical lesions induce abnormalities in cortical morphology and connectivity [1-4], we hypothesized that the differential behavioral effects of focal cortical lesions on P1, P3 or P5 may be associated with underlying neuroanatomical changes that are sensitive to timing of injury. Clinical studies indicate that humans with perinatal brain injury often show regional reductions in corpus callosum size and abnormal symmetry, which frequently correspond to learning impairments [5-7]. Therefore, in the current study the brains of P1, 3 or 5 lesion rats, previously evaluated for brain weight, and cortical volume changes and auditory processing impairments (P21-90), were further analyzed for changes in corpus callosum volume. Results Results showed a significant main effect of Treatment on corpus callosum volume [F (1,57) = 10.2, P < .01], with lesion subjects showing significantly smaller callosal volumes as compared to shams. An Age at Treatment × Treatment interaction [F(2,57) = 3.2, P < .05], indicated that corpus callosum size decreased as the age of injury decreased from P5 to P1. Simple effects analysis showed significant differences between P1 and P3 [F(1,28) = 8.7, P < .01], and P1 and P5 [F(1,28) = 15.1, P < .001], subjects. Rats with P1 injury resulting in microgyria had the greatest reduction in corpus callosum volume (22% reduction), followed by the P3 group (11% reduction), which showed a significant reduction in corpus callosum volume compared to shams [F(1,31) = 5.9, P < .05]. Finally, the P5 lesion group did not significantly differ from the sham subjects in callosal volume. Conclusion Decrements in corpus callosum volume in the P1 and 3 lesion groups are consistent with the reductions in brain weight and cortical volume previously reported for microgyric rats [1,8]. Current results suggest that disruption to the cortical plate during early postnatal development may lead to more widely dispersed neurovolumetric anomalies and subsequent behavioral impairments [1], compared with injury that occurs later in development. Further, these results suggest that in a human clinical setting decreased corpus callosum volume may represent an additional marker for long-term behavioral outcome. PMID:17997836

  1. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  2. Lipoma of corpus callosum associated with dysraphic lesions and trisomy 13

    SciTech Connect

    Wainwright, H.; Bowen, R.; Radcliffe, M.

    1995-05-22

    We report on a further case of corpus callosal lipoma and frontal cranial defects. Most cases in the literature of corpus callosal lipoma in association with {open_quotes}dysraphic{close_quotes} lesions have been frontal in location. Malformation of the corpus callosum is said to be associated with 50% of these lipomas. Trisomy 13 was confirmed by the 13q14 cosmid probe on paraffin-embedded liver tissue. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  3. A de novo mutation in PRICKLE1 in fetal agenesis of the corpus callosum and polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2016-01-01

    Homozygous recessive mutations in the PRICKLE1 gene were originally reported in three consanguineous families with myoclonic epilepsy. Subsequently, several studies have identified neurological abnormalities in animal models with both heterozygous and homozygous mutations in PRICKLE1 orthologues, including epilepsy in flies and in mice with heterozygous PRICKLE1 mutations. We describe a fetus with a novel de novo mutation in PRICKLE1 associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. PMID:26727662

  4. Postnatal Lesion Evidence Against a Primary Role for the Corpus Callosum in Mouse Sociability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mu; Clarke, Andrew M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2009-01-01

    BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred strain of mice that displays prominent social deficits and repetitive behaviors analogous to the defining symptoms of autism, along with a complete congenital agenesis of corpus callosum. BTBR is genetically distant from the widely used C57BL/6J (B6) strain, which exhibits high levels of sociability, low repetitive behaviors, and an intact corpus callosum. Emerging evidence implicates compromised inter-hemispherical connectivity in some cases of autism. We investigated the hypothesis that the disconnection of corpus callosum (CC) fiber tracts contribute to behavioral traits in mice that are relevant to the behavioral symptoms of autism. Surgical lesion of the CC in B6 mice at postnatal day 7 had no effect on juvenile play and adult social approach, and did not elevate repetitive self-grooming. No correlations were detected between rostral-caudal extent of the CC lesion and behavioral scores. In addition, LP/J, the strain that is genetically closest to BTBR but has an intact CC, displayed juvenile play deficits and repetitive self-grooming similar to those seen in BTBR. These corroborative results offer evidence against the hypothesis that the corpus callosum disconnection is a primary cause of low sociability and high repetitive behaviors in inbred mice. Our findings indicate that genes mediating other aspects of neurodevelopment, including those whose mutations underlie more subtle disruptions in white matter pathways and connectivity, are more likely to contribute to the aberrant behavioral phenotypes in the BTBR mouse model of autism. PMID:19419429

  5. Orofaciodigital syndrome type I associated with polycystic kidneys and agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Connacher, A A; Forsyth, C C; Stewart, W K

    1987-01-01

    We report a female case of orofaciodigital syndrome type I (OFD I) associated with polycystic kidneys and agenesis of the corpus callosum. She had chronic renal failure requiring maintenance dialysis and significant neurological deficits. Her mother had less severe OFD I associated with polycystic kidneys but her renal function was normal and there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a structural abnormality of the brain. Images PMID:3560170

  6. Functional topography of the corpus callosum investigated by DTI and fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Fabri, Mara; Pierpaoli, Chiara; Barbaresi, Paolo; Polonara, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    This short review examines the most recent functional studies of the topographic organization of the human corpus callosum, the main interhemispheric commissure. After a brief description of its anatomy, development, microstructure, and function, it examines and discusses the latest findings obtained using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography (DTT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), three recently developed imaging techniques that have significantly expanded and refined our knowledge of the commissure. While DTI and DTT have been providing insights into its microstructure, integrity and level of myelination, fMRI has been the key technique in documenting the activation of white matter fibers, particularly in the corpus callosum. By combining DTT and fMRI it has been possible to describe the trajectory of the callosal fibers interconnecting the primary olfactory, gustatory, motor, somatic sensory, auditory and visual cortices at sites where the activation elicited by peripheral stimulation was detected by fMRI. These studies have demonstrated the presence of callosal fiber tracts that cross the commissure at the level of the genu, body, and splenium, at sites showing fMRI activation. Altogether such findings lend further support to the notion that the corpus callosum displays a functional topographic organization that can be explored with fMRI. PMID:25550994

  7. MIR137HG risk variant rs1625579 genotype is related to corpus callosum volume in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Veena S; Kelly, Sinead; Wright, Carrie; Gupta, Cota Navin; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Bustillo, Juan R; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Cannon, Dara M; McDonald, Colm; Donohoe, Gary; Calhoun, Vince D; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-08-18

    Genome-wide association studies implicate the MIR137HG risk variant rs1625579 (MIR137HGrv) within the host gene for microRNA-137 as a potential regulator of schizophrenia susceptibility. We examined the influence of MIR137HGrv genotype on 17 subcortical and callosal volumes in a large sample of individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls (n=841). Although the volumes were overall reduced relative to healthy controls, for individuals with schizophrenia the homozygous MIR137HGrv risk genotype was associated with attenuated reduction of mid-posterior corpus callosum volume (p=0.001), along with trend-level effects in the adjacent central and posterior corpus callosum. These findings are unique in the literature and remain robust after analysis in ethnically homogenous and single-scanner subsets of the larger sample. Thus, our study suggests that the mechanisms whereby MIR137HGrv works to increase schizophrenia risk are not those that generate the corpus callosum volume reductions commonly found in the disorder. PMID:26123324

  8. Pediatric neurofunctional intervention in agenesis of the corpus callosum: a case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sheila Cristina da Silva; Queiroz, Ana Paula Adriano; Niza, Nathália Tiepo; da Costa, Letícia Miranda Resende; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a clinical report pre- and post-neurofunctional intervention in a case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. Case description: Preterm infant with corpus callosum agenesis and hypoplasia of the cerebellum vermis and lateral ventricles, who, at the age of two years, started the proposed intervention. Functional performance tests were used such as the neurofunctional evaluation, the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Gross Motor Function Classification System. In the initial evaluation, absence of equilibrium reactions, postural transfers, deficits in manual and trunk control were observed. The intervention was conducted with a focus on function, prioritizing postural control and guidance of the family to continue care in the home environment. After the intervention, there was an improvement of body reactions, postural control and movement acquisition of hands and limbs. The intervention also showed improvement in functional performance. Comments: Postural control and transfers of positions were benefited by the neurofunction intervention in this case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. The approach based on function with activities that involve muscle strengthening and balance reactions training, influenced the acquisition of a more selective motor behavior. PMID:25479858

  9. A cascade of morphogenic signaling initiated by the meninges controls corpus callosum formation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Youngshik; Siegenthaler, Julie A.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The corpus callosum is the most prominent commissural connection between the cortical hemispheres, and numerous neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with callosal agenesis. Using mice with either meningeal overgrowth or selective loss of meninges, we’ve identified a cascade of morphogenic signals initiated by the meninges that regulates corpus callosum development. The meninges produce BMP7, an inhibitor of callosal axon outgrowth. This activity is overcome by the induction of expression of Wnt3 by the callosal pathfinding neurons, which antagonizes the inhibitory effects of BMP7. Wnt3 expression in the cingulate callosal pathfinding axons is developmentally regulated by another BMP family member, GDF5, produced by the adjacent Cajal-Retzius neurons and turns on before outgrowth of the callosal axons. The effects of GDF5 are in turn under the control of a soluble GDF5 inhibitor, Dan, made by the meninges. Thus, the meninges and medial neocortex use a cascade of signals to regulate corpus callosum development. PMID:22365545

  10. Processing Speed Delays Contribute to Executive Function Deficits in Individuals with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Elysa J.; Harrell, Kathryn M.; Brown, Warren S.; Hill, Susanna S.; Jeremy, Rita J.; Kramer, Joel H.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Paul, Lynn K.

    2013-01-01

    Corpus callosum malformation and dysfunction are increasingly recognized causes of cognitive and behavioral disability. Individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) offer unique insights regarding the cognitive skills that depend specifically upon callosal connectivity. We examined the impact of AgCC on cognitive inhibition, flexibility, and processing speed using the Color-Word Interference Test (CWIT) and Trail Making Test (TMT) from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System. We compared 36 individuals with AgCC and IQs within the normal range to 56 matched controls. The AgCC cohort was impaired on timed measures of inhibition and flexibility; however, group differences on CWIT Inhibition, CWIT Inhibition/Switching and TMT Number-Letter Switching appear to be largely explained by slow performance in basic operations such as color naming and letter sequencing. On CWIT Inhibition/Switching, the AgCC group was found to commit significantly more errors which suggests that slow performance is not secondary to a cautious strategy. Therefore, while individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum show real deficits on tasks of executive function, this impairment appears to be primarily a consequence of slow cognitive processing. Additional studies are needed to investigate the impact of AgCC on other aspects of higher order cortical function. PMID:22390821

  11. Clinical, genetic and imaging findings identify new causes for corpus callosum development syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Timothy J.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Barkovich, A. James

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest fibre tract in the brain, connecting the two cerebral hemispheres, and thereby facilitating the integration of motor and sensory information from the two sides of the body as well as influencing higher cognition associated with executive function, social interaction and language. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a common brain malformation that can occur either in isolation or in association with congenital syndromes. Understanding the causes of this condition will help improve our knowledge of the critical brain developmental mechanisms required for wiring the brain and provide potential avenues for therapies for callosal agenesis or related neurodevelopmental disorders. Improved genetic studies combined with mouse models and neuroimaging have rapidly expanded the diverse collection of copy number variations and single gene mutations associated with callosal agenesis. At the same time, advances in our understanding of the developmental mechanisms involved in corpus callosum formation have provided insights into the possible causes of these disorders. This review provides the first comprehensive classification of the clinical and genetic features of syndromes associated with callosal agenesis, and provides a genetic and developmental framework for the interpretation of future research that will guide the next advances in the field. PMID:24477430

  12. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Due to Defective Glial Wedge Formation in Lhx2 Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Gregory A; Hirokawa, Karla E; Chuang, Tony M; Urbina, Cecilia; Patel, Fenil; Fong, Jeanette; Funatsu, Nobuo; Monuki, Edwin S

    2015-09-01

    Establishment of the corpus callosum involves coordination between callosal projection neurons and multiple midline structures, including the glial wedge (GW) rostrally and hippocampal commissure caudally. GW defects have been associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Here we show that conditional Lhx2 inactivation in cortical radial glia using Emx1-Cre or Nestin-Cre drivers results in ACC. The ACC phenotype was characterized by aberrant ventrally projecting callosal axons rather than Probst bundles, and was 100% penetrant on 2 different mouse strain backgrounds. Lhx2 inactivation in postmitotic cortical neurons using Nex-Cre mice did not result in ACC, suggesting that the mutant phenotype was not autonomous to the callosal projection neurons. Instead, ACC was associated with an absent hippocampal commissure and a markedly reduced to absent GW. Expression studies demonstrated strong Lhx2 expression in the normal GW and in its radial glial progenitors, with absence of Lhx2 resulting in normal Emx1 and Sox2 expression, but premature exit from the cell cycle based on EdU-Ki67 double labeling. These studies define essential roles for Lhx2 in GW, hippocampal commissure, and corpus callosum formation, and suggest that defects in radial GW progenitors can give rise to ACC. PMID:24781987

  13. Growth of the Human Corpus Callosum: Modular and Laminar Morphogenetic Zones

    PubMed Central

    Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Čuljat, Marko; Kostović, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this focused review is to present and discuss recent data on the changing organization of cerebral midline structures that support the growth and development of the largest commissure in humans, the corpus callosum. We will put an emphasis on the callosal growth during the period between 20 and 45 postconceptual weeks (PCW) and focus on the advantages of a correlated histological/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach. The midline structures that mediate development of the corpus callosum in rodents, also mediate its early growth in humans. However, later phases of callosal growth in humans show additional medial transient structures: grooves made up of callosal septa and the subcallosal zone. These modular (septa) and laminar (subcallosal zone) structures enable the growth of axons along the ventral callosal tier after 18 PCW, during the rapid increase in size of the callosal midsagittal cross-section area. Glial fibrillary acidic protein positive cells, neurons, guidance molecule semaphorin3A in cells and extracellular matrix (ECM), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the ECM have been identified along the ventral callosal tier in the protruding septa and subcallosal zone. Postmortem MRI at 3 T can demonstrate transient structures based on higher water content in ECM, and give us the possibility to follow the growth of the corpus callosum in vivo, due to the characteristic MR signal. Knowledge about structural properties of midline morphogenetic structures may facilitate analysis of the development of interhemispheric connections in the normal and abnormal fetal human brain. PMID:19562029

  14. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Ferrara, L. M.; de Erausquin, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, severe, and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Indices commonly derived from DTI include (1) mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (2) fractional anisotropy (FA) or relative anisotropy (RA), (3) axial diffusivity, and (4) radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes (OLG), and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased FA in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding. PMID:23483798

  15. A solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsch, P.; Funk, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of the cosmic ray (CR) anisotropy are widely advertised as a means of finding nearby sources. This idea has recently gained currency after the discovery of a rise in the positron fraction and is the goal of current experimental efforts, e.g., with AMS-02 on the International Space Station. Yet, even the anisotropy observed for hadronic CRs is not understood, in the sense that isotropic diffusion models overpredict the dipole anisotropy in the TeV-PeV range by almost two orders of magnitude. Here, we consider two additional effects normally not considered in isotropic diffusion models: anisotropic diffusion due to the presence of a background magnetic field and intermittency effects of the turbulent magnetic fields. We numerically explore these effect by tracking test-particles through individual realisations of the turbulent field. We conclude that a large misalignment between the CR gradient and the background field can explain the observed low level of anisotropy.

  16. Agenesis and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum: clinical, genetic and neuroimaging findings in a series of 41 patients.

    PubMed

    Schell-Apacik, Chayim Can; Wagner, Kristina; Bihler, Moritz; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Heinrich, Uwe; Klopocki, Eva; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Muenke, Maximilian; von Voss, Hubertus

    2008-10-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is among the most frequent human brain malformations with an incidence of 0.5-70 in 10,000. It is a heterogeneous condition, for which several different genetic causes are known, for example, ACC as part of monogenic syndromes or complex chromosomal rearrangements. We systematically evaluated the data of 172 patients with documented corpus callosum abnormalities in the records, and 23 patients with chromosomal rearrangements known to be associated with corpus callosum changes. All available neuroimaging data, including CT and MRI, were re-evaluated following a standardized protocol. Whenever feasible chromosome and subtelomere analyses as well as molecular genetic testing were performed in patients with disorders of the corpus callosum in order to identify a genetic diagnosis. Our results showed that 41 patients with complete absence (agenesis of the corpus callosum-ACC) or partial absence (dysgenesis of the corpus callosum-DCC) were identified. Out of these 28 had ACC, 13 had DCC. In 11 of the 28 patients with ACC, the following diagnoses could be established: Mowat-Wilson syndrome (n = 2), Walker-Warburg syndrome (n = 1), oro-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (n = 1), and chromosomal rearrangements (n = 7), including a patient with an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation, which led to the disruption and a predicted loss of function in the FOXG1B gene. The cause of the ACC in 17 patients remained unclear. In 2 of the 13 patients with DCC, unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements could be detected (n = 2), while the cause of DCC in 11 patients remained unclear. In our series of cases a variety of genetic causes of disorders of the corpus callosum were identified with cytogenetic anomalies representing the most common underlying etiology. PMID:18792984

  17. Anisotropy in OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callens, M. K.; Yokoyama, D.; Neyts, K.

    2015-09-01

    Small-molecule OLEDs, deposited by thermal evaporation, allow for precise control over layer thicknesses. This enables optimisation of the optical behaviour of the stack which ultimately determines the outcoupling efficiency. In terms of optical outcoupling there are limits to the efficiency by which the generated electromagnetic radiation can be extracted from the stack. These limitations are linked to the refractive indices of the individual layers. Values for maximum outcoupling efficiency are sometimes calculated under the implicit assumptions that the OLED stack is planar, that all layers are isotropic with a certain refractive index and that the emitters are not preferentially oriented. In reality it is known that these assumptions are not always valid, be it intentional or unintentional. In our work we transcend these limiting assumptions and look at different forms of anisotropy in OLEDs. Anisotropy in OLEDs comes in three distinct flavours; 1. Geometrical anisotropy, as for example in gratings, lenses or other internal or external scattering centres, 2. Anisotropic emitters, where the orientation significantly influences the direction in which radiation is emitted and 3. Anisotropic optical materials, where their anisotropic nature breaks the customary assumption of isotropic OLED materials. We investigate the effect of these anisotropic features on the outcoupling efficiency and ultimately, on the external quantum efficiency (EQE).

  18. Associated anisotropy decays of ethidium bromide interacting with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Sabnis, Sarika; Singhal, Preeti; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-03-01

    Ethidium Bromide (EB) is a commonly used dye in a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) study. Upon an intercalation, this dye significantly increases its brightness and fluorescence lifetime. In this report we have studied the time resolved fluorescence properties of EB existing simultaneously in free and DNA-bound forms in the solution. Fluorescence intensity decays were fitted globally to a double exponential model with lifetimes corresponding to free (1.6 ns) and bound (22 ns) forms, and molar fractions were determined for all used solutions. Anisotropy decays displayed characteristic time dependence with an initial rapid decline followed by recovery and slow decay. The short-lived fraction associated with free EB molecules decreases faster than long-lived fraction associated with EB bound to DNA. Consequently, contribution from fast rotation leads to initial rapid decay in anisotropy. On the other hand bound fraction, due to slow rotation helps recover anisotropy in time. This effect of associated anisotropy decays in systems such as EB free/EB-DNA is clearly visible in a wide range of concentrations, and should be taken into account in polarization assays and biomolecule dynamics studies.

  19. Some aspects of amoeboid microglia in the corpus callosum and neighbouring regions of neonatal rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1976-01-01

    The distribution and form of amoeboid microglia in the brain of neonatal rats have been studied with the light and electron microscope. With the silver carbonate method of Rio-Hortega, two major 'colonies' of amoeboid microglia are identified: (1) in the supraventricular corpus callosum in which the nerve fibres are widely spaced, and (2) at the medial angle of the lateral ventricle inferior to the corpus callosum. Scattered amoeboid cells are also seen in the cavum septum pellucidum and in the lumen of the lateral ventricle. Associated with the subependyma forming the roof of the lateral ventricle there are also numerous amoeboid cells. Ultrastructural studies show that the subependyma includes cellular elements with features intermediate between those of immature subependymal cells and full-blown amoeboid microglia. It is suggested that the latter are derived from the subependymal cells and that, once they are formed, they leave the subependyma and migrate into the corpus callosum and elsewhere. With the metallic stain, the amoeboid microglia present a wide diversity of appearances, some of which bear a close resemblance to typical microglia. It is therefore suggested that amoeboid microglia change into typical microglia. The present study clearly demonstrates that amoeboid microglia are active phagocytes. Their cytoplasm is heavily loaded with secretory granules (lysosomes) and give a positive reaction with PAS and acid phosphatase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Figs. 4-9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 PMID:1254530

  20. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  1. Effects of prenatal irradiation on the development of cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.L.; Lent, R.

    1987-10-08

    Defects of the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of mice subjected prenatally to gamma irradiation were evaluated as a function of dose and of embryonic age at irradiation. Pregnant mice were exposed to a gamma source at 16, 17, and 19 days of gestation (E16, E17, and E19, respectively), with total doses of 2 Gy and 3 Gy, in order to produce brain defects on their progeny. At 60 postnatal days, the brains of the offspring were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively and compared with those of nonirradiated animals. Mice irradiated at E16 were all acallosal. Those that were exposed to 2 Gy displayed an aberrant longitudinal bundle typical of other acallosals, but this was not the case in those irradiated with 3 Gy. The corpus callosum of animals irradiated at E17 with 3 Gy was pronouncedly hypotrophic, but milder effects were observed in the other groups. Quantitative analysis confirmed a dependence of callosal midsagittal area upon dose and age at irradiation, and, in addition, indicated an interaction between these variables. The neocortex of irradiated animals was hypotrophic: layers II-III were much more affected than layer V, and this was more affected than layer VI. Quantitative analysis indicated that this effect also depended on dose and age at irradiation and that it was due to a loss of cortical neurons. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between the number of neurons within layers II-III, and V and the midsagittal area of the corpus callosum. Ectopic neurons were found in the white matter and in layer I of animals irradiated at E16 and E17, indicating that fetal exposure to ionizing radiation interfered with the migration of cortical neuroblasts.

  2. Severe psychiatric disturbance and abnormalities of the corpus callosum: review and case series.

    PubMed Central

    David, A S; Wacharasindhu, A; Lishman, W A

    1993-01-01

    The association between developmental defects of the corpus callosum and major psychiatric disturbance is discussed with a review of published cases. Seven new cases are presented, of which four had clear psychotic symptoms, two receiving a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Of the remainder, one had a developmental disorder affecting social interaction and speech which could be classed as Asperger's syndrome, one had a personality disorder with depressive and conversion symptoms, and the last was an adolescent boy with severe behavioural problems. The difficulties in determining the precise relevance of the callosal anomalies to these clinical manifestations are discussed especially since the prevalence of such anomalies in the population is uncertain. Images PMID:8429328

  3. Recessively inherited spastic paraplegia associated with ataxia, congenital cataracts, thin corpus callosum and axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, I; Sasaki, H; Yabe, I; Kikuchi, S; Chin, S; Fukazawa, T; Okumura, H; Tashiro, K

    2000-07-01

    We investigated a consanguineous Japanese family with a complicated form of familial spastic paraplegia (FSP). Three siblings were affected, probably by autosomal recessive inheritance. All showed ataxia, subnormal mentality, congenital cataracts, and slight cerebellar atrophy on CT scans. Spastic paraplegia was predominant in 2 siblings, while ataxia was more marked in the other. Slight but definite atrophy of the corpus callosum and axonal neuropathy were demonstrated in 1 sibling who underwent detailed investigation. Review of similar cases reported in the literature indicates that this recessively inherited disorder probably represents a homogeneous group within the heterogeneous cluster of complicated FSP. PMID:10893066

  4. Robust detection of traumatic axonal injury in individual mild traumatic brain injury patients: intersubject variation, change over time and bidirectional changes in anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Michael L; Kim, Namhee; Park, Young K; Hulkower, Miriam B; Gardin, Tova M; Shifteh, Keivan; Kim, Mimi; Zimmerman, Molly E; Lipton, Richard B; Branch, Craig A

    2012-06-01

    To identify and characterize otherwise occult inter-individual spatial variation of white matter abnormalities across mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients. After informed consent and in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on a 3.0 T MR scanner in 34 mTBI patients (19 women; 19-64 years old) and 30 healthy control subjects. The patients were imaged within 2 weeks of injury, 3 months after injury, and 6 months after injury. Fractional anisotropy (FA) images were analyzed in each patient. To examine white matter diffusion abnormalities across the entire brain of individual patients, we applied Enhanced Z-score Microstructural Assessment for Pathology (EZ-MAP), a voxelwise analysis optimized for the assessment of individual subjects. Our analysis revealed areas of abnormally low or high FA (voxel-wise P-value < 0.05, cluster-wise P-value < 0.01(corrected for multiple comparisons)). The spatial pattern of white matter FA abnormalities varied among patients. Areas of low FA were consistent with known patterns of traumatic axonal injury. Areas of high FA were most frequently detected in the deep and subcortical white matter of the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes, and in the anterior portions of the corpus callosum. The number of both abnormally low and high FA voxels changed during follow up. Individual subject assessments reveal unique spatial patterns of white matter abnormalities in each patient, attributable to inter-individual differences in anatomy, vulnerability to injury and mechanism of injury. Implications of high FA remain unclear, but may evidence a compensatory mechanism or plasticity in response to injury, rather than a direct manifestation of brain injury. PMID:22684769

  5. Mowat-Wilson syndrome in a fetus with antenatal diagnosis of short corpus callosum: advocacy for standard autopsy.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Emmanuel; Baumann, Clarisse; Alison, Marianne; Oury, Jean-François; Belarbi, Nadia; Dupont, Céline; Guimiot, Fabien; Delezoide, Anne-Lise

    2013-06-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a genetic disease caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZEB2 gene rarely diagnosed prenatally and with little fetal description reported. It is mainly characterized by moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism and various malformations including Hirschsprung disease and corpus callosum anomalies. Here we report a fetal case of MWS well described, suspected at standard autopsy. The association of a corpus callosum hypoplasia with a histological Hirschsprung disease and a typical facial gestalt allowed the guiding of genetic testing. Classical fetopathological examination still keeps indications in cases of syndromic association in the era of virtual autopsy. PMID:23523603

  6. Shape analysis of corpus callosum in autism subtype using planar conformal mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Duan, Ye; Yin, Xiaotian; Gu, Xianfeng; Karsch, Kevin; Miles, Judith

    2009-02-01

    A number of studies have documented that autism has a neurobiological basis, but the anatomical extent of these neurobiological abnormalities is largely unknown. In this study, we aimed at analyzing highly localized shape abnormalities of the corpus callosum in a homogeneous group of autism children. Thirty patients with essential autism and twenty-four controls participated in this study. 2D contours of the corpus callosum were extracted from MR images by a semiautomatic segmentation method, and the 3D model was constructed by stacking the contours. The resulting 3D model had two openings at the ends, thus a new conformal parameterization for high genus surfaces was applied in our shape analysis work, which mapped each surface onto a planar domain. Surface matching among different individual meshes was achieved by re-triangulating each mesh according to a template surface. Statistical shape analysis was used to compare the 3D shapes point by point between patients with autism and their controls. The results revealed significant abnormalities in the anterior most and anterior body in essential autism group.

  7. Peritrigonal and temporo-occipital heterotopia with corpus callosum and cerebellar dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Tiziana; Barkovich, A. James; Leventer, Richard J.; Squier, Waney; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Parrini, Elena; Blaser, Susan; Marini, Carla; Robertson, Stephen; Tortorella, Gaetano; Rosenow, Felix; Thomas, Pierre; McGillivray, George; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe a homogeneous subtype of periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) as part of a newly defined malformation complex. Methods: Observational study including review of brain MRI and clinical findings of a cohort of 50 patients with PNH in the temporo-occipital horns and trigones, mutation analysis of the FLNA gene, and anatomopathologic study of a fetal brain. Results: There were 28 females and 22 males. All were sporadic with the exception of an affected mother and son. Epilepsy occurred in 62%, cerebellar signs in 56%, cognitive impairment in 56%, and autism in 12%. Seventy percent were referred within the 3rd year of life. Imaging revealed a normal cerebral cortex in 76% and abnormal cortical folding in 24%. In all patients the hippocampi were under-rotated and in 10% they merged with the heterotopia. Cerebellar dysgenesis was observed in 84% and a hypoplastic corpus callosum in 60%. There was no gender bias or uneven gender distribution of clinical and anatomic severity. No mutations of FLNA occurred in 33 individuals examined. Heterotopia in the fetal brain revealed cytoarchitectonic characteristics similar to those associated with FLNA mutations; cortical pathology was not typical of polymicrogyria. Cerebellar involvement was more severe and the hippocampi appeared simple and under-rotated. Conclusions: This series delineates a malformation complex in which PNH in the trigones and occipito-temporal horns is associated with hippocampal, corpus callosum, and cerebellar dysgenesis. This subtype of PNH is distinct from classic PNH caused by FLNA mutations. PMID:22914838

  8. Ontophyletics of the nervous system: development of the corpus callosum and evolution of axon tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M J; Lasek, R J; Silver, J

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of nervous systems has included significant changes in the axon tracts of the central nervous system. These evolutionary changes required changes in axonal growth in embryos. During development, many axons reach their targets by following guidance cues that are organized as pathways in the embryonic substrate, and the overall pattern of the major axon tracts in the adult can be traced back to the fundamental pattern of such substrate pathways. Embryological and comparative anatomical studies suggest that most axon tracts, such as the anterior commissure, have evolved by the modified use of preexisting substrate pathways. On the other hand, recent developmental studies suggest that a few entirely new substrate pathways have arisen during evolution; these apparently provided opportunities for the formation of completely new axon tracts. The corpus callosum, which is found only in placental mammals, may be such a truly new axon tract. We propose that the evolution of the corpus callosum is founded on the emergence of a new preaxonal substrate pathway, the "glial sling," which bridges the two halves of the embryonic forebrain only in placental mammals. Images PMID:6577462

  9. Communicative deficits in agenesis of the corpus callosum: nonliteral language and affective prosody.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lynn K; Van Lancker-Sidtis, Diana; Schieffer, Beatrix; Dietrich, Rosalind; Brown, Warren S

    2003-05-01

    While some individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum can perform normally on standardized intelligence tests, clinical observations suggest that they nevertheless have deficits in the domains of fluid and social intelligence. Particularly important for social competence is adequate understanding and use of paralinguistic information. This study examined the impact of callosal absence on the processing of pragmatic and paralinguistic information. Young adult males with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) were evaluated in the areas of nonliteral language comprehension, proverb recognition and interpretation, and perception of affective prosody. Ten ACC individuals with normal Wechsler IQ were compared to 14 sex, age, and IQ matched normal controls. The Formulaic and Novel Language Comprehension Test (FANL-C), Gorham Proverbs Test, and LA Prosody Test were administered. ACC subjects exhibited significant impairment on the nonliteral items of the FANL-C, but no significant difference from controls in comprehension of literal items. ACC subjects also exhibited significant deficits in both self-generated interpretation and recognition of proverb meaning, and in recognition of affective prosody. These results demonstrate that normally intelligent individuals with ACC are impaired in the understanding of nonliteral language and emotional-prosodic cues that are important in social communication. In all three tests, the performance of individuals with ACC was similar to patients with right hemisphere brain damage. Thus, persons with ACC appear to lack interhemispheric integration of critical aspects of language processed by the right hemisphere. PMID:12735947

  10. Corpus callosum analysis using MDL-based sequential models of shape and appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Mikkel B.; Davies, Rhodri H.; Ryberg, Charlotte

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a method for automatically analysing and segmenting the corpus callosum from magnetic resonance images of the brain based on the widely used Active Appearance Models (AAMs) by Cootes et al. Extensions of the original method, which are designed to improve this specific case are proposed, but all remain applicable to other domain problems. The well-known multi-resolution AAM optimisation is extended to include sequential relaxations on texture resolution, model coverage and model parameter constraints. Fully unsupervised analysis is obtained by exploiting model parameter convergence limits and a maximum likelihood estimate of shape and pose. Further, the important problem of modelling object neighbourhood is addressed. Finally, we describe how correspondence across images is achieved by selecting the minimum description length (MDL) landmarks from a set of training boundaries using the recently proposed method of Davies et al. This MDL-approach ensures a unique parameterisation of corpus callosum contour variation, which is crucial for neurological studies that compare reference areas such as rostrum, splenium, et cetera. We present quantitative and qualitative results that show that the method produces accurate, robust and rapid segmentations in a cross sectional study of 17 subjects, establishing its feasibility as a fully automated clinical tool for analysis and segmentation.

  11. Pre- and Postnatal Analysis of Chromosome 1q44 Deletion in Agenesis of Corpus Callosum.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mitesh; Srikanth, Ambika; Kadandale, Jayarama; Hegde, Sridevi

    2015-10-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the common brain abnormalities and also a common finding in children with mental disability. ACC is heterogeneous and can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a syndrome. ACC can be accurately identified by the absence of the cavum septum pallucidum and tear drop effect of the lateral ventricle after 18 weeks of pregnancy in an ultrasound scan. Genetic causes have been attributed to 30-45% of cases with ACC. Submicroscopic deletions of 1q43q44 have been reported in several cases of ACC. The AKT3 gene, mapped to 1q44, is required for the development of the callosum and brain size. It is considered to be a candidate gene for ACC. We studied a total of 22 cases with ACC, in pre- and postnatal samples using FISH probes. None of the samples showed a deletion in 1q44, implying that the AKT3 gene may not be associated with ACC. PMID:26648835

  12. Pre- and Postnatal Analysis of Chromosome 1q44 Deletion in Agenesis of Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mitesh; Srikanth, Ambika; Kadandale, Jayarama; Hegde, Sridevi

    2015-01-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the common brain abnormalities and also a common finding in children with mental disability. ACC is heterogeneous and can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a syndrome. ACC can be accurately identified by the absence of the cavum septum pallucidum and tear drop effect of the lateral ventricle after 18 weeks of pregnancy in an ultrasound scan. Genetic causes have been attributed to 30-45% of cases with ACC. Submicroscopic deletions of 1q43q44 have been reported in several cases of ACC. The AKT3 gene, mapped to 1q44, is required for the development of the callosum and brain size. It is considered to be a candidate gene for ACC. We studied a total of 22 cases with ACC, in pre- and postnatal samples using FISH probes. None of the samples showed a deletion in 1q44, implying that the AKT3 gene may not be associated with ACC. PMID:26648835

  13. fMRI and corpus callosum relationships in monozygotic twins discordant for handedness.

    PubMed

    Gurd, J M; Cowell, P E; Lux, S; Rezai, R; Cherkas, L; Ebers, G C

    2013-03-01

    To further investigate brain structure and function in 26 handedness discordant monozygotic twin pairs (MzHd), MRI and behavioural assessments were carried out. These showed significant correlation between language-specific functional laterality in inferior and middle frontal gyri, and anterior corpus callosum. Previous studies of handedness discordant monozygotic twins failed to resolve the issue concerning handedness and hemispheric laterality for language due to methodological disparities. The results would be relevant to genetic theories as well as to brain structure:function explanations. MzHd twins underwent MRI and fMRI scanning as well as behavioural assessment of motor performance and cognition. There were significant differences on MRI and fMRI laterality measures, as well as a significant correlation between anterior callosal widths and functional laterality. LH twins showed higher frequencies of atypical functional laterality. There was no significant within-twin pair correlation on fMRI verbal laterality, nor did results show within-twin pair differences on verbal fluency or IQ. Implications for the field of laterality research pertain to frontal hemispheric equipotentiality for verbal processes in healthy individuals. In particular, there can be an apparent lack of cognitive 'cost' to atypical laterality. An fMRI verbal laterality index correlated significantly with corpus callosum widths near Broca's area. PMID:22527119

  14. Transient lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum due to rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna; Jonczyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Szpura, Krystyna; Biega?ski, Grzegorz; Mania, Anna; Kemnitz, Pawe?; S?u?ewski, Wojciech; Figlerowicz, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Transient signal changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) can result from many different reasons, including encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by infection, seizures, metabolic disorders and asphyxia. We report a case of a 6-year-old Polish girl with rotavirus infection demonstrating a reversible SCC lesion on diffusion-weighted MRI images. She presented six episodes of generalized tonic seizures with mild acute gastroenteritis. Stool test for rotavirus antigen was positive. At the time of admission imaging showed the hyperintense region in T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MRI, a well-defined lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum with restricted diffusion in diffusion-weighted MRI and no enhancement in post contrast T1-weighted imaging. Her first EEG showed slow brain activity in the posterior occipitotemporal portion, consisting mainly of theta waves with a frequency of 4.5-5.5 Hz and amplitude of 40 uV. The lesion had completely disappeared on follow-up MRI 10 days later. The patient recovered fully without any sequelae. PMID:25686898

  15. Thermal conductivity anisotropy of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Keehm, Youngseuk; Shin, Sang Ho

    2013-04-01

    The interior heat of the lithosphere of the Earth is mainly transferred by conduction that depends on thermal conductivity of rocks. Many sedimentary and metamorphic rocks have thermal conductivity anisotropy, i.e. heat is preferentially transferred in the direction parallel to the bedding and foliation of these rocks. Deming (JGR, 1994) proposed an empirical relationship between K(perp) and anisotropy (K(par)/K(perp)) using 89 measurements on rock samples from literatures. In Deming's model, thermal conductivity is almost isotropic for K(perp) > 4 W/mK, but anisotropy is exponentially increasing with decreasing K(perp), with final anisotropy of ~2.5 at K(perp) < 1.0 W/mK. However, Davis et al. (JGR, 2007) argued that there is little evidence for Deming's suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for rocks with low thermal conductivity. Davis et al. insisted that Deming's increase in anisotropy for 1 < K(perp) < 4 W/mK with decreasing K(perp) could be due to the fractures filled with air or water, which causes thermal conductivity anisotropy. To test Deming's suggestion and Davis et al.'s argument on thermal conductivity anisotropy, we measured thermal conductivity parallel (K(par)) and perpendicular (K(perp)) to bedding or foliation and performed analytical & numerical modeling. Our measurements on 53 rock samples show the anisotropy range from 0.79 to 1.36 for 1.84 < K(prep) < 4.06 W/mK. Analytical models show that anisotropy can increase or stay the same at the range of 1 < K(perp) < 4 W/mK. Numerical modeling for gneiss shows that anisotropy ranges 1.21 to 1.36 for 2.5 < K(perp) < 4.8 W/mK. Another numerical modeling with interbedded coal layers in high thermal conductivity rocks (3.5 W/mK) shows anisotropy of 1.87 when K(perp) is 1.7 W/mK. Finally, numerical modeling with fractures indicates that the fractures does not seem to affect thermal conductivity anisotropy significantly. In conclusion, our preliminary results imply that thermal conductivity anisotropy can increase or stay at low value in the range of 1.0 < K(perp) < 4.0 W/mK. Both cases are shown to be possible through lab measurements and analytical & numerical modeling.

