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Sample records for calreticulin transacetylase catalyzed

  1. Calreticulin Transacetylase mediated activation of human platelet nitric oxide synthase by acetyl group donor compounds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Sushama, Anupam; Manral, Sushma; Sinha, Rajesh; Joshi, Rini; Singh, Usha; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Prasad, Ashok K; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols have attracted immense interest because of their diverse biological and pharmacological activities. Surprisingly, not much is documented about the biological activities of acetoxy derivatives of polyphenol called polyphenolic acetates (PA). In our previous reports, we have conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by PA. In the present work, specificity of CRTAase to various classes of PA was characterized in human platelet. The effect of PA, on platelet NOS and intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation were studied in an elaborated manner. Platelet CRTAase exhibited differential specificities to polyphenolic acetates upon incubation with l-arginine leading to activation of NOS. The intraplatelet generation of NO was studied by flowcytometry using DCFH-DA. The differential specificities of CRTAase to PA were found to positively correlate with increased production of NO upon incubation of PRP with PA and l-arginine. Further, the inhibitory effect of l-NAME on PA induced NO formation in platelets substantiated the CRTAase catalyzed activation of NOS. The real-time RT-PCR profile of NOS isoforms confirmed the preponderance of eNOS over iNOS in human platelets on treatment with PA. Western blot analysis also reiterated the differential pattern of acetylation of eNOS by PA. PA were also found effective in increasing the intraplatelet cGMP levels and inhibiting ADP-induced platelet aggregation. It is worth mentioning that the effects of PA were found to be in tune with the specificities of platelet CRTAase to PA as the substrates. PMID:22100620

  2. Enzyme-catalyzed acylation of homoserine: mechanistic characterization of the Haemophilus influenzae met2-encoded homoserine transacetylase.

    PubMed

    Born, T L; Franklin, M; Blanchard, J S

    2000-07-25

    The first unique step in bacterial and plant methionine biosynthesis involves the acylation of the gamma-hydroxyl of homoserine. In Haemophilus influenzae, acylation is accomplished via an acetyl-CoA-dependent acetylation catalyzed by homoserine transacetylase. The activity of this enzyme regulates flux of homoserine into multiple biosynthetic pathways and, therefore, represents a critical control point for cell growth and viability. We have cloned homoserine transacetylase from H. influenzae and present the first detailed enzymatic study of this enzyme. Steady-state kinetic experiments demonstrate that the enzyme utilizes a ping-pong kinetic mechanism in which the acetyl group of acetyl-CoA is initially transferred to an enzyme nucleophile before subsequent transfer to homoserine to form the final product, O-acetylhomoserine. The maximal velocity and V/K(homoserine) were independent of pH over the range of values tested, while V/K(acetyl)(-)(CoA) was dependent upon the ionization state of a single group exhibiting a pK value of 8.6, which was required to be protonated. Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies yielded inverse effects of 0.75 on V and 0.74 on V/K(CoA) on the reverse reaction and effects of 1.2 on V and 1.7 on V/K(homoserine) on the forward reaction. Direct evidence for the formation of an acetyl-enzyme intermediate was obtained using rapid-quench labeling studies. On the basis of these observations, we propose a chemical mechanism for this important member of the acyltransferase family and contrast its mechanism with that of homoserine transsuccinylase. PMID:10913262

  3. Crystal Structure of Homoserine Transacetylase from Haemophilus Influenzae Reveals a New Family of alpha/beta-Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza,I.; Nazi, I.; Korczynska, M.; Wright, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2005-01-01

    Homoserine transacetylase catalyzes one of the required steps in the biosynthesis of methionine in fungi and several bacteria. We have determined the crystal structure of homoserine transacetylase from Haemophilus influenzae to a resolution of 1.65 A. The structure identifies this enzyme to be a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase structural superfamily. The active site of the enzyme is located near the end of a deep tunnel formed by the juxtaposition of two domains and incorporates a catalytic triad involving Ser143, His337, and Asp304. A structural basis is given for the observed double displacement kinetic mechanism of homoserine transacetylase. Furthermore, the properties of the tunnel provide a rationale for how homoserine transacetylase catalyzes a transferase reaction vs. hydrolysis, despite extensive similarity in active site architecture to hydrolytic enzymes.

  4. Purification and characterization of Thermotoga maritima homoserine transsuccinylase indicates it is a transacetylase.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Born, Timothy L

    2006-10-01

    The methionine biosynthetic pathway found in bacteria is controlled at the first step, acylation of the gamma-hydroxyl of homoserine. This reaction is catalyzed by one of two unique enzymes, homoserine transacetylase or homoserine transsuccinylase, which have no amino acid sequence similarity. We cloned, expressed, and purified homoserine transsuccinylase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Substrate specificity experiments demonstrated that acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) is the preferred acyl donor and is used at least 30-fold more efficiently than succinyl-CoA. Steady-state kinetic experiments confirm that the enzyme utilizes a ping-pong kinetic mechanism in which the acetate group of acetyl-CoA is initially transferred to an enzyme nucleophile before subsequent transfer to homoserine. The maximal velocity, V/K (acetyl-CoA) and V/K (homoserine), all exhibited bell-shaped pH curves with apparent pKs of 6.0-6.9 and 8.2-8.8. The enzyme was inactivated by iodoacetamide in a pH-dependent manner, with an apparent pK of 6.3, suggesting the presence of an active-site cysteine residue which forms an acetyl-enzyme thioester intermediate during catalytic turnover, similar to observations with other transsuccinylases. In addition, the enzyme is highly stable at elevated temperatures, maintaining full activity at 70 degrees C. Taken together, these data suggest that the T. maritima enzyme functions biochemically as a transacetylase, despite having the sequence of a transsuccinylase. PMID:16708165

  5. Calreticulin inhibits commitment to adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Baksh, Shairaz; Michalak, Marek; Opas, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Calreticulin, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein, affects many critical cellular functions, including protein folding and calcium homeostasis. Using embryonic stem cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, we show that calreticulin modulates adipogenesis. We find that calreticulin-deficient cells show increased potency for adipogenesis when compared with wild-type or calreticulin-overexpressing cells. In the highly adipogenic crt−/− cells, the ER lumenal calcium concentration was reduced. Increasing the ER lumenal calcium concentration led to a decrease in adipogenesis. In calreticulin-deficient cells, the calmodulin–Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) pathway was up-regulated, and inhibition of CaMKII reduced adipogenesis. Calreticulin inhibits adipogenesis via a negative feedback mechanism whereby the expression of calreticulin is initially up-regulated by peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ). This abundance of calreticulin subsequently negatively regulates the expression of PPARγ, lipoprotein lipase, CCAAT enhancer–binding protein α, and aP2. Thus, calreticulin appears to function as a Ca2+-dependent molecular switch that regulates commitment to adipocyte differentiation by preventing the expression and transcriptional activation of critical proadipogenic transcription factors. PMID:18606846

  6. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  7. Role of homoserine transacetylase as a new target for antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Nazi, Ishac; Scott, Adam; Sham, Anita; Rossi, Laura; Williamson, Peter R; Kronstad, James W; Wright, Gerard D

    2007-05-01

    Microbial amino acid biosynthesis is a proven yet underexploited target of antibiotics. The biosynthesis of methionine in particular has been shown to be susceptible to small-molecule inhibition in fungi. The first committed step in Met biosynthesis is the acylation of homoserine (Hse) by the enzyme homoserine transacetylase (HTA). We have identified the MET2 gene of Cryptococcus neoformans H99 that encodes HTA (CnHTA) by complementation of an Escherichia coli metA mutant that lacks the gene encoding homoserine transsuccinylase (HTS). We cloned, expressed, and purified CnHTA and determined its steady-state kinetic parameters for the acetylation of L-Hse by acetyl coenzyme A. We next constructed a MET2 mutant in C. neoformans H99 and tested its growth behavior in Met-deficient media, confirming the expected Met auxotrophy. Furthermore, we used this mutant in a mouse inhalation model of infection and determined that MET2 is required for virulence. This makes fungal HTA a viable target for new antibiotic discovery. We screened a 1,000-compound library of small molecules for HTA inhibitors and report the identification of the first inhibitor of fungal HTA. This work validates HTA as an attractive drug-susceptible target for new antifungal agent design. PMID:17353245

  8. Calreticulin: conserved protein and diverse functions in plants.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Yun; He, Li-Heng; Jing, Rui-Lian; Li, Run-Zhi

    2009-06-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a key Ca2+-binding protein mainly resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is highly conserved and extensively expressed in all eukaryotic organisms investigated. The protein plays important roles in a variety of cellular processes including Ca2+ signaling and protein folding. Although calreticulin has been well characterized in mammalian systems, increased investigations have demonstrated that plant CRTs have a number of specific properties different from their animal counterparts. Recent developments on plant CRTs have highlighted the significance of CRTs in plants growth and development as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. There are at least two distinct groups of calreticulin isoforms in higher plants. Glycosylation of CRT was uniquely observed in plants. In this article, we will describe our current understanding of plant calreticulin gene family, protein structure, cellular localization, and diverse functions in plants. We also discuss the prospects of using this information for genetic improvements of crop plants. PMID:19453510

  9. Structural Basis of Carbohydrate Recognition by Calreticulin*

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Rosenauer, Angelika; Bastos-Aristizabal, Sara; Gorelik, Alexei; Williams, David B.; Gehring, Kalle

