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Sample records for calmodulin

  1. Plant Calmodulins and Calmodulin-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ranty, Benoît; Aldon, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The calmodulin (CaM) family is a major class of calcium sensor proteins which collectively play a crucial role in cellular signaling cascades through the regulation of numerous target proteins. Although CaM is one of the most conserved proteins in all eukaryotes, several features of CaM and its downstream effector proteins are unique to plants. The continuously growing repertoire of CaM-binding proteins includes several plant-specific proteins. Plants also possess a particular set of CaM isoforms and CaM-like proteins (CMLs) whose functions have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent insights that help to understand the role of this multigene family in plant development and adaptation to environmental stimuli. PMID:19521489

  2. SK channels and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+ levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca2+ signaling, free Ca2+ levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca2+ binding proteins transduce Ca2+ signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca2+ binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca2+ ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca2+-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  3. SK channels and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca(2+) signaling, free Ca(2+) levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca(2+) binding proteins transduce Ca(2+) signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca(2+) binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca(2+) ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca(2+)-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  4. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  5. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  6. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  7. Mechanical stretching of proteins: calmodulin and titin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Mechanical unfolding of several domains of calmodulin and titin is studied using a Go-like model with a realistic contact map and Lennard-Jones contact interactions. It is shown that this simple model captures the experimentally observed difference between the two proteins: titin is a spring that is tough and strong whereas calmodulin acts like a weak spring with featureless force-displacement curves. The difference is related to the dominance of the α secondary structures in the native structure of calmodulin. The tandem arrangements of calmodulin unwind simultaneously in each domain whereas the domains in titin unravel in a serial fashion. The sequences of contact events during unravelling are correlated with the contact order, i.e., with the separation between contact making amino acids along the backbone in the native state. Temperature is found to affect stretching in a profound way.

  8. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  9. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  10. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  11. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  12. Functional in vitro test of calmodulin antagonism: effect of drugs on interaction between calmodulin and glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Orosz, F; Christova, T Y; Ovádi, J

    1988-06-01

    A simple procedure has been elaborated to screen for the calmodulin antagonist effect of drugs. A covalently attached fluorescent probe was used to monitor the binding of enzymes known as target enzymes to calmodulin. Moreover, the probe made it possible to recognize a new target enzyme, aldolase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13), for calmodulin among glycolytic enzymes. The calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine prevented or eliminated the complex formation between calmodulin and enzymes studied in reconstituted systems; the Ca channel blockers had no effect. The functional consequences of the effect of drugs on calmodulin-phosphofructokinase (ATP:D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) interaction were investigated as well. Whereas trifluoperazine suspended the calmodulin-mediated hysteretic inactivation of phosphofructokinase, Ca channel blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) were ineffective. Fendiline (regarded as a Ca channel blocker) seems to act as a functional calmodulin antagonist. Its binding to calmodulin does not prevent the complex formation of phosphofructokinase and calmodulin, but within this ternary complex phosphofructokinase preserves or recovers its original activity measured in the absence of calmodulin. The possible molecular effect of drugs on a calmodulin-enzyme complex is discussed. PMID:2837637

  13. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Rabaud, Nicole E.; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 μM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney. PMID:19336226

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  15. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  17. Calmodulin enhances the stability of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Joyal, J L; Sacks, D B

    2001-05-18

    The estrogen receptor mediates breast cell proliferation and is the principal target for chemotherapy of breast carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that the estrogen receptor binds to calmodulin-Sepharose in vitro. However, the association of endogenous calmodulin with endogenous estrogen receptors in intact cells has not been reported, and the function of the interaction is obscure. Here we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation from MCF-7 human breast epithelial cells that endogenous estrogen receptors bind to endogenous calmodulin. Estradiol treatment of the cells had no significant effect on the interaction. However, incubation of the cells with tamoxifen enhanced by 5-10-fold the association of calmodulin with the estrogen receptor and increased the total cellular content of estrogen receptors by 1.5-2-fold. In contrast, the structurally distinct calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and CGS9343B attenuated the interaction between calmodulin and the estrogen receptor and dramatically reduced the number of estrogen receptors in the cell. Neither of these agents altered the amount of estrogen receptor mRNA, suggesting that calmodulin stabilizes the protein. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that, in the presence of Ca2+, calmodulin protected estrogen receptors from in vitro proteolysis by trypsin. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type calmodulin, but not a mutant calmodulin incapable of binding Ca2+, increased the concentration of estrogen receptors in MCF-7 cells, whereas transient expression of a calmodulin inhibitor peptide reduced the estrogen receptor concentration. These data demonstrate that calmodulin binds to the estrogen receptor in intact cells in a Ca2+-dependent, but estradiol-independent, manner, thereby modulating the stability and the steady state level of estrogen receptors. PMID:11278648

  18. Competitive inhibition of TRPV1-calmodulin interaction by vanilloids.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Németh, Lukács; Wéber, Edit; Szakonyi, Gerda; Winter, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Bartus, Éva; Oláh, Zoltán; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-08-01

    There is enormous interest toward vanilloid agonists of the pain receptor TRPV1 in analgesic therapy, but the mechanisms of their sensory neuron-blocking effects at high or repeated doses are still a matter of debate. Our results have demonstrated that capsaicin and resiniferatoxin form nanomolar complexes with calmodulin, and competitively inhibit TRPV1-calmodulin interaction. These interactions involve the protein recognition interface of calmodulin, which is responsible for all of the cell-regulatory calmodulin-protein interactions. These results draw attention to a previously unknown vanilloid target, which may contribute to the explanation of the paradoxical pain-modulating behavior of these important pharmacons. PMID:27339229

  19. Action of pinaverium bromide on calmodulin-regulated functions.

    PubMed

    Wuytack, F; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1985-08-01

    Pinaverium bromide at concentrations below 10(-5) M did not inhibit calmodulin-dependent enzymes such as phosphodiesterase and the Ca transport ATPase of the plasma membrane. At higher concentrations the compound interacted with the stimulation of those enzymes by calmodulin and also inhibited the calmodulin-independent activity. A similar inhibitory action was observed for the NaK ATPase. It is concluded that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on smooth muscle concentration at concentrations below 10(-5) M was due to its interaction with the voltage-dependent Ca channels and not to its interference with the calmodulin-dependent activation of the contractile proteins. PMID:2995077

  20. Ca2+-calmodulin regulates fesselin-induced actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Mechthild; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2004-11-01

    Fesselin is a proline-rich actin-binding protein that was isolated from avian smooth muscle. Fesselin bundles actin and accelerates actin polymerization by facilitating nucleation. We now show that this polymerization of actin can be regulated by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin was shown to bind to immobilized calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). The fesselin-calmodulin interaction was confirmed by a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) fluorescence upon addition of fesselin to MIANS-labeled wheat germ calmodulin. The affinity was estimated to be approximately 10(9) M(-1). The affinity of Ca(2+)-calmodulin to the fesselin F-actin complex was approximately 10(8) M(-1). Calmodulin binding to fesselin appeared to be functionally significant. In the presence of fesselin and calmodulin, the polymerization of actin was Ca(2+)-dependent. Ca(2+)-free calmodulin either had no effect or enhanced the ability of fesselin to accelerate actin polymerization. Ca(2+)-calmodulin not only reversed the stimulatory effect of fesselin but reduced the rate of polymerization below that observed in the absence of fesselin. While Ca(2+)-calmodulin had a large effect on the interaction of fesselin with G-actin, the effect on F-actin was small. Neither the binding of fesselin to F-actin nor the subsequent bundling of F-actin was greatly affected by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin may function as an actin-polymerizing factor that is regulated by Ca(2+) levels. PMID:15504050

  1. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  2. The Effect of Calcium on the Binding of Calmodulin to Calcium/Calmodulin Protein Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a follow-up laboratory experiment demonstrating the formation change when calcium binds to calmodulin. This conformation change allows this complex to bind to a target protein. Presents the necessary information to conduct the experiment and discusses the results. (YDS)

  3. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  4. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  5. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  6. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the period of support, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism. This laboratory has made breakthroughs by cloning and characterizing genes that are involved in calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling. Some of these genes show altered expression under hypergravity and simulated microgravity conditions. A major advance was made in our attempts to understand gravity signal transduction by cloning and characterizing a catalase which requires calcium/calmodulin for its activation. Our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin have dual roles in regulating the level of hydrogen peroxide (H202), a signal molecule that plays a major role in gravitropism. It is well established that auxin plays a major role in gravitropism. Our results indicate that there is a 'cross-talk' between calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and auxin-mediated signal transduction. Auxin-regulated SAUR proteins that are involved in gravitropism bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. A novel chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase was cloned and characterized and its role in gravity signal transduction was investigated. These studies have provided some answers to the fundamental questions about how signal molecules such as calcium, H202, and hormones such as auxin bring about the ultimate gravitropic response and the integral role of calmodulin in gravity signal transduction. This NASA-funded study has led to some spinoffs that have applications in solving agricultural problems. The Washington State University Research Foundation has obtained several patents related to this work.

  7. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-06-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin. PMID:26446938

  8. Inhibition by calmodulin of calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, K A; Wu, W C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1984-01-01

    Calmodulin was previously found to inhibit the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate, called the 87-kilodalton protein, in a crude extract prepared from rat brain synaptosomal cytosol. We investigated the mechanism of this inhibition, using Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase and the 87-kilodalton protein, both of which had been purified to homogeneity from bovine brain. Rabbit brain calmodulin and some other Ca2+-binding proteins inhibited the phosphorylation of the 87-kilodalton protein by this kinase in the purified system. Calmodulin also inhibited the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of H1 histone, synapsin I, and the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, with use of purified components. These results suggest that calmodulin may be a physiological regulator of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase. Images PMID:6233611

  9. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  10. Interaction of smooth muscle relaxant drugs with calmodulin and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Ronca-Testoni, S; Hrelia, S; Hakim, G; Rossi, C A

    1985-01-15

    Some smooth muscle relaxant drugs with an unknown mechanism of action have been tested for their interaction with calmodulin and with calmodulin-induced cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The affinity of these drugs for calmodulin does not parallel their inhibitory effect on the calmodulin activation of PDE. The lack of parallelism could be due to a binding of the drugs to different sites on calmodulin; furthermore a binding of papaverine, octylonium bromide and felodipine to PDE molecule might also be considered to explain their inhibitory effect on PDE basal activity. The myolytic effect of octylonium bromide and pinaverium bromide may be due to their interaction with calmodulin-dependent systems. PMID:2981701

  11. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  12. Conformational Frustration in Calmodulin-Target Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Pengzhi; Hoffman, Laurel; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a primary calcium (Ca2+) signaling protein that specifically recognizes and activates highly diverse target proteins. We explored the molecular basis of target recognition of CaM with peptides representing the CaM-binding domains from two Ca2+-CaM dependent kinases, CaMKI and CaMKII, by employing experimentally-constrained molecular simulations. Detailed binding route analysis revealed that the two CaM target peptides, although similar in length and net charge, follow distinct routes that lead to a higher binding frustration in the CaM-CaMKII complex than the CaM-CaMKI complex. We discovered that the molecular origin of the binding frustration is caused by intermolecular contacts formed with the C-domain of CaM that need to be broken before the formation of intermolecular contacts with the N-domain of CaM. We argue that the binding frustration is important for determining the kinetics of the recognition process of proteins involving large structural fluctuations. PMID:25622562

  13. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  14. Pivoting between Calmodulin Lobes Triggered by Calcium in the Kv7.2/Calmodulin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) is the principal molecular component of the slow voltage gated M-channel, which strongly influences neuronal excitability. Calmodulin (CaM) binds to two intracellular C-terminal segments of Kv7.2 channels, helices A and B, and it is required for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CaM controls channel trafficking are currently unknown. Here we used two complementary approaches to explore the molecular events underlying the association between CaM and Kv7.2 and their regulation by Ca2+. First, we performed a fluorometric assay using dansylated calmodulin (D-CaM) to characterize the interaction of its individual lobes to the Kv7.2 CaM binding site (Q2AB). Second, we explored the association of Q2AB with CaM by NMR spectroscopy, using 15N-labeled CaM as a reporter. The combined data highlight the interdependency of the N- and C-lobes of CaM in the interaction with Q2AB, suggesting that when CaM binds Ca2+ the binding interface pivots between the N-lobe whose interactions are dominated by helix B and the C-lobe where the predominant interaction is with helix A. In addition, Ca2+ makes CaM binding to Q2AB more difficult and, reciprocally, the channel weakens the association of CaM with Ca2+. PMID:24489773

  15. The chemosensitizing agent lubeluzole binds calmodulin and inhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Claudio; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Lovece, Angelo; Carrieri, Antonio; Pracella, Riccardo; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Viale, Maurizio; Illario, Maddalena; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-06-30

    An affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method to estimate apparent dissociation constants between bovine brain calmodulin (CaM) and non-peptidic ligands was developed. The method was validated reproducing the dissociation constants of a number of well-known CaM ligands. In particular, the potent antagonist 125-C9 was ad hoc synthesized through an improved synthetic procedure. The ACE method was successfully applied to verify CaM affinity for lubeluzole, a well-known neuroprotective agent recently proved useful to potentiate the activity of anti-cancer drugs. Lubeluzole was slightly less potent than 125-C9 (Kd = 2.9 ± 0.7 and 0.47 ± 0.06 μM, respectively) and displayed Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition (IC50 = 40 ± 1 μM). Possible binding modes of lubeluzole to CaM were explored by docking studies based on the X-ray crystal structures of several trifluoperazine-CaM complexes. An estimated dissociation constant in good agreement with the experimental one was found and the main aminoacidic residues and interactions contributing to complex formation were highlighted. The possibility that interference with Ca(2+) pathways may contribute to the previously observed chemosensitizing effects of lubeluzole on human ovarian adenocarcinoma and lung carcinoma cells are discussed. PMID:27043269

  16. Calcium and Calmodulin Localization in Gravitropically-responding Plant Organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Antimonate staining procedures were used to detect calcium redistribution changes in corn roots. Results show that an asymmetric redistribution of Ca is induced by a gravitropic stimulus in roots as it is in shoots. Since this response occurs within 10 min, at least 5 min before any visible bending, it could play a role in the regulation of root gravitropism. Two different general approaches were used to localize calmodulin in plant tissue: radioimmunoassay of its content in tissue and in purified subcellular organelles, and immunocytochemical detection of it in roots and coleoptiles. Radioimmunoassay results indicate that calmodulin is present in large quantities in pllant cells and that it is specifically associated with mitochondria, etioplasts and nuclei. An assayed of an extract of soluble wall proteins revealed that over 1% of these proteins was calmodulin. Controls indicate that this calmodulin is not cytoplasmic in origin. A reaction product from anti-calmodulin was found mainly in the root cap cells, moderately in metazylem elements, in some cells in the stele surrounding metaxylem elements and in cortical cells.

  17. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Plant organs respond to different physical signals such as gravity, light and touch. Gravity gives plants proper orientation, resulting in the proper form that we take for granted; the roots grow down into soil and shoots grow towards the light. Under microgravity conditions, as in space, plant growth patterns lack a clear sense of direction. Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) play an important role in gravity signal transduction. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in gravity signal transduction are not clearly understood. The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the grant period, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism.

  18. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  19. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  20. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  1. Low parotid saliva calmodulin in patients with taste and smell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Law, J S; Henkin, R I

    1986-08-01

    Parotid saliva calmodulin was found both in 32 normal volunteers and in 60 patients with taste and smell dysfunction; salivary calmodulin concentration was significantly lower in the patients than in the volunteers. There were no differences in salivary calmodulin concentration with respect to age, sex, or salivary flow rate in either normal volunteers or patients. When patients were categorized by diagnosis, calmodulin concentration was found to be decreased in all patient groups. The concentration of calmodulin in saliva was about 10 times that found in serum, suggesting that the parotid gland is a major source of this protein. PMID:3741698

  2. A general framework to characterize inhibitors of calmodulin: use of calmodulin inhibitors to study the interaction between calmodulin and its calmodulin binding domains.

    PubMed

    Audran, Emilie; Dagher, Rania; Gioria, Sophie; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Didier, Bruno; Villa, Pascal; Makarov, Alexander A; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Haiech, Jacques

    2013-07-01

    The prominent role of Ca(2+) in cell physiology is mediated by a whole set of proteins involved in Ca(2+)-signal generation, deciphering and arrest. Among these intracellular proteins, calmodulin (CaM) known as a prototypical calcium sensor, serves as a ubiquitous carrier of the intracellular calcium signal in all eukaryotic cell types. CaM is assumed to be involved in many diseases including Parkinson, Alzheimer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Defects in some of many reaction partners of CaM might be responsible for disease symptoms. Several classes of drugs bind to CaM with unwanted side effects rather than specific therapeutic use. Thus, it may be more promising to concentrate at searching for pharmacological interferences with the CaM target proteins, in order to find tools for dissecting and investigating CaM-regulatory and modulatory functions in cells. In the present study, we have established a screening assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) to identify a diverse set of small molecules that disrupt the regulatory function of CaM. The FP-based CaM assay consists in the competition of two fluorescent probes and a library of chemical compounds for binding to CaM. Screening of about 5300 compounds (Strasbourg Academic Library) by displacement of the probe yielded 39 compounds in a first step, from which 6 were selected. Those 6 compounds were characterized by means of calorimetry studies and by competitive displacement of two fluorescent probes interacting with CaM. Moreover, those small molecules were tested for their capability to displace 8 different CaM binding domains from CaM. Our results show that these CaM/small molecules interactions are not functionally equivalent. The strategy that has been set up for CaM is a general model for the development and validation of other CaM interactors, to decipher their mode of action, or rationally design more specific CaM antagonists. Moreover, this strategy may be used for other protein binding assays intended to

  3. Calmodulin Promotes N-BAR Domain-Mediated Membrane Constriction and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Margaret D; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Hicke, Linda; Payne, Gregory S

    2016-04-18

    Membrane remodeling by BAR (Bin, Amphiphysin, RVS) domain-containing proteins, such as endophilins and amphiphysins, is integral to the process of endocytosis. However, little is known about the regulation of endocytic BAR domain activity. We have identified an interaction between the yeast Rvs167 N-BAR domain and calmodulin. Calmodulin-binding mutants of Rvs167 exhibited defects in endocytic vesicle release. In vitro, calmodulin enhanced membrane tubulation and constriction by wild-type Rvs167 but not calmodulin-binding-defective mutants. A subset of mammalian N-BAR domains bound calmodulin, and co-expression of calmodulin with endophilin A2 potentiated tubulation in vivo. These studies reveal a conserved role for calmodulin in regulating the intrinsic membrane-sculpting activity of endocytic N-BAR domains. PMID:27093085

  4. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of calmodulin in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakayama, A; Kanehisa, T

    1986-01-01

    Calmodulin, a wide-spread eukaryotic Ca2+-binding protein, was phosphorylated at its tyrosine residues in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed chicken and rat cells but not in normal chicken embryo fibroblasts. In contrast, serine and threonine phosphorylation of calmodulin was found to occur in both normal and virus-transformed cells. In an in vitro system containing purified src kinase from RSV-transformed cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin by the src kinase was inhibited by Ca2+. Furthermore, the tyrosine-phosphorylated calmodulin showed slower mobility than that of nonphosphorylated calmodulin in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis when Ca2+ was present. These results suggest that the structure of calmodulin Ca2+ complex may be altered by tyrosine phosphorylation. It is thus inferred that Ca2+ may regulate the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin in RSV-transformed cells, and phosphorylation in turn may attenuate the function of this protein in vivo. Images PMID:2424020

  5. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  6. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca2+ sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca2+ signals. Ca2+-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal and overview of Ca2+ signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca2+ signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to improve stress-tolerance of

  7. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  8. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  9. Cloning and expression of calmodulin gene in Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Daisuke; Asakura, Yuki; Nkembo, Marguerite Kasidimoko; Shite, Masato; Sugiyama, Ryuji; Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2007-06-01

    A homology-based cloning strategy yielded a cDNA clone, designated Sd-cam, encoding calmodulin protein from Scoparia dulcis. The restriction digests of genomic DNA of S. dulcis showed a single hybridized signal when probed with the fragment of this gene in Southern blot analyses, suggesting that Sd-cam occurs as a sole gene encoding calmodulin in the plant. The reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that Sd-cam was appreciably expressed in leaf, root and stem tissues. It appeared that transcription of this gene increased transiently when the leaf cultures of S. dulcis were treated with methyl jasmonate and calcium ionophore A23187. These results suggest that transcriptional activation of Sd-cam is one of the early cellular events of the methyl jasmonate-induced responses of S. dulcis. PMID:17541174

  10. Abnormal expression of the calmodulin gene in muscle from the dystrophic chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Hudecki, M.S.; Kibler, P.K.; Pollina, C.M.; Thacore, H.R.; Davis, P.J.; Davis, F.B.

    1986-05-29

    Compared to that of genetically-related normal chickens, pectoralis muscle from the dystrophic chicken contained increased calmodulin measured by radioimmunoassay. Determined by the dot blot procedure, expression of the calmodulin gene was enhanced in muscle from affected animals. The bioactivity of the gene product was normal. Together with previous studies reporting of increased sarcoplasmic calmodulin suggest the latter is a cellular response to defective Ca/sup 2 +/ transport at the level of cell efflux or intracellular organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum) uptake.

  11. The interaction of IQGAPs with calmodulin-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Hamilton, Elaine; Atcheson, Erwan; Timson, David J

    2011-04-01

    Since their identification over 15 years ago, the IQGAP (IQ-motif-containing GTPase-activating protein) family of proteins have been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-cell adhesion, cytokinesis and apoptosis. These processes rely on protein-protein interactions, and understanding these (and how they influence one another) is critical in determining how the IQGAPs function. A key group of interactions is with calmodulin and the structurally related proteins myosin essential light chain and S100B. These interactions occur primarily through a series of IQ motifs, which are α-helical segments of the protein located towards the middle of the primary sequence. The three human IQGAP isoforms (IQGAP1, IQGAP2 and IQGAP3) all have four IQ motifs. However, these have different affinities for calmodulin, myosin light chain and S100B. Whereas all four IQ motifs of IQGAP1 interact with calmodulin in the presence of calcium, only the last two do so in the absence of calcium. IQ1 (the first IQ motif) interacts with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa and the first two undergo a calcium-dependent interaction with S100B. The significance of the interaction between Mlc1sa and IQGAP1 in mammals is unknown. However, a similar interaction involving the Saccharomyces cerevisiae IQGAP-like protein Iqg1p is involved in cytokinesis, leading to speculation that there may be a similar role in mammals. PMID:21428964

  12. Expression analysis of calmodulin and calmodulin-like genes from rice, Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, a large family of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins transduce the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations by binding to and altering the activities of target proteins, and thereby affecting the physiological responses to a vast array of stimuli. Here, transcript expression analysis of Cam and CML gene family members in rice (Oryza sativa L.) was extensively examined. Results Cam and CML genes in rice exhibited differential expression patterns in tissues/organs. Under osmotic stress and salt stress, expression of OsCam1-1, OsCML4, 5, 8, and 11 was induced with different kinetics and magnitude. OsCML4 and 8 mRNA levels significantly increased by 3 h after treatment and remained elevated for at least 24 h while expression of OsCam1-1, OsCML5 and 11 was up-regulated as early as 1–3 h before rapidly returning to normal levels. Several cis-acting elements in response to abiotic stresses, including DREs (important promoter elements responsive to drought, high salt, and cold stress), were detected in the 5′ upstream regions of these genes. The observed induction of the GUS activity of transgenic rice plants via the OsCam1-1 promoter appeared to be biphasic and dependent on the severity of salt stress. Conclusions Large OsCam and OsCML gene family members likely play differential roles as signal transducers in regulating various developmental processes and represent important nodes in the signal transduction and transcriptional regulation networks in abiotic stresss responses mediated by the complex Ca2+ signals in plants, which are rich in both spatial and temporal information. PMID:23134977

  13. Calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in cystic fibrosis and normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the possibility that a lesion in a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent regulatory mechanism may be involved in cystic fibrosis (CF). The level of CaM, CaM-binding proteins (CaM-BP) and a CaM-dependent phosphatase (CaM-Ptase) have been compared in cultured fibroblasts from CF patients versus age- and sex-matched control subjects. The CaM concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 ..mu..g/mg protein (n=8); there was no significant difference in the average CaM concentration from CF patients vs controls. Using Western blotting techniques with /sup 125/I-CaM, they detected at least ten distinct CaM-BPs in fibroblasts with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 37K; the only consistent difference between control and CF cell lines was in a 46.5K CaM-BP, which was depressed in all three CF samples. The 46.5 K CaM-BP was found only in the particulate fraction. A 59K CaM-BP was identified as a CaM-Ptase by its crossreactivity with an antibody against a brain CaM-Ptase. There was no significant difference in CaM-Ptase activity or in the amount of the phosphatase as determined by radioimmunoassay in CF vs. normal samples (n=8). Thus, the level of CaM as well as its various enzymes and proteins do not appear to be altered in CF fibroblasts except for a CaM-BP of 46.5K, the identity of which is currently being investigated.

  14. Synthesis and Accumulation of Calmodulin in Suspension Cultures of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Imara Y.; Zielinski, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of calmodulin mRNA and protein were measured during a growth cycle of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. A full-length carrot calmodulin cDNA clone isolated from a λgt10 library was used to measure steady-state calmodulin mRNA levels. During the exponential phase of culture growth when mitotic activity and oxidative respiration rates were maximal, calmodulin mRNA levels were 4- to 5-fold higher than they were during the later stages of culture growth, when respiration rates were lower and growth was primarily by cell expansion. Net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis, as measured by pulse-labeling in vivo with [35S]methionine, paralleled the changes in calmodulin steady-state mRNA level during culture growth. As a consequence, net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis declined 5- to 10-fold during the later stages of culture growth. The qualitative spectrum of polypeptides synthesized and accumulated by the carrot cells during the course of a culture cycle, however, remained largely unchanged. Calmodulin polypeptide levels, in contrast to its net synthesis, remained relatively constant during the exponential phases of the culture growth cycle and increased during the later stages of culture growth. Our data are consistent with increased calmodulin polypeptide turnover associated with periods of rapid cell proliferation and high levels of respiration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16653062

  15. Molecular mechanisms of calmodulin action on TRPV5 and modulation by parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A E; Bindels, René J M; Vuister, Geerten W; Hoenderop, Joost G

    2011-07-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. Ca(2+) influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca(2+) influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca(2+)-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Calmodulin Action on TRPV5 and Modulation by Parathyroid Hormone▿†

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Bindels, René J. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Hoenderop, Joost G.

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. Ca2+ influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca2+ influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca2+-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca2+-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca2+-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  17. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  18. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  19. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  20. Calmodulin gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding the stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various physiological responses in plants. To determine the functional significance of calmodulin in fl...

  1. Functional analysis of calmodulin genes family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin as a ubiquitous calcium sensor can recognize the different developmental and/or stimulus-triggered calcium changes and modulate the functions of its target proteins involved in plant growth and development. However, it remains elusive for the functions of calmodulin for fleshy fruit devel...

  2. Calmodulin Adopts an Extended Conformation when Interacting with L-Selectin in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Putkey, John A.; Li, Renhao

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin, an intracellular calcium-binding protein, is thought to regulate ectodomain shedding of many membrane proteins, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Basing on a solution structure of calcium-loaded calmodulin in complex with a L-selectin fragment that contains a portion of its transmembrane domain, Gifford et al. (University of Calgary) recently suggested that calmodulin regulates L-selectin shedding by binding directly to a portion of the L-selectin transmembrane domain in a compact conformation. Using fluorescently labeled calmodulin, we show however that calmodulin adopts a distinctly different and much more extended conformation when it binds to the CLS peptide (i.e. the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin) reconstituted in the phosphatidylcholine liposome with micromolar dissociation constant and in a calcium-independent manner. Calmodulin adopts a similarly extended conformation in a ternary complex with the N-terminal FERM domain of moesin and CLS reconstituted in the phospholipid liposome that mimics the native membrane environment. These results indicate that calmodulin does not bind directly to the transmembrane domain of L-selectin. Understanding the association of calmodulin with L-selectin helps to shed light on the mechanisms underlying regulation of ectodomain shedding. PMID:23658780

  3. A new potent calmodulin antagonist with arylalkylamine structure: crystallographic, spectroscopic and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Harmat, V; Böcskei, Z; Náray-Szabó, G; Bata, I; Csutor, A S; Hermecz, I; Arányi, P; Szabó, B; Liliom, K; Vértessy, B G; Ovádi, J

    2000-03-31

    An arylalkylamine-type calmodulin antagonist, N-(3, 3-diphenylpropyl)-N'-[1-R-(3, 4-bis-butoxyphenyl)ethyl]-propylene-diamine (AAA) is presented and its complexes with calmodulin are characterized in solution and in the crystal. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra show that AAA binds to calmodulin with 2:1 stoichiometry in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The crystal structure with 2:1 stoichiometry is determined to 2.64 A resolution. The binding of AAA causes domain closure of calmodulin similar to that obtained with trifluoperazine. Solution and crystal data indicate that each of the two AAA molecules anchors in the hydrophobic pockets of calmodulin, overlapping with two trifluoperazine sites, i.e. at a hydrophobic pocket and an interdomain site. The two AAA molecules also interact with each other by hydrophobic forces. A competition enzymatic assay has revealed that AAA inhibits calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase activity at two orders of magnitude lower concentration than trifluoperazine. The apparent dissociation constant of AAA to calmodulin is 18 nM, which is commensurable with that of target peptides. On the basis of the crystal structure, we propose that the high-affinity binding is mainly due to a favorable entropy term, as the AAA molecule makes multiple contacts in its complex with calmodulin. PMID:10731425

  4. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  5. Modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions. Quantitative analysis of the phosphofructokinase-aldolase-calmodulin system.

    PubMed

    Orosz, F; Christova, T Y; Ovádi, J

    1988-11-23

    The simultaneous effect of calmodulin and aldolase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13) on the concentration-dependent behaviour of muscle phosphofructokinase (ATP: D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) has been analysed by means of a covalently attached fluorescent probe, gel penetration experiments, and using a kinetic approach. We found that calmodulin-induced inactivation of phosphofructokinase is suspended by addition of an equimolar amount of aldolase. This effect was attributed to an apparent competition of calmodulin and aldolase for the dimeric forms of kinase. Moreover, the direct binding of aldolase to calmodulin has also been demonstrated, which resulted in a significant decrease in the kcat value of the enzyme. The quantitative analysis of these interactions in the system phosphofructokinase-calmodulin-aldolase is presented. A possible molecular model for the modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions is envisaged. PMID:2973356

  6. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  7. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  8. Integrated Protein Array Screening and High Throughput Validation of 70 Novel Neural Calmodulin-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, David J.; Bauer, Mikael C.; O'Brien, John; Johnson, Winifred M.; Divizio, Catherine A.; O'Kane, Sara L.; Berggård, Tord; Merino, Alejandro; Åkerfeldt, Karin S.; Linse, Sara; Cahill, Dolores J.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin is an essential regulator of intracellular processes in response to extracellular stimuli mediated by a rise in Ca2+ ion concentration. To profile protein-protein interactions of calmodulin in human brain, we probed a high content human protein array with fluorophore-labeled calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. This protein array contains 37,200 redundant proteins, incorporating over 10,000 unique human neural proteins from a human brain cDNA library. We designed a screen to find high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm) binding partners of calmodulin and identified 76 human proteins from all intracellular compartments of which 72 are novel. We measured the binding kinetics of 74 targets with calmodulin using a high throughput surface plasmon resonance assay. Most of the novel calmodulin-target complexes identified have low dissociation rates (koff ≤ 10−3 s−1) and high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm), consistent with the design of the screen. Many of the identified proteins are known to assemble in neural tissue, forming assemblies such as the spectrin scaffold and the postsynaptic density. We developed a microarray of the identified target proteins with which we can characterize the biochemistry of calmodulin for all targets in parallel. Four novel targets were verified in neural cells by co-immunoprecipitation, and four were selected for exploration of the calmodulin-binding regions. Using synthetic peptides and isothermal titration calorimetry, calmodulin binding motifs were identified in the potassium voltage-gated channel Kv6.1 (residues 474–493), calmodulin kinase-like vesicle-associated protein (residues 302–316), EF-hand domain family member A2 (residues 202–216), and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase, type I, γ (residues 400–415). PMID:20068228

  9. A 115 kDa calmodulin-binding protein is located in rat liver endosome fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Enrich, C; Bachs, O; Evans, W H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin-binding polypeptides in various rat liver subcellular fractions was investigated. Plasma-membrane, endosome, Golgi and lysosome fractions were prepared by established procedures. The calmodulin-binding polypeptides present in the subcellular fractions were identified by using an overlay technique after transfer from gels to nitrocellulose sheets. Distinctive populations of calmodulin-binding polypeptides were present in all the fractions examined except lysosomes. A major 115 kDa calmodulin-binding polypeptide of pI 4.3 was located to the endosome subfractions, and it emerges as a candidate endosome-specific protein. Partitioning of endosome fractions between aqueous and Triton X-114 phases indicated that the calmodulin-binding polypeptide was hydrophobic. Major calmodulin-binding polypeptides of 140 and 240 kDa and minor polypeptides of 40-60 kDa were present in plasma membranes. The distribution of calmodulin in the various endosome and plasma-membrane fractions was also analysed, and the results indicated that the amounts were high compared with those in the cytosol. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3214436

  10. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  11. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  12. Simultaneous binding of drugs with different chemical structures to Ca2+-calmodulin: crystallographic and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Vertessy, B G; Harmat, V; Böcskei, Z; Náray-Szabó, G; Orosz, F; Ovádi, J

    1998-11-01

    The modulatory action of Ca2+-calmodulin on multiple targets is inhibited by trifluoperazine, which competes with target proteins for calmodulin binding. The structure of calmodulin crystallized with two trifluoperazine molecules is determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.74 A resolution. The X-ray data together with the characteristic and distinct signals obtained by circular dichroism in solution allowed us to identify the binding domains as well as the order of the binding of two trifluoperazine molecules to calmodulin. Accordingly, the binding of trifluperazine to the C-terminal hydrophobic pocket is followed by the interaction of the second drug molecule with an interdomain site. Recently, we demonstrated that the two bisindole derivatives, vinblastine and KAR-2 [3"-(beta-chloroethyl)-2",4"-dioxo-3, 5"-spirooxazolidino-4-deacetoxyvinblastine], interact with calmodulin with comparable affinity; however, they display different functional effects [Orosz et al. (1997) British J. Pharmacol. 121, 955-962]. The structural basis responsible for these effects were investigated by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The data provide evidence that calmodulin can simultaneously accommodate trifluoperazine and KAR-2 as well as vinblastine and KAR-2, but not trifluoperazine and vinblastine. The combination of the binding and structural data suggests that distinct binding sites exist on calmodulin for vinblastine and KAR-2 which correspond, at least partly, to that of trifluoperazine at the C-terminal hydrophobic pocket and at an interdomain site, respectively. This structural arrangement can explain why these drugs display different anticalmodulin activities. Calmodulin complexed with melittin is also able to bind two trifluoperazine molecules, the binding of which appears to be cooperative. Results obtained with intact and proteolytically cleaved calmodulin reveal that the central linker region of the protein is indispensable for simultanous interactions

  13. Barium can replace calcium in calmodulin-dependent contractions of skinned renal arteries of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kreye, V A; Hofmann, F; Mühleisen, M

    1986-03-01

    Renal arteries of the rabbit were chemically skinned using Triton X-100. In EGTA-buffered solutions containing calmodulin and ATP, small strips of the skinned preparations were found to develop contractile force which was dependent on the concentrations of either free calcium or of free barium. However, a 220 times greater concentration of barium than of calcium was necessary for comparable effects. Quantitatively, the response to barium was dependent on the concentration of calmodulin added to the test solutions. The contractile effect of barium was partly antagonized by the calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. PMID:3960707

  14. Localization of calmodulin in epidermis and skin glands: a comparative immunohistological investigation in different vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Wevers, A; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The study deals with the immunolocalization of calmodulin-reactive epithelial cells in different vertebrates (Tinca tinca, Ambystoma mexicanum, Xenopus laevis, Rana ridibunda, Columba domestica, Sus scrofa domestica, Homo sapiens sapiens). The immunoperoxidase technique was performed on acetone fixed frozen sections using monoclonal (BF8) and polyclonal (ACAM) anti-calmodulin antibodies. We were able to differentiate 2 major types of staining patterns: 1. A more superficial epidermal staining in species adapted to an aqueous environment and 2. a staining along the epidermal-dermal junction in species adapted to a terrestrial environment. It seems most likely that epithelial cells immunoreactive for calmodulin are involved in skin permeability control. PMID:1718122

  15. Calmodulin Point Mutations Affect Drosophila Development and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, H. B.; Heiman, R. G.; Bolduc, C.; Kovalick, G. E.; Whitley, P.; Stern, M.; Beckingham, K.

    1997-01-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) is recognized as a major intermediary in intracellular calcium signaling, but as yet little is known of its role in developmental and behavioral processes. We have generated and studied mutations to the endogenous Cam gene of Drosophila melanogaster that change single amino acids within the protein coding region. One of these mutations produces a striking pupal lethal phenotype involving failure of head eversion. Various mutant combinations produce specific patterns of ectopic wing vein formation or melanotic scabs on the cuticle. Anaphase chromosome bridging is also seen as a maternal effect during the early embryonic nuclear divisions. In addition, specific behavioral defects such as poor climbing and flightlessness are detected among these mutants. Comparisons with other Drosophila mutant phenotypes suggests potential CAM targets that may mediate these developmental and behavioral effects, and analysis of the CAM crystal structure suggests the structural consequences of the individual mutations. PMID:9409836

  16. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  17. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  18. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  19. Structural Analysis of a Calmodulin Variant from Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidiha, Mostafa; Ishida, Hiroaki; Sutherland, Cindy; Gifford, Jessica L.; Walsh, Michael P.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    OsCaM61 is one of five calmodulins known to be present in Oryza sativa that relays the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+] to downstream targets. OsCaM61 bears a unique C-terminal extension with a prenylation site. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy we studied the behavior of the calmodulin (CaM) domain and the C-terminal extension of OsCaM61 in the absence and presence of Ca2+. NMR dynamics data for OsCaM61 indicate that the two lobes of the CaM domain act together unlike the independent behavior of the lobes seen in mammalian CaM and soybean CaM4. Also, data demonstrate that the positively charged nuclear localization signal region in the tail in apo-OsCaM61 is helical, whereas it becomes flexible in the Ca2+-saturated protein. The extra helix in apo-OsCaM61 provides additional interactions in the C-lobe and increases the structural stability of the closed apo conformation. This leads to a decrease in the Ca2+ binding affinity of EF-hands III and IV in OsCaM61. In Ca2+-OsCaM61, the basic nuclear localization signal cluster adopts an extended conformation, exposing the C-terminal extension for prenylation or enabling OsCaM61 to be transferred to the nucleus. Moreover, Ser172 and Ala173, residues in the tail, interact with different regions of the protein. These interactions affect the ability of OsCaM61 to activate different target proteins. Altogether, our data show that the tail is not simply a linker between the prenyl group and the protein but that it also provides a new regulatory mechanism that some plants have developed to fine-tune Ca2+ signaling events. PMID:24052265

  20. Tracking and localization of calmodulin in live cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carey K; Harms, Gregory S

    2016-08-01

    The calcium signaling protein calmodulin (CaM) interacts with many target proteins inside the cell to regulate a wide range of biological signals. CaM's availability to propagate signals depends on its mobility, which may be regulated by interactions with multiple target proteins. We detected single molecules of CaM labeled with a fluorescent dye and injected into living HEK 293 cells, and we used high-speed, wide-field, single-molecule imaging to track single CaM molecules. Single-molecule trajectories were analyzed to characterize the motions of individual CaM molecules. Single-molecule localization resolved CaM positions with a position accuracy of <100nm, permitting sub-diffraction imaging of features with localized CaM that form in response to increased free Ca(2+). Single-molecule tracking demonstrated the presence of a wide range of mobilities of individual calmodulin molecules in a cell, with diffusion coefficients ranging from <0.01μm(2)s(-1) to ~5μm(2) s(-1), whereas analysis by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy revealed faster-moving components with diffusion coefficients of >10μm(2)s(-1). For molecules confined to small regions of the cell, super-resolved images of presumed signaling complexes were recovered. Individual trajectories were classified as normal diffusion, confined diffusion, or directed motion, and could suggest how the individual CaM molecules were bound in the cell. The results show that interactions of CaM with target proteins result in decreased translational mobilities of a significant fraction of CaM molecules inside cells. The work presented here illustrates methods that can characterize location, mobilities, and the availability of signaling molecules in live cells. PMID:27113857

  1. Calmodulin Affects Sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mukunda, Latha; Miazzi, Fabio; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Hansson, Bill S.; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs), occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX) and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco). The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or22a inside the fly's antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native neurons are required

  2. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  4. Folding and binding energy of a calmodulin-binding cell antiproliferative peptide.