  16. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert H.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters—flow rate and vibration strength—this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows.

  17. The subventricular zone continues to generate corpus callosum and rostral migratory stream astroglia in normal adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jiho; Orosco, Lori; Guo, Fuzheng; Chung, Seung-Hyuk; Bannerman, Peter; Mills Ko, Emily; Zarbalis, Kostas; Deng, Wenbin; Pleasure, David

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS, and have many essential functions, including maintenance of blood-brain barrier integrity, and CNS water, ion, and glutamate homeostasis. Mammalian astrogliogenesis has generally been considered to be completed soon after birth, and to be reactivated in later life only under pathological circumstances. Here, by using genetic fate-mapping, we demonstrate that new corpus callosum astrocytes are continuously generated from nestin(+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in normal adult mice. These nestin fate-mapped corpus callosum astrocytes are uniformly postmitotic, express glutamate receptors, and form aquaporin-4(+) perivascular endfeet. The entry of new astrocytes from the SVZ into the corpus callosum appears to be balanced by astroglial apoptosis, because overall numbers of corpus callosum astrocytes remain constant during normal adulthood. Nestin fate-mapped astrocytes also flow anteriorly from the SVZ in association with the rostral migratory stream, but do not penetrate into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. Production of new astrocytes from nestin(+) NPCs is absent in the normal adult cortex, striatum, and spinal cord. Our study is the first to demonstrate ongoing SVZ astrogliogenesis in the normal adult mammalian forebrain. PMID:25740506

  18. Corpus Callosum Size, Reaction Time Speed and Variability in Mild Cognitive Disorders and in a Normative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstey, Kaarin J.; Mack, Holly A.; Christensen, Helen; Li, Shu-Chen; Reglade-Meslin, Chantal; Maller, Jerome; Kumar, Rajeev; Dear, Keith; Easteal, Simon; Sachdev, Perminder

    2007-01-01

    Intra-individual variability in reaction time increases with age and with neurological disorders, but the neural correlates of this increased variability remain uncertain. We hypothesized that both faster mean reaction time (RT) and less intra-individual RT variability would be associated with larger corpus callosum (CC) size in older adults, and…

  19. Maturation of the corpus callosum of the rat: II. Influence of thyroid hormones on the number and maturation of axons.

    PubMed

    Gravel, C; Sasseville, R; Hawkes, R

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative electron microscopy has been used to study the number of callosal axons in the corpus callosum of normal and hypothyroid rats during postnatal development. At birth, the normal corpus callosum contains 4.4 x 10(6) axons. This number increases to 11.4 x 10(6) by 5 days of age (P5) and then, in contrast to cats and primates, remains constant until at least P60, the oldest age examined. The number of axons in the corpus callosum of hypothyroid animals is not significantly different from the values observed in normal rats at all ages studied, although the callosal axons of hypothyroid rats remain structurally immature. As extensive elimination of callosal axons has been shown to occur in normal rats past P5, we conclude that new callosal processes grow through the corpus callosum past this age that compensate numerically for the loss. Moreover, as the number of callosally projecting neurons seems to be higher in hypothyroid rats than in normal controls, it seems that the constant axon number derives from more parent neurons, and thus that there are more axon collaterals per callosal neuron in a normal animal than in a hypothyroid one. Taken together, these data indicate that although hypothyroidism does not alter the total number of callosally projecting axons, it interferes with the normal processes that define or sculpt the projection fields, thereby leading to a numerically normal projection with abnormal topography. PMID:2298928

  20. Calpain inhibitor MDL-28170 reduces the functional and structural deterioration of corpus callosum following fluid percussion injury.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jinglu; Liu, Elaine; Wang, Jianli; Chen, Yonghong; Yu, Julie; Baker, Andrew J

    2007-06-01

    It is known that calpain activation is involved in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and that calpain inhibition can have neuroprotective effects on both gray matter and white matter injury of TBI models. However, the role of calpain activation in the corpus callosum remains unclear and requires elucidation given its potential clinical relevance. We evaluated the neuroprotective effects of calpain inhibitor MDL-28170 on corpus callosum function and structural destruction using a fluid percussion injury (FPI) model. The therapeutic time window for a single administration of MDL-28170 was up to 4 h post injury in protecting the corpus callosum structural integrity, and up to 30 min in protecting the axonal function evaluated 1 day following injury. When given 30 min prior injury, MDL-28170 showed neuroprotective effects that lasted up to 7 days. However, 30 min post injury administration of the drug afforded neuroprotection only up to 3 days. In contrast, two additional reinforcement injections at 24 and 48 h in addition to 30 min post FPI significantly protected both axonal function and structural integrity that lasted 14 days following FPI. Our data indicated that calpain inhibitor MDL-28170 is an effective neuroprotectant for axonal injury in corpus callosum following FPI with a therapeutic time window up to 4 hours. Although delayed treatment (2 or 4 h post FPI) was effective in protecting the axonal structure, the axons saved may not be as functional as normal fibers. Multiple drug administrations may be necessary for achieving a persisting effectiveness of this compound. PMID:17600513

  1. Interaction of thiamine deficiency and voluntary alcohol consumption disrupts rat corpus callosum ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaohua; Sullivan, Edith V; Stankovic, Roger K; Harper, Clive G; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2007-10-01

    The relative roles of alcohol and thiamine deficiency in causing brain damage remain controversial in alcoholics without the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Experimental control over alcohol consumption and diet are impossible in humans but can be accomplished in animal models. This experiment was designed to differentiate the separate and combined effects on the macro- and ultrastructure of the corpus callosum of thiamine deficiency and voluntary alcohol consumption. Adult male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (9 chronically alcohol-exposed and 9 water controls) received a thiamine-deficient diet for 2 weeks. There were four groups: five rats previously exposed to alcohol were treated with pyrithiamine (a thiamine phosphorylation inhibitor); five rats never exposed to alcohol were treated with pyrithiamine; four alcohol-exposed rats were treated with thiamine; and four rats never exposed to alcohol were treated with thiamine. On day 14, thiamine was restored in all 18 rats; 2 weeks later the 10 pyrithiamine-treated rats received intraperitoneal thiamine. The rats were perfused 61 days post-pyrithiamine treatment at age 598 days. Brains were dissected and weight and volumes were calculated. Sagittal sections were stained to measure white matter structures. The corpus callosum was examined using transmission electron microscopy to determine density of myelinated fibers, fiber diameter, and myelin thickness. The corpus callosum in the alcohol/pyrithiamine group was significantly thinner, had greater fiber density, higher percentage of small fibers, and myelin thinning than in the alcohol/thiamine and water/thiamine groups. Several measures showed a graded effect, where the alcohol/pyrithiamine group had greater pathology than the water/pyrithiamine group, which had greater pathology than the two thiamine-replete groups. Across all 16 rats, thinner myelin sheaths correlated with higher percentage of small fibers. Myelin thickness and axon diameter together accounted for 71% of the variance associated with percentage of small fibers. Significant abnormalities in the alcohol/pyrithiamine group and lack of abnormality in the alcohol-exposed/thiamine-replete group indicate that thiamine deficiency caused white matter damage. The graded abnormalities across the dually to singly treated animals support a compounding effect of alcohol exposure and thiamine depletion, and indicate the potential for interaction between alcohol and thiamine deficiency in human alcohol-related brain damage. PMID:17299515

  2. [Case of suspected multiple sclerosis with transcallosal lesions involving the upper surface of the corpus callosum].

    PubMed

    Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Oya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Harumasa; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Ogawa, Masafumi; Kawai, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    A 26-year-old woman noticed gradually progressive, right lower leg weakness over a 1.5-month period. Neurological examination revealed right hemiparesis with slightly increased deep tendon reflexes, Babinski's sign on the right side, loss of position sense in the right leg, and slight loss of superficial sensation in the right toes. MR FLAIR images showed a high intensity area measuring 5 x 2 x 3 cm in the left frontal lobe, extending to the outer surface of the body of the corpus callosum and the adjacent right cingulate gyrus. Gadolinium enhancement was seen along the cortex and the outer surface of the body of the corpus callosum. CSF findings showed no pleocytosis, a protein content of 32 mg/dl, a sugar level of 85 mg/dl, and an IgG index of 0.46. The biopsy specimen obtained from the superior frontal gyrus showed perivascular cuffing of T-lymphocytes and some B-lymphocytes, as well as multiple small foci of demyelination. Starting on the second day of admission, the patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (1,000 mg/day for 3 days); she was then switched to oral prednisolone (20 mg/day). Thereafter, the patient had two clinical relapses: one was due to a lesion in the dorsal part of the medulla oblongata associated with a disturbance of deep sensation in both hands, and the other was due to a lesion involving the right internal capsule, the globus pallidus, and the caudate nucleus associated with left facial nerve palsy. Visual evoked potentials suggested a demyelinating lesion in the right optic nerve. We suspected a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis based on the presence of more than two clinical episodes of neurological deficits with identifiable lesions on MRI. Multiple sclerosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions located in the outer part of the corpus callosum and transcallosal bilateral hemispheres on MRI, even though inner callosal lesions are common in multiple sclerosis. PMID:18540378

  3. Linking strain anisotropy and plasticity in copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son

    2015-05-01

    The elastic anisotropy of copper leads to significant variation in the x-ray elastic constants (XEC), which link diffraction-based strain measurements to stress. An accurate depiction of the mechanical response in copper thin films requires a determination of an appropriate grain interaction model that lies between Voigt and Reuss limits. It is shown that the associated XEC weighting fraction, x*, between these limits provides a metric by which strain anisotropy can be quantified. Experimental values of x*, as determined by a linear regression scheme of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections, reveal the degree of strain anisotropy and its dependence on plastic deformation induced during in-situ and ex-situ thermal treatments.

  4. Linking strain anisotropy and plasticity in copper metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Conal E. Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son

    2015-05-04

    The elastic anisotropy of copper leads to significant variation in the x-ray elastic constants (XEC), which link diffraction-based strain measurements to stress. An accurate depiction of the mechanical response in copper thin films requires a determination of an appropriate grain interaction model that lies between Voigt and Reuss limits. It is shown that the associated XEC weighting fraction, x*, between these limits provides a metric by which strain anisotropy can be quantified. Experimental values of x*, as determined by a linear regression scheme of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections, reveal the degree of strain anisotropy and its dependence on plastic deformation induced during in-situ and ex-situ thermal treatments.

  5. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, E.M. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on a study to quantify the reflectance anisotropy of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for grasslands. PAR falls in the wavelength range 0.4 to 0.7[mu]m. The study looks at the variation of PAR with illumination and vegetative canopy conditions. It uses bidirectional reflectance distribution function data, and measures of anisotropy derived from reflectance factor and reflectance fraction data to aid in the analysis. The data used for this analysis came from an intense effort mounted to measure diurnal changes in the anisotropy of surface reflectance from prairie grassland as a function of the vegetative canopy.

  6. Agenesis and Dysgenesis of the Corpus Callosum: Clinical, Genetic and Neuroimaging Findings in a Series of 41 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schell-Apacik, Chayim Can; Wagner, Kristina; Bihler, Moritz; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Heinrich, Uwe; Klopocki, Eva; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Muenke, Maximilian; von Voss, Hubertus

    2009-01-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is among the most frequent human brain malformations with an incidence of 0.5–70 in 10,000. It is a heterogeneous condition, for which several different genetic causes are known, for example, ACC as part of monogenic syndromes or complex chromosomal rearrangements. We systematically evaluated the data of 172 patients with documented corpus callosum abnormalities in the records, and 23 patients with chromosomal rearrangements known to be associated with corpus callosum changes. All available neuroimaging data, including CT and MRI, were re-evaluated following a standardized protocol. Whenever feasible chromosome and subtelomere analyses as well as molecular genetic testing were performed in patients with disorders of the corpus callosum in order to identify a genetic diagnosis. Our results showed that 41 patients with complete absence (agenesis of the corpus callosum—ACC) or partial absence (dysgenesis of the corpus callosum—DCC) were identified. Out of these 28 had ACC, 13 had DCC. In 11 of the 28 patients with ACC, the following diagnoses could be established: Mowat–Wilson syndrome (n = 2), Walker–Warburg syndrome (n = 1), oro-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (n = 1), and chromosomal rearrangements (n = 7), including a patient with an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation, which led to the disruption and a predicted loss of function in the FOXG1B gene. The cause of the ACC in 17 patients remained unclear. In 2 of the 13 patients with DCC, unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements could be detected (n = 2), while the cause of DCC in 11 patients remained unclear. In our series of cases a variety of genetic causes of disorders of the corpus callosum were identified with cytogenetic anomalies representing the most common underlying etiology. PMID:18792984

  7. Reversible cytotoxic oedema in the splenium of the corpus callosum related to tetracycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Grühbaum, Barbara; Salzer, Hans; Nasel, Christian; Lernbass, Isolde

    2010-10-01

    We report a symptomatic girl with reversible circumscribed cytotoxic oedema in the splenium of the corpus callosum (CC) that occurred, to our knowledge, for the first time in relation to tetracycline treatment. After stopping tetracycline therapy the girl recovered completely and the CC lesion, clearly visible on diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), disappeared. Reversible circumscribed cytotoxic oedema (CCO) of the splenium of the CC is a well-defined entity that is found to be associated with administration of antiepileptic drugs, alterations in therapy using arginin-vasopressin and metronidazole or infections with influenza and rotavirus. CCO of splenium of the CC is clearly visible on DWI, shows no enhancement after administration of contrast medium and is completely reversible in most cases. PMID:20689948

  8. Sudden worsening after subdural haematoma surgery: will there be a corpus callosum injury?

    PubMed Central

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Lodoli, Giovanni; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) which occurred after chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) surgery. The patient was admitted to our hospital for drowsiness and marked asthenia. The cerebral CT scan revealed a CSDH and surgery allowed to improve the symptoms, but after several days we observed a sudden worsening. The patient developed left-sided myoclonic seizures followed by left hemiplegia and worsening drowsiness. Electrolytes imbalance and inflammatory causes were excluded. The CT scan showed a right cerebral swelling and the subsequent MRI revealed a single lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum, hyperintense on diffusion-weighted images. After osmotic therapy the patient improved and on day 10 of admission the MRI showed a complete resolution of the lesion. This is the first report that described an association between CSDH and MERS. Possible aetiopathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24862419

  9. Reversible splenial lesion on the corpus callosum in nonfulminant hepatitis A presenting as encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Soon Young; Kim, Byung Kook; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Seo, Hee Yeon; Kwon, So Young

    2014-12-01

    Reversible focal lesions on the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) have been reported in patients with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy caused by various infectious agents, such as influenza, mumps, adenovirus, Varicella zoster, Escherichia coli, Legionella pneumophila, and Staphylococcus aureus. We report a case of a reversible SCC lesion causing reversible encephalopathy in nonfulminant hepatitis A. A 30-year-old healthy male with dysarthria and fever was admitted to our hospital. After admission his mental status became confused, and so we performed electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, which revealed an intensified signal on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at the SCC. His mental status improved 5 days after admission, and the SCC lesion had completely disappeared 15 days after admission. PMID:25548747

  10. EARS2 mutations cause fatal neonatal lactic acidosis, recurrent hypoglycemia and agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Danhauser, Katharina; Haack, Tobias B; Alhaddad, Bader; Melcher, Marlen; Seibt, Annette; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klee, Dirk; Mayatepek, Ertan; Prokisch, Holger; Distelmaier, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are essential for organelle protein synthesis. Genetic defects affecting the function of these enzymes may cause pediatric mitochondrial disease. Here, we report on a child with fatal neonatal lactic acidosis and recurrent hypoglycemia caused by mutations in EARS2, encoding mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase 2. Brain ultrasound revealed agenesis of corpus callosum. Studies on patient-derived skin fibroblasts showed severely decreased EARS2 protein levels, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and altered mitochondrial morphology. Our report further illustrates the clinical spectrum of the severe neonatal-onset form of EARS2 mutations. Moreover, in this case the live-cell parameters appeared to be more sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction compared to standard diagnostics, which indicates the potential relevance of fibroblast studies in children with mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26780086

  11. The corpus callosum and empathy in adults with a history of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, E J; Allen, G M; Walshe, M; Allin, M; Murray, R; Rifkin, L; McGuire, P K; Nosarti, C

    2010-07-01

    Reduced posterior corpus callosum (CC) area has been consistently observed in children and adolescents born very preterm (VPT). CC structural differences are also observed in people diagnosed with empathy disorders. This study examined empathy in relation to CC size in VPT adults and controls. CC area was manually measured for 17 VPT adults and 9 controls. Participants completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (Davis, 1980) and the Empathy Quotient (Baron-Cohen & Wheelwright, 2004). VPT adults had reduced posterior CC area in contrast to controls, and a positive linear trend was observed between posterior CC size and gestational age. No between-group empathy differences were observed, although self-reported personal distress in response to social situations was higher in VPT adults, and negatively associated with anterior CC area. We conclude that VPT adults have a smaller posterior CC, which is associated with gestational age, and elevated social distress, which may be mediated by anterior CC size. PMID:20441689

  12. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-08-01

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(φ)F{sup 2} model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton φ and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(φ)F{sup 2} model.

  13. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  14. Calculation of magnetocrystalline anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gunter

    The magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) for fcc Ni and bcc Fe is calculated as the difference of single particle energy eigenvalue sums using a tight-binding model. For nickel we predict a MAE of -0.15 eV and the wrong easy axis, for iron we find a MAE of -0.7 eV with the easy axis in agreement with experiment. Our results compare favorably with previously reported first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the local spin density approximation. The inclusion of an orbital polarization correction improves the magnitude of the MAE for iron, but fails to bring the result for nickel closer to the experimental value. The outstanding feature of our calculations is the careful handling of the necessary Brillouin zone integrals. Linear interpolation schemes and methods based on Fermi surface smearing were used and analyzed. An alternative method of calculating the MAE based on the torque on a magnetic moment centered on an atom is found to be equivalent to the calculation of the MAE in terms of energy differences.

  15. The Role of Corpus Callosum Development in Functional Connectivity and Cognitive Processing

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Anne M.; Honma, Susanne; Jeremy, Rita J.; Strominger, Zoe; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari; Brown, Warren S.; Paul, Lynn K.; Barkovich, A. James; Mukherjee, Pratik; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2012-01-01

    The corpus callosum is hypothesized to play a fundamental role in integrating information and mediating complex behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that lack of normal callosal development can lead to deficits in functional connectivity that are related to impairments in specific cognitive domains. We examined resting-state functional connectivity in individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) and matched controls using magnetoencephalographic imaging (MEG-I) of coherence in the alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–30 Hz) and gamma (30–55 Hz) bands. Global connectivity (GC) was defined as synchronization between a region and the rest of the brain. In AgCC individuals, alpha band GC was significantly reduced in the dorsolateral pre-frontal (DLPFC), posterior parietal (PPC) and parieto-occipital cortices (PO). No significant differences in GC were seen in either the beta or gamma bands. We also explored the hypothesis that, in AgCC, this regional reduction in functional connectivity is explained primarily by a specific reduction in interhemispheric connectivity. However, our data suggest that reduced connectivity in these regions is driven by faulty coupling in both inter- and intrahemispheric connectivity. We also assessed whether the degree of connectivity correlated with behavioral performance, focusing on cognitive measures known to be impaired in AgCC individuals. Neuropsychological measures of verbal processing speed were significantly correlated with resting-state functional connectivity of the left medial and superior temporal lobe in AgCC participants. Connectivity of DLPFC correlated strongly with performance on the Tower of London in the AgCC cohort. These findings indicate that the abnormal callosal development produces salient but selective (alpha band only) resting-state functional connectivity disruptions that correlate with cognitive impairment. Understanding the relationship between impoverished functional connectivity and cognition is a key step in identifying the neural mechanisms of language and executive dysfunction in common neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders where disruptions of callosal development are consistently identified. PMID:22870191

  16. Corpus callosum index: a practical method for long-term follow-up in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Fernando Faria Andrade; Santos, Valeria Silva dos; Figueira, Gustavo Medeiros Andrade; Silva, Angela Correa Marques da

    2007-12-01

    Rather than acute inflammation, long-standing multiple sclerosis (MS) course is hallmarked by relentless axonal loss and brain atrophy, both with subtle clinical expression and scarcely visible on conventional MRI studies. Brain atrophy imaging has sophisticated methodological requirements, not always practical and accessible to most centers. Corpus callosum (CC) is a major inter-hemispheric white matter bundle, grossly affected by long term MS and easily assessed by MRI. To determine whether a practical imaging method can reliably follow presumed axonal loss in patients with progressive MS, we designed a 5-year prospective open label study, enrolling 128 consecutive patients (75 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 53 secondary-progressive (SP)), on regular immunomodulatory therapy compared to control group, formed by 23 patients with MRI considered normal. On a conventional best mid-sagittal T1W, CC index (CCI) was obtained by measuring anterior, medium and posterior segments of CC, normalized to its greatest anteroposterior diameter using an orthogonal semi-automated linear system. CCI was measured at baseline and at least once yearly. Results were plotted intra-individually; baseline values were used as reference. At baseline, CCI was able to distinguish SP patients from RR and controls, and on follow-up, despite some overlap, demonstrated a progressive reduction from baseline on both RR and SP groups compared to controls. From the third year on, difference between SP and RR patients reached statistical significance, which did not correlated with disability measured by EDSS. So, a corpus callosum index proved practical and feasible to longitudinally demonstrate morphometric callosal changes with potential to be used as a tool for long-term follow-up, mostly in SP patients. PMID:18094848

  17. Experimental Studies on Seismic Anisotropy Enhanced by Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, J.; Yang, X.

    2008-12-01

    It is commonly agreed that the seismic anisotropy, most likely caused by aligned minerals, is a very important indicator of intracrustal deformation. Ultrasonic velocity measurements on the schists, gneisses, migmatites, amphibolites and mylonites from Higher Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) and Honghe strike-slip fault zone in the south-western China show that the average anisotropic magnitude of them is about 4 % (the maximal magnitude of them is less than 8 %). However, a series of measurements of surface-wave dispersion inversions and waveform inversions of P to S conversions produced at seismic impedance contrasts conducted in Tibet indicate marked anisotropy with the magnitude ranging from 4 - 18% within the middle to lower crust. What causes the abnormal large anisotropy within Tibetan crust? The peak metamorphism temperatures and pressures of HHC reached 800 -850°C and varied from 0.8 GPa to 1.2 GPa, and part of HHC rocks to some extent had undergone granulitic-grade metamorphism which temperature and pressure were in excess their solidus. Localized melt bands and melt pocket preferred orientation (MPO) are present in HHC pervasively. If melt is oriented, the melt is expected to be an extremely important factor to induce anisotropy. Experimental results indicated that MPO can result in an extra anisotropy, whose magnitude can be increased by a factor of 2 for a melt fraction of 5 - 10 vol% with an aspect ratio of 0.1 - 0.5. The contribution of MPO on the anisotropy is likely comparable to or larger than that induced by lattice preferred orientation of major minerals, possibly amphiboles and micas, in middle to lower crust. Therefore, we attribute the abnormal anisotropy observed within Tibetan middle to lower crust to the aligned melt.

  18. Braneworld cosmological models with anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Antonio; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2003-11-01

    For a cosmological Randall-Sundrum braneworld with anisotropy, i.e., of Bianchi type, the modified Einstein equations on the brane include components of the five-dimensional Weyl tensor for which there are no evolution equations on the brane. If the bulk field equations are not solved, this Weyl term remains unknown, and many previous studies have simply prescribed it as ad hoc. We construct a family of Bianchi braneworlds with anisotropy by solving the five-dimensional field equations in the bulk. We analyze the cosmological dynamics on the brane, including the Weyl term, and shed light on the relation between anisotropy on the brane and the Weyl curvature in the bulk. In these models, it is not possible to achieve geometric anisotropy for a perfect fluid or scalar field—the junction conditions require anisotropic stress on the brane. But the solutions can isotropize and approach a Friedmann brane in an anti de Sitter bulk.

  19. Magnetic anisotropies of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyborny, Karel; Han, J. E.; Oszwaldowski, Rafal; Zutic, Igor; Petukhov, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic anisotropies in quantum dots (QDs) doped by magnetic ions are discussed in terms of two frameworks: anisotropic g-factors and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy [1]. Two examples, related to zinc-blende p-doped materials, are given of how these frameworks are utilized: four-level Hamiltonian of a flat QD and a cuboid infinite-well QD containing a single hole. The latter model, despite being an idealization of a real QD, displays a rich phenomenology of anisotropies. We quantify the anisotropy constants for ZnSe and CdTe QDs, confirming that the Ising-like effective Hamiltonians apply to magnetic QDs [2]. Compared to bulk systems, confinement tuning offers a new way to control easy axes in magnetic QDs. [1] K. Vyborny et al., preprint (2011). [2] C. Le Gall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 057401 (2011).

  20. Laboratory seismic anisotropy in mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, B. S. G.; Herwegh, M.; Hirt, A. M.; Ebert, A.; Linckens, J.; Precigout, J.; Leiss, B.; Walter, J. M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic strain is often accommodated along narrow zones in the Earth's crust and upper mantle, and these high-strain zones represent an important mechanical and rheological component in geodynamics. In outcrop we observe the intense deformation along and across these structures. But at depth, in the mid and lower crust, and in the mantle, we are dependent on geophysical methods for analysis of structures, such as seismic reflection and refraction surveys. A natural progression has therefore been to understand the remote geophysical signal in terms of laboratory ultrasonic pulse transmission measurements on rock cores, collected in the field or from borehole drill core. Here we first present a brief review that consider key studies in the area of laboratory seismic measurements in strongly anisotropic rocks, ranging from calcite mylonites to metapelites. In the second part we focus attention on ongoing research projects targetting laboratory seismic anisotropy in mylonitized rocks, and associated challenges. Measurements of compressional (P) and shear (S) waves were made at high confining pressure (up to 5 kbar). Mineral texture analysis was performed with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron texture diffraction to determine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). So-called "rock-recipe" models are used to calculate seismic anisotropy, which consider the elastic properties of minerals that constitutes the rock, and their respective CPO. However, the outcome of such models do not always simply correspond to the measured seismic anisotropy. Differences are attributed to several factors, such as grain boundaries, mineral microstructures including shape-preferred orientation (SPO), micro-cracks and pores, and grain-scale stress-strain conditions. We highlight the combination of these factors in case studies on calcite and peridotite mylonites. In calcite mylonites, sampled in the Morcles nappe shear zone, the measured seismic anisotropy generally match the calculated seismic anisotropy. However, anisotropy may be reinforced by the contribution of grain-boundary effects and calcite SPO, as is indicated by microCT imaging and SEM analysis. This is evident in one case where the measured P wave anisotropy exceeded the calculated anisotropy by more than 5%, and by ~4 % higher shear-wave splitting. An even greater discrepancy can be found when comparing measured and calculated seismic anisotropy in mylonitized peridotites from shear zones in the Lanzo (Italy) and Ronda (Spain) massifs. This is in part related to serpentinization of olivine, which remains a challenge for laboratory measurements of peridotites. Highest values of calculated anisotropy, for both the calcite and peridotite mylonites, are found in near monomineralic specimens (i.e., 8 - 10% P wave anisotropy). In comparison, polymineralic specimens have calculated P wave anisotropy ranging between <2 - 5%. In contrast, the laboratory measured seismic anisotropy do not display a simple relationship as a function of mono- versus polymineralic composition. Seismic properties and anisotropy are discussed in light of conditions and mechanisms of deformation, and the possible role and influence of second-phase minerals. Laboratory measurements offers a venue for exploring the relationship between deformation and seismic anisotropy. Such investigation may, in combination with high-resolution geophysical methods and increasingly sophisticated numerical models, yield further insight on remote active deformation in the mid and lower crust, and in the upper mantle.

  1. Structural origins of diamagnetic anisotropy in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Worcester, D L

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy in proteins and polypeptides can be attributed to the diamagnetic anisotropy of the planar peptide bonds. The alpha helix in particular has large anisotropy due to the axial alignment of the peptide bonds. The regular arrangements of the peptide bonds in beta pleated sheet and collagen structures also produce substantial anisotropy, but less than for alpha helix. The anisotropy permits orientation of small structures of these types in magnetic fields of several kilogauss. PMID:281695

  2. Effects of Severing the Corpus Callosum on Electrical and BOLD Functional Connectivity and Spontaneous Dynamic Activity in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Matthew E.; Thompson, Garth J.; Pan, Wen-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional networks, defined by synchronous spontaneous blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) oscillations between spatially distinct brain regions, appear to be essential to brain function and have been implicated in disease states, cognitive capacity, and sensing and motor processes. While the topographical extent and behavioral function of these networks has been extensively investigated, the neural functions that create and maintain these synchronizations remain mysterious. In this work callosotomized rodents are examined, providing a unique platform for evaluating the influence of structural connectivity via the corpus callosum on bilateral resting state functional connectivity. Two experimental groups were assessed, a full callosotomy group, in which the corpus callosum was completely sectioned, and a sham callosotomy group, in which the gray matter was sectioned but the corpus callosum remained intact. Results indicated a significant reduction in interhemispheric connectivity in the full callosotomy group as compared with the sham group in primary somatosensory cortex and caudate-putamen regions. Similarly, electrophysiology revealed significantly reduced bilateral correlation in band limited power. Bilateral gamma Band-limited power connectivity was most strongly affected by the full callosotomy procedure. This work represents a robust finding indicating the corpus callosum's influence on maintaining integrity in bilateral functional networks; further, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electrophysiological connectivity share a similar decrease in connectivity as a result of the callosotomy, suggesting that fMRI-measured functional connectivity reflects underlying changes in large-scale coordinated electrical activity. Finally, spatiotemporal dynamic patterns were evaluated in both groups; the full callosotomy rodents displayed a striking loss of bilaterally synchronous propagating waves of cortical activity. PMID:24117343

  3. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) [congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation] associated with tracheoesophageal fistula and agensesis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Fassan, Matteo; Ludwig, Kathrin; Cassina, Matteo; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Salmaso, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM) are a family of hamartomatous disorders due to the uncontrolled overgrowth of the terminal bronchioles. Congenital pulmonary airway malformations can co-exist with cardiovascular and/or urogenital malformations, but their association with thoracopulmonary malformations is extremely rare. We report the first case of CPAM type I, co-existing with tracheo-esophageal fistula and corpus callosum agenesis. PMID:22414029

  4. Crustal Anisotropy in Eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzwoller, M. H.; Xie, J.; Shen, W.; Molnar, P. H.; Yang, Y.; Zhou, L.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A growing list and wide variety of evidence suggests that the Tibetan middle and lower crust is warm and presumably ductile. This list includes extensive Cenozoic volcanism, low electrical resistivity, satellite magnetic anomalies consistent with a raised Curie isotherm, and the lack of mid- to lower-crustal earthquakes. Seismological observations include strong P-to-S conversion bright-spots on active source wide-angle reflection data, strong crustal attenuation, pervasive crustal low velocity zones (LVZs) inferred from receiver functions or surface wave dispersion that are strongest near the periphery of the Plateau, and strong radial anisotropy, characteristic of significant shear strains, in the middle crust. Yet, surface strain rates and finite strains, as measured by GPS and SKS splitting fast axis orientations, respectively, appear to imply a vertical coherence of deformation from the uppermost crust into the upper mantle. Thus, questions about the mechanism of deformation of the Tibetan crust remain, including: (1) To what extent is deformation of the middle crust localized in a channel (channel flow) and hence different from that above and perhaps below it? (2) Or, conversely, to what extent is deformation of the entire lithosphere vertically coherent? Observations of crustal anisotropy can help to answer these questions, but although such observations are widespread, for the most part they remain either localized or so poorly resolved that exploiting such observations to answer these questions remains difficult. We summarize recently constructed models of radial and azimuthal anisotropy in the middle and lower crust beneath eastern Tibet. The models result from Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion of surface wave dispersion derived from ambient noise cross-correlations for Rayleigh and Love waves using Chinese Earthquake Array and PASSCAL data in and surrounding Tibet. (1) Significant middle-to-lower crustal radial anisotropy characterizes the crust beneath most of E. Tibet, but vanishes toward the S. China block in the east and north of the Kunlun fault in the north. Radial anisotropy is confined to the middle to perhaps lower crust with an upper boundary at about 20 km depth and a less well resolved lower boundary, but, on average, radial anisotropy is found between 40%-80% of the Moho depth. (2) In the upper crust, azimuthal anisotropy is strong (~4%) and fast axis orientations are roughly parallel to strikes of major strike-slip faults. Azimuthal anisotropy is weak in the middle crust (<2%) where radial anisotropy is strongest and increases in the lower crust. The azimuthal anisotropy in the lower crust and uppermost mantle is coherent with upper crustal anisotropy across some but not all of E. Tibet. On a preliminary basis, the seismological evidence is consistent with channel flow in the middle crust but with vertically coherent deformation across only part of E. Tibet. The marked radial anisotropy in the middle crust may result from layers of partial melt, which would not affect shear on vertical planes.

  5. Anisotropy of conductivity in carbon fiber-reinforced plastics with continuous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Anatoliy T.; Shevchenko, Vitaliy G.; Letyagin, Sergey V.; Klason, Carl

    1995-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP), as high strength advanced materials are often used as media for embedding sensors and actuators. Due to the properties of components and processing conditions they are electrically anisotropic, with coefficient of anisotropy sometimes exceeding several thousands. This may prevent elimination of static electricity and cause erosion of material due to micro discharges at contacts with fastenings and embedded sensors and actuators, causing their malfunction. For this reason, the investigation of electrical properties of CFRP may provide the solution to this problem. Distribution of electric current field in CFRP and related with it possible errors in measurements of longitudinal conductivity and anisotropy are analyzed. CFRP have been prepared from PAN or cellulose fibers with different heat treatment temperatures and conductivity anisotropy was measured as a function of filler volume fraction and processing conditions. With increasing loading coefficient of anisotropy (alpha) decreases. Lower values of (alpha) were observed when curing agents containing ionic complexes of metals were used. Modifications of fiber surface with hydrophobic agents results in increased anisotropy. Composites prepared with carbon fabrics are isotropic in the fabric plane. Coefficient of anisotropy decreases with increasing molding pressure and depends on the type of weaving of fabric. In hybrid composites with alternating layers of carbon fabric and complex fiber fabric anisotropy is higher due to partial decomposition of conducting layer on top of complex fibers. A method for reducing anisotropy by introducing conducting `jumpers', shorting individual fibers or layers of fabric is proposed. The change of anisotropy in the process of fabrication of carbon-carbon composite by passing electric current through fibers has been investigated. In conclusion, alternative uses of CFRP with reduced anisotropy for contact elements of electric current through fibers has been investigated. In conclusion, alternative uses of CFRP with reduced anisotropy for contact elements of electric machines and geological prospecting as imitations of rocks are discussed.