    2010-01-01

    The calnexin cycle is a process by which glycosylated proteins are subjected to folding cycles in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen via binding to the membrane protein calnexin (CNX) or to its soluble homolog calreticulin (CRT). CNX and CRT specifically recognize monoglucosylated Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 glycans, but the structural determinants underlying this specificity are unknown. Here, we report a 1.95-Å crystal structure of the CRT lectin domain in complex with the tetrasaccharide α-Glc-(1→3)-α-Man-(1→2)-α-Man-(1→2)-Man. The tetrasaccharide binds to a long channel on CRT formed by a concave β-sheet. All four sugar moieties are engaged in the protein binding via an extensive network of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. The structure explains the requirement for glucose at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate; the oxygen O2 of glucose perfectly fits to a pocket formed by CRT side chains while forming direct hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl of Gly124 and the side chain of Lys111. The structure also explains a requirement for the Cys105–Cys137 disulfide bond in CRT/CNX for efficient carbohydrate binding. The Cys105–Cys137 disulfide bond is involved in intimate contacts with the third and fourth sugar moieties of the Glc1Man3 tetrasaccharide. Finally, the structure rationalizes previous mutagenesis of CRT and lays a structural groundwork for future studies of the role of CNX/CRT in diverse biological pathways. PMID:20880849

  10. CALRETICULIN IS ENRICHED IN THE CRYSTAL IDIOBLASTS OF PISTIA STRATIOTES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calreticulin (CRT) has the highest calcium-binding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins found thus far in plants. In this study, we isolated cDNAs encoding CRT from Pistia stratiotes and analyzed the temporal and spatial patterns of CRT expression in leaves. Northern analysis showed...

  11. Release of calreticulin from neutrophils may alter C1q-mediated immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, U; Sontheimer, R D; Sastry, K N; Zaner, K S; Zappi, E G; Hughes, G R; Khamashta, M A; Strong, P; Reid, K B; Eggleton, P

    1997-01-01

    Calreticulin is an abundant intracellular protein which is involved in a number of cellular functions. During cytomegalovirus infection, as well as inflammatory episodes in autoimmune disease, calreticulin can be released from cells and detected in the circulation, where it may act as an immunodominant autoantigen in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Calreticulin is known to bind to the molecules of innate immunity, such as C1q, the first subcomponent of complement. However, the functional implications of C1q-calreticulin interactions are unknown. In the present study we sought to investigate, in greater detail, the interaction between these two proteins following the release of calreticulin from neutrophils upon stimulation. In order to pinpoint the regions of interaction, recombinant calreticulin and its discrete domains (N-, P- and C-domains) were produced in Escherichia coli. Both the N- and P-domains of calreticulin were shown to bind to the globular head regions of C1q. Calreticulin also appeared to alter C1q-mediated immune functions. Binding of calreticulin to C1q inhibited haemolysis of IgM-sensitized erythrocytes. Both the N- and P-domains of calreticulin were found to contain sites involved in the inhibition of C1q-induced haemolysis. Full-length calreticulin, and its N- and P-domains, were also able to reduce the C1q-dependent binding of immune complexes to neutrophils. We conclude that calreticulin, once released from neutrophils during inflammation, may not only induce an antigenic reaction, but, under defined conditions, may also interfere with C1q-mediated inflammatory processes. PMID:9065775

  12. BiP and calreticulin form an abundant complex that is independent of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, AJ; Leborgne-Castel, N; Pesca, M; Vitale, A; Denecke, J

    1998-01-01

    BiP is found in association with calreticulin, both in the presence and absence of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although the BiP-calreticulin complex can be disrupted by ATP, several properties suggest that the calreticulin associated with BiP is neither unfolded nor partially or improperly folded. (1) The complex is stable in vivo and does not dissociate during 8 hr of chase. (2) When present in the complex, calreticulin masks epitopes at the C terminus of BiP that are not masked when BiP is bound to an assembly-defective protein. And (3) overproduction of calreticulin does not lead to the recruitment of more BiP into complexes with calreticulin. The BiP-calreticulin complex can be disrupted by low pH but not by divalent cation chelators. When the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal of BiP is removed, complex formation with calreticulin still occurs, and this explains the poor secretion of the truncated molecule. Gel filtration experiments showed that BiP and calreticulin are present in distinct high molecular weight complexes in which both molecules interact with each other. The possible functions of this complex are discussed. PMID:9596639

  13. Comparison of Protein Acetyltransferase Action of CRTAase with the Prototypes of HAT

    PubMed Central

    Ponnan, Prija; Kumar, Ajit; Singh, Prabhjot; Gupta, Prachi; Joshi, Rini; Saso, Luciano; Prasad, Ashok K.; Rastogi, Ramesh C.; Parmar, Virinder S.; Raj, Hanumantharao G.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory is credited for the discovery of enzymatic acetylation of protein, a phenomenon unknown till we identified an enzyme termed acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase (TAase), catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from polyphenolic acetates to receptor proteins (RP). Later, TAase was identified as calreticulin (CR), an endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein. CR was termed calreticulin transacetylase (CRTAase). Our persistent study revealed that CR like other families of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) such as p300, Rtt109, PCAF, and ESA1, undergoes autoacetylation. The autoacetylated CR was characterized as a stable intermediate in CRTAase catalyzed protein acetylation, and similar was the case with ESA1. The autoacetylation of CR like that of HATs was found to enhance protein-protein interaction. CR like HAT-1, CBP, and p300 mediated the acylation of RP utilizing acetyl CoA and propionyl CoA as the substrates. The similarities between CRTAase and HATs in mediating protein acylation are highlighted in this review. PMID:24688408

  14. Lipoyl content and other properties of the protein X and the transacetylase components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Radke, G.A.; Rahmatullah, M.; Jilka, J.M; Roche, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Previous work demonstrated by structural and immunological techniques that protein X (X) was distinct from the transacetylase (E2) but that regions of X and E2 (specifically including the portions acetylated) were similar. Trypsin cleaved X and E2 into large domains giving acetylated portions with apparent M/sub r/ values of approx.20 kdal and approx.38 kdal, respectively. Purified (denatured) E2 and X subunits were prepared and amino acid compositions determined. Reduced subunits were reacted with FDNB and acid hydrolyzed. Bis(DNP)dihydrolipoic was extracted into ethylacetate and quantitated by HPLC (epsilon = 25 O.D.mM/sup -1/cm/sup -1/ at 340 nm) and the levels normalized based on the amino acid analysis of the acid hydrolysates. E2 and X were estimated to contain about 1 lipoyl moiety per subunit. Following dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase-dependent NADH reduction of E2-X, 1.5-2 /sup 14/C-NEM per subunit were incorporated into E2 and X consistent with reduction of one lipoyl moiety per subunit. Incorporation into E2-X subcomplex of > 90 acetyl groups per molecule of subcomplex led to > 1.5 acetyl group incorporated per X and per E2 subunit and nearly eliminated NADH-dependent incorporation of /sup 14/C-NEM into these subunits suggesting diacetyl moieties were formed. Consistent with that possibility, acetylation to high levels yielded rapid and slowly exchanging acetyl groups on both E2 and X.

  15. Induction of calreticulin expression in response to amino acid deprivation in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heal, R; McGivan, J

    1998-01-01

    The role of calreticulin as a stress-induced molecular chaperone protein of the endoplasmic reticulum is becoming more apparent. We characterize here the induction of calreticulin in response to complete amino acid deprivation in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Amino acid deprivation caused a 4-fold increase in calreticulin protein levels over a period of 4-10 h. In addition to an overall increase in protein levels, the glycosylation of calreticulin was increased. This glycosylation event was blocked by tunicamycin and was not required for the increase in calreticulin protein levels. Immunofluorescence studies localized calreticulin to the ER of CHO cells, and no significant change was observed after amino acid deprivation. Northern-blot analysis showed that calreticulin mRNA levels were increased approx. 10-fold in response to complete amino acid deprivation. The response was sensitive to actinomycin D and alpha-amanitin, implying that regulation is primarily at the level of transcription. These results are similar to the large increases in asparagine synthetase mRNA observed in response to amino acid deprivation, but the amino acid-deprivation-response element identified to be involved in asparagine synthetase induction is absent from the calreticulin promoter. PMID:9425124

  16. Characterization of calreticulin as a protein interacting with protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Rendón-Huerta, E; Mendoza-Hernández, G; Robles-Flores, M

    1999-01-01

    A protein kinase C (PKC)-binding protein was purified to homogeneity from the Triton-insoluble fraction from rat hepatocytes homogenates. The protein was identified as the mature calreticulin chain by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and by its immunoreactivity with anti-calreticulin antibody raised against the C-terminal KDEL (single-letter code) sequence. The calculated molecular mass was 46. 6 kDa but the protein migrates in SDS/PAGE as a doublet with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 55 kDa. Studies in vitro with purified calreticulin with the use of an overlay assay approach demonstrated that it binds to activated PKC isoenzymes expressed in rat hepatocytes. Phosphorylation of purified calreticulin with a PKC isoenzyme-specific immune complex kinase assay showed that it is also a very good substrate for all PKC isoforms in vitro. The treatment of intact cells with phorbol ester or with adrenaline (epinephrine) plus propranolol increased calreticulin phosphorylation, which was blocked by the pretreatment of cells with the PKC-specific inhibitor Ro 31-8220. The analysis of calreticulin immunoprecipitates from control or treated cells indicated that PKCalpha, PKCbeta, PKCtheta;, PKCzeta and PKCmu, but not PKCdelta or PKCepsilon, co-immunoprecipitated with calreticulin. Taken together, our results indicate that PKC interacts in vivo with calreticulin and suggest that they can operate in common signalling pathways. PMID:10567230