    PubMed

    Almudallal, Ahmad M; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Stewart, John M

    2015-09-01

    We carry out a computational study of a calmodulin-binding peptide shown to be effective in reducing cell proliferation. We find several folded states for two short variants of different length of the peptide and determine the location of the binding site on calmodulin, the binding free energy for the different conformers and structural details that play a role in optimal binding. Binding to a hydrophobic pocket in calmodulin occurs via an anchoring phenylalanine residue of the natively disordered peptide, and is enhanced when a neighbouring hydrophobic residue acts as a co-anchor. The shorter sequence possesses better binding to calmodulin, which is encouraging in terms of the development of non-peptide analogues as therapeutic agents. PMID:26310499

  5. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  6. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  7. Ca2+-calmodulin promotes survival of pheromone-induced growth arrest by activation of calcineurin and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M J; Geiser, J R; Davis, T N

    1996-01-01

    The cmd1-6 allele contains three mutations that block Ca2+ binding to calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that strains containing cmd1-6 lose viability during cell cycle arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha-factor. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of alpha-factor for the calmodulin mutant is almost fivefold below the LD50 for a wild-type strain. The calmodulin mutants are not more sensitive to alpha-factor, as measured by activation of a pheromone-responsive reporter gene. Two observations indicate that activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin contributes to survival of pheromone-induced arrest. First, deletion of the gene encoding the calcineurin regulatory B subunit, CNB1, from a wild-type strain decreases the LD50 of alpha-factor but has no further effect on a cmd1-6 strain. Second, a dominant constitutive calcineurin mutant partially restores the ability of the cmd1-6 strain to survive exposure to alpha-factor. Activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) also contributes to survival, thus revealing a new function for this enzyme. Deletion of the CMK1 and CMK2 genes, which encode CaMK, decreases the LD50 of pheromone compared with that for a wild-type strain but again has no effect in a cmd1-6 strain. Furthermore, the LD50 of alpha-factor for a mutant in which the calcineurin and CaMK genes have been deleted is the same as that for the calmodulin mutant. Finally, the CaMK and calcineurin pathways appear to be independent since the ability of constitutive calcineurin to rescue a cmd1-6 strain is not blocked by deletion of the CaMK genes. PMID:8756641

  8. N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibits cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, H; Sasaki, Y; Tanaka, T; Endo, T; Ohno, S; Fujii, Y; Nagata, T

    1981-01-01

    N-(6-Aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and its derivatives are putative calmodulin antagonists that bind to calmodulin and inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated enzyme activities. Autoradiographic studies using tritiated W-7 showed that this compound penetrates the cell membrane, is distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, and inhibits proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. Cytoplasmic [3H]W-7 was excluded completely within 6 hr after removal of [3H]W-7 from the culture medium. N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide, an analogue of W-7 that interacts only weakly with calmodulin, proved to be a much weaker inhibitor of cell proliferation. CHO-K1 cells were synchronized by shaking during mitosis and then released into the cell cycle in the presence of 25 microM W-7 or 2.5 mM thymidine for 12 hr. Cell division was observed approximately 6 hr later. The results suggest that the effect of W-7 on cell proliferation might be through selective inhibition of the G1/S boundary phase, which is similar to the effect of excess thymidine. This pharmacological demonstration that cytoplasmic calmodulin is involved in cell proliferation is significant; W-7 and its derivatives may be useful tools for research on calmodulin and cell biology-related studies. Images PMID:6945588

  9. 3'-modified antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides complementary to calmodulin mRNA alter behavioral responses in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, R D; Fraga, D; Reed, M W

    1992-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin has been shown to modulate the Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels of Paramecium tetraurelia. Mutations in the calmodulin gene of Paramecium result in an altered pattern of behavioral responses. Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), complementary to calmodulin mRNA in Paramecium, were synthesized from a modified solid support that introduced a 3'-hydroxyhexyl phosphate. These 3'-modified ODNs were tested for their ability to alter the behavioral response of Paramecium. The microinjection of antisense ODNs temporarily reduced the backward swimming behavior of the cells in test solutions containing Na+. The injection of sense and random 3'-modified ODNs, or unmodified antisense ODNs, had no effect. The antisense ODN-induced effect was reversed by the injection of calmodulin protein. The pattern of response of the injected cells in various behavioral test solutions indicated that the calmodulin antisense ODNs reduce the Ca(2+)-dependent Na+ current. Antisense ODNs, complementary either to the 5' start site or to an internal sequence of the calmodulin mRNA, were similarly effective in altering behavior. These results show that antisense ODNs may be utilized in ciliated protozoa as a tool for reducing the expression of specific gene products. In addition, Paramecium represents a powerful model system with which to study and develop antisense ODN technology. PMID:1528867

  10. Calcium-dependent Regulation of SNARE-mediated Membrane Fusion by Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca2+ sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca2+-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca2+/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (KD = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (KD = 2 μm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca2+ sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion. PMID:20519509

  11. Calcium- and calmodulin-regulated breakdown of phospholipid by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Paliyath, G.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in the regulation of phospholipid breakdown by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons has been obtained by following the formation of radiolabeled degradation products from (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine. Three membrane-associated enzymes were found to mediate the breakdown of (U-/sup 14/C) phosphatidylcholine, viz. phospholipase D phosphatidic acid phosphatase and lipolytic acyl hydrolase. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase were both stimulated by physiological levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas lipolytic acyl hydrolase proved to be insensitive to Ca/sup 2 +/. Phospholipase D was unaffected by calmodulin, but the activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was additionally stimulated by nanomolar levels of calmodulin in the presence of 15 micromolar free Ca/sup 2 +/. Calmidazolium, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity at IC/sub 50/ values ranging from 10 to 15 micromolar. Thus, the Ca/sup 2 +/-induced stimulation of phosphatidic acid phosphatase appears to be mediated through calmodulin, whereas the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on phospholipase D is independent of calmodulin. The role of Ca/sup 2 +/ as a second messenger in the initiation of membrane lipid degradation is discussed.

  12. Two Distinct Calmodulin Binding Sites in the Third Intracellular Loop and Carboxyl Tail of Angiotensin II (AT1A) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renwen; Liu, Zhijie; Qu, Youxing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present data that support the presence of two distinct calmodulin binding sites within the angiotensin II receptor (AT1A), at juxtamembrane regions of the N-terminus of the third intracellular loop (i3, amino acids 214–231) and carboxyl tail of the receptor (ct, 302–317). We used bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to document interactions of calmodulin with the AT1A holo-receptor and GST-fusion protein pull-downs to demonstrate that i3 and ct interact with calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. The former is a 1–12 motif and the latter belongs to 1-5-10 calmodulin binding motif. The apparent Kd of calmodulin for i3 is 177.0±9.1 nM, and for ct is 79.4±7.9 nM as assessed by dansyl-calmodulin fluorescence. Replacement of the tryptophan (W219) for alanine in i3, and phenylalanine (F309 or F313) for alanine in ct reduced their binding affinities for calmodulin, as predicted by computer docking simulations. Exogenously applied calmodulin attenuated interactions between G protein βγ subunits and i3 and ct, somewhat more so for ct than i3. Mutations W219A, F309A, and F313A did not alter Gβγ binding, but reduced the ability of calmodulin to compete with Gβγ, suggesting that calmodulin and Gβγ have overlapping, but not identical, binding requirements for i3 and ct. Calmodulin interference with the Gβγ binding to i3 and ct regions of the AT1A receptor strongly suggests that calmodulin plays critical roles in regulating Gβγ-dependent signaling of the receptor. PMID:23755207

  13. Purification of F plasmid-encoded native TraC from Escherichia coli by affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose.

    PubMed

    Hellstern, Simon; Mutzel, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    We have enriched several native bacterial proteins from Escherichia coli by chromatography on the immobilized eukaryotic Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. These bacterial proteins bound in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner to calmodulin, and were released by the addition of the Ca(2+)-chelator, EGTA, similar to many eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. One of the bacterial proteins, F factor-encoded TraC, was purified to apparent homogeneity by an additional chromatographic step, anion exchange chromatography on MonoQ. Experiments with four chemically distinct calmodulin antagonists (R24571, Compound 48/80, melittin, and W7) showed that all of these substances inhibited the binding of purified TraC to calmodulin at effective concentrations comparable to those required for inhibiting in vitro binding of eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. Three further bacterial proteins were identified as calmodulin-binding proteins: SecA, GlpD, and GlpC. We suggest that also these native bacterial proteins might be isolated by the unusual purification procedure including affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose. Whether the identified proteins bind to, and are regulated by, putative bacterial calmodulin-like proteins in Escherichia coli remains to be established. PMID:26892535

  14. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  15. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  16. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  17. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  18. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  19. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, no functional significance of Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins has been identified in plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca2+/CaM-bindi...

  20. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  1. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. CML10, a variant of calmodulin, modulates ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Moon; Nguyen, Ha Thi Kim; Kim, Soo Youn; Shin, Jin Seok; Cho, Dong Hwa; Hong, Seung Beom; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Ok, Sung Han

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) regulate numerous Ca(2+) -mediated cellular processes in plants by interacting with their respective downstream effectors. Due to the limited number of CaMs, other calcium sensors modulate the regulation of Ca(2+) -mediated cellular processes that are not managed by CaMs. Of 50 CaM-like (CML) proteins identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the function of CML10. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed phosphomannomutase (PMM) as a putative interaction partner of CML10. In vitro and in vivo interaction assays were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms of CML10 and PMM. PMM activity and the phenotypes of cml10 knock-down mutants were studied to elucidate the role(s) of the CML10-PMM interaction. PMM interacted specifically with CML10 in the presence of Ca(2+) through its multiple interaction motifs. This interaction promoted the activity of PMM. The phenotypes of cml10 knock-down mutants were more sensitive to stress conditions than wild-type plants, corresponding with the fact that PMM is an enzyme which modulates the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. The results of this research demonstrate that a calcium sensor, CML10, which is an evolutionary variant of CaM, modulates the stress responses in Arabidopsis by regulating ascorbic acid production. PMID:26315131

  3. Structural basis for activation of calcineurin by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Rumi-Masante, Julie; Rusinga, Farai I; Lester, Terrence E; Dunlap, Tori B; Williams, Todd D; Dunker, A Keith; Weis, David D; Creamer, Trevor P

    2012-01-13

    The highly conserved phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) plays vital roles in numerous processes including T-cell activation, development and function of the central nervous system, and cardiac growth. It is activated by the calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM). CaM binds to a regulatory domain (RD) within CaN, causing a conformational change that displaces an autoinhibitory domain (AID) from the active site, resulting in activation of the phosphatase. This is the same general mechanism by which CaM activates CaM-dependent protein kinases. Previously published data have hinted that the RD of CaN is intrinsically disordered. In this work, we demonstrate that the RD is unstructured and that it folds upon binding CaM, ousting the AID from the catalytic site. The RD is 95 residues long, with the AID attached to its C-terminal end and the 24-residue CaM binding region toward the N-terminal end. This is unlike the CaM-dependent protein kinases that have CaM binding sites and AIDs immediately adjacent in sequence. Our data demonstrate that not only does the CaM binding region folds but also an ∼25- to 30-residue region between it and the AID folds, resulting in over half of the RD adopting α-helical structure. This appears to be the first observation of CaM inducing folding of this scale outside of its binding site on a target protein. PMID:22100452

  4. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  5. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  6. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  7. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI

    PubMed Central

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin expressed in Leishmania parasites. Although it is assumed that it performs a variety of motile functions, the motor’s oligomerization states, cargo-binding, and motility are unknown. Here we show that binding of a single calmodulin causes the motor to adopt a monomeric state and to move actin filaments. In the absence of calmodulin, nonmotile dimers that cross-linked actin filaments were formed. Unexpectedly, structural analysis revealed that the dimerization domains include the calmodulin-binding neck region, essential for the generation of force and movement in myosins. Furthermore, monomeric myosin XXI bound to mixed liposomes, whereas the dimers did not. Lipid-binding sections overlapped with the dimerization domains, but also included a phox-homology domain in the converter region. We propose a mechanism of myosin regulation where dimerization, motility, and lipid binding are regulated by calmodulin. Although myosin-XXI dimers might act as nonmotile actin cross-linkers, the calmodulin-binding monomers might transport lipid cargo in the parasite. PMID:24379364

  8. Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Giri, S; Khuller, G K

    1998-06-01

    A soluble Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase has been partially purified (approximately 400 fold) from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607 using several purification steps like ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60%), Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration, DEAE-cellulose and finally calmodulin-agarose affinity chromatography. On SDS-PAGE, this enzyme preparation showed a major protein band of molecular mass 35 kD and its activity was dependent on calcium, calmodulin and ATP when measured under saturating histone IIs (exogenous substrate) concentration. Phosphorylation of histone IIs was inhibited by W-7 (calmodulin inhibitor) and KN-62 (CaM-kinase inhibitor) with IC50 of 1.5 and 0.25 microm respectively, but was not affected by inhibitors of PKA (Sigma P5015) and PKC (H-7). All these results confirm that purified enzyme is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase of M. smegmatis. The protein kinase of M. smegmatis demonstrated a narrow substrate specificity for both exogenous as well as endogenous substrates. These results suggest that purified CaM-kinase must be involved in regulating specific function(s) in this organism. PMID:9655195

  9. Label-free detection of protein-protein interactions using a calmodulin-modified nanowire transistor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Wu; Hsieh, Po-Jen; Lin, Chih-Lung; Fang, Yi-Ya; Yang, Jia-Xun; Tsai, Chia-Chang; Chiang, Pei-Ling; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we describe a highly sensitive and reusable silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for the detection of protein-protein interactions. This reusable device was made possible by the reversible association of glutathione S-transferase-tagged calmodulin with a glutathione modified transistor. The calmodulin-modified transistor exhibited selective electrical responses to Ca2+ (≥1 μM) and purified cardiac troponin I (∼7 nM); the change in conductivity displayed a linear dependence on the concentration of troponin I in a range from 10 nM to 1 μM. These results are consistent with the previously reported concentration range in which the dissociation constant for the troponin I-calmodulin complex was determined. The minimum concentration of Ca2+ required to activate calmodulin was determined to be 1 μM. We have also successfully demonstrated that the N-type Ca2+ channels, expressed by cultured 293T cells, can be recognized specifically by the calmodulin-modified nanowire transistor. This sensitive nanowire transistor can serve as a high-throughput biosensor and can also substitute for immunoprecipitation methods used in the identification of interacting proteins. PMID:20080536

  10. Blockade by calmodulin inhibitors of Ca2+ channels in smooth muscle from rat vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, K.; Higo, K.; Abe, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Saito, H.; Matsuki, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects of three compounds which are used as calmodulin inhibitors (trifluoperazine, W-7 and calmidazolium) on Ca2+ channels were investigated in smooth muscle from rat vas deferens. 2. All three calmodulin inhibitors relaxed the smooth muscle precontracted by a high concentration of KCl (63.7 mM). The order of potency for the relaxation was trifluoperazine > W-7 > calmidazolium. 3. In binding studies using a microsomal fraction of vas deferens, all these calmodulin inhibitors displaced specific [3H]-nimodipine binding. Trifluoperazine and W-7 inhibited the binding at concentrations that relaxed the smooth muscle whereas calmidazolium inhibited at concentrations much lower than those necessary for muscle relaxation. 4. Ba2+ current flowing through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels was measured under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions in isolated smooth muscle cells. The Ba2+ current was suppressed by the three calmodulin inhibitors in the concentration-range where inhibition of [3H]-nimodipine binding was observed. Neither voltage-dependence nor the inactivation time course of Ba2+ current were affected by these compounds. 5. The results suggest that the calmodulin inhibitors directly block Ca2+ channels in the smooth muscle cells. The channel inhibition by trifluoperazine and W-7, but perhaps not that by calmidazolium, may be responsible for the muscle relaxation observed with these compounds. PMID:8495236

  11. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2014-01-14

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin expressed in Leishmania parasites. Although it is assumed that it performs a variety of motile functions, the motor's oligomerization states, cargo-binding, and motility are unknown. Here we show that binding of a single calmodulin causes the motor to adopt a monomeric state and to move actin filaments. In the absence of calmodulin, nonmotile dimers that cross-linked actin filaments were formed. Unexpectedly, structural analysis revealed that the dimerization domains include the calmodulin-binding neck region, essential for the generation of force and movement in myosins. Furthermore, monomeric myosin XXI bound to mixed liposomes, whereas the dimers did not. Lipid-binding sections overlapped with the dimerization domains, but also included a phox-homology domain in the converter region. We propose a mechanism of myosin regulation where dimerization, motility, and lipid binding are regulated by calmodulin. Although myosin-XXI dimers might act as nonmotile actin cross-linkers, the calmodulin-binding monomers might transport lipid cargo in the parasite. PMID:24379364

  12. Calmodulin expression during Giardia intestinalis differentiation and identification of calmodulin-binding proteins during the trophozoite stage.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Magda E; Wasserman, Moisés

    2012-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is the primary sensor for calcium in the cell. It modulates various functions by activating CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). This study examined the calcium/CaM-dependent system in the ancient eukaryote Giardia intestinalis. A specific antibody against the parasite's CaM was developed; this protein's expression and location during different stages of the parasite's life cycle were analyzed. The results showed that it is a housekeeping protein which is possibly involved in the parasite's motility. No CaMBP has been identified in G. intestinalis to date. Pull-down assays were used for isolating proteins which specifically bind to CaM in a calcium-dependent way. Three of them were identified through mass spectrometry; they were GASP180, α-tubulin, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK).The first two are cytoskeleton proteins, and the last one is an essential enzyme for glycolysis. The presence of binding sites was analyzed through bioinformatics in each protein sequence. This is the first report of a CaMBP in this organism; it is considered to be a very interesting differentiation model, indicating that CaM is involved at least in two vital processes: G. intestinalis motility and energetic metabolism. PMID:21927871

  13. Effects of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on Ca uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum of saponin skinned caudal artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Silver, P.J.

    1986-03-05

    Calmodulin (CaM) stimulates plasma membrane transport in many cell types, however, its role in Ca regulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle has not been established. /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in saponin skinned strips of rat caudal artery as a function of CaM and the CaM inhibitors, W-7, calmidazolium (CaMZ), and trifluoperazine (TFP). Although caudal artery strips lose approximately 30% of total tissue CaM during skinning, 0.3 - 2 ..mu..M CaM did not increase /sup 45/Ca uptake over a wide range of free Ca concentrations (10/sup -8/ - 10/sup -6/M). Neither W-7 nor CaMZ at concentration of 10/sup -4/ - 2 x 10/sup -4/M inhibited the MgATP-dependent Ca uptake. Ca uptake was not affected by 50 ..mu..M TFP but a significant inhibition was produced by 500 ..mu..M. Studies of the effects of TFP on /sup 45/Ca efflux indicated that TFP concentrations which inhibited Ca uptake also significantly increased the rate of Ca release. The results suggest that total Ca uptake in caudal artery depends mainly upon MgATP and is not modulated by exogenous CaM or affected by these CaM inhibitors. They cannot preclude that CaM may affect initial velocities or that the CaM inhibitors failed to reach active sites.

  14. Identification of a calmodulin-binding domain in Sema4D that regulates its exodomain shedding in platelets.

    PubMed

    Mou, Peipei; Zeng, Zhao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xin, Xiaoran; Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Ruan, Changgeng; Li, Renhao; Brass, Lawrence F; Zhu, Li

    2013-05-16

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a transmembrane protein that supports contact-dependent amplification of platelet activation by collagen before being gradually cleaved by the metalloprotease ADAM17, as we have previously shown. Cleavage releases a soluble 120-kDa exodomain fragment for which receptors exist on platelets and endothelial cells. Here we have examined the mechanism that regulates Sema4D exodomain cleavage. The results show that the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of Sema4D contains a binding site for calmodulin within the polybasic region Arg762-Lys779. Coprecipitation studies show that Sema4D and calmodulin are associated in resting platelets, forming a complex that dissociates upon platelet activation by the agonists that trigger Sema4D cleavage. Inhibiting calmodulin with W7 or introducing a membrane-permeable peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding site is sufficient to trigger the dissociation of Sema4D from calmodulin and initiate cleavage. Conversely, deletion of the calmodulin-binding site causes constitutive shedding of Sema4D. These results show that (1) Sema4D is a calmodulin-binding protein with a site of interaction in its membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain, (2) platelet agonists cause dissociation of the calmodulin-Sema4D complex, and (3) dissociation of the complex is sufficient to trigger ADAM17-dependent cleavage of Sema4D, releasing a bioactive fragment. PMID:23564909

  15. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  16. Altered binding of /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin to a 46. 5-kilodalton protein in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1987-02-01

    The levels of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins have been determined in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age- and sex-matched controls. Calmodulin ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 microgram/mg protein; there was no difference between calmodulin concentration in fibroblasts from CF patients and controls. Calmodulin-binding proteins of 230, 212, 204, 164, 139, 70, 59, 46.5, and 41 kD were identified. A protein with a mobility identical to the 59-kD calmodulin-binding protein was labeled by antiserum against calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Although Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent phosphatase activity was detected, there was no different in activity between control and CF fibroblasts or in the level of phosphatase protein as determined by radioimmunoassay. Lower amounts of /sup 125/I-calmodulin were bound to the 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein in CF fibroblasts as compared with controls. The 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein may be reduced in CF fibroblasts or its structure may be altered resulting in a reduced binding capacity and/or affinity for calmodulin and perhaps reflecting, either directly or indirectly, the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis.

  17. Calmodulin interacts with the platelet ADP receptor P2Y1

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Jane F.; Shen, Yang; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Leon, Catherine; Gachet, Christian; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    P2Y1 [P2 (purinergic type-2)-receptor 1] is a G-protein-coupled ADP receptor that regulates platelet activation and ADP-induced Ca2+ signalling. Studies using P2Y1-knockout mice, Gq-deficient mice or P2Y1-selective inhibitors have previously identified a key role for P2Y1 in pathophysiological thrombus formation at high shear stress. We provide evidence that a positively charged juxtamembrane sequence within the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of P2Y1 can bind directly to the cytosolic regulatory protein calmodulin. Deletion by mutagenesis of the calmodulin-binding domain of P2Y1 inhibits intracellular Ca2+ flux in transfected cells. These results suggest that the interaction of calmodulin with the P2Y1 C-terminal tail may regulate P2Y1-dependent platelet aggregation. PMID:16848759

  18. Calmodulin Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Leishmania Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Aracelis; Samudio, Franklyn; González, Kadir; Saldaña, Azael; Brandão, Adeilton; Calzada, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    A precise identification of Leishmania species involved in human infections has epidemiological and clinical importance. Herein, we describe a preliminary validation of a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay, based on the calmodulin intergenic spacer region, as a tool for detecting and typing Leishmania species. After calmodulin amplification, the enzyme HaeIII yielded a clear distinction between reference strains of Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania lainsoni, and the rest of the Viannia reference species analyzed. The closely related Viannia species: Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania panamensis, and Leishmania guyanensis, are separated in a subsequent digestion step with different restriction enzymes. We have developed a more accessible molecular protocol for Leishmania identification/typing based on the exploitation of part of the calmodulin gene. This methodology has the potential to become an additional tool for Leishmania species characterization and taxonomy. PMID:27352873

  19. Calmodulin permanently associates with rat olfactory CNG channels under native conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jonathan; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Yau, King-Wai; Frings, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    An important mechanism by which vertebrate olfactory sensory neurons rapidly adapt to odorants is feedback modulation of the Ca2+ permeable cyclic nucleotide–gated (CNG) transduction channels. Extensive heterologous studies of homomeric CNGA2 channels have led to a molecular model of channel modulation based on the binding of calcium-calmodulin to a site on the cytoplasmic amino terminus of CNGA2. Native rat olfactory CNG channels, however, are heteromeric complexes of three homologous but distinct subunits. Notably, in heteromeric channels, we found no role for CNGA2 in feedback modulation. Instead, an IQ-type calmodulin-binding site on CNGB1b and a similar but previously unidentified site on CNGA4 are necessary and sufficient. These sites seem to confer binding of Ca2+-free calmodulin (apocalmodulin), which is then poised to trigger inhibition of native channels in the presence of Ca2+. PMID:15195096

  20. Structural characterization of the interaction of human lactoferrin with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jessica L; Ishida, Hiroaki; Vogel, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an 80 kDa, iron (Fe(3+))-binding immunoregulatory glycoprotein secreted into most exocrine fluids, found in high concentrations in colostrum and milk, and released from neutrophil secondary granules at sites of infection and inflammation. In a number of cell types, Lf is internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis and targeted to the nucleus where it has been demonstrated to act as a transcriptional trans-activator. Here we characterize human Lf's interaction with calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous, 17 kDa regulatory calcium (Ca(2+))-binding protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of activated cells. Due to the size of this intermolecular complex (∼100 kDa), TROSY-based NMR techniques were employed to structurally characterize Ca(2+)-CaM when bound to intact apo-Lf. Both CaM's backbone amides and the ε-methyl group of key methionine residues were used as probes in chemical shift perturbation and cross-saturation experiments to define the binding interface of apo-Lf on Ca(2+)-CaM. Unlike the collapsed conformation through which Ca(2+)-CaM binds the CaM-binding domains of its classical targets, Ca(2+)-CaM assumes an extended structure when bound to apo-Lf. Apo-Lf appears to interact predominantly with the C-terminal lobe of Ca(2+)-CaM, enabling the N-terminal lobe to potentially bind another target. Our use of intact apo-Lf has made possible the identification of a secondary interaction interface, removed from CaM's primary binding domain. Secondary interfaces play a key role in the target's response to CaM binding, highlighting the importance of studying intact complexes. This solution-based approach can be applied to study other regulatory calcium-binding EF-hand proteins in intact intermolecular complexes. PMID:23236421

  1. Protein flexibility is key to cisplatin crosslinking in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wells, Stephen A; Jimenez-Roldan, J Emilio; Römer, Rudolf A; Zhao, Yao; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking in combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) has significant potential for studying protein structures and protein–protein interactions. Previously, cisplatin has been shown to be a crosslinker and crosslinks multiple methionine (Met) residues in apo-calmodulin (apo-CaM). However, the inter-residue distances obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance structures are inconsistent with the measured distance constraints by crosslinking. Met residues lie too far apart to be crosslinked by cisplatin. Here, by combining FTICR MS with a novel computational flexibility analysis, the flexible nature of the CaM structure is found to be key to cisplatin crosslinking in CaM. It is found that the side chains of Met residues can be brought together by flexible motions in both apo-CaM and calcium-bound CaM (Ca4-CaM). The possibility of cisplatin crosslinking Ca4-CaM is then confirmed by MS data. Therefore, flexibility analysis as a fast and low-cost computational method can be a useful tool for predicting crosslinking pairs in protein crosslinking analysis and facilitating MS data analysis. Finally, flexibility analysis also indicates that the crosslinking of platinum to pairs of Met residues will effectively close the nonpolar groove and thus will likely interfere with the binding of CaM to its protein targets, as was proved by comparing assays for cisplatin-modified/unmodified CaM binding to melittin. Collectively, these results suggest that cisplatin crosslinking of apo-CaM or Ca4-CaM can inhibit the ability of CaM to recognize its target proteins, which may have important implications for understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance to platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:22733664

  2. Matricellular signal transduction involving calmodulin in the social amoebozoan dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Huber, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes a developmental sequence wherein an extracellular matrix (ECM) sheath surrounds a group of differentiating cells. This sheath is comprised of proteins and carbohydrates, like the ECM of mammalian tissues. One of the characterized ECM proteins is the cysteine-rich, EGF-like (EGFL) repeat-containing, calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) CyrA. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA increases the rate of random cell motility and cyclic AMP-mediated chemotaxis. Processing of full-length CyrA (~63 kDa) releases two major EGFL repeat-containing fragments (~45 kDa and ~40 kDa) in an event that is developmentally regulated. Evidence for an EGFL repeat receptor also exists and downstream intracellular signaling pathways involving CaM, Ras, protein kinase A and vinculin B phosphorylation have been characterized. In total, these results identify CyrA as a true matricellular protein comparable in function to tenascin C and other matricellular proteins from mammalian cells. Insight into the regulation and processing of CyrA has also been revealed. CyrA is the first identified extracellular CaMBP in this eukaryotic microbe. In keeping with this, extracellular CaM (extCaM) has been shown to be present in the ECM sheath where it binds to CyrA and inhibits its cleavage to release the 45 kDa and 40 kDa EGFL repeat-containing fragments. The presence of extCaM and its role in regulating a matricellular protein during morphogenesis extends our understanding of CaM-mediated signal transduction in eukaryotes. PMID:24705101

  3. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R.; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J.; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S.; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M.; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  4. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  5. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Labeled Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Paula B.; Puett, David

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein consisting of two homologous domains, each of which contains two EF-hands, that is known to bind well over 300 proteins and peptides. In most cases the (Ca2+)4-form of CaM leads to the activation of a key regulatory enzyme or protein in a myriad of biological processes. Using the nitroxide spin-labeling reagent, 3-(2-iodoacetamido)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl oxyl, bovine brain CaM was modified at 2-3 methionines with retention of activity as judged by the activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the spectral changes upon addition of Ca2+ to the apo-form of spin-labeled protein. A significant loss of spectral intensity, arising primarily from reductions in the heights of the low, intermediate, and high field peaks, accompanied Ca2+ binding. The midpoint of the Ca2+-mediated transition determined by EPR occurred at a higher Ca2+ concentration than that measured with circular dichroic spectroscopy and enzyme activation. Recent data have indicated that the transition from the apo-state of CaM to the fully saturated form, [Ca2+)4-CaM], contains a compact intermediate corresponding to [Ca2+)2-CaM], and the present results suggest that the spin probes are reporting on Ca2+ binding to the last two sites in the N-terminal domain, i.e. for the [Ca2+)2-CaM] → [Ca2+)4-CaM] transition in which the compact structure becomes more extended. EPR of CaM, spin-labeled at methionines, offers a different approach for studying Ca2+-mediated conformational changes and may emerge as a useful technique for monitoring interactions with target proteins. PMID:24718677

  6. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  7. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  8. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  9. Oxidative-stress-induced afterdepolarizations and calmodulin kinase II signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Chen, Fuhua; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Weiss, James N

    2009-01-01

    In the heart, oxidative stress caused by exogenous H(2)O(2) has been shown to induce early afterdepolarizations (EADs) and triggered activity by impairing Na current (I(Na)) inactivation. Because H(2)O(2) activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase (CaMK)II, which also impairs I(Na) inactivation and promotes EADs, we hypothesized that CaMKII activation may be an important factor in EADs caused by oxidative stress. Using the patch-clamp and intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) imaging in Fluo-4 AM-loaded rabbit ventricular myocytes, we found that exposure to H(2)O(2) (0.2 to 1 mmol/L) for 5 to 15 minutes consistently induced EADs that were suppressed by the I(Na) blocker tetrodotoxin (10 micromol/L), as well as the I(Ca,L) blocker nifedipine. H(2)O(2) enhanced both peak and late I(Ca,L), consistent with CaMKII-mediated facilitation. By prolonging the action potential plateau and increasing Ca influx via I(Ca,L), H(2)O(2)-induced EADs were also frequently followed by DADs in response to spontaneous (ie, non-I(Ca,L)-gated) sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release after repolarization. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1 micromol/L; n=4), but not its inactive analog KN-92 (1 micromol/L, n=5), prevented H(2)O(2)-induced EADs and DADs, and the selective CaMKII peptide inhibitor AIP (autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide) (2 micromol/L) significantly delayed their onset. In conclusion, H(2)O(2)-induced afterdepolarizations depend on both impaired I(Na) inactivation to reduce repolarization reserve and enhancement of I(Ca,L) to reverse repolarization, which are both facilitated by CaMKII activation. Our observations support a link between increased oxidative stress, CaMKII activation, and afterdepolarizations as triggers of lethal ventricular arrhythmias in diseased hearts. PMID:19038865

  10. Ca2+ and Calmodulin Dynamics during Photopolarization in Fucus serratus Zygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Love, J.; Brownlee, C.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in zygote polarization in fucoid algae (Fucus, Ascophyllum, and Pelvetia species) zygote polarization is controversial. Using a local source of Fucus serratus, we established that zygotes form a polar axis relative to unilateral light (photopolarization) between 8 and 14 h after fertilization (AF), and become committed to this polarity at approximately 15 to 18 h AF. We investigated the role of Ca2+, calmodulin, and actin during photopolarization by simultaneously exposing F. serratus zygotes to polarizing light and various inhibitors. Neither removal of Ca2+ from the culture medium or high concentrations of EGTA and LaCl3 had any effect on photopolarization. Bepridil, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino) octyl ester, nifedipine, and verapamil, all of which block intracellular Ca2 release, reduced photopolarization from 75 to 30%. The calmodulin antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-L-naphthalenesulfonamide and trifluoperazine inhibited photopolarization in all zygotes, whereas N-(6-aminohexyl)-L-naphthalenesulfonamide had no effect. Cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, and latrunculin B, all of which inhibit actin polymerization, had no effect on photopolarization, but arrested polar axis fixation. The role of calmodulin during polarization was investigated further. Calmodulin mRNA from the closely related brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera was cloned and the protein was expressed in bacteria. Photopolarization was enhanced following microinjections of this recombinant calmodulin into developing zygotes. Confocal imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled recombinant calmodulin in photopolarized zygotes showed a homogenous signal distribution at 13 h AF, which localized to the presumptive rhizoid site at 15 h AF. PMID:12223805

  11. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  12. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  13. Ca2+ binding sites in calmodulin and troponin C alter interhelical angle movements.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kunihiko; Toyama, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Iwamoto, Masatoshi; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2004-03-12

    Molecular dynamics analyses were performed to examine conformational changes in the C-domain of calmodulin and the N-domain of troponin C induced by binding of Ca(2+) ions. Analyses of conformational changes in calmodulin and troponin C indicated that the shortening of the distance between Ca(2+) ions and Ca(2+) binding sites of helices caused widening of the distance between Ca(2+) binding sites of helices on opposite sides, while the hydrophobic side chains in the center of helices hardly moved due to their steric hindrance. This conformational change acts as the clothespin mechanism. PMID:15013750

  14. Oxidation of Met(144) and Met(145) in Calmodulin Blocks Calmodulin Dependent Activation of the Plasma Membrane Ca-ATPase.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Anbanandam, A; Smallwood, Heather S.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2003-04-15

    Methionine oxidation in calmodulin (CaM) isolated from senescent brain results in an inability to fully activate the plasma membrane (PM) Ca-ATPase which may contribute to observed increases in cytosolic calcium levels under conditions of oxidative stress and biological aging. To identify the functional importance of the oxidation of Met-144 and Met-145 near the carboxyl-terminus of CaM, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to substitute leucines for methionines at other positions in CaM, permitting the site-specific oxidation of Met-144 and Met-145. Prior to the oxidation, the CaM-dependent activation of the PM-CA-ATPase by these CaM mutants is similar to that of wild-type CaM. Likewise, oxidation of individual methionines has a minimal effect on the CaM concentration necessary for half-maximal activation of the PM-Ca-ATPase. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that no single methionine within CaM is essential for activation of the PM-CA-ATPase. Oxidation of either Met-144 or Met-145 or all nine methionines in CaM results in an equivalent inhibition of the PM-Ca-ATPase, resulting in a 50-60% reduction in the level of enzyme activation. Oxidation of Met-144 is largely responsible for the decreased extent of enzyme activation, suggesting that this site is critical in modulating the sensitivity of CaM to oxidant-induced loss-of-function. These results are discussed in terms of a possible functional role for Met-144 and Met-145 in CaM as redox sensors that function to modulate calcium homeostasis and energy metabolism in response to conditions of oxidative stress.

  15. Ca2+/Calmodulin and Apo-Calmodulin Both Bind to and Enhance the Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Estefanía; Benaim, Gustavo; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in multiple cellular processes, including: cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, stress response, and cell adhesion and migration, among others. And when deregulated by mutations, overexpression, and/or the arrival of faulty incoming signals, its hyperactivity contributes to the development of hematological and solid tumors. c-Src is a prototypical member of this family of kinases, which is highly regulated by a set of phosphorylation events. Other factor contributing to the regulation of Src activity appears to be mediated by the Ca2+ signal generated in cells by different effectors, where the Ca2+-receptor protein calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role. In this report we demonstrate that CaM directly interacts with Src in both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent manners in vitro and in living cells, and that the CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) inhibits the activation of this kinase induced by the upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in human carcinoma epidermoide A431 cells, and by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, in both A431 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+/CaM complex strongly activates the auto-phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src toward exogenous substrates, but most relevantly and for the first time, we demonstrate that Ca2+-free CaM (apo-CaM) exerts a far higher activatory action on Src auto-phosphorylation and kinase activity toward exogenous substrates than the one exerted by the Ca2+/CaM complex. This suggests that a transient increase in the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is not an absolute requirement for CaM-mediated activation of Src in living cells, and that a direct regulation of Src by apo-CaM could be inferred. PMID:26058065

  16. The Actin Nucleator Cobl Is Controlled by Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Natja; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Actin nucleation triggers the formation of new actin filaments and has the power to shape cells but requires tight control in order to bring about proper morphologies. The regulation of the members of the novel class of WASP Homology 2 (WH2) domain-based actin nucleators, however, thus far has largely remained elusive. Our study reveals signal cascades and mechanisms regulating Cordon-Bleu (Cobl). Cobl plays some, albeit not fully understood, role in early arborization of neurons and nucleates actin by a mechanism that requires a combination of all three of its actin monomer–binding WH2 domains. Our experiments reveal that Cobl is regulated by Ca2+ and multiple, direct associations of the Ca2+ sensor Calmodulin (CaM). Overexpression analyses and rescue experiments of Cobl loss-of-function phenotypes with Cobl mutants in primary neurons and in tissue slices demonstrated the importance of CaM binding for Cobl’s functions. Cobl-induced dendritic branch initiation was preceded by Ca2+ signals and coincided with local F-actin and CaM accumulations. CaM inhibitor studies showed that Cobl-mediated branching is strictly dependent on CaM activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that Ca2+/CaM modulates Cobl’s actin binding properties and furthermore promotes Cobl’s previously identified interactions with the membrane-shaping F-BAR protein syndapin I, which accumulated with Cobl at nascent dendritic protrusion sites. The findings of our study demonstrate a direct regulation of an actin nucleator by Ca2+/CaM and reveal that the Ca2+/CaM-controlled molecular mechanisms we discovered are crucial for Cobl’s cellular functions. By unveiling the means of Cobl regulation and the mechanisms, by which Ca2+/CaM signals directly converge on a cellular effector promoting actin filament formation, our work furthermore sheds light on how local Ca2+ signals steer and power branch initiation during early arborization of nerve cells—a key process in neuronal network formation. PMID

  17. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan R; Thompson, Andrew R; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J; Olenek, Michael J; Klein, Jennifer C; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM's structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4nm (closed) and another at ∼6nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1 to 3nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM's functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  18. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  19. Apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin bind to the same region on the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. P.; Rodney, G.; Zhang, J. Z.; Santacruz-Toloza, L.; Strasburg, G.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) is regulated by calmodulin in both its Ca2+-free (apocalmodulin) and Ca2+-bound (Ca2+ calmodulin) states. Apocalmodulin is an activator of the channel, and Ca2+ calmodulin is an inhibitor of the channel. Both apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin binding sites on RYR1 are destroyed by a mild tryptic digestion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, but calmodulin (either form), bound to RYR1 prior to tryptic digestion, protects both the apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin sites from tryptic destruction. The protected sites are after arginines 3630 and 3637 on RYR1. These studies suggest that both Ca2+ calmodulin and apocalmodulin bind to the same or overlapping regions on RYR1 and block access of trypsin to sites at amino acids 3630 and 3637. This sequence is part of a predicted Ca2+ CaM binding site of amino acids 3614-3642 [Takeshima, H., et al. (1989) Nature 339, 439-445].

  20. On the calcium receptor activating exocytosis: inhibitory effects of calmodulin-interacting drugs on rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, W W; Nemeth, E F

    1982-01-01

    1. A series of neuroleptic drugs (five phenothiazines, imipramine, and pimozide) and the smooth muscle relaxant W-7, which all inhibit calcium-calmodulin-activated processes inhibited rat mast cell secretion elicited by antigen, by 48/80, and by the calcium ionophore A23187. 2. Neither the phenothiazines nor W-7 reduced 45Ca uptake in response to A23187. The drugs thus exert an inhibitory action distal to the rise in intracellular Ca ions that activates exocytosis. 3. Chlorpromazine sulphoxide, which shares several membrane-perturbing actions of the phenothiazines but is a weak inhibitor of calmodulin, did not inhibit secretion. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of the phenothiazines were not overcome by a 5- or 10-fold increase in the concentration of calcium, which should counter unspecific membrane effects. 4. The inhibitory effects of the various neuroleptic drugs appeared to be related to their ability to inhibit calmodulin because the individual potencies of these compounds on secretion evoked by 48/80 or A23187 correlated significantly with their reported potencies in inhibiting calmodulin-activated processes. (The greater potency and different rank order of these compounds on secretion evoked by antigen suggests an additional inhibitory action, perhaps involving Ca entry.) 5. These results, which parallel those obtained with drugs of this sort in smooth muscle where calmodulin seemingly functions as the Ca receptor activating contraction, strengthen the view that calmodulin, or some calmodulin-like protein, is the Ca receptor activating exocytosis. PMID:6178817

  1. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-10-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin-sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well. PMID:20522785

  2. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin–sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well.—Kovacs, E., Harmat, V., Tóth, J., Vértessy, B. G., Módos, K., Kardos, J., Liliom, K. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:20522785

  3. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  4. Fast-Response Calmodulin-Based Fluorescent Indicators Reveal Rapid Intracellular Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Conte, Ianina; Scaringi, John; Esposito, Elric; Bradley, Jonathan; Carter, Thomas; Ogden, David; Morad, Martin; Török, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Faithful reporting of temporal patterns of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics requires the working range of indicators to match the signals. Current genetically encoded calmodulin-based fluorescent indicators are likely to distort fast Ca2+ signals by apparent saturation and integration due to their limiting fluorescence rise and decay kinetics. A series of probes was engineered with a range of Ca2+ affinities and accelerated kinetics by weakening the Ca2+-calmodulin-peptide interactions. At 37 °C, the GCaMP3-derived probe termed GCaMP3fast is 40-fold faster than GCaMP3 with Ca2+ decay and rise times, t1/2, of 3.3 ms and 0.9 ms, respectively, making it the fastest to-date. GCaMP3fast revealed discreet transients with significantly faster Ca2+ dynamics in neonatal cardiac myocytes than GCaMP6f. With 5-fold increased two-photon fluorescence cross-section for Ca2+ at 940 nm, GCaMP3fast is suitable for deep tissue studies. The green fluorescent protein serves as a reporter providing important novel insights into the kinetic mechanism of target recognition by calmodulin. Our strategy to match the probe to the signal by tuning the affinity and hence the Ca2+ kinetics of the indicator is applicable to the emerging new generations of calmodulin-based probes. PMID:26527405

  5. Absolute configuration of acremoxanthone C, a potent calmodulin inhibitor from Purpureocillium lilacinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract prepared from the culture medium and mycelium of Purpureocillium lilacinum allowed the isolation of two calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, namely, acremoxanthone C (1) and acremonidin A (2). The absolute configuration of 1 was established as 2R, 3R, 1'S, 11'S, ...

  6. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  7. IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PKCAM-GR: A NOVEL NEURONAL CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increase in intracellular Ca levels via various mechanisms is a general response to many stimuli and has a pleiotropic effect on many intracellular systems. One family of enzymes which are activated by an increase in intracellular Ca levels are Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein ...