  6. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  7. Isolated astasia manifested by acute infarct of the anterior corpus callosum and cingulate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, Shihui; Li, Jingjing; Chen, Li; Chen, Hongbing; Dang, Chao; Liu, Gang; Li, Chuo; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-04-01

    Astasia, the inability to stand and walk, in the absence of weakness or ataxia, is uncommon and unique. This syndrome is easy to misdiagnose as vestibulocerebellar disease. We report a patient with anterior callosal and cingulate infarction presenting as isolated astasia. A 65-year-old hypertensive man was admitted to our hospital with marked truncal instability. On neurological examination, he was unable to stand and walk independently. When asked to stand up from a sitting position, he had to grasp something nearby to propel himself upwards, and could not use his axial muscles. He collapsed when support was withdrawn. The patient showed no signs of amnesia, aphasia, apraxia or hemiasomatognosia. Diffusion weighted imaging at 3days after onset demonstrated an acute infarct in the anterior part of the right-sided corpus callosum and cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed an occlusion of the right anterior cerebral artery. We discuss the possible mechanisms of astasia due to anterior callosal and cingulate infarction. PMID:25564268

  8. Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    El-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. PMID:25092805

  9. Inter-hemispheric functional connectivity changes with corpus callosum morphology in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zito, G; Luders, E; Tomasevic, L; Lupoi, D; Toga, A W; Thompson, P M; Rossini, P M; Filippi, M M; Tecchio, F

    2014-04-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects myelin sheaths within the central nervous system, concurring to cause brain atrophy and neurodegeneration as well as gradual functional disconnections. To explore early signs of altered connectivity in MS from a structural and functional perspective, the morphology of corpus callosum (CC) was correlated with a dynamic inter-hemispheric connectivity index. Twenty mildly disabled patients affected by a relapsing-remitting (RR) form of MS (EDSS⩽3.5) and 15 healthy subjects underwent structural MRI to measure CC thickness over 100 sections and electroencephalography to assess a spectral coherence index between primary regions devoted to hand control, at rest and during an isometric handgrip. In patients, an overall CC atrophy was associated with increased lesion load. A less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence (IHCoh) during movement was associated with CC atrophy in sections interconnecting homologous primary motor areas (anterior mid-body). In healthy controls, less efficacious IHCoh at rest was associated with a thinner CC splenium. Our data suggest that in mildly disabled RR-MS patients a covert impairment may be detected in the correlation between the structural (CC thickness) and functional (IHCoh) measures of homologous networks, whereas these two counterparts do not yet differ individually from controls. PMID:24486438

  10. Splenium of Corpus Callosum: Patterns of Interhemispheric Interaction in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Knyazeva, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    The splenium of the corpus callosum connects the posterior cortices with fibers varying in size from thin late-myelinating axons in the anterior part, predominantly connecting parietal and temporal areas, to thick early-myelinating fibers in the posterior part, linking primary and secondary visual areas. In the adult human brain, the function of the splenium in a given area is defined by the specialization of the area and implemented via excitation and/or suppression of the contralateral homotopic and heterotopic areas at the same or different level of visual hierarchy. These mechanisms are facilitated by interhemispheric synchronization of oscillatory activity, also supported by the splenium. In postnatal ontogenesis, structural MRI reveals a protracted formation of the splenium during the first two decades of human life. In doing so, the slow myelination of the splenium correlates with the formation of interhemispheric excitatory influences in the extrastriate areas and the EEG synchronization, while the gradual increase of inhibitory effects in the striate cortex is linked to the local inhibitory circuitry. Reshaping interactions between interhemispherically distributed networks under various perceptual contexts allows sparsification of responses to superfluous information from the visual environment, leading to a reduction of metabolic and structural redundancy in a child's brain. PMID:23577273

  11. Automatic segmentation of corpus callosum using Gaussian mixture modeling and Fuzzy C means methods.

    PubMed

    İçer, Semra

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the success and performance of the Gaussian mixture modeling and Fuzzy C means methods to determine the volume and cross-sectionals areas of the corpus callosum (CC) using simulated and real MR brain images. The Gaussian mixture model (GMM) utilizes weighted sum of Gaussian distributions by applying statistical decision procedures to define image classes. In the Fuzzy C means (FCM), the image classes are represented by certain membership function according to fuzziness information expressing the distance from the cluster centers. In this study, automatic segmentation for midsagittal section of the CC was achieved from simulated and real brain images. The volume of CC was obtained using sagittal sections areas. To compare the success of the methods, segmentation accuracy, Jaccard similarity and time consuming for segmentation were calculated. The results show that the GMM method resulted by a small margin in more accurate segmentation (midsagittal section segmentation accuracy 98.3% and 97.01% for GMM and FCM); however the FCM method resulted in faster segmentation than GMM. With this study, an accurate and automatic segmentation system that allows opportunity for quantitative comparison to doctors in the planning of treatment and the diagnosis of diseases affecting the size of the CC was developed. This study can be adapted to perform segmentation on other regions of the brain, thus, it can be operated as practical use in the clinic. PMID:23871683

  12. Neuropilin 1-Sema Signaling Regulates Crossing of Cingulate Pioneering Axons during Development of the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Michael; Plachez, Céline; Zalucki, Oressia; Fothergill, Thomas; Goudreau, Guy; Erzurumlu, Reha; Gu, Chenghua

    2009-01-01

    Pioneer axons from the cingulate cortex initiate corpus callosum (CC) development, yet nothing is known about the molecules that regulate their guidance. We demonstrate that neuropilin 1 (Npn1) plays an integral role in the development of the CC. Npn1 is localized to axons of cingulate neurons as they cross the midline, and multiple class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are expressed around the developing CC, implicating these guidance molecules in the regulation of Npn1-expressing axons emanating from the cingulate cortex. Furthermore, axons from the cingulate cortex display guidance errors in Npn1Sema- mice, a knockin mouse line in which Npn1 is unable to bind Semas. Analysis of mice deficient in the transcription factor Emx2 demonstrated that the cingulate cortex of these mice was significantly reduced in comparison to wild-type controls at E17 and that the CC was absent in rostral sections. Expression of Npn1 was absent in rostral sections of Emx2 mutants, suggesting that Npn1-expressing cingulate pioneers are required for CC formation. These data highlight a central role for Npn1 in the development of projections from the cingulate cortex and further illustrate the importance of these pioneer axons in the formation of the CC. PMID:19357391

  13. Topographic organization of V1 projections through the corpus callosum in humans.

    PubMed

    Saenz, M; Fine, I

    2010-10-01

    The visual cortex in each hemisphere is linked to the opposite hemisphere by axonal projections that pass through the splenium of the corpus callosum. Visual-callosal connections in humans and macaques are found along the V1/V2 border where the vertical meridian is represented. Here we identify the topography of V1 vertical midline projections through the splenium within six human subjects with normal vision using diffusion-weighted MR imaging and probabilistic diffusion tractography. Tractography seed points within the splenium were classified according to their estimated connectivity profiles to topographic subregions of V1, as defined by functional retinotopic mapping. First, we report a ventral-dorsal mapping within the splenium with fibers from ventral V1 (representing the upper visual field) projecting to the inferior-anterior corner of the splenium and fibers from dorsal V1 (representing the lower visual field) projecting to the superior-posterior end. Second, we also report an eccentricity gradient of projections from foveal-to-peripheral V1 subregions running in the anterior-superior to posterior-inferior direction, orthogonal to the dorsal-ventral mapping. These results confirm and add to a previous diffusion MRI study (Dougherty et al., 2005) which identified a dorsal/ventral mapping of human splenial fibers. These findings yield a more detailed view of the structural organization of the splenium than previously reported and offer new opportunities to study structural plasticity in the visual system. PMID:20553894

  14. The corpus callosum in primates: processing speed of axons and the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kimberley A; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Smaers, Jeroen B; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Jacobs, Bob; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-11-01

    Interhemispheric communication may be constrained as brain size increases because of transmission delays in action potentials over the length of axons. Although one might expect larger brains to have progressively thicker axons to compensate, spatial packing is a limiting factor. Axon size distributions within the primate corpus callosum (CC) may provide insights into how these demands affect conduction velocity. We used electron microscopy to explore phylogenetic variation in myelinated axon density and diameter of the CC from 14 different anthropoid primate species, including humans. The majority of axons were less than 1 µm in diameter across all species, indicating that conduction velocity for most interhemispheric communication is relatively constant regardless of brain size. The largest axons within the upper 95th percentile scaled with a progressively higher exponent than the median axons towards the posterior region of the CC. While brain mass among the primates in our analysis varied by 97-fold, estimates of the fastest cross-brain conduction times, as conveyed by axons at the 95th percentile, varied within a relatively narrow range between 3 and 9 ms across species, whereas cross-brain conduction times for the median axon diameters differed more substantially between 11 and 38 ms. Nonetheless, for both size classes of axons, an increase in diameter does not entirely compensate for the delay in interhemispheric transmission time that accompanies larger brain size. Such biophysical constraints on the processing speed of axons conveyed by the CC may play an important role in the evolution of hemispheric asymmetry. PMID:26511047

  15. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-05-27

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  16. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E. J.; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  17. Inter-hemispheric Functional Connectivity Changes with Corpus Callosum Morphology in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Giancarlo; Luders, Eileen; Tomasevic, Leo; Lupoi, Domenico; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Rossini, Paolo M.; Filippi, Maria M.; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects myelin sheaths within the central nervous system, concurring to cause brain atrophy and neurodegeneration as well as gradual functional disconnections. To explore early signs of altered connectivity in MS from a structural and functional perspective, the morphology of corpus callosum (CC) was correlated with a dynamic inter-hemispheric connectivity index. Twenty mildly disabled patients affected by a relapsing-remitting (RR) form of MS (EDSS ≤ 3.5) and 15 healthy subjects underwent structural MRI to measure CC thickness over 100 sections and electroencephalography to assess a spectral coherence index between primary regions devoted to hand control, at rest and during an isometric handgrip. In patients, an overall CC atrophy was associated with increased lesion load. A less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence during movement was associated with CC atrophy in sections interconnecting homologous primary motor areas (anterior mid-body). In healthy controls, less efficacious inter-hemispheric coherence at rest was associated with a thinner CC splenium. Our data suggest that in mildly disabled RR-MS patients a covert impairment may be detected in the correlation between the structural (CC thickness) and functional (inter-hemispheric coherence) measures of homologous networks, whereas these two counterparts do not yet differ individually from controls. PMID:24486438

  18. Transcriptome analysis of amoeboid and ramified microglia isolated from the corpus callosum of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), have two distinct phenotypes in the developing brain: amoeboid form, known to be amoeboid microglial cells (AMC) and ramified form, known to be ramified microglial cells (RMC). The AMC are characterized by being proliferative, phagocytic and migratory whereas the RMC are quiescent and exhibit a slow turnover rate. The AMC transform into RMC with advancing age, and this transformation is indicative of the gradual shift in the microglial functions. Both AMC and RMC respond to CNS inflammation, and they become hypertrophic when activated by trauma, infection or neurodegenerative stimuli. The molecular mechanisms and functional significance of morphological transformation of microglia during normal development and in disease conditions is not clear. It is hypothesized that AMC and RMC are functionally regulated by a specific set of genes encoding various signaling molecules and transcription factors. Results To address this, we carried out cDNA microarray analysis using lectin-labeled AMC and RMC isolated from frozen tissue sections of the corpus callosum of 5-day and 4-week old rat brain respectively, by laser capture microdissection. The global gene expression profiles of both microglial phenotypes were compared and the differentially expressed genes in AMC and RMC were clustered based on their functional annotations. This genome wide comparative analysis identified genes that are specific to AMC and RMC. Conclusions The novel and specific molecules identified from the trancriptome explains the quiescent state functioning of microglia in its two distinct morphological states. PMID:22697290

  19. The tumor suppressor Nf2 regulates corpus callosum development by inhibiting the transcriptional coactivator Yap

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Alfonso; Ware, Michelle; Paré, Joshua; Cao, Xinwei

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum connects cerebral hemispheres and is the largest axon tract in the mammalian brain. Callosal malformations are among the most common congenital brain anomalies and are associated with a wide range of neuropsychological deficits. Crossing of the midline by callosal axons relies on a proper midline environment that harbors guidepost cells emitting guidance cues to instruct callosal axon navigation. Little is known about what controls the formation of the midline environment. We find that two components of the Hippo pathway, the tumor suppressor Nf2 (Merlin) and the transcriptional coactivator Yap (Yap1), regulate guidepost development and expression of the guidance cue Slit2 in mouse. During normal brain development, Nf2 suppresses Yap activity in neural progenitor cells to promote guidepost cell differentiation and prevent ectopic Slit2 expression. Loss of Nf2 causes malformation of midline guideposts and Slit2 upregulation, resulting in callosal agenesis. Slit2 heterozygosity and Yap deletion both restore callosal formation in Nf2 mutants. Furthermore, selectively elevating Yap activity in midline neural progenitors is sufficient to disrupt guidepost formation, upregulate Slit2 and prevent midline crossing. The Hippo pathway is known for its role in controlling organ growth and tumorigenesis. Our study identifies a novel role of this pathway in axon guidance. Moreover, by linking axon pathfinding and neural progenitor behaviors, our results provide an example of the intricate coordination between growth and wiring during brain development. PMID:25336744

  20. Dehydration-Induced Anorexia Reduces Astrocyte Density in the Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder associated with severe weight loss as a consequence of voluntary food intake avoidance. Animal models such as dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) mimic core features of the disorder, including voluntary reduction in food intake, which compromises the supply of energy to the brain. Glial cells, the major population of nerve cells in the central nervous system, play a crucial role in supplying energy to the neurons. The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest white matter tract in mammals, and more than 99% of the cell somata correspond to glial cells in rodents. Whether glial cell density is altered in anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate glial cell density in the three main regions of the CC (genu, body, and splenium) in a murine model of DIA. The astrocyte density was significantly reduced (~34%) for the DIA group in the body of the CC, whereas in the genu and the splenium no significant changes were observed. DIA and forced food restriction (FFR) also reduced the ratio of astrocytes to glial cells by 57.5% and 22%, respectively, in the body of CC. Thus, we conclude that DIA reduces astrocyte density only in the body of the rat CC. PMID:26090235

  1. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  2. Relativistic Strange Stars with Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. C.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Karmakar, S.; Tikekar, R.

    We study a compact star comprising strange matter content in the presence of pressure anisotropy. Considering strange matter with equation of state p = (ρ-4B)/3, where B is Bag parameter, we analyze the effect of pressure anisotropy on the Bag parameter for a compact star described by Vaidya-Tikekar metric. The values of B inside and on surface of the star are determined for different anisotropy parameter α. It is found that in the vicinity of the center of a compact star, B parameter is almost constant. However, away from the center B varies with the radial distance and finally at the surface B attains a value independent of the anisotropy. It is also noted that for some values of α, B remains constant throughout the star. Given α and spheriodicity a, B is found to be decreasing with the increase in compactness factor. The models admitting B increasing with α for a given spheriodicity parameter (a) and compactness are also found.

  3. Anisotropy of machine building materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the anisotropy of elastic and strength characteristics of various structural materials, including pressure worked metals and alloys, laminated fiberglass plastics, and laminated wood plastics, are correlated and classified. Strength criteria under simple and complex stresses are considered as applied to anisotropic materials. Practical application to determining the strength of machine parts and structural materials is discussed.

  4. The microwave background anisotropies: observations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation-fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 microK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1 degrees and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe--the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  5. Anisotropy Studies in Central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviris, G.; Papadimitriou, P.; Makropoulos, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Gulf of Corinth, located in Central Greece, is a tectonic graben characterized by high seismicity level. GPS measurements indicate extension of the Gulf in an approximately N-S direction, with a rate of 10 to 15 mm/year. The southern part of the Gulf is dominated by the presence of large active normal faults in an almost E-W direction, dipping north, resulting to the subsidence of the central part of the graben. Analysis of data recorded by the Cornet network, which is the permanent network of the University of Athens, revealed the existence of an anisotropic upper crust at the eastern part of the Gulf of Corinth. Anisotropy was also observed at the western part of Corinth Gulf, using data recorded by a temporary seismological network installed in the area. Furthermore, shear wave splitting analysis was performed in the region of Attica (to the NE of the Gulf) that hosts Athens, the capital of Greece, using aftershocks of the 1999 Athens earthquake (Mw=6.0) that caused 143 fatalities. The methods used for the determination of the splitting parameters are the polarization vector as a function of time (polarigram) and the hodogram. For each selected event the direction of polarization of the fast shear wave, the delay between the two split shear waves and the polarization of the source were measured. Concerning both parts of the Gulf of Corinth, the obtained mean values of anisotropy vary between N90 and N142. In the region of Attica the mean values of the anisotropy direction of all stations vary between N95 and N100, almost parallel to the azimuth of the Parnitha fault. The time delay between the split shear waves vary between 0.020s and 0.130s. The obtained anisotropy measurements are in agreement with the extensive dilatancy anisotropy (EDA) model, since the direction of anisotropy is independent from the event-station azimuth and perpendicular to the direction of extension. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The present study was co-funded by the European Social Fund and National Resources - (EPEAEK II) PYTHAGORAS, contract No. 70/3/7306.

  6. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor-Mediated Axonal Injury in Adult Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Jianuo; Fox, Howard S.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Damage to white matter such as corpus callosum (CC) is a pathological characteristic in many brain disorders. Glutamate (Glut) excitotoxicity through AMPA receptors on oligodendrocyte (OL) was previously considered as a mechanism for white matter damage. Recent studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed on myelin sheath of neonatal rat OL processes and that activation of these receptors mediated demyelization. Whether NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic axonal injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of NMDARs in the adult rat CC and their distributions in myelinated nerve fibers and OL somata by means of immunocytochemical staining and Western blot. Incubation of the CC slices with Glut or NMDA induced axonal injury as revealed by analyzing amplitude of CC fiber compound action potentials (CAPs) and input–output response. Both Glut and NMDA decreased the CAP amplitude and input–output responses, suggesting an involvement of NMDARs in Glut- and NMDA-induced axonal injury. The involvement of NMDAR in Glut-induced axonal injury was further assayed by detection of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) in the CC axonal fibers. Treatment of the CC slices with Glut resulted in β-APP accumulation in the CC fibers as detected by Western blot, reflecting an impairment of axonal transport function. This injurious effect of Glut on CC axonal transport was significantly blocked by MK801. Taken together, these results show that NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic activity in adult CC slices in vitro. PMID:23161705

  7. Progesterone Enhanced Remyelination in the Mouse Corpus Callosum after Cuprizone Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Hedayatpour, Azim; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Kafami, Laya; Khallaghi, Behzad; Malek, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Progesterone as a sex steroid hormone is thought to affect and prevent demyelination, but its role in promoting myelin repair is far less investigated. In this study, remyelinating potential of progesterone in corpus callosum was evaluated on an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this experimental study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 0.2% (w/w) cuprizone in ground breeder chow ad libitum for 6 weeks. At day zero, after cuprizone removal, mice were divided randomly into two groups: (a) placebo group, which received saline pellet implant, (b) progesterone group, which received progesterone pellet implant. Some mice of the same age were fed with their normal diet to serve as the healthy control group. Two weeks after progesterone administration, Myelin content was assessed by Luxol-fast blue staining. The myelin basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) expression were assessed using Western blot analysis and the changes in the number of oligodendrocytes and oligodendroglial progenitor cells were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Results: Luxol-fast blue staining revealed enhanced remyelination in the progesterone group when compared with the placebo group. Densitometry measurements of immunoblots demonstrated that MBP and PLP proteins contents were significantly increased in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Flow cytometry and IHC analysis showed increases in Olig2 and O4 cells in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion: Overall, our results indicate that progesterone treatment can stimulate myelin production and that it may provide a feasible and practical way for remyelination in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26538779

  8. Abnormalities of the Corpus Callosum in Non-Psychotic high-risk offspring of schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, A.; Bhojraj, TS; Prasad, K; Kulkarni, S; Montrose, D; Eack, S; Keshavan, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the structure of the corpus callosum (CC) have been observed in schizophrenia. Offspring of schizophrenia parents have 10–15 times higher risk for developing schizophrenia. We examined CC volume in offspring at genetic high risk (HR) subjects. Since the sub regions of CC are topographically mapped to cortical brain regions, we hypothesized that HR subjects may show a decrement in total volume and differential volume decreases in sub-regions of CC. The offspring of schizophrenia parents (HR; n=70; 36 males) and healthy volunteers with no family or personal history of psychotic disorders (HC; n=73; 37 males) matched for age, gender and education were selected for the study. Magnetic resonance images were collected using a GE 1.5T scanner and processed using Freesurfer image analysis software. The CC was divided into five neuroanatomically based partitions. The volume of total CC and the five sub-regions were measured blind to clinical information. Covarying intra cranial volume, HR subjects had significantly reduced total CC, more prominently observed in the anterior splenium. An age-related increase in CC volume was found in the anterior and posterior splenium of healthy controls but not in HR subjects. The volume reduction was greater in male than female HR subjects. The volume reduction in the CC may reflect a reduction in axonal fibers crossing the hemispheres and/or myelination between the left and right temporo-parietal cortices. The absence of an age-related volume increase suggests an abnormal developmental trajectory that may underlie susceptibility to schizophrenia. PMID:21145214

  9. Social communication in young children with traumatic brain injury: Relations with corpus callosum morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Prasad, Mary R.; Swank, Paul; Kramer, Larry; Mendez, Donna; Treble, Amery; Payne, Christa; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to characterize the relations of specific social communication behaviors, including joint attention, gestures, and verbalization, with surface area of midsagittal corpus callosum (CC) subregions in children who sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI) before 7 years of age. Participants sustained mild (n = 10) or moderate–severe (n = 26) noninflicted TBI. The mean age at injury was 33.6 months; mean age at MRI was 44.4 months. The CC was divided into seven subregions. Relative to young children with mild TBI, those with moderate–severe TBI had smaller surface area of the isthmus. A semi-structured sequence of social interactions between the child and an examiner was videotaped and coded for specific social initiation and response behaviors. Social responses were similar across severity groups. Even though the complexity of their language was similar, children with moderate–severe TBI used more gestures than those with mild TBI to initiate social overtures; this may indicate a developmental lag or deficit as the use of gestural communication typically diminishes after age 2. After controlling for age at scan and for total brain volume, the correlation of social interaction response and initiation scores with the midsagittal surface area of the CC regions was examined. For the total group, responding to a social overture using joint attention was significantly and positively correlated with surface area of all regions, except the rostrum. Initiating joint attention was specifically and negatively correlated with surface area of the anterior midbody. Use of gestures to initiate a social interaction correlated significantly and positively with surface area of the anterior and posterior midbody. Social response and initiation behaviors were selectively related to regional callosal surface areas in young children with TBI. Specific brainbehavior relations indicate early regional specialization of anterior and posterior CC for social communication. PMID:21807088

  10. Ultrastructural identification of oligodendrocyte/myelin proteins in corpus callosum of hypothyroid animals.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A A; Pereira, M J S; Manhães, A C; Barradas, P C

    2007-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) deficiency impairs the development of the CNS, particularly myelination. We have previously described an increase in the frequency of morphological abnormalities in the central myelin sheath in a hypothyroidism model, which reinforced the hypothesis of a role for T3 in myelin compaction. However, there are no data concerning the cellular distribution of myelin proteins in hypothyroid animals. In the present work, we describe the distribution of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), myelin basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) throughout the central myelin sheath of a hypothyroidism model. We used euthyroid and hypothyroid adult rats at 90 days of age. In order to induce hypothyroid status, animals received 0.02% methimazol from the 19th gestation day onwards. After perfusion with a fixative mixture, small pieces of corpus callosum were obtained, dehydrated and embedded in LR White resin. Ultrathin sections were immunoreacted, using specific antibodies revealed by a secondary antibody coupled to colloidal gold particles of 10nm. Gold particle density per region of myelin sheath for each one of these proteins was obtained. In normal animals, CNPase, PLP and MBP were identified in sites that had already been described in previous studies. In hypothyroid animals, CNPase was identified in the region corresponding to compact lamellae, which normally does not contain this protein, while, in this same region, PLP and MBP immunolabeling were decreased. These results suggest that thyroid hormone deficiency impairs the distribution of the major oligodendrocyte/myelin markers. This effect may justify the reduction in myelin sheath compaction previously demonstrated in a similar model of hypothyroidism. PMID:17287103

  11. Characterization of NO-producing neurons in the rat corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Barbaresi, Paolo; Fabri, Mara; Mensà, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the presence and distribution of nitric oxide (NO)-producing neurons in the rat corpus callosum (cc). Material and methods To investigate this aspect of cc organization we used nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) immunocytochemistry. Results Intense NADPH-d-positive (NADPH-d+) neurons were found along the rostrocaudal extension of the cc (sagittal sections). They were more numerous in the lateral cc and gradually decreased in the more medial regions, where they were very few or absent. The Golgi-like appearance of NADPH-d+ intracallosal neurons allowed dividing them into five morphological types: (1) bipolar; (2) fusiform; (3) round; (4) polygonal; and (5) pyramidal. The number of NADPH-d+ neurons (both hemispheres) was counted in two brains using 50-μm thick sections. In the first brain, counts involved 145 sections and neurons were 2959; in the second, 2227 neurons were counted in 130 sections. The distribution and morphology of nNOS-immunopositive (nNOSIP) neurons was identical to that of NADPH-d+neurons. Some of these neurons were observed in the cc ependymal region, where they might be in contact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), monitoring its composition, pH, and osmolality changes, or playing a role in regulating the synthesis and release of several peptides. The somatic, dendritic, and axonal processes of many NADPH-d+/nNOSIP neurons were closely associated with intracallosal blood vessels. Conclusions Such close relationship raises the possibility that these neurons are a major source of NO during neural activity. As NO is a potent vasodilator, these findings strongly suggest that NO-positive neurons transduce neuronal signals into vascular responses in selected cc regions, thus giving rise to hemodynamic changes detectable by neuroimaging. PMID:24944862

  12. Effects of sex chromosome dosage on corpus callosum morphology in supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (sSCA) are characterized by the presence of one or more additional sex chromosomes in an individuals karyotype; they affect around 1 in 400 individuals. Although there is high variability, each sSCA subtype has a characteristic set of cognitive and physical phenotypes. Here, we investigated the differences in the morphometry of the human corpus callosum (CC) between sex-matched controls 46,XY (N =99), 46,XX (N =93), and six unique sSCA karyotypes: 47,XYY (N =29), 47,XXY (N =58), 48,XXYY (N =20), 47,XXX (N =30), 48,XXXY (N =5), and 49,XXXXY (N =6). Methods We investigated CC morphometry using local and global area, local curvature of the CC boundary, and between-landmark distance analysis (BLDA). We hypothesized that CC morphometry would vary differentially along a proposed spectrum of Y:X chromosome ratio with supernumerary Y karyotypes having the largest CC areas and supernumerary X karyotypes having significantly smaller CC areas. To investigate this, we defined an sSCA spectrum based on a descending Y:X karyotype ratio: 47,XYY, 46,XY, 48,XXYY, 47,XXY, 48,XXXY, 49,XXXXY, 46,XX, 47,XXX. We similarly explored the effects of both X and Y chromosome numbers within sex. Results of shape-based metrics were analyzed using permutation tests consisting of 5,000 iterations. Results Several subregional areas, local curvature, and BLDs differed between groups. Moderate associations were found between area and curvature in relation to the spectrum and X and Y chromosome counts. BLD was strongly associated with X chromosome count in both male and female groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that X- and Y-linked genes have differential effects on CC morphometry. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare CC morphometry across these extremely rare groups. PMID:25780557

  13. Arteriovenous malformations of the corpus callosum: Pooled analysis and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pabaney, Aqueel H.; Ali, Rushna; Kole, Maximillian; Malik, Ghaus M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the corpus callosum (CC) are rare entities. We performed a systematic review of the available literature to better define the natural history, patient characteristics, and treatment options for these lesions. Methods: A MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and The Cochrane Library search were performed for studies published through June 2015. Data from all eligible studies were used to examine epidemiology, natural history, clinical features, treatment strategies, and outcomes of patients with CC-AVMs. A systematic review and pooled analysis of the literature were performed. Results: Our search yielded 37 reports and 230 patients. Mean age at presentation was 26.8 years (±13.12 years). AVMs were most commonly located in the splenium (43%), followed by the body (31%), and then the genu (23%) of the CC. A Spetzler-Martin grade of III was the most common (37%). One hundred eighty-seven (81.3%) patients presented with hemorrhage, 91 (40%) underwent microsurgical excision, and 87 (38%) underwent endovascular embolization. Radiosurgery was performed on 57 (25%) patients. Complete obliteration of the AVM was achieved in 102 (48.1%) patients and approximately twice as often when microsurgery was performed alone or in combination with other treatment modalities (94% vs. 49%; P < 0.001). Mean modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at presentation was 1.54 and mean mRS at last follow-up was 1.31. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.35). Conclusion: We present an analysis of the pooled data in the form of a systematic review focusing on management of CC-AVMs. This review aims to provide a valuable tool to aid in decision making when dealing with this particular subtype of AVM. PMID:27127713

  14. Corpus Callosum Atrophy Rate in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Prodromal Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Sahar; Bachman, Alvin H.; Lee, Sang Han; Sidtis, John J.; Ardekani, Babak A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Corpus callosum (CC) size and shape have been previously studied in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with the majority of studies having been cross-sectional. Due to the large variance in normal CC morphology, cross-sectional studies are limited in statistical power. Determining individual rates of change requires longitudinal data. Physiological changes are particularly relevant in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in which CC morphology has not been previously studied longitudinally. Objective To study temporal rates of change in CC morphology in MCI patients over a one-year period, and to determine whether these rates differ between MCI subjects who converted to AD (MCI-C) and those who did not (MCI-NC) over an average (±SD) observation period of 5.4 (±1.6) years. Methods We used a novel multi-atlas based algorithm to segment the mid-sagittal cross-sectional area of the CC in longitudinal MRI scans. Rates of change of CC circularity, total area, and five sub-areas were compared between 57 MCI-NC and 81 MCI-C subjects. Results The CC became less circular (−0.89% per year in MCI-NC, −1.85% per year in MCI-C) with time, with faster decline in MCI-C (p=0.0002). In females, atrophy rates were higher in MCI-C relative to MCI-NC in total CC area (p=0.0006), genu/rostrum (p=0.005), and splenium (0.002). In males, these rates did not differ between groups. Conclusion A greater than normal decline in CC circularity was shown to be an indicator of prodromal AD in MCI subjects. This measure is potentially useful as an imaging biomarker of disease and a therapeutic target in clinical trials. PMID:25633676

  15. LPO Induced Seismic Anisotropy in Naturally and Experimentally Deformed UHP Eclogites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.

    2006-12-01

    Eclogites with strong plastic deformation often show marked anisotropy of petrophysical properties. We report here seismic velocities and anisotropies of ultra-high-pressure eclogites calculated from the lattice preferred orientations (LPOs) of their constituent minerals (garnet, omphacite, quartz and rutile) and single crystal elastic properties using the Unicef Careware software package. The effects of garnet and omphacite layering in eclogite deformed to high strain were not included in calculation which could underestimate seismic anisotropy. We compared calculated results with measured results in similar eclogites. Our results suggest: 1) All minerals except garnet show strong seismic anisotropy (AVp = 23.0 - 40.9 %, Max. AVs = 18.51 - 47.07 %). The average seismic velocity is high in garnet and rutile, moderate in omphacite and coesite, and low in quartz. 2) The deformed eclogites have Vpmax (8.33 - 8.75 km/s) approximately parallel to foliation and lineation, Vpmin (8.25 - 8.62 km/s) approximately normal to foliation (S) and lineation (L) and Vp anisotropies of 1.0-1.7 %. Their Vs are 4.93-4.97 km/s, with maximum anisotropy (0.73-1.78 %) at ~45° to both S and L and minimum anisotropies normal to L in S. Their Vs1 polarization planes are approximately parallel to S. The Vp and Vs of eclogite under UHP peak metamorphic conditions (P = 3-5 GPa, T = 1173-1373 K) are estimated to be 3.4-7.2 % and 6.3-12.1 % higher than those at ambient pressure and temperature conditions, respectively. 3) Omphacite dominates the anisotropy of eclogite while garnet reduces the anisotropy and increases seismic velocity. The influence of rutile is negligible due to its trivial volume fraction. 4) The seismic velocity of eclogite decreases with volume fraction of omphacite and is minimum in omphacitite. In contrast, the anisotropy of eclogite increases with volume fraction of omphacite and is maximum in omphacitite. Omphacitite has seismic velocities reduced by 6-8 % and anisotropies increased to 3-4 % compared to garnetite. The calculated seismic properties of eclogite are comparable to those measured in the laboratory. Moreover, the calculations provide true 3D information on eclogite seismic properties and the corresponding mineral physical interpretations.

  16. Anisotropy, inhomogeneity, and conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, E. A.

    1983-10-01

    We consider two versions of Minkowski space, each of which is connected in a nontrivial way. In the first version, which corresponds physically to a static universe with one spatial dimension finite, we introduce a variation of the twin paradox in which neither twin undergoes any acceleration. The resolution of the paradox is shown to derive from the (global) anisotropy of this version of space-time. Furthermore, the (global) anisotropy is shown to imply the existence of a set of preferred inertial frames and the possibility of nonconservation of angular momentum in the absence of any torque. In the second version, which corresponds physically to a universe with one spatial dimension finite but expanding in time, we show that the (global) inhomogeneity of this version of space-time can cause nonconservation of energy and momentum in the absence of any force.

  17. Elastic anisotropy of tire shreds

    SciTech Connect

    Heimdahl, T.C.; Drescher, A.

    1999-05-01

    This paper deals with anisotropic elastic properties of large-size tire shreds used as lightweight fills in road and embankment construction. The anisotropy is a result of compaction and overburden pressure, which induce a layered structure of the shreds. Laboratory experiments conducted in a novel biaxial apparatus revealed a difference in Young`s moduli perpendicular and parallel to the layered structure; also, Poisson`s ratios differ although their values could not be determined accurately. The out-of-plane shear modulus not readily determined from the tests was assessed by means of a layered material model. The results were used for determining the settlement of two road structures containing a layer of tire shreds modeled as either an isotropic or an anisotropic elastic material. Numerical calculations using the code CIRCLY indicated that the effect of tire shreds` anisotropy on road structure settlements is moderate, and the traditional isotropic elastic analysis overestimates the actual settlements.

  18. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  19. Rare association of thin corpus callosum with infantile tremor syndrome in a 5.5-month-old infant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Sharma, Deepti; Kumar, Romal; Ranjan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Infantile tremor syndrome (ITS) is a clinical disorder characterized by coarse tremors, anemia and regression of motor and mental milestones, presenting in malnourished children aged between 5 months and 3 years. Few reports of neuroimaging abnormalities in children with ITS are present. The most common finding of neuroimaging in ITS is cerebral atrophy with ex-vacuo enlargement of ventricles and subarachnoid space, some recent reports also showed pontine myelinolysis and cerebral hyperintensities. We did not find any report of thin corpus callosum associated with ITS in the literature. PMID:26557175

  20. Parameter inversion for seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Chandan

    An important objective of reflection seismology is to transform a seismic dataset into a reflectivity image of the subsurface. Reflectivity imaging involves removal of propagation effects by creating an inverse propagation operator using an estimated macro velocity model. The accuracy of a reflectivity image depends on the accuracy of the velocity model used. Hence, the estimation of a good velocity model is crucial. Flat sedimentary layers, though laterally homogeneous over small-scale, often exhibit a simple kind of anisotropy called vertical transverse isotropy (VTI). Negligence of anisotropy in migration may result in significant deviation of an imaged reflector from its true position. Our ability to estimate anisotropic parameters using limited aperture, limited bandwidth seismic data is restricted. Several recent developments in data acquisition including more intense acquisition (e.g., 3-D), broader bandwidths, and new survey methodologies (e.g., Ocean Bottom Seismics and vertical cables) have improved our ability in dealing with anisotropy. In light of these recent developments the objective of my research is three-fold---(i) finding better algorithms for anisotropy estimation that makes use of enhanced data acquisition, more powerful computers and graphical interfaces, (ii) understanding and re-evaluating our limitations/capabilities of anisotropy estimation in light of the new algorithms, and (iii) using the results of analysis as an aid to constrain anisotropy estimates. The Common Focus Point (CFP) technology defines a recent method of prestack migration velocity analysis which has several advantages over other popular methods. One remarkable advantage is that the imaging error is given directly in time allowing easier model updates through inversion. The CFP technique has been used in recent past for estimating isotropic heterogeneous velocity model for geologically complex subsurface. For my research, I extend this method to anisotropic parameter inversion by suitably implementing the space-time domain version of CFP method for picking the traveltime error resulting from the incorrect guess model. I successfully implement this approach to estimate anisotropy of the shale thrust-sheets in the Canadian Foothills model. This model has targets of interest below transversely isotropic shale thrust-sheets and estimating anisotropic parameters is important for proper depth imaging of target zone. The synthetic P-mode data used for the analysis has been generated using a finite difference algorithm. In order to quantitatively assess the advantages or limitations of CFP domain velocity analysis in estimating the anisotropic parameters, I have performed sensitivity analysis under different experimental settings like different observation apertures, layer thicknesses, tilt in symmetry axis, picking error and the use of mode converted data. The results quantitatively establish the advantage of joint inversion of P-P and P-Sv over the conventional inversion of solely P-P data in constraining the depth and anisotropic parameters. Also the constraint on parameter estimation improves with increase in angle of tilt of symmetry axis with respect to the reflector. The CFP domain analysis also has advantages in dealing with mode converted P-Sv data as separate focusing at the receiver side and source side allows it to deal with one wave type at a time. In complex media, this helps avoid the cumbersome calculation of common conversion point (CCP) location. The CFP analysis has been applied for estimating anisotropic parameters as well as layer thickness by joint inversion of P-P and P-Sv synthetic data for the geology encountered in Blackfoot field.