  17. Transient, lectin-like association of calreticulin with folding intermediates of cellular and viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, J R; Ora, A; Van, P N; Helenius, A

    1995-01-01

    The soluble, calcium-binding protein calreticulin shares high sequence homology with calnexin, a transmembrane chaperone of glycoprotein folding. Our experiments demonstrated that calreticulin, like calnexin, associated transiently with numerous newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. The population of proteins that bound to calreticulin was partially overlapping with those that bound to calnexin. Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus was shown to associate with both calreticulin and calnexin. Using HA as a model substrate, it was found that both calreticulin- and calnexin-bound HA corresponded primarily to incompletely disulfide-bonded folding intermediates and conformationally trapped forms. Binding of all substrates was oligosaccharide-dependent and required the trimming of glucose residues from asparagine-linked core glycans by glucosidases I and II. In vitro, alpha-mannosidase digestion of calreticulin-bound HA indicated that calreticulin was specific for monoglucosylated glycans. Thus, calreticulin appeared to be a lectin with similar oligosaccharide specificity as its membrane-bound homologue, calnexin. Both are therefore likely to play an important role in glycoprotein maturation and quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum. Images PMID:8534914

  18. Decoded Calreticulin-Deficient Embryonic Stem Cell Transcriptome Resolves Latent Cardiophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Randolph S.; Chiriac, Anca; Niederlander, Nicolas J.; Nelson, Timothy J.; Behfar, Atta; Mishra, Prasanna K.; Macura, Slobodan; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Genomic perturbations that challenge normal signaling at the pluripotent stage may trigger unforeseen ontogenic aberrancies. Anticipatory systems biology identification of transcriptome landscapes that underlie latent phenotypes would offer molecular diagnosis before the onset of symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of calreticulin-deficient embryonic stem cell transcriptomes on molecular functions and physiological systems. Bioinformatic surveillance of calreticulin-null stem cells, a monogenic insult model, diagnosed a disruption in transcriptome dynamics, which re-prioritized essential cellular functions. Calreticulin-calibrated signaling axes were uncovered, and network-wide cartography of undifferentiated stem cell transcripts suggested cardiac manifestations. Calreticulin-deficient stem cell-derived cardiac cells verified disorganized sarcomerogenesis, mitochondrial paucity, and cytoarchitectural aberrations to validate calreticulin-dependent network forecasts. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology detected a ventricular septal defect, revealing organogenic manifestation of calreticulin deletion. Thus, bioinformatic deciphering of a primordial calreticulin-deficient transcriptome decoded at the pluripotent stem cell stage a reconfigured multifunctional molecular registry to anticipate predifferentiation susceptibility toward abnormal cardiophenotype. PMID:20506533

  19. Calreticulin: non-endoplasmic reticulum functions in physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Gold, Leslie I; Eggleton, Paul; Sweetwyne, Mariya T; Van Duyn, Lauren B; Greives, Matthew R; Naylor, Sara-Megumi; Michalak, Marek; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E

    2010-03-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), when localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), has important functions in directing proper conformation of proteins and glycoproteins, as well as in homeostatic control of cytosolic and ER calcium levels. There is also steadily accumulating evidence for diverse roles for CRT localized outside the ER, including data suggesting important roles for CRT localized to the outer cell surface of a variety of cell types, in the cytosol, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, the addition of exogenous CRT rescues numerous CRT-driven functions, such as adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and immunoregulatory functions of CRT-null cells. Recent studies show that topically applied CRT has diverse and profound biological effects that enhance cutaneous wound healing in animal models. This evidence for extracellular bioactivities of CRT has provided new insights into this classically ER-resident protein, despite a lack of knowledge of how CRT exits from the ER to the cell surface or how it is released into the extracellular milieu. Nonetheless, it has become clear that CRT is a multicompartmental protein that regulates a wide array of cellular responses important in physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing, the immune response, fibrosis, and cancer.-Gold, L. I., Eggleton, P., Sweetwyne, M. T., Van Duyn, L. B., Greives, M. R., Naylor, S.-M., Michalak, M., Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. Calreticulin: non-endoplamic reticulum functions in physiology and disease. PMID:19940256

  20. Functional characterization of Arabidopsis calreticulin1a: a key alleviator of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anna; Svensson, Karin; Persson, Staffan; Jung, Joanna; Michalak, Marek; Widell, Susanne; Sommarin, Marianne

    2008-06-01

    The chaperone calreticulin plays important roles in a variety of processes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of animal cells, such as Ca2+ signaling and protein folding. Although the functions of calreticulin are well characterized in animals, only indirect evidence is available for plants. To increase our understanding of plant calreticulins we introduced one of the Arabidopsis isoforms, AtCRT1a, into calreticulin-deficient (crt-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. As a result of calreticulin deficiency, the mouse crt-/- fibroblasts have decreased levels of Ca2+ in the ER and impaired protein folding abilities. Expression of the AtCRT1a in mouse crt-/- fibroblasts rescued these phenotypes, i.e. AtCRT1a restored the Ca2+-holding capacity and chaperone functions in the ER of the mouse crt-/- fibroblasts, demonstrating that the animal sorting machinery was also functional for a plant protein, and that basic calreticulin functions are conserved across the Kingdoms. Expression analyses using a beta-glucuronidase (GUS)-AtCRT1a promoter construct revealed high expression of CRT1a in root tips, floral tissues and in association with vascular bundles. To assess the impact of AtCRT1a in planta, we generated Atcrt1a mutant plants. The Atcrt1a mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to the drug tunicamycin, an inducer of the unfolded protein response. We therefore conclude that AtCRT1a is an alleviator of the tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response, and propose that the use of the mouse crt-/- fibroblasts as a calreticulin expression system may prove useful to assess functionalities of calreticulins from different species. PMID:18436549

  1. Calreticulin is transcriptionally upregulated by heat shock, calcium and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T O; Capra, J D; Sontheimer, R D

    1996-01-01

    Calreticulin is a new human rheumatic disease-associated autoantigen that plays a multifaceted role in cell biology. In earlier studies, this protein was shown to share an intimate relationship with the Ro/SS-A autoantigen complex, although the nature of this association continues to be debated. Since modulation of the Ro/SS-A autoantigen in epidermal keratinocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and neonatal lupus erythematosus, we have begun to examine the transcriptional regulation of calreticulin. A 504 bp calreticulin promoter fragment was subcloned into a reporter gene plasmid containing firefly luciferase. Calcium ionophore, heat shock, and heavy metals such as zinc and cadmium were consistently found to increase calreticulin transcriptional activities in A431 cells (a human epidermoid squamous carcinoma cell line) under transient transfection conditions. These studies suggest that (a) calreticulin is regulated at the transcriptional level, and (b) calreticulin, like some other LE-related autoantigens, appears to function as a heat shock/stress-response gene. PMID:8676889

  2. Cell surface calreticulin is a putative mannoside lectin which triggers mouse melanoma cell spreading.

    PubMed

    White, T K; Zhu, Q; Tanzer, M L

    1995-07-01

    B16 mouse melanoma cells adhere to and spread on laminin. We have previously shown that cell spreading is uncoupled from adhesion when unglycosylated laminin is used as a substratum; spreading was restored by a Pronase digest of laminin which became inactive when it was specifically depleted of its mannoside peptides; spreading was also specifically restored by mannosides such as mannan, Man9, and Man6, but not Man3. The effector mannosides bind to a cell surface receptor, previously shown by direct and indirect methods. We have now identified the receptor as cell surface calreticulin by isolating it via mannan affinity chromatography and showing its sequence identity with mouse calreticulin. Anti-calreticulin antibodies confirm this identity, decorate the B16 cell surface, and block cell spreading. Purified B16 cell calreticulin from whole cell lysates successfully competes with cell surface calreticulin and prevents cell spreading. The composite data implicate cell surface calreticulin as a putative lectin that must be occupied to initiate spreading of laminin-adherent B16 cells. PMID:7608143

  3. Entamoeba histolytica Cell Surface Calreticulin Binds Human C1q and Functions in Amebic Phagocytosis of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaithilingam, Archana; Teixeira, Jose E.; Miller, Peter J.; Heron, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis of host cells is characteristic of tissue invasion by the intestinal ameba Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses. Entamoeba histolytica induces host cell apoptosis and uses ligands, including C1q, on apoptotic cells to engulf them. Two mass spectrometry analyses identified calreticulin in amebic phagosome preparations, and, in addition to its function as an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, calreticulin is believed to be the macrophage receptor for C1q. The purpose of this study was to determine if calreticulin functions as an E. histolytica C1q receptor during phagocytosis of host cells. Calreticulin was localized to the surface of E. histolytica during interaction with both Jurkat lymphocytes and erythrocytes and was present in over 75% of phagocytic cups during amebic erythrophagocytosis. Presence of calreticulin on the cell surface was further demonstrated using a method that selectively biotinylated cell surface proteins and by flow cytometry using trophozoites overexpressing epitope-tagged calreticulin. Regulated overexpression of calreticulin increased E. histolytica's ability to phagocytose apoptotic lymphocytes and calcium ionophore-treated erythrocytes but had no effect on amebic adherence to or destruction of cell monolayers or surface expression of the GalNAc lectin and serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) receptors. Finally, E. histolytica calreticulin bound specifically to apoptotic lymphocytes and to human C1q. Collectively, these data implicate cell surface calreticulin as a receptor for C1q during E. histolytica phagocytosis of host cells. PMID:22473608