  8. Expression of calmodulin-related genes in lead-exposed mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Xie-Lai; Jiang, Su-Jun; Yuan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The toxic metal lead is a widespread environmental polutant that can adversely affect human health. However, the underlying mechanisms of lead-induced toxicity are still largely unknown. The mechanism of lead toxicity was presumed to involve cross reaction between Pb2+ and Ca2+ with calmodulin dependent systems. The aim of the present study was thus to identify differential expression of calmodulin-related genes in the spleen of lead-exposed mice. We performed microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed genes. RNAs from spleen tissue of lead exposed animals (n=6) and controls (n=6) were converted to labeled cRNA and hybridized to Illumina mouse WG-6_v2_Bead Chip. Expression profiles were analyzed using Illumina BeadStudio Application. Real-time RT-PCR was conducted to validate the microarray data. By microarray analysis 5 calmodulin-related genes (MAP2K6, CAMKK2, CXCR4, PHKA2, MYLK) were found to be differently expressed in lead exposed compared with control mice (p<0.05). The results of Real-time RT-PCR showed that MAP2K6 and CAMKK2 were up-regulated and CXCR4 was down-regulated in lead exposure, but there were no significant differences in PHKA2 and MYLK expression between the lead exposed and control group. These results show that lead exposure produced significant changes in expression of a variety of genes in the spleen and can affect calmodulin-related gene expression. PMID:27486376

  9. Structural Insights into Calmodulin-regulated L-selectin Ectodomain Shedding*

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jessica L.; Ishida, Hiroaki; Vogel, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    The L-selectin glycoprotein receptor mediates the initial steps of leukocyte migration into secondary lymphoid organs and sites of inflammation. Following cell activation through the engagement of G-protein-coupled receptors or immunoreceptors, the extracellular domains of L-selectin are rapidly shed, a process negatively controlled via the binding of the ubiquitous eukaryotic calcium-binding protein calmodulin to the cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin. Here we present the solution structure of calcium-calmodulin bound to a peptide encompassing the cytoplasmic tail and part of the transmembrane domain of L-selectin. The structure and accompanying biophysical study highlight the importance of both calcium and the transmembrane segment of L-selectin in the interaction between these two proteins, suggesting that by binding this region, calmodulin regulates in an “inside-out” fashion the ectodomain shedding of the receptor. Our structure provides the first molecular insight into the emerging new role for calmodulin as a transmembrane signaling partner. PMID:22711531

  10. Microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis for the discovery and characterisation of calmodulin binding partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Non-covalent and transient protein-ligand interactions are integral to cellular function and malfunction. Key steps in signalling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible non-covalent protein-protein binding or ion chelation. Here we present a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis method for detecting and characterising protein-ligand interactions in solution. We apply this method to probe the binding equilibria of calmodulin, a central protein to calcium signalling pathways. In this study we characterise the specific binding of calmodulin to phosphorylase kinase, a known target, and creatine kinase, which we identify as a putative binding partner through a protein array screen and surface plasmon resonance experiments. We verify the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase in solution using free-flow electrophoresis and investigate the effect of calcium and sodium chloride on the calmodulin-ligand binding affinity in free solution without the presence of a potentially interfering surface. Our results demonstrate the general applicability of quantitative microfluidic electrophoresis to characterise binding equilibria between biomolecules in solution.

  11. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF CALCIUM/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE II IN RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is a prominent enzyme in mammalian brain capable of phosphorylating a variety of substrate proteins. In the present investigation, the subcellular and regional distribution of CaM kinase II has been studied by light a...

  12. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  13. Probing calmodulin protein-protein interactions using high-content protein arrays.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, David J; Bauer, Mikael; Linse, Sara; Cahill, Dolores J

    2011-01-01

    The calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous second messenger that is crucial for the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The diverse transient signals transduced by Ca(2+) are mediated by intracellular -Ca(2+)-binding proteins. Calcium ions shuttle into and out of the cytosol, transported across membranes by channels, exchangers, and pumps that regulate flux across the ER, mitochondrial and plasma membranes. Calcium regulates both rapid events, such as cytoskeleton remodelling or release of vesicle contents, and slower ones, such as transcriptional changes. Moreover, sustained cytosolic calcium elevations can lead to unwanted cellular activation or apoptosis. Calmodulin represents the most significant of the Ca(2+)-binding proteins and is an essential regulator of intracellular processes in response to extracellular stimuli mediated by a rise in Ca(2+) ion concentration. To profile novel protein-protein interactions that calmodulin participates in, we probed a high-content recombinant human protein array with fluorophore-labelled calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). This protein array contains 37,200 redundant proteins, incorporating over 10,000 unique human proteins expressed from a human brain cDNA library. We describe the identification of a high affinity interaction between calmodulin and the single-pass transmembrane proteins STIM1 and STIM2 that localise to the ER. Translocation of STIM1 and STIM2 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane is a key step in store operated calcium entry in the cell. PMID:21901608

  14. Control of Ca2+ Influx and Calmodulin Activation by SK-Channels in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Thom; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The key trigger for Hebbian synaptic plasticity is influx of Ca2+ into postsynaptic dendritic spines. The magnitude of [Ca2+] increase caused by NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) and voltage-gated Ca2+ -channel (VGCC) activation is thought to determine both the amplitude and direction of synaptic plasticity by differential activation of Ca2+ -sensitive enzymes such as calmodulin. Ca2+ influx is negatively regulated by Ca2+ -activated K+ channels (SK-channels) which are in turn inhibited by neuromodulators such as acetylcholine. However, the precise mechanisms by which SK-channels control the induction of synaptic plasticity remain unclear. Using a 3-dimensional model of Ca2+ and calmodulin dynamics within an idealised, but biophysically-plausible, dendritic spine, we show that SK-channels regulate calmodulin activation specifically during neuron-firing patterns associated with induction of spike timing-dependent plasticity. SK-channel activation and the subsequent reduction in Ca2+ influx through NMDARs and L-type VGCCs results in an order of magnitude decrease in calmodulin (CaM) activation, providing a mechanism for the effective gating of synaptic plasticity induction. This provides a common mechanism for the regulation of synaptic plasticity by neuromodulators. PMID:27232631

  15. CA+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IS NOT ALTERED BY AMYGDALOID KINDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of amygdaloid kindling on Ca2+/Calmodulin (CaM) dependent protein phosphorylation were assessed using one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. n vitro phosphorylation of membrane and cytosol fractions in the presence or absence of Ca2+/CaM did not differentiate b...

  16. Nucleomorphin. A novel, acidic, nuclear calmodulin-binding protein from dictyostelium that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2002-05-31

    Probing of Dictyostelium discoideum cell extracts after SDS-PAGE using (35)S-recombinant calmodulin (CaM) as a probe has revealed approximately three-dozen Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a novel calmodulin-binding protein (CaMBP); we have called nucleomorphin, from D. discoideum. A lambdaZAP cDNA expression library of cells from multicellular development was screened using a recombinant calmodulin probe ((35)S-VU1-CaM). The open reading frame of 1119 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide of 340 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.7 kDa and is constitutively expressed throughout the Dictyostelium life cycle. Nucleomorphin contains a highly acidic glutamic/aspartic acid inverted repeat (DEED) with significant similarity to the conserved nucleoplasmin domain and a putative transmembrane domain in the carboxyl-terminal region. Southern blotting reveals that nucleomorphin exists as a single copy gene. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-agarose we show that bacterially expressed nucleomorphin binds to bovine CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Amino-terminal fusion to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) showed that GFP-NumA localized to the nucleus as distinct arc-like patterns similar to heterochromatin regions. GFP-NumA lacking the acidic DEED repeat still showed arc-like accumulations at the nuclear periphery, but the number of nuclei in these cells was increased markedly compared with control cells. Cells expressing GFP-NumA lacking the transmembrane domain localized to the nuclear periphery but did not affect nuclear number or gross morphology. Nucleomorphin is the first nuclear CaMBP to be identified in Dictyostelium. Furthermore, these data present the first identification of a member of the nucleoplasmin family as a calmodulin-binding protein and suggest nucleomorphin has a role in nuclear structure in Dictyostelium. PMID:11919178

  17. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  18. Zinc deficiency decreases the activity of calmodulin regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in vivo in selected rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Law, J S; McBride, S A; Graham, S; Nelson, N R; Slotnick, B M; Henkin, R I

    1988-08-01

    The effect of zinc deficiency on calmodulin function was investigated by assessing the in vivo activity of two calmodulin regulated enzymes, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (c-AMP) and guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (c-GMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) in several rat tissues. Enzymatic activities in brain, heart, and testis of rats fed a zinc deficient diet were compared with activities in these tissues from pair fed, zinc supplemented rats. In testis, a tissue in which zinc concentration decreased with zinc deficient diet, enzyme activities were significantly decreased over those in rats who were pair fed zinc supplemented diets. In brain and heart, tissues in which zinc concentrations did not change with either diet, enzymatic activities between the groups were not different. These results indicate that zinc deficiency influences the activity of calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterases in vivo supporting the hypothesis that zinc plays a role in calmodulin function in vivo in zinc sensitive tissues. PMID:2484550

  19. Modulation of the cGMP-gated ion channel in frog rods by calmodulin and an endogenous inhibitory factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S E; Downing-Park, J; Zimmerman, A L

    1995-01-01

    1. Outer segment patches excised in the light were used to investigate the effects of exogenous calmodulin and an endogenous inhibitory factor on the cGMP-gated channel of frog rods. 2. Calmodulin shifted to the right the dose-response relation for activation of the channels by 8-Br-cGMP, but did not change the maximum current or the form of the relation. Reversal of this effect by removal of calmodulin was accelerated by brief exposure to saturating [8-Br-cGMP]. Inhibition by calmodulin required calcium and gave as much as a 5-fold decrease in current for an [8-Br-cGMP] functionally comparable to the presumed physiological [cGMP]. 3. Exposure to low [Ca2+]i (tens of nanomolar) appeared to irreversibly remove or inactivate an endogenous channel inhibitory factor from the patches, increasing the current at low [8-Br-cGMP]. Like calmodulin, this factor slowed the voltage-dependent channel-gating kinetics and did not change the maximum current. However, unlike calmodulin, the endogenous factor remained stably associated with the patches at high [Ca2+]i (1 microM), even with exposure to saturating [8-Br-cGMP]. 4. After the low-Ca2+ treatment increased the current, calmodulin reduced the current to about the same level as it had before the low-Ca2+ treatment, giving a larger fractional suppression. Furthermore, patches with high initial sensitivity to 8-Br-cGMP had small low-Ca2+ effects and large calmodulin effects, while the reverse was true for patches with low initial agonist sensitivity. 5. Application of trypsin to the intracellular surface of the patch prevented the responses to calmodulin and to low [Ca2+]i, suggesting involvement of a cytoplasmic portion of the channel. However, trypsin also reduced the total agonist-induced patch current. 6. Our results are consistent with a model in which calmodulin and an endogenous calcium-binding protein compete for the same site, inhibiting channel opening or cGMP binding. The tight association of the endogenous factor

  20. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  1. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  2. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  3. Affinity selection of chemically modified proteins: role of lysyl residues in the binding of calmodulin to calcineurin

    SciTech Connect

    Manalan, A.S.; Klee, C.B.

    1987-03-10

    In affinity selection, calcineurin selects from a population of randomly modified calmodulins those species with which it prefers to interact. The method shows that acetylation of lysines affects calmodulin so as to interfere with its ability to interact with calcineurin. Monoacetylation of any lysine of calmodulin reduces its affinity for calcineurin by 5-10-fold. Multiple acetylations amplify the loss of affinity; none of the modifications are incompatible with activity. The lack of selective of calcineurin against any particular modified lysine indicates that the loss of affinity reflects changes induced by the removal of the charged groups and suggests an important role for electrostatic interactions in the cooperative structural transitions which calmodulin undergoes upon binding its target proteins or calcium. In the presence of calcineurin, a large and specific decrease in the rate of acetylation of Lys-75 and -148 of calmodulin is observed. The reactivity of the same residues is greatly increased in the presence of calcium alone. Their reactivity changes in opposite directions in response to calcium-induced or calcineurin-induced structural changes. The reactivity of other residues such as Lys-21, decreased in the presence of calcineurin but not calcium, is also affected by a conformational change which is induced specifically by calcineurin. Radiolabelled calmodulin was purified by HPLC.

  4. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  5. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  6. Distribution of calmodulin in corn seedlings - Immunocytochemical localization in coleoptiles and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in etiolated corn (Zea mays, var. Bear Hybrid) seedlings. Uniform staining was seen in the background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and vacuoles were not stained. In coleoptile mesophyll cells the nucleoplasm of most nuclei was stained as was the stroma of most amyloplasts. The lumen border of mature tracheary elements in coleoptiles also stained. In the rootcap the most intensely stained regions were the cytoplasms of columella cells and of the outermost cells enmeshed in the layer of secreted slime. Nuclei in the rootcap cells did not stain distinctly, but those in all cell types of the root meristem did. Also in the root meristem, the cytoplasm of metaxylem elements stained brightly. These results are compared and contrasted with previous data on the localization of calmodulin in pea root apices and epicotyls and discussed in relation to current hypotheses on mechanisms of gravitropism.

  7. Ca2+ and calmodulin initiate all forms of endocytosis during depolarization at a nerve terminal

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Junmei; Xue, Lei; Melicoff, Ernestina; Adachi, Roberto; Bai, Li; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although endocytosis maintains synaptic transmission, how endocytosis is initiated is unclear. We found that calcium influx initiated all forms of endocytosis at a single nerve terminal in rodents, including clathrin-dependent slow endocytosis, bulk endocytosis, rapid endocytosis and endocytosis overshoot (excess endocytosis), with each being evoked with a correspondingly higher calcium threshold. As calcium influx increased, endocytosis gradually switched from very slow endocytosis to slow endocytosis to bulk endocytosis to rapid endocytosis and to endocytosis overshoot. The calcium-induced endocytosis rate increase was a result of the speeding up of membrane invagination and fission. Pharmacological experiments suggested that the calcium sensor mediating these forms of endocytosis is calmodulin. In addition to its role in recycling vesicles, calcium/calmodulin-initiated endocytosis facilitated vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool, probably by clearing fused vesicle membrane at release sites. Our findings provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of various forms of endocytosis that are critical in maintaining exocytosis. PMID:19633667

  8. Potent anti-calmodulin activity of cyclotetradepsipeptides isolated from Isaria fumosorosea using a newly designed biosensor.

    PubMed

    Madariaga-Mazón, Abraham; González-Andradeb, Martín; Toriello, Conchita; Navarro-Barranco, Hortensia; Mata, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Seven cyclotetradepsipeptides, namely beauverolides C (1), F (2), I (3), Ja (4), L (5), M (6), and N (7), were isolated from the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea. The beauverolides were evaluated as potential calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors using the newly designed CaM biosensor hCaM M124C-AF350; these peptides displayed high affinity to the protein with dissociation constants (Kd) ranging from 0.078 μM to 3.44 μM. Beauverolide Ja, the only one containing a tryptophan residue in its structure, showed the highest affinity. The docking study predicted that beauverolides could bind to CaM in the same site of interaction as chlorpromazine, a well-known calmodulin ligand. PMID:25920232

  9. Genetic identification of an autoinhibitor in CDPK, a protein kinase with a calmodulin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Harper, J F; Huang, J F; Lloyd, S J

    1994-06-14

    CDPKs are a family of calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases which are defined by a carboxyl-terminal calmodulin-like domain. Mutational analysis indicates that the junction domain, which joins the kinase and calmodulin-like domains, contains an autoinhibitor. CDPK isoform AK1 from Arabidopsis was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein sandwiched between glutathione S-transferase and six consecutive histidines at the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. This fusion, called AK1-6H, was purified and displayed kinase activity which was stimulated up to 127-fold by Ca2+, with a typical specific activity of 2000 nmol min-1 mg-1, using syntide-2 as peptide substrate. A truncation which deletes the calmodulin-like domain, as in mutant delta C-6H, disrupts Ca2+ activation and leaves the enzyme with a basal level of activity. Delta C-6H could be activated 87-fold by preincubation with a purified polyclonal IgG which was raised against a junction domain fusion. A further deletion of the junction domain, as in mutant delta JC, results in a constitutively active enzyme. This indicates that the junction domain in delta C-6H can function as an autoinhibitor. Its function as an autoinhibitor in a full-length enzyme was confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis, as shown by mutant KJM23-6H, which had a six-residue substitution in the junction domain between A422 and A432. Both delta JC and KJM23-6H encoded Ca(2+)-independent enzymes which had specific activities greater than 70% that of a fully active AK1-6H and displayed equivalent Km values for ATP and syntide-2. Inhibition studies on delta JC, using peptides based on the autoinhibitory domains of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, are consistent with a model where the junction domain contains a similar pseudosubstrate-type autoinhibitor. PMID:8003490

  10. Interleukin-1β Processing Is Dependent on a Calcium-mediated Interaction with Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Ainscough, Joseph S; Gerberick, G Frank; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2015-12-25

    The secretion of IL-1β is a central event in the initiation of inflammation. Unlike most other cytokines, the secretion of IL-1β requires two signals: one signal to induce the intracellular up-regulation of pro-IL-1β and a second signal to drive secretion of the bioactive molecule. The release of pro-IL-1β is a complex process involving proteolytic cleavage by caspase-1. However, the exact mechanism of secretion is poorly understood. Here we sought to identify novel proteins involved in IL-1β secretion and intracellular processing to gain further insights into the mechanism of IL-1 release. A human proteome microarray containing 19,951 unique proteins was used to identify proteins that bind human recombinant pro-IL-1β. Probes with a signal-to-noise ratio of >3 were defined as biologically relevant. In these analyses, calmodulin was identified as a particularly strong hit, with a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼ 11. Using an ELISA-based protein-binding assay, the interaction of recombinant calmodulin with pro-IL-1β, but not mature IL-1β, was confirmed and shown to be calcium-dependent. Finally, using small molecule inhibitors, it was demonstrated that both calcium and calmodulin were required for nigericin-induced IL-1β secretion in THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes. Together, these data suggest that, following calcium influx into the cell, pro-IL-1β interacts with calmodulin and that this interaction is important for IL-1β processing and release. PMID:26559977

  11. Conformational Changes of Calmodulin on Calcium and Peptide Binding Monitored by Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Nirschl, Martin; Ottl, Johannes; Vörös, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) are mass sensitive, label-free biosensors that allow monitoring of the interaction between biomolecules. In this paper we use the FBAR to measure the binding of calcium and the CaMKII peptide to calmodulin. Because the mass of the calcium is too small to be detected, the conformational change caused by the binding process is measured by monitoring the resonant frequency and the motional resistance of the FBAR. The resonant frequency is a measure for the amount of mass coupled to the sensor while the motional resistance is influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbent. The measured frequency shift during the calcium adsorptions was found to be strongly dependent on the surface concentration of the immobilized calmodulin, which indicates that the measured signal is significantly influenced by the amount of water inside the calmodulin layer. By plotting the measured motional resistance against the frequency shift, a mass adsorption can be distinguished from processes involving measurable conformational changes. With this method three serial processes were identified during the peptide binding. The results show that the FBAR is a promising technology for the label-free measurement of conformational changes. PMID:25585566

  12. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  13. [Thermodynamics of calmodulin and tubulin binding to the vinca-alkaloid vinorelbine].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, F O; Kulikova, A A; Devred, F; Zerniĭ, E Iu; Lafitte, D; Makarov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Vinca-alkaloids, such as vinblastine, and some of their derivatives, as for example vinorelbine, are widely used in clinical therapy of leukemia and several types of tumors. Their effects are associated with the disfunctioning of the mitotic spindle, which leads to mitosis blockage and a shutdown of the cell cycle. Their primary target is tubulin, however recent research has shown that some of the vinca-alkaloids inhibit calmodulin binding to its targets. Vinka-alkaloids binding with other proteins could be responsible for their efficiency and neuroprotection. Here we investigated the thermodynamics of vinorelbine interactions with calmodulin and tubulin. It was determined that unlike the other vinca-alkaloids both vinorelbine binding sites are located in the C-domain of calmodulin, and characterized by association constants of 4.0 x 10(5) and 5.4 x 10(4) M(-1). At the same time the thermodynamics of vinorelbine binding to tubulin are not much different from that of other vinca-alkaloids. These results will allow getting a better insight on the reaction mechanisms of vinca-alkaloids on a secondary protein target. PMID:21954603

  14. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  15. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  16. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  17. Detachment of glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton of melanoma cells induced by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Glass-Marmor, L; Beitner, R

    1997-06-11

    Glycolysis, which is the primary energy source in cancer cells, is known to be controlled by allosteric regulators, as well as by reversible binding of glycolytic enzymes to cytoskeleton. We have previously found that different calmodulin antagonists decrease the levels of allosteric activators of glycolysis, and reduce ATP content and cell viability in B16 melanoma cells. Here we report of a novel, additional, mechanism of action of calmodulin antagonists in melanoma cells. We show that these drugs cause a detachment of the glycolytic enzymes, phosphofructokinase (ATP: D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) and aldolase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13), from cytoskeleton of B16 melanoma cells. This effect was dose- and time-dependent, and preceded the decrease in cell viability. The detachment of glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton would reduce the provision of local ATP, in the vicinity of the cytoskeleton-membrane and would affect cytoskeleton structure. Since the cytoskeleton is being recognized as an important modulator of cell function, proliferation, differentiation and neoplasia, detachment of the glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton induced by calmodulin antagonists, as well as their reported inhibitory action on cell proliferation, make these drugs most promising agents in treatment of cancer. PMID:9218707

  18. Inhibition of calmodulin - regulated calcium pump activity in rat brain by toxaphene

    SciTech Connect

    Trottman, C.H.; Moorthy, K.S.

    1986-03-05

    In vivo effects of toxaphene on calcium pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with toxaphene at 0,25,50, and 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days and sacrificed 24 h after last dose. Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca uptake were determined in brain P/sub 2/ fraction. Toxaphene inhibited both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and the inhibition was dose dependent. Both substrate and Ca/sup 2 +/ activation kinetics of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase indicated non-competitive type of inhibition as evidenced by decreased catalytic velocity but not enzyme-substrate affinity. The inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake were restored to normal level by exogenously added calmodulin which increased both velocity and affinity. The inhibition of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and restoration by calmodulin suggests that toxaphene may impair active calcium transport mechanisms by decreasing regulator protein calmodulin levels.

  19. Calmodulin and lipid binding to synaptobrevin regulates calcium-dependent exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Stephanie; Iborra, Cecile; Sasakawa, Nobuyuki; De Haro, Luc; Kumakura, Konosuke; Sato, Kazuki; Leveque, Christian; Seagar, Michael

    2002-08-01

    Neurotransmitter release involves the assembly of a heterotrimeric SNARE complex composed of the vesicle protein synaptobrevin (VAMP 2) and two plasma membrane partners, syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25. Calcium influx is thought to control this process via Ca(2+)-binding proteins that associate with components of the SNARE complex. Ca(2+)/calmodulin or phospholipids bind in a mutually exclusive fashion to a C-terminal domain of VAMP (VAMP(77-90)), and residues involved were identified by plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Microinjection of wild-type VAMP(77-90), but not mutant peptides, inhibited catecholamine release from chromaffin cells monitored by carbon fibre amperometry. Pre-incubation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells with the irreversible calmodulin antagonist ophiobolin A inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent human growth hormone release in a permeabilized cell assay. Treatment of permeabilized cells with tetanus toxin light chain (TeNT) also suppressed secretion. In the presence of TeNT, exocytosis was restored by transfection of TeNT-resistant (Q(76)V, F(77)W) VAMP, but additional targeted mutations in VAMP(77-90) abolished its ability to rescue release. The calmodulin- and phospholipid-binding domain of VAMP 2 is thus required for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis, possibly to regulate SNARE complex assembly. PMID:12145198

  20. Biological activities of the peptides obtained by digestion of troponin C and calmodulin with thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, C M; Grand, R J; Perry, S V

    1981-01-01

    1. Troponin C and calmodulin were not digested by thrombin at a significant rate in the presence of Ca2+. 2. In the presence of EGTA, troponin C was digested by thrombin to yield three peptides, TH1 (residues 1--120), TH3 (residues 1--100) and TH2 (residues 121--159). 3. In the presence of EGTA calmodulin was digested by thrombin giving two peptides, TM1 (residues 1--106) and TM2 (residues 107--148). 4. The electrophoretic mobilities of peptides TH1 and TM1 were increased at pH 8.6 by Ca2+ both in the presence and absence of urea. The mobilities of peptides TH2 and TM2 were unaltered under these conditions. 5. Peptides TH1, TH2 and tM1 formed complexes with troponin I on polyacrylamide gels at pH 8.6 in the presence of Ca2+. 6. The phosphorylation of troponin I by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was significantly inhibited by peptides TH1 and TH3 and to a lesser extent by peptide TM1. 7. The calmodulin peptide TM1 activated myosin light-chain kinase when present in large molar excess. Peptide TM2 did not activate the enzyme. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:6895466

  1. Regulation of intracellular levels of calmodulin and tubulin in normal and transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chafouleas, J G; Pardue, R L; Brinkley, B R; Dedman, J R; Means, A R

    1981-01-01

    Transformation of mammalian tissue culture cells by oncogenic viruses results in a 2-fold increase in the intracellular concentration of calmodulin quantitated by radioimmunoassay. The two pairs of companion cell lines used in this study were the Swiss mouse 3T3/simian virus 40-transformed 3T3 cells and the normal rat kidney (NRK)/Rous sarcoma virus-transformed NRK cells. The increased intracellular levels of calmodulin in the transformed cells are due to a greater increase in the rate of synthesis (3-fold) relative to the change in the rate of degradation (1.4-fold). On the other hand, no increases were observed in tubulin levels as quantitated by a colchicine-binding assay. The lack of change in tubulin concentration was accounted for by a 2-fold increase in the rate of degradation that is compensated by a similar increase in the rate of synthesis. The consequence of such changes in both transformed cell types is a 2-fold increase in the calmodulin-to-tubulin protein ratio relative to that in their nontransformed counterparts. PMID:6262788

  2. NRIP, a novel calmodulin binding protein, activates calcineurin to dephosphorylate human papillomavirus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-07-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) decreases E2 protein levels and E2-driven gene expression. We found that NRIP can directly bind with calmodulin in the presence of calcium through its IQ domain, resulting in decreased E2 ubiquitination and increased E2 protein stability. Complex formation between NRIP and calcium/calmodulin activates the phosphatase calcineurin to dephosphorylate E2 and increase E2 protein stability. We present evidences for E2 phosphorylation in vivo and show that NRIP acts as a scaffold to recruit E2 and calcium/calmodulin to prevent polyubiquitination and degradation of E2, enhancing E2 stability and E2-driven gene expression. PMID:21543494

  3. Effects of calmodulin inhibitors on the cellular metabolism of /sup 45/Ca and /sup 210/Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Pounds, J.G.; Nye, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Altered Ca/sup + +/ homeostasis may result from the direct inhibition of calmodulin-dependent or -independent transport processes. Changes in cell function not directly related to the transport of Ca, e.g., uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation or altered membrane permeability also disrupt cell calcium metabolism. Thus, the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor W-13 on cell Pb/sup + +/ metabolism may be due to its direct effects on Pb/sup + +/ transporting Ca/sup + +/ pumps, or indirectly as a result of changes in Ca/sup + +/ homeostasis. Direct comparison of the effects of W-13 on the metabolism of Pb and Ca is impaired by differences in the kinetic distribution and behavior of Pb and Ca. A further complication is that the calmodulin-dependent processes are most active during periods of elevated intracellular Ca/sup + +/. The preliminary experiments reported here were conducted in unstimulated cells which have a low resting level of cytosolic Ca/sup + +/. Therefore, W-13 induced alterations in cell Ca/sup + +/ and Pb/sup + +/ may not reflect the changes which could occur in stimulated cells. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  4. Calmodulin-stimulated phosphorylation of 17 beta-estradiol receptor on tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1984-01-01

    The calf uterine 17 beta-estradiol receptor is a phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the receptor is controlled by a cytosol receptor kinase that activates the hormone binding and by a nuclear phosphatase that inactivates this binding. This report concerns the nature of the 17 beta-estradiol receptor kinase. Highly purified calf uterus 17 beta-estradiol receptor preinactivated by the nuclear phosphatase was used as substrate of the purified receptor kinase. Ca2+ and calmodulin stimulate both the kinase-dependent activation of the hormone binding and 32P incorporation from [gamma-32P]-ATP into the receptor. Maximal stimulation of hormone binding activation requires 1 microM Ca2+ and 0.6 microM calmodulin. Fifteen micromolar trifluoperazine is the lowest concentration that will prevent completely Ca2+-calmodulin stimulation of the kinase. The receptor is phosphorylated by the receptor kinase exclusively on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine is a rare event implicated in hormone-induced cell growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:6207535

  5. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer studies of calmodulin produced by native protein ligation reveal inter-domain electrostatic repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, Erik; Kukora, Stephanie; Shuman, Cynthia F; Steenbergen, Sara; Thulin, Eva; Kohli, Anita; Krouse, Beth; Linse, Sara; Åkerfeldt, Karin S

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the influence of long-range intra-protein electrostatic interactions on the conformation of calmodulin in solution. Ensemble Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is measured for calmodulin with a fluorophore pair incorporated specifically with a donor at residue 17 and an acceptor at position 117. This construct was generated by a combination of solid phase peptide synthesis, cloning, expression and native chemical ligation. This labelling method has not previously been used with calmodulin and represents a convenient method for ensuring the explicit positioning of the fluorophores. The ensemble FRET experiments reveal significant electrostatic repulsion between the globular domains in the calcium-free protein. At low salt, calmodulin has a relatively extended conformation and the distance between the domains is further increased by denaturation, by heat or by non-ionic denaturants. The repulsion between domains is screened by salt and is also diminished by calcium binding, which changes the protein net charge from -23 to -15. Compared with the calcium-free form at low salt, the FRET efficiency for the calcium-bound form has, on average, increased 10-fold. The conformation of the calcium form is insensitive to salt screening. These results imply that when the two globular domains of calmodulin interact with target, there is no significant free energy penalty due to electrostatic interactions. PMID:23552119

  7. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the activation of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Bowman, B F; Peterson, J A; Stull, J T

    1992-03-15

    Myosin light chain kinase is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin. Insights into the kinetic mechanism of this activation by Ca2+/calmodulin have now been obtained using extrinsically labeled fluorescent calmodulin, a fluorescent peptide substrate, and a stopped-flow spectrophotofluorimeter. We employed spinach calmodulin labeled with the sulfhydryl-selective probe, 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid, to measure changes in the fluorescence intensity of the 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid-calmodulin upon binding to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. The fluorescent peptide substrate KKRAARAC(sulfobenzo-furazan)SNVFS-amide was used to measure kinase activity. Our results showed that the binding interaction could be modeled as a two-step process: a bimolecular reaction with an association rate of 4.6 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 followed by an isomerization with a rate of 2.2 s-1. Phosphorylation of the peptide during stopped-flow experiments could be modeled by a two-step process with a catalytic association rate of 6.5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 and a turnover rate of 10-20 s-1. Our results also indicated that kinase activity occurred too rapidly for the slower isomerization rate of 2.2 s-1 to be linked specifically to the activation process. PMID:1544916

  8. A New Versatile Immobilization Tag Based on the Ultra High Affinity and Reversibility of the Calmodulin-Calmodulin Binding Peptide Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Ura, Marcin; Hoey, Robert J; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2015-08-14

    Reversible, high-affinity immobilization tags are critical tools for myriad biological applications. However, inherent issues are associated with a number of the current methods of immobilization. Particularly, a critical element in phage display sorting is functional immobilization of target proteins. To circumvent these problems, we have used a mutant (N5A) of calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) as an immobilization tag in phage display sorting. The immobilization relies on the ultra high affinity of calmodulin to N5A mutant CBP (RWKKNFIAVSAANRFKKIS) in presence of calcium (KD~2 pM), which can be reversed by EDTA allowing controlled "capture and release" of the specific binders. To evaluate the capabilities of this system, we chose eight targets, some of which were difficult to overexpress and purify with other tags and some had failed in sorting experiments. In all cases, specific binders were generated using a Fab phage display library with CBP-fused constructs. KD values of the Fabs were in subnanomolar to low nanomolar (nM) ranges and were successfully used to selectively recognize antigens in cell-based experiments. Some of these targets were problematic even without any tag; thus, the fact that all led to successful selection endpoints means that borderline cases can be worked on with a high probability of a positive outcome. Taken together with examples of successful case specific, high-level applications like generation of conformation-, epitope- and domain-specific Fabs, we feel that the CBP tag embodies all the attributes of covalent immobilization tags but does not suffer from some of their well-documented drawbacks. PMID:26159704

  9. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  10. [Study of the calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcium adenosine triphosphatase of erythrocyte membranes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Petruniaka, V V; Rudyk, Iu S

    1991-01-01

    The inhibitor calmodulin (R 24571) was examined for effects on the activity of red blood cell Ca-ATPases in patients with coronary heart disease during the treatment with nitrates, beta-blockers and calcium antagonists. The maximum activity of Ca-ATPase was measured in the erythrocytes perforated with saponine in the presence of endogenous regulators at a concentration of Ca2+ of 3-5 microM. Patients with high and low Ca-ATPase activity were identified. In the control group R24571 failed to affect Ca-ATPase activity. In patients, the calmodulin inhibitor caused both Ca-ATPase activation and inhibition. The effects of R 24571 correlated with the severity of the patients' condition. In effective therapy, the action of the calmodulin inhibitor became lower on Ca-ATPase activity. It was concluded that there was Ca-ATPase regulation imbalance in patients with coronary heart diseases. PMID:1838226

  11. Structural basis for the association of MAP6 protein with microtubules and its regulation by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Julien; Savarin, Philippe; Gans, Pierre; Hamon, Loïc; Clément, Marie-Jeanne; David, Marie-Odile; Bosc, Christophe; Andrieux, Annie; Curmi, Patrick A

    2013-08-23

    Microtubules are highly dynamic αβ-tubulin polymers. In vitro and in living cells, microtubules are most often cold- and nocodazole-sensitive. When present, the MAP6/STOP family of proteins protects microtubules from cold- and nocodazole-induced depolymerization but the molecular and structure determinants by which these proteins stabilize microtubules remain under debate. We show here that a short protein fragment from MAP6-N, which encompasses its Mn1 and Mn2 modules (MAP6(90-177)), recapitulates the function of the full-length MAP6-N protein toward microtubules, i.e. its ability to stabilize microtubules in vitro and in cultured cells in ice-cold conditions or in the presence of nocodazole. We further show for the first time, using biochemical assays and NMR spectroscopy, that these effects result from the binding of MAP6(90-177) to microtubules with a 1:1 MAP6(90-177):tubulin heterodimer stoichiometry. NMR data demonstrate that the binding of MAP6(90-177) to microtubules involve its two Mn modules but that a single one is also able to interact with microtubules in a closely similar manner. This suggests that the Mn modules represent each a full microtubule binding domain and that MAP6 proteins may stabilize microtubules by bridging tubulin heterodimers from adjacent protofilaments or within a protofilament. Finally, we demonstrate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin competes with microtubules for MAP6(90-177) binding and that the binding mode of MAP6(90-177) to microtubules and Ca(2+)-calmodulin involves a common stretch of amino acid residues on the MAP6(90-177) side. This result accounts for the regulation of microtubule stability in cold condition by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. PMID:23831686

  12. The IQGAP1 Protein Is a Calmodulin-regulated Barbed End Capper of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan-Conchaudron, Andrea; Le Clainche, Christophe; Didry, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    2011-01-01

    IQGAP1 is a large modular protein that displays multiple partnership and is thought to act as a scaffold in coupling cell signaling to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in cell migration, adhesion, and cytokinesis. However the molecular mechanisms underlying the activities of IQGAP1 are poorly understood in part because of its large size, poor solubility and lack of functional assays to challenge biochemical properties in various contexts. We have purified bacterially expressed recombinant human IQGAP1. The protein binds Cdc42, Rac1, and the CRIB domain of N-WASP in a calmodulin-sensitive fashion. We further show that in addition to bundling of filaments via a single N-terminal calponin-homology domain, IQGAP1 actually regulates actin assembly. It caps barbed ends, with a higher affinity for ADP-bound terminal subunits (KB = 4 nm). The barbed end capping activity is inhibited by calmodulin, consistent with calmodulin binding to IQGAP1 with a KC of 40 nm, both in the absence and presence of Ca2+ ions. The barbed end capping activity resides in the C-terminal half of IQGAP1. It is possible that the capping activity of IQGAP1 accounts for its stimulation of cell migration. We further find that bacterially expressed recombinant IQGAP1 fragments easily co-purify with nucleic acids that turn out to activate N-WASP protein to branch filaments with Arp2/3 complex. The present results open perspectives for tackling the function of IQGAP1 in more complex reconstituted systems. PMID:21730051

  13. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers.

    PubMed

    Poovaiah, B W; Xia, M; Liu, Z; Wang, W; Yang, T; Sathyanarayanan, P V; Franceschi, V R

    1999-08-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther. PMID:10436217

  14. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-01-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage. PMID:8278508

  15. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes.

    PubMed

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  16. Role of Ca2+ and calmodulin in ehrlichial infection in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Zhang, Y; Park, J

    1995-01-01

    Replication of Ehrlichia risticii was inhibited in P388D1 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages when a calmodulin antagonist (W-7, chlorpromazine, or trifluoperazine); a Ca2+ channel blocker (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine, or flunarizine); an extracellular Ca2+ chelator, EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid]; an inhibitor of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, TMB-8; or Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was added after internalization of the organism at 3 h postincubation. When intracellular ehrlichiae at their logarithmic stage of growth were treated with these reagents, not only was further proliferation prevented but also there was significant reduction in numbers of intracellular ehrlichiae. These reagents prevented spreading of E. risticii from P388D1 cells to THP-1 cells. None of these reagents prevented binding of [35S]methionine-labeled E. risticii to P388D1 cells, but all of these reagents prevented internalization of [35S]methionine-labeled E. risticii. Protein kinase C inhibitors, H-7 and staurosporin, had no effect. 14CO2 production from L-[14C]glutamine in Percoll-density-gradient-purified E. risticii was inhibited by A23187 but not by W-7 or verapamil, suggesting that Ca2+ but not calmodulin directly regulates ehrlichials glutamine oxidation. Pretreatment of E. risticii with W-7 or verapamil did not reduce its infectivity. These results indicate that calmodulin and Ca2+ are essential for ehrlichial internalization, replication, and spreading in macrophages but are not essential for binding. PMID:7768614

  17. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  18. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  19. Comparison of the crystal and solution structures of calmodulin and troponin C

    SciTech Connect

    Heidorn, D.B.; Trewhella, J.

    1988-02-09

    X-ray solution scattering data from skeletal muscle troponin C and from calmodulin have been measured. Modeling studies based on the crystal structure coordinates for these proteins show discrepancies between the solution data and the crystal structure that indicate that if the size and shape of the globular domains are the same in solution as in the crystal, the distances between them must be smaller by several angstroms. Bringing the globular domains closer together requires structural changes in the interconnecting helix that joins them.

  20. Calmodulin 4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C; Kalinin, Alexandr; Bible, Paul W; Morasso, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signals play important roles in epidermal barrier formation, skin homoeostasis and wound repair. Calmodulin 4 (Calm4) is a small, Ca2+ -binding protein with strong expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. In mice, Calm4 first appears in the skin at the time of barrier formation, and its expression increases in response to epidermal barrier challenges. In this study, we report the generation of Calm4 knockout mice and provide evidence that Calm4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation, maintenance and repair. PMID:25316000

  1. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  2. Drosophila calmodulin mutants with specific defects in the musculature or in the nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Beckingham, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    We have studied lethal mutations in the single calmodulin gene (Cam) of Drosophila to gain insight into the in vivo functions of this important calcium sensor. As a result of maternal calmodulin (CaM) in the mature egg, lethality is delayed until the postembryonic stages. Prior to death in the first larval instar, Cam nulls show a striking behavioral abnormality (spontaneous backward movement) whereas a mutation, Cam7, that results in a single amino acid change (V91G) produces a very different phenotype: short indented pupal cases and pupal death with head eversion defects. We show here that the null behavioral phenotype originates in the nervous system and involves a CaM function that requires calcium binding to all four sites of the protein. Further, backward movement can be induced in hypomorphic mutants by exposure to high light levels. In contrast, the V91G mutation specifically affects the musculature and causes abnormal calcium release in response to depolarization of the muscles. Genetic interaction studies suggest that failed regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor, is the major defect underlying the Cam7 phenotype. PMID:14668380

  3. Metal binding affinity and structural properties of calmodulin-like protein 14 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin, plants possess many calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that are predicted to have specific roles in the cell. Herein, we described the biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana CML14. We applied isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the energetics of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to CML14, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, together with intrinsic and ANS-based fluorescence, to evaluate the structural effects of metal binding and metal-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and limited proteolysis were used to characterize protein thermal and local stability. Our data demonstrate that CML14 binds one Ca(2+) ion with micromolar affinity (Kd ∼ 12 µM) and the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) decreases the Ca(2+) affinity by ∼5-fold. Although binding of Ca(2+) to CML14 increases protein stability, it does not result in a more hydrophobic protein surface and does not induce the large conformational rearrangement typical of Ca(2+) sensors, but causes only localized structural changes in the unique functional EF-hand. Our data, together with a molecular modelling prediction, provide interesting insights into the biochemical properties of Arabidopsis CML14 and may be useful to direct additional studies aimed at understanding its physiological role. PMID:27124620

  4. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  5. Increased transmitter release and aberrant synapse morphology in a Drosophila calmodulin mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, L; Nelson, H B; Beckingham, K; Stern, M

    1998-01-01

    The ubiquitous calcium-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) has been implicated in the development and function of the nervous system in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. We have generated mutations in the single Drosophila Calmodulin (Cam) gene and examined the effects of these mutations on behavior, synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction, and structure of the larval motor nerve terminal. Flies hemizygous for Cam3c1, a mutation in the first Ca2+-binding site, exhibit behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroanatomical abnormalities. In particular, adults exhibit defects in locomotion, coordination, and flight. Larvae exhibit increased neurotransmitter release from the motor nerve terminal at low [Ca2+] in the presence of the K+ channel-blocking drug quinidine. In addition, synaptic bouton structure at motor nerve terminals is altered. These effects are distinct from those produced by altering the activity of the CaM target enzymes CaM-activated kinase II (CaMKII) and CaM-activated adenylyl cyclase (CaMAC). Furthermore, previous in vitro studies of mutant Cam3c1 demonstrated that although its Ca2+ affinity is decreased, Cam3c1 protein can activate CaMKII, CaMAC, and CaM-activated phosphatase calcineurin in a manner similar to wild-type CaM. Thus, the Cam3c1 mutation might affect Ca2+ buffering or interfere with the activation or inhibition of a CaM target distinct from CaMKII or CaMAC. PMID:9725845

  6. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cuiping; Zhang, Junting; Zheng, Ye; Xu, Hongbing; Yu, Shaoning

    2015-08-01

    Calcineurin (CN) is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) activated serine/threonine phosphatase, and its regulatory region (CNRR) plays a critical role in the coupling of Ca(2+) signals to cellular responses. Ca(2+)/CaM binds to the CNRR, resulting in a conformational change that removes an autoinhibitory domain (CN467-486) from the active site of the phosphatase and activates the enzyme. However, almost the entire regulatory region (CN374-521) is not visible in the electron density maps of reported structures. In this study, we produced separate CN fragments corresponding to the CNRR (CNRR381-521, CN residues 381-521) and determined the binding affinity of CNRR381-521 for Ca(2+)/CaM using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The structural change in CNRR381-521 induced by Ca(2+)/CaM binding was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicate that Ca(2+)/CaM binding to CNRR381-521 is an exothermic reaction with a dissociation constant of 2.0×10(-6) M. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation. PMID:25956027

  7. The effect of macromolecular crowding, ionic strength and calcium binding on calmodulin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Liang, Kao-Chen; Waxham, Neal; Cheung, Margaret

    2011-03-01

    The flexibility in the structure of calmodulin (CaM) allows its binding to over 300 target proteins in the cell. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CaM in response to the changing intracellular environment, we use a combined method of computer simulation and experiments based on circular dichroism (CD). The conformation, helicity and EF hand orientation of CaM are analyzed computationally to address the effect of macromolecular crowding, ionic strength and calcium binding in the experiments. We applied a unique solution of charges computed from QM/MM to accurately represent the charge distribution in the transition from apo-CaM to holo-CaM. Computationally, we found that a high level of macromolecular crowding, in addition to calcium binding and ionic strength, can impact the conformation, helicity and the EF hand orientation of CaM. Our result may provide unique insight into understanding the promiscuous behavior of calmodulin in target selection inside cells. This work is supported by National Science Foundation, Molecular & Cellular Biosciences (MCB0919974).