  1. Magnetic anisotropy at material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Peter Kevin

    In this dissertation, a comprehensive set of depth dependent magnetic measurements, as well as structural characterizations, were carried out on the Co/Pd multilayer system. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) technique is applied extensively to identify reversal mechanisms and different reversal phases within the material. In particular, the extension of the FORC technique to x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as a surface sensitive technique that identifies reversible magnetization change was performed for the first time. Polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR) was also used to directly measure the magnetization as a function of depth. The effects of deposition pressure grading within the Co/Pd multilayers were investigated. Structures were graded with three distinct pressure regions. FORC analysis shows that not only does increasing the deposition pressure increase the coercivity and effective anisotropy within that region, but also the order in which the pressure is changed also affects the entire structure. Layers grown at high sputtering pressures tend to reverse via domain wall pinning and rotation while those grown at lower pressures reverse via rapid domain wall propagation laterally across the film. Having high pressure layers underneath low pressure layers causes disorder to vertically propagate and lessen the induced anisotropy gradient. This analysis is confirmed by depth dependent magnetization profiles obtain from PNR. Continuously pressure-graded Co/Pd multilayers were then sputtered at two incident angles onto porous aluminum oxide templates with different pore aspect ratios. The effects of pressure grading versus uniform low pressure deposition is studied, as well as the effect of the angle of the incident deposition flux. The coercivity of the pressure graded perpendicular flux sample is compared to the low pressure sample. Additionally the effect of deposition angle and pore sidewall deposition is investigated. It is shown that sidewall deposition strongly affects the reversal behavior. As another way to induce a vertical anisotropy gradient, Co/Pd multilayers were bombarded with Ar+ ions at different energies and fluences. The effects of the depth dependent structural damage as a function of irradiation conditions were investigated. It is shown that the structural damage weakens the perpendicular anisotropy of the surface layers, causing a tilting of the surface magnetic moment into the plane of the film. The surface behavior is explicitly measured and shown to have a significant tilting angle in the top 5 nm depending on irradiation energy and fluence. Continuing the study of vertical anisotropy gradients in Co/Pd multilayers, multilayers with varied Co thickness were studied. Four films with varying Co thickness profiles were created and then patterned into nanodot arrays with diameters between 700 nm and 70 nm. The different films were graded continuously, or in stacks with varying Co thicknesses. An anisotropy gradient is shown to be established in the graded samples, and the switching field is lowered as a result. Furthermore, in the continuously graded samples the magnetization reversal behavior is fundamentally different from all other samples. The thermal energy barriers are measured in the uniform and continuously graded samples, yielding similar results. Finally, the establishment of exchange anisotropy at the ferromagnet / antiferromagnet (FM/AFM) interface in the epitaxial Fe/CoO system is investigated as a function of AFM thickness. The establishment of frozen AFM moments is analyzed using the FORC technique. The FORC technique combined with vector coil measurements also shows the transition from rotatable AFM to pinned AFM moments and suggests a mechanism of winding domain walls within the bulk AFM. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  2. Search for a positron anisotropy with PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, B.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Giaccari, U.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-09-01

    The PAMELA experiment has been collecting data since 2006; its results indicate a rise in the positron fraction with respect to the sum of electrons and positrons in the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum above 10 GeV. This excess can be due to additional sources, as SNRs or pulsars, which can lead to an anisotropy in the local CR positron, detectable from current experiments. We report on the analysis on spatial distributions of positron events collected by PAMELA, taking into account also the geomagnetic field effects. No significant deviation from the isotropy has been observed.

  3. Nematic polymer mechanics: flow-induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Forest, M. Gregory; Lipton, Robert; Zhou, Ruhai

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we model and compute flow-induced mechanical properties of nematic polymer nano-composites, consisting of transversely isotropic rigid spheroids in an isotropic matrix. Our goal is to fill a gap in the theoretical literature between random and perfectly aligned spheroidal composites (Odegard et al. in Compos. Sci. Technol. 63, 1671 1687, 2003; Gusev et al. in Adv. Eng. Mater. 4(12), 927 931 2002; Torquato in Random heterogeneous materials. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2002; Milton in The Theory of Composites. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2002) by modeling the influence of nano-particle volume fraction, flow type and flow rate on nano-composite elasticity tensors. As these influences vary, we predict the degree of elastic anisotropy, determining the number of independent moduli, and compute their values relative to the nano-particle and matrix moduli. We restrict here to monodomains, addressing features associated with orientational configurations of the rod or platelet ensemble. The key modeling advance is the transfer of symmetries (Forest et al. in Phys. Fluids 12(3), 490 498, 2000) and numerical databases (Forest et al. in Rheol. Acta 43(1), 17 37, 2004a, Rheol. Acta 44(1), 80 93, 2004b) for the orientational probability distribution function of the nematic polymer ensemble into the classical Mori Tanaka effective elasticity tensor formalism. Isotropic, transversely isotropic, orthotropic, monoclinic, and maximally anisotropic elasticity tensors are realized as volume fraction, imposed flow type and flow strength are varied, with 2, 5, 9, 13 or 21 independent moduli for the various symmetries.

  4. Decreased multi-band posterior interhemispheric coherence with a lipoma on the corpus callosum: a case report of a possible association.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Struve, F A; Meyer, M A; Patrick, G; Reeves, R R

    1997-07-01

    The corpus callosum plays a role in mediating interhemisphere communication. Coherence may be a quantitative EEG-based measure of this communication. The present report is of a female schizophrenic patient with a marked coherence deficit in the temporal-parietal-occipital region involving multiple frequency bands. An MRI scan of her brain revealed a lipoma involving the splenium of the corpus callosum. It is speculated that this lipoma may have caused a physical impingment on or developmental aberration of adjacent callosal fibers, resulting in the observed coherence deficit. Further studies of coherence measures in patients with collosal lipomas are proposed. PMID:9241469

  5. Decision-making in individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum: expectancy-valence in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Brown, Warren S; Anderson, Luke B; Symington, Melissa F; Paul, Lynn K

    2012-08-01

    Individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) can have intelligence within the normal range, but nevertheless have deficiencies in decision-making and complex novel problem-solving. The specific nature of these problems is not yet clearly understood. The Iowa Gambling Task was used to test decision-making ability and problem-solving in 40 individuals with complete or partial ACC (full-scale intelligence quotient >80) and 26 control participants. The expectancy-valence (EV) model was applied to the trial-by-trial responses of each participant to elucidate differences in decision processes utilized by each group. The ACC group had a lower overall net gain and fewer advantageous choices than controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. Within the EV model, individuals with ACC exhibited significantly higher attention to losses, less consistency in their choice strategy, and greater frequency of switching between decks. They also showed a tendency to be more influenced by recent trials. This outcome is similar to that seen in individuals with Asperger's disorder. Taken together, these results suggest that individuals with ACC have difficulty in inferring game contingencies and forming a coherent selection strategy, implicating the corpus callosum in these decision processes. PMID:22721927

  6. A T1 and DTI fused 3D corpus callosum analysis in pre- vs. post-season contact sports players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yi; Law, Meng; Shi, Jie; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Sports related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide public health issue, and damage to the corpus callosum (CC) has been considered as an important indicator of TBI. However, contact sports players suffer repeated hits to the head during the course of a season even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, and less is known about their effect on callosal anatomy. In addition, T1-weighted and diffusion tensor brain magnetic resonance images (DTI) have been analyzed separately, but a joint analysis of both types of data may increase statistical power and give a more complete understanding of anatomical correlates of subclinical concussions in these athletes. Here, for the first time, we fuse T1 surface-based morphometry and a new DTI analysis on 3D surface representations of the CCs into a single statistical analysis on these subjects. Our new combined method successfully increases detection power in detecting differences between pre- vs. post-season contact sports players. Alterations are found in the ventral genu, isthmus, and splenium of CC. Our findings may inform future health assessments in contact sports players. The new method here is also the first truly multimodal diffusion and T1-weighted analysis of the CC, and may be useful to detect anatomical changes in the corpus callosum in other multimodal datasets.

  7. Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, G.; Antoni, T.; Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Blmer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Bttner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Feler, F.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hrandel, J. R.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K. H.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehlschlger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Scholz, J.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Vardanyan, A.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2003-07-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays with energies in the region of the knee in the energy spectrum is investigated in three different persp ectives based on the arrival directions of about 150 Mio. extensive air showers measured by KASCADE. The different analyses are a harmonic analysis of the right ascension distribution and a point source search of showers above 0.5 PeV as well as an auto correlation analysis of showers above 100 PeV. All three analyses agree inside the statistical limits with an isotropic distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays.

  8. Saturation-dependent anisotropy in the Hanford subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, L.; Skinner, T.; Hunt, A.

    2006-12-01

    In previous work anisotropy in a fracture network was shown to provide a possible explanation for the observed scale-effect in the hydraulic conductivity of a carbonate aquifer. Use was made of a coordinate transformation and reference made to the transverse and longitudinal electrical conductivities of thin (disordered) solid films. An analogous approach is now developed to describe the inferred anisotropy of the hydraulic conductivity as a function of saturation in the Hanford subsurface. Here different soil types play the role of fractures of different apertures, while the spatial anisotropy is generated by soils of higher silt and clay fractions. A quasi- equilibrium condition (equal matric potentials) is implemented at matric potentials believed characteristic of the Hanford subsurface (several hundred centimeters) and theoretical results for the hydraulic conductivity (modified by known values at saturation) are used to develop the distribution of K values at the appropriate potential. The results are hoped to be relevant to the dispersion of a Tc plume. Work was supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER64067 and -06ER64196 and NSF grant EAR 0609884

  9. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-01

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (pT) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v2) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √{sNN}=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and 39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v2 is mainly due to the average pT increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v3) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v3 is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v2{2} and v2{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √{sNN}=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v2{2} and v2{4}.

  11. Towards metamaterials with giant dielectric anisotropy via homogenization: An analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2015-01-01

    A random mixture of two isotropic dielectric materials, one composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity ɛa and the other composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity ɛb, was considered in the long wavelength regime. The permittivity dyadic of the resulting homogenized composite material (HCM) was estimated using the Bruggeman homogenization formalism. The HCM was an orthorhombic biaxial material if the symmetry axes of the two populations of spheroids were mutually perpendicular and a uniaxial material if these two axes were mutually aligned. The degree of anisotropy of the HCM, as gauged by the ratio of the eigenvalues of the HCM's permittivity dyadic, increased as the shape of the constituent particles became more eccentric. The greatest degrees of HCM anisotropy were achieved for the limiting cases wherein the constituent particles were shaped as needles or discs. In these instances explicit formulas for the HCM anisotropy were derived from the dyadic Bruggeman equation. Using these formulas it was found that the degrees of HCM anisotropy are proportional to √{ɛb } or ɛb, at fixed values of volume fraction and ɛa, for ɛb > ɛa. Thus, in principle, metamaterials can be conceptualized via homogenization with extremely large degrees of anisotropy, by controlling the geometries and orientations of remarkably simple constituent particles. In practice, the degree of anisotropy would be limited by the available value of ɛb (and/or ɛa).

  12. Abnormal Corpus Callosum Connectivity, Socio-Communicative Deficits, and Motor Deficits in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanaie, Ryuzo; Mohri, Ikuko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Tachibana, Masaya; Matsuzaki, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Norihiko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    In addition to social and communicative deficits, many studies have reported motor deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the macro and microstructural properties of the corpus callosum (CC) of 18 children with ASD and 12 typically developing controls using diffusion tensor imaging tractography. We aimed to explore…

  13. Abnormal Corpus Callosum Connectivity, Socio-Communicative Deficits, and Motor Deficits in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanaie, Ryuzo; Mohri, Ikuko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Tachibana, Masaya; Matsuzaki, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Norihiko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    In addition to social and communicative deficits, many studies have reported motor deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the macro and microstructural properties of the corpus callosum (CC) of 18 children with ASD and 12 typically developing controls using diffusion tensor imaging tractography. We aimed to explore

  14. Effects of diagenetic processes on seismic velocity anisotropy in near-surface sandstone and carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koesoemadinata, Adam P.; McMechan, George A.

    2004-10-01

    The effects of diagenetic processes on velocity anisotropy in Ferron sandstone and Ellenburger carbonate core samples are investigated using petrophysical/petrological and P-wave velocity ( Vp) data at room pressure and ambient (air dry) saturation. The Vp data are measured in both vertical ( Vpv) and horizontal ( Vph) directions (parallel and perpendicular to the axes of the cores, respectively), using a 125-kHz sonic probe. The petrophysical/petrological properties for the Ferron sandstone are bulk porosity, fluid permeability and volume fractions of quartz, clay, feldspar and calcite; for the Ellenburger carbonate, they are bulk porosity, vertical permeability, horizontal permeability, maximum permeability, grain density and bulk density. In the Ferron sandstone samples, the Vph values are higher (˜8.5%) than the Vpv values, which is attributed to laminated bedding or alignment of grain orientation. Correlations between Vp anisotropy and minerals that represent diagenetic processes are clearly demonstrated in the Ferron sandstone. Anisotropy decreases with decreasing feldspar, increasing calcite and increasing clay. This correlation suggests that calcite cementation and pore-filling kaolinite reduce velocity anisotropy of the Ferron sandstone by reduction of the net grain alignment or preferred pore orientations. The heterogeneity of the Ellenburger carbonate caused by multiple karsting and burials does not provide observable correlations between the velocity anisotropy and petrophysical/petrographic properties. In the Ellenburger carbonate, Vpv values are mostly higher (˜7.9%) than the Vph values and are likely to be related to near-vertically aligned regional fractures. The orientation and amount of velocity anisotropy and of permeability is scale dependent when fractures are present. Seismic anisotropy is closely related to subsurface lithology, rock fabric and texture, and to its diagenetic history. Consequently, analysis of seismic anisotropy provides an important tool for reservoir characterization and environmental and engineering applications.

  15. Seismic anisotropy observed in upper oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the upper 150Om. of oceanic basement has been observed by polarization analysis of three-component bore-hole seismometer records. The most convincing evidence for the anisotropy is shear wave splitting for explosive sources at four azimuths. Compressional wave particle motion deviations suggestive of anisotropy are also observed but they may be caused by lateral inhomogeneities. The anisotropy was not resolved by travel-time analysis. The observed velocities and particle motions in the horizontal plane can be modelled to within a standard deviation by assuming a perfectly elastic, homogeneous, anisotropic layer 2 with hexagonal symmetry and a horizontal symmetry axis. The most probable cause of the anisotropy is preferred crack orientation.

  16. Anisotropy in high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, A.; Seredyńska, M.

    2012-07-01

    It is shown below that complex diffusion anisotropy observed in diffusion-weighted MRI can be fully accounted for by allowing for non-locality of the spatial operator in the diffusion equation. The anisotropy is represented by a distribution over directions on a sphere. It allows recognition of fiber tracts crossing at arbitrary angles. A simple generalization of the Stejskal-Tanner equation for the determination of the ODF is presented. Furthermore, an explicit solution of the Bloch-Torrey equation for an anisotropic time-fractional diffusion equation is obtained in terms of a generalized Mittag-Leffler type function.

  17. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  18. Anisotropy of successive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, N.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Ohashi, A.; Yamamoto, I.; Nakatsuka, T.; Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) Group

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the anisotropy of successive air shower (SAS) events, which we define as the detection of many air showers within a short time window, using data from six stations of the Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group. On the criterion of 22 air showers within 20 minutes, five SAS events are found against 1.4 expected from the Poisson distribution in Okayama University station's data. From six stations' data, we find 24 SAS events in total. By plotting them in equatorial coordinates, it is revealed that SAS events are observed more frequently when the Galactic plane is around the zenith. This can be attributed to a hypothetical small flux of ultra-high-energy γ-rays from the direction of the Galactic plane superposed on conventional cosmic rays. If this hypothesis is true, the analytical procedure used here has potential to measure ultra-high-energy γ-ray sources by even small air shower arrays like ours.

  19. Ratcheting fluid with geometric anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiria, Benjamin; Zhang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    We investigate a mechanism that effectively transports fluids using vibrational motion imposed onto fluid boundary with anisotropy. In our experiment, two asymmetric, sawtooth-like structures are placed facing each other and form a corrugated fluid channel. This channel is then forced to open and close periodically. Under reciprocal motion, fluid fills in the gap during the expansion phase of the channel and is then forced out during contraction. Since the fluid experiences different impedances when flowing in different directions, the stagnation point that separates flows of two directions changes within each driving period. As a result, fluid is transported unidirectionally. This ratcheting effect of fluid is demonstrated through our measurements and its working principle discussed in some detail.

  20. Statistical anisotropy from inflationary magnetogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Provided the quantum fluctuations are amplified in the presence of a classical gauge field configuration the resulting curvature perturbations exhibit a mild statistical anisotropy which should be sufficiently weak not to conflict with current observational data. The curvature power spectra induced by weakly anisotropic initial states are computed here for the first time when the electric and the magnetic gauge couplings evolve at different rates as it happens, for instance, in the relativistic theory of van der Waals interactions. After recovering the results valid for coincident gauge couplings, the constraints imposed by the isotropy and the homogeneity of the initial states are discussed. The obtained bounds turn out to be more stringent than naively expected and cannot be ignored when discussing the underlying magnetogenesis scenarios.

  1. A Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Corpus Callosum during the First Year after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hberg, Asta Kristine; Skandsen, Toril; Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Vik, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to explore the evolution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in normal-appearing tissue of the corpus callosum during the 1st year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and relate findings to outcome. Fifty-seven patients (mean age 34 [range 1163] years) with moderate to severe TBI were examined with diffusion weighted MRI at three time points (median 7 days, 3 and 12 months), and a sex- and age-matched control group of 47 healthy individuals, were examined once. The corpus callosum was subdivided and the mean ADC values computed blinded in 10 regions of interests without any visible lesions in the ADC map. Outcome measures were Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) and neuropsychological domain scores at 12 months. We found a gradual increase of the mean ADC values during the 12 month follow-up, most evident in the posterior truncus (r=0.19, p<0.001). Compared with the healthy control group, we found higher mean ADC values in posterior truncus both at 3 months (p=0.021) and 12 months (p=0.003) post-injury. Patients with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) lesions in the corpus callosum in the early MRI, and patients with disability (GOSE score ?6) showed evidence of increased mean ADC values in the genu and posterior truncus at 12 months. Mean ADC values in posterior parts of the corpus callosum at 3 months predicted the sensory-motor function domain score (p=0.0100.028). During the 1st year after moderate and severe TBI, we demonstrated a slowly evolving disruption of the microstructure in normal appearing corpus callosum in the ADC map, most evident in the posterior truncus. The mean ADC values were associated with both outcome and ability to perform speeded, complex sensory-motor action. PMID:23837731

  2. Mapping average axon diameters in porcine spinal cord white matter and rat corpus callosum using d-PFG MRI

    PubMed Central

    Komlosh, M.E.; Özarslan, E.; Lizak, M. J.; Horkayne-Szakaly, I.; Freidlin, R. Z.; Horkay, F.; Basser, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of microstructural features of nerve fascicles, such as axon diameter, is crucial for understanding normal function in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as assessing changes due to pathologies. In this study double-pulsed field gradient (d-PFG) filtered MRI was used to map the average axon diameter (AAD) in porcine spinal cord, which was then compared to AADs measured with optical microscopy of the same specimen, as a way to further validate this MRI method. A novel 3D acquisition scheme was then used to obtain AADs in each voxel of a coronal slice of rat brain corpus callosum. AAD measurements were also acquired using optical microscopy performed on histological sections and validated using a novel MRI glass capillary array phantom. PMID:23583426

  3. A case of isolated and transient splenial lesion of the corpus callosum associated with disseminated Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Man; Joo, In Soo

    2006-12-01

    We report a 20-year-old man who presented with temporary encephalopathy. Serial brain MRI revealed an isolated and transient splenial lesion of the corpus callosum (SCC). He was subsequently diagnosed with septic metastasis of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) involving both lungs and multiple joints; however, there was no indication of S. aureus involvement of the meninges or brain parenchyma in CSF and MRI studies. Within 24 h of presentation, the serum sodium concentration and effective osmolality changed by approximately 10 mmol/L and 25 mOsm/kg H(2)O, respectively. On the basis of the MRI findings, the changes in electrolyte concentration, and a review of relevant literature, an isolated and transient SCC in this case might be related to osmotic demyelination caused by fluid imbalance rather than direct invasion of S. aureus. PMID:16876825

  4. Exome sequencing identifies recessive CDK5RAP2 variants in patients with isolated agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Jouan, Loubna; Ouled Amar Bencheikh, Bouchra; Daoud, Hussein; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Spiegelman, Dan; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Szuto, Anna; Lassonde, Maryse; Barbelanne, Marine; Tsang, William Y; Dion, Patrick A; Théoret, Hugo; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-04-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is a common brain malformation which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as part of numerous congenital syndromes. Therefore, cognitive and neurological involvements in patients with ACC are variable, from mild linguistic and behavioral impairments to more severe neurological deficits. To date, the underlying genetic causes of isolated ACC remains elusive and causative genes have yet to be identified. We performed exome sequencing on three acallosal siblings from the same non-consanguineous family and identified compound heterozygous variants, p.[Gly94Arg];[Asn1232Ser], in the protein encoded by the CDK5RAP2 gene, also known as MCPH3, a gene previously reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Our findings suggest a novel role for this gene in the pathogenesis of isolated ACC. PMID:26197979

  5. Atrophy analysis of corpus callosum in Alzheimer brain MR images using anisotropic diffusion filtering and level sets.

    PubMed

    Anandh, K R; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to analyze the atrophy of Corpus Callosum (CC) in Alzheimer brain magnetic resonance images using anisotropic diffusion filtering and modified distance regularized level set method. Anisotropic diffusion filtering is used as preprocessing to obtain the edge map. The modified distance regularized level set method is employed to segment CC using this edge map. Geometric features are extracted from the segmented CC and are analyzed. Results show that anisotropic diffusion filtering is able to extract the edge map with high contrast and continuous boundaries. Modified distance regularized level set method could perform the segmentation of CC in both normal and Alzheimer images. The extracted geometric features such as minor axis, Euler number and solidity are able to demarcate the Alzheimer subjects from the control normals. As atrophy of CC is closely associated with the pathology, this study seems to be clinically useful. PMID:25570361

  6. Netrin-DCC signaling regulates corpus callosum formation through attraction of pioneering axons and by modulating Slit2-mediated repulsion.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Thomas; Donahoo, Amber-Lee S; Douglass, Amelia; Zalucki, Oressia; Yuan, Jiajia; Shu, Tianzhi; Goodhill, Geoffrey J; Richards, Linda J

    2014-05-01

    The left and right sides of the nervous system communicate via commissural axons that cross the midline during development using evolutionarily conserved molecules. These guidance cues have been particularly well studied in the mammalian spinal cord, but it remains unclear whether these guidance mechanisms for commissural axons are similar in the developing forebrain, in particular for the corpus callosum, the largest and most important commissure for cortical function. Here, we show that Netrin1 initially attracts callosal pioneering axons derived from the cingulate cortex, but surprisingly is not attractive for the neocortical callosal axons that make up the bulk of the projection. Instead, we show that Netrin-deleted in colorectal cancer signaling acts in a fundamentally different manner, to prevent the Slit2-mediated repulsion of precrossing axons thereby allowing them to approach and cross the midline. These results provide the first evidence for how callosal axons integrate multiple guidance cues to navigate the midline. PMID:23302812

  7. The influence of magnetic aftereffects on the magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, A.; Mashukova, A.

    2012-04-01

    There were investigated the time dependences of the magnetic anisotropy characteristics of artificial depositions received in the geomagnetic field. The content of magnetite in the nonmagnetic matrix of kaolin did not exceed 1%. The Co content in the grains of magnetite Fe3 O4 was 0.0018%. The viscous magnetization was created in the depositions with grain sizes of Fe3O4 in micrometers (0 ÷ 8), (9 ÷ 16), (17 ÷ 32), (33 ÷ 64), (65 ÷ 100), (101 ÷ 150). The X-ray method of direct pole figures indicates that the intensity of the ordering of the ferromagnetic grains in the depositions depends strongly on the grain size in the above-mentioned ranges, getting reduced from 1.9 to 1.1. Compared with the characteristics received immediately after drying the samples and after holding them for two years in the earth's magnetic field in the direction of In, one could observe increase in all the characteristics of the magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude Hd of the magnetic field having the periodicity change of Hd 2π to π increases. This indicates the stabilization of the new domain structure. The increase in the uniaxial anisotropy constant (K) is associated with the emergence of the large induced anisotropy due to the diffusion of Co ions. It was found out that the constant K decreases markedly with increasing particle size in the range from 8 mm to 40 microns. Based on the results of the X-ray analysis by using the method direct pole figures, it may be explained by the creation of the axial texture in the depositions with grains having the size less than 40 microns. The intensity of more than 40 microns decreases insignificantly - from 1.3 to 1.1. After creating the viscous magnetization in two years, the constant K has increased by 1.5 - 2 times. The influence of the magnetic after-effects on K in strong magnetic fields denotes the diffusion nature of the viscous magnetization. The losses of the rotational magnetic hysteresis (W) also rise in the presence of the structural defects and internal stresses. The value of the maximum loss (Wm) increases the more the smaller the grain size Fe3O4.The greatest influence of magnetic viscosity is exercised on the depositions having d < 40 microns. It is shown that there is a correlation between the dependence of the temporal variation of Wm and the dependence of the coefficients of the magnetic viscosity on the ferromagnetic grain size. The magnitude of the magnetic field (HW), corresponding to the maximum losses and characterizing the beginning of the transition of the spins from the connection with the crystal lattice to the connection with the external magnetic field, does not change. So, the magnetic field HW can be considered as an indicator of the composition of the ferromagnetic fraction. Depending on the composition of the ferromagnetic, value HW has a wide range of values. For the depositions, containing magnetite grains, the value of HW makes up 1.8 kOe, and for the grains of hematite it is 9 kOe. Thus, the contribution to the effective anisotropy of rocks containing large particles of the ferromagnetic fraction, can not be explained by the energy of crystallographic anisotropy. Diffusion magnetic anisotropy is a widely spread phenomenon in the rocks.

  8. QL-07TREATMENT OF FATIGUE IN A PATIENT WITH CORPUS-CALLOSUM GLIOMA AND ATYPICAL SLEEP DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Alissa; Johnson, Derek; Brown, Paul; Cerhan, Jane

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 53 year-old married gentleman with above-average IQ who has a high-grade glioma of the corpus callosum, severe fatigue, cognitive concerns, and an atypical sleep disorder. He has had severe daytime somnolence and poor concentration since childhood, with normal nighttime sleep. Since his teens, he has had two hours of alertness in the morning, followed by disabling sleepiness for the rest of the day. Epworth sleepiness scores have been extremely high (20 to 24). Diagnoses of ADHD, narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia had been applied, but he has not met full diagnostic criteria. From 2007 to 2012, escalating doses of stimulant medication were utilized, with the best response ("can attempt some household tasks" and "approaching a normal life" per his wife) on 400 mg modafinil, and 456 mg methylphenidate (seven times the recommended maximum). This allowed him to stay awake for some normal activities such as attending his child's baseball game. In June of 2012, the modafanil and methylphenidate were discontinued by his doctor because the sleep disorder could not be confirmed with polysomnograph and multiple sleep latency testing. The somnolence returned, and the patient became distraught and expressed suicidal ideation. He saw a psychotherapist who referred him to Neurology where the corpus callosum glioma was identified incidentally (biopsy confirmed grade III astrocytoma). Pre-treatment neuropsychological evaluation revealed impairment on digit-symbol coding (z= -2.0) and was otherwise normal. The tumor was treated with radiation and temozolamide, and is currently radiographically stable. Fatigue is an ongoing problem (Epworth = 17, he rates fatigue at 8/10). He takes 80 mg Adderall. He would like to resume the previous regimen and high dose of Ritalin. We explore practical and ethical considerations in the treatment of fatigue with special consideration for quality of life in the context of high-grade glioma.

  9. Sgk1 regulates desmoglein 1 expression levels in oligodendrocytes in the mouse corpus callosum after chronic stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Keiko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Ishikawa, Toshiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shimizu, Shoko; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-08-14

    Major depression, one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, is thought to be a multifactorial disease related to both genetic and environmental factors. However, the genes responsible for and the pathogenesis of major depression at the molecular level remain unclear. Recently, we reported that stressed mice with elevated plasma corticosterone levels show upregulation and activation of serum glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) in oligodendrocytes. Active Sgk1 causes phosphorylation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (Ndrg1), and phospho-Ndrg1 increases the expression of N-cadherin, α-catenin, and β-catenin in oligodendrocytes. This activation of the Sgk1 cascade results in morphological changes in the oligodendrocytes of nerve fiber bundles, such as those present in the corpus callosum. However, little is known about the molecular functions of the traditional and/or desmosomal cadherin superfamily in oligodendrocytes. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the functions of the desmosomal cadherin superfamily in oligodendrocytes. Desmoglein (Dsg) 1, Dsg2, and desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) were found to be expressed in the corpus callosum of mouse brain, and the expression of a subtype of Dsg1, Dsg1c, was upregulated in oligodendrocytes after chronic stress exposure. Furthermore, Dsg1 proteins were localized around the plasma membrane regions of oligodendrocytes. A study in primary oligodendrocyte cultures also revealed that chronic upregulation of Sgk1 by dexamethasone administration is involved in upregulation of Dsg1c mRNA. These results may indicate that chronic stress induced Sgk1 activation in oligodendrocytes, which increases Dsg1 expression near the plasma membrane. Thus, Dsg1 upregulation may be implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the morphological changes in oligodendrocytes in response to chronic stress exposure. PMID:26043694

  10. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: emami@ipm.ir

    2014-05-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent δN mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations.

  11. X-Ray Diffraction Study on the Strain Anisotropy and Dislocation Structure of Deformed Lath Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein Nedjad, S.; Hosseini Nasab, F.; Movaghar Garabagh, M. R.; Damadi, S. R.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2011-08-01

    18Ni (300) maraging steel possessing lath martensite structure was deformed by four passes of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at ambient temperature. Line profile analysis (LPA) of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns identified strong strain anisotropy and remarkable increases in the relative fraction of screw dislocations after ECAP. The strain anisotropy was reasonably accounted for by the anisotropy of elastic constants. Domination of screw dislocations in the deformed structure was attributed to the preferred annihilation of edge dislocations in the early stages of deformation along with the difficulties for annihilation of screw dislocations by cross slipping. Cobalt addition was mainly assumed to make cross slipping difficult by reducing stacking-fault energy and favoring short-range ordering.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy of the visual pigment rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, F T

    1980-01-01

    A new estimate of diamagnetic anisotropy of the frog rhodopsin is reported. The estimate is obtained by combining the data of magnetic field induced orientation of isolated frog rod outer segments as measured by Chagneux and Chalazonitis (1972) and the data of diamagnetic anisotropy of lecithin membranes as recently reported by Boroske and Helfrich (1978). The anisotropy of the volume susceptibilities of frog rhodopsin is calculated to be 4.4 X 10(-8) cgs unit/cm3, which corresponds to 1.5 X 10(-27) cgs unit/molecule, or 9.0 X 10(-4) cgs unit/mol. PMID:7260258

  13. Mechanical anisotropy of the Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Noel, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    Three series of measurements were performed on oriented cores of several Yucca Mountain tuffs to determine the importance of mechanical anisotropy in the intact rock. Outcrop and drillhole samples were tested for acoustic velocities, linear compressibilities, and strengths in different orientations. The present data sets are preliminary, but suggest the tuffs are transversely anisotropic for these mechanical properties. The planar fabric that produces the anisotropy is believed to be predominantly the result of the preferred orientation of shards and pumice fragments. The potential of significant anisotropy has direct relevance to the formulation of constitutive formulation and the analyses of an underground opening within the Yucca Mountain.

  14. Orthogonal Invariant Sets of the Diffusion Tensor and the Development of a Curvilinear Set Suitable for Low-Anisotropy Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Damion, Robin A.; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Ingham, Eileen; Jin, Zhongmin; Ries, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a curvilinear invariant set of the diffusion tensor which may be applied to Diffusion Tensor Imaging measurements on tissues and porous media. This new set is an alternative to the more common invariants such as fractional anisotropy and the diffusion mode. The alternative invariant set possesses a different structure to the other known invariant sets; the second and third members of the curvilinear set measure the degree of orthotropy and oblateness/prolateness, respectively. The proposed advantage of these invariants is that they may work well in situations of low diffusion anisotropy and isotropy, as is often observed in tissues such as cartilage. We also explore the other orthogonal invariant sets in terms of their geometry in relation to eigenvalue space; a cylindrical set, a spherical set (including fractional anisotropy and the mode), and a log-Euclidean set. These three sets have a common structure. The first invariant measures the magnitude of the diffusion, the second and third invariants capture aspects of the anisotropy; the magnitude of the anisotropy and the shape of the diffusion ellipsoid (the manner in which the anisotropy is realised). We also show a simple method to prove the orthogonality of the invariants within a set. PMID:24244366

  15. Anisotropy of X-Ray Bursts from Neutron Stars with Concave Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.-C.; Keek, L.

    2016-03-01

    Emission from neutron stars and accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries is anisotropic. The non-spherical shape of the disk as well as blocking of the neutron star by the disk make the observed flux dependent on the inclination angle of the disk with respect to the line of sight. This is of importance for the interpretation of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Because part of the X-ray burst is reflected off the disk, the observed burst flux depends on the anisotropies for both direct emission from the neutron star and reflection off the disk. This influences measurements of source distance, mass accretion rate, and constraints on the neutron star’s equation of state. Previous predictions of the anisotropy factors assumed a geometrically flat disk. Detailed observations of two so-called superbursts allowed for the direct and the reflected burst fluxes to each be measured separately. The reflection fraction was much higher than what the anisotropies of a flat disk can account for. We create numerical models to calculate the anisotropy factors for different disk shapes, including concave disks. We present the anisotropy factors of the direct and reflected burst fluxes separately, as well as the anisotropy of the persistent flux. Reflection fractions substantially larger than unity are produced in the case where the inner accretion disk increases steeply in height, such that part of the star is blocked from view. Such a geometry could possibly be induced by the X-ray burst if X-ray heating causes the inner disk to puff up.

  16. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  17. Fracture toughness anisotropy in shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Michael R.; Meredith, Philip G.; Brantut, Nicolas; Crawford, Brian R.

    2016-03-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale gas has focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales, but there remains a paucity of available experimental data on their mechanical and physical properties. Such shales are strongly anisotropic, so that their fracture propagation trajectories depend on the interaction between their anisotropic mechanical properties and the anisotropic in situ stress field in the shallow crust. Here we report fracture toughness measurements on Mancos shale determined in all three principal fracture orientations: Divider, Short Transverse, and Arrester, using a modified short-rod methodology. Experimental results for a range of other sedimentary and carbonate rocks are also reported for comparison purposes. Significant anisotropy is observed in shale fracture toughness measurements at ambient conditions, with values, as high as 0.72 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is normal to the bedding, and values as low as 0.21 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is parallel to the bedding. For cracks propagating nonparallel to bedding, we observe a tendency for deviation toward the bedding-parallel orientation. Applying a maximum energy release rate criterion, we determined the conditions under which such deviations are more or less likely to occur under more generalized mixed-mode loading conditions. We find for Mancos shale that the fracture should deviate toward the plane with lowest toughness regardless of the loading conditions.

  18. Reflectance anisotropy for porphyrin ostaester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Nava, Raúl; Castillo, César; Mendoza, Bernardo

    2004-03-01

    We present a theoretical study for the reflectance anosotropy of prophyrin layers deposited onto gold substrates by Langmuir-Schaefer technique. We have used a polarizable dipole model, in which the effect of the electric local field is incorporated, to obtain the reflectance anisotropy spectra as function of the number of porphyrin layers. We show that the spectra changes from a peak-like to derivative-like line shape as the tilting and twisting of the molecules is varied. More specifically, at low coverage the molecules tend to be inclined relative to the substrate, due to stronger interaction with it, but as the number of layers is increased the substrate influence decreases as it is screened by the underlying layers, and the molecules tend to straighten up[1]. Our results coincide qualitatively with those of the experiments[2]. [1] C. Castillo, R. A. Vázquez-Nava and Bernardo S. Mendoza, Phys. stat. sol. (c) DOI 10.1002/pssc.200303859. [2] C. Goletti, R. Paolesse, E. Dalcanale, T. Berzina, C. Di Natale, G. Bussetti, P. Chiaradia, A. Froiio, L. Cristofolini, M. Costa and A. DÁmico, Lamgmuir 18, 6881 (2002).

  19. Pressure anisotropy in Jupiter's magnetodisc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Achilleos, N.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    2013-09-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system at Jupiter has been studied by a number of authors over the last decade. Until recently, however, the various modelling studies treated the magnetic field as an empirically-based input derived from Voyager observations. This limitation was removed by Nichols (2011), who employed a self-consistent field model calculated using force-balance between the outward plasma pressure gradients plus the centrifugal force of the rotating iogenic plasma, and the inward JxB force arising from the azimuthal current sheet. However, the above study, which incorporated the magnetic field model of Caudal (1983), employed isotropic plasma pressure, whereas it is known that anisotropic plasma pressure plays a key role in the stress balance at Jupiter (e.g. Paranicas et al., 1991). In this paper we generalise the computation to include anisotropic pressure, and compute the magnetic field by summing over elliptical integrals. We then calculate the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents assuming an equatorial parallel-to-perpendicular pressure ratio of 1.14, the value determined by Paranicas et al. (1991), and we also consider the effect on the system of solar wind-induced compression events. We find that the anisotropy current dominates the current sheet in the middle magnetosphere between 20-40RJ, and that Jupiter's magnetosphere is susceptible to the firehose instability.

  20. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  1. Atomic scale evolution of magnetic anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Hope, S.; Tselepi, M.; Choi, B.

    1998-03-01

    The results of in situ studies of the evolution of the magnetic anisotropy of Co(100) and Co(110) epitaxial films are discussed. It is shown that uniaxial magnetic anisotropies are the generic signature of symmetry breaking atomic and nm scale structures, e.g. steps, clusters, islands revealed by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies, and are strongly affected by nonmagnetic overlayers. However, the thickness dependent behaviour is surprisingly complex, with strong changes in anisotropy behaviour occurring with submonolayer depositions of nonmagnetic overlayers. These effects cannot be understood within the usual framework of the Nel model but are discussed in terms of several contributing mechanisms, e.g. strain, dipolar interactions and edge and surface anisotropies.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy due to the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Metalidis, G.; Bruno, P.