  4. Calreticulin promotes folding of functional human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Culina, Slobodan; Lauvau, Grégoire; Gubler, Brigitte; van Endert, Peter M

    2004-12-24

    The assembly of MHC class I molecules with beta(2)-microglobulin and peptides is assisted by the housekeeping chaperones calnexin, calreticulin, and Erp57 and the dedicated accessory protein, tapasin. Tapasin and calreticulin are essential for efficient MHC class I assembly, but their precise action during class I assembly remains to be elucidated. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that the lectin calreticulin interacts with monoglucosylated MHC class I heavy chains, whatever their state of assembly with light chains and peptide, and inhibits their aggregation above physiological temperature. We used a soluble single chain HLA-A2/beta(2)-microglobulin molecule, A2SC, to study the effect of calreticulin on the peptide binding capacity of HLA class I molecules. Calreticulin inhibited the formation of A2SC aggregates both when co-expressed in insect cells and during incubations at elevated temperature. Calreticulin dramatically enhanced acquisition of peptide binding capacity when added to denatured A2SC molecules during refolding at 4 degrees C. However, it had no effect on the rapid loss of A2SC peptide binding capacity at physiological temperature. We conclude that calreticulin promotes the folding of HLA class I molecules to a state in which, at low temperature, they spontaneously acquire peptide binding capacity. However, it does not induce or maintain a peptide-receptive state of the class I-binding site, which is likely to be promoted by one or several other components of the class I loading complexes. By being amenable to complementation with additional proteins, the described system should be useful for identification of these components. PMID:15494401

  5. Calreticulin secures calcium-dependent nuclear pore competency required for cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Randolph S; Behfar, Atta; Groenendyk, Jody; Wyles, Saranya P; Niederlander, Nicolas; Reyes, Santiago; Puceat, Michel; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Calreticulin deficiency causes myocardial developmental defects that culminate in an embryonic lethal phenotype. Recent studies have linked loss of this calcium binding chaperone to failure in myofibrillogenesis through an as yet undefined mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to identify cellular processes corrupted by calreticulin deficiency that precipitate dysregulation of cardiac myofibrillogenesis related to acquisition of cardiac phenotype. In an embryonic stem cell knockout model, calreticulin deficit (crt(-/-)) compromised nucleocytoplasmic transport of nuclear localization signal-dependent and independent pathways, disrupting nuclear import of the cardiac transcription factor MEF2C. The expression of nucleoporins and associated nuclear transport proteins in derived crt(-/-) cardiomyocytes revealed an abnormal nuclear pore complex (NPC) configuration. Altered protein content in crt(-/-) cells resulted in remodeled NPC architecture that caused decreased pore diameter and diminished probability of central channel occupancy versus wild type counterparts. Ionophore treatment of impaired calcium handling in crt(-/-) cells corrected nuclear pore microarchitecture and rescued nuclear import resulting in normalized myofibrillogenesis. Thus, calreticulin deficiency alters nuclear pore function and structure, impeding myofibrillogenesis in nascent cardiomyocytes through a calcium dependent mechanism. This essential role of calreticulin in nucleocytoplasmic communication competency ties its regulatory action with proficiency of cardiac myofibrillogenesis essential for proper cardiac development. PMID:26826378

  6. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease. PMID:15766574

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  9. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Sevin, Margaux; Ramla, Selim; Truffot, Aurélie; Verrier, Tiffany; Bouchot, Dominique; Courtois, Martine; Bas, Mathilde; Benali, Sonia; Bailly, François; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Martin, Laurent; Maynadié, Marc; Carillo, Serge; Girodon, François

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) mutations have recently been reported in 70–84% of JAK2V617F-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), and this detection has become necessary to improve the diagnosis of MPN. In a large single-centre cohort of 298 patients suffering from Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), the JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL mutations were noted in 179 (60%), 56 (18.5%) and 13 (4.5%) respectively. For the detection of the CALR mutations, three methods were compared in parallel: high-resolution melting-curve analysis (HRM), product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing. The sensitivity for the HRM, product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing was 96.4%, 98.2% and 89.3% respectively, whereas the specificity was 96.3%, 100% and 100%. In our cohort, the product-sizing analysis was the most sensitive method and was the easiest to interpret, while the HRM was sometimes difficult to interpret. In contrast, when large series of samples were tested, HRM provided results more quickly than did the other methods, which required more time. Finally, the sequencing method, which is the reference method, had the lowest sensitivity but can be used to describe the type of mutation precisely. Altogether, our results suggest that in routine laboratory practice, product-sizing analysis is globally similar to HRM for the detection of CALR mutations, and that both may be used as first-line screening tests. If the results are positive, Sanger sequencing can be used to confirm the mutation and to determine its type. Product-sizing analysis provides sensitive and specific results, moreover, with the quantitative measurement of CALR, which might be useful to monitor specific treatments. PMID:26501981

  10. Thrombopoietin receptor activation by myeloproliferative neoplasm associated calreticulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, Ilyas; Pecquet, Christian; El-Khoury, Mira; Nivarthi, Harini; Albu, Roxana-Irina; Marty, Caroline; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Vertenoeil, Gaëlle; Ngo, Anna; Koay, Ann; Raslova, Hana; Courtoy, Pierre J; Choong, Meng Ling; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2016-03-10

    Mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) represented by deletions and insertions in exon 9 inducing a -1/+2 frameshift are associated with a significant fraction of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The mechanisms by which CALR mutants induce MPN are unknown. Here, we show by transcriptional, proliferation, biochemical, and primary cell assays that the pathogenic CALR mutants specifically activate the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR/MPL). No activation is detected with a battery of type I and II cytokine receptors, except granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, which supported only transient and weak activation. CALR mutants induce ligand-independent activation of JAK2/STAT/phosphatydylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3-K) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways via TpoR, and autonomous growth in Ba/F3 cells. In these transformed cells, no synergy is observed between JAK2 and PI3-K inhibitors in inhibiting cytokine-independent proliferation, thus showing a major difference from JAK2V617F cells where such synergy is strong. TpoR activation was dependent on its extracellular domain and its N-glycosylation, especially at N117. The glycan binding site and the novel C-terminal tail of the mutant CALR proteins were required for TpoR activation. A soluble form of TpoR was able to prevent activation of full-length TpoR provided that it was N-glycosylated. By confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation, CALR mutants exhibit different intracellular localization from that of wild-type CALR. Finally, knocking down either MPL/TpoR or JAK2 in megakaryocytic progenitors from patients carrying CALR mutations inhibited cytokine-independent megakaryocytic colony formation. Taken together, our study provides a novel signaling paradigm, whereby a mutated chaperone constitutively activates cytokine receptor signaling. PMID:26668133

  11. Structural Insight into the Role of Thrombospondin-1 Binding to Calreticulin in Calreticulin-Induced Focal Adhesion Disassembly†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Song, Yuhua

    2010-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) binding to calreticulin (CRT) on the cell surface stimulates association of CRT with LDL receptor-related protein (LRP1) to signal focal adhesion disassembly and engagement of cellular activities. The structural basis for this phenomenon is unknown. We studied the binding thermodynamics of the TSP1–CRT complex and the conformational changes in CRT induced by binding to TSP1 with combined binding free energy analysis, molecular dynamics simulation, and anisotropic network model restrained molecular dynamics simulation. Results showed that mutations of Lys 24 and Lys 32 in TSP1 to Ala and of amino acids 24–26 and 32–34 in CRT to Ala significantly weakened the binding of TSP1 and CRT, which is consistent with experimental results. Upon validation of the calculated binding affinity changes of the TSP1–CRT complex by mutations in key residues in TSP1 and CRT with the experimental results, we performed conformational analyses to understand the role of TSP1 binding to CRT in the induction of conformational changes in CRT. Conformational analyses showed that TSP1 binding to CRT resulted in a more “open” conformation and a significant rotational change for the CRT N-domain with respect to the CRT P-domain, which could expose the potential binding site(s) in CRT for binding to LRP1 to signal focal adhesion disassembly. Results offer structural insight into the role of TSP1 binding to CRT in CRT-induced focal adhesion disassembly. PMID:20337411

  12. Calreticulin is the major Ca2+ storage protein in the endoplasmic reticulum of the pea plant (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Hassan, A M; Wesson, C; Trumble, W R