  8. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Adrián G; Estrin, Darío A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; McCormick, John E; Martin, Stephen R; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-11-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via activation of its G-protein-coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring (15)N and (1)H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca(2+) by paramagnetic Tb(3+) allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  9. Isolation of Hybridomas for Golgi-associated Proteins and a Plant Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Ray, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of a role for calcium in the mechanism of the gravitropic response indicates a role for calmodulin. Localization studies indicate that plant cell walls have a high content of calmodulin which suggests a regulatory role for CaM in both gravitropic curvature and auxin-induced growth. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the ctivity of Golgi-localized B-1,4-glucan synthase (GS), an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. In order to determine whether auxin stimulates GS activity either by modulation of existing enzyme or induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase, a study was undertaken to isolate and quantitate glucan synthase. This enzyme appears to be an integral protein of the Golgi membrane and has resisted isolation with retention of activity. The production of monoclonal antibody for glucan synthase was undertaken due to the inability to isolate GS by standard detergent/liposome techniques.

  10. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  11. Reduced expressions of calmodulin genes and protein and reduced ability of calmodulin to activate plasma membrane Ca(2+) -ATPase in the brain of protein undernourished rats: modulatory roles of selenium and zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Khera, Alka; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2016-03-01

    The roles of protein undernutrition as well as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) supplementation on the ability of calmodulin (CaM) to activate erythrocyte ghost membrane (EGM) Ca(2+) -ATPase and the calmodulin genes and protein expressions in rat's cortex and cerebellum were investigated. Rats on adequate protein diet and protein-undernourished (PU) rats were fed with diet containing 16% and 5% casein, respectively, for a period of 10 weeks. The rats were then supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg l(-1) , respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results obtained from the study showed significant reductions in synaptosomal plasma membrane Ca(2+) -ATPase (PMCA) activity, Ca(2+) /CaM activated EGM Ca(2+) ATPase activity and calmodulin genes and protein expressions in PU rats. Se or Zn supplementation improved the ability of Ca(2+) /CaM to activate EGM Ca(2+) -ATPase and protein expressions. Se or Zn supplementation improved gene expression in the cerebellum but not in the cortex. Also, the activity of PMCA was significantly improved by Zn. In conclusion, it is postulated that Se and Zn might be beneficial antioxidants in protecting against neuronal dysfunction resulting from reduced level of calmodulin such as present in protein undernutrition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26879852

  12. The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase confer Ca2+/calmodulin sensitivity on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1995-01-01

    The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the rat brain plasma membrane (PM) Ca(2+)-ATPase II containing the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain was connected to the C-terminus of the ouabain sensitive chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit. Expression of this chimeric molecule in ouabain resistant mouse L cells was assured by the high-affinity binding of [3H]ouabain. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, this chimeric molecule exhibited ouabain inhibitable Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity; the putative chimeric ATPase activity was absent in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and activated by Ca2+/calmodulin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this chimeric molecule could bind monoclonal IgG 5 specific to the chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit only in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, suggesting that the epitope for IgG 5 in this chimera is masked in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and uncovered in their presence. These results propose a direct interaction between the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase and the specific regions of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit that are structurally homologous to the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed several possible regions within the Na+,K(+)-ATPase that might interact with the auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. Images PMID:7828596

  13. Ca2+-dependent Calmodulin Binding to FcRn Affects Immunoglobulin G Transport in the Transcytotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Bonny L.; Claypool, Steven M.; D'Angelo, June A.; Aiken, Martha L.; Venu, Nanda; Yen, Elizabeth H.; Wagner, Jessica S.; Borawski, Jason A.; Pierce, Amy T.; Hershberg, Robert; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    The Fcγ receptor FcRn transports immunoglobulin G (IgG) so as to avoid lysosomal degradation and to carry it bidirectionally across epithelial barriers to affect mucosal immunity. Here, we identify a calmodulin-binding site within the FcRn cytoplasmic tail that affects FcRn trafficking. Calmodulin binding to the FcRn tail is direct, calcium-dependent, reversible, and specific to residues comprising a putative short amphipathic α-helix immediately adjacent to the membrane. FcRn mutants with single residue substitutions in this motif, or FcRn mutants lacking the cytoplasmic tail completely, exhibit a shorter half-life and attenuated transcytosis. Chemical inhibitors of calmodulin phenocopy the mutant FcRn defect in transcytosis. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of IgG transport by calmodulin-dependent sorting of FcRn and its cargo away from a degradative pathway and into a bidirectional transcytotic route. PMID:18003977

  14. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  15. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Nolet, Ryan P.; Calvert, Richard J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival and motility. The p21 Ras proteins such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca2+-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-γ-S loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. PMID:19583261

  16. Calcium/calmodulin inhibition of the BRI1 receptor kinase provides a possible link between calcium- and brassinosteroid-signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The receptor kinase BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) is a key component in brassinosteroid (BR) perception and signaling transduction, which has broad impacts on plant growth and development. In the present study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis calmodulin (CaM) binds to the recombinant cytoplas...

  17. A micronucleus-specific sequence exists in the 5'-upstream region of calmodulin gene in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M; Hirono, M; Takemasa, T; Kimura, M; Watanabe, Y

    1993-01-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila possesses a transcriptionally inactive micronucleus and an active macronucleus. Both nuclei are developed from micronucleus-derived germ nuclei during conjugation. Extensive DNA rearrangement and transcriptional activation are known to be involved in macronuclear development, but little has been known about these processes in a particular functional gene. Therefore the micro- and macronuclear genomic DNAs for calmodulin gene were analyzed. A 1,384 bp micronucleus-specific sequence located about 3.5 kb upstream of calmodulin gene has been found, suggesting DNA rearrangement during macronuclear development. The micronucleus-specific sequence had 85% A + T, no extensive ORF, ATTAs at both ends, and two palindromic structures just outside of both ends. Interestingly, the micronucleus-specific sequence included a T-rich tract, T16CT5, in the middle, and a nearly complementary A-rich tract, A5TA10GA5, existed 7 bp upstream from the initiation codon. In addition, there was a 20 bp repetitive sequence TAAT(TAAC)4 about 100 bp upstream of the micronucleus-specific sequence and also in the promoter region of calmodulin gene. Although the functional significance of the micronucleus-specific sequence remains unclear, T16CT5 and TAAT(TAAC)4 elements might exert an influence on transcription of the calmodulin gene. Stringent Southern hybridization revealed that this micronucleus-specific sequence or very similar sequence(s) were abundant in the Tetrahymena micronuclear genome. Images PMID:8506136

  18. Intracellular transduction in the regulation of pheromone biosynthesis of the silkworm, Bombyx mori: suggested involvement of calmodulin and phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Ozawa, R; Nagamine, T; Kim, G H; Uchiumi, K; Shono, T; Mitsui, T

    1995-03-01

    We have tested the effects of chemicals on bombykol production in vitro in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, to probe the biochemical steps as well as underlying mechanisms regulated by PBAN. These results suggest the involvement of calmodulin and phosphoprotein phosphatase in the intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action. PMID:7766202

  19. Stress Induced Expression of a Beta vulgaris L. Gene for a Chloroplast-Targeted Signal Calmodulin-Binding Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugarbeet, Beta vulgaris L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn and Populus trichocarpa Torr & Gray, a cluster of orthologous genes includes NPR1, a disease resistance-controlling gene, CaMP, encoding a calmodulin-binding protein and CK1PK, determining a dual-specificity casein kinase 1-class protein kin...

  20. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  1. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  2. NUCLEAR AND AXONAL LOCALIZATION OF CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE TYPE GR IN RAT CEREBELLAR CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The granule cell enriched Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Cam kinase-Gr) may serve as a calcium activated switch involved in neuronal communication. o investigate its potential sites of action we have characterized its subcellular distribution within the cerebellum by i...

  3. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor Binds Calmodulin with High Affinity in a Calcium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Piirainen, Henni; Hellman, Maarit; Tossavainen, Helena; Permi, Perttu; Kursula, Petri; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ligands bind to G-protein-coupled receptors and how binding changes receptor structure to affect signaling is critical for developing a complete picture of the signal transduction process. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a particularly interesting example, as it has an exceptionally long intracellular carboxyl terminus, which is predicted to be mainly disordered. Experimental data on the structure of the A2AR C-terminus is lacking, because published structures of A2AR do not include the C-terminus. Calmodulin has been reported to bind to the A2AR C-terminus, with a possible binding site on helix 8, next to the membrane. The biological meaning of the interaction as well as its calcium dependence, thermodynamic parameters, and organization of the proteins in the complex are unclear. Here, we characterized the structure of the A2AR C-terminus and the A2AR C-terminus-calmodulin complex using different biophysical methods, including native gel and analytical gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the C-terminus is disordered and flexible, and it binds with high affinity (Kd = 98 nM) to calmodulin without major conformational changes in the domain. Calmodulin binds to helix 8 of the A2AR in a calcium-dependent manner that can displace binding of A2AR to lipid vesicles. We also predicted and classified putative calmodulin-binding sites in a larger group of G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25692595

  4. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  5. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in

  7. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. PMID:22588125

  8. Structure of the recombinant Paramecium tetraurelia calmodulin at 1.68 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Ban, C; Ramakrishnan, B; Ling, K Y; Kung, C; Sundaralingam, M

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of the recombinant calmodulin from Paramecium tetraurelia (rPCaM, M(r) = 16 700, 148 residues) has been determined at 1.68 A resolution. X-ray intensity data were collected at 263 K using a Siemens-Nicolet area detector and Cu Kalpha radiation from a rotating-anode source. A total of 35 936 observations were processed with XENGEN1.3 and scaled to yield 16 255 unique reflections with R(symm)(I) of 4.1%. The crystals are triclinic, with unit-cell dimensions a = 29.89, b = 53.42, c = 25.35 A, alpha = 93.67, beta = 96.88, gamma = 89.24 degrees, space group P1, with one molecule in the unit cell. The atomic coordinates of the wild-type Paramecium calmodulin (PCaM) studied in our laboratory provided the starting model. Refinement of the structure by X-PLOR and refitting it into omit maps yielded an R value of 0.194 for 15 965 reflections greater than 3sigma(F) in the 6.0-1.68 A resolution range. The final model contained 1165 protein atoms for all of the 148 residues, four Ca(2+) ions, and 172 water molecules. The dumbbell structure has seven alpha-helices including a long 7.8 turn central helix connecting the two terminal domains each containing two EF-hand (helix-loop-helix motif) calcium-binding sites. The loops within each pair of EF-hand motifs in the N- and C-terminal domains are brought into juxtaposition to form a pair of hydrogen-bonded antiparallel beta-sheets which are extended at either ends by water bridges. The four calcium-binding EF-hands are superposable with r.m.s. deviations of 0.31-0.79 A. The best agreement is between site 1 and site 3 and the worst agreement is between site 1 and 4. The largest differences are in the ninth and tenth residues of the calcium-binding loops probably because of their involvement in the mini beta-sheets. The calcium coordination distances vary between 2.04 and 2.69 A, average 2.34 A. The rPCaM and wild-type PCaM have an r.m.s. deviation of 0.36 A for equivalent C(alpha) atoms. The side chains of Lys

  9. Isolation of calcium-binding proteins on selective adsorbents. Application to purification of bovine calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Ersson, B; Porath, J O

    1996-05-01

    We report the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with hard metal ions. Various hard metal ions (Mn2+, La3+, Nd3+, Eu(3 were immobilized on cross-linked agarose substituted with Tris(carboxymethyl)ethylenediamine (TED) and used as an adsorbent. After systematic studies, europium was selected for further work on the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins. It was found that the presence of Ca2+ in the sample and the solvent strongly promoted the adsorption and selectivity. Selective elution was accomplished in stepwise mode by the addition of calcium chelators such as malonate, citrate and phosphate. Calmodulin of high purity was isolated from a crude extract. Similar behavior of other calcium-binding proteins indicates that the reported chromatographic procedure can be generally applied to such proteins. PMID:8653201

  10. Interaction between p68 RNA helicase and Ca2+-calmodulin promotes cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haizhen; Gao, Xueliang; Yang, Jenny J.; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary p68 RNA helicase is a prototypical RNA helicase. Here we present evidence to show that, by interacting with Ca-calmodulin (CaM), p68 plays a role in cancer metastasis and cell migration. A peptide fragment that spans the IQ motif of p68 strongly inhibits cancer metastasis in two different animal models. The peptide interrupts p68 and CaM interaction and inhibits cell migration. Our results demonstrate that the p68-CaM interaction is essential for the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in migrating cells. p68 interacts with microtubules in the presence of CaM. Our experiments show that interaction with microtubules stimulates p68 ATPase activity. Further, microtubule gliding assays demonstrate that p68, in the presence of CaM, can function as a microtubule motor. This motor activity may allow p68 to transport CaM to the leading edge of migrating cells. PMID:23322042

  11. Assembly and Calcium Binding Properties of Quantum Dot-Calmodulin Calcium Sensor.

    PubMed

    Eun, Su-yong; Nguyen-ta, Kim; Yoo, Hoon; Silva, Gabriel A; Kim, Soon-jong

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the first nanoengineered quantum dot molecular complex designed to measure changes of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration at high spatial and temporal resolutions in real time. The sensor is ratiometric and composed of three components: a quantum dot (QD) emitting at 620 nm as a fluorescence donor, an organic dye (Alexa Fluor 647) as a fluorescence acceptor, and a calmodulin-M13 (CaM-M13) protein part as a calcium sensing component. In this work, we have determined the maximal number of CaM-M13 required for saturating a single QD particle to be approximately 16. The dissociation constant, Kd of the QD-based calcium ion sensor was also estimated to be around 30 microM. PMID:27433729

  12. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  13. Fluorescence quenching studies of structure and dynamics in calmodulin-eNOS complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, David C.; Persechini, Anthony; Tran, Quang-Kim; Black, D.J.; Johnson, Carey K.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by calmodulin (CaM) facilitates formation of a sequence of conformational states that is not well understood. Fluorescence decays of fluorescently labeled CaM bound to eNOS reveal four distinct conformational states and single-molecule fluorescence trajectories show multiple fluorescence states with transitions between states occurring on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. A model is proposed relating fluorescence quenching states to enzyme conformations. Specifically, we propose that the most highly quenched state corresponds to CaM docked to an oxygenase domain of the enzyme. In single-molecule trajectories, this state occurs with time lags consistent with the oxygenase activity of the enzyme. PMID:25871521

  14. Allosteric mechanism of water channel gating by Ca2+–calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Reichow, Steve L.; Clemens, Daniel M.; Freites, J. Alfredo; Németh-Cahalan, Karin L.; Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hall, James E.; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a universal regulatory protein that communicates the presence of calcium to its molecular targets and correspondingly modulates their function. This key signaling protein is important for controlling the activity of hundreds of membrane channels and transporters. However, our understanding of the structural mechanisms driving CaM regulation of full-length membrane proteins has remained elusive. In this study, we determined the pseudo-atomic structure of full-length mammalian aquaporin-0 (AQP0, Bos Taurus) in complex with CaM using electron microscopy to understand how this signaling protein modulates water channel function. Molecular dynamics and functional mutation studies reveal how CaM binding inhibits AQP0 water permeability by allosterically closing the cytoplasmic gate of AQP0. Our mechanistic model provides new insight, only possible in the context of the fully assembled channel, into how CaM regulates multimeric channels by facilitating cooperativity between adjacent subunits. PMID:23893133

  15. A pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, NPG1, interacts with putative pectate lyases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Bong; Golovkin, Maxim; Reddy, Anireddy S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies have revealed that a pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, No Pollen Germination 1 (NPG1), is required for pollen germination. However, its mode of action is unknown. Here we report direct interaction of NPG1 with pectate lyase-like proteins (PLLs). A truncated form of AtNPG1 lacking the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (TPR1) failed to interact with PLLs, suggesting that it is essential for NPG1 interaction with PLLs. Localization studies with AtNPG1 fused to a fluorescent reporter driven by its native promoter revealed its presence in the cytosol and cell wall of the pollen grain and the growing pollen tube of plasmolyzed pollen. Together, our data suggest that the function of NPG1 in regulating pollen germination is mediated through its interaction with PLLs, which may modify the pollen cell wall and regulate pollen tube emergence and growth. PMID:24919580

  16. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  17. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

  18. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Maia V.; Malanina, Galina G.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca2+-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca2+ signaling since Ca2+- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  19. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Maia V; Malanina, Galina G; Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E; Fletterick, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca(2+) signaling since Ca(2+)- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  20. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II regulates cardiac Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefan; Dybkova, Nataliya; Rasenack, Eva C.L.; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Fabritz, Larissa; Kirchhof, Paulus; Maier, Sebastian K.G.; Zhang, Tong; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M.; Maier, Lars S.

    2006-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) expression is increased. Altered Na+ channel gating is linked to and may promote ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) in HF. Calmodulin regulates Na+ channel gating, in part perhaps via CaMKII. We investigated effects of adenovirus-mediated (acute) and Tg (chronic) overexpression of cytosolic CaMKIIδC on Na+ current (INa) in rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes, respectively (in whole-cell patch clamp). Both acute and chronic CaMKIIδC overexpression shifted voltage dependence of Na+ channel availability by –6 mV (P < 0.05), and the shift was Ca2+ dependent. CaMKII also enhanced intermediate inactivation and slowed recovery from inactivation (prevented by CaMKII inhibitors autocamtide 2–related inhibitory peptide [AIP] or KN93). CaMKIIδC markedly increased persistent (late) inward INa and intracellular Na+ concentration (as measured by the Na+ indicator sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate [SBFI]), which was prevented by CaMKII inhibition in the case of acute CaMKIIδC overexpression. CaMKII coimmunoprecipitates with and phosphorylates Na+ channels. In vivo, transgenic CaMKIIδC overexpression prolonged QRS duration and repolarization (QT intervals), decreased effective refractory periods, and increased the propensity to develop VT. We conclude that CaMKII associates with and phosphorylates cardiac Na+ channels. This alters INa gating to reduce availability at high heart rate, while enhancing late INa (which could prolong action potential duration). In mice, enhanced CaMKIIδC activity predisposed to VT. Thus, CaMKII-dependent regulation of Na+ channel function may contribute to arrhythmogenesis in HF. PMID:17124532

  1. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  2. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J.; Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A.; Bayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca2+-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that “autonomous” CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca2+/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca2+/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.—Barcomb, K., Buard, I., Coultrap, S. J., Kulbe, J. R., O'Leary, H., Benke, T. A., Bayer, K. U. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength. PMID:24843070

  3. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-08-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway. PMID:7919983

  4. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qingshan Hou Liyan; Zhang Cuili; Zhao Xiulan; Yu Sufang; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs.

  5. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response through calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongjian; Xi, Jing; Du, Liqun; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Poovaiah, B W

    2012-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, very few Ca(2+)/CaM-binding proteins have been identified which regulate plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca(2+)/CaM-binding transcription factors designated as AtSRs (also known as AtCAMTAs) can respond differentially to wounding stress. Further studies revealed that AtSR1/CAMTA3 is a negative regulator of plant defense, and Ca(2+)/CaM-binding to AtSR1 is indispensable for the suppression of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and disease resistance. Here we report that Ca(2+)/CaM-binding is also critical for AtSR1-mediated herbivore-induced wound response. Interestingly, atsr1 mutant plants are more susceptible to herbivore attack than wild-type plants. Complementation of atsr1 mutant plants by overexpressing wild-type AtSR1 protein can effectively restore plant resistance to herbivore attack. However, when mutants of AtSR1 with impaired CaM-binding ability were overexpressed in atsr1 mutant plants, plant resistance to herbivore attack was not restored, suggesting a key role for Ca(2+)/CaM-binding in wound signaling. Furthermore, it was observed that elevated SA levels in atsr1 mutant plants have a negative impact on both basal and induced biosynthesis of jasmonates (JA). These results revealed that Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling regulates plant response to herbivore attack/wounding by modulating the SA-JA crosstalk through AtSR1. PMID:22371088

  6. Changes in the Levels of Calmodulin and of a Calmodulin Inhibitor in the Early Phases of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Cocucci, Maurizio; Negrini, Noemi

    1988-01-01

    An inhibitor of Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-dependent brain phosphodiesterase was present in the soluble fraction of embryo axes from ungerminated radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds. This inhibitor is a Ca2+-dependent, Cam-binding protein; in fact: (a) its effect was strongly reduced by treatment with proteases; (b) the inhibition was counteracted by Cam but not by Ca2+; (c) on gel filtration in the presence of Ca2+, Cam co-chromatographed with the inhibitor. The inhibitor is heat stable and positively charged at pH 7.5. During early phases of germination, the fresh weight and the levels of DNA and RNA of embryo axes increased, the level of the inhibitor decreased, and the level of Cam increased. Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited germination, the decrease of inhibitor, and the increase of Cam. Fusicoccin (FC) stimulated the increase in fresh weight but not the increase in the RNA and DNA levels; in this condition, the inhibitor level decreased and the increase in Cam level was higher than in the control. In the presence of both ABA and FC, there was an increase in fresh weight not accompanied by an increase in DNA and RNA levels; Cam increased and, on a fresh weight basis, reached the value of the control. These results indicate that the Ca2+-Cam system was activated in early germination of radish seeds by an increase in Cam and a decrease in the inhibitor levels, that FC, probably through the activation of membrane functions, increased Cam level, and that the ABA inhibition on germination was not mediated by the Ca2+-Cam system. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666403

  7. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the human cervix carcinoma cell line ME-180.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Werner, E R; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Mayer, B; Reibnegger, G; Weiss, G; Wachter, H

    1993-01-01

    We show here that the human cervix carcinoma cell line ME-180 expresses a constitutive nitric oxide (NO) synthase, as demonstrated by formation of [3H]citrulline and nitrite. The enzyme is dependent on tetrahydrobiopterin, NADPH, flavins and Ca2+/calmodulin. Enzyme activity is located in the cytosol rather than in the membrane fraction and can be inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA). An antiserum to NO synthase purified from porcine cerebellum inhibited the enzyme activity. ME-180 cells released NO, as was shown by stimulation of guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2) in RFL-6 detector cells; this release was stimulated 8-fold by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 2-fold by increasing the intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels with cytokines. This is the first characterization of a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent NO synthase activity in human epithelial-type tumour cells. PMID:7678733

  8. A mechanism for tunable autoinhibition in the structure of a human Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Luke H.; Stratton, Margaret M.; Lee, Il-Hyung; Rosenberg, Oren S.; Levitz, Joshua; Mandell, Daniel J.; Kortemme, Tanja; Groves, Jay T.; Schulman, Howard; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) forms a highly conserved dodecameric assembly that is sensitive to the frequency of calcium pulse trains. Neither the structure of the dodecameric assembly nor how it regulates CaMKII are known. We present the crystal structure of an autoinhibited full-length human CaMKII holoenzyme, revealing an unexpected compact arrangement of kinase domains docked against a central hub, with the calmodulin binding sites completely inaccessible. We show that this compact docking is important for the autoinhibition of the kinase domains and for setting the calcium response of the holoenzyme. Comparison of CaMKII isoforms, which differ in the length of the linker between the kinase domain and the hub, demonstrates that these interactions can be strengthened or weakened by changes in linker length. This equilibrium between autoinhibited states provides a simple mechanism for tuning the calcium response without changes in either the hub or the kinase domains. PMID:21884935

  9. Calmodulin antagonists increase the amount of mRNA for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, H; Filipovic, I; Hasilik, A; Buddecke, E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin antagonists on the amount of LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA in cultured human fibroblasts was examined by hybridization with a fragment of LDL-R cDNA. In a 'Northern' blot the fragment hybridized to a 5.3-kilobase RNA, as expected for LDL-R mRNA. The concentration of this RNA was increased in preparations from cells that were treated with trifluoperazine or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide]. The selectivity of the increase was established by using a probe for beta-actin mRNA. In dot-blot hybridization it was observed that the calmodulin antagonists cause 2-4-fold relative increase in the amount of LDL-R mRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3421929

  10. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  11. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots.

    PubMed

    Björkman, T; Leopold, A C

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing. PMID:11539682

  12. Effect of Inhibitors of Auxin Transport and of Calmodulin on a Gravisensing-Dependent Current in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Thomas; Leopold, A. Carl

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing. PMID:11539682

  13. The calmodulin-binding transcription activator CAMTA1 is required for long-term memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by calcium/calmodulin signaling in the nucleus. Recent studies have drawn attention to a new family of transcriptional regulators, the so-called calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) proteins. CAMTAs are expressed at particularly high levels in the mouse and human brain, and we reasoned that, as calmodulin-binding transcription factors, CAMTAs may regulate the formation of long-term memory by coupling synaptic activity and calcium/calmodulin signaling to memory-related transcriptional responses. This hypothesis is supported by genetic studies that reported a correlation between Camta gene polymorphisms or mutations and cognitive capability in humans. Here, we show that acute knockdown of CAMTA1, but not CAMTA2, in the hippocampus of adult mice results in impaired performance in two memory tests, contextual fear conditioning and object-place recognition test. Short-term memory and neuronal morphology were not affected by CAMTA knockdown. Gene expression profiling in the hippocampus of control and CAMTA knockdown mice revealed a number of putative CAMTA1 target genes related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. Patch clamp recordings in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures provided further evidence for CAMTA1-dependent changes in electrophysiological properties. In summary, our study provides experimental evidence that confirms previous human genetic studies and establishes CAMTA1 as a regulator of long-term memory formation. PMID:27194798

  14. Activation of chloride channels in normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells by multifunctional calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, John A.; Cozens, Alison L.; Schulman, Howard; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stryer, Lubert; Gardner, Phyllis

    1991-02-01

    CYSTIC fibrosis is associated with defective regulation of apical membrane chloride channels in airway epithelial cells. These channels in normal cells are activated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase1,2 and protein kinase C3,4. In cystic fibrosis these kinases fail to activate otherwise normal Cl- channels1-4. But Cl- flux in cystic fibrosis cells, as in normal cells, can be activated by raising intracellular Ca2+ (refs 5-10). We report here whole-cell patch clamp studies of normal and cystic fibrosis-derived airway epithelial cells showing that Cl- channel activation by Ca2+ is mediated by multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. We find that intracellular application of activated kinase and ATP activates a Cl- current similar to that activated by a Ca2+ ionophore, that peptide inhibitors of either the kinase or calmodulin block Ca2+-dependent activation of Cl- channels, and that a peptide inhibitor of protein kinase C does not block Ca2+-dependent activation. Ca2+/calmodulin activation of Cl- channels presents a pathway with therapeutic potential for circumventing defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis.

  15. The Plasma Membrane Ca(2+) ATPase: Purification by Calmodulin Affinity Chromatography, and Reconstitution of the Purified Protein.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Verena; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) are key regulators of cytosolic Ca(2+) in eukaryotes. They extrude Ca(2+) from the cytosol, using the energy of ATP hydrolysis and operate as Ca(2+)-H(+) exchangers. They are activated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin, by acidic phospholipids and by other mechanisms, among them kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Isolation of the PMCA in pure and active form is essential for the analysis of its structure and function. In this chapter, the purification of the pump, as first achieved from erythrocyte plasma membranes by calmodulin-affinity chromatography, is described in detail. The reversible, high-affinity, Ca(2+)-dependent interaction of the pump with calmodulin is the basis of the procedure. Either phospholipids or glycerol have to be present in the isolation buffers to keep the pump active during the isolation procedure. After the isolation of the PMCA pump from human erythrocytes the pump was purified from other cell types, e.g., heart sarcolemma, plant microsomal fractions, and cells that express it ectopically. The reconstitution of the purified pump into phospholipid vesicles using the cholate dialysis method will also be described. It allows studies of transport mechanism and of regulation of pump activity. The purified pump can be stored in the reconstituted form for several days at 4 °C with little loss of activity, but it rapidly loses activity when stored in the detergent-solubilized form. PMID:26695022

  16. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  17. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes [Hamada et al., 2009]. The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca2+ spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca2+ events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional sites to activate HT program. PMID

  18. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  19. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T(9)TKE(12) sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K(d) = 25±6 nM to K(d) = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (K(d) = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν(as)(P-O) and ν(s)(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν(as)(UO(2))(2+) vibration (from 923 cm(-1) to 908 cm(-1)) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  20. Isolation and characterization of a novel calmodulin-binding protein from potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N.; Day, Irene S.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Safadi, Farida; Reddy, Vaka S.; Golovkin, Maxim; Harnly, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberization in potato is controlled by hormonal and environmental signals. Ca(2+), an important intracellular messenger, and calmodulin (CaM), one of the primary Ca(2+) sensors, have been implicated in controlling diverse cellular processes in plants including tuberization. The regulation of cellular processes by CaM involves its interaction with other proteins. To understand the role of Ca(2+)/CaM in tuberization, we have screened an expression library prepared from developing tubers with biotinylated CaM. This screening resulted in isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel CaM-binding protein (potato calmodulin-binding protein (PCBP)). Ca(2+)-dependent binding of the cDNA-encoded protein to CaM is confirmed by (35)S-labeled CaM. The full-length cDNA is 5 kb long and encodes a protein of 1309 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant similarity with a hypothetical protein from another plant, Arabidopsis. However, no homologs of PCBP are found in nonplant systems, suggesting that it is likely to be specific to plants. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide in CaM binding assays we mapped the CaM-binding region to a 20-amino acid stretch (residues 1216-1237). The bacterially expressed protein containing the CaM-binding domain interacted with three CaM isoforms (CaM2, CaM4, and CaM6). PCBP is encoded by a single gene and is expressed differentially in the tissues tested. The expression of CaM, PCBP, and another CaM-binding protein is similar in different tissues and organs. The predicted protein contained seven putative nuclear localization signals and several strong PEST motifs. Fusion of the N-terminal region of the protein containing six of the seven nuclear localization signals to the reporter gene beta-glucuronidase targeted the reporter gene to the nucleus, suggesting a nuclear role for PCBP.

  1. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  2. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  3. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  4. Calmodulin-dependent regulation of a lipid binding domain in the v-SNARE synaptobrevin and its role in vesicular fusion.

    PubMed

    De Haro, Luc; Quetglas, Stéphanie; Iborra, Cécile; Lévêque, Christian; Seagar, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Trans SNARE complex assembly is an essential step in Ca2+-dependent membrane fusion, although the SNARE proteins do not bind Ca2+ ions. Studies to evaluate how the Ca2+sensor protein calmodulin might regulate this process led to the identification of a consensus calmodulin binding motif in the v-SNARE VAMP2. This sequence (residues 77-90) is situated precisely C-terminal to the tetanus toxin (TeNT) and botulinum B toxin cleavage site (76Q-F77) close to the transmembrane anchor. The same domain also binds acidic phospholipids and Ca2+/calmodulin or lipid binding are mutually exclusive. Directed mutagenesis of basic or hydrophobic residues within this motif reduced interactions with both Ca2+/calmodulin and phospholipids to a similar extent. The effects of these mutations on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis was explored using an hGH release assay in permeabilized pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Treatment of cells with tetanus toxin (TeNT), which cleaves endogenous VAMP, abolished secretion. Secretion could be re-established by transfecting TeNT-resistant VAMP with mutations (Q76V,F77W) in the cleavage site. However rescue of exocytosis was abolished when additional mutations (K83A,K87V or W89A,W90A) were introduced that inhibited calmodulin and phospholipid binding to VAMP. Thus calmodulin and/or phospholipid binding to the membrane proximal region of VAMP is required for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. We speculate that interactions between cis phospholipids at the vesicle surface and the membrane proximal region of VAMP inhibits SNARE complex assembly. Displacement of these interactions by Ca2+/calmodulin may promote SNARE complex assembly and lead to trans interactions between the membrane proximal region of VAMP and phospholipids in the plasma membrane. PMID:14597264

  5. The structure of the complex of calmodulin with KAR-2: a novel mode of binding explains the unique pharmacology of the drug.

    PubMed

    Horváth, István; Harmat, Veronika; Perczel, András; Pálfi, Villo; Nyitray, László; Nagy, Attila; Hlavanda, Emma; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Ovádi, Judit

    2005-03-01

    3'-(beta-Chloroethyl)-2',4'-dioxo-3,5'-spiro-oxazolidino-4-deacetoxyvinblastine (KAR-2) is a potent anti-microtubular agent that arrests mitosis in cancer cells without significant toxic side effects. In this study we demonstrate that in addition to targeting microtubules, KAR-2 also binds calmodulin, thereby countering the antagonistic effects of trifluoperazine. To determine the basis of both properties of KAR-2, the three-dimensional structure of its complex with Ca(2+)-calmodulin has been characterized both in solution using NMR and when crystallized using x-ray diffraction. Heterocorrelation ((1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence) spectra of (15)N-labeled calmodulin indicate a global conformation change (closure) of the protein upon its binding to KAR-2. The crystal structure at 2.12-A resolution reveals a more complete picture; KAR-2 binds to a novel structure created by amino acid residues of both the N- and C-terminal domains of calmodulin. Although first detected by x-ray diffraction of the crystallized ternary complex, this conformational change is consistent with its solution structure as characterized by NMR spectroscopy. It is noteworthy that a similar tertiary complex forms when calmodulin binds KAR-2 as when it binds trifluoperazine, even though the two ligands contact (for the most part) different amino acid residues. These observations explain the specificity of KAR-2 as an anti-microtubular agent; the drug interacts with a novel drug binding domain on calmodulin. Consequently, KAR-2 does not prevent calmodulin from binding most of its physiological targets. PMID:15596444

  6. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  7. S100A1 and Calmodulin Compete for the Same Binding Site on Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nathan T.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Varney, Kristen M.; Zimmer, Danna B.; Schneider, Martin F.; Weber, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In heart and skeletal muscle an S100 protein family member, S100A1, binds to the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and promotes Ca2+ release. Using competition binding assays, we further characterized this system in skeletal muscle and showed that Ca2+-S100A1 competes with Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) for the same binding site on RyR1. In addition, the NMR structure was determined for Ca2+-S100A1 bound to a peptide derived from this CaM/S100A1 binding domain, a region conserved in RyR1 and RyR2 and termed RyRP12 (residues 3616-3627 in human RyR1). Examination of the S100A1-RyRP12 complex revealed residues of the helical RyRP12 peptide (Lys-3616, Trp-3620, Lys-3622, Leu-3623, Leu-3624, and Lys-3626) that are involved in favorable hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with Ca2+-S100A1. These same residues were shown previously to be important for RyR1 binding to Ca2+-CaM. A model for regulating muscle contraction is presented in which Ca2+-S100A1 and Ca2+-CaM compete directly for the same binding site on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:18650434

  8. Neuroligins/LRRTMs prevent activity- and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent synapse elimination in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Llavina, Gilberto J.; Fuccillo, Marc V.; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) and leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. In this paper, we show that short hairpin ribonucleic acid–mediated knockdowns (KDs) of LRRTM1, LRRTM2, and/or NL-3, alone or together as double or triple KDs (TKDs) in cultured hippocampal neurons, did not decrease synapse numbers. In neurons cultured from NL-1 knockout mice, however, TKD of LRRTMs and NL-3 induced an ∼40% loss of excitatory but not inhibitory synapses. Strikingly, synapse loss triggered by the LRRTM/NL deficiency was abrogated by chronic blockade of synaptic activity as well as by chronic inhibition of Ca2+ influx or Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) kinases. Furthermore, postsynaptic KD of CaM prevented synapse loss in a cell-autonomous manner, an effect that was reversed by CaM rescue. Our results suggest that two neurexin ligands, LRRTMs and NLs, act redundantly to maintain excitatory synapses and that synapse elimination caused by the absence of NLs and LRRTMs is promoted by synaptic activity and mediated by a postsynaptic Ca2+/CaM-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:21788371

  9. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  10. Genome-wide identification and analyses of the rice calmodulin and related potential calcium sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonburapong, Bongkoj; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2007-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli evoke rapid and transient increases in [Ca2+]cyt in plant cells which are transmitted by protein sensors that contain EF-hand motifs. Here, a group of Oryza sativa L. genes encoding calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins that do not possess functional domains other than the Ca2+-binding EF-hand motifs was analyzed. Results By functional analyses and BLAST searches of the TIGR rice database, a maximum number of 243 proteins that possibly have EF-hand motifs were identified in the rice genome. Using a neighbor-joining tree based on amino acid sequence similarity, five loci were defined as Cam genes and thirty two additional CML genes were identified. Extensive analyses of the gene structures, the chromosome locations, the EF-hand motif organization, expression characteristics including analysis by RT-PCR and a comparative analysis of Cam and CML genes in rice and Arabidopsis are presented. Conclusion Although many proteins have unknown functions, the complexity of this gene family indicates the importance of Ca2+-signals in regulating cellular responses to stimuli and this family of proteins likely plays a critical role as their transducers. PMID:17263873

  11. mRNA expression profiles of calmodulin and liver receptor homolog-1 genes in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-C; Xiao, L-H; Wang, Y; Chen, S-Y; Yang, Z-Q; Zhao, X-L; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y-P

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CALM), a calcium-binding protein, is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; it plays a pivotal role in the reproductive system by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling. Downstream of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling pathways, liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is involved in female gonadal hormone synthesis. In the chicken, although the two genes are known to be associated with reproductive traits, the interaction between gonadotropins and gonadal steroids remains unclear. We used quantitative real-time PCR to quantify the tissular (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, liver, kidney, oviduct, heart) and ontogenetic (12, 18, 32, and 45 weeks) mRNA expression profiles of CALM and LRH-1 in Erlang Mountainous chickens to determine their roles in the endocrine control of fertility, and compared these profiles with expression in Roman chickens. We found that the relative expressions of CALM and LRH-1 genes had the highest levels in the pituitary and ovary at 32 weeks. The expression level of CALM mRNA in the pituitary of Roman chickens was significantly higher than that in Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks, while the LRH-1 transcript level in the ovaries of Roman chickens was significantly lower than that of Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks. In summary, the transcript levels of CALM and LRH-1 genes are associated with chicken reproductive traits; in addition, we found that the CALM gene is the key regulator in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling network. PMID:23079841

  12. Enkurin is a novel calmodulin and TRPC channel binding protein in sperm.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Keith A; Jungnickel, Melissa K; Wang, Yanli; Cullen, Kay; Lambert, Stephen; Florman, Harvey M

    2004-10-15

    The TRPC cation channel family has been implicated in receptor- or phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated Ca2+ entry into animal cells. These channels are present in mammalian sperm and are assigned a role in ZP3-evoked Ca2+ influx that drives acrosome reactions. However, the mechanisms controlling channel activity and coupling Ca2+ entry through these channels to cellular responses are not well understood. A yeast two-hybrid screen was carried out to identify TRPC-interacting proteins that would be candidate regulators or effectors. We identified a novel protein, enkurin, that is expressed at high levels in the testis and vomeronasal organ and at lower levels in selected other tissues. Enkurin interacts with several TRPC proteins (TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC5, but not TRPC3) and colocalizes with these channels in sperm. Three protein-protein interaction domains were identified in enkurin: a C-terminal region is essential for channel interaction; an IQ motif binds the Ca2+ sensor, calmodulin, in a Ca2+-dependent manner; and a proline-rich N-terminal region contains predicted ligand sequences for SH3 domain proteins, including the SH3 domain of the p85 regulatory subunit of 1-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. We suggest that enkurin is an adaptor that functions to localize a Ca2+ sensitive signal transduction machinery in sperm to a Ca2+-permeable ion channel. PMID:15385169

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  14. Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedlings: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.; Hardison, L.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in young etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. A fairly uniform staining was seen in the nucleoplasm and background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and nucleoli were not stained. In addition, patterned staining reactions were seen in many cells. In cells of the plumule, punctate staining of the cytoplasm was common, and in part this stain appeared to be associated with the plastids. A very distinctive staining of amyloplasts was seen in the columella of the root cap. Staining associated with cytoskeletal elements could be shown in division stages. By metaphase, staining of the spindle region was quite evident. In epidermal cells of the stem and along the underside of the leaf there was an intense staining of the vacuolar contents. Guard cells lacked this vacuolar stain. Vacuolar staining was sometimes seen in cells of the stele, but the most distinctive pattern in the stele was associated with young conducting cells of the xylem. These staining patterns are consistent with the idea that the interactions of plastids and the cytoskeletal may be one of the Ca(2+)-mediated steps in the response of plants to environmental stimuli. Nuclear functions may also be controlled, at least in part, by Ca2+.