    2010-02-15

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a ferromagnetic and a nonmagnetic mirror and show how the Casimir effect gives rise to a magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic layer. The anisotropy is out of plane if the nonmagnetic plate is optically isotropic. If the nonmagnetic plate shows a uniaxial optical anisotropy (with optical axis in the plate plane), we find an in-plane magnetic anisotropy. In both cases, the energetically most favorable magnetization orientation is given by the competition between polar, longitudinal, and transverse contributions to the magneto-optical Kerr effect and will therefore depend on the interplate distance. Numerical results will be presented for a magnetic plate made out of Fe and nonmagnetic plates of Au (optically isotropic), quartz, calcite, and barium titanate (all uniaxially birefringent).

  3. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-01

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core. PMID:18258912

  4. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  5. Anisotropy and corotation of galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y-Q; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-10-20

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments. PMID:17053141

  6. Separating intrinsic and apparent seismic anisotropy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, A.; Kennett, B. L.; Trampert, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy plays a key role in studies of the Earth's rheology and deformation because of its relation to flow-induced lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of intrinsically anisotropic minerals. In addition to LPO, small-scale heterogeneity produces apparent anisotropy that need not be related to deformation in the same way as intrinsic anisotropy. Quantitative interpretations of observed anisotropy therefore require the separation of its intrinsic and apparent components. We analyse the possibility of separating intrinsic and apparent anisotropy in media with hexagonal symmetry - typically used in surface wave tomography and SKS splitting studies. Our analysis is on the level of the wave equation, which makes it general and independent of specific data types. We find that commonly observed anisotropy can always be explained by a purely isotropic laminated medium unless all anisotropic parameters are known with unrealistic accuracy. Most importantly, minute changes in the poorly constrained P wave anisotropy and the parameter eta can switch between the existence or not of a laminated isotropic equivalent. Important implications of our study are: (1) Intrinsic anisotropy over tomographically resolved length scales is never strictly required when reasonable error bars for anisotropic parameters are taken into account. (2) Currently available seismic observables do not provide adequate constraints on the relative contributions of intrinsic and apparent anisotropy. (3) Therefore, seismic observables alone do not provide compelling constraints on the magnitude of mantle flow. (4) Quantitative interpretations of anisotropy in terms of mantle flow require a combined seismic/geodynamic inversion that properly accounts for the formation of both LPO and small-scale heterogeneity. Equivalence diagrams used to investigate the possibility to explain observed seismic anisotropy in terms of purely isotropic models. Earth models with elastic parameters falling into the black regions are unstable and do not exist. Anisotropic Earth models falling into the grey regions are not equivalent to a complex purely isotropic medium. For Earth models falling into the coloured regions, purely isotropic equivalents do exist. Note that the patterns of the equivalence diagrams change completely in response to only minor changes of the poorly constrained elastic parameter eta.

  7. Cortical Depth Dependence of the Diffusion Anisotropy in the Human Cortical Gray Matter In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625×0.625×3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo. PMID:24608869

  8. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  9. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Sun, D.; Neelakrishnan, S.

    2007-12-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or tension) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have been recognized for long time, but they have not been fully described conceptually. Previous models include quantifying saturation-dependent anisotropy of soil formations that consist of many thin layers each with its own hydraulic properties characterized by a uniform density distribution of saturated hydraulic conductivity or soil bulk density. Some other approaches have also been developed to study the soil anisotropy behavior in dealing with flow and transport problems in saturated and unsaturated soils, such as tensorial connectivity-tortuosity concept. In this study, we investigate soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity anisotropy that mainly arises from a combination of both wide range of soil texture variations and within narrow range of texture units in conjunction with pedotransfer functions (PTFs) of soil hydraulic properties. PTFs are often used to estimate soil hydraulic properties because direct measurements are too expensive and difficult. PTFs transform basic soil properties such as texture, bulk density into water retention and saturated or unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. We develop a new approach to combine the neural network based PTF results with the thin layer approach to explore saturation-dependent anisotropy behavior for a wide range of texture and bulk density conditions. Anisotropy models are developed that quantify saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities for soils composed of many thin layers distinguished by texture, organic carbon content and bulk density.

  10. Effects of Planar Anisotropy on Eliashberg Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao

    Within the context of Eliashberg theory, we have studied the effects of planar anisotropy on many superconducting properties. Planar anisotropy is of interest for superconductors with layered crystal structure, such as the metallic transition metal dichalcogenide and high-T_{c } oxide superconductors. To describe planar anisotropy we use a model dispersion relation which gives free-particle-like electronic states in the direction parallel to the layers and the tight-binding form in the direction perpendicular to the layers. Using this dispersion relation and the Fermi-Surface-Harmonic (FSH) expansion technique, we specify the general anisotropic Eliashberg equations for the problem of planar anisotropy. We begin with the study of the effects of planar anisotropy on the superconducting transition temperature, the thermodynamic critical magnetic field, and the quasiparticle density of states in the superconducting state. For all these properties, especially the quasiparticle density of states, the effects of planar anisotropy are usually quite significant. Next, we study some thermodynamic and transport properties, namely, the specific heat, the thermal conductivity, and the ultrasound attenuation. The effects of planar anisotropy on these properties are closely related to the changes in the quasiparticle density of states due to anisotropy. The changes in the quasiparticle lifetime due to the superconducting phase transition and anisotropy are also important for the unusual behaviors of thermal conductivity at low temperature. Several electromagnetic properties are also studied. The introduction of anisotropy usually reduces the values of the London penetration depth below its isotropic value, and strongly depresses the Hebel-Slichter peak in the nuclear spin relaxation rate. The theoretical results for the nuclear spin relaxation rate with strong coupling, anisotropy and Fermi liquid corrections have been compared with the experimental data for the high-T_{c } oxides. The major effect of planar anisotropy on the infrared conductivity is to reduce the frequency at which the absorption starts. Finally, we have examined the changes of the phonon self-energy when the superconducting phase transition occurs. It is found that there is a qualitative difference between the results for isotropic superconductors and for anisotropic ones. This may be displayed in experiment under certain conditions. Anisotropy also complicates the analysis of the structures in the phonon self-energy. It is generally true, for all the properties which we have studied, that the effects of anisotropy will be diminished if we increase the coupling strengths, and/or introduce impurity scatterings. Besides the problem of planar anisotropy, we briefly discuss the problem of an energy dependent electronic density of states (EDOS) for Eliashberg superconductors. This is of interest for a model of two-dimensional tight-binding dispersion relation. For a Lorentzian form for EDOS around the Fermi level, we have discussed the modifications of the Eliashberg equations and, then, calculated the quasiparticle density of states in the superconducting state. The effects of an energy dependent electronic density of states on the temperature evolution of the quasiparticle density of states below T_{c} is particularly interesting.

  11. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  12. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  13. Fractional statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2006-09-01

    The Liouville and first Bogoliubov hierarchy equations with derivatives of noninteger order are derived. The fractional Liouville equation is obtained from the conservation of probability to find a system in a fractional volume element. This equation is used to obtain Bogoliubov hierarchy and fractional kinetic equations with fractional derivatives. Statistical mechanics of fractional generalization of the Hamiltonian systems is discussed. Liouville and Bogoliubov equations with fractional coordinate and momenta derivatives are considered as a basis to derive fractional kinetic equations. The Fokker-Planck-Zaslavsky equation that has fractional phase-space derivatives is obtained from the fractional Bogoliubov equation. The linear fractional kinetic equation for distribution of the charged particles is considered. PMID:17014213

  14. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  15. Fractional incompressible stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayin, Selcuk S.; Krisch, Jean P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions and/or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density and equation of state. The fractional objects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

  16. Tailoring magnetic anisotropy gradients by ion bombardment for domain wall positioning in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graded anisotropy magnetic materials possess a coercive field changing laterally with position. A simple fabrication procedure to produce such an anisotropy gradient in a polycrystalline Au/Co layer system without lateral thickness variation and with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, prototypical for a large variety of thin film systems, is shown. The procedure uses light-ion bombardment without the use of a mask. Magnetization reversal in this polycrystalline layer system takes place by unidirectional movement of a single domain wall only in regions with larger anisotropies and anisotropy gradients. In this anisotropy/anisotropy gradient regime, the domain wall is oriented perpendicular to the coercive field gradient, and it can be positioned along the gradient by an appropriate magnetic field pulse. For smaller anisotropies/anisotropy gradients, the natural anisotropy fluctuations of the polycrystalline layer system induce magnetization reversal dominated by domain nucleation. PACS 75.30.Gw; 75.70.Cn; 75.60.Ch PMID:25232291

  17. Tailoring magnetic anisotropy gradients by ion bombardment for domain wall positioning in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matczak, Michał; Szymański, Bogdan; Kuświk, Piotr; Urbaniak, Maciej; Stobiecki, Feliks; Kurant, Zbigniew; Maziewski, Andrzej; Lengemann, Daniel; Ehresmann, Arno

    2014-08-01

    Graded anisotropy magnetic materials possess a coercive field changing laterally with position. A simple fabrication procedure to produce such an anisotropy gradient in a polycrystalline Au/Co layer system without lateral thickness variation and with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, prototypical for a large variety of thin film systems, is shown. The procedure uses light-ion bombardment without the use of a mask. Magnetization reversal in this polycrystalline layer system takes place by unidirectional movement of a single domain wall only in regions with larger anisotropies and anisotropy gradients. In this anisotropy/anisotropy gradient regime, the domain wall is oriented perpendicular to the coercive field gradient, and it can be positioned along the gradient by an appropriate magnetic field pulse. For smaller anisotropies/anisotropy gradients, the natural anisotropy fluctuations of the polycrystalline layer system induce magnetization reversal dominated by domain nucleation.

  18. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-15

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  19. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-01

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  20. Galaxy cluster baryon fractions revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-11-20

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot-gas components for 12 galaxy clusters and groups at z ∼ 0.1 with M = 1-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM-Newton X-ray data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component—intracluster medium, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies—for each system. We recover a mean relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass, M{sub ⋆}∝M{sub 500}{sup −0.52±0.04}, that is 1σ shallower than in our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot-gas components is a strong function of M {sub 500}; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within a sphere of radius r {sub 500} scale as f{sub ⋆}∝M{sub 500}{sup −0.45±0.04} and f{sub gas}∝M{sub 500}{sup 0.26±0.03}, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the brightest cluster galaxy and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. Studies that fail to fully account for intracluster stars typically underestimate the normalization of the stellar baryon fraction versus M {sub 500} relation by ∼25%. Our derived stellar baryon fractions are also higher, and the trend with halo mass weaker, than those derived from recent halo occupation distribution and abundance matching analyses. One difference from our previous work is the weak, but statistically significant, dependence here of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass: f{sub bary}∝M{sub 500}{sup 0.16±0.04}. For M {sub 500} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 14}, the total baryon fractions within r {sub 500} are on average 18% below the universal value from the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) analysis, or 7% below for the cosmological parameters from the Planck analysis. In the latter case, the difference between the universal value and cluster baryon fractions is less than the systematic uncertainties associated with the M {sub 500} determinations. The total baryon fractions exhibit significant scatter, particularly at M {sub 500} < 2 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} where they range from 60%-90%, or 65%-100%, of the universal value for WMAP7 and Planck, respectively. The ratio of the stellar-to-gas mass within r {sub 500} (M {sub *}/M {sub gas}), a measure of integrated star-formation efficiency, strongly decreases with increasing M {sub 500}. This relation is tight, with an implied intrinsic scatter of 12%. The fact that this relation remains tight at low mass implies that the larger scatter in the total baryon fractions at these masses arises from either true scatter in the total baryon content or observational scatter in M {sub 500} rather than late-time physical processes such as redistribution of gas to beyond r {sub 500}. If the scatter in the baryon content at low mass is physical, then our results imply that in this mass range, the integrated star-formation efficiency rather than the baryon fraction that is constant at fixed halo mass.

  1. Simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy, and FRAP recovery curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Alibhai, Dominic R.; Suhling, Klaus

    2011-02-01

    We present fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and fluorescence anisotropy imaging along with translational diffusion measurements of living cells labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) recorded in a single experiment. The experimental set-up allows for time and polarization-resolved fluorescence images to be measured in every frame of a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) series. We have validated the method using rhodamine 123 in homogeneous solution prior to measurements of living A431 cells labelled with cdc42-GFP, for which the FRAP recovery exhibits an immobile fraction and the rotational mobility of the protein is hindered while the fluorescence lifetime fairly homogeneous across the cell. By eliminating the need for sequential measurements to extract fluorescence lifetimes and molecular diffusion coefficients we remove artefacts arising from changes in sample morphology and excessive photobleaching during sequential experiments.

  2. Single-shot T1 mapping of the corpus callosum: a rapid characterization of fiber bundle anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Sabine; Wang, Xiaoqing; Roeloffs, Volkert; Frahm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Using diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography the topographic organization of the human corpus callosum (CC) has been described to comprise five segments with fibers projecting into prefrontal (I), premotor and supplementary motor (II), primary motor (III), and primary sensory areas (IV), as well as into parietal, temporal, and occipital cortical areas (V). In order to more rapidly characterize the underlying anatomy of these segments, this study used a novel single-shot T1 mapping method to quantitatively determine T1 relaxation times in the human CC. A region-of-interest analysis revealed a tendency for the lowest T1 relaxation times in the genu and the highest T1 relaxation times in the somatomotor region of the CC. This observation separates regions dominated by myelinated fibers with large diameters (somatomotor area) from densely packed smaller axonal bundles (genu) with less myelin. The results indicate that characteristic T1 relaxation times in callosal profiles provide an additional means to monitor differences in fiber anatomy, fiber density, and gray matter in respective neocortical areas. In conclusion, rapid T1 mapping allows for a characterization of the axonal architecture in an individual CC in less than 10 s. The approach emerges as a valuable means for studying neocortical brain anatomy with possible implications for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26029059

  3. Restricted diffusion in the splenium of the corpus callosum in organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy: case report and review of literatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Shao, Yankun; Shi, Kai; Yang, Hong; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    We described a 35 year-old female who developed organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) with an unusal clinical manifestation and neuroradiological presentation. Case report: A 35-year-old woman came into contact with organophosphate pesticide by remissly inhalation. She got transient unconsciousness lasting for nearly 2 hours and developed transient hematuria and hyperhidrotic subsequently. She received atropine as treatment and got a satisfying recovery and was hospital discharged without any symptoms. But 20 days later the patient displayed symptoms including headache, vertigo, mental and memory decline, and was hospitalized again. Clinical manifestations, laboratorial findings, images data will be presented. The brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an unusal neuroradiological presentation characterized by restricted diffusion in the splenium of the corpus callosum. The patient recovered satisfactorily after administration of corticosteroids and immunogloblin. Conclusion: OPIDN may develop in some susceptible individuals even by inhalation and sometimes with central nervous system involvement. Treatment with corticosteroids and intravenous immunogloblins was found to achieve good results. PMID:26550404

  4. Application of fractal and grey level co-occurrence matrix analysis in evaluation of brain corpus callosum and cingulum architecture.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Igor; Dacic, Sanja; Brkic, Predrag; Lavrnja, Irena; Pantic, Senka; Jovanovic, Tomislav; Pekovic, Sanja

    2014-10-01

    This aim of this study was to assess the discriminatory value of fractal and grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analysis methods in standard microscopy analysis of two histologically similar brain white mass regions that have different nerve fiber orientation. A total of 160 digital micrographs of thionine-stained rat brain white mass were acquired using a Pro-MicroScan DEM-200 instrument. Eighty micrographs from the anterior corpus callosum and eighty from the anterior cingulum areas of the brain were analyzed. The micrographs were evaluated using the National Institutes of Health ImageJ software and its plugins. For each micrograph, seven parameters were calculated: angular second moment, inverse difference moment, GLCM contrast, GLCM correlation, GLCM variance, fractal dimension, and lacunarity. Using the Receiver operating characteristic analysis, the highest discriminatory value was determined for inverse difference moment (IDM) (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve equaled 0.925, and for the criterion IDM≤0.610 the sensitivity and specificity were 82.5 and 87.5%, respectively). Most of the other parameters also showed good sensitivity and specificity. The results indicate that GLCM and fractal analysis methods, when applied together in brain histology analysis, are highly capable of discriminating white mass structures that have different axonal orientation. PMID:24967845

  5. SLC1A4 mutations cause a novel disorder of intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, spasticity and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Marek-Yagel, D; Eyal, E; Barel, O; Oz Levi, D; Hoffmann, C; Ruzzo, E K; Ganelin-Cohen, E; Lancet, D; Pras, E; Rechavi, G; Nissenkorn, A; Anikster, Y; Goldstein, D B; Ben Zeev, B

    2015-10-01

    Two unrelated patients, presenting with significant global developmental delay, severe progressive microcephaly, seizures, spasticity and thin corpus callosum (CC) underwent trio whole-exome sequencing. No candidate variant was found in any known genes related to the phenotype. However, crossing the data of the patients illustrated that they both manifested pathogenic variants in the SLC1A4 gene which codes the ASCT1 transporter of serine and other neutral amino acids. The Ashkenazi patient is homozygous for a deleterious missense c.766G>A, p.(E256K) mutation whereas the Ashkenazi-Iraqi patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and a nonsense c.945delTT, p.(Leu315Hisfs*42) mutation. Structural prediction demonstrates truncation of significant portion of the protein by the nonsense mutation and speculates functional disruption by the missense mutation. Both mutations are extremely rare in general population databases, however, the missense mutation was found in heterozygous mode in 1:100 Jewish Ashkenazi controls suggesting a higher carrier rate among Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that SLC1A4 is the disease causing gene of a novel neurologic disorder manifesting with significant intellectual disability, severe postnatal microcephaly, spasticity and thin CC. The role of SLC1A4 in the serine transport from astrocytes to neurons suggests a possible pathomechanism for this disease and implies a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26138499

  6. A nonsense variant in HERC1 is associated with intellectual disability, megalencephaly, thick corpus callosum and cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lam Son; Schneider, Taiane; Rio, Marlène; Moutton, Sébastien; Siquier-Pernet, Karine; Verny, Florine; Boddaert, Nathalie; Desguerre, Isabelle; Munich, Arnold; Rosa, José Luis; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Colleaux, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    Megalencephaly is a congenital condition characterized by severe overdeveloped brain size. This phenotype is often caused by mutations affecting the RTK/PI3K/mTOR (receptor tyrosine kinase-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-AKT) signaling and its downstream pathway of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, using a whole-exome sequencing in a Moroccan consanguineous family, we show that a novel autosomal-recessive neurological condition characterized by megalencephaly, thick corpus callosum and severe intellectual disability is caused by a homozygous nonsense variant in the HERC1 gene. Assessment of the primary skin fibroblast from the proband revealed complete absence of the HERC1 protein. HERC1 is an ubiquitin ligase that interacts with tuberous sclerosis complex 2, an upstream negative regulator of the mTOR pathway. Our data further emphasize the role of the mTOR pathway in the regulation of brain development and the power of next-generation sequencing technique in elucidating the genetic etiology of autosomal-recessive disorders and suggest that HERC1 defect might be a novel cause of autosomal-recessive syndromic megalencephaly. PMID:26153217

  7. Preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy in shales.

    SciTech Connect

    Lonardelli, I.; Wenk, H.-R.; Ren, Y.; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2007-03-01

    Anisotropy in shales is becoming an important issue in exploration and reservoir geophysics. In this study, the crystallographic preferred orientation of clay platelets that contributes to elastic anisotropy was determined quantitatively by hard monochromatic X-ray synchrotron diffraction in two different shales from drillholes off the coast of Nigeria. To analyze complicated diffraction images with five different phases (illite/smectite, kaolinite, quartz, siderite, feldspar) and many overlapping peaks, we applied a methodology based on the crystallographic Rietveld method. The goal was to describe the intrinsic physical properties of the sample (phase composition, crystallographic preferred orientation, crystal structure, and microstructure) and compute macroscopic elastic properties by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution for each phase. Our results show that elastic anisotropy resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of the clay particles can be determined quantitatively. This provides a possible way to compare measured seismic anisotropy and texture-derived anisotropy and to estimate the contribution of the low-aspect ratio pores aligned with bedding.

  8. Surface anisotropy characterisation with meteosat observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Pinty, B.

    Surface albedo, or more precisely Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR), is the integral the Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of the surface over all angles of the upward hemisphere. The retrieval of the DHR trough space observations requires accounting for the scattering and absorption processes in the atmosphere as well as for the angular anisotropy of the surface, the two systems being radiatively coupled. The accuracy achieved in the albedo estimation depends thus on the density of the angular sampling and the reliability of the atmospheric correction. Pinty et al. demonstrated the possibility to derive reliable surface albedo from observations acquired by Meteosat, the European meteorological geostationary satellite. The purpose of this presentation is to analyse the accuracy of this new Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) product, including the effects due to instrument changes and associated calibration uncertainties. In particular, the consistency of the surface anisotropy characterisation is examined in detail. To this end, observations acquired by two adjacent geostationary spacecrafts, i.e., Meteosat-7 and Meteosat-5 have been processed with the MSA algorithm. These satellites are located respectively at 0 and 63 degrees East. Data acquired by these two instruments overlap over a large area encompassing most of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The consistency of the surface anisotropy retrieval is evaluated through a reconstruction of the Meteosat-5 (-7) observations with the Meteosat-7 (-5) surface anisotropy characterisation. No differences larger than the calibration uncertainties have been found, which indicates that the MSA algorithm accounts correctly for the surface anisotropy and instrument differences.

  9. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  10. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  11. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  12. FRACTIONAL INTEGRATION TOOLBOX

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Toma M.; Ramirez, Nelson; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The problems formulated in the fractional calculus framework often require numerical fractional integration/differentiation of large data sets. Several existing fractional control toolboxes are capable of performing fractional calculus operations, however, none of them can efficiently perform numerical integration on multiple large data sequences. We developed a Fractional Integration Toolbox (FIT), which efficiently performs fractional numerical integration/differentiation of the Riemann-Liouville type on large data sequences. The toolbox allows parallelization and is designed to be deployed on both CPU and GPU platforms. PMID:24812536

  13. Introducing anisotropic Minkowski functionals and quantitative anisotropy measures for local structure analysis in biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; De, Titas; Lochmüller, Eva; Eckstein, Felix; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of Minkowski Functionals to characterize local structure in different biological tissue types has been demonstrated in a variety of medical image processing tasks. We introduce anisotropic Minkowski Functionals (AMFs) as a novel variant that captures the inherent anisotropy of the underlying gray-level structures. To quantify the anisotropy characterized by our approach, we further introduce a method to compute a quantitative measure motivated by a technique utilized in MR diffusion tensor imaging, namely fractional anisotropy. We showcase the applicability of our method in the research context of characterizing the local structure properties of trabecular bone micro-architecture in the proximal femur as visualized on multi-detector CT. To this end, AMFs were computed locally for each pixel of ROIs extracted from the head, neck and trochanter regions. Fractional anisotropy was then used to quantify the local anisotropy of the trabecular structures found in these ROIs and to compare its distribution in different anatomical regions. Our results suggest a significantly greater concentration of anisotropic trabecular structures in the head and neck regions when compared to the trochanter region (p < 10-4). We also evaluated the ability of such AMFs to predict bone strength in the femoral head of proximal femur specimens obtained from 50 donors. Our results suggest that such AMFs, when used in conjunction with multi-regression models, can outperform more conventional features such as BMD in predicting failure load. We conclude that such anisotropic Minkowski Functionals can capture valuable information regarding directional attributes of local structure, which may be useful in a wide scope of biomedical imaging applications.

  14. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.

    1999-05-11

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties.

  15. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT AND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; Becker Tjus, Julia; Mandelartz, Matthias; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-05-10

    We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at {approx}10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

  16. Nanoengineered composite materials with giant dielectric anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2015-07-01

    A nanoengineered composite material was considered in the long-wavelength regime. It consisted of a random mixture of two isotropic dielectric component materials. Each component material was composed of oriented spheroidal particles. The Bruggeman formalism was used to estimate the permittivity dyadic of the corresponding homogenized composite material (HCM). If the rotational symmetry axes of the two populations of spheroids were mutually orthogonal then the HCM was an orthorhombic biaxial material; if these two symmetry axes were mutually parallel then the HCM was a uniaxial material. The degree of anisotropy of the HCM increased as the shape of the component particles became more elongated, with the greatest degrees of anisotropy being attained when the component particles were shaped as needles or discs. Hence, nanoengineered composite materials based on simple oriented component particles may be homogenized to realize extremely large degrees of anisotropy.

  17. Anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the angular anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on both small and large angular scales are presented, and the effect of massive neutrinos on both the background radiation anisotropy and on the galaxy correlation function over very large scales is reviewed. Current observations show that the quadrupole anisotropy provides the greatest constraint on theory, and the values for the gravitational potential fluctuations indicate that small amplitude but sufficiently large-scale density fluctuations, both at the present epoch and on the surface of last scattering, can produce significant large angular scale variations in the radiation temperature. Most importantly, it is proposed that the quadrupole moment is most simply and elegantly interpreted in terms of the density fluctuations on very large scales whose presence is inferred from the requirement that an initial fluctuation spectrum is required in order for structure to develop.

  18. Psychophysics and the anisotropy of time.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin

    2015-12-15

    In psychophysics, experimental control over the presented stimuli is an important prerequisite. Due to the anisotropy of time, this prerequisite is not given in psychophysical experiments on time perception. Many important factors (e.g., the direction of perceived time flow) cannot be manipulated in timing experiments. The anisotropy of time is a peculiarity, which distinguishes the time dimension from other perceptual qualities. Here I summarize the anisotropy-related differences between the perception of time and the perception of other qualities. It is discussed to what extent these differences might affect results and interpretations in psychophysical experiments. In conclusion, I argue for a 'view from nowhen' on the psychophysical study of time perception. PMID:26121957

  19. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  20. Large directional optical anisotropy in multiferroic ferroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, A. M.; Dziom, V.; Shuvaev, A.; Pimenov, Anna; Schiebl, M.; Mukhin, A. A.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Gudim, I. A.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Pimenov, A.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most fascinating and counterintuitive recent effects in multiferroics is directional anisotropy, the asymmetry of light propagation with respect to the direction of propagation. In such case the absorption in a material can be different for opposite directions. Besides absorption, different velocities of light for different directions of propagation may be also expected, which is termed directional birefringence. In this work, we demonstrate large directional anisotropy in multiferroic samarium ferroborate. The effect is observed for linear polarization of light in the range of millimeter wavelengths, and it survives down to low frequencies. The dispersion and absorption close to the electromagnon resonance can be controlled by external magnetic field and are fully suppressed in one direction. By changing the geometry of the external field, samarium ferroborate shows giant optical activity, which makes this material a universal tool for optical control: with a magnetic field as an external parameter it allows switching between two functionalities: polarization rotation and directional anisotropy.

  1. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ν B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ν B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  2. Preferred Orientations and Anisotropy in Shales: Callovo-Oxfordian Shale (France) and Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)

    SciTech Connect

    Wenk, H.-R.; Voltolini, M.; Mazurek, M.; Van Loon, L.R.; Vinsot, A.

    2009-06-30

    Anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks is receiving increasing attention. Seismic anisotropy is essential in the prospecting for petroleum deposits. Anisotropy of diffusion has become relevant for environmental contaminants, including nuclear waste. In both cases, the orientation of component minerals is a critical ingredient and, largely because of small grain size and poor crystallinity, the orientation distribution of clay minerals has been difficult to quantify. A method is demonstrated that relies on hard synchrotron X-rays to obtain diffraction images of shales and applies the crystallographic Rietveld method to deconvolute the images and extract quantitative information about phase fractions and preferred orientation that can then be used to model macroscopic physical properties. The method is applied to shales from European studies which investigate the suitability of shales as potential nuclear waste repositories (Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory near Bure, France, and Benken borehole and Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland). A Callovo-Oxfordian shale from Meuse/Haute-Marne shows a relatively weak alignment of clay minerals and a random distribution for calcite. Opalinus shales from Benken and Mont Terri show strong alignment of illite-smectite, kaolinite, chlorite, and calcite. This intrinsic contribution to anisotropy is consistent with macroscopic physical properties where anisotropy is caused both by the orientation distribution of crystallites and high-aspect-ratio pores. Polycrystal elastic properties are obtained by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution and polyphase properties by averaging over all phases. From elastic properties we obtain anisotropies for p waves ranging from 7 to 22%.

  3. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troxel, M. A.; Peel, Austin; Ishak, Mustapha

    2013-12-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lemaȋtre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall — the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found to increase by 2.5, 10, and 20 km s-1 (0.5%, 2%, and 4.5%), respectively, for the same three levels of anisotropy. This response to the anisotropy in a structure is found to be strongly nonlinear with respect to the strength of anisotropy. These relative velocities correspond to an equivalent increase in the total mass of the spherically symmetric structure of 1%, 3.8%, and 8.4%, indicating that not accounting for the presence of anisotropic mass distributions in cluster models can strongly bias the determination of physical properties like the total mass.

  4. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    SciTech Connect

    Troxel, M.A.; Peel, Austin; Ishak, Mustapha E-mail: austin.peel@utdallas.edu

    2013-12-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lema?tre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found to increase by 2.5, 10, and 20 km s{sup ?1} (0.5%, 2%, and 4.5%), respectively, for the same three levels of anisotropy. This response to the anisotropy in a structure is found to be strongly nonlinear with respect to the strength of anisotropy. These relative velocities correspond to an equivalent increase in the total mass of the spherically symmetric structure of 1%, 3.8%, and 8.4%, indicating that not accounting for the presence of anisotropic mass distributions in cluster models can strongly bias the determination of physical properties like the total mass.

  5. Energetic ion anisotropies in the geomagnetic tail. I - A statistical survey. II - Magnetic field and substorm characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettmann, Georg; Fritz, Theodore A.; Hones, Edward W., Jr.; Daly, Patrick W.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive data set from the ISEE 2 spacecraft is used here to perform a statistical study of events in the earth's central magnetotail that are characterized by high anisotropies of energetic ions. In about 75 percent of the cases the anisotropy vector deviates no more than 45 deg from the tidal axis. High-anisotropy samples within 45 deg of the tidal axis are dominated by the earthward fraction. High ion anisotropies are observed continuously for longer than 1 min only in a few cases. The probability of observing high ion anisotropies is significantly enhanced beyond about 16 R(E) downtail distance within a few earth radii of the neutral sheet and on the duskside of the magnetotail. The analysis is extended with respect to the local magnetic field and to the relationship between energetic ion anisotropies and substorm phases. It is found that the events can be well organized in terms of substorm expansion phase and substorm recovery. These relations and the magnetic field characteristics during the events support the notion that the near-earth source of tailward streaming ions is identical with a substorm neutral line.

  6. Heterogeneity and anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The lithospheric mantle is intrinsically heterogeneous and anisotropic. These two properties govern the repartition of deformation, controlling intraplate strain localization and development of new plate boundaries. Geophysical and geological observations provide clues on the types, ranges, and characteristic length scales of heterogeneity and anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic tomography points to variations in geothermal gradient and hence in rheological behavior at scales of hundreds of km. Seismic anisotropy data substantiate anisotropic physical properties consistent at scales of tens to hundreds of km. Receiver functions imply lateral and vertical heterogeneity at scales < 10 km, which might record gradients in composition or anisotropy. Observations on naturally deformed peridotites establish that compositional heterogeneity and Crystal Preferred Orientations (CPOs) are ubiquitous from the mm to the km scales. These data allow discussing the processes that produce/destroy heterogeneity and anisotropy and constraining the time scales over which they are active. This analysis highlights: (i) the role of deformation and reactive percolation of melts and fluids in producing compositional and structural heterogeneity and the feedbacks between these processes, (ii) the weak mechanical effect of mineralogical variations, and (iii) the low volumes of fine-grained microstructures and difficulty to preserve them. In contrast, olivine CPO and the resulting anisotropy of mechanical and thermal properties are only modified by deformation. Based on this analysis, we propose that strain localization at the plate scale is, at first order, controlled by large-scale variations in thermal structure and in CPO-induced anisotropy. In cold parts of the lithospheric mantle, grain size reduction may contribute to strain localization, but the low volume of fine-grained domains limits this effect.

  7. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  8. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Price, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  9. Direct expressions for magnetic anisotropy constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryo; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-11-01

    Direct expressions for the magnetic anisotropy constants are given at a finite temperature from a microscopic viewpoint. The present derivation assumes that the Hamiltonian is a linear function with respect to the magnetization direction. We discuss in detail the first-order anisotropy constant K1 and show that our present results reproduce previous results. We applied our method to Nd2Fe14B compounds and confirmed that the present method can reproduce the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotoropy constants K1, K2, and K3 well.

  10. Anisotropy Effects on Microseismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Talebi, Shahriar

    2007-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy in sedimentary environments is significant—microseismic waveforms often show strong shear-wave splitting, with differences reaching 40% between horizontally and vertically-polarized shear-wave velocities. Failure to account for this anisotropy is shown to result in large microseismic event location errors. A method is presented here for determining the five elastic parameters of a homogeneous, vertical transverse-isotropic (VTI) model from calibration shot data. The method can also use data from mining-induced seismic events, which are then simultaneously located. This simple model provides a good fit to arrival times from coal-environment data, and results in dramatic shifts in interpreted event locations.

  11. Weak Elastic Anisotropy in Global Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the major features of the Earth's interior were discovered using the concepts of isotropic seismology; however, subtle features require more realistic concepts. Although the importance of anisotropy has been known for over 50 years, only in the last decade has the increasing quality and quantity of data forced the wide recognition that anisotropyis crucial for accurate descriptions of upper mantle structure. The persistence of the "plume hypothesis", in spite of abundant evidence to the contrary, is partly based on the neglect of anisotropy, sparse and biased ray coverage, and the misuse of Occam's razor. Whereas isotropic inversion of teleseismic near-vertical travel-time datasets suggests the presence of deep vertical zones of low velocity (interpreted as mantle plumes), anisotropic inversion of data having a range of polarizations and directions of approach suggests instead shallow zones of relatively high anisotropy. This raises the possibility that current understanding of manyof the subtle features of Earth structure could be erroneous, caused by over-simplified analysis. The simplest plausible anisotropic model is that of polar anisotropy ("VTI" [sic!]), with a radial symmetry axis. The essential idea which makes anisotropic seismology feasible is the recognition that, in the Earth, the anisotropy is almost invariably weak, and the anisotropic equations (linearized in appropriately chosen small parameters) are quite simple (see below). These equations show that, to first order, the anisotropic variation of velocity is not governed by the individual Cab , but rather by the combinations of parameters given above. Hence, inversions should seek these combinations, rather than the individual moduli. The Rayleigh velocity VR is a simple function of VS0 and the P- and SV- anisotropies. The Love velocity VL is a complicated function of VS0 and the SH anisotropy γ. The simplest plausible model of azimuthal anisotropy is orthorhombic (not ("HTI" [sic!]), which may be analyzed as a simple generalization of the foregoing. Along the two principle azimuths, the velocities are exactly those of two (different) polar anisotropic media, which may be simplified as above. At other azimuths, a 9th (δ-like) parameter is required. The VR-VL discrepancy is best described in these terms.

  12. Ion anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations in Earth's magnetosheath have delineated several different kinds of magnetic fluctuation spectra below the proton cyclotron frequency. This paper provides a theoretical interpretation for some of these observations describing solutions of the linear Vlasov dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic instabilities for particle distributions which model those observed in the magnetosheath. This model yields three growing modes: the proton cyclotron anisotropy the helium cyclotron anisotropy, and the mirror instabilities. The results show very good agreement with the observations of mirror-like and proton-cyclotron-like events. This agreement with observations implies that the transition between cyclotron and mirror fluctuation dominance is consistent with linear theory.

  13. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  14. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  15. Microwave background anisotropies from scaling seed perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    1997-10-01

    We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed perturbations in a universe dominated by cold dark matter. Using a gauge-invariant linear perturbation analysis, we solve the perturbation equations on super-horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds. We find that perturbations induced by seeds-under very mild restrictions-are nearly isocurvature. Thus, compensation, which is mainly the consequence of physically sensible initial conditions, is very generic. We then restrict our study to the case of scaling sources, motivated by global scalar fields. We parametrize the energy-momentum tensor of the source by ``seed functions'' and calculate the Sachs-Wolfe and acoustic contributions to the CMB anisotropies. We discuss the dependence of the anisotropy spectrum on the parameters of the model considered. Even within the restricted class of models investigated in this work, we find a surprising variety of results for the position and height of the first acoustic peak as well as for the overall amplitude. In particular, for certain choices of parameters, the spectrum resembles very much the well known adiabatic inflationary spectrum, whereas for others, the position of the first acoustic peak is significantly shifted towards smaller angular scales.

  16. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of

  17. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Benjamin W; Braun, Lukas; Pascual, Jose I; Franke, Katharina J

    2015-06-10

    The magnetism of single atoms and molecules is governed by the atomic scale environment. In general, the reduced symmetry of the surrounding splits the d states and aligns the magnetic moment along certain favorable directions. Here, we show that we can reversibly modify the magnetocrystalline anisotropy by manipulating the environment of single iron(II) porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. When we decrease the tip-molecule distance, we first observe a small increase followed by an exponential decrease of the axial anisotropy on the molecules. This is in contrast to the monotonous increase observed earlier for the same molecule with an additional axial Cl ligand ( Nat. Phys. 2013 , 9 , 765 ). We ascribe the changes in the anisotropy of both species to a deformation of the molecules in the presence of the attractive force of the tip, which leads to a change in the d level alignment. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of a precise tuning of the magnetic anisotropy of an individual molecule by mechanical control. PMID:25942560

  18. Knitted Patterns as a Model for Anisotropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepic, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropy is a difficult concept, although it is often met in everyday life. This paper describes a simple model--knitted patterns--having anisotropic elastic properties. The elastic constant is measured for the force applied in different directions with respect to the knitting direction. It is also shown that the deformation of the knitted

  19. Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis.