    1995-06-01

    A 56kDa protein with high similarity in its N-terminal amino acid sequence to animal calreticulin and 100% homology with the N-terminal amino acids of spinach calreticulin has been identified in seeds of the pea plant (Pisum sativum). A new purification procedure is described by which the calreticulin-like protein was selectively solubilized by incubation with deoxycholate and HgCl2 from microsomes enriched for endoplasmic reticulum. Following Mono Q ion exchange chromatography of the deoxycholate extract by fast protein liquid chromatography, the calreticulin-like protein was obtained in nearly pure form. This purified protein is similar to animal calreticulin in apparent mass, characteristic blue staining with Stains-all dye and calcium-binding ability. In addition, this protein is recognized only by affinity purified antibodies against rabbit calreticulin and is not recognized by anti-calsequestrin antibodies. Our data suggested that calreticulin rather than calsequestrin functions as the Ca(2+)-storage protein in the endoplasmic reticulum of pea plants. PMID:7779109

  13. A comparative proteomic study identified calreticulin and prohibitin up-regulated in adrenocortical carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying novel tumor biomarkers to develop more effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with ACC is urgently needed. The aim of the study was to compare the proteomic profiles between adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC) and normal adrenocortical tissues in order to identify novel potential biomarkers for ACC. Methods The protein samples from 12 ACC tissues and their paired adjacent normal adrenocortical tissues were profiled with two-dimensional electrophoresis; and differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Expression patterns of three differently expressed proteins calreticulin, prohibitin and HSP60 in ACC, adrenocortical adenomas (ACA) and normal adrenocortical tissues were further validated by immunohistochemistry. Results In our proteomic study, we identified 20 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated proteins in ACC tissues compared with paired normal controls. Most of the up-regulated proteins were focused in protein binding and oxidoreductase activity in Gene Ontology (GO) molecular function classification. By immunohistochemistry, two biomarkers calreticulin and prohibitin were validated to be overexpressed in ACC compared with adrenocortical adenomas (ACA) and normal tissues, but also calreticulin overexpression was significantly associated with tumor stages of ACC. Conclusion For the first time, calreticulin and prohibitin were identified to be novel candidate biomarkers for ACC, and their roles during ACC carcinogenesis and clinical significance deserves further investigation. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1897372598927465 PMID:23587357

  14. The tobacco homolog of mammalian calreticulin is present in protein complexes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Denecke, J; Carlsson, L E; Vidal, S; Höglund, A S; Ek, B; van Zeijl, M J; Sinjorgo, K M; Palva, E T

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of protein sorting signals responsible for the retention of reticuloplasmins (RPLs), a group of soluble proteins that reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), has revealed a structural similarity between mammalian and plant ER retention signals. We present evidence that the corresponding epitope is conserved in a vast family of soluble ER resident proteins. Microsequences of RPL60 and RPL90, two abundant members of this family, show high sequence similarity with mammalian calreticulin and endoplasmin. RPL60/calreticulin cofractionates and costains with the lumenal binding protein (BiP). Both proteins were detected in the nuclear envelope and the ER, and in mitotic cells in association with the spindle apparatus and the phragmoplast. Immunoprecipitation of proteins from in vivo-labeled cells demonstrated that RPL60/calreticulin is associated with other polypeptides in a stress- and ATP-dependent fashion. RPL60/calreticulin transcript levels increased rapidly in abundance during the proliferation of the secretory apparatus and the onset of hydrolase secretion in gibberellic acid-treated barley aleurone cells. This induction profile is identical to that of the well-characterized ER chaperones BiP and endoplasmin. However, expression patterns in response to different stress conditions as well as tissue-specific expression patterns indicate that these genes are differentially regulated and may not act in concert. PMID:7773014

  15. Confirmation of Tick Bite by Detection of Antibody to Ixodes Calreticulin Salivary Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon-Chaidez, Francisco; Ryan, Raymond; Wikel, Stephen; Dardick, Kenneth; Lawler, Caroline; Foppa, Ivo M.; Tomas, Patricio; Cushman, Alexis; Hsieh, Ann; Spielman, Andrew; Bouchard, Keith R.; Dias, Filiciano; Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Krause, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Ticks introduce a variety of pharmacologically active molecules into their host during attachment and feeding in order to obtain a blood meal. People who are repeatedly exposed to ticks may develop an immune response to tick salivary proteins. Despite this response, people usually are unaware of having been bitten, especially if they are not repeatedly exposed to ticks. In order to develop a laboratory marker of tick exposure that would be useful in understanding the epidemiology of tick-borne infection and the immune response to tick bite, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibody to a recombinant form of calreticulin protein found in the salivary glands of Ixodes scapularis, a member of a complex of Ixodes ticks that serve as the vectors for Lyme disease, human babesiosis, and human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Using this assay, we tested sera obtained from C3H/HeN and BALB/c mice before and after experimental deer tick infestation. These mice developed antibody to Ixodes calreticulin antigen after infestation. We then used the same assay to test sera obtained from people before and after they experienced deer tick bite(s). People experiencing deer tick bite(s) developed Ixodes calreticulin-specific antibody responses that persisted for up to 17 months. This Ixodes recombinant calreticulin ELISA provides objective evidence of deer tick exposure in people. PMID:16928887

  16. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  17. Molecular characterization of calreticulin from Anopheles stephensi midgut cells and functional assay of the recombinant calreticulin with Plasmodium berghei ookinetes.

    PubMed

    Borhani Dizaji, Nahid; Basseri, Hamid Reza; Naddaf, Saied Reza; Heidari, Mansour

    2014-10-25

    Transmission blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target the antigens on the midgut epithelium of Anopheles mosquitoes are among the promising tools for the elimination of the malaria parasite. Characterization and analysis of effective antigens is the first step to design TBVs. Calreticulin (CRT), a lectin-like protein, from Anopheles albimanus midgut, has shown antigenic features, suggesting a promising and novel TBV target. CRT is a highly conserved protein with similar features in vertebrates and invertebrates including anopheline. We cloned the full-length crt gene from malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (AsCrt) and explored the interaction of recombinant AsCrt protein, expressed in a prokaryotic system (pGEX-6p-1), with surface proteins of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes by immunofluorescence assay. The cellular localization of AsCrt was determined using the baculovirus expression system. Sequence analysis of the whole cDNA of AsCrt revealed that AsCrt contains an ORF of 1221 bp. The amino acid sequence of AsCrt protein obtained in this study showed 64% homology with similar protein in human. The AsCrt shares the most common features of CRTs from other species. This gene encodes a 406 amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 46 kDa, which contains a predicted 16 amino-acid signal peptides, conserved cysteine residues, a proline-rich region, and highly acidic C-terminal domain with endoplasmic reticulum retrieval sequence HDEL. The production of GST-AsCrt recombinant protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody against the GST protein. The FITC-labeled GST-AsCrt exhibited a significant interaction with P. berghei ookinete surface proteins. Purified recombinant GST-AsCrt, labeled with FITC, displayed specific binding to the surface of P. berghei ookinetes in comparison with control. Moreover, the expression of AsCrt in baculovirus expression system indicated that AsCrt was localized on the surface of Sf9 cells. Our results suggest that AsCrt could be utilized as a potential target for future studies in TBV area for malaria control. PMID:25150160

  18. Macrophages eat cancer cells using their own calreticulin as a guide: Roles of TLR and Btk

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingye; Chen, James Y.; Weissman-Tsukamoto, Rachel; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Ho, Po Yi; McKenna, Kelly M.; Cheshier, Samuel; Zhang, Michael; Guo, Nan; Gip, Phung; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated programmed cell removal (PrCR) is an important mechanism of eliminating diseased and damaged cells before programmed cell death. The induction of PrCR by eat-me signals on tumor cells is countered by don’t-eat-me signals such as CD47, which binds macrophage signal-regulatory protein α to inhibit phagocytosis. Blockade of CD47 on tumor cells leads to phagocytosis by macrophages. Here we demonstrate that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages synergizes with blocking CD47 on tumor cells to enhance PrCR. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) mediates TLR signaling in macrophages. Calreticulin, previously shown to be an eat-me signal on cancer cells, is activated in macrophages for secretion and cell-surface exposure by TLR and Btk to target cancer cells for phagocytosis, even if the cancer cells themselves do not express calreticulin. PMID:25646432

  19. Macrophages eat cancer cells using their own calreticulin as a guide: roles of TLR and Btk.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingye; Chen, James Y; Weissman-Tsukamoto, Rachel; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Ho, Po Yi; McKenna, Kelly M; Cheshier, Samuel; Zhang, Michael; Guo, Nan; Gip, Phung; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-02-17

    Macrophage-mediated programmed cell removal (PrCR) is an important mechanism of eliminating diseased and damaged cells before programmed cell death. The induction of PrCR by eat-me signals on tumor cells is countered by don't-eat-me signals such as CD47, which binds macrophage signal-regulatory protein α to inhibit phagocytosis. Blockade of CD47 on tumor cells leads to phagocytosis by macrophages. Here we demonstrate that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages synergizes with blocking CD47 on tumor cells to enhance PrCR. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) mediates TLR signaling in macrophages. Calreticulin, previously shown to be an eat-me signal on cancer cells, is activated in macrophages for secretion and cell-surface exposure by TLR and Btk to target cancer cells for phagocytosis, even if the cancer cells themselves do not express calreticulin. PMID:25646432