  15. Calmodulin effects on steroids-regulated plasma membrane calcium pump activity.

    PubMed

    Zylinska, Ludmila; Kowalska, Iwona; Ferenc, Bozena

    2009-03-01

    It is now generally accepted that non-genomic steroids action precedes their genomic effects by modulation of intracellular signaling pathways within seconds after application. Ca(2+) is a very potent and ubiquitous ion in all cells, and its concentration is precisely regulated. The most sensitive on Ca(2+) increase is ATP-consuming plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). The enzyme is coded by four genes, but isoforms diversity was detected in excitable and non-excitable cells. It is the only ion pump stimulated directly by calmodulin (CaM). We examined the role of PMCA isoforms composition and CaM effect in regulation of Ca(2+) uptake by estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnenolone (PREG), and their sulfates in a concentration range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, using the membranes from rat cortical synaptosomes, differentiated PC12 cells, and human erythrocytes. In excitable membranes with full set of PMCAs steroids apparently increased Ca(2+) uptake, although to a variable extent. In most of the cases, CaM decreased transport by 30-40% below controls. Erythrocyte PMCA was regulated by the steroids somewhat differently than excitable cells. CaM strongly increased the potency for Ca(2+) extrusion in membranes incubated with 17-beta-estradiol and PREG. Our results indicated that steroids may sufficiently control cytoplasmic calcium concentration within physiological and therapeutic range. The response depended on the cell type, PMCA isoforms expression profile, CaM presence, and the steroids structure. PMID:19226536

  16. Calmodulin binds a highly extended HIV-1 MA protein that refolds upon its release.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James E; Chow, John Y H; Jeffries, Cy M; Kwan, Ann H; Duff, Anthony P; Hamilton, William A; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 MA protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds MA in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the MA tertiary fold such that MA becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-MA interface is extensive, covering ~70% of the length of the MA such that regions known to be important in MA interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-MA complex, either by the removal of Ca(2+) or increasing ionic strength, MA reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in MA that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870

  17. Calmodulation meta-analysis: predicting calmodulin binding via canonical motif clustering.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Karen; Farley, Brian M; Ritacco, Alan W; Kobertz, William R

    2014-07-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) directly binds to membrane transport proteins to modulate their function in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentrations. Because CaM recognizes and binds to a wide variety of target sequences, identifying CaM-binding sites is difficult, requiring intensive sequence gazing and extensive biochemical analysis. Here, we describe a straightforward computational script that rapidly identifies canonical CaM-binding motifs within an amino acid sequence. Analysis of the target sequences from high resolution CaM-peptide structures using this script revealed that CaM often binds to sequences that have multiple overlapping canonical CaM-binding motifs. The addition of a positive charge discriminator to this meta-analysis resulted in a tool that identifies potential CaM-binding domains within a given sequence. To allow users to search for CaM-binding motifs within a protein of interest, perform the meta-analysis, and then compare the results to target peptide-CaM structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, we created a website and online database. The availability of these tools and analyses will facilitate the design of CaM-related studies of ion channels and membrane transport proteins. PMID:24935744

  18. Comparing allosteric transitions in the domains of calmodulin through coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+-binding protein consisting of two structurally similar domains with distinct stabilities, binding affinities, and flexibilities. We present coarse grained simulations that suggest that the mechanism for the domain's allosteric transitions between the open and closed conformations depends on subtle differences in the folded state topology of the two domains. Throughout a wide temperature range, the simulated transition mechanism of the N-terminal domain (nCaM) follows a two-state transition mechanism while domain opening in the C-terminal domain (cCaM) involves unfolding and refolding of the tertiary structure. The appearance of the unfolded intermediate occurs at a higher temperature in nCaM than it does in cCaM consistent with nCaM's higher thermal stability. Under approximate physiological conditions, the simulated unfolded state population of cCaM accounts for 10% of the population with nearly all of the sampled transitions (approximately 95%) unfolding and refolding during the conformational change. Transient unfolding significantly slows the domain opening and closing rates of cCaM, which can potentially influence its Ca2+-binding mechanism.

  19. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II links ER stress with Fas and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Jenelle M.; Ozcan, Lale; Seimon, Tracie A.; Li, Gang; Malagelada, Cristina; Backs, Johannes; Backs, Thea; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Anderson, Mark E.; Tabas, Ira

    2009-01-01

    ER stress–induced apoptosis is implicated in various pathological conditions, but the mechanisms linking ER stress–mediated signaling to downstream apoptotic pathways remain unclear. Using human and mouse cell culture and in vivo mouse models of ER stress–induced apoptosis, we have shown that cytosolic calcium resulting from ER stress induces expression of the Fas death receptor through a pathway involving calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ) and JNK. Remarkably, CaMKIIγ was also responsible for processes involved in mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis, including release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. CaMKII-dependent apoptosis was also observed in a number of cultured human and mouse cells relevant to ER stress–induced pathology, including cultured macrophages, endothelial cells, and neuronal cells subjected to proapoptotic ER stress. Moreover, WT mice subjected to systemic ER stress showed evidence of macrophage mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, renal epithelial cell apoptosis, and renal dysfunction, and these effects were markedly reduced in CaMKIIγ-deficient mice. These data support an integrated model in which CaMKII serves as a unifying link between ER stress and the Fas and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. Our study also revealed what we believe to be a novel proapoptotic function for CaMKII, namely, promotion of mitochondrial calcium uptake. These findings raise the possibility that CaMKII inhibitors could be useful in preventing apoptosis in pathological settings involving ER stress–induced apoptosis. PMID:19741297

  20. Calmodulin physically interacts with the erythropoietin receptor and enhances Jak2-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masahide; Iiyama, Mitsuko; Miura, Osamu . E-mail: miura.hema@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    Stimulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level as well as activation of the Jak2 tyrosine kinase to stimulate various downstream signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the universal Ca{sup 2+} receptor calmodulin (CaM) binds EpoR in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner in vitro. Binding studies using various EpoR mutants in hematopoietic cells showed that CaM binds the membrane-proximal 65-amino-acid cytoplasmic region (amino acids 258-312) of EpoR that is critical for activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling. Structurally unrelated CaM antagonists, W-13 and CMZ, inhibited activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling pathways, whereas W-12, a W-13 analog, did not show any significant inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of CaM augmented Epo-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EpoR. W-13, but not W-12, also inhibited Epo-induced proliferation and survival. Together, these results indicate that CaM binds to the membrane-proximal EpoR cytoplasmic region and plays an essential role in activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling.

  1. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  2. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  3. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A.; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2014-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Nav1.5 (CTNav1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg2+ reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNav1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNav, that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNav1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Nav channels.

  4. Structural Environment and Stability of the Complexes Formed Between Calmodulin and Actinyl Ions.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, Florian; Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurélie; Martinez-Baez, Ernesto; Roques, Jérôme; Berthomieu, Catherine; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Simoni, Éric

    2016-03-21

    Because of their presence in the nuclear fuel cycle, neptunium and uranium are two actinides of main interest in case of internal contamination. Complexation of U(VI) and Np(V) by the target protein calmodulin (CaM(WT)) was therefore studied herein. Both actinides have two axial oxygen atoms, which, charge aside, makes them very similar structurally wise. This work combines spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L(III)-edge for each studied actinide. Models for the binding site of the protein were developed and then refined by using DFT to fit the obtained experimental EXAFS data. The effect of hydrolysis was also considered for both actinides (the uranyl experiment was performed at pH 3 and 6, while the neptunyl experiment was conducted at pH 7 and 9). The effect of the pH variation was apparent on the coordination sphere of the uranyl complexes, while the neptunyl complex characteristics remained stable under both studied conditions. The DFT calculations showed that at near physiological pH the complex formed by CaM(WT) with the neptunium ion is more stable than the one formed with uranyl. PMID:26954703

  5. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. PMID:10526320

  6. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  7. Modulating the affinity and the selectivity of engineered calmodulin EF-Hand peptides for lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Clainche, Loïc Le; Figuet, Mélanie; Montjardet-Bas, Véronique; Blanchard, Sébastien; Vita, Claudio

    2006-09-01

    A set of engineered peptides (33 amino acids long) corresponding to the helix-turn-helix (EF-Hand) motif of the metal-binding site I of the protein calmodulin from paramecium tetraurelia have been synthesized. A disulfide bridge has been introduced in the native sequence in order to stabilize a native-like conformation. The calcium-binding carboxylate residues in positions 20, 22, 24, and 31 were mutated into other amino acids and the influence of such mutations on the binding affinity of the peptides for calcium and lanthanides have been studied. It was shown that the binding affinity for terbium ions can be modulated with dissociation constants ranging from 40 nmolar to 40 mmolar. The study of the influence of the mutations on the terbium affinity showed that the residue in position 24 played a key role on the capability of the peptides to bind lanthanides and that the affinity could be enhanced by mutations on non-coordinating positions. Such peptides with high affinity for lanthanides may facilitate the development of new highly sensitive biosensors to monitor the metal pollution in the environment. PMID:16637059

  8. Cloning and analysis of calmodulin gene from Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Mao, Yunxiang; Zhuang, Yunyun; Kong, Fanna; Sui, Zhenghong

    2009-09-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of signal transduction and anti-desiccation mechanisms of Porphyra yezoensis, cDNA and its genomic sequence of Calmodulin gene (CaM) was cloned by the technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the analysis of P. yezoensis ESTs from dbEST database. The result shows that the full-length cDNA of CaM consists of 603 bps including an ORF encoding for 151 amino acids and a terminate codon UGA, while the length of genomic sequence is 1231 bps including 2 exons and 1 intron. The average GC content of the coding region is 58.77%, while the GC content of the third position of this gene is as high as 82.23%. Four Ca2+ binding sites (EF-hand) are found in this gene. The predicted molecular mass of the deduced peptide is 16688.72 Da and the pI is 4.222. By aligning with known CaM genes, the similarity of CaM gene sequence with homologous genes in Chlamydomonas incerta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is 72.7% and 72.2% respectively, and the similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence of CaM gene with homologous genes in C. incerta and C. reinhardtii are both 71.5%. This is the first report on CaM from a species of Rhodophyta.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  10. Selective Nitration of Tyr(99) in Calmodulin as a Marker of Cellular Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S. ); Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Williams, Todd D.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C. )

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite(ONOO-)was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr-99 at physiological pH resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 15. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr-99 is readily nitrated by perioxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging perioxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of

  11. Cllmodulin in tip-growing plant cells, visualized by fluorescing calmodulin-binding phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Haußer, I; Herth, W; Reiss, H D

    1984-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was visualized light-microscopically by the fluorescent CaM inhibitors fluphenazine and chlorpromazine, both phenothiazines, during polar tip growth of pollen tubes of Lilium longiflorum, root hairs of Lepidium sativum, moss caulonema of Funaria hygrometrica, fungal hyphae of Achlya spec. and in the alga Acetabularia mediterranea, as well as during multipolar tip growth in Micrasterias denticulata. Young pollen tubes and root hairs showed tip fluorescence; at later stages and in the growing parts of the other subjects the fluorescence was almost uniform. After treatment with cytochalasin B, punctuate fluorescence occurred in the clear zone adjacent to the tip of pollen tubes. The observations indicate that there is CaM in all our tested systems detectable with this method. It may play a key role in starting polar growth. As in pollen tubes, CaM might be in part associated with the microfilament network at the tip, and thus regulate vesicle transport and cytoplasmic streaming. PMID:24253945

  12. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric–contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  13. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-07-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric-contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  14. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; Umeda, Masahiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency. PMID:20209163

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of the calmodulin gene from guinea pig hearts

    PubMed Central

    FENG, RUI; LIU, YAN; SUN, XUEFEI; WANG, YAN; HU, HUIYUAN; GUO, FENG; ZHAO, JINSHENG; HAO, LIYING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding the calmodulin (CaM; GenBank accession no. FJ012165) gene from guinea pig hearts. The CaM gene was amplified from cDNA collected from guinea pig hearts and inserted into a pGEM®-T Easy vector. Subsequently, CaM nucleotide and protein sequence similarity analysis was conducted between guinea pigs and other species. In addition, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to investigate the CaM 3 expression patterns in different guinea pig tissues. Sequence analysis revealed that the CaM gene isolated from the guinea pig heart had ∼90% sequence identity with the CaM 3 genes in humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, the deduced peptide sequences of CaM 3 in the guinea pig showed 100% homology to the CaM proteins from other species. In addition, the RT-PCR results indicated that CaM 3 was widely and differentially expressed in guinea pigs. In conclusion, the current study provided valuable information with regard to the cloning and expression of CaM 3 in guinea pig hearts. These findings may be helpful for understanding the function of CaM3 and the possible role of CaM3 in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26136979

  16. Calmodulin-controlled spatial decoding of oscillatory Ca2+ signals by calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sohum; Aye-Han, Nwe-Nwe; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Oldach, Laurel; Gorshkov, Kirill; Zhang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Calcineurin is responsible for mediating a wide variety of cellular processes in response to dynamic calcium (Ca2+) signals, yet the precise mechanisms involved in the spatiotemporal control of calcineurin signaling are poorly understood. Here, we use genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors to directly probe the role of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations in modulating calcineurin activity dynamics in insulin-secreting MIN6 β-cells. We show that Ca2+ oscillations induce distinct temporal patterns of calcineurin activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane vs at the ER and mitochondria in these cells. Furthermore, we found that these differential calcineurin activity patterns are determined by variations in the subcellular distribution of calmodulin (CaM), indicating that CaM plays an active role in shaping both the spatial and temporal aspects of calcineurin signaling. Together, our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms by which oscillatory signals are decoded to generate specific functional outputs within different cellular compartments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03765.001 PMID:25056880

  17. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding to ion channels demonstrates the role of its plasticity in regulation.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Bate, Neil; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Vuister, Geerten W

    2013-11-01

    The Ca²⁺-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) is a well-known regulator of ion-channel activity. Consequently, the Protein Data Bank contains many structures of CaM in complex with different fragments of ion channels that together display a variety of binding modes. In addition to the canonical interaction, in which CaM engages its target with both its domains, many of the ion-channel-CaM complexes demonstrate alternative non-canonical binding modes that depend on the target and experimental conditions. Based on these findings, several mechanisms of ion-channel regulation by CaM have been proposed, all exploiting its plasticity and flexibility in interacting with its targets. In this review, we focus on complexes of CaM with either the voltage-gated calcium channels; the voltage-gated sodium channels or the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, for which both structural and functional data are available. For each channel, the functional relevance of these structural data and possible mechanism of calcium-dependent (in)activation and/or facilitation are discussed in detail. PMID:23609407

  18. Noncanonical binding of calmodulin to aquaporin-0: implications for channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Steve L; Gonen, Tamir

    2008-09-10

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of ubiquitous membrane channels that conduct water across cell membranes. AQPs form homotetramers containing four functional and independent water pores. Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is expressed in the eye lens, where its water permeability is regulated by calmodulin (CaM). Here we use a combination of biochemical methods and NMR spectroscopy to probe the interaction between AQP0 and CaM. We show that CaM binds the AQP0 C-terminal domain in a calcium-dependent manner. We demonstrate that only two CaM molecules bind a single AQP0 tetramer in a noncanonical fashion, suggesting a form of cooperativity between AQP0 monomers. Based on these results, we derive a structural model of the AQP0/CaM complex, which suggests CaM may be inhibitory to channel permeability by capping the vestibules of two monomers within the AQP0 tetramer. Finally, phosphorylation within AQP0's CaM binding domain inhibits the AQP0/CaM interaction, suggesting a temporal regulatory mechanism for complex formation. PMID:18786401

  19. Molecular characteristics and expression of calmodulin cDNA from the freshwater pearl mussel, Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L-G; Wang, J-H; Li, Y-J; Sheng, J-Q; Gu, Q; Hong, Y-J

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional intracellular calcium ion receptor protein that participates in a range of cellular processes, including calcium metabolism in mussels. To investigate the role of CaM in freshwater mollusk shell calcium metabolism, the full-length CaM cDNA was isolated from the freshwater pearl mussel, Hyriopsis schlegelii (referred to as hsCaM) using SMART RACE technology. The full-length hsCaM was 855 bp in size, containing a 70-bp 5'-untranslated sequence, a 447-bp open reading frame, a 309-bp 3'-untranslated sequence, and a 26-nucleotide long poly(A) tail. The hsCaM mRNA expression in different mussel tissues was examined using real-time PCR. The hsCaM mRNA was found to be ubiquitously expressed, but far more abundant in the gill, foot, and mantle than in the posterior adductor muscle. Real-time PCR was also used to determine hsCaM mRNA expression levels in mantle tissues of H. schlegelii at different ages. No significant differences between one-, two-, and three-year-old mussels were detected, but expression increased in four-year-old mussels and then decreased in five-year-old mussels. CaM appears to be involved in calcium regulation of the mantle in four-year-old mussels, which may secrete more mother of pearl during pearl culture. PMID:22290464

  20. Coping with Stresses: Roles of Calcium- and Calcium/Calmodulin-Regulated Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Ali, Gul S.; Celesnik, Helena; Day, Irene S.

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses are major limiting factors of crop yields and cause billions of dollars of losses annually around the world. It is hoped that understanding at the molecular level how plants respond to adverse conditions and adapt to a changing environment will help in developing plants that can better cope with stresses. Acquisition of stress tolerance requires orchestration of a multitude of biochemical and physiological changes, and most of these depend on changes in gene expression. Research during the last two decades has established that different stresses cause signal-specific changes in cellular Ca2+ level, which functions as a messenger in modulating diverse physiological processes that are important for stress adaptation. In recent years, many Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binding transcription factors (TFs) have been identified in plants. Functional analyses of some of these TFs indicate that they play key roles in stress signaling pathways. Here, we review recent progress in this area with emphasis on the roles of Ca2+- and Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription in stress responses. We will discuss emerging paradigms in the field, highlight the areas that need further investigation, and present some promising novel high-throughput tools to address Ca2+-regulated transcriptional networks. PMID:21642548

  1. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  2. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Love, Nick R.; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD+ kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  3. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  4. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  5. Matrin 3 is a Ca2+/calmodulin-binding protein cleaved by caspases.

    PubMed

    Valencia, C Alexander; Ju, Wujian; Liu, Rihe

    2007-09-21

    Matrin 3 is a nuclear matrix protein that has been implicated in interacting with other nuclear proteins to anchor hyperedited RNAs to the nuclear matrix, in modulating the activity of proximal promoters, and as the main PKA substrate following NMDA receptor activation. In our proteome-wide selections for calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins and for caspase substrates using mRNA-displayed human proteome libraries, matrin 3 was identified as both a Ca(2+)-dependent CaM-binding protein and a downstream substrate of caspases. We report here, the in vitro characterization of the CaM-binding motif and the caspase cleavage site on matrin 3. Significantly, the Ca(2+)/CaM-binding motif is partially overlapped by the RRM of matrin 3 and is also very close to the bipartite NLS that is essential for its nuclear localization. The caspase cleavage site is downstream of the NLS but upstream of the second U1-like zinc finger. Our results suggest that the functions of matrin 3 could be regulated by both Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CaM and caspase-mediated cleavage. PMID:17658460

  6. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  7. Novel Role of Calmodulin in Regulating Protein Transport to Mitochondria in a Unicellular Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Lower eukaryotes like the kinetoplastid parasites are good models to study evolution of cellular pathways during steps to eukaryogenesis. In this study, a kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania donovani, was used to understand the process of mitochondrial translocation of a nucleus-encoded mitochondrial protein, the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTXNPx). We report the presence of an N-terminal cleavable mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) validated through deletion and grafting experiments. We also establish a novel finding of calmodulin (CaM) binding to the MTS of mTXNPx through specific residues. Mutation of CaM binding residues, keeping intact the residues involved in mitochondrial targeting and biochemical inhibition of CaM activity both in vitro and in vivo, prevented mitochondrial translocation. Through reconstituted import assays, we demonstrate obstruction of mitochondrial translocation either in the absence of CaM or Ca2+ or in the presence of CaM inhibitors. We also demonstrate the prevention of temperature-driven mTXNPx aggregation in the presence of CaM. These findings establish the idea that CaM is required for the transport of the protein to mitochondria through maintenance of translocation competence posttranslation. PMID:24043313

  8. Ca2+-bound calmodulin forms a compact globular structure on binding four trifluoperazine molecules in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, N; Hayashi, N; Jinbo, Y; Izumi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which determines the radius of gyration, R(g), and the pair distance distribution function, was used to investigate the conformational changes of calmodulin (CaM) on binding to an antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP), with or without Ca(2+) in solution. We previously applied this SAXS method to CaM complexed with N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulphonamide (W-7) [Osawa, Kuwamoto, Izumi, Yap, Ikura, Shibanuma, Yokokura, Hidaka and Matsushima (1999) FEBS Lett. 442, 173-177] and found that the binding of two W-7 TFP molecules to one Ca(2+)-saturated CaM molecule induces structural changes from a 'dumb-bell' shape to a compact globular shape. We report here that the most compact globular shape whose size is consistent with that of the 1:2 Ca(2+)-saturated CaM-W-7 complex is formed by the binding of four TFP molecules to one Ca(2+)-saturated CaM molecule. Even in the absence of Ca(2+), the conformational changes of CaM occur on TFP binding, giving a slightly smaller R(g) than Ca(2+)-free CaM alone. PMID:10727421

  9. Responses of plant calmodulin to endocytosis induced by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cheng, Mengzhu; Chu, Yunxia; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, David D Y; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The wide application of rare earth elements (REEs) have led to their diffusion and accumulation in the environment. The activation of endocytosis is the primary response of plant cells to REEs. Calmodulin (CaM), as an important substance in calcium (Ca) signaling systems, regulating almost all of the physiological activities in plants, such as cellular metabolism, cell growth and division. However, the response of CaM to endocytosis activated by REEs remains unknown. By using immunofluorescence labeling and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we found that trivalent lanthanum [La(III)], an REE ion, affected the expression of CaM in endocytosis. Using circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and computer simulations, we demonstrated that a low concentration of La(III) could interact with extracellular CaM by electrostatic attraction and was then bound to two Ca-binding sites of CaM, making the molecular structure more compact and orderly, whereas a high concentration of La(III) could be coordinated with cytoplasmic CaM or bound to other Ca-binding sites, making the molecular structure more loose and disorderly. Our results provide a reference for revealing the action mechanisms of REEs in plant cells. PMID:27081794

  10. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  11. A monoclonal antibody to the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase from pig stomach smooth muscle inhibits plasmalemmal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Verbist, J; Wuytack, F; Raeymaekers, L; Van Leuven, F; Cassiman, J J; Casteels, R

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (2B3) directed against the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase from pig stomach smooth muscle was prepared. This antibody reacts with a 130,000-Mr protein that co-migrates on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase purified from smooth muscle by calmodulin affinity chromatography. The antibody causes partial inhibition of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in plasma membranes from pig stomach smooth muscle, in pig erythrocytes and human erythrocytes. It appears to be directed against a specific functionally important site of the plasmalemmal Ca2+-transport ATPase and acts as a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding. Binding of the antibody does not change the Km of the ATPase for Ca2+ and its inhibitory effect is not altered by the presence of calmodulin. No inhibition of (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity or of the oxalate-stimulated Ca2+ uptake was observed in a pig smooth-muscle vesicle preparation enriched in endoplasmic reticulum. These results confirm the existence in smooth muscle of two different types of Ca2+-transport ATPase: a calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase located in the plasma membrane and a second one confined to the endoplasmic reticulum. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2950852

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  13. Calmodulin controls liver proliferation via interactions with C/EBPbeta-LAP and C/EBPbeta-LIP.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Daniel; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Gou-Li; Jin, Jingling; Iakova, Polina; Timchenko, Nikolai A

    2010-07-23

    A truncated isoform of C/EBPbeta, C/EBPbeta-LIP, is required for liver proliferation. This isoform is expressed at high levels in proliferating liver and in liver tumors. However, high levels of C/EBPbeta-LIP are also observed in non-proliferating livers during acute phase response (APR). In this paper we present mechanisms by which liver regulates activities of C/EBPbeta-LIP. We found that calmodulin (CaM) inhibits the ability of C/EBPbeta-LIP to promote liver proliferation during APR through direct interactions. This activity of CaM is under negative control of Ca(2+), which is reduced in nuclei of livers with APR, whereas it is increased in nuclei of proliferating livers. A mutant CaM, which does not interact with C/EBPbeta-LIP, also fails to inhibit the growth promotion activity of C/EBPbeta-LIP. Down-regulation of CaM in livers of LPS-treated mice causes liver proliferation via activation of C/EBPbeta-LIP. Overexpression of C/EBPbeta-LIP above levels of CaM also initiates liver proliferation in LPS-treated mice. In addition, CaM regulates transcriptional activity of another isoform of C/EBPbeta, C/EBPbeta-LAP, and might control liver biology through the regulation of both isoforms of C/EBPbeta. In searching for molecular mechanisms by which C/EBPbeta-LIP promotes cell proliferation, we found that C/EBPbeta-LIP releases E2F.Rb-dependent repression of cell cycle genes by a disruption of E2F1.Rb complexes and by a direct interaction with E2F-dependent promoters. CaM inhibits these growth promotion activities of C/EBPbeta-LIP and, therefore, supports liver quiescence. Thus, our findings discover a new pathway of the regulation of liver proliferation that involves calcium-CaM signaling. PMID:20498378

  14. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-06-15

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  15. Calmodulin activity regulates group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signal transduction and synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Ferzin; Zhang, Ming; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Klann, Eric; Autio, Dawn; Cox, Charles L; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), including mGluR1 and mGluR 5 (mGluR1/5), are coupled to Gq and modulate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Direct activation of mGluR1/5 causes protein translation-dependent long-term depression (LTD). Although it has been established that intracellular Ca(2+) and the Gq-regulated signaling molecules are required for mGluR1/5 LTD, whether and how Ca(2+) regulates Gq signaling and upregulation of protein expression remain unknown. Through pharmacological inhibition, we tested the function of the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin (CaM) in intracellular signaling triggered by the activation of mGluR1/5. CaM inhibitor N-[4-aminobutyl]-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W13) suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p70-S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in hippocampal neurons. W13 also blocked the mGluR1/5 agonist-induced synaptic depression in hippocampal slices and in anesthetized mice. Consistent with the function of CaM, inhibiting the downstream targets Ca(2+) /CaM-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) blocked ERK1/2 and S6K1 activation. Furthermore, disruption of the CaM-CaMK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated upregulation of Arc expression. Altogether, our data suggest CaM as a new Gq signaling component for coupling Ca(2+) and protein upregulation and regulating mGluR1/5-mediated synaptic modification. PMID:26864654

  16. Distinct Mechanisms of Calmodulin Binding and Regulation of Adenylyl Cyclases 1 and 8

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), by mediating the stimulation of the activity of two adenylyl cyclases (ACs), plays a key role in integrating the cAMP and Ca2+ signaling systems. These ACs, AC1 and AC8, by decoding discrete Ca2+ signals can contribute to fine-tuning intracellular cAMP dynamics, particularly in neurons where they predominate. CaM comprises an α-helical linker separating two globular regions at the N-terminus and the C-terminus that each bind two Ca2+ ions. These two lobes have differing affinities for Ca2+, and they can interact with target proteins independently. This study explores previous indications that the two lobes of CaM can regulate AC1 and AC8 differently and thereby yield different responses to cellular transitions in [Ca2+]i. We first compared by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays and offline nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry the interaction of CaM and Ca2+-binding deficient mutants of CaM with the internal CaM binding domain (CaMBD) of AC1 and the two terminal CaMBDs of AC8. We then examined the influence of these three CaMBDs on Ca2+ binding by native and mutated CaM in stopped-flow experiments to quantify their interactions. The three CaMBDs show quite distinct interactions with the two lobes of CaM. These findings establish the critical kinetic differences between the mechanisms of Ca2+-CaM activation of AC1 and AC8, which may underpin their different physiological roles. PMID:22971080

  17. Sequential changes in trace metal, metallothionein and calmodulin concentrations in healing skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A B; Sampson, B; Rowe, A

    1999-10-01

    Metalloenzymes have an important role in repair and regenerative processes in skin wounds. Demands for different enzymes vary according to the phase in the healing cascade and constituent events. Sequential changes in the concentrations of calcium, copper, magnesium and zinc were studied in the incisional wound model in the rat over a 10 d period. Copper levels remained low (< 10 microg/g dry weight) throughout, but calcium, magnesium and zinc increased from wounding and peaked at about 5 d at a time of high inflammation, granulation tissue formation and epidermal cell proliferation. Metal concentrations declined to normal by 7 d when inflammation had regressed, re-epithelialisation of the wound site was complete and the 'normalisation' phase had commenced. Although the wound was overtly healed by 10 d, the epidermis was still moderately hyperplastic. In view of competitive binding of trace metals at membrane receptors and carrier proteins, the ratios or balance between these trace metals was examined and the significance is discussed. Using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated increases in metallothionein immunoreactivity as an indication of zinc and copper activity in the papillary dermis and in basal epidermal cells near the wound margin 1-5 d after wounding. This is consistent with metalloenzyme requirements in inflammation and fibrogenesis. Calmodulin, a major cytosolic calcium binding protein was highest in maturing keratinocytes and in sebaceous gland cells of normal skin; it was notably more abundant in the epidermis near the wound margin and in re-epithelialising areas at a time when local calcium levels were highest. PMID:10580852

  18. A receptor-like kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Charpenteau, Martine; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ramirez, Bertha C; Tretyn, Andrzej; Ranjeva, Raoul; Ranty, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    Screening a cDNA expression library with a radiolabelled calmodulin (CaM) probe led to the isolation of AtCaMRLK, a receptor-like kinase (RLK) of Arabidopsis thaliana. AtCaMRLK polypeptide sequence shows a modular organization consisting of the four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: an amino terminal signal sequence, a domain containing seven leucine-rich repeats, a single putative membrane-spanning segment and a protein kinase domain. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide, we demonstrated that a region of 23 amino acids, located near the kinase domain of AtCaMRLK, binds CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Real-time binding experiments showed that AtCaMRLK interacted in vitro with AtCaM1, a canonical CaM, but not with AtCaM8, a divergent isoform of the Ca2+ sensor. The bacterially expressed kinase domain of the protein was able to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate the myelin basic protein, using Mn2+ preferentially to Mg2+ as an ion activator. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved lysine residue (Lys423) to alanine, in the kinase subdomain II, resulted in a complete loss of kinase activity. CaM had no influence on the autophosphorylation activity of AtCaMRLK. AtCaMRLK was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of A. thaliana, except in leaves. Disruption in the AtCaMRLK coding sequence by insertion of a DsG transposable element in an Arabidopsis mutant did not generate a discernible phenotype. The CaM-binding motif of AtCaMRLK was found to be conserved in several other members of the plant RLK family, suggesting a role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of RLK-mediated pathways. PMID:14720124

  19. Five Members of a Novel Ca2+-binding Protein (CABP) Subfamily with Similarity to Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Haeseleer, Françoise; Sokal, Izabela; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Pronin, Alexey N.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.; Fariss, Robert N.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Five members of a novel Ca2+-binding protein subfamily (CaBP), with 46–58% sequence similarity to calmodulin (CaM), were identified in the vertebrate retina. Important differences between these Ca2+-binding proteins and CaM include alterations within their second EF-hand loop that render these motifs inactive in Ca2+ coordination and the fact that their central α-helixes are extended by one α-helical turn. CaBP1 and CaBP2 contain a consensus sequence for N-terminal myristoylation, similar to members of the recoverin subfamily and are fatty acid acylated in vitro. The patterns of expression differ for each of the various members. Expression of CaBP5, for example, is restricted to retinal rod and cone bipolar cells. In contrast, CaBP1 has a more widespread pattern of expression. In the brain, CaBP1 is found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and in the retina this protein is found in cone bipolar and amacrine cells. CaBP1 and CaBP2 are expressed as multiple, alternatively spliced variants, and in heterologous expression systems these forms show different patterns of subcellular localization. In reconstitution assays, CaBPs are able to substitute functionally for CaM. These data suggest that these novel CaBPs are an important component of Ca2+-mediated cellular signal transduction in the central nervous system where they may augment or substitute for CaM. PMID:10625670

  20. Ca(2+)-Calmodulin regulation of testicular androgen production in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Martins, Rute S T; Fuentes, Juan; Almeida, Olinda; Power, Deborah M; Canario, Adelino V M

    2009-06-01

    The Ca(2+)-Calmodulin (CaM) signaling pathway has previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of teleost fish ovarian steroidogenesis. However, a putative role of CaM in testicular steroidogenesis and potential targets has not been examined. To examine whether basal steroidogenesis is modulated by Ca(2+) and CaM levels in the testis of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) we have incubated testicular fragments in vitro under different conditions and analyzed steroid output. Calcium-free medium with or without EGTA did not affect testicular basal 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and testosterone (T) secretion. However, addition of 80microM the CaM inhibitor W7 significantly reduced basal 11-KT, T and androstenedione secretion. Interestingly, the decreased androgen production by 80microM of W7 was accompanied by increased 11-desoxicortisol output and by the activation of cortisol synthesis in the testis, the latter undetected in untreated tissues. However, production of 17,20alpha-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one was unaltered by W7. This suggests that C17,20 desmolase, 21-hydroxylase and possibly 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase are targets for CaM. In addition, androgen production was also found to be regulated by the level of cAMP since incubations with forskolin (FK) significantly increased 11-KT and T output. A cross-talk between the cAMP and Ca(2+)-CaM signaling pathways was detected since W7 administration also decreased FK stimulated androgen production. Altogether, these data show that both basal and cAMP stimulated androgen levels were modulated by intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent CaM and that possibly Ca(2+)-CaM determines the shift in steroidogenesis from C21 steroids to androgens. PMID:19341736

  1. Cooperative phenomena in binding and activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, A; Krin, E; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Danchin, A; Glaser, P; Bârzu, O

    1993-01-25

    The catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase located within the first 400 amino acids of the protein can be cleaved by trypsin in two subdomains (T25 and T18) corresponding to ATP-(T25) and calmodulin (CaM)-(T18) binding sites. Reassociation of subdomains by CaM is a cooperative process, which is a unique case among CaM-activated enzymes. To understand better the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we used several approaches such as partial deletions of the adenylate cyclase gene, isolation of peptides of various size, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. We found that a stretch of 72 amino acid residues overlapping the carboxyl terminus of T25 and the amino terminus of T18 accounts for 90% of the binding energy of adenylate cyclase-CaM complex. The hydrophobic "side" of the helical region situated around Trp242 plays a major role in the interaction of adenylate cyclase with CaM, whereas basic residues that alternate with acidic residues in bacterial enzyme play a much less important role. The amino-terminal half of the catalytic domain of adenylate cyclase contributes only 10% to the binding energy of CaM, whereas the last 130 amino acid residues are not at all involved in binding. However, these segments of adenylate cyclase might affect protein/protein interaction and catalysis by propagating conformational changes to the CaM-binding sequence which is located in the middle of the catalytic domain of bacterial enzyme. PMID:8420945

  2. Calmodulin localization and its effects on endocytic and phagocytic membrane trafficking in Paramecium multimicronucleatum.

    PubMed

    Fok, Agnes K; Aihara, Marilynn S; Ishida, Masaki; Allen, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    In ciliates, calmodulin (CaM), as in other cells, has multiple functions, such as activation of regulatory enzymes and modulating calcium-dependent cellular processes. By immunogold localization, CaM is concentrated at multiple sites in Paramecium. It is seen scattered over the cytosol, but bound to its matrix, and is concentrated at the pores of the contractile vacuole complexes and with at least three microtubular arrays. It was localized peripheral to the nine-doublet microtubules of the ciliary axonemes. The most striking localization was on the akinetic side only of the cytopharyngeal microtubular ribbons opposite the side where the discoidal vesicles, acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles bind and move. CaM was also present at the periphery of the postoral microtubular bundles along which the early vacuole moves and was associated with the cytoproct microtubules that guide the spent digestive vacuoles to the cytoproct. It was not found on the membranes of, or in the interior of nuclei, mitochondria, phagosomes, and trichocysts, and was only sparsely scattered over the cytosolic sides of discoidal vesicles, acidosomes, lysosomes, and digestive vacuoles. Together the associations with specific microtubular arrays and the effects of trifluoperazine and calmidazolium indicate that CaM is involved (i) in vesicle transport to the cytopharynx area for vacuole formation and subsequent vacuole acidification, (ii) in early vacuole transport along the postoral fiber, and (iii) in transporting the spent vacuole to the cytoproct. Higher CaM concentrations subjacent to the cell's pellicle and close to the decorated tubules of the contractile vacuole complex may support a role for CaM in ion traffic. PMID:19120793

  3. Amphiphilic Residues 29-44 of DREAM N-Termini Mediate Calmodulin:DREAM Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Walter G; Arango, Andres S; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2015-07-21

    DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator) is a neuronal calcium sensor that has been shown to modulate gene expression as well as to be involved in numerous neuronal processes. In this report, we show that association of calcium-bound calmodulin (CaM) with DREAM is mediated by a short amphipathic amino acid sequence located between residues 29 and 44 on DREAM. The association of CaM with a peptide analogous to DREAM(29-44) or to full-length DREAM protein is calcium-dependent with a dissociation constant of 136 nM or 3.4 μM, respectively. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies show that the observed decrease in affinity for the native protein is due to electrostatic interactions between the basic N-terminus and an electronegative surface on DREAM. These results are further supported by circular dichroism, binding studies, and molecular dynamics simulations. Additionally, fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements show a rotational correlation time of 10.8 ns for a complex of CaM with a DREAM(29-44) peptide, supporting a wraparound semispherical model with 1:1 stoichiometry. Furthermore, the interaction between an IEDANS-labeled CaM construct with DREAM is best modeled as a heterotetramer that adopts an elongated conformation with a correlation time of 45 ns in the presence of Ca(2+). We also demonstrate that association of CaM with DREAM eliminates the nonspecific interaction of DREAM with the DRE double-stranded DNA sequence of the human prodynorphin gene. This work provides molecular insight into the CaM:DREAM complex and its potential role in modulation of gene expression. PMID:26108881

  4. Hsp90 Enhances Degradation of Oxidized Calmodulin by the 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, Jennifer E.; Xiong, Yijia; Rechsteiner, Martin C.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-10-29

    The 20S proteasome has been suggested to play a critical role in mediating the degradation of abnormal proteins under conditions of oxidative stress, and has been found in tight association with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. To elucidate the role of Hsp90 in promoting the degradation of oxidized calmodulin (CaMox), which accumulates in senescent brain during normal biological aging, we have purified the 20S proteasome free of Hsp90 from red blood cells and assessed its ability to recognize and degrade CaMox in the absence and presence of added Hsp90. The purified 20S proteasome does not degrade CaMox to any appreciable extent. However, following association with Hsp90, the 20S proteasome selectively degrades CaMox. This degradation is sensitive to both proteasome and Hsp90-specific inhibitors, and is further enhanced in the presence of 2 mM ATP. Irrespective of the presence of Hsp90 we find that unoxidized CaM is not significantly degraded. Furthermore, the ability of the proteasome to degrade commonly used fluorogenic peptides is not affected by Hsp90, indicating that there is no change in the accessibility of the catalytic core. Direct binding measurements demonstrate that Hsp90 selectively associates with CaMox; essentially no binding is observed between Hsp90 and unoxidized CaM. Since oxidation has previously been shown to induce both global conformational changes and a reduction in helical content of CaM, these results suggest that Hsp90 in association with the 20S proteasome selectively associates with partially unfolded proteins to promote their degradation by the proteasome.