  20. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  1. Knitted Patterns as a Model for Anisotropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepic, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropy is a difficult concept, although it is often met in everyday life. This paper describes a simple model--knitted patterns--having anisotropic elastic properties. The elastic constant is measured for the force applied in different directions with respect to the knitting direction. It is also shown that the deformation of the knitted…

  2. Magnetic anisotropy of strained epitaxial manganite films

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. V. Borisenko, I. V.; Klimov, A. A.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Petrzhik, A. M.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2011-05-15

    The in-plane magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) films is studied at room temperature by the following three independent techniques: magnetooptical Kerr effect, ferromagnetic resonance at a frequency of 9.61 GHz, and recording of absorption spectra of electromagnetic radiation at a frequency of 290.6 MHz. The films are deposited onto NdGaO{sub 3} (NGO) substrates in which the (110)NGO plane is tilted at an angle of 0-25.7 Degree-Sign to the substrate plane. The uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced by the strain of the film is found to increase with the tilt angle of the (110)NGO plane. A model is proposed to describe the change in the magnetic anisotropy energy with the tilt angle. A sharp increase in the radio-frequency absorption in a narrow angular range of a dc magnetic field near a hard magnetization axis is detected The anisotropy parameters of the LSMO films grown on (110)NGO, (001)SrTiO{sub 3}, and (001)[(LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3} + (Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}] substrates are compared.

  3. Elastic Anisotropy and Auxetic Behavior in Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are of fundamental importance for understanding thermodynamic and mechanical behavior as well as for interpretation of seismic data. In recent years, there has been renewed interest in novel aspects of single-crystal elastic behavior. A database of single-crystal elastic properties of minerals and related phases has been constructed in order to evaluate auxetic behavior among minerals at ambient conditions and at high P and T. Partially auxetic behavior (directions with negative Poisson's ratios) is common among minerals, especially among the quartz, rutile, calcite, spinel, and sphalerite structures. Auxetic behavior is most common in the cubic and trigonal systems and correlates strongly with the elastic anisotropy as measured by the universal anisotropy index. MgO provides a striking example of P-T tuning of auxeticity and anisotropy. The larger variation in elastic anisotropy of MgO from ambient P and 3000 K to ambient T and 250 GPa samples nearly the entire range of extrema in Poisson's ratio of cubic crystals. MgO is strongly auxetic along [110] at high temperatures.

  4. Diffusion abnormalities of the corpus callosum in patients receiving bevacizumab for malignant brain tumors: suspected treatment toxicity.

    PubMed

    Futterer, Stephen F; Nemeth, Alexander J; Grimm, Sean A; Ragin, Ann B; Chandler, James P; Muro, Kenji; Marymont, Maryanne H; Raizer, Jeffrey J

    2014-05-01

    Bevacizumab has been reported to cause diffusion restriction in the tumor bed of patients with malignant gliomas. This study evaluated prolonged diffusion restriction, in the corpus callosum (CC), of patients with malignant brain tumors treated with bevacizumab. We retrospectively reviewed our database of patients treated with bevacizumab for malignant brain tumors looking for those with restricted diffusion in the CC. CC ADC ratio measurements were obtained prior to and following treatment. Correlation was made with biopsy (n = 3) and MR perfusion (n = 7) and PET (n = 4). The temporal evolution of these changes relative to therapy was examined with mixed effects regression analysis. Nine patients (eight malignant gliomas, one malignant meningioma) out of 146 patients were found to have developed areas of diffusion restriction in the CC. These areas tended to enlarge and coalesce over serial MRIs and persisted for up to 22 months. Hypoperfusion was demonstrated in MR perfusion in 7/7. PET was hypometabolic in all 4. Biopsy of the CC showed no tumor in 3/3. ADC ratio measurements indicated a significant overall effect of time (F(16,60) = 11.2; p < 0.0001), consistent with persistent diffusion restriction over the measured time periods. Bevacizumab causes prolonged diffusion restriction in the CC. The negative MR perfusion, FDG PET and histopathology suggest this is a toxicity of bevacizumab and not active tumor. Awareness of these changes can assist in patient care. PMID:24574050

  5. Segmentation and Analysis of Corpus Callosum in Alzheimer MR Images using Total Variation Based Diffusion Filter and Level Set Method.

    PubMed

    Anandh, K R; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a common form of dementia that affects gray and white matter structures of brain. Manifestation of AD leads to cognitive deficits such as memory impairment problems, ability to think and difficulties in performing day to day activities. Although the etiology of this disease is unclear, imaging biomarkers are highly useful in the early diagnosis of AD. Magnetic resonance imaging is an indispensible non-invasive imaging modality that reflects both the geometry and pathology of the brain. Corpus Callosum (CC) is the largest white matter structure as well as the main inter-hemispheric fiber connection that undergoes regional alterations due to AD. Therefore, segmentation and feature extraction are predominantly essential to characterize the CC atrophy. In this work, an attempt has been made to segment CC using edge based level set method. Prior to segmentation, the images are pre-processed using Total Variation (TV) based diffusion filtering to enhance the edge information. Shape based geometric features are extracted from the segmented CC images to analyze the CC atrophy. Results show that the edge based level set method is able to segment CC in both the normal and AD images. TV based diffusion filtering has performed uniform region specific smoothing thereby preserving the texture and small scale details of the image. Consequently, the edge map of CC in both the normal and AD are apparently sharp and distinct with continuous boundaries. This facilitates the final contour to correctly segment CC from the nearby structures. The extracted geometric features such as area, perimeter and minor axis are found to have the percentage difference of 5.97%, 22.22% and 9.52% respectively in the demarcation of AD subjects. As callosal atrophy is significant in the diagnosis of AD, this study seems to be clinically useful. PMID:25996739

  6. Corpus callosum area in patients with bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Samuel; d’Albis, Marc-Antoine; McDonald, Colm; Linke, Julia; Wessa, Michèle; Phillips, Mary; Delavest, Marine; Emsell, Louise; Versace, Amelia; Almeida, Jorge; Mangin, Jean-François; Poupon, Cyril; Le Dudal, Katia; Daban, Claire; Hamdani, Nora; Leboyer, Marion; Houenou, Josselin

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported MRI abnormalities of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), although only a few studies have directly compared callosal areas in psychotic versus nonpsychotic patients with this disorder. We sought to compare regional callosal areas in a large international multicentre sample of patients with BD and healthy controls. Methods We analyzed anatomic T1 MRI data of patients with BD-I and healthy controls recruited from 4 sites (France, Germany, Ireland and the United States). We obtained the mid-sagittal areas of 7 CC subregions using an automatic CC delineation. Differences in regional callosal areas between patients and controls were compared using linear mixed models (adjusting for age, sex, handedness, brain volume, history of alcohol abuse/dependence, lithium or antipsychotic medication status, symptomatic status and site) and multiple comparisons correction. We also compared regional areas of the CC between patients with BD with and without a history of psychotic features. Results We included 172 patients and 146 controls in our study. Patients with BD had smaller adjusted mid-sagittal CC areas than controls along the posterior body, the isthmus and the splenium of the CC. Patients with a positive history of psychotic features had greater adjusted area of the rostral CC region than those without a history of psychotic features. Limitations We found small to medium effect sizes, and there was no calibration technique among the sites. Conclusion Our results suggest that BD with psychosis is associated with a different pattern of interhemispheric connectivity than BD without psychosis and could be considered a relevant neuroimaging subtype of BD. PMID:26151452

  7. The role of primary cilia in corpus callosum formation is mediated by production of the Gli3 repressor.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Anselme, Isabelle; Besse, Laurianne; Catala, Martin; Palmyre, Aurlien; Baas, Dominique; Paschaki, Marie; Pedraza, Maria; Mtin, Christine; Durand, Bndicte; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie

    2015-09-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a frequent brain disorder found in over 80 human congenital syndromes including ciliopathies. Here, we report a severe AgCC in Ftm/Rpgrip1l knockout mouse, which provides a valuable model for Meckel-Grber syndrome. Rpgrip1l encodes a protein of the ciliary transition zone, which is essential for ciliogenesis in several cell types in mouse including neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain. We show that AgCC in Rpgrip1l(-/-) mouse is associated with a disturbed location of guidepost cells in the dorsomedial telencephalon. This mislocalization results from early patterning defects and abnormal cortico-septal boundary (CSB) formation in the medial telencephalon. We demonstrate that all these defects primarily result from altered GLI3 processing. Indeed, AgCC, together with patterning defects and mispositioning of guidepost cells, is rescued by overexpressing in Rpgrip1l(-/-) embryos, the short repressor form of the GLI3 transcription factor (GLI3R), provided by the Gli3(?699) allele. Furthermore, Gli3(?699) also rescues AgCC in Rfx3(-/-) embryos deficient for the ciliogenic RFX3 transcription factor that regulates the expression of several ciliary genes. These data demonstrate that GLI3 processing is a major outcome of primary cilia function in dorsal telencephalon morphogenesis. Rescuing CC formation in two independent ciliary mutants by GLI3(?699) highlights the crucial role of primary cilia in maintaining the proper level of GLI3R required for morphogenesis of the CC. PMID:26071364

  8. Radiologic Determination of Corpus Callosum Injury in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Shin; Yang, Jin Seo; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Suk Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of corpus callosum injury (CCI) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) using brain MRI. We also performed a review of the clinical characteristics associated with this injury. Methods A total of 356 patients in the study were diagnosed with TBI, with 94 patients classified as having mild TBI. We included patients with mild TBI for further evaluation if they had normal findings via brain computed tomography (CT) scans and also underwent brain MRI in the acute phase following trauma. As assessed by brain MRI, CCI was defined as a high-signal lesion in T2 sagittal images and a corresponding low-signal lesion as determined by axial gradient echo (GRE) imaging. Based on these criteria, we divided patients into two groups for further analysis : Group I (TBI patients with CCI) and Group II (TBI patients without CCI). Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled in this study (including 16 patients in Group I and 40 patients in Group II). Analysis of clinical symptoms revealed a significant difference in headache severity between groups. Over 50% of patients in Group I experienced prolonged neurological symptoms including dizziness and gait disturbance and were more common in Group I than Group II (dizziness : 37 and 12% in Groups I and II, respectively; gait disturbance : 12 and 0% in Groups I and II, respectively). Conclusion The incidence of CCI in patients with mild TBI was approximately 29%. We suggest that brain MRI is a useful method to reveal the cause of persistent symptoms and predict clinical prognosis. PMID:26361529

  9. The microwave background anisotropies: Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation—fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 μK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1° and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe—the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  10. Multi-scale characterization of topographic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. G.; Koons, P. O.; Osti, B.; Upton, P.; Tucker, G. E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the every-direction variogram analysis (EVA) method for quantifying orientation and scale dependence of topographic anisotropy to aid in differentiation of the fluvial and tectonic contributions to surface evolution. Using multi-directional variogram statistics to track the spatial persistence of elevation values across a landscape, we calculate anisotropy as a multiscale, direction-sensitive variance in elevation between two points on a surface. Tectonically derived topographic anisotropy is associated with the three-dimensional kinematic field, which contributes (1) differential surface displacement and (2) crustal weakening along fault structures, both of which amplify processes of surface erosion. Based on our analysis, tectonic displacements dominate the topographic field at the orogenic scale, while a combination of the local displacement and strength fields are well represented at the ridge and valley scale. Drainage network patterns tend to reflect the geometry of underlying active or inactive tectonic structures due to the rapid erosion of faults and differential uplift associated with fault motion. Regions that have uniform environmental conditions and have been largely devoid of tectonic strain, such as passive coastal margins, have predominantly isotropic topography with typically dendritic drainage network patterns. Isolated features, such as stratovolcanoes, are nearly isotropic at their peaks but exhibit a concentric pattern of anisotropy along their flanks. The methods we provide can be used to successfully infer the settings of past or present tectonic regimes, and can be particularly useful in predicting the location and orientation of structural features that would otherwise be impossible to elude interpretation in the field. Though we limit the scope of this paper to elevation, EVA can be used to quantify the anisotropy of any spatially variable property.

  11. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  12. Impacts of dark matter particle annihilation on recombination and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Le; Chen Xuelei; Lei Yian; Si Zongguo

    2006-11-15

    The recombination history of the Universe provides a useful tool for constraining the annihilation of dark matter particles. Even a small fraction of dark matter particles annihilated during the cosmic dark age can provide sufficient energy to affect the ionization state of the baryonic gas. Although this effect is too small for neutralinos, lighter dark matter particle candidates, e.g. with mass of 1-100 MeV, which was proposed recently to explain the observed excess of positrons in the galactic center, may generate observable differences in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The annihilations at the era of recombination affects mainly the CMB anisotropy at small angular scales (large l), and is distinctively different from the effect of early reionization. We perform a multiparameter analysis of the CMB data, including both the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) first year and three year data, and the ACBAR, Boomerang, CBI, and VSA data. Assuming that the observed excess of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in the galactic center region is produced by dark matter annihilation, and that a sizable fraction of the energy produced in the annihilation is deposited in the baryonic gas during recombination, we obtain a 95% dark matter mass limit of M<8 MeV with the current data set.

  13. Anisotropy and micromagnetics in complex oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Thomas Andrew

    Complex oxide perovskites are a class of material with a remarkably wide range of functional properties including magnetism, superconductivity, metal-to-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and in some cases high magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Reduction in length scales through thin film deposition and nanopatterning results in altered properties from their bulk constituents. In this work, thin films of La0.7Sr0.3CoO3 (LSCO) and LSCO/La 0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) bilayers of varying thicknesses were deposited onto (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2TaAlO 6)0.7 (LSAT) substrates, and their anisotropic magnetic properties were measured along the in- plane [100] and [110] directions using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and soft x-ray magnetic spectroscopy. The LSCO showed thickness dependent magnetism, and films were non-magnetic below a critical thickness of 4 nm. Magnetic LSCO films showed unique anisotropic effects on the saturation magnetization (Ms), with a lower M s in the [110] direction than the [100] direction. This potentially indicates the existence of a hard component in the [110] direction that is not being switched at fields in the SQUID magnetometer (7 T). Normalized hysteresis loops indicate the LSCO films display little magnetocrystalline anisotropy within the plane of the film. LSCO/LSMO bilayers with a fixed LSMO layer of 6 nm in thickness showed cobalt magnetism at thicknesses where single layers were non-magnetic, suggesting that the substrate/film interface is not the cause of the non-magnetic layer in the LSCO thin films. Magnetic coupling occurs in bilayers with LSCO layer thicknesses of below 4 nm, and both LSCO and LSMO layers showed a [110] easy axis. When the layer thickness of LSCO was increased above 8 nm, the LSCO layer developed a soft component at the LSCO/LSMO interface. This soft LSCO component remained coupled with the LSMO, though the easy axis changed to the [100] direction, and the harder, non-interface LSCO maintained a [110] easy axis. To examine magnetocrystalline effects at further reduced length scales, a series of two-micron micromagnets of various shapes and orientations were patterned via argon ion implantation into LSMO thin films deposited on a SrTiO 3 substrates. The magnetic ground state was observed via x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM), directly probing the competition between magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies. Analysis of the images showed that the domain patterns consisted of a superposition of Landau and vortex patterns. A metric, named the vortex fraction, was formulated to quantify this behavior as a function of temperature and radius in circular micromagnets. Vortex fractions were used to compare X-PEEM images to simulations performed by the Object Oriented Micromagnetics Framework (OOMMF) and MuMax3 micromagnetics simulation software; results allowed for the extraction of magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant at sub-micron length scales from X-PEEM data. These results illustrate the potential for tuning magnetic ground states for future spintronic devices.

  14. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  15. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore » values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  16. Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Michael B.; Blaber, Martin G.; Schatz, George C.

    2014-06-01

    The a priori ability to design electromagnetic wave propagation is crucial for the development of novel metamaterials. Incorporating plasmonic building blocks is of particular interest due to their ability to confine visible light. Here we explore the use of anisotropy in nanoscale and mesoscale plasmonic array architectures to produce noble metal-based metamaterials with unusual optical properties. We find that the combination of nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy leads to rich opportunities for metamaterials throughout the visible and near-infrared. The low volume fraction (<5%) plasmonic metamaterials explored herein exhibit birefringence, a skin depth approaching that of pure metals for selected wavelengths, and directionally confined waves similar to those found in optical fibres. These data provide design principles with which the electromagnetic behaviour of plasmonic metamaterials can be tailored using high aspect ratio nanostructures that are accessible via a variety of synthesis and assembly methods.

  17. In Vivo Imaging of the Actin Polymerization State with Two-Photon Fluorescence Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Trifilieff, Pierre; Kandel, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    Using two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging of actin-GFP, we have developed a method for imaging the actin polymerization state that is applicable to a broad range of experimental systems extending from fixed cells to live animals. The incorporation of expressed actin-GFP monomers into endogenous actin polymers enables energy migration FRET (emFRET, or homoFRET) between neighboring actin-GFPs. This energy migration reduces the normally high polarization of the GFP fluorescence. We derive a simple relationship between the actin-GFP fluorescence polarization anisotropy and the actin polymer fraction, thereby enabling a robust means of imaging the actin polymerization state with high spatiotemporal resolution and providing what to the best of our knowledge are the first direct images of the actin polymerization state in live, adult brain tissue and live, intact Drosophila larvae. PMID:22404943

  18. Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Blaber, Martin G; Schatz, George C

    2014-01-01

    The a priori ability to design electromagnetic wave propagation is crucial for the development of novel metamaterials. Incorporating plasmonic building blocks is of particular interest due to their ability to confine visible light. Here we explore the use of anisotropy in nanoscale and mesoscale plasmonic array architectures to produce noble metal-based metamaterials with unusual optical properties. We find that the combination of nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy leads to rich opportunities for metamaterials throughout the visible and near-infrared. The low volume fraction (<5%) plasmonic metamaterials explored herein exhibit birefringence, a skin depth approaching that of pure metals for selected wavelengths, and directionally confined waves similar to those found in optical fibres. These data provide design principles with which the electromagnetic behaviour of plasmonic metamaterials can be tailored using high aspect ratio nanostructures that are accessible via a variety of synthesis and assembly methods. PMID:24934374

  19. Plagioclase preferred orientation and induced seismic anisotropy in mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Shao, Tongbin; Salisbury, Matthew H.; Sun, Shengsi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Changxing; Liang, Fenghua; Satsukawa, Takako

    2014-11-01

    Fractional crystallization and crystal segregation controlled by settling or floating of minerals during the cooling of magma can lead to layered structures in mafic and ultramafic intrusions in continental and oceanic settings in the lower crust. Thus, the seismic properties and fabrics of layered intrusions must be calibrated to gain insight into the origin of seismic reflections and anisotropy in the deep crust. To this end, we have measured P and S wave velocities and anisotropy in 17 plagioclase-rich mafic igneous rocks such as anorthosite and gabbro at hydrostatic pressures up to 650 MPa. Anorthosites and gabbroic anorthosites containing >80 vol% plagioclase and gabbros consisting of nearly equal modal contents of plagioclase and pyroxene display distinctive seismic anisotropy patterns: Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≥ 1 and Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≥ 1 for anorthosites while 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≤ 1 and 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≤ 1 for gabbros. Amphibolites lie in the same domain as gabbros, but show a significantly stronger tendency of Vp(X) > Vp(Y) than the gabbros. Laminated anorthosites with Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) ≪ Vp(Z) display a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of plagioclase whose (010) planes and [100] and [001] directions parallel to the foliation. For the gabbros and amphibolites characterized by Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) > Vp(Z) and Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), respectively, pyroxene and amphibole play a dominant role over plagioclase in the formation of seismic anisotropy. The Poisson's ratio calculated using the average P and S wave velocities from the three principal propagation-polarization directions (X, Y, and Z) of a highly anisotropic anorthosite cannot represent the value of a true isotropic equivalent. The CPO-induced anisotropy enhances and decreases the foliation-normal incidence reflectivity at gabbro-peridotite and anorthosite-peridotite interfaces, respectively.

  20. Quantification of microscopic diffusion anisotropy disentangles effects of orientation dispersion from microstructure: applications in healthy volunteers and in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Lasič, Samo; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C.; Englund, Elisabet; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Lätt, Jimmy; Topgaard, Daniel; Nilsson, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropy of water diffusion in brain tissue is affected by both disease and development. This change can be detected using diffusion MRI and is often quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Although FA is sensitive to anisotropic cell structures, such as axons, it is also sensitive to their orientation dispersion. This is a major limitation to the use of FA as a biomarker for “tissue integrity”, especially in regions of complex microarchitecture. In this work, we seek to circumvent this limitation by disentangling the effects of microscopic diffusion anisotropy from the orientation dispersion. The microscopic fractional anisotropy (μFA) and the order parameter (OP) were calculated from the contrast between signal prepared with directional and isotropic diffusion encoding, where the latter was achieved by magic angle spinning of the q-vector (qMAS). These parameters were quantified in healthy volunteers and in two patients; one patient with meningioma and one with glioblastoma. Finally, we used simulations to elucidate the relation between FA and μFA in various micro-architectures. Generally, μFA was high in the white matter and low in the gray matter. In the white matter, the largest differences between μFA and FA were found in crossing white matter and in interfaces between large white matter tracts, where μFA was high while FA was low. Both tumor types exhibited a low FA, in contrast to the μFA which was high in the meningioma and low in the glioblastoma, indicating that the meningioma contained disordered anisotropic structures, while the glioblastoma did not. This interpretation was confirmed by histological examination. We conclude that FA from DTI reflects both the amount of diffusion anisotropy and orientation dispersion. We suggest that the μFA and OP may complement FA by independently quantifying the microscopic anisotropy and the level of orientation coherence. PMID:25284306

  1. Magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial Cu/Ni/Cu nanolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, E. S.; O'Handley, R. C.; Ross, C. A.

    2004-06-01

    Continuous nickel films grown pseudoepitaxially between copper layers have been shown to have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to large magnetoelastic and interface magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies. These Cu/Ni/Cu films with tNi=6.9 nm have been patterned into lines approximately 200 nm wide using interferometric lithography and ion milling. Torque magnetometer measurements show the anisotropy of the nanolines to be significantly different from that of the continuous films. The magnetoelastic anisotropy (favoring perpendicular magnetization) decreases in the patterned films due to strain relaxation at the line edges. Although the anisotropy change for this line width is most likely due to shape anisotropy, we anticipate observation of magnetoelastic anisotropy due to strain relief at the edges of the lines at narrower line widths in future work.

  2. Tailored magnetic anisotropy in an amorphous trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yu; Barsukov, I.; Raanaei, H.; Spasova, M.; Lindner, J.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    An amorphous Co68Fe24Zr8(3 nm)/Al70Zr30(3 nm)/Co68Fe24Zr8(3 nm) trilayer system has been investigated using in-plane and out-of-plane angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance at different frequencies. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial, retaining its value of (2.9 ± 0.1) × 103 J/m3 for each magnetic layer, whereas its direction was tailored independently in an arbitrary manner by applying an external magnetic field during the film deposition. The perpendicular anisotropy constant, supposed to reflect the interface quality, is nearly identical for both layers. Furthermore, the magnetic layers act independently upon each other due to the absence of interlayer coupling.

  3. Statistical anisotropy in the inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtanov, Yuri; Pyatkovska, Hanna

    2009-07-01

    During cosmological inflation, quasiclassical perturbations are permanently generated on super-Hubble spatial scales, their power spectrum being determined by the fundamental principles of quantum field theory. By the end of inflation, they serve as primeval seeds for structure formation in the universe. At early stages of inflation, such perturbations break homogeneity and isotropy of the inflationary background. In the present paper, we perturbatively take into account this quasiclassical background inhomogeneity of the inflationary universe while considering the evolution of small-scale (sub-Hubble) quantum modes. As a result, the power spectrum of primordial perturbations develops statistical anisotropy, which can subsequently manifest itself in the large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background. The statistically anisotropic contribution to the primordial power spectrum is predicted to have almost scale-invariant form dominated by a quadrupole. Theoretical expectation of the magnitude of this anisotropy depends on the assumptions about the physics in the trans-Planckian region of wave numbers.

  4. Statistical anisotropy in the inflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Shtanov, Yuri; Pyatkovska, Hanna

    2009-07-15

    During cosmological inflation, quasiclassical perturbations are permanently generated on super-Hubble spatial scales, their power spectrum being determined by the fundamental principles of quantum field theory. By the end of inflation, they serve as primeval seeds for structure formation in the universe. At early stages of inflation, such perturbations break homogeneity and isotropy of the inflationary background. In the present paper, we perturbatively take into account this quasiclassical background inhomogeneity of the inflationary universe while considering the evolution of small-scale (sub-Hubble) quantum modes. As a result, the power spectrum of primordial perturbations develops statistical anisotropy, which can subsequently manifest itself in the large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background. The statistically anisotropic contribution to the primordial power spectrum is predicted to have almost scale-invariant form dominated by a quadrupole. Theoretical expectation of the magnitude of this anisotropy depends on the assumptions about the physics in the trans-Planckian region of wave numbers.

  5. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  6. Local anisotropy of fluids using Minkowski tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapfer, S. C.; Mickel, W.; Schaller, F. M.; Spanner, M.; Goll, C.; Nogawa, T.; Ito, N.; Mecke, K.; Schröder-Turk, G. E.

    2010-11-01

    Statistics of the free volume available to individual particles have previously been studied for simple and complex fluids, granular matter, amorphous solids, and structural glasses. Minkowski tensors provide a set of shape measures that are based on strong mathematical theorems and easily computed for polygonal and polyhedral bodies such as free volume cells (Voronoi cells). They characterize the local structure beyond the two-point correlation function and are suitable to define indices 0 <= βνa, b <= 1 of local anisotropy. Here, we analyze the statistics of Minkowski tensors for configurations of simple liquid models, including the ideal gas (Poisson point process), the hard disks and hard spheres ensemble, and the Lennard-Jones fluid. We show that Minkowski tensors provide a robust characterization of local anisotropy, which ranges from βνa, b≈0.3 for vapor phases to \\beta_\

  7. Cosmic-ray streaming and anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Gleeson, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the differential current densities and anisotropies that exist in the interplanetary cosmic-ray gas, and in particular with a correct formulation and simple interpretation of the momentum equation that describes these on a local basis. Two examples of the use of this equation in the interpretation of previous data are given. It is demonstrated that in interplanetary space, the electric-field drifts and convective flow parallel to the magnetic field of cosmic-ray particles combine as a simple convective flow with the solar wind, and that there exist diffusive currents and transverse gradient drift currents. Thus direct reference to the interplanetary electric-field drifts is eliminated, and the study of steady-state and transient cosmic-ray anisotropies is both more systematic and simpler.

  8. Induced electronic anisotropy in bismuth thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Albert D.; Yao, Mengliang; Opeil, Cyril; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Li, Mingda; Tang, Shuang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-08-11

    We use magneto-resistance measurements to investigate the effect of texturing in polycrystalline bismuth thin films. Electrical current in bismuth films with texturing such that all grains are oriented with the trigonal axis normal to the film plane is found to flow in an isotropic manner. By contrast, bismuth films with no texture such that not all grains have the same crystallographic orientation exhibit anisotropic current flow, giving rise to preferential current flow pathways in each grain depending on its orientation. Extraction of the mobility and the phase coherence length in both types of films indicates that carrier scattering is not responsible for the observed anisotropic conduction. Evidence from control experiments on antimony thin films suggests that the anisotropy is a result of bismuth's large electron effective mass anisotropy.

  9. Microwave background anisotropies in quasiopen inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Garriga, Jaume; Montes, Xavier

    1999-10-01

    Quasiopenness seems to be generic to multifield models of single-bubble open inflation. Instead of producing infinite open universes, these models actually produce an ensemble of very large but finite inflating islands. In this paper we study the possible constraints from CMB anisotropies on existing models of open inflation. The effect of supercurvature anisotropies combined with the quasiopenness of the inflating regions make some models incompatible with observations, and severely reduces the parameter space of others. Supernatural open inflation and the uncoupled two-field model seem to be ruled out due to these constraints for values of Ω0<~0.98. Others, such as the open hybrid inflation model with suitable parameters for the slow roll potential can be made compatible with observations.

  10. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-17

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above T(C) and up to T*≈200-225 °C. Above T*, however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization. PMID:26230825

  11. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-01

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above TC and up to T*≈2 00 - 2 2 5 °C . Above T* , however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization.

  12. Tailored magnetic anisotropy in an amorphous trilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yu; Barsukov, I.; Spasova, M.; Lindner, J.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Raanaei, H.; Hjoervarsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    An amorphous Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm)/Al{sub 70}Zr{sub 30}(3 nm)/Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm) trilayer system has been investigated using in-plane and out-of-plane angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance at different frequencies. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial, retaining its value of (2.9 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 3} J/m{sup 3} for each magnetic layer, whereas its direction was tailored independently in an arbitrary manner by applying an external magnetic field during the film deposition. The perpendicular anisotropy constant, supposed to reflect the interface quality, is nearly identical for both layers. Furthermore, the magnetic layers act independently upon each other due to the absence of interlayer coupling.

  13. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  14. The Future of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman P.

    2007-01-01

    In the 1970s, the movement to the metric system (which has still not completely occurred in the United States) and the advent of hand-held calculators led some to speculate that decimal representation of numbers would render fractions obsolete. This provocative proposition stimulated Zalman Usiskin to write "The Future of Fractions" in 1979. He…

  15. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems…

  16. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  17. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems

  18. Self-referential and social cognition in a case of autism and agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While models of autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are emerging at the genetic level of analysis, clear models at higher levels of analysis, such as neuroanatomy, are lacking. Here we examine agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) as a model at the level of neuroanatomy that may be relevant for understanding self-referential and social-cognitive difficulties in ASC. Methods We examined performance on a wide array of tests in self-referential and social-cognitive domains in a patient with both AgCC and a diagnosis of ASC. Tests included a depth-of-processing memory paradigm with self-referential and social-cognitive manipulations, self-report measures of self-consciousness, alexithymia, and empathy, as well as performance measures of first-person pronoun usage and mentalizing ability. The performance of the AgCC patient was compared to a group of individuals with ASC but without AgCC and with neurotypical controls. These comparison groups come from a prior study where group differences were apparent across many measures. We used bootstrapping to assess whether the AgCC patient exhibited scores that were within or outside the 95% bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap confidence intervals observed in both comparison groups. Results Within the depth-of-processing memory paradigm, the AgCC patient showed decreased memory sensitivity that was more extreme than both comparison groups across all conditions. The patient’s most pronounced difficulty on this task emerged in the social-cognitive domain related to information-processing about other people. The patient was similar to the ASC group in benefiting less from self-referential processing compared to the control group. Across a variety of other self-referential (i.e. alexithymia, private self-consciousness) and social-cognitive measures (i.e. self-reported imaginative and perspective-taking subscales of empathy, mentalizing), the AgCC patient also showed more extreme scores than those observed for both of the comparison groups. However, the AgCC patient scored within the range observed in the comparison groups on measures of first-person pronoun usage and self-reported affective empathy subscales. Conclusions We conclude that AgCC co-occurring with a diagnosis of ASC may be a relevant model at the level of neuroanatomy for understanding mechanisms involved in self-referential and high-level social-cognitive difficulties in ASC. PMID:23171505

  19. Anisotropy of wood in the microwave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Čepič, Mojca

    2010-05-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of wood), which is evident from the observable anisotropic structure of wood, they may serve as a demonstration for explaining the anisotropic properties in crystals in the optical region.

  20. Optical and neural anisotropy in peripheral vision

    PubMed Central

    Zheleznyak, Len; Barbot, Antoine; Ghosh, Atanu; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Optical blur in the peripheral retina is known to be highly anisotropic due to nonrotationally symmetric wavefront aberrations such as astigmatism and coma. At the neural level, the visual system exhibits anisotropies in orientation sensitivity across the visual field. In the fovea, the visual system shows higher sensitivity for cardinal over diagonal orientations, which is referred to as the oblique effect. However, in the peripheral retina, the neural visual system becomes more sensitive to radially-oriented signals, a phenomenon known as the meridional effect. Here, we examined the relative contributions of optics and neural processing to the meridional effect in 10 participants at 0°, 10°, and 20° in the temporal retina. Optical anisotropy was quantified by measuring the eye's habitual wavefront aberrations. Alternatively, neural anisotropy was evaluated by measuring contrast sensitivity (at 2 and 4 cyc/deg) while correcting the eye's aberrations with an adaptive optics vision simulator, thus bypassing any optical factors. As eccentricity increased, optical and neural anisotropy increased in magnitude. The average ratio of horizontal to vertical optical MTF (at 2 and 4 cyc/deg) at 0°, 10°, and 20° was 0.96 ± 0.14, 1.41 ± 0.54 and 2.15 ± 1.38, respectively. Similarly, the average ratio of horizontal to vertical contrast sensitivity with full optical correction at 0°, 10°, and 20° was 0.99 ± 0.15, 1.28 ± 0.28 and 1.75 ± 0.80, respectively. These results indicate that the neural system's orientation sensitivity coincides with habitual blur orientation. These findings support the neural origin of the meridional effect and raise important questions regarding the role of peripheral anisotropic optical quality in developing the meridional effect and emmetropization. PMID:26928220

  1. Deformation-Induced Anisotropy of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    New theory calculates anisotropies induced by large deformations in polymers. Theory was developed primarily for calculating anistropy of thermal expansivity, but is also applicable to thermal conductivity, elastic moduli and other properties. Theory assumes that in isotropic state, long polymer chains are randomly coiled and not oriented in particular direction. They acquire an orientation when material is deformed. As average molecular orientation increases with deformation, properties of bulk material exhibit averaging of the microscopic anistropies of the oriented molecular segments.

  2. Optical and neural anisotropy in peripheral vision.

    PubMed

    Zheleznyak, Len; Barbot, Antoine; Ghosh, Atanu; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2016-03-01

    Optical blur in the peripheral retina is known to be highly anisotropic due to nonrotationally symmetric wavefront aberrations such as astigmatism and coma. At the neural level, the visual system exhibits anisotropies in orientation sensitivity across the visual field. In the fovea, the visual system shows higher sensitivity for cardinal over diagonal orientations, which is referred to as the oblique effect. However, in the peripheral retina, the neural visual system becomes more sensitive to radially-oriented signals, a phenomenon known as the meridional effect. Here, we examined the relative contributions of optics and neural processing to the meridional effect in 10 participants at 0°, 10°, and 20° in the temporal retina. Optical anisotropy was quantified by measuring the eye's habitual wavefront aberrations. Alternatively, neural anisotropy was evaluated by measuring contrast sensitivity (at 2 and 4 cyc/deg) while correcting the eye's aberrations with an adaptive optics vision simulator, thus bypassing any optical factors. As eccentricity increased, optical and neural anisotropy increased in magnitude. The average ratio of horizontal to vertical optical MTF (at 2 and 4 cyc/deg) at 0°, 10°, and 20° was 0.96 ± 0.14, 1.41 ± 0.54 and 2.15 ± 1.38, respectively. Similarly, the average ratio of horizontal to vertical contrast sensitivity with full optical correction at 0°, 10°, and 20° was 0.99 ± 0.15, 1.28 ± 0.28 and 1.75 ± 0.80, respectively. These results indicate that the neural system's orientation sensitivity coincides with habitual blur orientation. These findings support the neural origin of the meridional effect and raise important questions regarding the role of peripheral anisotropic optical quality in developing the meridional effect and emmetropization. PMID:26928220

  3. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy beneath the Pakistan Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvol, Eric A.; Ni, James F.; Hearn, Thomas M.; Roecker, Steve

    1994-07-01

    Teleseismics S, SKS, and SKKS data, collected from a temporary broadband array across the Himalayan front in Pakistan, are analyzed for shear-wave splitting parameters. The SKS and SKKS phases have ray paths originating from both the South Pacific and Colombia which have azimuths approximately 40 deg apart with respect to the Pakistan array. If significant seismic azimuthal anisotropy is present we should observe splitting associated with one of these ray paths. No evidence was seen for any shear-wave splitting beneath any of the stations in the array. Teleseismic S waves were also used in order to provide better azimuthal coverage for the shear-wave splitting measurements. We were able to correct for any source-side anisotropy when needed. No receiver-side splitting was observed in any of the S wave data. The lack of shear-wave splitting beneath the Pakistan array indicates that there is no appreciable large-scale azimuthal anisotropy beneath this part of the Himalayas. Therefore, if there is any significant strain in the upper mantle beneath this area, it must either be vertically oriented, or, if horizontal, vertically vary in such a way that the integrated effect on S wave splitting is null.

  4. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  5. Precipitate induced anisotropy effects inaluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglesong, T.; Sehitoglu, H.; Maeir, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    A physically-based hardening formulation, derived from dislocation theory, was incorporated into a polycrystal model and applied to a binary aluminum-copper precipitation-hardened alloy. The alloy was heat treated at 190^{circ}C and 260^{circ}C for various times and was studied in both polycrystal and single crystal forms. Single crystals eliminated the complicating effects of grain boundaries allowing clear determination of the active deformation mechanisms, as well as a detailed study of the effect of precipitates on the flow anisotropy behavior. Different deformation mechanisms were observed corresponding to the degree of coherency between the precipitate and the matrix. The influence of precipitate-induced anisotropy on single crystal flow behavior was clearly established, again relating to the precipitate character and included in the hardening description. The physically-based hardening formulation was comprised of both statistical and geometrical storage components. Model results were compared to single crystal and polycrystal compression experiments. Accurate simulations were obtained for most of the aging conditions and the correct trends due to precipitate-induced anisotropy were predicted.