  20. Transcriptional regulation of Schistosoma mansoni calreticulin: possible role of AP-1.

    PubMed

    Khalife, J; Godin, C; Capron, A

    1995-11-01

    Little is known about the regulation and control of Schistosoma mansoni gene expression. In order to study such mechanisms a gene reporter expression vector construction, under the control of a promoter region derived from the S. mansoni calreticulin gene was used to transfect the human Jurkat T cell line. The promoter region contains potential TATA and CAAT boxes as well as an AP-1 core element. We show here that transcriptional factors of eucaryotic cells may induce a gene reporter activity under the control of a S. mansoni promoter region. Treatment of stably transfected cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a well-characterized antioxidant which counteracts the effects of reactive oxygen intermediates, enhanced the AP-1 dependent transactivation. This effect was abolished when the SmCaR promoter region was deleted in the AP-1 site. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays showed that the AP-1 sequence of S. mansoni bound to both S. mansoni extracts and in nuclear extracts from Jurkat cells, thus explaining possible activation of AP-1 by NAC. Finally treatment of S. mansoni schistosomula and adult worms with NAC induced an increased synthesis of calreticulin protein suggesting a possible role of redox mechanisms in the regulation of a calreticulin gene transcription process in S. mansoni. PMID:11023411

  1. Mutant calreticulin-expressing cells induce monocyte hyperreactivity through a paracrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garbati, Michael R; Welgan, Catherine A; Landefeld, Sally H; Newell, Laura F; Agarwal, Anupriya; Dunlap, Jennifer B; Chourasia, Tapan K; Lee, Hyunjung; Elferich, Johannes; Traer, Elie; Rattray, Rogan; Cascio, Michael J; Press, Richard D; Bagby, Grover C; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Druker, Brian J; Dao, Kim-Hien T

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) were recently identified in approximately 70-80% of patients with JAK2-V617F-negative essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. All frameshift mutations generate a recurring novel C-terminus. Here we provide evidence that mutant calreticulin does not accumulate efficiently in cells and is abnormally enriched in the nucleus and extracellular space compared to wildtype calreticulin. The main determinant of these findings is the loss of the calcium-binding and KDEL domains. Expression of type I mutant CALR in Ba/F3 cells confers minimal IL-3-independent growth. Interestingly, expression of type I and type II mutant CALR in a nonhematopoietic cell line does not directly activate JAK/STAT signaling compared to wildtype CALR and JAK2-V617F expression. These results led us to investigate paracrine mechanisms of JAK/STAT activation. Here we show that conditioned media from cells expressing type I mutant CALR exaggerate cytokine production from normal monocytes with or without treatment with a toll-like receptor agonist. These effects are not dependent on the novel C-terminus. These studies offer novel insights into the mechanism of JAK/STAT activation in patients with JAK2-V617F-negative essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. Am. J. Hematol. 91:211-219, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26573090

  2. Comparative effect of human and Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ignacio Arias, J; Sepulveda, Caroll; Bravo, Patricia; Hamilton-West, Christopher; Maldonado, Ismael; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In orthopaedics, the use of factors that enhance granulation tissue formation and prevent or delay new bone regeneration is sometimes desirable. Calreticulin (CRT), a unique endoplasmic reticulum luminal Ca(2+) -binding chaperone widely distributed in eukaryotic cells, is involved in many cellular functions. Among them, CRT has an important influence in cutaneous wound healing and diverse processes associated with cutaneous repair, inhibition of angiogenesis, promotion of cell adhesion and antitumour effect. One of the molecules involved in several aspects of the host-parasite interplay is Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), which is highly homologous to human calreticulin (HuCRT). Here, recombinant (r)HuCRT and rTcCRT are compared on their abilities to affect fibroblast behaviour in a scratch plate assay, and wound healing in in vivo skin rat models. In molar terms, rTcCRT is three orders of magnitude more efficient than rHuCRT in increasing proliferation and migration of human fibroblasts in vitro. A similar effect was observed in vivo on rat skin wounds and inhibition of bone gap bridging in rabbit unicortical bone osteotomies. PMID:23109509

  3. Agarose gel shift assay reveals that calreticulin favors substrates with a quaternary structure in solution.

    PubMed

    Boelt, Sanne Grundvad; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2015-07-15

    Here we present an agarose gel shift assay that, in contrast to other electrophoresis approaches, is loaded in the center of the gel. This allows proteins to migrate in either direction according to their isoelectric points. Therefore, the presented assay enables a direct visualization, separation, and prefractionation of protein interactions in solution independent of isoelectric point. We demonstrate that this assay is compatible with immunochemical methods and mass spectrometry. The assay was used to investigate interactions with several potential substrates for calreticulin, a chaperone that is involved in different biological aspects through interaction with other proteins. The current analytical assays used to investigate these interactions are mainly spectroscopic aggregation assays or solid phase assays that do not provide a direct visualization of the stable protein complex but rather provide an indirect measure of interactions. Therefore, no interaction studies between calreticulin and substrates in solution have been investigated previously. The results presented here indicate that calreticulin has a preference for substrates with a quaternary structure and primarily β-sheets in their secondary structure. It is also demonstrated that the agarose gel shift assay is useful in the study of other protein interactions and can be used as an alternative method to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PMID:25908558

  4. Generation of Amyloid-β Is Reduced by the Interaction of Calreticulin with Amyloid Precursor Protein, Presenilin and Nicastrin

    PubMed Central

    Plöger, Frank; Loers, Gabriele; Lutz, David; Buck, Friedrich; Michalak, Marek; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330–344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330–344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein and the γ-secretase complex regulates the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex, pointing to calreticulin as a potential target for therapy in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23585889

  5. Roles of Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin in parasite-host interactions and in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ramrez, Galia; Valck, Carolina; Aguilar, Lorena; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Lpez-Muoz, Rodrigo; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Morello, Antonio; Ferreira, Jorge; Maya, Juan Diego; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2012-10-01

    In Latin America, there are about 10-12 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, one of the most important neglected tropical parasitism. Identification of molecular targets, specific for the aggressor or host cells or both, may be useful in the development of pharmacological and/or immunological therapeutic tools. Classic efforts in Chagas' disease explore those strategies. Although the immune system frequently controls parasite aggressions, sterile immunity is seldom achieved and chronic interactions are thus established. However, laboratory-modified immunologic probes aimed at selected parasite targets, may be more effective than their unmodified counterparts. Calreticulin (CRT) from vertebrates is a calcium binding protein, present mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it directs the conformation of proteins and controls calcium levels. We have isolated, gene-cloned, expressed and characterized T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Upon infection, the parasite can translocate this molecule from the ER to the surface, where it inhibits both the classical and lectin complement pathways. Moreover, by virtue of its capacity to bind and inactivate first complement component C1, it promotes parasite infectivity. These two related properties reside in the central domain of this molecule. A different domain, amino terminal, binds to endothelial cells, thus inhibiting their angiogenic capacity. Since tumor growth depends, to a large extent on angiogenesis, their growth is also inhibited. PMID:22673211

  6. Oncogenic Drivers in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: From JAK2 to Calreticulin Mutations.

    PubMed

    Cahu, Xavier; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2015-12-01

    During the past 10 years, major progress has been accomplished with the discovery of activating mutations that are associated with the vast majority of BCR-ABL negative human myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The identification in 2005 of JAK2 V617F triggered great interest in the JAK2-STAT5/STAT3 pathway. Discovery in 2006 of mutants of thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R/MPL) and later on of mutants in negative regulators of JAK-STAT pathway led to the notion that persistent JAK2 activation is a hallmark of MPNs. In 2013, mutations in the gene coding for the chaperone calreticulin were reported in 20-30 % of essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis patients. Here, we will address the question: what do we know about calreticulin that could help us understand its role in MPNs? In addition to oncogenic driver mutations, certain MPNs also exhibit epigenetic mutations. Targeting of both oncogenic drivers and epigenetic defects could be required for effective therapy. PMID:26370832

  7. Calreticulin mutation burden--is it a stable clone in patients with essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis?

    PubMed

    Shuly, Yulia; Nagar, Meital; Ben-Asaf, Lior; Kneller, Abraham; Steinberg, David M; Amariglio, Ninette; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-12-01

    Calreticulin mutation represents the second most frequent mutation after JAK2 V617F in myeloproliferative disorder and is considered to be a driving mutation. Herein the mutation burden was evaluated in patients with essential thrombocythemia or myelofibrosis and found to increase by 5.7% over time unrelated to the time elapsed from the initial to the final positive test. The longer the course of the disease when first tested (range 0-30 years, mean 7.9 years) the lower mutation burden was observed. The mutated clone was larger in type II in comparison with type I mutation when first tested but the difference in mutation burden from the final to the first positive test was significantly higher in those with type I. Similarly, the difference in mutation burden was higher in patients with essential thrombocythemia reaching almost 8% in comparison to 1.3% in post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Thus a repeat calreticulin quantitative test is not warranted. PMID:26460248

  8. Differential requirement of unfolded protein response pathway for calreticulin expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dukgyu; Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Park, Byung-Jae; Ahnn, Joohong