  5. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  6. Selective nitration of Tyr99 in calmodulin as a marker of cellular conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Bartlett, Ryan K; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Williams, Todd D; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Squier, Thomas C

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr99 at physiological pH, resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 1.5. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr99 is readily nitrated by peroxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging peroxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of methionine and nitration of Tyr99 whose relative concentrations are determined by solution conditions. The sensitivity of Tyr99 in CaM to nitration suggests that CaM-dependent signaling pathways are sensitive to peroxynitrite formation and that nitration of CaM represents a cellular marker of peroxynitrite-induced changes in cellular function. PMID:12693036

  7. Biphasic Ca2+-dependent switching in a calmodulin-IQ domain complex†

    PubMed Central

    Black, D. J.; Leonard, Jared; Persechini, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the free Ca2+ concentration and the apparent dissociation constant for the complex between calmodulin (CaM) and the neuromodulin IQ domain consists of two phases. In the first phase Ca2+ bound to the C-ter EF hand pair in CaM increases the Kd for the complex from the Ca2+-free value of 2.3±0.1 μM to a value of 14.4±1.3 μM. In the second phase Ca2+ bound to the N-ter EF hand pair reduces the Kd for the complex to a value of 2.5±0.1 μM, reversing the effect of the first phase. Due to energy coupling effects associated with these phases the mean dissociation constant for Ca2+-binding to the C-ter EF hand pair is increased ~3-fold, from 1.8±0.1 to 5.1±0.7 μM, and the mean dissociation constant for Ca2+-binding to the N-ter EF hand pair is decreased by the same factor, from 11.2±1.0 to 3.5±0.6 μM. These characteristics produce a bell-shaped relationship between the apparent dissociation constant for the complex and the free Ca2+ concentration, with a distance of 5–6 μM between the midpoints of the rising and falling phases. Release of CaM from the neuromodulin IQ domain therefore appears to be promoted over a relatively narrow range of free Ca2+ concentrations. Our results demonstrate that CaM-IQ domain complexes can function as a biphasic Ca2+ switches through opposing effects of Ca2+ bound sequentially to the two EF hand pairs in CaM. PMID:16734434

  8. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  9. Intrinsically disordered caldesmon binds calmodulin via the “buttons on a string” mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Permyakov, Sergei E.; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    We show here that chicken gizzard caldesmon (CaD) and its C-terminal domain (residues 636–771, CaD136) are intrinsically disordered proteins. The computational and experimental analyses of the wild type CaD136 and series of its single tryptophan mutants (W674A, W707A, and W737A) and a double tryptophan mutant (W674A/W707A) suggested that although the interaction of CaD136 with calmodulin (CaM) can be driven by the non-specific electrostatic attraction between these oppositely charged molecules, the specificity of CaD136-CaM binding is likely to be determined by the specific packing of important CaD136 tryptophan residues at the CaD136-CaM interface. It is suggested that this interaction can be described as the “buttons on a charged string” model, where the electrostatic attraction between the intrinsically disordered CaD136 and the CaM is solidified in a “snapping buttons” manner by specific packing of the CaD136 “pliable buttons” (which are the short segments of fluctuating local structure condensed around the tryptophan residues) at the CaD136-CaM interface. Our data also show that all three “buttons” are important for binding, since mutation of any of the tryptophans affects CaD136-CaM binding and since CaD136 remains CaM-buttoned even when two of the three tryptophans are mutated to alanines. PMID:26417545

  10. Calmodulin and STIM proteins: Two major calcium sensors in the cytoplasm and endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher B; Nishikawa, Tadateru; Osawa, Masanori; Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-04-24

    The calcium (Ca(2+)) ion is a universal signalling messenger which plays vital physiological roles in all eukaryotes. To decode highly regulated intracellular Ca(2+) signals, cells have evolved a number of sensor proteins that are ideally adapted to respond to a specific range of Ca(2+) levels. Among many such proteins, calmodulin (CaM) is a multi-functional cytoplasmic Ca(2+) sensor with a remarkable ability to interact with and regulate a plethora of structurally diverse target proteins. CaM achieves this 'multi-talented' functionality through two EF-hand domains, each with an independent capacity to bind targets, and an adaptable flexible linker. By contrast, stromal interaction molecule-1 and -2 (STIMs) have evolved for a specific role in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensing using EF-hand machinery analogous to CaM; however, whereas CaM structurally adjusts to dissimilar binding partners, STIMs use the EF-hand machinery to self-regulate the stability of the Ca(2+) sensing domain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction by CaM and STIMs have revealed a remarkable repertoire of actions and underscore the flexibility of nature in molecular evolution and adaption to discrete Ca(2+) levels. Recent genomic sequencing efforts have uncovered a number of disease-associated mutations in both CaM and STIM1. This article aims to highlight the most recent key structural and functional findings in the CaM and STIM fields, and discusses how these two Ca(2+) sensor proteins execute their biological functions. PMID:25998729

  11. Rapid Method for Quantifying the Extent of Methionine Oxidation in Intact Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Esch, S Wynn; Williams, Todd D.; Markillie, Lye MENG.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly quantifying the extent to which the functionally important Met144 and Met145 residues near the C-terminus of calmodulin (CaM) are converted to the corresponding sulfoxides, Met(O). The method utilizes a whole protein collision induced dissociation (CID) approach on an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. Using standards of CaM oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-), we demonstrated that CID fragmentation of the protein ions resulted in a series of C-terminal singly charged y1?y15 ions. Fragments larger than y4 exhibited mass shifts of +16 or +32 Da, corresponding to oxidation of one or two methionines, respectively. To assess the extent of oxidative modification for Met144 and Met145 to Met(O), we averaged the ratio of intensities for yn, yn +16, and yn +32 ions, where n = 6?9. By alternating MS and CID scans at low and high collision energies, this technique allowed us to rapidly determine both the distribution of intact CaM oxiforms and the extent of oxidative modification in the C-terminal region of the protein in a single run. We have applied the method to studies of the repair of fully oxidized CaM by methionine sulfoxide reductases (MsrA and MsrB), which normally function in concert to reduce the S and R stereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide. We found that repair of Met(O)144 and Met(O)145 did not go to completion, but was more efficient than average Met repair. Absence of complete repair is consistent with previous studies showing that accumulation of methionine sulfoxide in CaM can occur during aging.

  12. Structure, expression, and functional analysis of the gene coding for calmodulin in the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Simão, R C; Gomes, S L

    2001-04-01

    The single calmodulin (CaM) gene and the corresponding cDNA of the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii were isolated and characterized. The CaM gene is interrupted by three introns and transcribed in a single 0.7-kb mRNA species encoding a predicted protein 91% identical to human CaM. B. emersonii CaM has been expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with gluthatione S-transferase (GST) and purified by affinity chromatography and cleavage from the GST portion using a site-specific protease. In the presence of Ca(2+), B. emersonii CaM exhibited a shift in apparent molecular mass similar to that observed with bovine CaM and was able to activate the autophosphorylation of CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) from rat brain. CaM expression is developmentally regulated in B. emersonii, with CaM mRNA and protein concentrations increasing during sporulation to maximum levels observed just prior to the release of the zoospores into the medium. Both CaM protein and mRNA levels decrease drastically at the zoospore stage, increasing again during germination. The CaM antagonists compound 48/80, calmidazolium, and W7 were shown to completely inhibit B. emersonii sporulation when added to the cultures at least 120, 150, and 180 min after induction, respectively. All these drugs also inhibited growth and zoospore production in this fungus. The Ca(2+) channel blocker TMB-8 and the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 completely inhibited sporulation if added up to 60 min after induction of this stage, but only KN93 affected fungal growth. The data presented suggest that the Ca(2+)-CaM complex and CaMKII play an important role during growth and sporulation in B. emersonii. PMID:11244068

  13. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe; Ranty, Benoit

    2010-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants. PMID:20627089

  14. Abiotic stress responses in plants: roles of calmodulin-regulated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Amardeep S.; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular changes in calcium ions (Ca2+) in response to different biotic and abiotic stimuli are detected by various sensor proteins in the plant cell. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most extensively studied Ca2+-sensing proteins and has been shown to be involved in transduction of Ca2+ signals. After interacting with Ca2+, CaM undergoes conformational change and influences the activities of a diverse range of CaM-binding proteins. A number of CaM-binding proteins have also been implicated in stress responses in plants, highlighting the central role played by CaM in adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Stress adaptation in plants is a highly complex and multigenic response. Identification and characterization of CaM-modulated proteins in relation to different abiotic stresses could, therefore, prove to be essential for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Various studies have revealed involvement of CaM in regulation of metal ions uptake, generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of transcription factors such as CAMTA3, GTL1, and WRKY39. Activities of several kinases and phosphatases have also been shown to be modulated by CaM, thus providing further versatility to stress-associated signal transduction pathways. The results obtained from contemporary studies are consistent with the proposed role of CaM as an integrator of different stress signaling pathways, which allows plants to maintain homeostasis between different cellular processes. In this review, we have attempted to present the current state of understanding of the role of CaM in modulating different stress-regulated proteins and its implications in augmenting abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26528296

  15. Designing Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Shift Populations of the Conformational States of Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Ayse Ozlem; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2013-01-01

    We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM). We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength. PMID:24339763

  16. Molecular evolution of the multiple calmodulin-like cal genes in C. elegans and in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Karabinos, Anton

    2016-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major EF hand containing intracellular calcium receptor in animals and plants; however, eukaryotes also express a number of related CaM-like proteins. We have previously characterized an embryonic phenotype of the single Caenorhabditis elegans CaM gene cmd-1, reported no visible RNAi phenotype for the four related cal-1 to cal-4 genes and started tissue-specific expression analyses of these proteins. In the present study, we analyzed evolutionary aspects of the previously reported CAL-1 to CAL-4 proteins, along with the four new CAL-5 to CAL-8 sequences retrieved from the worm database. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that all C. elegans CAL proteins arose from a CaM ancestor through repeated gene duplications, fusions and sequence divergence. The same holds, also, for the variable N-terminal extensions of the CAL-1 to CAL-4 proteins, which have evolved from the CaM-like core domain. We found 97 CAL homologs in different nematode clades and also detected two CAL-7-related sequences outside the nematodes. Moreover, the C. elegans-specific cal-6 gene, representing the most CaM-related sequence found in nematodes so far, harbours many deletions, insertions and sequence substitutions and is predicted, therefore, to be non-functional. These analyses provide an insight into a complex and dynamic origin of the multiple CAL genes in C. elegans and in nematodes and represent also a basis for further functional studies of these CaM-related sequences in nematodes. PMID:27558386

  17. Regulation of K-Ras4B Membrane Binding by Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Benjamin; Kapoor, Shobhna; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Weise, Katrin

    2016-07-12

    K-Ras4B is a membrane-bound small GTPase with a prominent role in cancer development. It contains a polybasic farnesylated C-terminus that is required for the correct localization and clustering of K-Ras4B in distinct membrane domains. PDEδ and the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) are known to function as potential binding partners for farnesylated Ras proteins. However, they differ in the number of interaction sites with K-Ras4B, leading to different modes of interaction, and thus affect the subcellular distribution of K-Ras4B in different ways. Although it is clear that Ca(2+)-bound CaM can play a role in the dynamic spatial cycle of K-Ras4B in the cell, the exact molecular mechanism is only partially understood. In this biophysical study, we investigated the effect of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of GDP- and GTP-loaded K-Ras4B with heterogeneous model biomembranes by using a combination of different spectroscopic and imaging techniques. The results show that Ca(2+)/CaM is able to extract K-Ras4B from negatively charged membranes in a nucleotide-independent manner. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the complex of Ca(2+)/CaM and K-Ras4B is stable in the presence of anionic membranes and shows no membrane binding. Finally, the influence of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of K-Ras4B with membranes is compared with that of PDEδ, which was investigated in a previous study. Although both CaM and PDEδ exhibit a hydrophobic binding pocket for farnesyl, they have different effects on membrane binding of K-Ras4B and hence should be capable of regulating K-Ras4B plasma membrane localization in the cell. PMID:27410739

  18. Dissociation of Calmodulin-Target Peptide Complexes by the Lipid Mediator Sphingosylphosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Previously we have identified the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) as the first potentially endogenous inhibitor of the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) (Kovacs, E., and Liliom, K. (2008) Biochem. J. 410, 427–437). Here we give mechanistic insight into CaM inhibition by SPC, based on fluorescence stopped-flow studies with the model CaM-binding domain melittin. We demonstrate that both the peptide and SPC micelles bind to CaM in a rapid and reversible manner with comparable affinities. Furthermore, we present kinetic evidence that both species compete for the same target site on CaM, and thus SPC can be considered as a competitive inhibitor of CaM-target peptide interactions. We also show that SPC disrupts the complex of CaM and the CaM-binding domain of ryanodine receptor type 1, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1, and the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump. By interfering with these interactions, thus inhibiting the negative feedback that CaM has on Ca2+ signaling, we hypothesize that SPC could lead to Ca2+ mobilization in vivo. Hence, we suggest that the action of the sphingolipid on CaM might explain the previously recognized phenomenon that SPC liberates Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Moreover, we demonstrate that unlike traditional synthetic CaM inhibitors, SPC disrupts the complex between not only the Ca2+-saturated but also the apo form of the protein and the target peptide, suggesting a completely novel regulation for target proteins that constitutively bind CaM, such as ryanodine receptors. PMID:19910470

  19. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  20. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  1. Early Expression of the Calmodulin Gene, Which Precedes Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe grisea, Is Inhibited by Self-Inhibitors and Requires Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Mei; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    1999-01-01

    Fungal conidia contain chemicals that inhibit germination and appressorium formation until they are well dispersed in a favorable environment. Recently, such self-inhibitors were found to be present on the conidia of Magnaporthe grisea, and plant surface waxes were found to relieve this self-inhibition. To determine whether the self-inhibitors suppress the expression of early genes involved in the germination and differentiation of conidia, the calmodulin gene was chosen as a representative early gene, because it was found to be expressed early in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum trifolii differentiation. After calmodulin cDNA and genomic DNA from M. grisea were cloned, the promoter of the calmodulin gene was fused to a reporter gene, that for green fluorescent protein (GFP), and transformed into the M. grisea genome. Confocal microscopic examination and quantitation of expression of GFP green fluorescence showed (i) that the expression of the calmodulin gene decreased significantly when self-inhibition of M. grisea appressorium formation occurred because of high conidial density or addition of exogenous self-inhibitors and (ii) that the expression level of this gene was restored when self-inhibition was relieved by the addition of plant surface waxes. The increase in fluorescence correlated with the percentage of conidia that formed appressoria. The induction of calmodulin was also confirmed by RNA blotting. Concanavalin A inhibited surface attachment of conidia, GFP expression, and appressorium formation without affecting germination. The high correlation between GFP expression and appressorium formation strongly suggests that calmodulin gene expression and appressorium formation require surface attachment. PMID:10348871

  2. The toxic effects of Bisphenol A on the mouse spermatocyte GC-2 cell line: the role of the Ca2+-calmodulin-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II axis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Zhu, Jingying; Mao, Changfei; Wang, Qiang; Huan, Fei; Cheng, Jie; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), is known to induce male reproductive toxicity in rodents. However, its toxic effects on the germ cells are still poorly understood. It has been proposed that Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) sensors, including calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate whether a perturbation in Ca(2+)-CaM-CaMKII signaling was involved in the BPA-induced injury to mouse spermatocyte GC-2spd (ts) (GC-2) cells. Our results showed that BPA (range from 0.2 to 20 μM) induced obvious GC-2 cell injury, including decreased cell viability, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. However, these processes could be partially abrogated by pretreatment with a Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA/AM), a CaM antagonist (W7) or a CaMKII inhibitor (KN93). These results, taken together, indicate that BPA exposure contributes to male germ cell injury, which may be partially mediated through a perturbation in Ca(2+)/CaM/CaMKII signaling and the mitochondrial apoptotic process. PMID:26096086

  3. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO–cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO–cGMP and cAMP–PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors. PMID:24741108

  4. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    SciTech Connect

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  5. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  6. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-12-31

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca{sup ++} as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca{sup ++}/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  7. Ca2+/calmodulin regulates Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation of voltage-gated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Sandip M.; Sahoo, Nirakar; Dennhardt, Sophie; Schönherr, Roland; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2015-01-01

    A-type K+ channels open on membrane depolarization and undergo subsequent rapid inactivation such that they are ideally suited for fine-tuning the electrical signaling in neurons and muscle cells. Channel inactivation mostly follows the so-called ball-and-chain mechanism, in which the N-terminal structures of either the K+ channel’s α or β subunits occlude the channel pore entry facing the cytosol. Inactivation of Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 channels induced by Kvβ1.1 subunits is profoundly decelerated in response to a rise in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus making the affected channel complexes negative feedback regulators to limit neuronal overexcitation. With electrophysiological and biochemical experiments we show that the Ca2+ dependence is gained by binding of calmodulin to the “chain” segment of Kvβ1.1 thereby compromising the mobility of the inactivation particle. Furthermore, inactivation regulation via Ca2+/calmodulin does not interfere with the β subunit’s enzymatic activity as an NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase, thus rendering the Kvβ1.1 subunit a multifunctional receptor that integrates cytosolic signals to be transduced to altered electrical cellular activity. PMID:26487174

  8. Measurement of the cytotoxic effects of different strains of Mycoplasma equigenitalium on the equine uterine tube using a calmodulin assay.

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, V M; Miller, R B; Rosendal, S; Fernando, M A; Johnson, W H; O'Brien, P J

    1992-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced by five strains of Mycoplasma equigenitalium for cells of equine uterine tube explants were tested by measuring changes in cellular and extracellular concentrations of calmodulin (CaM). Calmodulin concentrations in samples of total homogenate (TH) and total homogenate supernates (THS) of the infected equine uterine tube explants were significantly lower than respective measurements on noninfected controls. In tissue culture medium fractions (TCM) of some infected explants, CaM concentrations were significantly higher than noninfected controls (p > 0.95). The results suggest that M. equigenitalium colonization on ciliated cells of the equine uterine tube can affect the permeability of the cell membrane leading to leakage or release of CaM during cell breakdown. Measurement of CaM concentrations in samples of TH revealed significant differences in the cytotoxic effects induced by different strains of M. equigenitalium on the equine uterine tube (EUT). The data suggests that some strains of M. equigenitalium may have a role in reproductive failure in the mare. In addition comparisons of the means of the concentrations of CaM in samples of TH or THS in EUT explants from four mares in the follicular and four in the luteal phase of the estrous cycle were found to be not significantly different. PMID:1477802

  9. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  10. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia; however its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine- induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (−/−), heterozygote (+/−), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot- plate latency in CaMKIV (+/−) and (−/−) mice after acute nicotine treatment, while no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception. PMID:24196027

  11. Yeast has homologs (CNA1 and CNA2 gene products) of mammalian calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Kunisawa, R; Kaim, D; Thorner, J

    1991-01-01

    Calcineurin, or phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase. We isolated a gene encoding a yeast PP2B homolog (CNA1) by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11, first with 125I-labeled yeast calmodulin and then with a human cDNA encoding the catalytic (or A) subunit of calcineurin. The predicted CNA1 gene product is 54% identical to its mammalian counterpart. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with oligonucleotide primers based on sequences conserved between CNA1 and mammalian PP2B genes, we isolated a second gene, CNA2. CNA2 is identical to PP2Bw, a partial cDNA clone previously described by others as originating from rabbit brain tissue. Our findings demonstrate that a unicellular eukaryote contains phosphoprotein phosphatases of the 2B class. Haploid cells containing a single cna1 or cna2 null mutation, or both mutations, were viable. MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants were more sensitive than wild-type cells or either single mutant to growth arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha factor and failed to resume growth during continuous exposure to alpha factor. Thus, calcineurin action antagonizes the mating-pheromone response pathway. Images PMID:1651503

  12. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin negatively regulates EGF receptor signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Calcineurin is a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated, Ser-Thr protein phosphatase that is essential for the translation of Ca(2+) signals into changes in cell function and development. We carried out a dominant modifier screen in the Drosophila eye using an activated form of the catalytic subunit to identify new targets, regulators, and functions of calcineurin. An examination of 70,000 mutagenized flies yielded nine specific complementation groups, four that enhanced and five that suppressed the activated calcineurin phenotype. The gene canB2, which encodes the essential regulatory subunit of calcineurin, was identified as a suppressor group, demonstrating that the screen was capable of identifying genes relevant to calcineurin function. We demonstrated that a second suppressor group was sprouty, a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Wing and eye phenotypes of ectopic activated calcineurin and genetic interactions with components of signaling pathways suggested a role for calcineurin in repressing Egf receptor/Ras signal transduction. On the basis of our results, we propose that calcineurin, upon activation by Ca(2+)-calmodulin, cooperates with other factors to negatively regulate Egf receptor signaling at the level of sprouty and the GTPase-activating protein Gap1. PMID:12019233

  13. Negative regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases: physiological and pharmacological significance of protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, A; Sueyoshi, N; Shigeri, Y; Kameshita, I

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) play pivotal roles in intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways. There is growing evidence that CaMKs are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various human diseases. In this review, we begin by briefly summarizing our knowledge of the involvement of CaMKs in the pathogenesis of various diseases suggested to be caused by the dysfunction/dysregulation or aberrant expression of CaMKs. It is widely known that the activities of CaMKs are strictly regulated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of specific phosphorylation sites. Since phosphorylation status is balanced by protein kinases and protein phosphatases, the mechanism of dephosphorylation/deactivation of CaMKs, corresponding to their ‘switching off', is extremely important, as is the mechanism of phosphorylation/activation corresponding to their ‘switching on'. Therefore, we focus on the regulation of multifunctional CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We summarize the current understanding of negative regulation of CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We also discuss the biochemical properties and physiological significance of a protein phosphatase that we designated as Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP), and those of its homologue CaMKP-N. Pharmacological applications of CaMKP inhibitors are also discussed. These compounds may be useful not only for exploring the physiological functions of CaMKP/CaMKP-N, but also as novel chemotherapies for various diseases. PMID:18454172

  14. Isolation and characterization of Dictyostelium thymidine kinase 1 as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Wagler, Stephanie; Myre, Michael A

    2005-06-17

    Probing of a cDNA expression library from multicellular development of Dictyostelium discoideum using a recombinant radiolabelled calmodulin probe (35S-VU1-CaM) led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 951 bp encoding a 227aa polypeptide (25.5 kDa). Sequence comparisons led to highly significant matches with cytosolic thymidine kinases (TK1; EC 2.7.1.21) from a diverse number of species including humans (7e-56; 59% Identities; 75% Positives) indicating that the encoded protein is D. discoideum TK1 (DdTK1; ThyB). DdTK1 has not been previously characterized in this organism. In keeping with its sequence similarity with DdTK1, antibodies against humanTK1 recognize DdTK1, which is expressed during growth but decreases in amount after starvation. A CaM-binding domain (CaMBD; 20GKTTELIRRIKRFNFANKKC30) was identified and wild type DdTK1 plus two constructs (DdTK deltaC36, DdTK deltaC75) possessing the domain were shown to bind CaM in vitro but only in the presence of calcium while a construct (DdTK deltaN72) lacking the region failed to bind to CaM. Thus, DdTK1 is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP. Sequence alignments against TK1 from vertebrates to viruses show that CaM-binding region is highly conserved. The identified CaMBD overlaps the ATP-binding (P-loop) domain suggesting CaM might affect the activity of this kinase. Recombinant DdTK is enzymatically active and showed stimulation by CaM (113+/-0.5%) an in vitro enhancement that was prevented by co-addition of the CaM antagonists W7 (91.2+/-0.8%) and W13 (96.6+/-0.6%). The discovery that TK1 from D. discoideum, and possibly other species including humans and a large number of human viruses, is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP opens up new avenues for research on this medically relevant protein. PMID:15883042

  15. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Jun; Hu, Yaopeng; Mori, Yasuo; Ito, Yushi; Inoue, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells by a muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh; 100 μm) was strongly attenuated by a CaMKII-specific peptide, autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP; 10 μm). TRPC6/C7 chimera experiments showed that the TRPC6 C-terminal sequence is indispensable for ICCh to be sensitive to AIP-induced CaMKII inhibition. Further, deletion of a distal region (Gln855–Glu877) of the C-terminal CaM/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor binding domain (CIRB) of TRPC6 was sufficient to abolish ICCh. Systematic alanine scanning for potential CaMKII phosphorylation sites revealed that Thr487 was solely responsible for the activation of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction of endogenous TRPC6-like current induced by Arg8-vasopressin in A7r5 aortic myocytes. Based on these results, we propose that the optimal spatial arrangement of a C-terminal domain (presumably the distal CIRB region) around a single CaMKII phosphorylation site Thr487 may be essential for CaMKII-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channels. This mechanism may be of physiological significance in a native environment such as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID

  16. Genome-wide identification and functional analyses of calmodulin genes in Solanaceous species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calmodulin (CaM) is a major calcium sensor in all eukaryotes. It binds calcium and modulates the activity of a wide range of downstream proteins in response to calcium signals. However, little is known about the CaM gene family in Solanaceous species, including the economically important species, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the gene silencing model plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the potential function of CaM in plant disease resistance remains largely unclear. Results We performed genome-wide identification of CaM gene families in Solanaceous species. Employing bioinformatics approaches, multiple full-length CaM genes were identified from tomato, N. benthamiana and potato (S. tuberosum) genomes, with tomato having 6 CaM genes, N. benthamiana having 7 CaM genes, and potato having 4 CaM genes. Sequence comparison analyses showed that three tomato genes, SlCaM3/4/5, two potato genes StCaM2/3, and two sets of N. benthamiana genes, NbCaM1/2/3/4 and NbCaM5/6, encode identical CaM proteins, yet the genes contain different intron/exon organization and are located on different chromosomes. Further sequence comparisons and gene structural and phylogenetic analyses reveal that Solanaceous species gained a new group of CaM genes during evolution. These new CaM genes are unusual in that they contain three introns in contrast to only a single intron typical of known CaM genes in plants. The tomato CaM (SlCaM) genes were found to be expressed in all organs. Prediction of cis-acting elements in 5' upstream sequences and expression analyses demonstrated that SlCaM genes have potential to be highly responsive to a variety of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Additionally, silencing of SlCaM2 and SlCaM6 altered expression of a set of signaling and defense-related genes and resulted in significantly lower resistance to Tobacco rattle virus and the oomycete pathogen, Pythium aphanidermatum. Conclusions The CaM gene families in the Solanaceous species tomato, N

  17. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bliss J.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F.; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas–mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209–239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251–288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD–CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  18. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bliss J; Samal, Alexandra B; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E; Saad, Jamil S

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas-mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209-239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251-288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD-CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling pathway

  19. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants having domain-specific effects on the regulation of ion channels.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Shea, Madeline A

    2006-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential, eukaryotic protein comprised of two highly homologous domains (N and C). CaM binds four calcium ions cooperatively, regulating a wide array of target proteins. A genetic screen of Paramecia by Kung [Kung, C. et al. (1992) Cell Calcium 13, 413-425] demonstrated that the domains of CaM have separable physiological roles: "under-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent sodium currents mapped to the N-domain, while "over-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent potassium currents localized to the C-domain of CaM. To determine whether and how these mutations affected intrinsic calcium-binding properties of CaM domains, phenylalanine fluorescence was used to monitor calcium binding to sites I and II (N-domain) and tyrosine fluorescence was used to monitor sites III and IV (C-domain). To explore interdomain interactions, binding properties of each full-length mutant were compared to those of its corresponding domain fragments. The calcium-binding properties of six under-reactive mutants (V35I/D50N, G40E, G40E/D50N, D50G, E54K, and G59S) and one over-reactive mutant (M145V) were indistinguishable from those of wild-type CaM, despite their deleterious physiological effects on ion-channel regulation. Four over-reactive mutants (D95G, S101F, E104K, and H135R) significantly decreased the calcium affinity of the C-domain. Of these, one (E104K) also increased the calcium affinity of the N-domain, demonstrating that the magnitude and direction of wild-type interdomain coupling had been perturbed. This suggests that, while some of these mutations alter calcium-binding directly, others probably alter CaM-channel association or calcium-triggered conformational change in the context of a ternary complex with the affected ion channel. PMID:17128970

  20. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  1. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L; Sheffield, Val C; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  2. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L.; Sheffield, Val C.; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  3. Dynamics of nitric oxide synthase-calmodulin interactions at physiological calcium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Michael; Guillemette, J Guy; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2015-03-24

    The intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration is an important regulator of many cellular functions. The small acidic protein calmodulin (CaM) serves as a Ca²⁺ sensor and control element for many enzymes. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is one of the proteins that is activated by CaM and plays a major role in a number of key physiological and pathological processes. Previous studies have shown CaM to act like a switch that causes a conformational change in NOS to allow for the electron transfer between the reductase and oxygenase domains through a process that is thought to be highly dynamic. We have analyzed the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by peptides based on inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) with CaM at Ca²⁺ concentrations that mimic the physiological basal (17 and 100 nM) and elevated levels (225 nM) found in mammalian cells using fluorescence techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results show the CaM-NOS complexes have similar structures at physiological and fully saturated Ca²⁺ levels; however, their dynamics are remarkably different. At 225 nM Ca²⁺, the CaM-NOS complexes show overall an increase in backbone dynamics, when compared to the dynamics of the complexes at saturating Ca²⁺ concentrations. Specifically, the N-lobe of CaM in the CaM-iNOS complex displays a lower internal mobility (higher S²) and higher exchange protection compared to those of the CaM-eNOS complex. In contrast, the C-lobe of CaM in the CaM-eNOS complex is less dynamic. These results illustrate that structures of CaM-NOS complexes determined at saturated Ca²⁺ concentrations cannot provide a complete picture because the differences in intramolecular dynamics become visible only at physiological Ca²⁺ levels. PMID:25751535

  4. Interactions of calmodulin with death-associated protein kinase peptides: experimental and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof; Kursula, Petri

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and three target peptides from the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) protein family using both experimental and modeling methods, aimed at determining the details of the underlying biological regulation mechanisms. Experimentally, calorimetric binding free energies were determined for the complexes of CaM with peptides representing the DAPK2 wild-type and S308D mutant, as well as DAPK1. The observed affinity of CaM was very similar for all three studied peptides. The DAPK2 and DAPK1 peptides differ significantly in sequence and total charge, while the DAPK2 S308D mutant is designed to model the effects of DAPK2 Ser308 phosphorylation. The crystal structure of the CaM-DAPK2 S308D mutant peptide is also reported. The structures of CaM-DAPK peptide complexes present a mode of CaM-kinase interaction, in which bulky hydrophobic residues at positions 10 and 14 are both bound to the same hydrophobic cleft. To explain the microscopic effects underlying these interactions, we performed free energy calculations based on the approximate MM-PBSA approach. For these highly charged systems, standard MM-PBSA calculations did not yield satisfactory results. We proposed a rational modification of the approach which led to reasonable predictions of binding free energies. All three complexes are strongly stabilized by two effects: electrostatic interactions and buried surface area. The strong favorable interactions are to a large part compensated by unfavorable entropic terms, in which vibrational entropy is the largest contributor. The electrostatic component of the binding free energy followed the trend of the overall peptide charge, with strongest interactions for DAPK1 and weakest for the DAPK2 mutant. The electrostatics was dominated by interactions of the positively charged residues of the peptide with the negatively charged residues of CaM. The nonpolar binding free energy was comparable for all three peptides, the

  5. Calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and electron transfer by inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Gribovskaja, Irena; Brownlow, Kaleb C; Dennis, Sam J; Rosko, Andrew J; Marletta, Michael A; Stevens-Truss, Regina

    2005-05-24

    Like that of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the binding of Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin (CaM) also regulates the activity of the inducible isoform (iNOS). However, the role of each of the four Ca(2+)-binding sites of CaM in the activity of iNOS is unclear. Using a series of single-point mutants of Drosophila melanogaster CaM, the effect that mutating each of the Ca(2+)-binding sites plays in the transfer of electrons within iNOS has been examined. The same Glu (E) to Gln (Q) mutant series of CaM used previously [Stevens-Truss, R., Beckingham, K., and Marletta, M. A. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 12337-12345] to study the role of the Ca(2+)-binding sites in the activity of nNOS was used for these studies. We demonstrate here that activity of iNOS is dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to sites II (B2Q) and III (B3Q) of CaM. Nitric oxide ((*)NO) producing activity (as measured using the hemoglobin assay) of iNOS bound to the B2Q and B3Q CaMs was found to be 41 and 43% of the wild-type activity, respectively. The site I (B1Q) and site IV (B4Q) CaM mutants only minimally affected (*)NO production (95 and 90% of wild-type activity, respectively). These results suggest that NOS isoforms, although all possessing a prototypical CaM binding sequence and requiring CaM for activity, interact with CaM differently. Moreover, iNOS activation by CaM, like nNOS, is not dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to all four Ca(2+)-binding sites, but has specific and distinct requirements. This novel information, in addition to helping us understand NOS, should aid in our understanding of CaM target activation. PMID:15896003

  6. The effects of mercuric chloride on calmodulin-mediated Ca sup 2+ transport in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, G.G.; Oelsner, D.; Anderson, C.R.; Pearce, C.J.; Wallin, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) inhibits in vitro vasopressin release from the isolated rat neurohypophysis with maximum inhibition occurring with 0.5 mM HgCl2. Associated with the inhibition of hormone release is an increase in 45Ca+2 uptake, an increase in cytosolic 45Ca+2, and a reduction of 45Ca+2 accumulation by mitochondria in the intact gland. In the present series of studies, the effect of HgCl2 on calmodulin (CM) function in neural tissue preparations is reported. Mercuric chloride (0.5 mM) reduced 45Ca+2 binding to CM purified from bovine neurohypophyses by 20% and inhibited endogenous CM-stimulated Ca,Mg-ATPase activity from rat brain mitochondria in a dose-dependent fashion. Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by 50 and 80% with 0.5 and 5.0 mM HgCl2, respectively. CM-stimulation of Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by calmidazolium (CMZ) with maximal inhibition seen with 0.1 mM CMZ. Reversibility of the HgCl2 interaction with CM was demonstrated using CM-stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDEase) activity from rat brain. HgCl2 inhibited both basal and CM-stimulated PDEase activity in a dose-dependent manner with maximum inhibition occurring with 1.0 mM HgCl2. Preexposure of CM to an inhibitory concentration (1.0 mM) of HgCl2 resulted in no loss of stimulatory PDEase enzyme activity. From these results, we conclude that HgCl2 reversibly interferes with 45Ca+2 binding to CM and also inhibits CM-regulated Ca+2 pumping enzyme systems in the neurohypophysis. The inhibition of vasopressin release from the intact gland in the presence of HgCl2 thus, may be associated with a disruption of calcium in the neurohypophysis.

  7. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    The use of (35)S-labeled calmodulin (CaM) to screen a corn root cDNA expression library has led to the isolation of a CaM-binding protein, encoded by a cDNA with sequence similarity to small auxin up RNAs (SAURs), a class of early auxin-responsive genes. The cDNA designated as ZmSAUR1 (Zea mays SAURs) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by CaM affinity chromatography. The CaM binding assay revealed that the recombinant protein binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion analysis revealed that the CaM binding site was located at the NH(2)-terminal domain. A synthetic peptide of amino acids 20-45, corresponding to the potential CaM binding region, was used for calcium-dependent mobility shift assays. The synthetic peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of calcium. The CaM affinity assay indicated that ZmSAUR1 binds to CaM with high affinity (K(d) approximately 15 nM) in a calcium-dependent manner. Comparison of the NH(2)-terminal portions of all of the characterized SAURs revealed that they all contain a stretch of the basic alpha-amphiphilic helix similar to the CaM binding region of ZmSAUR1. CaM binds to the two synthetic peptides from the NH(2)-terminal regions of Arabidopsis SAUR-AC1 and soybean 10A5, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon for all SAURs. Northern analysis was carried out using the total RNA isolated from auxin-treated corn coleoptile segments. ZmSAUR1 gene expression began within 10 min, increased rapidly between 10 and 60 min, and peaked around 60 min after 10 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid treatment. These results indicate that ZmSAUR1 is an early auxin-responsive gene. The CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride inhibited the auxin-induced cell elongation but not the auxin-induced expression of ZmSAUR1. This suggests that calcium/CaM do not regulate ZmSAUR1 at the transcriptional level. CaM binding to ZmSAUR1 in a calcium

  8. Roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in long-term memory formation in crickets.

    PubMed

    Mizunami, Makoto; Nemoto, Yuko; Terao, Kanta; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Yukihisa

    2014-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key molecule in many systems of learning and memory in vertebrates, but roles of CaMKII in invertebrates have not been characterized in detail. We have suggested that serial activation of NO/cGMP signaling, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, Ca(2+)/CaM and cAMP signaling participates in long-term memory (LTM) formation in olfactory conditioning in crickets, and here we show participation of CaMKII in LTM formation and propose its site of action in the biochemical cascades. Crickets subjected to 3-trial conditioning to associate an odor with reward exhibited memory that lasts for a few days, which is characterized as protein synthesis-dependent LTM. In contrast, animals subjected to 1-trial conditioning exhibited memory that lasts for only several hours (mid-term memory, MTM). Injection of a CaMKII inhibitor prior to 3-trial conditioning impaired 1-day memory retention but not 1-hour memory retention, suggesting that CaMKII participates in LTM formation but not in MTM formation. Animals injected with a cGMP analogue, calcium ionophore or cAMP analogue prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention, and co-injection of a CaMKII inhibitor impaired induction of LTM by the cGMP analogue or that by the calcium ionophore but not that by the cAMP analogue, suggesting that CaMKII is downstream of cGMP production and Ca(2+) influx and upstream of cAMP production in biochemical cascades for LTM formation. Animals injected with an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention. Interestingly, a CaMKII inhibitor impaired LTM induction by the AC activator, although AC is expected to be a downstream target of CaMKII. The results suggest that CaMKII interacts with AC to facilitate cAMP production for LTM formation. We propose that CaMKII serves as a key molecule for interplay between Ca(2+) signaling and cAMP signaling for LTM formation, a new role of CaMKII in

  9. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  10. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin gene, VcCaM1, that is differentially expressed under aluminum stress in highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin (CaM), a small acidic protein, is one of the best characterized Ca2+ sensors in eukaryotes. This Ca2+-regulated protein plays a critical role in decoding and transducing environmental stress signals by activating specific targets. Many environmental stresses elicit changes in intracellu...

  11. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A{sup 2} (pntA{sup 2}), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca{sup ++}-binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca{sup ++}-related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/{sup 2} CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA{sup 2}. Once pntA{sup 2} CaM is N-methylated, the (methyl-{sup 3}H) group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA{sup 2} cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA{sup 2} high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM.

  12. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  13. A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lourette, Natacha M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wu, Si; Robinson, Errol W.; Squier, Thomas C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based approach for monitoring time dependent changes in the degree of nitration and oxidation of intact calmodulin (CaM) has been used to resolve approximately 500 CaM oxiforms. Tentative identifications of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as oxidation or nitration have been assigned by combining tryptic peptide information (generated from bottom-up analyses) with online collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) at the intact protein level. The reduction in abundance and diversity of oxidatively modified CaM (i.e. nitrated tyrosines and oxidized methionines) induced by macrophage activation has been explored and semi-quantified for different oxidation degrees of CaM (i.e. no oxidation, moderate and high oxidation). This work demonstrates the power of top-down approach to identify hundreds of combinations of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) for single protein target such as CaM.