  6. Empirical model of whistler anisotropy instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Seough, Jung Joon; Lee, Junggi; An, Junmo; Lee, Jae Ok

    2011-10-15

    Empirical formulae for the real frequency and growth rate associated with the whistler anisotropy instability are obtained. The electrons are assumed to have an anisotropic distribution function, with Maxwellian parallel distribution. Under such an assumption complex roots of the dispersion relation depend only on two dimensionless parameters, namely, the temperature anisotropy factor A = T{sub perpendiculare}/T{sub ||e} - 1, where T{sub perpendiculare} and T{sub ||e} are the perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures, respectively, and parallel electron beta, {beta}{sub ||} = (8{pi}nT{sub ||e}/B{sup 2}){sup 1/2}, where n and B are the plasma density and magnetic field intensity, respectively. Comparison against exact numerical roots show that analytical formulae describe the whistler instability over a wide range of parallel electron beta and temperature anisotropy factor. The present result may be useful for circumstances in which the use of exact numerical roots becomes impractical, such as in the radiation belt quasi-linear transport coefficient calculation.

  7. Engineering Functional Anisotropy in Fibrocartilage Neotissues

    PubMed Central

    MacBarb, R.F.; Chen, A.L.; Hu, J.C.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The knee meniscus, intervertebral disc, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc all possess complex geometric shapes and anisotropic matrix organization. While these characteristics are imperative for proper tissue function, they are seldom recapitulated following injury or disease. Thus, this study’s objective was to engineer fibrocartilages that capture both gross and molecular structural features of native tissues. Self-assembled TMJ discs were selected as the model system, as the disc exhibits a unique biconcave shape and functional anisotropy. To drive anisotropy, 50:50 co-cultures of meniscus cells and articular chondrocytes were grown in biconcave, TMJ-shaped molds and treated with two exogenous stimuli: biomechanical (BM) stimulation via passive axial compression and bioactive agent (BA) stimulation via chondroitinase-ABC and transforming growth factor-β1. BM+BA synergistically increased Col/WW, Young’s modulus, and ultimate tensile strength 5.8-fold, 14.7-fold, and 13.8-fold that of controls, respectively; it also promoted collagen fibril alignment akin to native tissue. Finite element analysis found BM stimulation to create direction-dependent strains within the neotissue, suggesting shape plays an essential role toward driving in vitro anisotropic neotissue development. Methods used in this study offer insight on the ability to achieve physiologic anisotropy in biomaterials through the strategic application of spatial, biomechanical, and biochemical cues. PMID:24075479

  8. Dynamical anisotropy of the optical propagation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Pisklin, Maksim V.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of laser beam intensity profile spatial modulations over a model tropospheric path with the controlled meteorological parameters was studied. Influence of the underlying surface temperature as well as the side wind load were considered. The increase of dynamic anisotropic disturbances saturation with the path length was observed. Spatio-temporal correlation characteristics of the directivity pattern in the signal beam registration plane were obtained. Proposed method of the experimental samples analysis on the base of chronogram with the following definition of the dynamic structure tensors array allows to estimate local and averaged projections of the flow velocities over the chosen spatio-temporal region and to restore their geometry in the zone of intersection with the signal beam. Additional characteristics suggested for the diagonalized local structure tensors such as local energy capacity and local structuredness are informative for the estimation of the inhomogeneities spatial dimensions, time of access through the section considered, the dynamics of energetic jets. The concepts of rotational and translational dynamic anisotropy are introduced to discriminate the types of the changes of the local ellipsoids axes orientation as well as their values. Rotational anisotropy shows itself in the changes of the local ellipsoids orientation, thus characterizing the illumination variation over the beam cross-section. Translational anisotropy describes the difference between the axes values for local ellipsoids.

  9. When One Plus One Does Not Equal Two: Fluorescence Anisotropy in Aggregates and Multiply Labeled Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zolmajd-Haghighi, Zahra; Hanley, Quentin S.

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of fluorescence anisotropy and polarization in systems with multiple dyes is well known. Homo-FRET and its consequent energy migration cause the fluorescence anisotropy to decrease as the number of like fluorophores within energy transfer distance increases. This behavior is well understood when all subunits within a cluster are saturated with fluorophores. However, incomplete labeling as might occur from a mixture of endogenous and labeled monomer units, incomplete saturation of binding sites, or photobleaching produces stochastic mixtures. Models in widespread and longstanding use that describe these mixtures apply an assumption of equal fluorescence efficiency for all sites first stated by Weber and Daniel in 1966. The assumption states that fluorophores have the same brightness when free in solution as they do in close proximity to each other in a cluster. The assumption simplifies descriptions of anisotropy trends as the fractional labeling of the cluster changes. However, fluorophores in close proximity often exhibit nonadditivity due to such things as self-quenching behavior or exciplex formation. Therefore, the anisotropy of stochastic mixtures of fluorophore clusters of a particular size will depend on the behavior of those fluorophores in clusters. We present analytical expressions for fractionally labeled clusters exhibiting a range of behaviors, and experimental results from two systems: an assembled tetrameric cluster of fluorescent proteins and stochastically labeled bovine serum albumin containing up to 24 fluorophores. The experimental results indicate that clustered species do not follow the assumption of equal fluorescence efficiency in the systems studied with clustered fluorophores showing reduced fluorescence intensity. Application of the assumption of equal fluorescence efficiency will underpredict anisotropy and consequently underestimate cluster size in these two cases. The theoretical results indicate that careful selection of the fractional labeling in strongly quenched systems will enhance opportunities to determine cluster sizes, making accessible larger clusters than are currently considered possible. PMID:24703307

  10. The K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 is mutant in a severe peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Howard, Heidi C; Mount, David B; Rochefort, Daniel; Byun, Nellie; Dupr, Nicolas; Lu, Jianming; Fan, Xuemo; Song, Luyan; Rivire, Jean-Baptiste; Prvost, Claude; Horst, Jrgen; Simonati, Alessandro; Lemcke, Beate; Welch, Rick; England, Roger; Zhan, Frank Q; Mercado, Adriana; Siesser, William B; George, Alfred L; McDonald, Michael P; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Mathieu, Jean; Delpire, Eric; Rouleau, Guy A

    2002-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a severe sensorimotor neuropathy associated with mental retardation, dysmorphic features and complete or partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. ACCPN is transmitted in an autosomal recessive fashion and is found at a high frequency in the province of Quebec, Canada. ACCPN has been previously mapped to chromosome 15q. The gene SLC12A6 (solute carrier family 12, member 6), which encodes the K+-Cl- transporter KCC3 and maps within the ACCPN candidate region, was screened for mutations in individuals with ACCPN. Four distinct protein-truncating mutations were found: two in the French Canadian population and two in non-French Canadian families. The functional consequence of the predominant French Canadian mutation (2436delG, Thr813fsX813) was examined by heterologous expression of wildtype and mutant KCC3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes; the truncated mutant is appropriately glycosylated and expressed at the cellular membrane, where it is non-functional. Mice generated with a targeted deletion of Slc12a6 have a locomotor deficit, peripheral neuropathy and a sensorimotor gating deficit, similar to the human disease. Our findings identify mutations in SLC12A6 as the genetic lesion underlying ACCPN and suggest a critical role for SLC12A6 in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. PMID:12368912

  11. EphB1 and EphB2 intracellular domains regulate the formation of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure.

    PubMed

    Robichaux, Michael A; Chenaux, George; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Soskis, Michael J; Greenberg, Michael E; Henkemeyer, Mark; Cowan, Christopher W

    2016-04-01

    The two cortical hemispheres of the mammalian forebrain are interconnected by major white matter tracts, including the corpus callosum (CC) and the posterior branch of the anterior commissure (ACp), that bridge the telencephalic midline. We show here that the intracellular signaling domains of the EphB1 and EphB2 receptors are critical for formation of both the ACp and CC. We observe partial and complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, as well as highly penetrant ACp misprojection phenotypes in truncated EphB1/2 mice that lack intracellular signaling domains. Consistent with the roles for these receptors in formation of the CC and ACp, we detect expression of these receptors in multiple brain regions associated with the formation of these forebrain structures. Taken together, our findings suggest that a combination of forward and reverse EphB1/2 receptor-mediated signaling contribute to ACp and CC axon guidance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 405-420, 2016. PMID:26148571

  12. Inflammatory response and chemokine expression in the white matter corpus callosum and gray matter cortex region during cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, J P; Berger, K; Awad, H; Clarner, T; Beyer, C; Kipp, M

    2012-09-01

    Brain inflammation plays a central role in multiple sclerosis (MS). Besides lymphocytes, the astroglia and microglia mainly contribute to the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in MS lesions. Several studies were able to demonstrate that cortical lesions are characterized by lower levels of inflammatory cells among activated microglia/macrophages. The underlying mechanisms for this difference, however, remain to be clarified. In the current study, we compared the kinetics and extent of microglia and astrocyte activation during early and late cuprizone-induced demyelination in the white matter tract corpus callosum and the telencephalic gray matter. Cellular parameters were related to the expression profiles of the chemokines Ccl2 and Ccl3. We are clearly able to demonstrate that both regions are characterized by early oligodendrocyte stress/apoptosis with concomitant microglia activation and delayed astrocytosis. The extent of microgliosis/astrocytosis appeared to be greater in the subcortical white matter tract corpus callosum compared to the gray matter cortex region. The same holds true for the expression of the key chemokines Ccl2 and Ccl3. The current study defines a model to study early microglia activation and to investigate differences in the neuroinflammatory response of white vs. gray matter. PMID:22528463

  13. Tempered fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad

    Tempered fractional Brownian motion (TFBM) modifies the power law kernel in the moving average representation of a fractional Brownian motion (FBM), adding an exponential tempering. It also has a harmonizable representation. The increments of TFBM are stationary, and the autocovariance of the resulting tempered fractional Gaussian noise (TFGN) has semi-long range dependence, in which the autocorrelations decay like a power law over a moderate length scale, but eventually fall off more rapidly. TFBM can be represented as the linear combination of tempered fractional derivative (or tempered fractional integral) of the indicator functions. This representation and the classical Ito isometry provides to characterize the class of all deterministic functions for which the stochastic integral with respect to TFBM is well defined. Replacing the Gaussian random measure (Brownian motion) in the moving average or harmonizable representation of TFBM by a stable random measure, a linear tempered fractional stable motion (LTFSM), or a real harmonizable tempered fractional stable motion (HTFSM), respectively. Unlike the Gaussian case, LTFSM and HTFSM are two completely different processes. Existence, basic properties, sample path behavior, and dependence structure of both processes will be described.

  14. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub-threshold nerve propagation. By expanding the range of mathematical operations to include fractional calculus, we can develop new and potentially useful functional relationships for modeling complex biological systems in a direct and rigorous manner. PMID:15248549

  15. Depth-dependent anisotropy in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinero, L.; Kendall, M.

    2001-12-01

    The tectonics of the Caribbean plate is controlled by its interaction with four other plates, the North American (NA), the South American (SA), the Nazca and the Cocos. Deformation along the east and the west boundaries is controlled by subduction - the Atlantic oceanic plate subducts beneath the Lesser Antilles trench in the east and the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Middle America trench in the west. The northern boundary is characterized by dextral strike-slip faulting to the east and a minor spreading center, the Cayman trough, in the west. The southern boundary zone is a complex and wide deformation zone consisting of a right-lateral transpressional fault connecting trench zones at either end where the Caribbean plate subducts beneath continental South America in the west and oceanic South America subducts beneath continental South America in the east. Our aim is to use observations of anisotropy to help characterise the style of mantle flow in the Caribbean region. We present preliminary estimates of seismic anisotropy obtained from shear-wave splitting analyses of SKS, SKKS and local S-phases. SKS and SKKS splitting has been analysed at the Caribbean IRIS stations, SDV (Santo Domingo, Venezuela), JTS (Costa Rica) and BOCO (Bogota, Colombia). The polarisation of the fast shear-wave correlates well with surface structural features, suggesting at first glance a continuity in mantle and crustal structures. However, a 90 degree periodicity in shear-wave splitting parameters with backazimuth is clearly observed at SJG, and to a lessor extent at SDV, implying depth-dependent variation in mantle anisotropy. Forward modelling suggest a 2-layer model of anisotropy with polarization directions of ? 1=246o and ? 2=270o and delay times of ? t1=1 s and ? t2=0.5 s. The lower layer aligns with the APM direction and the upper layer with the surface geology at the station. To gain further insight into variations in anisotropy with depth we analyse S--phases recorded on the Venezuelan Seismological Network in the northern eastern part of Venezuela. Given the limited number of stations but an abundance of seismicity, many events lie outside the shear-wave window. To better exploit this dataset we use a predictions of near-surface anisotropy and the associated free--surface effects to guide the interpretation of S-phases splitting outside the shear-wave window. Preliminary analysis suggests an average polarisation direction of 81 degrees, which corresponds well with the major structural features present in the area (e.g., the El Pilar fault) and with previous studies of SKS and SKKS phases done by Russo et al. (1993). The results to date suggest that the crust and mantle are coupled during deformation, but that deeper anisotropy may reflect current mantle flow patterns.

  16. Optical anisotropy in packed isotropic spherical particles: indication of nanometer scale anisotropy in packing structure.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the origin of birefringence in colloidal films of spherical silica particles. Although each particle is optically isotropic in shape, colloidal films formed by drop drying demonstrated birefringence. While periodic particle structures were observed in silica colloidal films, no regular pattern was found in blended films of silica and latex particles. However, since both films showed birefringence, regular film structure patterns were not required to exhibit birefringence. Instead, we propose that nanometer-scale film structure anisotropy causes birefringence. Due to capillary flow from the center to the edge of a cast suspension, particles are more tightly packed in the radial direction. Directional packing results in nanometer-scale anisotropy. The difference in the interparticle distance between radial and circumferential axes was estimated to be 10 nm at most. Nanometer-scale anisotropy in colloidal films and the subsequent optical properties are discussed. PMID:23340745

  17. Fabrication of electrodeposited Co nanowire arrays with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shihui; Ma, Xiao; Li, Chao; Li, Wei

    2001-05-01

    Co nanowire arrays have been electrodeposited into polycarbonate membranes with nanosized pores at different voltages. By means of X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, their microstructures and magnetic properties were investigated at full length. The sample prepared at -1.2 V, 250 mA/cm 2 shows perpendicular anisotropy, but the one deposited at -1.0V, 125 mA/cm 2 has no perpendicular anisotropy. This different magnetic behavior can be explained from their different microstructures. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction evidence that the former sample is amorphous, and the latter is polycrystalline. In the polycrystalline sample, due to the competition of shape anisotropy and magnetocrystal anisotropy, the sample does not display perpendicular anisotropy. But magnetocrystal anisotropy is very small in amorphous sample, therefore, shape anisotropy plays a dominant role which leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy because of shape anisotropy. Furthermore, applying a magnetic field during deposition, Co grains will preferentially grow with c-axis along the wire axis, which also leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy.

  18. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  19. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  20. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.

  1. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  2. Anisotropies observed within ejecta during solar particle onsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    1995-01-01

    The observation of solar energetic particle onsets within ejecta material suggests that the magnetic field topology of these ejecta is more likely to be that of a 'magnetic bottle' rooted at the Sun than that of a detached plasmoid-like structure. Another possibility is that only open field lines are present. We examine the anisotropies of particle onsets which onset inside ejecta material. A striking feature of a significant fraction of these events is that they show, at onset, strong flows from the east of the Sun, in contrast to the flows from the west usually observed at the onset of solar particle events outside of ejecta. This observation confirms that magnetic field lines can be strongly distorted inside ejecta so as to lie nearly opposite to the Parker spiral direction. This conclusion is fully consistent with the presence of looped magnetic structures in ejecta. If only open field lines are present, it is unclear how these large field line distortions could have been produced.

  3. Upper mantle anisotropy structure beneath eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Chen, X.

    2013-12-01

    Continental collision between the Indian and the Eurasian plates resulted in uplift of the Tibetan plateau and the thickening of the crust. A lot of work has been done on the crust structures beneath Tibet, and several tectonic models are proposed to explain the mechanism of the uplift and thickening. But due to the absence of the upper mantle structures, those models are still under debate. Fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures can help us understand the dynamic process of the Tibetan plateau. Previous studies used shear wave splitting and surface wave analysis to study anisotropy structures beneath the Tibetan plateau. But those two methods provide a poor vertical resolution in upper mantle. Waveform modeling of upper mantle triplication phases can provide a good vertical resolution, but present methods for calculating synthetic seismograms cannot process anisotropic media. We develop a method based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagating in stratified VTI media, so we can waveform model upper mantle triplications propagating in anisotropic media. Recently, the increasing number of permanent and temporary seismic stations near Tibet provides us a good opportunity to study fine upper mantle structures beneath the Tibetan plateau. In this study, we waveform model the tangential and radial seismic triplication data recorded in Chinese digital seismic stations at a epicentral distance of 10-30 degree for several events occurring in middle Tibet to constrain fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures beneath eastern Tibet. We also use mineral physics modeling method to explore thermal and compositional models that would explain the inferred seismic structures.

  4. Structure and Anisotropy Beneath Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeler, A.; Gu, Y. J.; Steckler, M. S.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    2007-12-01

    The crust and upper mantle structures beneath southern Italy are often associated with rollback and fragmentation of the Western Mediterranean subduction zone in the past 30 million years. In this study, we utilize broadband records from the Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction Collision-Accretion Network (CAT/SCAN) to probe the effect of the past and on-going plate motions beneath this region. Waveforms from two distinct frequency ranges are examined in detail using both forward and inverse waveform modeling approaches, and the resulting 1-D models for each path are subjected to a Monte-Carlo uncertainty test. By analyzing the Love and Rayleigh waves from two regional earthquakes during the temporary deployment between 2003 and 2005, we are able to retrieve information on the anisotropic seismic structure down to 200-km depth. Our study shows that the average seismic structure beneath Calabria/Apulia is significantly faster than that beneath the Apenninic mountain chain. Sharp changes in seismic velocities, regardless of wave polarizations, lend strong support for the distinct geologic histories of the major tectonic units. The difference between Love- and Rayleigh-wave models provides further constraints on the dynamic processes and crust/mantle fabric beneath the study area. Our preliminary results show relatively minor anisotropy beneath the southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea and Calabrian Arc region, which could be partially explained by the rapid changes in the alignment of olivine fast crystallographic-axes due to the complex arc geometry. The ray paths connecting the Ionian Sea and the Southern Apennines reveal strong anisotropy, where transversely polarized waves travel at higher speeds than vertically polarized waves. Both "frozen-in" and flow-induced anisotropy could contribute to the observed waveform differences between the Love and Rayleigh waves sampling this region.

  5. Detecting Mantle Anisotropy with Marine CSEM Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, S.; Key, K. W.; Behrens, J. P.; MacGregor, L.; Evans, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    We can detect transverse electrical anisotropy in the oceanic crust and upper mantle using circular transmitter tows around a pair of highly sensitive controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) receivers. Our long-wire electromagnetic (LEM) receivers, equipped with 100-200 m antennas, improve signal to noise by about an order of magnitude over standard EM receivers using 8-10 m antennas. LEMs work well in deep water where voltage noise from electrodes and amplifiers dominates, and electric field noise from magnetotelluric signals and water motion is low. When combined with SUESI, our marine EM transmitter, which emits 300 amps across a 250 m antenna, noise floors of 10-17~V/Am2 may be obtained at 2-4 Hz over 40-minute stacks. Towing a transmitter in a 30 km circle around an orthogonal pair of LEMs samples propagation though the crust and upper mantle in all horizontal directions. This purely azimuthal geometry generates linearly polarized data for an isotropic earth, but in the presence of anisotropy the minor axis of the polarization ellipse develops a characteristic clover-leaf pattern when plotted against source-receiver direction, and the major axis becomes elongated. We have conducted such experiments on 40 Ma lithosphere offshore California (the APPLE experiment), and 24 Ma lithosphere as it subducts into the Nicaraguan trench (part of the SERPENT expedition). Both regions produce remarkably similar results, with increased conductivity in the fossil ridge-parallel directions, which we interpret to be caused by serpentinized mantle-penetrating faults. This pattern of anisotropy is modified in the outer rise of the trench, as the lithosphere bends and shallower (crustal) fractures develop.

  6. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Mota, David F.; Ricciardone, Angelo; Arroja, Frederico

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by Ph(k) = Ph(0)(k) [ 1 + ∑LM fL(k) gLM YLM (hat k)], where Ph(0)(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f0(k) = f2(k) propto k-2 are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely l2 = l1 ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and l2 = l1 ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g00 = 30 and g2M = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  7. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers. Previously announced in STAR as N83-12998

  8. Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background

    SciTech Connect

    Ölmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X. E-mail: mandic@physics.umn.edu

    2012-07-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

  9. Polarization-shaped laser pulses for improved fluorescence anisotropy contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achazi, Georg; Hermes, Nils; Patas, Alexander; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2013-08-01

    We present a method to change the fluorescence contrast between two dyes with high fluorescence anisotropy in the same solution under different polarization directions by using polarization-shaped pulses. First a theoretical relationship between contrast, anisotropy and polarization is derived for this case. Then the wavelength dependent polarization anisotropy and the change of contrast by phase-shaping for a solution of Rhodamine B and Stilbene 3 in glycerol is shown. Finally, the application of the polarization-shaped pulses is demonstrated.

  10. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  11. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  12. Structural anisotropy of directionally dried colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulogne, François; Pauchard, Ludovic; Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, Frédérique; Botet, Robert; Schweins, Ralf; Sztucki, Michael; Li, Joaquim; Cabane, Bernard; Goehring, Lucas

    2014-02-01

    Aqueous colloidal dispersions of silica particles become anisotropic when they are dried through evaporation. This anisotropy is generated by a uniaxial strain of the liquid dispersions as they are compressed by the flow of water toward a solidification front. Part of the strain produced by the compression is relaxed, and part of it is stored and transferred to the solid. This stored elastic strain has consequences for the properties of the solid, where it may facilitate the growth of shear bands, and generate birefringence.

  13. Seismic anisotropy above a subducting plate

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, X.R.; Meyer, R.P. ); Schneider, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Shear-wave splitting observed in northeastern Colombia has provided evidence of seismic anisotropy in a shear zone immediately above a subducting plate. In an upper mantle composed mainly of olivine (57%) and orthopyroxene (17%), the splitting can be interpreted by wave propagation in an anisotropic medium of orthorhombic symmetry that results from alignment of these intrinsically anisotropic minerals. The mechanism of alignment is most likely the shearing associated with the subduction, aided by fluids migrating from the subducting plate when the plate exceeds 100 km in depth.

  14. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Bassett, Will; Banishev, Alexandr; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy measurements, where the parallel and perpendicular polarized emissions from probe molecules are acquired simultaneously, provide direct measurement of molecular rotational dynamics. In our experiments, the fluorescence from rhodamine 6G dye in various materials under GPa shocks produced by laser-driven flyer plates is collected, separated into two orthogonally-polarized beams using a Wollaston prism and detected with a streak camera. In liquids, the molecular rotations result from rotational diffusion and in solids from shear flow. The rotation rates can be used to determine the viscosity of the shocked medium.

  15. Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy

    DOEpatents

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

  16. Axial Magnetic Anisotropy from Two Systems Fe2B and Co2B with Planar Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Lamichhane, Tej; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Jesche, Anton; Goldman, Alan I.; Dennis, Kevin W.; McCallum, R. William; Antropov, Vladimir; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    Growth of single crystals of (Fe1-xCox)2B (0 <= x <= 1) and detailed characterization of their magnetic properties will be presented. Despite the fact that both Fe2B and Co2B show a planar anisotropy at room temperature, we observe a uniaxial anisotropy at intermediate doping which makes (Fe,Co)2B a promising system for permanent magnet applications in a system without rare-earth element. Comparison with recent band structure calculations will be presented. The temperature dependence of the anisotropy measured on single crystals from 2 K to 1000 K shows some unusual variations with an increase of the magnetic anisotropy with increasing temperature at some specific substitution. This work is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US DOE and by the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. Ames Laboratory is operated for the US DOE by Iowa State University under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  17. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  18. Forced Abstinence from Cocaine Self-Administration is Associated with DNA Methylation Changes in Myelin Genes in the Corpus Callosum: a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, David A.; Huang, Wen; Hamon, Sara C.; Maili, Lorena; Witkin, Brian M.; Fox, Robert G.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Human cocaine abuse is associated with alterations in white matter integrity revealed upon brain imaging, an observation that is recapitulated in an animal model of continuous cocaine exposure. The mechanism through which cocaine may affect white matter is unknown and the present study tested the hypothesis that cocaine self-administration results in changes in DNA methylation that could result in altered expression of several myelin genes that could contribute to the effects of cocaine on white matter integrity. Methods: In the present study, we examined the impact of forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration on chromatin associated changes in white matter. To this end, rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/0.1 mL infusion) for 14 days followed by forced abstinence for 1 day (n = 6) or 30 days (n = 6) before sacrifice. Drug-free, sham surgery controls (n = 7) were paired with the experimental groups. Global DNA methylation and DNA methylation at specific CpG sites in the promoter regions ofmyelin basic protein (Mbp), proteolipid protein-1 (Plp1), and SRY-related HMG-box-10 (Sox10) genes were analyzed in DNA extracted from corpus callosum. Results: Significant differences in the overall methylation patterns of the Sox10 promoter region were observed in the corpus callosum of rats at 30 days of forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration relative to sham controls; the −189, −142, −93, and −62 CpG sites were significantly hypomethylated point-wise at this time point. After correction for multiple comparisons, no differences in global methylation or the methylation patterns of Mbp or Plp1 were found. Conclusion: Forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration was associated with differences in DNA methylation at specific CpG sites in the promoter region of the Sox10 gene in corpus callosum. These changes may be related to reductions in normal age related changes in DNA methylation and could be a factor in white matter alterations seen after withdrawal from repeated cocaine self-administration. Further research is warranted examining the effects of cocaine on DNA methylation in white matter. PMID:22712019

  19. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer. PMID:24033332

  20. A discrete fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2005-11-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  1. A large anisotropy in the sky distribution of 3CRR quasars and other radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2015-06-01

    We report the presence of large anisotropies in the sky distributions of powerful extended quasars as well as some other sub-classes of radio galaxies in the 3CRR survey, the most reliable and most intensively studied complete sample of strong steep-spectrum radio sources. The anisotropies lie about a plane passing through the equinoxes and the north celestial pole. Out of a total of 48 quasars in the sample, 33 of them lie in one half of the observed sky and the remaining 15 in the other half. The probability that in a random distribution of 3CRR quasars in the sky, statistical fluctuations could give rise to an asymmetry in observed numbers up to this level is only ˜1 %. Also only about 1/4th of Fanaroff-Riley 1 (FR1) type of radio galaxies lie in the first half of the observed sky and the remainder in the second half. If we include all the observed asymmetries in the sky distributions of quasars and radio galaxies in the 3CRR sample, the probability of their occurrence by a chance combination reduces to ˜2×10-5. Two pertinent but disturbing questions that could be raised here are—firstly why should there be such large anisotropies present in the sky distribution of some of the strongest and most distant discrete sources, implying inhomogeneities in the universe at very large scales (covering a fraction of the universe)? Secondly why should such anisotropies lie about a great circle decided purely by the orientation of earth's rotation axis and/or the axis of its revolution around the sun? It seems yet more curious when we consider the other anisotropies, e.g., an alignment of the four normals to the quadrupole and octopole planes in the CMBR with the cosmological dipole and the equinoxes. Then there is the other recently reported large dipole anisotropy in the NVSS radio source distribution differing in magnitude from the CMBR dipole by a factor of four, and therefore not explained as due to the peculiar motion of the Solar system, yet aligned with the CMBR dipole which itself lies close to the line joining the equinoxes. Are these alignments a mere coincidence or do they imply that these axes have a preferential placement in the larger scheme of things, implying an apparent breakdown of the Copernican principle or its more generalization, cosmological principle, upon which the standard cosmological model is based upon?

  2. Analytic spectra of CMB anisotropies and polarization generated by scalar perturbations in synchronous gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-05-01

    The temperature anisotropies and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation not only serve as indispensable cosmological probes, but also provide a unique channel to detect relic gravitational waves (RGW) at very long wavelengths. Analytical studies of the anisotropies and polarization improve our understanding of various cosmic processes and help to separate the contribution of RGW from that of density perturbations. We present a detailed analytical calculation of CMB temperature anisotropies αk and polarization βk generated by scalar metric perturbations in synchronous gauge, parallel to our previous work with RGW as a generating source. This is realized primarily by an analytic time integration of Boltzmann’s equation, yielding the closed forms of αk and βk. Approximations, such as the tight-coupling approximation for photons a priori to the recombination and the long-wavelength limit for scalar perturbations, are used. The residual gauge modes in scalar perturbations are analyzed and a proper joining condition of scalar perturbations at the radiation-matter equality is chosen, ensuring the continuity of energy perturbation. The resulting analytic expressions of the multipole moments of polarization aEl and of temperature anisotropies aTl are explicit functions of the scalar perturbations, recombination time, recombination width, photon-free streaming damping factor, baryon fraction, initial amplitude, primordial scalar spectral index and the running index. These results show that a longer recombination width yields higher amplitudes of polarization on large scales and more damping on small scales, and that a late recombination time shifts the peaks of C^{XX^{\\prime }}_l to larger angular scales. Calculations show that aEl is generated in the presence of the quadrupole α2 of temperature anisotropies via scattering, both having similar structures and being smaller than the total aTl, which consists of the contributions from the monopole, dipole, quadrupole and Sachs-Wolfe terms as well. The origin of the two bumps in CEEl on large angular scales is found to be due to the time derivative of the monopole of temperature anisotropies. Furthermore, aEl together with aTl demonstrates explicitly that the peaks of CEEl and CTTl alternate in the l-space. These results substantially extend earlier analytic work. The analytic spectra C^{XX^{\\prime }}_l agree with the numerical ones and with those observed by WMAP on large scales (l ≲ 500), but deviate considerably from the numerical results on smaller scales, showing the limitations of our approximate analytic calculations. Several possible improvements are pointed out for further studies.

  3. Topological signatures in CMB temperature anisotropy maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W.S.; Gomero, G.I.

    2005-11-15

    We propose an alternative formalism to simulate cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps in {lambda}CDM universes with nontrivial spatial topologies. This formalism avoids the need to explicitly compute the eigenmodes of the Laplacian operator in the spatial sections. Instead, the covariance matrix of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the temperature anisotropies is expressed in terms of the elements of the covering group of the space. We obtain a decomposition of the correlation matrix that isolates the topological contribution to the CMB temperature anisotropies out of the simply connected contribution. A further decomposition of the topological signature of the correlation matrix for an arbitrary topology allows us to compute it in terms of correlation matrices corresponding to simpler topologies, for which closed quadrature formulas might be derived. We also use this decomposition to show that CMB temperature maps of (not too large) multiply connected universes must show ''patterns of alignment,'' and propose a method to look for these patterns, thus opening the door to the development of new methods for detecting the topology of our Universe even when the injectivity radius of space is slightly larger than the radius of the last scattering surface. We illustrate all these features with the simplest examples, those of flat homogeneous manifolds, i.e., tori, with special attention given to the cylinder, i.e., T{sup 1} topology.

  4. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  5. Effects of pressure anisotropy on plasma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zawaideh, E.; Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    In a recent paper a new set of generalized two-field equations is derived which describes plasma transport along the field lines of a space and time dependent magnetic field. These equations are valid for collisional to weakly collisional plasmas; they reduce to the conventional fluid equations of Braginskii for highly collisional plasmas. An important feature of these equations is that the anisotropy in the ion pressure is explicitly included. In this paper, these generalized transport equations are applied to a model problem of plasma flow through a magnetic mirror field. The profiles of the plasma parameters (density, flow speed, and pressures) are numerically calculated for plasma in different collisionality regimes. These profiles are explained by examining the competing terms in the transport equation. The pressure anisotropy is found to profoundly impact the plasma flow behavior. As a result, the new generalized equations predict flow behavior more accurately than the conventional transport equations. A large density and pressure drop is predicted as the flow passes through a magnetic mirror. Further, the new equations uniquely predict oscillations in the density profile, an effect missing in results from the conventional equations.

  6. Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings

    SciTech Connect

    Urrestilla, Jon; Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R E-mail: n.bevis@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: martin.kunz@physics.unige.ch

    2008-07-15

    We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter {mu}, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) semilocal strings resemble global textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l=10 is reproduced if G{mu} = 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is G{mu}<2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} when CMB, Hubble key project and big bang nucleosynthesis data are used (cf G{mu}<0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} for cosmic strings). We additionally carry out a Bayesian model comparison of several models with and without defects, showing that models with defects are neither conclusively favoured nor disfavoured at present.

  7. Spintronic anisotropy: proximity-induced superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Hell, Michael; Wegewijs, Maarten

    2014-03-01

    Superparamagnetism of molecular magnets, i.e. the preferential alignment of their spins along an easy axis, is a useful effect for nanoscale applications as it prevents undesired spin reversals. In these systems such a stabilization of axial spin states is ensured by the magnetic anisotropy barrier stemming from intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Here we demonstrate that any spin-isotropic high-spin quantum dot coupled to ferromagnets can in fact acquire such superparamagnetic properties in a spintronic way, even though spin-orbit interaction is negligible. We predict a proximity-induced spin-anisotropy barrier, which has hallmarks of a spintronic exchange-field of quadrupolar nature: it is highly localized, electrically controllable, increases with tunnel coupling and spin-polarization. Such a field is a generalization of the dipolar exchange field that relates to a current-induced spin-torque, effect well established in spintronics. We acknowledge the financial support from the DFG (FOR 912), the Foundation for Polish Science (M.M.) and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (M.M.).

  8. Velocity anisotropy in filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Ji, Wei-Guang; Li, Hua-Bai

    2015-08-01

    The complex interplay between turbulence, magnetic fields, and self-gravity leads to the formation of filamentary molecular clouds out of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). One avenue of studying this interplay is by analyzing statistical features derived from observations, where the interpretation of these features is greatly facilitated by comparisons with numerical simulations. Here we focus on the statistical anisotropy present in synthetic maps of velocity centroid data, which we derive from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating patch of ISM. We study how the orientation and magnitude of the velocity anisotropy correlate with the magnetic field and with the filamentary structure of the generated cloud, thereby highlighting whether turbulence, magnetic field, or self-gravity is the dynamically dominant force. The simulations explore various conditions of the ISM, a range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, as well as the effect of the turbulence driving mode (solenoidal or compressive). Finally, we compare our simulation results with recent analysis of observational data from the Ophiuchus region.

  9. In Plane Resistivity Anisotropy in iron Chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jiun-Haw; Kucharczyk, Chris; Fisher, Ian

    2012-02-01

    FeTe suffers a bicolinear antiferromagnetic ordering, with a (12 0) ordering wave-vector, in contrast to the (12 12) ordering wave-vector found in underdoped ``122'' and ``1111'' iron pnictides. At the optimal doping the static (12 0) order disappears and a spin resonance at the (12 12) wave-vector emerges. Here we report measurements of the in-plane resistivity anisotropy of single crystals of Fe1+δTe1-xSex for underdoped and optimally doped compositions. The underdoped compounds were partially detwinned by applying uni-axial strain along the (12 0), revealing a larger resistivity along the antiferromagnetic ordering direction. However, for optimal doping uni-axial strain induces the largest resistivity anisotropy along the (12 12) direction, similar to the ``122'' family of compounds. This behaviour suggests that in addition to the presence of spin resonance, a divergent nematic susceptibility might be a key feature associated with optimal doping in iron based superconductors.

  10. Probing the Pulsar Origin of the Anomalous Positron Fraction with AMS-02 and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the positron fraction rise is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for detecting such an anisotropy. Specifically, we show that much of the proton and ?-ray background which affects measurements of the cosmic-ray electron-positron spectrum with ACTs may be controlled in the search for anisotropies. We conclude that observations using archival ACT data could already constrain or substantiate the pulsar origin of the positron anomaly, while upcoming instruments (such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array) will provide strong constraints on the source of the rising positron fraction.

  11. PROBING THE PULSAR ORIGIN OF THE ANOMALOUS POSITRON FRACTION WITH AMS-02 AND ATMOSPHERIC CHERENKOV TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2013-07-20

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the positron fraction rise is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for detecting such an anisotropy. Specifically, we show that much of the proton and {gamma}-ray background which affects measurements of the cosmic-ray electron-positron spectrum with ACTs may be controlled in the search for anisotropies. We conclude that observations using archival ACT data could already constrain or substantiate the pulsar origin of the positron anomaly, while upcoming instruments (such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array) will provide strong constraints on the source of the rising positron fraction.

  12. Multipartite Fully Entangled Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Fully entangled fraction is a definition for bipartite states, which is tightly related to bipartite maximally entangled states, and has clear experimental and theoretical significance. In this work, we generalize it to multipartite case, we call the generalized version multipartite fully entangled fraction (MFEF). MFEF measures the closeness of a state to GHZ states. The analytical expressions of MFEF are very difficult to obtain except for very special states, however, we show that, the MFEF of any state is determined by a system of finite-order polynomial equations. Therefore, the MFEF can be efficiently numerically computed.

  13. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the liquid phase. Release fractions are commonly used to make conservative estimates of emissions from processes. Usually, rather gross assumptions are made in such estimates, such as the total failure of abatement equipment and the use of maximum inventory values. Consequently, it is common practice to report bounding release fraction values with single digit accuracy. The release fractions for the top of the unventilated tank ranged from 9 x 10{sup -7} to 8 x 10{sup -5} depending on the process simulated.