    2007-09-14

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which increases the expression of chaperones to maintain the homeostasis. Calreticulin is a calcium-binding chaperone located in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we show that in response to a UPR inducing reagent, tunicamycin, the expression of calreticulin (crt-1) is specifically up-regulated in Caenorhabditis elegans. Tunicamycin (TM) induced expression of the crt-1 requires IRE-1 and XBP-1 but is ATF-6 and PEK-1 independent. Analysis of the crt-1 promoter reveals a putative XBP-1 binding site at the -284 to -278 bp region, which was shown to be necessary for TM-mediated induction. Genetic analysis of crt-1 mutants and mutants of UPR pathway genes show various degrees of developmental arrest upon TM treatment. Our results suggest that the TM-induced UPR pathway culminates in the up-regulation of crt-1, which protects the worm from deleterious accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER. Knockdown of the crt-1, pdi-2, or pdi-3 increased the crt-1 expression, whereas knockdown of the hsp-3 or hsp-4 did not have any effect on crt-1 expression, indicating the existence of complex compensatory networks to cope up with ER stress. PMID:17651753

  9. Calreticulin mRNA expression and clinicopathological characteristics in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Sholhui; Huh, Hee Jin; Mun, Yeung Chul; Seong, Chu-Myong; Chung, Wha Soon; Chung, Hae-Sun; Huh, Jungwon

    2015-12-01

    Calreticulin, encoded by CALR, is a multifunctional protein with roles in calcium homeostasis and chaperoning molecular processes. This study aimed to evaluate calreticulin mRNA expression levels in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with other hematologic malignancies, and to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics associated with expression in AML patients. The study group included 43 patients diagnosed with AML, 57 with other hematologic malignancies, and 21 benign hematologic conditions. CALR mRNA quantification using real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed it to be significantly higher in AML compared with other hematologic malignancies (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in CALR mRNA expression between AML subgroups by karyotype (P = 0.3201). No differences were found in age, white blood cell counts, platelet counts, bone marrow blast percentage, calcium, lactate dehydrogenase or CD34 expression rate between the high and low CALR groups (CALR mRNA ≥ 1.2 fold and <1.2 fold, respectively), although hemoglobin and sex differences were observed. Although statistically not significant, there was a trend that Relapse rate was lower (54.5% vs. 84.6%) (P = 0.1063) and disease-free survival was longer (22 months vs. 7 months) (P = 0.0784) in low CALR group, whereas overall survival was similar between the two groups (11 months and 8 months). The clinical relevance of CALR expression in AML remains to be clarified in a larger cohort. PMID:26640226

  10. Mutation specific immunohistochemistry is highly specific for the presence of calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Farzin, Mahtab; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Sheen, Amy; Watson, Nicole; Toon, Christopher W; Koleth, Mary; Stevenson, William; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    The identification of somatic calreticulin (CALR) mutations can be used to confirm the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder in Philadelphia chromosome-negative, JAK2 and MPL wild type patients with thrombocytosis. All pathogenic CALR mutations result in an identical C-terminal protein and therefore may be identifiable by immunohistochemistry. We sought to test the sensitivity and specificity of mutation specific immunohistochemistry for pathogenic CALR mutations using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (clone CAL2). Immunohistochemistry for mutant calreticulin was performed on the most recent bone marrow trephine from a cohort of patients enriched for CALR mutations and compared to mutation testing performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by fragment length analysis. Twenty-nine patients underwent both immunohistochemistry and molecular testing. Eleven patients had CALR mutation, and immunohistochemistry was positive in nine (82%). One discrepant case appeared to represent genuine false negative immunohistochemistry. The other may be attributable to a 12 year delay between the bone marrow trephine and the specimen which underwent molecular testing, particularly because a liver biopsy performed at the same time as molecular testing demonstrated positive staining in megakaryocytes in extramedullary haematopoiesis. All 18 cases which lacked CALR mutation demonstrated negative staining. In this population enriched for CALR mutations, the specificity was 100%; sensitivity 82-91%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 90-95%. We conclude that mutation specific immunohistochemistry is highly specific for the presence of CALR mutations. Whilst it may not identify all mutations, it may be very valuable in routine clinical care. PMID:27114372

  11. Cytokine, Antibody and Proliferative Cellular Responses Elicited by Taenia solium Calreticulin upon Experimental Infection in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis. PMID:25811778

  12. Isolation of a full-length cDNA encoding calreticulin from a PCR library of in vitro zygotes of maize.

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, T; Hagel, C; Lörz, H; Kranz, E

    1996-04-01

    A full-size cDNA clone (1614 bp) encoding calreticulin was isolated from a PCR-based cDNA library of maize in vitro zygotes. Calreticulin is a major Ca2+ storage protein located mainly in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum but also in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of some cells. A differential screening between cDNA libraries originating from 104 in vitro zygotes (18 h after in vitro fertilization) and 128 unfertilized egg cells was performed to isolate newly expressed genes or genes expressed more abundantly after fertilization. The expression of the isolated cDNA clone is enhanced after fertilization and strongly correlated to cell division. Sequence comparison to a shorter maize calreticulin cDNA isolated from a PCR based cDNA library construction from a few plant cells [12]. It is further shown that calreticulins in maize are probably transcribed from a small gene family differentially expressed in abundance in diverse tissues. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes an acidic protein (pI 4.17) of 48 kDa sharing 77-92% and 50-54% homology to other plant and animal calreticulins, respectively. The described calreticulin gene represents to our knowledge the first cDNA clone isolated from a RT/PCR cDNA library originating from only a few plant cells and is the first gene isolated from zygotes of higher plants. PMID:8704156

  13. Pyruvate dehydrogenase/sub b/ phosphatase inhibition by NADH and dihydrolipoamide along with effects of and capacity for binding the phosphatase to the bovine kidney transacetylase-protein X subcomplex

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, T.E.; Rahmatullah, M.; Maher, J.

    1986-05-01

    NADH inhibits PDH/sub b/ phosphatase activity when /sup 32/P-PDH is associated with the intact complex but not when /sup 32/P-PDH is prepared free of other components of the complex. Addition of the transacetylase-protein X (E2-X) subcomplex both activated the phosphatase and restored NADH inhibition. Low levels of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase associated with the subcomplex might be required for NADH inhibition. Dihydrolipoamide gave inhibition of the phosphatase equivalent to NADH and the combination did not give additional inhibition suggesting a common mechanism. Pretreatment of phosphorylated complex and phosphatase with 2.0 mM dithiothreitol nearly eliminated inhibition of the phosphatase by NADH or dihydrolipoamide. Strong arsenite inhibition of phosphatase activity occurred only in the presence of NADH suggesting modification of thiols reduced by NADH can alter phosphatase activity. Only about 6 molecules of purified phosphatase could be activated by 1 molecule of E2-X subcomplex (initial velocities measured in 15s period). Since that corresponded to the number of protein X rather than E2 subunits, protein X may contribute to the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of the phosphatase. Since protein X also contains a lipoyl moiety, it may also contribute to NADH inhibition of the phosphatase.

  14. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  15. Calreticulin contributes to C1q-dependent recruitment of microglia in the leech Hirudo medicinalis following a CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Le Marrec-Croq, Françoise; Bocquet-Garcon, Annelise; Vizioli, Jacopo; Vancamp, Christelle; Drago, Francesco; Franck, Julien; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Sautiere, Pierre-Eric; Lefebvre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background The medicinal leech is considered as a complementary and appropriate model to study immune functions in the central nervous system (CNS). In a context in which an injured leech’s CNS can naturally restore normal synaptic connections, the accumulation of microglia (immune cells of the CNS that are exclusively resident in leeches) has been shown to be essential at the lesion to engage the axonal sprouting. HmC1q (Hm for Hirudo medicinalis) possesses chemotactic properties that are important in the microglial cell recruitment by recognizing at least a C1q binding protein (HmC1qBP alias gC1qR). Material/Methods Recombinant forms of C1q were used in affinity purification and in vitro chemotaxis assays. Anti-calreticulin antibodies were used to neutralize C1q-mediated chemotaxis and locate the production of calreticulin in leech CNS. Results A newly characterized leech calreticulin (HmCalR) has been shown to interact with C1q and participate to the HmC1q-dependent microglia accumulation. HmCalR, which has been detected in only some microglial cells, is consequently a second binding protein for HmC1q, allowing the chemoattraction of resident microglia in the nerve repair process. Conclusions These data give new insight into calreticulin/C1q interaction in an immune function of neuroprotection, suggesting another molecular target to use in investigation of microglia reactivity in a model of CNS injury. PMID:24747831

  16. Proteomic identification of calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin as a potential mediator for the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of fruit-derived glycoside amygdalin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Tse, Hung Fat; Rong, Jianhui

    2015-02-01

    Amygdalin is a fruit-derived glycoside with the potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. This study was designed to identify the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We initially demonstrated that amygdalin enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis and attenuated 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. To define protein targets for amygdalin, we selected a total of 11 mostly regulated protein spots from two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. We verified the effect of amygdalin on six representative proteins (i.e., calreticulin, Hsp90β, Grp94, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3ζ/δ and Rab GDI-α) for biological relevance to neuronal survival and differentiation. Calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin is of special interest for its activities to promote folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control of proteins that modulate cell survival and differentiation. We transiently knocked down calreticulin expression by specific siRNA and studied its effect on the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We found that amygdalin failed to enhance NGF-induced neuritogenesis in calreticulin-siRNA transfected cells. On the other hand, amygdalin rescued 6-OHDA-induced loss of calreticulin expression. We also found that amygdalin increased the intracellular calcium concentration possibly via inducing calreticulin. Collectively, our results demonstrated the role of calreticulin in mediating the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. PMID:25465157