  14. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  15. Solution structure of the calmodulin-like C-terminal domain of Entamoeba α-actinin2.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Göran; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Hedenström, Mattias; Backman, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Cell motility is dependent on a dynamic meshwork of actin filaments that is remodelled continuously. A large number of associated proteins that are severs, cross-links, or caps the filament ends have been identified and the actin cross-linker α-actinin has been implied in several important cellular processes. In Entamoeba histolytica, the etiological agent of human amoebiasis, α-actinin is believed to be required for infection. To better understand the role of α-actinin in the infectious process we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain using NMR. The final structure ensemble of the apo form shows two lobes, that both resemble other pairs of calcium-binding EF-hand motifs, connected with a mobile linker. PMID:26800385

  16. Ca2+ -calmodulin feedback mediates sensory adaptation and inhibits pheromone-sensitive ion channels in the vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Jennifer; Hagendorf, Silke; Weiss, Jan; Spehr, Marc; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Zufall, Frank

    2009-02-18

    The mammalian vomeronasal organ (VNO) mediates the regulation of social behaviors by complex chemical signals. These cues trigger transient elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) in vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), but the functional role of such Ca(2+) elevations is unknown. We show that stimulus-induced Ca(2+) entry plays an essential role as a negative feedback regulator of VSN sensitivity. Electrophysiological VSN responses undergo effective sensory adaptation that requires the influx of Ca(2+) and is mediated by calmodulin (CaM). Removal of the Ca(2+)-CaM feedback eliminates this form of adaptation. A key target of this feedback module is the pheromone-sensitive TRPC2-dependent cation channel of VSNs, as its activation is strongly inhibited by Ca(2+)-CaM. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized CaM-signaling pathway that endows the VSNs with a mechanism for adjusting gain and sensitivity of chemosensory signaling in the VNO. PMID:19228965

  17. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  18. Inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels in smooth muscle by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms responsible for the termination of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)), simultaneous measurements of whole cell currents and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were made in equine tracheal myocytes. In nondialyzed cells, or cells dialyzed with 1 mM ATP, ICl(Ca) decayed before the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas the calcium-activated potassium current decayed at the same rate as [Ca2+]i. Substitution of AMP-PNP or ADP for ATP markedly prolonged the decay of ICl(Ca), resulting in a rate of current decay similar to that of the fall in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of ATP, dialysis of the calmodulin antagonist W7, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN93, or a CaMKII-specific peptide inhibitor the rate of ICl(Ca) decay was slowed and matched the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas H7, a nonspecific kinase inhibitor with low affinity for CaMKII, was without effect. When a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was produced in ATP dialyzed cells, the current decayed completely, whereas in cells loaded with 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), KN93, or the CaMKII inhibitory peptide, ICl(Ca) did not decay. Slowly decaying currents were repeatedly evoked in ADP- or AMP-PNP-loaded cells, but dialysis of adenosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) or okadaic acid resulted in a smaller initial ICl(Ca), and little or no current (despite a normal [Ca2+]i transient) with a second stimulation. These data indicate that CaMKII phosphorylation results in the inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels, and that transition from the inactivated state to the closed state requires protein dephosphorylation. PMID:9405714

  19. Ginseng Gintonin Activates the Human Cardiac Delayed Rectifier K+ Channel: Involvement of Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Shin, Ho-Chul; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Ha, Tal soo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Hana; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Gintonin, a novel, ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand, elicits [Ca2+]i transients in neuronal and non-neuronal cells via pertussis toxin-sensitive and pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins. The slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ (IKs) channel is a cardiac K+ channel composed of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. The C terminus of the KCNQ1 channel protein has two calmodulin-binding sites that are involved in regulating IKs channels. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of gintonin-mediated activation of human IKs channel activity by expressing human IKs channels in Xenopus oocytes. We found that gintonin enhances IKs channel currents in concentration- and voltage-dependent manners. The EC50 for the IKs channel was 0.05 ± 0.01 μg/ml. Gintonin-mediated activation of the IKs channels was blocked by an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, an active phospholipase C inhibitor, an IP3 receptor antagonist, and the calcium chelator BAPTA. Gintonin-mediated activation of both the IKs channel was also blocked by the calmodulin (CaM) blocker calmidazolium. Mutations in the KCNQ1 [Ca2+]i/CaM-binding IQ motif sites (S373P, W392R, or R539W)blocked the action of gintonin on IKs channel. However, gintonin had no effect on hERG K+ channel activity. These results show that gintonin-mediated enhancement of IKs channel currents is achieved through binding of the [Ca2+]i/CaM complex to the C terminus of KCNQ1 subunit. PMID:25234465

  20. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  1. Purification and characterization of caldesmon77: a calmodulin-binding protein that interacts with actin filaments from bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Sobue, K; Tanaka, T; Kanda, K; Ashino, N; Kakiuchi, S

    1985-01-01

    Caldesmon150, a protein composed of the Mr 150,000/147,000 doublet, alternately binds to calmodulin and actin filaments in a Ca2+-dependent "flip-flop" fashion. In all fibroblast cell lines examined, we also found a Mr 77,000 protein that crossreacts with anti-caldesmon150 antibody by using an immunoprecipitation technique [Owada, M.K., Hakura, A., Iida, K., Yahara, I., Sobue, K. & Kakiuchi, S. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 3133-3137]. In this report, we examine the tissue distribution of caldesmon by the method of immunoblotting, using caldesmon-specific antibody. Both caldesmon150 and caldesmon77 show widespread distribution in the tissues examined. Caldesmon77 is more widely distributed than caldesmon150, and we have purified caldesmon77 from bovine adrenal medulla. Its molecular weight estimated by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 77,000, and a tetramer of this polypeptide may constitute the native molecule (Mr, 300,000). Caldesmon77 possesses a number of features in common with caldesmon150, including flip-flop binding to calmodulin and actin filaments depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and crossreactivity with caldesmon150-specific antibody. Analysis of caldesmon77-F actin interaction by sedimentation and electrophoresis revealed that 0.5 mg of caldesmon77 bound to 1 mg of F actin. This indicated that the molar ratio between caldesmon77 (tetramer) and actin monomer was calculated to be 1:12-14. In addition, caldesmon77 regulated the actin-myosin interaction in Ca2+-sensitive actomyosin obtained from adrenal medulla. These results suggest that caldesmon77 might be a ubiquitous actin-linked regulator of nonmuscle contractile processes, including those in adrenal medulla. Images PMID:2991905

  2. Avermectin induces P-glycoprotein expression in S2 cells via the calcium/calmodulin/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang; Sun, Yin-Jian; Yang, Lin; Huang, Shile; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-04-25

    Avermectin (AVM) is a macrocyclic lactone agent widely used as a nematicide, acaricide and insecticide in veterinary medicine and plant protection. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump for xenobiotic compounds, and is involved in multidrug resistance. To understand the development of AVM resistance in invertebrates, we investigated the mechanisms by which AVM affected P-gp expression in Drosophila S2 cells. We found that AVM induced upregulation of P-gp protein expression, increased P-gp ATPase activity and enhanced cellular efflux of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 from cells. Furthermore, we observed that AVM-induced expression of P-gp was due to elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This occurred both directly, by activating calcium ion channels, and indirectly, by activating chloride ion channels. These results are supported by our observations that verapamil, a Ca(2+) channel blocker, and niflumic acid, a chloride channel antagonist, significantly attenuated AVM-induced [Ca(2+)](i) elevation, thereby reducing P-gp expression. Inhibition of P-gp with anti-P-gp antibody or cyclosporine A (a P-gp inhibitor) reduced the AVM-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i), implying that P-gp and [Ca(2+)](i) regulate each other. Finally, we found that trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamic acid, an NF-κB inhibitor, attenuated the AVM-induced expression of P-gp, suggesting that AVM induces P-gp protein expression via the calmodulin/Relish (NF-κB) signaling pathway. PMID:23523950

  3. Hypotonic shock modulates Na(+) current via a Cl(-) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent mechanism in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, André; Tessier, Marie-Claude; Tatur, Sabina; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Berthiaume, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells are involved in Na(+) absorption via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), an important process for maintaining an appropriate volume of liquid lining the respiratory epithelium and for lung oedema clearance. Here, we investigated how a 20% hypotonic shock modulates the ionic current in these cells. Polarized alveolar epithelial cells isolated from rat lungs were cultured on permeant filters and their electrophysiological properties recorded. A 20% bilateral hypotonic shock induced an immediate, but transient 52% rise in total transepithelial current and a 67% increase in the amiloride-sensitive current mediated by ENaC. Amiloride pre-treatment decreased the current rise after hypotonic shock, showing that ENaC current is involved in this response. Since Cl(-) transport is modulated by hypotonic shock, its contribution to the basal and hypotonic-induced transepithelial current was also assessed. Apical NPPB, a broad Cl(-) channel inhibitor and basolateral DIOA a potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC) inhibitor reduced the total and ENaC currents, showing that transcellular Cl(-) transport plays a major role in that process. During hypotonic shock, a basolateral Cl(-) influx, partly inhibited by NPPB is essential for the hypotonic-induced current rise. Hypotonic shock promoted apical ATP secretion and increased intracellular Ca(2+). While apyrase, an ATP scavenger, did not inhibit the hypotonic shock current response, W7 a calmodulin antagonist completely prevented the hypotonic current rise. These results indicate that a basolateral Cl(-) influx as well as Ca(2+)/calmodulin, but not ATP, are involved in the acute transepithelial current rise elicited by hypotonic shock. PMID:24019969

  4. Ca2+/calmodulin-mediated fast desensitization by the B1b subunit of the CNG channel affects response termination but not sensitivity to recurring stimulation in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yijun; Cygnar, Katherine D.; Sagdullaev, Botir; Valley, Matthew; Hirsh, Sarah; Stephan, Aaron; Reisert, Johannes; Zhao, Haiqing

    2008-01-01

    Summary Ca2+/calmodulin-mediated negative feedback is a prototypical regulatory mechanism for Ca2+ permeable ion channels. In olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) such regulation on the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is considered a major mechanism of OSN adaptation. To determine the role of Ca2+/calmodulin desensitization of the olfactory CNG channel, we introduced a mutation in the channel subunit CNGB1b in mice that rendered the channel resistant to fast desensitization by Ca2+/calmodulin. Contrary to expectations, mutant OSNs showed normal receptor current adaptation to repeated stimulation. Rather, they displayed slower response termination and consequently, a reduced ability to transmit olfactory information to the olfactory bulb. They also displayed reduced response decline during sustained odorant exposure. These results suggest that Ca2+/calmodulin-mediated CNG channel fast desensitization is less important in regulating the sensitivity to recurring stimulation than previously thought and instead functions primarily to terminate OSN responses. PMID:18466748

  5. A brain-specific Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is regulated by autophosphorylation. Relevance to neuronal Ca sup 2+ signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Frangakis, M.V.; Ohmstede, C.A.; Sahyoun, N. )

    1991-06-15

    A neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) undergoes autophosphorylation on a serine residue(s) in response to Ca2+ and calmodulin. Phosphate incorporation leads to the formation of a Ca(2+)-independent (autonomous) activity state, as well as potentiation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent response. The autonomous enzyme activity of the phosphorylated enzyme {approximately} equals the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated activity of the unphosphorylated enzyme, but displays diminished affinity toward ATP and the synthetic substrate, syntide-2. The Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 increased 4.3- and 1.7-fold, respectively. Further activation of the autonomous enzyme by Ca2+/calmodulin yields a marked increase in the affinity for ATP and peptide substrate such that the Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 decreased by 14- and 8-fold, respectively. Both autophosphorylation and the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin are required to produce the maximum level of enzyme activation and to increase substrate affinity. Unlike Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II that is dephosphorylated by the Mg(2+)-independent phosphoprotein phosphatases 1 and 2A, CaM kinase-Gr is dephosphorylated by a Mg(2+)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase that may be related to the type 2C enzyme. Dephosphorylation of CaM kinase-Gr reverses the effects of autophosphorylation on enzyme activity. A comparison between the autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions of CaM kinase-Gr and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II provides useful insights into the operation of Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switches.

  6. Vitellogenesis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster: antagonists demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C pathway is triggered by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J; Woodruff, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca(2+) release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  7. Loss of Calmodulin Binding to Bax Inhibitor-1 Affects Pseudomonas-mediated Hypersensitive Response-associated Cell Death in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Hori, Zenta; Ogawa, Taro; Ihara-Ohori, Yuri; Tamura, Katsunori; Nagano, Minoru; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor protein conserved across a variety of organisms. The Arabidopsis atbi1-1 plant is a mutant in which the C-terminal 6 amino acids of the expressed BI-1 protein have been replaced by T-DNA insertion. This mutant BI-1 protein (AtBI-CM) produced in Escherichia coli can no longer bind to calmodulin. A promoter-reporter assay demonstrated compartmentalized expression of BI-1 during hypersensitive response, introduced by the inoculation of Pseudomonas syringae possessing the avrRTP2 gene, Pst(avrRPT2). In addition, both BI-1 knockdown plants and atbi1-1 showed increased sensitivity to Pst(avrRPT2)-induced cell death. The results indicated that the loss of calmodulin binding reduces the cell death suppressor activity of BI-1 in planta. PMID:19674971

  8. Vitellogenesis in the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster: Antagonists Demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C Pathway is Triggered by Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J.; Woodruff, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca2+ release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  9. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  10. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  11. A surface plasmon resonance study of the interactions between the component subunits of protein kinase CK2 and two protein substrates, casein and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Benítez, M J; Cochet, C; Jiménez, J S

    2001-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has been used to study the interaction between the subunits composing protein kinase CK2 (two catalytic, alpha-subunits, and two regulatory, beta-subunits), as well as the interaction of each subunit with two types of protein substrates, casein, the phosphorylation of which is activated by the regulatory subunit, and calmodulin, which belongs to the kind of substrates on which the catalytic subunit is downregulated by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of casein with the catalytic subunit differs from the interaction with the holoenzyme. Similarly to the interaction with the regulatory subunit, the catalytic subunit interacts with the protein substrate forming a very stable, irreversible complex. The reconstituted holoenzyme, however, binds casein reversibly, displaying a binding mode similar to that displayed by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of calmodulin with the catalytic subunit gives place, like in the case of casein, to an irreversible complex. The interactions with the regulatory subunit and with the holoenzyme were practically negligible, and the interaction with the regulatory subunit disappeared upon increasing the temperature value to close to 30 degrees C. The presence of polylysine induced a high increase in the extent of calmodulin binding to the holoenzyme. The results obtained suggest that CK2beta subunit and protein substrates share a common, or at least an overlapping, site of interaction on the catalytic subunit. The interaction between both subunits would prevent substrates from binding irreversibly to alpha subunit, and, at the same time, it would generate a new and milder site of interaction between the whole holoenzyme and the protein substrate. The main difference between casein and calmodulin would consist in the lower affinity display by the last for the new site generated upon the binding of the regulatory subunit, in the absence of polycations like polylysine. PMID:11827172

  12. Calspermin gene transcription is regulated by two cyclic AMP response elements contained in an alternative promoter in the calmodulin kinase IV gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Sassone-Corsi, P; Means, A R

    1995-01-01

    The transcript for the high-affinity Ca2+/calmodulin-binding protein calspermin is generated from the gene encoding Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV only in postmeiotic germ cells during spermatogenesis. We demonstrate that this testis-specific calspermin transcript can be produced in heterologous cells by utilization of a promoter located in an intron of the calmodulin (CaM) kinase IV gene. Critical motifs within this promoter are two cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-like sequences located about -70 and -50 bp upstream of the transcriptional initiation site. Both CRE motifs are footprinted by the authentic testis-specific transcriptional activator CREM tau or by CREM tau present in adult testis nuclear extract. Whereas a 2.1-kb DNA fragment containing the calspermin promoter is inactive when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells, activity can be restored by cotransfection of CREM tau and protein kinase A or CaM kinase IV but not CaM kinase II alpha. Restoration of activity is greatly reduced by mutation of the two CRE motifs. Since CRE-like motifs have been identified in many genes uniquely expressed in postmeiotic germ cells, which contain abundant CREM tau protein, we suggest that CREM tau may function as one transcription factor responsible for the expression of postmeiotic germ cell-specific genes. PMID:7799965

  13. Utilization of troponin C as a model calcium-binding protein for mapping of the calmodulin-binding sites of caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Polyakov, A A; Gusev, N B

    1997-01-01

    Troponin C, a structural analogue of calmodulin, was used for mapping the calmodulin-binding sites of caldesmon. The apparent Kd values for the formation of the caldesmon-calcium-binding-protein complex as determined by native gel electrophoresis were 0.5, 1.2 and 3.9 microM for calmodulin, rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C and bovine cardiac troponin C respectively. Troponin C induced a 4-6 nm blue shift of the Trp fluorescence of caldesmon without affecting the amplitude of fluorescence. In the presence of Ca2+, troponin C induced partial displacement of caldesmon from actin tropomyosin complexes. Addition of 5,5'-dithiobis(nitrobenzoic) acid to an equimolar complex of caldesmon and troponin C induced disulphide cross-linking between Cys-98 of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C and the single Cys residue of duck gizzard caldesmon, located in a position analogous to Cys-580 of the chicken gizzard protein. The cross-linked caldesmon-troponin C complex was ineffective in inhibiting actomyosin ATPase activity. It is concluded that Cys-580 of caldesmon can be located close to both the central helix of calcium-binding proteins and the C-terminal domain of actin. This may be important for the regulation of actomyosin ATPase activity by caldesmon. PMID:9032478

  14. Occurrence of caldesmon (a calmodulin-binding protein) in cultured cells: comparison of normal and transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Owada, M K; Hakura, A; Iida, K; Yahara, I; Sobue, K; Kakiuchi, S

    1984-01-01

    Caldesmon is a calmodulin-binding and F-actin-binding protein originally purified from chicken gizzard smooth muscle. This protein binds to F-actin filaments in a Ca2+- and calmodulin-dependent "flip-flop" fashion, thereby regulating the function of actin filaments. Here we report that various lines of cultured cells contain a Mr 77,000 protein that specifically reacts with the affinity-purified caldesmon antibody raised against chicken gizzard caldesmon . Among the fibroblast proteins that had been pulse-labeled with [35S]methionine, the Mr 77,000 protein was the only protein band detected on the NaDodSO4 gel that reacted with the anticaldesmon . The subcellular distribution of the Mr 77,000 protein was investigated by the indirect immunofluorescence technique using the anticaldesmon . In all fibroblast cell lines examined, the immunofluorescence localized along the cellular stress fibers and in leading edges of the cell. In Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells (S7-1), however, the distribution of the fluorescence changed to a diffuse and blurred appearance. These staining patterns of anticaldesmon obtained with the normal and transformed cells coincided with those of antiactin in the corresponding states, strongly suggesting the functional linkage between the Mr 77,000 protein and actin filaments. We propose to refer to this Mr 77,000 protein as caldesmon 77. The cellular level of caldesmon 77 in transformed S7-1 cells decreased to about one-third of that in their normal counterparts (cell line no. 7). Essentially the same result was obtained with normal rat kidney cells infected with the temperature-sensitive transformation mutant Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus (68 N2 clone). The cellular level of caldesmon 77 observed at a permissive temperature (35 degrees C) was about one-third of that at a nonpermissive temperature (38.5 degrees C). These changes of caldesmon 77 in transformed cells may correlate with the loss of Ca2+ regulation in the

  15. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  16. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha in optic axons moves with slow axonal transport and undergoes posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    2001-12-21

    In neurons, the mRNA for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CKIIalpha) is known to be targeted to dendrites-where the enzyme is synthesized and supports postsynaptic functions. We are interested in knowing how neuronal proteins enter axons from the nerve cell body, and the mechanism for protein transport to terminals. Because CKIIalpha immunofluorescence can be demonstrated in over 80% of retinal ganglion cells, we asked whether this regulatory protein is being transported into optic axons. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, [(35)S] methionine was injected into the vitreous humor of the eye. Four days later, the optic nerves, tracts, lateral geniculate ganglia, and superior colliculi were removed and processed for 2D-PAGE and Western blotting. Radiolabeled CKIIalpha appears to move with slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport, as is the case in rodent sciatic motor neurons. In addition, the radiolabeled CKIIalpha isoform that enters the optic nerve is found to be 4 kDa heavier (in SDS-PAGE molecular mass) than the isoform in the optic tract, superior colliculus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. This reduction is likely the result of dephosphorylation, which is a mechanism used to regulate the enzyme's activity. PMID:11741313

  17. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1

    PubMed Central

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  18. Expression and localization of calmodulin-related proteins in brain, heart and kidney from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kameshima, Satoshi; Okada, Muneyoshi; Yamawaki, Hideyuki

    2016-01-15

    Blood pressure is regulated not only by peripheral arterial resistance, but also by heart, kidney, and central nervous system. We have previously demonstrated that expression level of calmodulin-related proteins including eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), death-associated protein kinase (DAPK)3, and histone deacetylase (HDAC)4 was specifically elevated in mesenteric artery from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which partly contributes to the development of hypertension via vascular inflammation and structural remodeling. We tested the hypothesis whether expression and localization of eEF2K, DAPK3, and HDAC4 are altered in brain, heart, and kidney from SHR. After brain, left ventricles (LV), and kidney were isolated from 12-week-old male Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHR, Western blotting and histological analysis were performed. In brain tissue, protein expression of eEF2K and HDAC4 was abundant, whereas DAPK3 protein was less. HDAC4 protein expression in SHR brain was significantly higher than that in WKY brain. In LV, protein expression of eEF2K was relatively higher than DAPK3 or HDAC4, and it was significantly higher in SHR than WKY. In kidney tissue, protein expression of DAPK3 was the highest and seemed to be localized specifically to renal tubule. The present results indicate that the increased HDAC4 in brain and increased eEF2K in LV might be at least in part related to the development of hypertension. PMID:26697749

  19. Adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation is modulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in normal and hypertrophied hearts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tamara P; Lawan, Ahmed; Robinson, Emma; Grieve, David J; Plevin, Robin; Paul, Andrew; Currie, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Increased adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation results in an increased collagen deposition responsible for the fibrosis accompanying pathological remodelling of the heart. The mechanisms regulating cardiac fibroblast proliferation remain poorly understood. Using a minimally invasive transverse aortic banding (MTAB) mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy, we have assessed fibrosis and cardiac fibroblast proliferation. We have investigated whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) regulates proliferation in fibroblasts isolated from normal and hypertrophied hearts. It is known that CaMKIIδ plays a central role in cardiac myocyte contractility, but nothing is known of its role in adult cardiac fibroblast function. The MTAB model used here produces extensive hypertrophy and fibrosis. CaMKIIδ protein expression and activity is upregulated in MTAB hearts and, specifically, in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from hypertrophied hearts. In response to angiotensin II, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from MTAB hearts show increased proliferation rates. Inhibition of CaMKII with autocamtide inhibitory peptide inhibits proliferation in cells isolated from both sham and MTAB hearts, with a significantly greater effect evident in MTAB cells. These results are the first to show selective upregulation of CaMKIIδ in adult cardiac fibroblasts following cardiac hypertrophy and to assign a previously unrecognised role to CaMKII in regulating adult cardiac fibroblast function in normal and diseased hearts. PMID:23881186

  20. Phosphorylation of serine residues affects the conformation of the calmodulin binding domain of human protein 4.1.

    PubMed

    Vetter, S W; Leclerc, E

    2001-08-01

    We have previously characterized the calcium-dependent calmodulin (CaM)-binding domain (Ser76-Ser92) of the 135-kDa human protein 4.1 isoform using fluorescence spectroscopy and chemically synthesized nonphosphorylated or serine phosphorylated peptides [Leclerc, E. & Vetter, S. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 258, 567-671]. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of two serine residues within the 17-residue peptide alters their ability to adopt alpha helical conformation in a position-dependent manner. The helical content of the peptides was determined by CD-spectroscopy and found to increase from 36 to 45% for the Ser80 phosphorylated peptide and reduce to 28% for the Ser84 phosphorylated peptide; the di-phosphorylated peptide showed 32% helical content. Based on secondary structure prediction methods we propose that initial helix formation involves the central residues Leu82-Phe86. The ability of the peptides to adopt alpha helical conformations did not correlate with the observed binding affinities to CaM. We suggest that the reduced CaM-binding affinities observed for the phosphorylated peptides are more likely to be the result of unfavorable sterical and electrostatic interactions introduced into the CaM peptide-binding interface by the phosphate groups, rather than being due to the effect of phosphorylation on the secondary structure of the peptides. PMID:11488924

  1. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Oscar, Breland G; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca(2+), the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼ 170 cm(-1) phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼ 30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca(2+) binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca(2+) in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:24987121

  2. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1.

    PubMed

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  3. 2D FT-ICR MS of Calmodulin: A Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approach.

    PubMed

    Floris, Federico; van Agthoven, Maria; Chiron, Lionel; Soulby, Andrew J; Wootton, Christopher A; Lam, Yuko P Y; Barrow, Mark P; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) allows data-independent fragmentation of all ions in a sample and correlation of fragment ions to their precursors through the modulation of precursor ion cyclotron radii prior to fragmentation. Previous results show that implementation of 2D FT-ICR MS with infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) has turned this method into a useful analytical tool. In this work, IRMPD tandem mass spectrometry of calmodulin (CaM) has been performed both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional FT-ICR MS using a top-down and bottom-up approach. 2D IRMPD FT-ICR MS is used to achieve extensive inter-residue bond cleavage and assignment for CaM, using its unique features for fragment identification in a less time- and sample-consuming experiment than doing the same thing using sequential MS/MS experiments. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27431513

  4. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively. PMID:27451188

  5. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  6. The Neuronal Calcium Sensor Protein Acrocalcin: A Potential Target of Calmodulin Regulation during Development in the Coral Acropora millepora

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Bermudez, Alejandro; Miller, David J.; Sprungala, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    To understand the calcium-mediated signalling pathways underlying settlement and metamorphosis in the Scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, a predicted protein set derived from larval cDNAs was scanned for the presence of EF-hand domains (Pfam Id: PF00036). This approach led to the identification of a canonical calmodulin (AmCaM) protein and an uncharacterised member of the Neuronal Calcium Sensor (NCS) family of proteins known here as Acrocalcin (AmAC). While AmCaM transcripts were present throughout development, AmAC transcripts were not detected prior to gastrulation, after which relatively constant mRNA levels were detected until metamorphosis and settlement. The AmAC protein contains an internal CaM-binding site and was shown to interact in vitro with AmCaM. These results are consistent with the idea that AmAC is a target of AmCaM in vivo, suggesting that this interaction may regulate calcium-dependent processes during the development of Acropora millepora. PMID:23284743

  7. 2D FT-ICR MS of Calmodulin: A Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Federico; van Agthoven, Maria; Chiron, Lionel; Soulby, Andrew J.; Wootton, Christopher A.; Lam, Yuko P. Y.; Barrow, Mark P.; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) allows data-independent fragmentation of all ions in a sample and correlation of fragment ions to their precursors through the modulation of precursor ion cyclotron radii prior to fragmentation. Previous results show that implementation of 2D FT-ICR MS with infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) has turned this method into a useful analytical tool. In this work, IRMPD tandem mass spectrometry of calmodulin (CaM) has been performed both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional FT-ICR MS using a top-down and bottom-up approach. 2D IRMPD FT-ICR MS is used to achieve extensive inter-residue bond cleavage and assignment for CaM, using its unique features for fragment identification in a less time- and sample-consuming experiment than doing the same thing using sequential MS/MS experiments.

  8. Graded Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This 'functional coupling' facilitates Ca(2+) influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca(2+) to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca(2+)/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca(2+)]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for 'molecular memory'. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca(2+)-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca(2+) signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. PMID:25714924

  9. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Dove, Stefan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Urbauer, Ramona J. Bieber; Moskovitz, Jackob; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF) is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM) leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met) residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut) with Met to leucine (Leu) substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils. PMID:26184312

  10. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  11. Intrathecal inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in diabetic neuropathy adversely affects pain-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Boric, Matija; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-10-25

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is considered an important enzyme contributing to the pathogenesis of persistent pain. The aim of this study was to test whether intrathecal injection of CaMKII inhibitors may reduce pain-related behavior in diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Diabetes was induced with intraperitoneal injection of 55mg/kg streptozotocin. Two weeks after diabetes induction, CaMKII inhibitor myristoil-AIP or KN-93 was injected intrathecally. Behavioral testing with mechanical and thermal stimuli was performed before induction of diabetes, the day preceding the injection, as well as 2h and 24h after the intrathecal injection. The expression of total CaMKII and its alpha isoform in dorsal horn was quantified using immunohistochemistry. Intrathecal injection of mAIP and KN-93 resulted in significant decrease in expression of total CaMKII and CaMKII alpha isoform activity. Also, mAIP and KN93 injection significantly increased sensitivity to a mechanical stimulus 24h after i.t. injection. Intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII reduced the expression of total CaMKII and its CaMKII alpha isoform activity in diabetic dorsal horn, which was accompanied with an increase in pain-related behavior. Further studies about the intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII should elucidate its role in nociceptive processes of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24035897

  12. Characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the calmodulin-binding domain of mouse brain calcineurin.

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, R L; Nightingale, M S; Martin, B M

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to a portion of the catalytic subunit of calmodulin (CaM)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase (calcineurin) was isolated from a murine brain library by expression vector immunoscreening. A beta-galactosidase fusion protein that reacted on Western blots with anti-calcineurin antibodies and biotinylated CaM was purified in preparative amounts using CaM-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Partial digestion of the hybrid protein with Staphylococcus aureus V-8 protease produced several immunoreactive peptides that appeared identical to fragments generated from authentic brain calcineurin. The 1111-base-pair (bp) EcoRI insert contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 35 kDa followed by a 190-bp 3' noncoding region; seven peptides obtained by partial amino acid sequencing of the bovine brain enzyme were found in the deduced sequence. A domain approximately 12 kDa from the carboxyl terminus was deduced to be the CaM-binding site based on consensus structural features and a sequence of seven amino acids highly related to smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase. Two regions with identity to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were found in the amino half of the cloned sequence; however, the intervening sequence contained apparent insertions, suggesting splicing of subdomains. Thus, the structure of calcineurin is chimeric, consisting of conserved catalytic elements and a regulatory CaM-binding domain. Images PMID:2848250

  13. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  14. Calmodulin Gene Family in Potato: Developmental and Touch-Induced Expression of the mRNA Encoding a Novel Isoform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Liu, Z. H.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparisons of different genes revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of PCM1 had several unique substitutions, especially in the fourth Ca(2+)-binding area. The expression patterns of different genes were studied by northern analysis using the 3'-untranslated regions as probes. The expression of PCM1, 5, and 8 was highest in the stolon tip and it decreased during tuber development. The expression of PCM6 did not vary much in the tissues tested, except in the leaves, where the expression was lower; whereas, the expression of PCM4 was very low in all the tissues. The expression of PCM2 and PCM3 was not detected in any of the tissues tested. Among these genes, only PCM1 showed increased expression following touch stimulation. To study the regulation of PCM1, transgenic potato plants carrying the PCM1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were produced. GUS expression was found to be developmentally regulated and touch-responsive, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of PCM1 and GUS mRNAs. These results suggest that the 5'-flanking region of PCM1 controls developmental and touch-induced expression. X-Gluc staining patterns revealed that GUS localization is high in meristematic tissues such as the stem apex, stolon tip, and vascular regions.

  15. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Is a Modulator of CARMA1-Mediated NF-κB Activation†

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Green, Todd; Rapley, Joseph; Wachtel, Heather; Giallourakis, Cosmas; Landry, Aimee; Cao, Zhifang; Lu, Naifang; Takafumi, Ando; Goto, Hidemi; Daly, Mark J.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2006-01-01

    CARMA1 is a central regulator of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. CARMA1 and Bcl10 functionally interact and control NF-κB signaling downstream of the T-cell receptor (TCR). Computational analysis of expression neighborhoods of CARMA1-Bcl10MALT 1 for enrichment in kinases identified calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) as an important component of this pathway. Here we report that Ca2+/CaMKII is redistributed to the immune synapse following T-cell activation and that CaMKII is critical for NF-κB activation induced by TCR stimulation. Furthermore, CaMKII enhances CARMA1-induced NF-κB activation. Moreover, we have shown that CaMKII phosphorylates CARMA1 on Ser109 and that the phosphorylation facilitates the interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. These results provide a novel function for CaMKII in TCR signaling and CARMA1-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:16809782

  16. Holoenzyme structures of endothelial nitric oxide synthase - an allosteric role for calmodulin in pivoting the FMN domain for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Page, Christopher; Swift, Mark; Hanein, Dorit; Masters, Bettie Sue

    2014-10-01

    While the three-dimensional structures of heme- and flavin-binding domains of the NOS isoforms have been determined, the structures of the holoenzymes remained elusive. Application of electron cryo-microscopy and structural modeling of the bovine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) holoenzyme produced detailed models of the intact holoenzyme in the presence and absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). These models accommodate the cross-electron transfer from the reductase in one monomer to the heme in the opposite monomer. The heme domain acts as the anchoring dimeric structure for the entire enzyme molecule, while the FMN domain is activated by CaM to move flexibly to bridge the distance between the reductase and oxygenase domains. Our results indicate that the key regulatory role of CaM involves the stabilization of structural intermediates and precise positioning of the pivot for the FMN domain tethered shuttling motion to accommodate efficient and rapid electron transfer in the homodimer of eNOS. PMID:25175399

  17. A highly sensitive immunosensor for calmodulin assay based on enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Kai; Sun, Qianqian; Lin, Bin; Lu, Danqin; Xu, Zhiai; Hu, Chen; Fan, Guangjian; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Chuangui; Zhang, Wen

    2014-06-15

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in eukaryotic cells, and it plays an important role in cancer progression. In this paper, a highly sensitive immunosensor adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy was proposed for electrochemical detection of CaM. This immunosensor was constructed by introducing honeycomb-like mesoporous carbon (HMPC) as a sensor platform to sequentially immobilize antibody (Ab1), CaM and a multi-functionalized label. The label (HRP-PAupc-Ab1) was synthesized by covalently binding Ab1 and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to poly(acrylic acid)-functionalized Au popcorn (PAupc) nanoparticles. A novel dual-layered enzyme strategy was employed by incubating HRP-secondary antibody (HRP-Ab2) onto the label surface and the enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation was therefore induced. This immunosensor exhibited satisfactory analytical performances for CaM detection with a linear response ranging from 5.0 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.5 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor has also been successfully applied to the CaM analysis in two cancer cells (HepG2 and MCF-7) with high sensitivity, which has shown great potency for cancer study. PMID:24508817

  18. Identification of Cellular Calcium Binding Protein Calmodulin as a Regulator of Rotavirus A Infection during Comparative Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Basak, Trayambak; Nayak, Mukti Kant; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Mukherjee, Anupam; Bhowmick, Rahul; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Chatterjee, Nabendu S.; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) being the major diarrhoegenic virus causes around 527000 children death (<5years age) worldwide. In cellular environment, viruses constantly adapt and modulate to survive and replicate while the host cell also responds to combat the situation and this results in the differential regulation of cellular proteins. To identify the virus induced differential expression of proteins, 2D-DIGE (Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis) based proteomics was used. For this, HT-29 cells were infected with RV strain SA11 for 0 hours, 3 hours and 9 hours post infection (hpi), differentially expressed spots were excised from the gel and identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. 2D-DIGE based proteomics study identified 32 differentially modulated proteins, of which 22 were unique. Some of these were validated in HT-29 cell line and in BALB/c mice model. One of the modulated cellular proteins, calmodulin (CaM) was found to directly interact with RV protein VP6 in the presence of Ca2+. Ca2+-CaM/VP6 interaction positively regulates RV propagation since both CaM inhibitor (W-7) and Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM) resulted in decreased viral titers. This study not only identifies differentially modulated cellular proteins upon infection with rotavirus in 2D-DIGE but also confirmed positive engagement of cellular Ca2+/CaM during viral pathogenesis. PMID:23437200

  19. The NMDA Receptor NR1 C1 Region Bound to Calmodulin: Structural Insights into Functional Differences between Homologous Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Zeynep Akyol; Gakhar, Lokesh; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Hell, Johannes W.; Shea, Madeline A.

    2008-09-17

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates tetrameric N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) by binding tightly to the C0 and C1 regions of its NR1 subunit. A crystal structure (2HQW; 1.96 {angstrom}) of calcium-saturated CaM bound to NR1C1 (peptide spanning 875-898) showed that NR1 S890, whose phosphorylation regulates membrane localization, was solvent protected, whereas the endoplasmic reticulum retention motif was solvent exposed. NR1 F880 filled the CaM C-domain pocket, whereas T886 was closest to the N-domain pocket. This 1-7 pattern was most similar to that in the CaM-MARCKS complex. Comparison of CaM-ligand wrap-around conformations identified a core tetrad of CaM C-domain residues (FLMM{sub C}) that contacted all ligands consistently. An identical tetrad of N-domain residues (FLMM{sub N}) made variable sets of contacts with ligands. This CaM-NR1C1 structure provides a foundation for designing mutants to test the role of CaM in NR1 trafficking as well as insights into how the homologous CaM domains have different roles in molecular recognition.

  20. Calcium-calmodulin does not alter the anion permeability of the mouse TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yawei; Kuan, Ai-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TMEM16A forms a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is permeable to many anions, including SCN−, I−, Br−, Cl−, and HCO3−, and has been implicated in various physiological functions. Indeed, controlling anion permeation through the TMEM16A channel pore may be critical in regulating the pH of exocrine fluids such as the pancreatic juice. The anion permeability of the TMEM16A channel pore has recently been reported to be modulated by Ca2+-calmodulin (CaCaM), such that the pore of the CaCaM-bound channel shows a reduced ability to discriminate between anions as measured by a shift of the reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions. Here, using a mouse TMEM16A clone that contains the two previously identified putative CaM-binding motifs, we were unable to demonstrate such CaCaM-dependent changes in the bi-ionic potential. We confirmed the activity of CaCaM used in our study by showing CaCaM modulation of the olfactory cyclic nucleotide–gated channel. We suspect that the different bi-ionic potentials that were obtained previously from whole-cell recordings in low and high intracellular [Ca2+] may result from different degrees of bi-ionic potential shift secondary to a series resistance problem, an ion accumulation effect, or both. PMID:24981232

  1. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression analysis of calmodulin-like (CML) proteins in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Munir, Shoaib; Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Song, Jianwen; Munir, Sadia; Zhang, Yuyang; Ye, Zhibiao; Wang, Taotao

    2016-05-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has emerged as a significant secondary messenger that regulates the activities of hormonal and environmental signals that are associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Ca(2+) binding proteins typically contain a Ca(2+) binding EF-hand (a helix-loop-helix structure) motif. In this study, tomato genes encoding calmodulin-like (CML) proteins that possess EF-hand motifs and no other identifiable functional domains were analyzed. Using genome analysis and BLAST searches in database, 52 CML genes were identified in tomato. Comprehensive analyses, including evolutionary relationships, gene structures, chromosomal locations, functional annotations, and gene duplications, were performed. Distribution mapping exhibited that 52 SlCML proteins containing different intron/exon patterns were unevenly distributed among ten chromosomes. In addition, 24 SlCML proteins were predicted as segmentally duplicated. Conserved motifs, promoter cis-regulatory elements, organ-based expression patterns and expression analyses indicated the potential responsiveness of SlCML proteins to abiotic stresses and phytohormones. These results illustrate the complexity of the CML gene family and indicate a potential vital role for these molecules in tomato growth and development as Ca(2+) signal transducers. PMID:26949025

  2. Characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase which is able to phosphorylate native and protease cleaved purified hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Z.H.; Stonik, J.A.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have extensively purified a low molecular weight Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from rat brain cytosol. This kinase (M/sub r/ 120,000) is able to phosphorylate both native and soluble purified HMG-CoA reductase. The concomitant inactivation and phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase was completely dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin. Incubation of phosphorylated /sup 32/P-HMG-CoA reductase was associated with the loss of /sup 32/P-radioactivity and reactivation of inactive enzyme. Maximal phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase involved the introduction of approximately 0.5 mol phosphate/53,000 enzyme fragment. The apparent Km for purified HMG-CoA reductase was .045 mg/ml. Microsomal native HMG-CoA reductase (M/sub r/ 100,000) was also phosphorylated and inactivated following incubation with calmodulin stimulated kinase, calmodulin, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg-ATP; dephosphorylation (reactivation) was catalyzed by the phosphoprotein phosphatase. The isolation and characterization of the M/sub r/ 120,000 calmodulin-binding enzyme complex provides additional insights into the mechanisms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent regulation of HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation. Based on these data and the authors previous in vitro and in vivo studies, they now propose that HMG-CoA reductase activity is modulated by three separate kinase systems.

  3. Backbone dynamics of a symmetric calmodulin dimer in complex with the calmodulin-binding domain of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2: a highly dynamic complex.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Göran; Schleucher, Jürgen; Onions, Jacqueline; Hermann, Stefan; Grundström, Thomas; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2005-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) interacts specifically as a dimer with some dimeric basic-Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors via a novel high affinity binding mode. Here we report a study of the backbone dynamics by (15)N-spin relaxation on the CaM dimer in complex with a dimeric peptide that mimics the CaM binding region of the bHLH transcription factor SEF2-1. The relaxation data were measured at multiple magnetic fields, and analyzed in a model-free manner using in-house written software designed to detect nanosecond internal motion. Besides picosecond motions, all residues also experience internal motion with an effective correlation time of approximately 2.5 ns with squared order parameter (S(2)) of approximately 0.75. Hydrodynamic calculations suggest that this can be attributed to motions of the N- and C-terminal domains of the CaM dimer in the complex. Moreover, residues with significant exchange broadening are found. They are clustered in the CaM:SEF2-1mp binding interface, the CaM:CaM dimer interface, and in the flexible helix connecting the CaM N- and C-terminal domains, and have similar exchange times (approximately 50 micros), suggesting a cooperative mechanism probably caused by protein:protein interactions. The dynamic features presented here support the conclusion that the conformationally heterogeneous bHLH mimicking peptide trapped inside the CaM dimer exchanges between different binding sites on both nanosecond and microsecond timescales. Nature has thus found a way to specifically recognize a relatively ill-fitting target. This novel mode of target-specific binding, which neither belongs to lock-and-key nor induced-fit binding, is characterized by dimerization and continuous exchange between multiple flexible binding alternatives. PMID:15894636

  4. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  5. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    SciTech Connect

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  6. Effects of 39 Compounds on Calmodulin-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclases AC1 and Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP into the second messenger cAMP. Membranous AC1 (AC1) is involved in processes of memory and learning and in muscle pain. The AC toxin edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is involved in the development of anthrax. Both ACs are stimulated by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM). The CaM-AC interaction could constitute a potential target to enhance or impair the AC activity of AC1 and EF to intervene in above (patho)physiological mechanisms. Thus, we analyzed the impact of 39 compounds including typical CaM-inhibitors, an anticonvulsant, an anticholinergic, antidepressants, antipsychotics and Ca2+-antagonists on CaM-stimulated catalytic activity of AC1 and EF. Compounds were tested at 10 μM, i.e., a concentration that can be reached therapeutically for certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Calmidazolium chloride decreased CaM-stimulated AC1 activity moderately by about 30%. In contrast, CaM-stimulated EF activity was abrogated by calmidazolium chloride and additionally decreased by chlorpromazine, felodipine, penfluridol and trifluoperazine by about 20–40%. The activity of both ACs was decreased by calmidazolium chloride in the presence and absence of CaM. Thus, CaM-stimulated AC1 activity is more insensitive to inhibition by small molecules than CaM-stimulated EF activity. Inhibition of AC1 and EF by calmidazolium chloride is largely mediated via a CaM-independent allosteric mechanism. PMID:25946093

  7. Mycorrhizal-induced calmodulin mediated changes in antioxidant enzymes and growth response of drought-stressed trifoliate orange

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Srivastava, A. K.; Zou, Ying-Ning; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Han, Yu; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L) Raf.] is considered highly arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) dependent for growth responses through a series of signal transductions in form of various physiological responses. The proposed study was carried out to evaluate the effect of an AM fungus (Funneliformis mosseae) on growth, antioxidant enzyme (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutase, SOD) activities, leaf relative water content (RWC), calmodulin (CaM), superoxide anion (O2•−), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in leaves of the plants exposed to both well-watered (WW) and drought stress (DS) conditions. A 58-day of DS significantly decreased mycorrhizal colonization by 60% than WW. Compared to non-AM seedlings, AM seedlings displayed significantly higher shoot morphological properties (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf number), biomass production (shoot and root fresh weight) and leaf RWC, regardless of soil water status. AM inoculation significantly increased CaM and soluble protein concentrations and CAT activity, whereas significantly decreased O2•− and H2O2 concentration under both WW and DS conditions. The AM seedlings also exhibited significantly higher Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities than the non-AM seedlings under DS but not under WW, which are triggered by higher CaM levels in AM plants on the basis of correlation studies. Further, the negative correlation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities with O2•− and H2O2 concentration showed the DS-induced ROS scavenging ability of CaM mediated SODs under mycorrhization. Our results demonstrated that AM-inoculation elevated the synthesis of CaM in leaves and up-regulated activities of the antioxidant enzymes, thereby, repairing the possible oxidative damage to plants by lowering the ROS accumulation under DS condition. PMID:25538696

  8. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  9. MicroRNA-30 inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Feng; Spinelli, Amy; Sun, Li-Yan; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V.; Ginnan, Roman; Saddouk, Fatima Z.; Van Riper, Dee; Singer, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ-isoform (CaMKIIδ) promotes vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, migration, and injury-induced vascular wall neointima formation. The objective of this study was to test if microRNA-30 (miR-30) family members are endogenous regulators of CaMKIIδ expression following vascular injury and whether ectopic expression of miR-30 can inhibit CaMKIIδ-dependent VSM cell function and neointimal VSM hyperplasia induced by vascular injury. The CaMKIIδ 3′UTR contains a consensus miR-30 binding sequence that is highly conserved across species. A significant decrease in miR-30 family members and increase in CaMKIIδ2 protein expression, with no change in CaMKIIδ mRNA expression, was observed in medial layers of VSM 7 days post-injury. In vitro, overexpression of miR-30c or miR-30e inhibited CaMKIIδ2 protein expression by ~50% in cultured rat aortic VSM cells, and inhibited VSM cell proliferation and migration. In vivo, lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c into injured rat carotid arteries prevented the injury-induced increase in CaMKIIδ2. Furthermore, neointima formation was dramatically inhibited by lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c in the injured medial smooth muscle. These studies define a novel mechanism for regulating CaMKIIδ expression in VSM and provide a new potential therapeutic strategy to reduce progression of vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:27199283

  10. Regulation of Cardiac ATP-sensitive Potassium Channel Surface Expression by Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II*

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sapay, Nicolas; Sharotri, Vikas; Kline, Crystal F.; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Snyder, Peter M.; Mohler, Peter J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Vivaudou, Michel; Zingman, Leonid V.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are key sensors and effectors of the metabolic status of cardiomyocytes. Alteration in their expression impacts their effectiveness in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and resistance to injury. We sought to determine how activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a central regulator of calcium signaling, translates into reduced membrane expression and current capacity of cardiac KATP channels. We used real-time monitoring of KATP channel current density, immunohistochemistry, and biotinylation studies in isolated hearts and cardiomyocytes from wild-type and transgenic mice as well as HEK cells expressing wild-type and mutant KATP channel subunits to track the dynamics of KATP channel surface expression. Results showed that activation of CaMKII triggered dynamin-dependent internalization of KATP channels. This process required phosphorylation of threonine at 180 and 224 and an intact 330YSKF333 endocytosis motif of the KATP channel Kir6.2 pore-forming subunit. A molecular model of the μ2 subunit of the endocytosis adaptor protein, AP2, complexed with Kir6.2 predicted that μ2 docks by interaction with 330YSKF333 and Thr-180 on one and Thr-224 on the adjacent Kir6.2 subunit. Phosphorylation of Thr-180 and Thr-224 would favor interactions with the corresponding arginine- and lysine-rich loops on μ2. We concluded that calcium-dependent activation of CaMKII results in phosphorylation of Kir6.2, which promotes endocytosis of cardiac KATP channel subunits. This mechanism couples the surface expression of cardiac KATP channels with calcium signaling and reveals new targets to improve cardiac energy efficiency and stress resistance. PMID:23223335

  11. Calcium binding decreases the stokes radius of calmodulin and mutants R74A, R90A, and R90G.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, B R; Shea, M A

    1996-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an intracellular cooperative calcium-binding protein essential for activating many diverse target proteins. Biophysical studies of the calcium-induced conformational changes of CaM disagree on the structure of the linker between domains and possible orientations of the domains. Molecular dynamics studies have predicted that Ca4(2+)CaM is in equilibrium between an extended and compact conformation and that Arg74 and Arg90 are critical to the compaction process. In this study gel permeation chromatography was used to resolve calcium-induced changes in the hydrated shape of CaM at pH 7.4 and 5.6. Results showed that mutation of Arg 74 to Ala increases the R(s) as predicted; however, the average separation of domains in Ca4(2+)-CaM was larger than predicted by molecular dynamics. Mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Gly affected the dimensions of apo-CaM more than those of Ca4(2+)-CaM. Calcium binding to CaM and mutants (R74A-CaM, R90A-CaM, and R90G-CaM) lowered the Stokes radius (R(s)). Differences between R(s) values reported here and Rg values determined by small-angle x-ray scattering studies illustrate the importance of using multiple techniques to explore the solution properties of a flexible protein such as CaM. Images FIGURE 2 SCHEME 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:8968610

  12. Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase mediates Hypergravity-Induced Changes in F-Actin Expression by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Felisha D.; Melhado, Caroline; Bosah, Francis; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A number of basic cellular functions, e.g., electrolyte concentration cell growth rate, glucose utilization, bone formation, response to growth stimulation and exocytosis are modified by microgravity or during spaceflight. Studies with intact animal during spaceflights have found lipid accumulations within the lumen of the vasculature and degeneration of the vascular wall. Capillary alterations with extensive endothelial invaginations were also seen. Hemodynamic studies have shown that there is a redistribution of blood from the lower extremities to the upper part of the body; this will alter vascular permeability, resulting in leakage into surrounding tissues. These studies indicate that changes in gravity will affect a number of physiological systems, including the vasculature. However, few studies have addressed the effect of microgravity on vascular cell function and metabolism. A major problem with ground based studies is that achieving a true microgravity hand, environment for prolonged period is not possible. On the other increasing gravity (i.e., hypergravity) is easily achieved. Several researchers have shown that hypergravity will increase the proliferation of several different cell limes (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. These studies suggest that hypergravity will alter the behavior of most cells. Several investigators have shown that hypergravity affects the expression of the early response genes (c-fos and c-myc) and the activation of several protein kinases (PK's) in cells (10,11). In this study we investigated whether hypergravity alters the expression of f-actin by aortic endothelial cells, and the possible role of protein kinases (calmodulin(II)-dependent and PKA) as mediators of these effects.