  14. Multipartite Fully Entangled Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Fully entangled fraction is a definition for bipartite states, which is tightly related to bipartite maximally entangled states, and has clear experimental and theoretical significance. In this work, we generalize it to multipartite case, we call the generalized version multipartite fully entangled fraction (MFEF). MFEF measures the closeness of a state to GHZ states. The analytical expressions of MFEF are very difficult to obtain except for very special states, however, we show that, the MFEF of any state is determined by a system of finite-order polynomial equations. Therefore, the MFEF can be efficiently numerically computed.

  15. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  16. Effects of Shear Zone Development on Seismic Anisotropy in the Lower Grenvillian Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Gerbi, C. C.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Deep crustal structure, particularly the geometry of shear zones, affects the degree of crust-mantle coupling and the kinematics of crustal deformation. In principle, shear zones in the deep crust can be visible using seismic imaging due to the change in the orientations and modes of anisotropic minerals. However, matching the seismic signals to structures present remains a challenge. This work seeks to bridge some of that gap. We utilize the Parry Sound domain in the western Central Gneiss Belt of the Grenville orogen, Ontario, Canada, to develop quantitative relationships between geologic structures and seismic anisotropy. This region provides excellent examples of granulite and amphibolite facies shear zones up to several km wide. We investigated three rock types: (1) regionally deformed mafic and felsic granulite facies orthogneiss, (2) granulite facies shear zones, and (3) amphibolite facies shear zones. Both of the latter two derived from (1). Using the numerical architecture of asymptotic expansion homogenization (which considers grain-scale elastic interactions), we computed much higher precision seismic velocities than is possible with conventional Voigt-Reuss-Hill algorithms. In all sheared felsic rocks, the dominant quartz slip system was prism + rhomb indicating slowest Vp direction paralleled lineation because in quartz a-axis is near the slowest direction. In contrast, in all sheared mafic rocks, the fastest amphibole direction is strongly parallel to the lineation. As a consequence of combining the quartz and amphibole deformation, rocks comprising felsic and mafic layers have a weak seismic anisotropy. In monolithological shear zones, anisotropy can exceed 10%. Despite the promise this work illustrates, we must continue to consider the influence of inherited fabrics in the host rock. In a second line of investigation, we explored how shear zone volume fraction affects seismic anisotropy.

  17. Texture and anisotropy analysis of a laminated lower crust: a neutron diffraction study of felsic granulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Perez, J.; Gomez Barreiro, J.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Castiñeiras Garcia, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Wenk, H.; Alvarez Valero, A.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative fabric analyses of high-P and high-T tectonites were done with HIPPO, a Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer at Los Alamos National Lab. Samples were collected in the Sobrado unit (NW Spain), a tectonic stack of highly deformed slices of metabasites, paragneisses and ultramafic rocks. Metamorphism ranges from granulites on top, to eclogites at the bottom of the unit. The ensemble represents and excellent example of laminated lower crust. The alternation of mechanically contrasted lithologies and/or the development of crystal preferred orientation might result into anisotropy. We explore the contribution of crystallographic preferred orientation or texture to the seismic anisotropy of the lower crust. Since strain partitioning occurred between mechanically strong and weak lithologies, a higher crystal preferred orientation is expected along the weak levels: the metasediments. TOF neutron diffraction experiments were conducted in HIPPO (LANSCE) with high-P and high-T mylonitic felsic paragneisses. Quantitative texture analysis of neutron data was accomplished by using the Rietveld method, with E-WIMW algorithm, implemented in the program package MAUD (Material Analysis Using Diffraction; Lutterotti, 1999). The orientation distribution function (ODF) for each mineral was calculated in MAUD and then processed in BEARTEX (Wenk et al. 1998). Selected pole figures were plotted for major components, quartz, plagioclase and biotite (first setting in monoclinic crystals). Texture patterns are compatible with non-coaxial progressive deformation and discussed accordingly in terms of dislocation activity. Besides, seismic waves velocities were computed from the texture data in BEARTEX. Calculated velocities and anisotropy were based on ODF, volume fraction of each mineral and their single-crystal elastic constant. Kinematic and mechanical implications are discussed in terms of the regional geology. The correlation of texture, mineral composition and seismic anisotropy in the model is also presented.

  18. Snow anisotropy enables more precise determination of thermal conductivity via second-order bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewe, H.; Riche, F.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of macroscopic physical properties of snow and their relation to microstructural parameters is a key aspect for virtually all applications in cryospheric sciences. Snow properties are usually parametrized phenomenologically, e.g. in terms of the density (ice volume fraction) as the most important microstructural parameter which correlates well with physical properties. However, a large scatter usually remains if properties are solely constrained on density. We show that the broad range of anisotropy in natural snow, if formalized by appropriate means, can be exploited to reduce the scatter. To this end we address the effective thermal conductivity tensor of snow via known rigorous, second-order bounds. The bounds predict the relevance of a microstructural anisotropy parameter Q which is given by an integral over the two-point correlation function and thereby unambiguously defined for arbitrary microstructures. For validation we compiled a comprehensive data set of 167 snow samples. These comprise individual samples of various seasonal snow types and several time series of metamorphism experiments under isothermal conditions (duration: one year) and temperature gradient conditions (duration: weeks to months) with emphasis on depth hoar. All samples were reconstructed by micro-computed tomography to facilitate a comparison of the theory with microstructure-based Finite Element simulations of conductive heat transport. Compared to purely density based parametrizations, the incorporation of Q yields a considerably smaller error. Our systematic approach quantifies the influence of snow anisotropy and constitutes a generalizable route to incorporate snow microstructure into macroscopic snow models. By mathematical analogy, we indicate the expected impact of anisotropy on the dielectric tensor, permeability and the adsorption rate of diffusing species in the pore space.

  19. Software pipeline for midsagittal corpus callosum thickness profile processing : automated segmentation, manual editor, thickness profile generator, group-wise statistical comparison and results display.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Chris; Beare, Richard; Walterfang, Mark; Seal, Marc

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a fully automated pipeline for thickness profile evaluation and analysis of the human corpus callosum (CC) in 3D structural T 1-weighted magnetic resonance images. The pipeline performs the following sequence of steps: midsagittal plane extraction, CC segmentation algorithm, quality control tool, thickness profile generation, statistical analysis and results figure generator. The CC segmentation algorithm is a novel technique that is based on a template-based initialisation with refinement using mathematical morphology operations. The algorithm is demonstrated to have high segmentation accuracy when compared to manual segmentations on two large, publicly available datasets. Additionally, the resultant thickness profiles generated from the automated segmentations are shown to be highly correlated to those generated from the ground truth segmentations. The manual editing tool provides a user-friendly environment for correction of errors and quality control. Statistical analysis and a novel figure generator are provided to facilitate group-wise morphological analysis of the CC. PMID:24968872

  20. Age-related changes in the corpus callosum in early-onset bipolar disorder assessed using volumetric and cross-sectional measurements

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Janis L.; Kennedy, David N.; Hodge, Steven M.; Tang, Lena; Moore, Constance; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Makris, Nikos; Caviness, Verne S.; Frazier, Jean A.

    2013-01-01

    Corpus callosum (CC) area abnormalities have been reported in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of adults and youths with bipolar disorder (BPD), suggesting interhemispheric communication may be abnormal in BPD and may be present early in the course of illness and affect normal neuromaturation of this structure throughout the lifecycle. Neuroimaging scans from 44 youths with DSM-IV BPD and 22 healthy controls (HC) were analyzed using cross-sectional area measurements and a novel method of volumetric parcellation. Univariate analyses of variance were conducted on CC subregions using both volume and traditional area measurements. Youths with BPD had smaller middle and posterior callosal regions, and reduced typical age-related increases in CC size. The cross-sectional area and novel volumetric methodologies resulted in similar findings. Future longitudinal assessments of CC development would track the evolution of callosal abnormalities in youths with BPD and allow exploration of the functional significance of these findings. PMID:20686873

  1. CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis Improves Migration of Neuroblasts Along Corpus Callosum by Stimulating MMP-2 Secretion After Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weifeng; Yi, Xin; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effect of CXCL12 on migration of neural precursor cells after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We randomly divided 48 rats into four groups: (1) the sham group, rats were performed craniotomy only, (2) the control group, saline were injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI, (3) the CXCL12 group, CXCL12 were injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI, and (4) the CXCL12 + AMD3100 group, CXCL12 and AMD3100 were mixed together and injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI. At 7 days after TBI, the brain tissues were subjected to immunofluorescent double-labeled staining with the antibodies of CXCR4/DCX, MMP-2/DCX, MMP-2/GFAP, MMP-2/NeuN. Western blot assay was used to measure the protein levels of MMP-2. Compared with the control group, the number of CXCR4/DCX and MMP-2 positive cells around the injured corpus callosum area were significantly increased in the CXCL12 treatment group. The area occupied by these cells expanded and the shape changed from chain distribution to radial. CXCL12 + AMD3100 treatment significantly decreased the number and distribution area of CXCR4/DCX and MMP-2 positive cells compared with the CXCL12 treatment and control group. The DCX positive cells could not form chain or radial distribution. The protein expressions of MMP-2 had the similar change trends as the results of immunofluorescent staining. MMP-2 could be secreted by DCX, GFAP and NeuN positive cells. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis can improve the migration of the neuroblasts along the corpus callosum by stimulating the MMP-2 secretion of different types of cells. PMID:26801174

  2. Fractionation of Soil Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the qualitative and quantitative information provided by soil phosphorus (P) fractionation methods is important for addressing agronomic and water quality problems, as well as evaluating P biogeochemistry in extreme environments. This chapter provides a schematic overview of and ...

  3. Ramping up on Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Ana C.; Bottge, Brian A.; Rueda, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a technology-based and hands-on instructional intervention designed to advance middle school students' understandings of fractions. This problem-solving experience is based on the principles of Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI) and proved instructionally worthwhile and motivating to teachers and students in both inclusive

  4. Fractions through Fruit Salad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Lisa

    1987-01-01

    The mathematics concept of fractions was taught to a group of learning disabled, dyslexic, and multiply handicapped students (15-20 years old) by preparing a fruit salad. Enthusiastic student participation and enhanced knowledge illustrated the effectiveness of employing several sensory modes in learning activities. (CB)

  5. Fractional charge search

    SciTech Connect

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour.

  6. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  7. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  8. On Difficulties with Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasemann, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    Students recognized as less successful individuals in mathematics are tested for their understanding of fractions. The data reveals that most were only able to apply remembered rules to problems without actually knowing if the rule worked for the given situation. (MP)

  9. Fractionally charged quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fractionally charged quasiparticles were proposed by Laughlin to explain the fractional quantum Hall effect. Flowing in one-dimensional-like strips along the edges of the sample the quasiparticles are expected to condense to a chiral Luttinger liquid (CLL). Adding a backscattering impurity in the path of the quasiparticles induces correlation among the scattering events at sufficiently low temperatures, hence leading to highly non-linear I-V characteristic and non-Poissonian shot noise. Moreover, a sufficiently strong backscatterer induces bunching of the backscattered quasiparticles with a super Poissonian shot noise corresponding to stochastic transfer of electrons. Diluting the impinging quasiparticle beam mimics an increased temperature. For example, correlation among scattering events in dilute beams relaxes and bunching ceased altogether. At finite temperature and fractionally charged quasiparticles are found to traverse almost opaque barriers. Turning to the extremely low-temperature regime ( ∼9 mK) we found unexpected results. At higher order fractions, ν= p/ m with p>1, and very weak backscattering potential a spontaneous bunching of quasiparticles to q= νe took place, namely, at ν=2/5, q=2 e/5 and at ν=3/7, q∼3 e/7. As the temperature increases bunching ceased and the scattered charge was again the familiar Laughlin's quasiparticle q= e/ m independent of p.

  10. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Mota, David F.; Arroja, Frederico E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  11. OBSERVATIONAL SCAN-INDUCED ARTIFICIAL COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hao; Li Tipei E-mail: litp@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2011-05-10

    Reliably detecting the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is of great importance in understanding the birth and evolution of the universe. One of the difficulties in CMB experiments is the domination of measured CMB anisotropy maps by the Doppler dipole moment from the motion of the antenna relative to the CMB. For each measured temperature, the expected dipole component has to be calculated separately and then subtracted from the data. A small error in dipole direction, antenna pointing direction, sidelobe pickup contamination, and/or timing synchronism can introduce a significant deviation in the dipole-cleaned CMB temperature. After a full-sky observational scan, the accumulated deviations will be structured with a pattern closely correlated with the observation pattern with artificial anisotropies, including artificial quadrupole, octupole, etc., on large scales in the final CMB map. Such scan-induced anisotropies on large scales can be predicted by the true dipole moment and observational scan scheme. Indeed, the expected scan-induced quadrupole pattern of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission is perfectly in agreement with the published WMAP quadrupole. With the scan strategy of the Planck mission, we predict that scan-induced anisotropies will also produce an artificially aligned quadrupole. The scan-induced anisotropy is a common problem for all sweep missions and, like the foreground emissions, has to be removed from observed maps. Without doing so, CMB maps from COBE, WMAP, and Planck are not reliable for studying the CMB anisotropy.

  12. Studying the Interstellar Magnetic Field from Anisotropies in Velocity Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position-position-velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  13. LOCAL ANISOTROPY, HIGHER ORDER STATISTICS, AND TURBULENCE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.; Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Dmitruk, P.; Oughton, S.

    2012-05-10

    Correlation anisotropy emerges dynamically in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), producing stronger gradients across the large-scale mean magnetic field than along it. This occurs both globally and locally, and has significant implications in space and astrophysical plasmas, including particle scattering and transport, and theories of turbulence. Properties of local correlation anisotropy are further documented here by showing through numerical experiments that the effect is intensified in more localized estimates of the mean field. The mathematical formulation of this property shows that local anisotropy mixes second-order with higher order correlations. Sensitivity of local statistical estimates to higher order correlations can be understood in connection with the stochastic coordinate system inherent in such formulations. We demonstrate this in specific cases, and illustrate the connection to higher order statistics by showing the sensitivity of local anisotropy to phase randomization, after which the global measure of anisotropy is recovered at all scales of averaging. This establishes that anisotropy of the local structure function is not a measure of anisotropy of the energy spectrum. Evidently, the local enhancement of correlation anisotropy is of substantial fundamental interest and must be understood in terms of higher order correlations, specifically fourth-order and above.

  14. Study of molecular dynamics in poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) by light induced absorption anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Grebenkin, S; Bol'shakov, B; Syutkin, V M

    2014-08-14

    Formation of absorbance anisotropy under linearly polarized irradiation at 405 nm in films of poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA), poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA), and poly(n-hexyl methacrylate) (PnHexMA) doped with azo compound has been studied in a wide temperature range below Tg. The anisotropy formation kinetics has been well described under the assumption that there are two types of environments in the polymer matrixes: mobile and immobile. The mobile environment allows the dopant to reorient in the course of cis-trans-cis isomerization cycle and the immobile environment does not. The fraction of mobile environments was estimated to be 0.12 in PEMA, 0.65 in PnBMA, and 1.0 in PnHexMA. An increase in the fraction of mobile environments within the series PEMA-PnBMA-PnHexMA have been associated with an increase in the size of alkyl nanodomains. The average angle of transition dipole rotation upon isomerization and the amplitude of molecules librations have been estimated in the temperature range studied. PMID:25068465

  15. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility of Igneous Rocks: Lessons From Obsidians and Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2013-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of igneous rocks differs from that of other lithologies in several aspects that are related to their characteristics of emplacement history. Nevertheless, within the group of igneous rocks there are also differences on emplacement mechanisms that can lead to specific and distinctive AMS signatures. In this work, a review of the most important emplacement regimes is made, paying special attention to the extreme conditions represented by obsidians and pyroclastic deposits. These two extreme emplacement regimes are controlled mainly by the viscosity of the fluid phase, but the differences in AMS signatures also includes other differences in the nature of the ferromagnetic grains that are present in the rocks during emplacement. For example, the results of this work indicate that the AMS can be associated to a population of ferromagnetic minerals of a submicroscopic size, despite of which it can be very well defined and yield large degrees of anisotropy. It is suggested that the AMS associated to such population of small grains might indeed be the origin of the AMS of other igneous rocks that have an optically observable fraction of mineral grains, although until present it had been overlooked in most instances. As it had been suggested before, use of tests designed to identify the contribution of a superparamagnetic fraction (SP) in the magnetic properties of a rock can help us to identify the presence of such a SP-related AMS in other cases.

  16. Phase diagrams of Wyoming Na-montmorillonite clay. Influence of particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Michot, Laurent J; Bihannic, Isabelle; Porsch, Katharina; Maddi, Solange; Baravian, Christophe; Mougel, Julien; Levitz, Pierre

    2004-12-01

    Natural Na-Wyoming montmorillonite was size fractionated by successive centrifugation. Polydisperse particles with average sizes of 400, 290, and 75 nm were then obtained. As the structural charge of the particles belonging to three fractions (determined by cationic exchange capacity measurements) is the same, such a procedure allows studying the effect of particle anisotropy on the colloidal phase behavior of swelling clay particles. Osmotic stress experiments were carried out at different ionic strengths. The osmotic pressure curves display a plateau whose beginning systematically coincides with the sol/gel transition determined by oscillatory stress measurements. The concentration corresponding to the sol/gel transition increases linearly with particle anisotropy, which shows that the sol/gel transition is not directly related to an isotropic/nematic transition of individual clay particles. Indeed, a reverse evolution should be observed for an I/N transition involving the individual clay particles. Still, when observed between crossed polarizer and analyzer, the gel samples exhibit permanent birefringent textures, whereas in the "sol" region, transient birefringence is observed when the samples are sheared. This suggests that interacting clay particles are amenable to generate, at rest and/or under shear, large anisotropic particle associations. PMID:15568830

  17. Reading performance correlates with white-matter properties in preterm and term children

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, James S; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Yeatman, Jason D; Flom, Lynda L; Luna, Beatriz; Feldman, Heidi M

    2010-01-01

    Aim We used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate the association between white-matter integrity and reading ability in a cohort of 28 children. Nineteen preterm children (14 males, five females; mean age 11y 11mo [SD 1y 10mo], mean gestational age 30.5wks (SD 3.2), mean birthweight was 1455g [SD 625]); and nine term children (five males, four females; mean age 12y 8mo [SD 2y 5mo], mean gestational age 39.6 weeks (SD 1.2), and mean birthweight 3877g [SD 473]). Method We tested whether fractional anisotropy in a left hemisphere temporoparietal region and in the corpus callosum correlates with birthweight and scores on the following three subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement: word identification, word attack, and passage comprehension. Results Preterm children had lower reading scores than a comparison group for all reading subtests (p<0.05). We found significant correlations between birthweight and fractional anisotropy in the whole corpus callosum (p=0.001), and between fractional anisotropy and reading skill in the genu (p=0.001) and body (p=0.001) of the corpus callosum. The correlation between reading skill and fractional anisotropy in a left temporoparietal region previously associated with reading disability was not significant (p=0.095). Interpretation We conclude that perinatal white-matter injury of the central corpus callosum may have long-term developmental implications for reading performance. PMID:19747208

  18. Geomechanics and elastic anisotropy of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadhassan, Mehdi

    Many of the earth's rocks exhibit anisotropic characteristics. Anisotropy is particularly common in many sedimentary rocks, such as shales. Anisotropy is defined as the spatial alignment of mineral grains, layers, fractures and stresses which causes elastic wave velocity and other elastic properties to vary with direction. There are two types of anisotropy: intrinsic and stress-induced. Intrinsic anisotropy is caused by beddings, microstructures or aligned fractures formed during deposition. Stress-induced anisotropy is caused by strain associated with external stresses. Intrinsic anisotropy originates in the absence of external stresses, while stress-induced anisotropy results from tectonic and overburden stresses. The style of earth material alignment causes two simplified, but convenient models of anisotropy: vertically transverse isotropy (VTI), like shale, and horizontally transverse isotropy (HTI), like vertically fractured medium. These models have been used to describe how physical properties of rock vary in a medium. Identifying the anisotropy in a formation is important in reservoir characterization seismic data processing and oil-field development. Deep shales are the most abundant yet least characterized sedimentary rocks in the Williston Basin of North Dakota. They are significant sources of hydrocarbon unconventional resources in this basin. This dissertation aims to fulfill an investigation of anisotropy in this rock type in several different facets through exploiting of field data. I seek to generate key information for better interplay of field in-situ stress and the existing natural fracture systems for the purpose of drilling, well completion, perforating, hydraulic fracturing and defining reservoir properties. In this study advanced sonic logging data has been processed and interpreted to calculate three independent shear moduli. These parameters then will be used to estimate Thomsen (1986) anisotropy parameters, elastic stiffness coefficients and principal stresses of deep shales in the Williston Basin. The parameters then will be used to generate shear radial profiles and slowness-frequency plots analyze formation anisotropy type and origin as well as reservoir quality. The next step will be to evaluate direction and magnitude of the minimum and maximum anisotropic principal horizontal stresses as the governing element in geomechanical modeling. I will analyze wellbore stability and predict wellbore behavior under stress alteration caused by drilling. Elastic anisotropy of the formation will be included in the 3-D numerical models. In addition the effects of local geological features on the mode of anisotropy both in the far-field and around the borehole to get an in-depth insight of the fractures will be studied. Finally, by generating stress polygons for the reservoir, before and after production and pressure decline, I will try to study how reservoir depletion may cause future geological natural hazards such as faulting and induced seismic events in the region.

  19. Tunable optical anisotropy in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Che Ming; Li Zhiyuan; Liu Rongjuan

    2007-08-15

    Artificial optical birefringence can be realized in three-dimensional photonic crystals with a uniaxial structural symmetry: e.g., woodpile photonic crystals with a tetragonal lattice structure in the long-wavelength limit. The ordinary and extraordinary indices of refraction are determined from calculation of the reflection coefficient for a plane wave incident on the surface of a semi-infinite photonic crystal at different angles. We find that the anisotropy can be widely tuned by simply changing the width and thickness of the dielectric rod. A large relative negative anisotropy over 33% is found. A transition from positive anisotropy to negative anisotropy can be readily achieved. At certain parameters, a structurally anisotropic nanostructure can behave like an optically isotropic medium. Our study opens a window to use artificial nanostructures to create an arbitrary optical anisotropy that is not possible in natural crystals.

  20. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhou, Tie-ge; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ˜16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  1. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    van der Beek, C.J.; Konczykowski, M.; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2012-07-17

    The field-angular dependence and anisotropy of the critical current density in iron-based superconductors is evaluated using a phenomenological approach featuring distinct anisotropy factors for the penetration depth and the coherence length. Both the weak collective pinning limit and the strong pinning limit relevant for iron-based superconductors at low magnetic fields are considered. It is found that in the more anisotropic materials, such as SmFeAsO and NdFeAsO, the field-angular dependence is completely dominated by the coherence length (upper critical field) anisotropy, thereby explaining recent results on the critical current in these materials. In less anisotropic superconductors, strong pinning can lead to an apparent inversion of the anisotropy. Finally, it is shown that, under all circumstances, the ratio of the c-axis and ab-plane critical current densities for the magnetic field along the ab-plane directly yields the coherence length anisotropy factor ??.

  2. Magnetisation reversal in anisotropy graded Co/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. W.; Thomson, T.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate high precision controllability of the magnetization reversal nucleation process in [Co/Pd]8 multilayer films consisting of two sets of bilayers with high and low perpendicular anisotropy, respectively. The anisotropy of the entire film is set by the degree of Co/Pd interfacial mixing during deposition which provides fine control of the anisotropy of an individual bilayer in the multilayer stack. The relative number of each type of bilayer is used to select the magnetisation reversal behavior such that changing one bilayer changes the properties of the entire multilayer through anisotropy averaging. A simple extension to the sputtering protocol would provide multilayer films with fully graded anisotropy, while maintaining a constant saturation magnetization opening new possibilities for the creation of highly engineered multilayer structures for spin torque devices and future magnetic recording media.

  3. Magnetic stress anisotropy field in plated cylindrical Permalloy films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, O. S.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis is made of the magnetic stress anisotropy field (Hks) arising from internal and external stress sources in plated-wire memory elements. The analysis takes into consideration circumferential composition variation and cylindrical geometry of the Permalloy film. Expressions are derived relating Hks to uniaxial film stress, average composition, and amplitude of composition variation. A result of particular importance is that even for average zeromagnetostrictive composition (ZMC) films, Hks may still make an appreciable contribution to the total anisotropy field if the composition is not uniform. Calculated Hks characteristics are shown to correlate with anisotropy field changes observed in annealing experiments. Examples are given to show the importance of composition uniformity in determining the stability of the anisotropy field. The utility of the analysis is extended by the inclusion of data expressing the inverse relation between anisotropy field and easy-axis dispersion in the film.

  4. Discriminating neurogenic from myopathic disease via measurement of muscle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Garmirian, Lindsay P; Chin, Anne B; Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is electrically anisotropic, with a tendency for applied electrical current to flow more readily along muscle fibers than across them. In this study, we assessed a method for non-invasive measurement of anisotropy to determine its potential to serve as a new technique for distinguishing neurogenic from myopathic disease. Measurements were made on the biceps brachii and tibialis anterior muscles in 15 normal subjects and 12 patients with neuromuscular disease (6 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6 with various myopathies) using 50 kHZ applied current. Consistent multi-angle anisotropic patterns were found for reactance and phase in both muscles in normal subjects. Normalized anisotropy differences for each subject were defined, and group average values identified. The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients demonstrated increased and distorted anisotropy patterns, whereas myopathic patients demonstrated normal or reduced anisotropy. These results suggest that non-invasive measurement of muscle anisotropy has potential for diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:19058193

  5. Orientational anisotropy and interfacial transport in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, M. M.; Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial diffusion is governed to a large degree by geometric parameters that are determined by crystallographic orientation. In this study, we assess the impact of orientational anisotropy on mass transport at internal interfaces, focusing on the role of preferred crystallographic orientation (i.e., texture) on mass diffusion in a polycrystal. More specifically, we perform both numerical and analytical studies of steady-state diffusion for polycrystals having various grain-orientation distributions. By relating grain misorientation to grain-boundary energies and, via the Borisov relation, to the diffusivity, we link microstructure variability to kinetics. Our aim is to correlate shape features of the orientation distribution, such as the location and shapes of peaks, with the calculated effective diffusivity. Finally, we discuss the role of crystallographic constraints, such as those associated with grain junctions, in determining the effective diffusivity of a polycrystal.

  6. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental lithosphere (σ=14.7° ). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS=4 mm a-1, σ=29° ) and Eurasia (vRMS=3 mm a-1, σ=33° ), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ˜5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. We will investigate if these relationships still hold with the new expanded data set and with the alternative set of relative plate angular velocities. We have found systematic differences between the SKS orientations and our predicted plate motion azimuths underneath the Arabia plate, which suggests to us either plate-scale mantle flow process not directly associated with that plate's absolute motion or intrinsic lithospheric anisotropy. We will discuss more of such discrepancies underneath other plates using the enlarged data set.

  7. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Müller, W-C

    2011-08-26

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, nonaxisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range nonaxisymmetry is reproduced by a "fly through" sampling of a direct numerical simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, fly through sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in nonaxisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed nonaxisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself. PMID:21929247

  8. Dark matter annihilation or unresolved astrophysical sources? Anisotropy probe of the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Narumoto, Takuro; Totani, Tomonori

    2007-03-15

    The origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) is a longstanding mystery in high-energy astrophysics. Possible candidates include ordinary astrophysical objects such as unresolved blazars, as well as more exotic processes such as dark matter annihilation. While it would be difficult to distinguish them from the mean intensity data alone, one can use anisotropy data instead. We investigate the CGB anisotropy both from unresolved blazars and dark matter annihilation (including contributions from dark matter substructures), and we find that the angular power spectra from these sources are very different. We then focus on detectability of dark matter annihilation signals using the anisotropy data by treating the unresolved blazar component as a known background. We find that the dark matter signature should be detectable in the angular power spectrum of the CGB from two-year all-sky observations with the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), as long as the dark matter annihilation contributes to a reasonable fraction, e.g., > or approx. 0.3, of the CGB at around 10 GeV. We conclude that the anisotropy measurement of the CGB with GLAST should be a powerful tool for revealing the CGB origin, and potentially for the first detection of dark matter annihilation.

  9. Fluid substitution effects on seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Stewart, Robert R.; Sil, Samik; Dyaur, Nikolay

    2015-02-01

    We derive equations for HTI and orthorhombic symmetries to analyze fluid substitution effects in porous fractured media. The derivations are based on the anisotropic Gassmann equation and linear slip theory. We assess the influence of fluid substitution (gas, brine, and oil) on elastic moduli, velocities, anisotropy, and azimuthal amplitude variations. We find that in the direction normal to fractures, P-wave moduli increase as much as 56% and P-wave velocity increases up to 19% for gas-to-brine substitution. For the direction parallel to fractures, P-wave velocity remains almost constant when porosity is low (5%) but can increase up to 4% if porosity is high (25%). Since P-waves in two different directions have different sensitivities to fluids and fractures, the Thomsen's parameters (defined for HTI and orthorhombic symmetries), ɛ and δ, are sensitive to fluid types and fractures. We also found that δ is sensitive to porosity for liquid saturation but insensitive to porosity for the case of gas saturation. Gassmann assumes (and as has been observed) that shear modulus does not depend on fluids. And we observe no changes in shear-wave splitting (γ) for different fluids. The azimuthal amplitude variation is dependent on fluid types, fractures, and porosity. We observe up to 12% increase in azimuthal amplitude variation for low porosity gas sands after brine saturation and 6% decrease for high porosity gas sands. We find that the percentage changes in gas-to-oil substitution are about half that of the gas-to-brine case. The equations we have derived provide a useful tool to quantitatively evaluate the effects of fluid substitution on seismic anisotropy.

  10. Blind image quality assessment through anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Gabarda, Salvador; Cristóbal, Gabriel

    2007-12-01

    We describe an innovative methodology for determining the quality of digital images. The method is based on measuring the variance of the expected entropy of a given image upon a set of predefined directions. Entropy can be calculated on a local basis by using a spatial/spatial-frequency distribution as an approximation for a probability density function. The generalized Rényi entropy and the normalized pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD) have been selected for this purpose. As a consequence, a pixel-by-pixel entropy value can be calculated, and therefore entropy histograms can be generated as well. The variance of the expected entropy is measured as a function of the directionality, and it has been taken as an anisotropy indicator. For this purpose, directional selectivity can be attained by using an oriented 1-D PWD implementation. Our main purpose is to show how such an anisotropy measure can be used as a metric to assess both the fidelity and quality of images. Experimental results show that an index such as this presents some desirable features that resemble those from an ideal image quality function, constituting a suitable quality index for natural images. Namely, in-focus, noise-free natural images have shown a maximum of this metric in comparison with other degraded, blurred, or noisy versions. This result provides a way of identifying in-focus, noise-free images from other degraded versions, allowing an automatic and nonreference classification of images according to their relative quality. It is also shown that the new measure is well correlated with classical reference metrics such as the peak signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:18059913

  11. Seismic anisotropy and mantle creep in young orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meissner, R.; Mooney, W.D.; Artemieva, I.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides evidence for the physical state and tectonic evolution of the lithosphere. We discuss the origin of anisotropy at various depths, and relate it to tectonic stress, geotherms and rheology. The anisotropy of the uppermost mantle is controlled by the orthorhombic mineral olivine, and may result from ductile deformation, dynamic recrystallization or annealing. Anisotropy beneath young orogens has been measured for the seismic phase Pn that propagates in the uppermost mantle. This anisotropy is interpreted as being caused by deformation during the most recent thermotectonic event, and thus provides information on the process of mountain building. Whereas tectonic stress and many structural features in the upper crust are usually orientated perpendicular to the structural axis of mountain belts, Pn anisotropy is aligned parallel to the structural axis. We interpret this to indicate mountain-parallel ductile (i.e. creeping) deformation in the uppermost mantle that is a consequence of mountain-perpendicular compressive stresses. The preferred orientation of the fast axes of some anisotropic minerals, such as olivine, is known to be in the creep direction, a consequence of the anisotropy of strength and viscosity of orientated minerals. In order to explain the anisotropy of the mantle beneath young orogens we extend the concept of crustal 'escape' (or 'extrusion') tectonics to the uppermost mantle. We present rheological model calculations to support this hypothesis. Mountain-perpendicular horizontal stress (determined in the upper crust) and mountain-parallel seismic anisotropy (in the uppermost mantle) require a zone of ductile decoupling in the middle or lower crust of young mountain belts. Examples for stress and mountain-parallel Pn anisotropy are given for Tibet, the Alpine chains, and young mountain ranges in the Americas. Finally, we suggest a simple model for initiating mountain parallel creep.

  12. Goal Sketches in Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sophian, Catherine; Madrid, Samara

    2003-01-01

    To examine how conceptual knowledge about fraction magnitudes changes as students' learning progresses, 5th and 7th-grade students were asked to solve fraction magnitude problems that entailed finding a fraction between two given fractions and then to evaluate solutions for similar problems that were modeled for them. When the given fractions…

  13. An Introduction to Continued Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.

    Provided is an introduction to the properties of continued fractions for the intellectually curious high school student. Among the topics included are (1) Expansion of Rational Numbers into Simple Continued Fractions, (2) Convergents, (3) Continued Fractions and Linear Diophantine Equations of the Type am + bn = c, (4) Continued Fractions and…

  14. Modal investigation of elastic anisotropy in shallow-water environments: anisotropy beyond vertical transverse isotropy.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Darin J; Odom, Robert I; Park, Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    Theoretical and numerical results are presented for modal characteristics of the seismo-acoustic wavefield in anisotropic range-independent media. General anisotropy affects the form of the elastic-stiffness tensor, particle-motion polarization, the frequency and angular dispersion curves, and introduces near-degenerate modes. Horizontally polarized particle motion (SH) cannot be ignored when anisotropy is present for low-frequency modes having significant bottom interaction. The seismo-acoustic wavefield has polarizations in all three coordinate directions even in the absence of any scattering or heterogeneity. Even weak anisotropy may have a significant impact on seismo-acoustic wave propagation. Unlike isotropic and transversely isotropic media with a vertical symmetry axis where acoustic signals comprise P-SV modes alone (in the absence of any scattering), tilted TI media allow both quasi-P-SV and quasi-SH modes to carry seismo-acoustic energy. Discrete modes for an anisotropic medium are best described as generalized P-SV-SH modes with polarizations in all three Cartesian directions. Conversion to SH is a loss that will mimic acoustic attenuation. An in-water explosion will excite quasi-SH. PMID:23862797

  15. Semilocal fractional instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-03-01

    We find semi-local fractional instantons of codimension four in Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories coupled with scalar fields and the corresponding {C}{P}^{N-1} and Grassmann sigma models at strong gauge coupling. They are 1/4 BPS states in super-symmetric theories with eight supercharges, carry fractional (half) instanton charges characterized by the fourth homotopy group π 4(G/H), and have divergent energy in infinite spaces. We construct exact solutions for the sigma models and numerical solutions for the gauge theories. Small instanton singularity in sigma models is resolved at finite gauge coupling (for the Abelian gauge theory). Instantons in Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories have negative and positive instantons charges, respectively, which are related by the Seiberg-like duality that changes the sign of the instanton charge.

  16. Hydrodynamic and magnetic fractionation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwa, Norbert; Knappe, Patrick; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Thnemann, Andreas F.; Trahms, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    Resovist originally developed as a clinical liver contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging exhibits also an outstanding performance as a tracer in Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI). In order to study the physical mechanism of the high MPI performance of Resovist, we applied asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (A4F) and static magnetic fractionation (SMF) to separate Resovist into a set of fractions with defined size classes. As A4F based on an elution method separates MNP according to their hydrodynamic size, SMF fractionates a particle distribution by its magnetic moment. The obtained fractions of both separation techniques were then magnetically characterized by magnetorelaxometry measurements to extract the corresponding effective magnetic anisotropy and hydrodynamic size distribution parameters. Additionally, the MPI performance of each fraction was assessed using magnetic particle spectroscopy. With both separation techniques fractions (normalized to their iron amount) an MPI signal gain of a factor of two could be obtained, even though the distribution of effective anisotropy and hydrodynamic size were significantly different. Relating these findings to the results from magnetic characterization allows for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MPI performance of Resovist. This knowledge may help to improve the design of novel MPI tracers and development of separation methods.

  17. Effects of pore structure and fractures on velocity anisotropy and permeability anisotropy in Ellenburger carbonate, Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unomah, Gabriel

    The effects of pore structure and fractures on seismic velocity anisotropy and permeability anisotropy in dry core samples from Ellenburger carbonate, Central Texas are investigated using P-wave velocity (Vp), polarized orthogonal S-wave velocities (Vs1 and Vs2), and permeability (Kh and K v) parallel and perpendicular to the dominant fracture direction. The presence of cracks influences the seismic, elastic and anisotropic parameters under applied stress. The stronger relationship between seismic, petrophysical and petrographic properties parallel than perpendicular to the dominant fracture is because the rock appears to be homogenous parallel to the aligned cracks. The strong correlation of P-wave anisotropy (0.87) and maximum shear anisotropy (0.52) with permeability anisotropy is because of the preferred orientation caused by the fractures. The empirical relationships may be useful in reservoir characterization, mapping fractures and hydraulic fracturing.

  18. Fractional Simple Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari Achar, B. N.; Hanneken, John W.; Clarke, Ted J.; Skaggs, Jeremy M.

    2000-03-01

    Applications of fractional calculus to physics have received considerable attention recently, including generalization of the simple harmonic oscillator problem. This paper presents a survey of several approaches that have been proposed and discusses the advantages and disadvantages thereof. An approach to be preferred is based on the generalization of the integral equation of the simple harmonic oscillator that involves physically meaningful initial conditions. A complete formal solution to the equation of motion together with graphical display will be presented.

  19. New Dry Fractionation Methods