  13. Atomic resolution experimental phase information reveals extensive disorder and bound 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol in Ca(2+)-calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiusheng; van den Bedem, Henry; Brunger, Axel T; Wilson, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is the primary calcium signaling protein in eukaryotes and has been extensively studied using various biophysical techniques. Prior crystal structures have noted the presence of ambiguous electron density in both hydrophobic binding pockets of Ca(2+)-CaM, but no assignment of these features has been made. In addition, Ca(2+)-CaM samples many conformational substates in the crystal and accurately modeling the full range of this functionally important disorder is challenging. In order to characterize these features in a minimally biased manner, a 1.0 Å resolution single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data set was measured for selenomethionine-substituted Ca(2+)-CaM. Density-modified electron-density maps enabled the accurate assignment of Ca(2+)-CaM main-chain and side-chain disorder. These experimental maps also substantiate complex disorder models that were automatically built using low-contour features of model-phased electron density. Furthermore, experimental electron-density maps reveal that 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) is present in the C-terminal domain, mediates a lattice contact between N-terminal domains and may occupy the N-terminal binding pocket. The majority of the crystal structures of target-free Ca(2+)-CaM have been derived from crystals grown using MPD as a precipitant, and thus MPD is likely to be bound in functionally critical regions of Ca(2+)-CaM in most of these structures. The adventitious binding of MPD helps to explain differences between the Ca(2+)-CaM crystal and solution structures and is likely to favor more open conformations of the EF-hands in the crystal. PMID:26894537

  14. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M

    2016-02-23

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr(99) or Tyr(138) of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe(99)-CaM, or Phe(138)-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(99)-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(138)-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(99)-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr(99) also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr(99) by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  15. Calmodulin inhibitors trigger the proteolytic processing of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, but not its shedding in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, B; Pilorget, A; Bousquet-Gagnon, N; Gingras, D; Béliveau, R

    2001-01-01

    Most transmembrane proteins are subjected to limited proteolysis by cellular proteases, and stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors was recently shown. The present study investigated the ability of several CaM inhibitors to induce the proteolytic cleavage of the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) from the cell surface of highly invasive U-87 glioblastoma cells. Although no shedding of a soluble MT1-MMP form was induced by CaM inhibitors in the conditioned media, we showed that these inhibitors induced MT1-MMP proteolytic processing to the 43 kDa membrane-bound inactive form that was not correlated with an increase in proMMP-2 activation but rather with an increase in tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP)-2 expression levels. Moreover, this proteolytic processing was sensitive to marimastat suggesting the involvement of MMPs. Interestingly, CaM inhibitors antagonized concanavalin A- and cytochalasin D-induced proMMP-2 activation, and affected the cytoskeletal actin organization resulting in the loss of migratory potential of U-87 glioblastoma cells. Cytoplasmic tail-truncated MT1-MMP constructs expressed in COS-7 cells were also affected by CaM inhibitors suggesting that these inhibitors stimulated MT1-MMP proteolytic processing by mechanisms independent of the CaM-substrate interaction. We also propose that TIMP-2 acts as a negative regulator of MT1-MMP-dependent activities promoted by the action of CaM inhibitors in U-87 glioblastoma cells. PMID:11583578

  16. Paramecium calmodulin mutants defective in ion channel regulation can bind calcium and undergo calcium-induced conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Jaren, O R; Harmon, S; Chen, A F; Shea, M A

    2000-06-13

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions cooperatively at four EF-hand binding sites to regulate signal transduction pathways. Interactions between the apo domains of vertebrate CaM reduce the calcium affinities of sites I and II below their intrinsic values, allowing sequential opening of the two hydrophobic clefts in CaM. Viable domain-specific mutants of Parameciumcalmodulin (PCaM) differentially affect ion channels and provide a unique opportunity to dissect the roles of the two highly homologous half-molecule domains. Calcium binding induced an increase in the level of ordered secondary structure and a decrease in Stokes radius in these mutants; such changes were identical in direction to those of wild type CaM, but the magnitude depended on the mutation. Calcium titrations monitored by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of Y138 in site IV showed that the affinities of sites III and IV of wild type PCaM were (i) higher than those of the same sites in rat CaM, (ii) equivalent to those of the same sites in PCaM mutants altered between sites I and II, and (iii) higher than those of PCaM mutants modified in sites III and IV. Thus, calcium saturation drove all mutants to undergo conformational switching in the same direction but not to the same extent as wild type PCaM. The disruption of the allosteric mechanism that is manifest as faulty channel regulation may be explained by altered properties of switching among the 14 possible partially saturated species of PCaM rather than by an inability to adopt two end-state conformations or target interactions similar to those of the wild type protein. PMID:10841769

  17. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain.

    PubMed

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J

    2011-10-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  18. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain

    PubMed Central

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  19. Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Plays a Role in Persistent Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crown, Eric D; Gwak, Young S.; Ye, Zaiming; Tan, Huaiyu; Johnson, Kathia M; Xu, Guo-Ying; McAdoo, David J; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-01-01

    Chronic central neuropathic pain following CNS injuries remains refractory to therapeutic interventions. A novel approach would be to target key intracellular signaling proteins that are known to contribute to continued activation by phosphorylation of kinases, transcription factors, and/or receptors that contribute to changes in membrane excitability. We demonstrate that one signaling kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), is critical in maintaining aberrant dorsal horn neuron hyperexcitability in the neuropathic pain condition following spinal cord injury (SCI). Following T10 contusion SCI, activated CaMKII (phosphorylated, pCAMKII) expression is significantly upregulated in the T7/8 spinal dorsal horn in neurons, but not glial cells, and in oligodendrocytes in the dorsal column in the same rats that displayed at-level mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, identified spinothalamic neurons demonstrated significant increases of pCaMKII after SCI compared to sham controls. However, neither astrocytes nor microglia showed pCaMKII expression in either sham or SCI rats. To demonstrate causality, treatment of SCI rats with KN-93, which prevents CaMKII activation, significantly attenuated at-level mechanical allodynia and aberrant WDR neuronal activity evoked by brush, pressure, pinch stimuli and a graded series of von Frey stimuli, respectively. This is the first evidence that persistent CaMKII activation contributes to chronic central neuropathic pain by mechanisms that involve maintained hyperexcitability of WDR dorsal horn neurons. Furthermore, targeting key signaling proteins is a novel, useful therapeutic strategy for treating chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:22296735

  20. An early ethylene up-regulated gene encoding a calmodulin-binding protein involved in plant senescence and death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    35S-Labeled calmodulin (CaM) was used to screen a tobacco anther cDNA library. A positive clone (NtER1) with high homology to an early ethylene-up-regulated gene (ER66) in tomato, and an Arabidopsis homolog was isolated and characterized. Based on the helical wheel projection, a 25-mer peptide corresponding to the predicted CaM-binding region of NtER1 (amino acids 796-820) was synthesized. The gel-mobility shift assay showed that the peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of Ca(2+). CaM binds to NtER1 with high affinity (K(d) approximately 12 nm) in a calcium-dependent manner. Tobacco flowers at different stages of development were treated with ethylene or with 1-methylcyclopropene for 2 h before treating with ethylene. Northern analysis showed that the NtER1 was rapidly induced after 15 min of exposure to ethylene. However, the 2-h 1-methylcyclopropene treatment totally blocked NtER1 expression in flowers at all stages of development, suggesting that NtER1 is an early ethylene-up-regulated gene. The senescing leaves and petals had significantly increased NtER1 induction as compared with young leaves and petals, implying that NtER1 is developmentally regulated and acts as a trigger for senescence and death. This is the first documented evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling in ethylene action.

  1. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  2. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  3. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  4. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr99 or Tyr138 of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe99-CaM, or Phe138-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe138-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr99 also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr99 by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  5. Dyad content is reduced in cardiac myocytes of mice with impaired calmodulin regulation of RyR2.

    PubMed

    Lavorato, Manuela; Huang, Tai-Qin; Iyer, Venkat Ramesh; Perni, Stefano; Meissner, Gerhard; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-04-01

    In cardiac muscle, calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of several membrane proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis (CaV1.2; RyR2, SERCA2, PMCA). Three engineered amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) in mice (Ryr2 (ADA/ADA) ) strongly affect cardiac function, with impaired CaM inhibition of RyR2, reduced SR Ca(2+) sequestration, and early cardiac hypertrophy and death (Yamaguchi et al., J Clin Invest 117:1344-1353, 2007). We have examined the ultrastructure and RyR2 immunolocalization in WT and Ryr2 (ADA/ADA) hearts at ~10 days after birth. The myocytes show only minor evidence of structural damage: some increase in intermyofibrillar space, with occasional areas of irregular SR disposition and an increase in frequency of smaller myofibrils, despite an increase of about 15 % in average myocyte cross sectional area. Z line streaming, a sign of myofibrillar stress, is limited and fairly rare. Immunolabeling with an anti-RyR2 antibody shows that RyR-positive foci located at the level of the Z lines are less frequent in mutant hearts. A dramatic decrease in the frequency and size of dyads, accompanied by a decrease in occupancy of the gap by RyR2, but without obvious alterations in location and general structure is a notable ultrastructural feature. The data suggest that the uneven distribution of dyads or calcium release sites within the cells resulting from an overall reduction in RyR2 content may contribute to the poor cardiac performance and early death of Ryr2 (ADA/ADA) mice. An unusual fragmentation of mitochondria, perhaps related to imbalances in free cytoplasmic calcium levels, accompanies these changes. PMID:25694159

  6. Alpha calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II in learning-dependent plasticity of mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Skibinska-Kijek, A; Radwanska, A; Kossut, M

    2008-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and more specifically its alpha subunit, is widely believed to be fundamental for hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In the cerebral cortex, deprivation-evoked plasticity was shown to depend on alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation abilities. Here we analyzed how learning-induced functional reorganization of cortical representations affected alphaCaMKII in adult Swiss mice. Mice were subjected to short-lasting sensory training in which stimulation of whiskers was paired with tail shock. The pairing results in enlargement of functional representation of vibrissae activated during the training. alphaCaMKII protein and its autophosphorylation level were determined by Western-blotting in somatosensory cortex crude synaptosomal fraction (P2) and postsynaptic protein-enriched, Triton X-100 insoluble fraction (TIF). The first training session resulted in an increase in alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation at autonomy site observed in TIF. A similar increase was also observed after the first session of just whiskers stimulation, which alone does not induce rearrangement of cortical representations. These data indicate that increased autophosphorylation of postsynaptic alphaCaMKII is not a correlate of induction phase of plasticity related reorganization of cortical representation of vibrissae. The increase observed in both experimental groups was transient and did not persist in the maintenance phase of the plastic change. Furthermore, we found that the training caused a delayed upregulation of alphaCaMKII protein level in crude synaptosomal fraction, but not in TIF, and the upregulation was not accompanied by an increase in autophosphorylation level of the kinase. The result indicates alphaCaMKII involvement in the late phase of plastic change and suggests the participation of a presynaptic pool of kinase rather than postsynaptic at this point. PMID:18164137

  7. Mycorrhizal-induced calmodulin mediated changes in antioxidant enzymes and growth response of drought-stressed trifoliate orange.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Srivastava, A K; Zou, Ying-Ning; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Han, Yu; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L) Raf.] is considered highly arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) dependent for growth responses through a series of signal transductions in form of various physiological responses. The proposed study was carried out to evaluate the effect of an AM fungus (Funneliformis mosseae) on growth, antioxidant enzyme (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutase, SOD) activities, leaf relative water content (RWC), calmodulin (CaM), superoxide anion ([Formula: see text]), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in leaves of the plants exposed to both well-watered (WW) and drought stress (DS) conditions. A 58-day of DS significantly decreased mycorrhizal colonization by 60% than WW. Compared to non-AM seedlings, AM seedlings displayed significantly higher shoot morphological properties (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf number), biomass production (shoot and root fresh weight) and leaf RWC, regardless of soil water status. AM inoculation significantly increased CaM and soluble protein concentrations and CAT activity, whereas significantly decreased [Formula: see text] and H2O2 concentration under both WW and DS conditions. The AM seedlings also exhibited significantly higher Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities than the non-AM seedlings under DS but not under WW, which are triggered by higher CaM levels in AM plants on the basis of correlation studies. Further, the negative correlation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities with [Formula: see text] and H2O2 concentration showed the DS-induced ROS scavenging ability of CaM mediated SODs under mycorrhization. Our results demonstrated that AM-inoculation elevated the synthesis of CaM in leaves and up-regulated activities of the antioxidant enzymes, thereby, repairing the possible oxidative damage to plants by lowering the ROS accumulation under DS condition. PMID:25538696

  8. Regulation of plant immunity through ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin-AtSR1/CAMTA3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Liqun; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Poovaiah, B W

    2014-04-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are essential signals for activation of plant immunity. It has also been reported that Ca(2+) signals suppress salicylic acid-mediated plant defense through AtSR1/CAMTA3, a member of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-regulated transcription factor family that is conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. How plants overcome this negative regulation to mount an effective defense response during a stage of intracellular Ca(2+) surge is unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of an important component of ubiquitin ligase, and the associated AtSR1 turnover. The AtSR1 interaction protein 1 (SR1IP1) was identified by CytoTrap two-hybrid screening. The loss-of-function mutant of SR1IP1 is more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, and over-expression of SR1IP1 confers enhanced resistance, indicating that SR1IP1 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. SR1IP1 and AtSR1 act in the same signaling pathway to regulate plant immunity. SR1IP1 contains the structural features of a substrate adaptor in cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and was shown to serve as a substrate adaptor that recruits AtSR1 for ubiquitination and degradation when plants are challenged with pathogens. Hence, SR1IP1 positively regulates plant immunity by removing the defense suppressor AtSR1. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how Ca(2+) -mediated actions are coordinated to achieve effective plant immunity. PMID:24528504

  9. Curcumin specifically binds to the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Nasimul; Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Dey, Sharmistha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) plays significant role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression, and thus, it is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as cell signaling and neuronal survival. On the other hand, curcumin, a naturally occurring yellow bioactive component of turmeric possesses wide spectrum of biological actions, and it is widely used to treat atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation. It also acts as an antioxidant. Here, we studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at pH 7.4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, fluorescence binding, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods. We performed MD simulations for both neutral and anionic forms of CAMK4-curcumin complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the protein-ligand complex. Molecular docking studies revealed that the curcumin binds in the large hydrophobic cavity of kinase domain of CAMK4 through several hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonded interactions. Additionally, MD simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-ligand complex system in aqueous solution and conformational changes in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. A significant increase in the fluorescence intensity at 495 nm was observed (λexc = 425 nm), suggesting a strong interaction of curcumin to the CAMK4. A high binding affinity (KD = 3.7 × 10(-8) ± .03 M) of curcumin for the CAMK4 was measured by SPR further indicating curcumin as a potential ligand for the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing a new inspired curcumin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life-threatening diseases. PMID:25929263

  10. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  11. Research Resource: Roles for Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) in Systems Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Ribar, Thomas; Means, Christopher R; Tsimelzon, Anna; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Bain, James R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Newgard, Christopher B; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have implicated calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling as a major factor in obesity that contributes to aberrant systems metabolism. Somewhat paradoxically, obesity correlates with decreased circulating Ca(2+) levels, leading to increased release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores from the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings suggest that insulin resistance associated with the obese state is linked to activation of canonical Ca(2+) signaling pathways. Mechanistically, increased intracellular Ca(2+) binds calmodulin (CaM) to activate a set of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinases. In this research resource, we explore the metabolic functions and implications of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) as a metabolic effector of Ca(2+)/CaM action. We reveal the importance of CaMKK2 for gating insulin release from pancreatic β-cells while concomitantly influencing the sensitivity of insulin-responsive tissues. To provide a better understanding of the metabolic impact of CaMKK2 loss, we performed targeted metabolomic analyses of key metabolic byproducts of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism in mice null for CaMKK2. We quantified amino acids and acyl carnitines in 3 insulin-sensitive tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, plasma) isolated from CaMKK2(-/-) mice and their wild-type littermates under conditions of dietary stress (low-fat diet, normal chow, high-fat diet, and fasting), thereby unveiling unique metabolic functions of CaMKK2. Our findings highlight CaMKK2 as a molecular rheostat for insulin action and emphasize the importance of Ca(2+)/CaM/CaMKK2 in regulation of whole-body metabolism. These findings reveal that CaMKK2 may be an attractive therapeutic target for combatting comorbidities associated with perturbed insulin signaling. PMID:27003444

  12. Novel regulation of equlibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) by receptor-stimulated Ca2+-dependent calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Bicket, Alex; Mehrabi, Pedram; Naydenova, Zlatina; Wong, Victoria; Donaldson, Logan; Stagljar, Igor; Coe, Imogen R

    2016-05-15

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) facilitate the flux of nucleosides, such as adenosine, and nucleoside analog (NA) drugs across cell membranes. A correlation between adenosine flux and calcium-dependent signaling has been previously reported; however, the mechanistic basis of these observations is not known. Here we report the identification of the calcium signaling transducer calmodulin (CaM) as an ENT1-interacting protein, via a conserved classic 1-5-10 motif in ENT1. Calcium-dependent human ENT1-CaM protein interactions were confirmed in human cell lines (HEK293, RT4, U-87 MG) using biochemical assays (HEK293) and the functional assays (HEK293, RT4), which confirmed modified nucleoside uptake that occurred in the presence of pharmacological manipulations of calcium levels and CaM function. Nucleoside and NA drug uptake was significantly decreased (∼12% and ∼39%, respectively) by chelating calcium (EGTA, 50 μM; BAPTA-AM, 25 μM), whereas increasing intracellular calcium (thapsigargin, 1.5 μM) led to increased nucleoside uptake (∼26%). Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (in U-87 MG) by glutamate (1 mM) and glycine (100 μM) significantly increased nucleoside uptake (∼38%) except in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (50 μM), or CaM antagonist, W7 (50 μM). These data support the existence of a previously unidentified novel receptor-dependent regulatory mechanism, whereby intracellular calcium modulates nucleoside and NA drug uptake via CaM-dependent interaction of ENT1. These findings suggest that ENT1 is regulated via receptor-dependent calcium-linked pathways resulting in an alteration of purine flux, which may modulate purinergic signaling and influence NA drug efficacy. PMID:27009875

  13. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  14. Involvement of calmodulin in regulation of primary root elongation by N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Zhenhua; Huang, Yali; Li, Haili; Song, Shuishan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use signal molecules of low molecular weight to monitor their local population density and to coordinate their collective behavior in a process called “quorum sensing” (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the primary QS signals among Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-mediated QS plays an essential role in diverse bacterial physiological processes. Recent evidence shows that plants are able to sense bacterial AHLs and respond to them appropriately. However, little is known about the mechanism by which plants perceive and transduce the bacterial AHLs within cells. In this study, we found that the stimulatory effect of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) on primary root elongation of Arabidopsis was abolished by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) and trifluoperazine (TFP). Western-blot and ELISA analysis revealed that the concentration of CaM protein in Arabidopsis roots increased after treatment with 1 μM 3OC6-HSL. Results from quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of all nine CaM genes in Arabidopsis genome was up-regulated in the plants treated with 3OC6-HSL. The loss-of-function mutants of each AtCaM gene (AtCaM1-9) were insensitive to 3OC6-HSL-stimulation of primary root elongation. On the other hand, the genetic evidence showed that CaM may not participates the inhibition of primary root length caused by application of long-chained AHLs such as C10-HSL and C12-HSL. Nevertheless, our results suggest that CaM is involved in the bacterial 3OC6-HSL signaling in plant cells. These data offer new insight into the mechanism of plant response to bacterial QS signals. PMID:25628641

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor expression via calmodulin kinase IV activation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Koji; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Ohkuma, Seitaro

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 R-1) are among the important calcium channels regulating intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we showed that drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induced IP3 R-1 upregulation via the calcium signal transduction pathway in psychological dependence. Although nicotine, a major component in tobacco smoke, participates in psychological and/or physical dependence, it has not yet been clarified how nicotine alters IP3 R-1 expression. The present study, therefore, seeks to clarify the mechanism bgy which nicotine modifies IP3 R-1 expression by using mouse cerebral cortical neurons in primary culture. Nicotine induced dose- and time-dependent upregulation of IP3 R-1 protein following its mRNA increase, and the latter was significantly suppressed by a nonselective nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) antagonist, mecamylamine. Both cFos and phosphorylated-cJun (p-cJun) were immediately increased in the nucleus, together with an increase of calmodulin kinase (CaMK) IV but not CaMKII expression after nicotine exposure. A nonselective inhibitor of CaMKs, KN-93, and a calcium chelating regent, BAPTA-AM, completely suppressed the expression of cFos and p-cJun in the nucleus as well as the nicotine-induced IP3 R-1 upregulation. These results indicate that nAChR activation by nicotine upregulates IP3 R-1 via increase of activator protein-1, which is a cFos and cJun dimmer, in the nucleus, with activation of Ca(2+) signaling transduction processes. PMID:25430056

  16. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ataei, Negar; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Movahedian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain's neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case–control and review studies were considered and evaluated by the search engines PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ScienceDirect Scopus between 1990 and February 2015. We did not carry out meta-analysis. Results: At the first search, it was fined 1015 articles which included “synaptic plasticity” OR “neuronal plasticity” OR “synaptic density” AND memory AND “molecular mechanism” AND “calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II” OR CaMKII as the keywords. A total of 335 articles were duplicates in the databases and eliminated. A total of 680 title articles were evaluated. Finally, 40 articles were selected as reference. Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory. PMID:26445635

  17. Calmodulin tagging provides a general method of using lanthanide induced magnetic field orientation to observe residual dipolar couplings in proteins in solution.

    PubMed

    Feeny, J; Birdsall, B; Bradbury, A F; Biekofsky, R R; Bayley, P M

    2001-09-01

    A general method is presented for magnetic field alignment of proteins in solution. By tagging a target protein with calmodulin saturated with paramagnetic lanthanide ions it is possible to measure substantial residual dipolar couplings (RDC) whilst minimising the effects of pseudocontact shifts on the target protein. A construct was made consisting of a calmodulin-binding peptide (M13 from sk-MLCK) attached to a target protein, dihydrofolate reductase in this case. The engineered protein binds tightly to calmodulin saturated with terbium, a paramagnetic lanthanide ion. By using only a short linker region between the M13 and the target protein, some of the magnetic field alignment induced in the CaM(Tb3+)4 is effectively transmitted to the target protein (DHFR). 1H-15N HSQC IPAP experiments on the tagged complex containing 15N-labelled DHFR-M13 protein and unlabelled CaM(Tb3+)4 allow one to measure RDC contributions in the aligned complex. RDC values in the range +4.0 to -7.4 Hz were measured at 600 MHz. Comparisons of 1H-15N HSQC spectra of 15N-DHFR-M13 alone and its complexes with CaM(Ca2+)4 and CaM(Tb3+)4 indicated that (i) the structure of the target protein is not affected by the complex formation and (ii) the spectra of the target protein are not seriously perturbed by pseudocontact shifts. The use of a relatively large tagging group (CaM) allows us to use a lanthanide ion with a very high magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (such as Tb3+) to give large alignments while maintaining relatively long distances from the target protein nuclei (and hence giving only small pseudocontact shift contributions). PMID:11693567

  18. Toxicity of heavy metals: 1. Correlation of metal toxicity with in vitro calmodulin inhibition. 2. Interactions of inorganic mercury with red blood cells: Control vs. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The toxic effects of metals are examined in two separate in vitro systems. In the first system, the correlation between published mouse LD{sub 50} values and experimentally derived values for calmodulin inhibition was determined. Calmodulin activity was defined as stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The basal PDE activity was determined with each cation and was unaffected by any of the concentrations utilized. The IC{sub 50} was determined from a plot of the log of the cation concentration vs. stimulated PDE activity for each cation. A very strong correlation was obtained when the IC{sub 50} vs. mouse LD{sub 50} curve was examined (p < 0.001). Calmodulin regulates many enzyme systems and processes that affect or are affected by calcium. This study was examined in light of the possible role of calcium in cell damage and death. In the second study, the interactions of erythrocytes (RBCs) and inorganic mercury (Hg) were examined. A broad range of Hg concentrations were utilized to explore the nature of the interactions. Two different mechanisms of RBC Hg accumulation and retention were evident. At lower Hg concentrations (0.001-0.1 {mu}M), the RBC accumulation/retention of Hg was constant (52% of available Hg), reversible, and temperature sensitive. At higher concentrations (1-100 {mu}M), the accumulation increased with Hg concentration, was not reversible, and was not temperature sensitive. A relationship between Hg and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is suggested by several reports in the literature. The accumulation/ retention of Hg by RBCs from control and ALS patients were compared. The RBCs from ALS patients released far more Hg during a two hr incubation 37C at 10 and 100 {mu}M Hg compared to controls.

  19. The calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B inhibits voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B on voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value of 0.81 μM. The decay rate of Kv channel inactivation was accelerated by CGS 9343B. The rate constants of association and dissociation for CGS 9343B were 2.77 ± 0.04 μM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 2.55 ± 1.50 s{sup −1}, respectively. CGS 9343B did not affect the steady-state activation curve, but shifted the inactivation curve toward to a more negative potential. Train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) application progressively increased the CGS 9343B-induced Kv channel inhibition. In addition, the inactivation recovery time constant was increased in the presence of CGS 9343B, suggesting that CGS 9343B-induced inhibition of Kv channel was use-dependent. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, did not affect Kv currents, and did not change the inhibitory effect of CGS 9343B on Kv current. Our results demonstrated that CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner, independent of calmodulin inhibition. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of CGS 9394B on Kv channels. • CGS 9394B inhibited Kv current in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner. • Caution is required when using CGS 9394B in vascular function studies.

  20. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  1. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  2. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  3. A direct pyrophosphatase-coupled assay provides new insights into the activation of the secreted adenylate cyclase from Bordetella pertussis by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anthony J; Coote, John G; Kazi, Yasmin F; Lawrence, Paul D; MacDonald-Fyall, Julia; Orr, Barbara M; Parton, Roger; Riehle, Mathis; Sinclair, James; Young, John; Price, Nicholas C

    2002-06-21

    Continuous recording of the activity of recombinant adenylate cyclase (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis (EC ) by conductimetric determination of enzyme-coupled pyrophosphate cleavage has enabled us to define a number of novel features of the activation of this enzyme by calmodulin and establish conditions under which valid activation data can be obtained. Activation either in the presence or absence of calcium is characterized by a concentration-dependent lag phase. The rate of formation and breakdown of the activated complex can be determined from an analysis of the lag phase kinetics and is in good agreement with thermodynamic data obtained by measuring the dependence of activation on calmodulin concentration, which show that calcium increases k(on) by about 30-fold. The rate of breakdown of the activated complex, formed either in the presence or absence of calcium, has been determined by dilution experiments and has been shown to be independent of the presence of calcium. The coupled assay is established as a rapid, convenient and safe method which should be readily applicable to the continuous assays of most other enzymes that catalyze reactions in which inorganic pyrophosphate is liberated. PMID:11934879

  4. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  5. Regulation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) by protocadherin-γC5 (Pcdh-γC5).

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takashi; Kishino-Kaneko, Yoshimi; Kameshita, Isamu; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2015-11-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. It is important to identify an endogenous regulator of CaMKP. Using an Escherichia coli two-hybrid screening method, we identified the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment of protocadherin γ subfamily C5 (Pcdh-γC5), which was generated by intracellular processing, as a CaMKP-binding protein. Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI) by CaMKP was significantly activated by the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment, Pcdh-γC5(715-944), both in vitro and in cells, suggesting that the C-terminal fragment functions as an endogenous activator of CaMKP. The nuclear translocation of the fragment was blocked by its binding to cytoplasmic CaMKP to form a ternary complex with CaMKI. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment of Pcdh-γC5 acts as a scaffold for CaMKP and CaMKI to regulate CaMKP activity. These findings may provide new insights into the reversible regulation of CaMKP in cells. PMID:26386307

  6. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  7. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of 45Ca2+, heat stability and Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca2+ binding transcriptional regulators. PMID:26455820

  8. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Numano, Takamasa; Shigeri, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Kameshita, Isamu Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP family phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.

  9. Calcium-calmodulin signaling elicits mitochondrial dysfunction and the release of cytochrome c during cadmium-induced apoptosis in primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Chenyang; Xia, Pengpeng; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Xuezhong; Bian, Jianchun; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Zongping

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal used in industry and is associated with adverse effects on human health following long- or short-term environmental exposure. Although Cd is known to induce apoptosis in many human organ systems, the mechanism that underlies its toxicity in primary osteoblasts (OBs) is not yet established. In the present study, we confirmed that Cd induced apoptosis in OBs isolated from the craniums of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. We then showed that exposure to Cd transiently increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) levels for up to 1.5h, after which the levels returned to normal. Pretreatment with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM was able to prevent Cd-induced apoptosis by reversing Cd-induced changes in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, we found that the antagonist of calcium-dependent calmodulin (CaM), W-7, inhibited the conformational change of calmodulin induced by Cd. Furthermore, Cd-induced apoptosis could be inhibited by W-7 through the suppression of the mitochondrial release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and the reversal of Cd-activation of caspase-3. These data indicate that activated Ca(2+)/CaM might transmit apoptotic signals to the mitochondria during Cd-induced apoptosis. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying apoptosis in OBs following exposure to Cd. PMID:24144892

  10. Effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-06-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr protein kinase family. It is regulated by the calcium-calmodulin dependent signal through a secondary messenger, Ca(2+), which leads to the activation of its autoinhibited form. The over-expression and mutation in CAMKIV as well as change in Ca(2+) concentration is often associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. We have successfully cloned, expressed, and purified a functionally active kinase domain of human CAMKIV. To observe the effect of different pH conditions on the structural and functional properties of CAMKIV, we have used spectroscopic techniques such as circular diachroism (CD) absorbance and fluorescence. We have observed that within the pH range 5.0-11.5, CAMKIV maintained both its secondary and tertiary structures, along with its function, whereas significant aggregation was observed at acidic pH (2.0-4.5). We have also performed ATPase activity assays under different pH conditions and found a significant correlation between the structure and enzymatic activities of CAMKIV. In-silico validations were further carried out by modeling the 3-dimensional structure of CAMKIV and then subjecting it to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand its conformational behavior in explicit water conditions. A strong correlation between spectroscopic observations and the output of molecular dynamics simulation was observed for CAMKIV. PMID:27032767

  11. Visualization and translocation of ternary Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B/Calmodulin-2 protein complexes by dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Waadt, Rainer; Kudla, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence complementation (FC) techniques are expedient for analyzing bimolecular protein-protein interactions. Here we aimed to develop a method for visualization of ternary protein complexes using dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation (TriFC). Dual-color TriFC combines protein fragments of mCherry and mVenus, in which a scaffold protein is bilaterally fused to C-terminal fragments of both fluorescent proteins and combined with potential interacting proteins fused to an N-terminal fluorescent protein fragment. For efficient visual verification of ternary complex formation, TriFC was combined with a cytoplasm to plasma membrane translocation assay. Modular vector sets were designed which are fully compatible with previously reported bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) vectors. As a proof-of-principle, the ternary complex formation of the PP2B protein phosphatase Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B with Calmodulin-2 was investigated in transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells. The results indicate a Calcineurin-B-induced interaction of Calmodulin-2 with Calcineurin-A. TriFC and the translocation of TriFC complexes provide a novel tool to investigate ternary complex formations with the simplicity of a BiFC approach. The robustness of FC applications and the opportunity to quantify fluorescence complementation render this assay suitable for a broad range of interaction analyses. PMID:25919910

  12. The effects of bepridil, compared with calcium-channel inhibitors and calmodulin antagonists on both spontaneous activity and contractions induced by potassium or phenylephrine in rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J K; Winslow, E; Marshall, R J

    1986-12-16

    Bepridil is known to block calcium channels in some vascular tissues. Recent work has shown that bepridil also antagonises calmodulin. The present study attempted to more fully characterize the vasodilator actions of bepridil by comparing it with the known calcium channel blocking drugs, nifedipine, diltiazem, verapamil and flunarizine, the calmodulin inhibitors, trifluoperazine and W7 and propylmethylenedioxyindene, which is thought to act intracellularly, on rat portal vein. The relative activities of the test drugs were compared on spontaneous activity and on all components of the contractile responses to potassium and phenylephrine. Bepridil inhibited all components of the potassium and phenylephrine responses equally, actions similar to those of the intracellular acting drugs. The exception to this was trifluoperazine which also exerted alpha-adrenoceptor blocking actions. In contrast the calcium channel blocking drugs, with the exception of verapamil, inhibited the tonic component of both spasmogen responses more than the phasic component. Bepridil like the intracellular acting drugs, but unlike the calcium channel blockers, markedly increased the frequency of spontaneous contractions whilst reducing amplitude. It is concluded that the profile of bepridil on rat portal vein more closely resembles that of intracellularly acting drugs than that of classical calcium channel inhibitors. PMID:3493163

  13. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  14. Overexpression of calmodulin-like (ShCML44) stress-responsive gene from Solanum habrochaites enhances tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Munir, Shoaib; Liu, Hui; Xing, Yali; Hussain, Saddam; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Yuyang; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are important Ca(2+) sensors, which play significant role in mediating plant stress tolerance. In the present study, cold responsive calmodulin-like (ShCML44) gene was isolated from cold tolerant wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites), and functionally characterized. The ShCML44 was differentially expressed in all plant tissues including root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit, and was strongly up-regulated under cold, drought and salinity stresses along with plant growth hormones. Under cold stress, progressive increase in the expression of ShCML44 was observed particularly in cold-tolerant S. habrochaites. The ShCML44-overexpressed plants showed greater tolerance to cold, drought, and salinity stresses, and recorded higher germination and better seedling growth. Transgenic tomato plants demonstrated higher antioxidant enzymes activity, gas exchange and water retention capacity with lower malondialdehyde accumulation and membrane damage under cold and drought stresses compared to wild-type. Moreover, transgenic plants exhibited reduced reactive oxygen species and higher relative water contents under cold and drought stress, respectively. Greater stress tolerance of transgenic plants was further reflected by the up-/down-regulation of stress-related genes including SOD, GST, CAT, POD, LOX, PR and ERD. In crux, these results strengthen the molecular understanding of ShCML44 gene to improve the abiotic stress tolerance in tomato. PMID:27546315

  15. Overexpression of calmodulin-like (ShCML44) stress-responsive gene from Solanum habrochaites enhances tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shoaib; Liu, Hui; Xing, Yali; Hussain, Saddam; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Yuyang; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are important Ca2+ sensors, which play significant role in mediating plant stress tolerance. In the present study, cold responsive calmodulin-like (ShCML44) gene was isolated from cold tolerant wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites), and functionally characterized. The ShCML44 was differentially expressed in all plant tissues including root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit, and was strongly up-regulated under cold, drought and salinity stresses along with plant growth hormones. Under cold stress, progressive increase in the expression of ShCML44 was observed particularly in cold-tolerant S. habrochaites. The ShCML44-overexpressed plants showed greater tolerance to cold, drought, and salinity stresses, and recorded higher germination and better seedling growth. Transgenic tomato plants demonstrated higher antioxidant enzymes activity, gas exchange and water retention capacity with lower malondialdehyde accumulation and membrane damage under cold and drought stresses compared to wild-type. Moreover, transgenic plants exhibited reduced reactive oxygen species and higher relative water contents under cold and drought stress, respectively. Greater stress tolerance of transgenic plants was further reflected by the up-/down-regulation of stress-related genes including SOD, GST, CAT, POD, LOX, PR and ERD. In crux, these results strengthen the molecular understanding of ShCML44 gene to improve the abiotic stress tolerance in tomato. PMID:27546315

  16. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Martijn J.; van de Bree, Jolet E.; Bodde, Hanna E.; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b–/– mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2bf/f and Camk2bT287A), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b–/– mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  17. An extracellular matrix, calmodulin-binding protein from Dictyostelium with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Andres; Huber, Robert J; Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2011-07-01

    CyrA is a novel cysteine-rich protein with four EGFL repeats that was isolated using the calmodulin (CaM) binding overlay technique (CaMBOT), suggesting it is a CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The full-length 63kDa cyrA is cleaved into two major C-terminal fragments, cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40. A putative CaM-binding domain was detected and both CaM-agarose binding and CaM immunoprecipitation verified that cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40 each bind to CaM in both a Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent manner. cyrA-C45 was present continuously throughout growth and development but was secreted at high levels during the multicellular slug stage of Dictyostelium development. At this time, cyrA localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM purification verified the presence of cyrA-C45. An 18 amino acid peptide (DdEGFL1) from the first EGFL repeat sequence of cyrA (EGFL1) that is present in both cyrA-C45 and -C40 enhances both random cell motility and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis. Here we reveal that the dose-dependent enhancement of motility by DdEGFL1 is related to the time of cell starvation. Addition of DdEGFL1 also inhibits cyrA proteolysis. The status of cyrA as an extracellular CaMBP was further clarified by the demonstration that CaM is secreted during development. Antagonism of CaM with W7 resulted in enhanced cyrA proteolysis suggesting a functional role for extracellular CaM in protecting CaMBPs from proteolysis. cyrA is the first extracellular CaMBP identified in Dictyostelium and since it is an ECM protein with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility and it likely also represents the first matricellular protein identified in a lower eukaryote. PMID:21402150

  18. Calcium-dependent stoichiometries of the KCa2.2 (SK) intracellular domain/calmodulin complex in solution

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Kenrick, Sophia A.; Riggs, Austen F.

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ activates SK Ca2+-activated K+ channels through the protein Ca2+ sensor, calmodulin (CaM). To understand how SK channels operate, it is necessary to determine how Ca2+ regulates CaM binding to its target on SK. Tagless, recombinant SK peptide (SKp), was purified for binding studies with CaM at low and high Ca2+ concentrations. Composition gradient multi-angle light scattering accurately measures the molar mass, stoichiometry, and affinity of protein complexes. In 2 mM Ca2+, SKp and CaM bind with three different stoichiometries that depend on the molar ratio of SKp:CaM in solution. These complexes include 28 kD 1SKp/1CaM, 39 kD 2SKp/1CaM, and 44 kD 1SKp/2CaM. A 2SKp/2CaM complex, observed in prior crystallographic studies, is absent. At <5 nM Ca2+, 1SKp/1CaM and 2SKp/1CaM were observed; however, 1SKp/2CaM was absent. Analytical ultracentrifugation was used to characterize the physical properties of the three SKp/CaM stoichiometries. In high Ca2+, the sedimentation coefficient is smaller for a 1SKp:1CaM solution than it is for either 2SKp:1CaM or 1SKp:2CaM. At low Ca2+ and at >100 µM protein concentrations, a molar excess of SKp over CaM causes aggregation. Aggregation is not observed in Ca2+ or with CaM in molar excess. In low Ca2+ both 1SKp:1CaM and 1SKp:2CaM solutions have similar sedimentation coefficients, which is consistent with the absence of a 1SKp/2CaM complex in low Ca2+. These results suggest that complexes with stoichiometries other than 2SKp/2CaM are important in gating. PMID:24420768

  19. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

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