  17. Calnexin and calreticulin bind to enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator during biosynthesis and are not required for folding to the native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Bulleid, N J

    1997-01-01

    The roles of the endoplasmic-reticulum lectins calnexin and calreticulin in the folding of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) have been investigated using an in vitro translation system that reconstitutes these processes as they would occur in the intact cell. Using co-immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized tPA with antibodies to calnexin and calreticulin, it was demonstrated that the interaction of tPA with both lectins was dependent upon tPA glycosylation and glucosidase trimming. When tPA was synthesized in the presence of semi-permeabilized cells under conditions preventing complex formation with calnexin and calreticulin, the translation product had a specific plasminogenolytic activity identical with that when synthesized under conditions permitting interactions with both lectins. Furthermore, complexes of tPA bound to calnexin and calreticulin were shown to be enzymically active. These results demonstrate that calnexin and calreticulin can form a stable interaction with correctly folded tPA; however, such interactions are not required for the synthesis of enzymically active tPA. PMID:9359841

  18. Hepatitis B virus-induced calreticulin protein is involved in IFN resistance.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Fanpeng; Liu, Shi; Wu, Jianguo; Ren, Wendan; Zhu, Ying

    2012-07-01

    IFN-α is a widely used treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and IFN resistance caused by viral and/or host factors is currently a challenging clinical problem. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying IFN immunotherapy in the treatment of viral infection would be very beneficial clinically and is of immense clinical importance. Calreticulin (CRT) is an endoplasmic reticulum luminal calcium-binding chaperone that is involved in the regulation of calcium homoeostasis, the folding of newly synthesized proteins, and many other cellular functions. However, little is known about the role of CRT in HBV infection. In this study, we observed high levels of CRT expression in the sera and PBMCs of patients with HBV relative to those of healthy individuals. HBV upregulated the expression of CRT at the transcriptional level. Further investigation showed that HBV-induced CRT enhanced HBV replication by antagonizing the IFN pathway. CRT suppressed the production of endogenous IFN-α by reducing the nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor-7 but not IFN regulatory factor-3. Furthermore, CRT also suppressed the antiviral activity of IFN-α by inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT1 and decreasing the expression of two IFN-α downstream effectors, protein kinase R and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase. Our results offer new insights into the pathogenesis of HBV infection and may provide potential targets for anti-HBV therapy. PMID:22661095

  19. Calreticulin is required for development of the cumulus oocyte complex and female fertility.

    PubMed

    Tokuhiro, Keizo; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Isotani, Ayako; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Hirashima, Yumiko; Matsumura, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Kazuhiro; Miyano, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Benham, Adam M; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin (CANX) and calreticulin (CALR) chaperones mediate nascent glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we report that these chaperones have distinct roles in male and female fertility. Canx null mice are growth retarded but fertile. Calr null mice die during embryonic development, rendering indeterminate any effect on reproduction. Therefore, we conditionally ablated Calr in male and female germ cells using Stra8 (mcKO) and Zp3 (fcKO) promoter-driven Cre recombinase, respectively. Calr mcKO male mice were fertile, but fcKO female mice were sterile despite normal mating behavior. Strikingly, we found that Calr fcKO female mice had impaired folliculogenesis and decreased ovulatory rates due to defective proliferation of cuboidal granulosa cells. Oocyte-derived, TGF-beta family proteins play a major role in follicular development and molecular analysis revealed that the normal processing of GDF9 and BMP15 was defective in Calr fcKO oocytes. These findings highlight the importance of CALR in female reproduction and demonstrate that compromised CALR function leads to ovarian insufficiency and female infertility. PMID:26388295

  20. Overexpression of a Triticum aestivum Calreticulin gene (TaCRT1) Improves Salinity Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; Wang, Yun; Xu, Wenqi; Wu, Lintao; Wang, Hancheng; Ma, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly conserved and abundant multifunctional protein that is encoded by a small gene family and is often associated with abiotic/biotic stress responses in plants. However, the roles played by this protein in salt stress responses in wheat (Triticum aestivum) remain obscure. In this study, three TaCRT genes were identified in wheat and named TaCRT1, TaCRT2 and TaCRT3-1 based on their sequence characteristics and their high homology to other known CRT genes. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that these three genes exhibit different expression patterns in different tissues and are strongly induced under salt stress in wheat. The calcium-binding properties of the purified recombinant TaCRT1 protein were determined using a PIPES/Arsenazo III analysis. TaCRT1 gene overexpression in Nicotiana tabacum decreased salt stress damage in transgenic tobacco plants. Physiological measurements indicated that transgenic tobacco plants showed higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) than non-transgenic tobacco under normal growth conditions. Interestingly, overexpression of the entire TaCRT1 gene or of partial TaCRT1 segments resulted in significantly higher tolerance to salt stress in transgenic plants compared with their WT counterparts, thus revealing the essential role of the C-domain of TaCRT1 in countering salt stress in plants. PMID:26469859

  1. Calreticulin is required for development of the cumulus oocyte complex and female fertility

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhiro, Keizo; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Isotani, Ayako; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Hirashima, Yumiko; Matsumura, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Kazuhiro; Miyano, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Benham, Adam M.; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin (CANX) and calreticulin (CALR) chaperones mediate nascent glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we report that these chaperones have distinct roles in male and female fertility. Canx null mice are growth retarded but fertile. Calr null mice die during embryonic development, rendering indeterminate any effect on reproduction. Therefore, we conditionally ablated Calr in male and female germ cells using Stra8 (mcKO) and Zp3 (fcKO) promoter-driven Cre recombinase, respectively. Calr mcKO male mice were fertile, but fcKO female mice were sterile despite normal mating behavior. Strikingly, we found that Calr fcKO female mice had impaired folliculogenesis and decreased ovulatory rates due to defective proliferation of cuboidal granulosa cells. Oocyte-derived, TGF-beta family proteins play a major role in follicular development and molecular analysis revealed that the normal processing of GDF9 and BMP15 was defective in Calr fcKO oocytes. These findings highlight the importance of CALR in female reproduction and demonstrate that compromised CALR function leads to ovarian insufficiency and female infertility. PMID:26388295

  2. Overexpression of a Triticum aestivum Calreticulin gene (TaCRT1) Improves Salinity Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Lu, Yun Hai; Song, Min; Wang, Yun; Xu, Wenqi; Wu, Lintao; Wang, Hancheng; Ma, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly conserved and abundant multifunctional protein that is encoded by a small gene family and is often associated with abiotic/biotic stress responses in plants. However, the roles played by this protein in salt stress responses in wheat (Triticum aestivum) remain obscure. In this study, three TaCRT genes were identified in wheat and named TaCRT1, TaCRT2 and TaCRT3-1 based on their sequence characteristics and their high homology to other known CRT genes. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that these three genes exhibit different expression patterns in different tissues and are strongly induced under salt stress in wheat. The calcium-binding properties of the purified recombinant TaCRT1 protein were determined using a PIPES/Arsenazo III analysis. TaCRT1 gene overexpression in Nicotiana tabacum decreased salt stress damage in transgenic tobacco plants. Physiological measurements indicated that transgenic tobacco plants showed higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) than non-transgenic tobacco under normal growth conditions. Interestingly, overexpression of the entire TaCRT1 gene or of partial TaCRT1 segments resulted in significantly higher tolerance to salt stress in transgenic plants compared with their WT counterparts, thus revealing the essential role of the C-domain of TaCRT1 in countering salt stress in plants. PMID:26469859

  3. Plasmodesmata without callose and calreticulin in higher plants – open channels for fast symplastic transport?

    PubMed Central

    Demchenko, Kirill N.; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) represent membrane-lined channels that link adjacent plant cells across the cell wall. PD of higher plants contain a central tube of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called desmotubule. Membrane and lumen proteins seem to be able to move through the desmotubule, but most transport processes through PD occur through the cytoplasmic annulus (Brunkard etal., 2013). Calreticulin (CRT), a highly conserved Ca2+-binding protein found in all multicellular eukaryotes, predominantly located in the ER, was shown to localize to PD, though not all PD accumulate CRT. In nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal root nodules of the Australian tree Casuarina glauca, the primary walls of infected cells containing the microsymbiont become lignified upon infection. TEM analysis of these nodules showed that during the differentiation of infected cells, PD connecting infected cells, and connecting infected and adjacent uninfected cells, were reduced in number as well as diameter (Schubert etal., 2013). In contrast with PD connecting young infected cells, and most PD connecting mature infected and adjacent uninfected cells, PD connecting mature infected cells did not accumulate CRT. Furthermore, as shown here, these PD were not associated with callose, and based on their diameter, they probably had lost their desmotubules. We speculate that either this is a slow path to PD degradation, or that the loss of callose accumulation and presumably also desmotubules leads to the PD becoming open channels and improves metabolite exchange between cells. PMID:24634671

  4. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway. PMID:26817954

  5. Overview of the role for calreticulin in the enhancement of wound healing through multiple biological effects.

    PubMed

    Gold, Leslie I; Rahman, Mohammad; Blechman, Keith M; Greives, Matthew R; Churgin, Samara; Michaels, Joseph; Callaghan, Matthew J; Cardwell, Nancy L; Pollins, Alonda C; Michalak, Marek; Siebert, John W; Levine, Jamie P; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Nanney, Lillian B; Galiano, Robert D; Cadacio, Caprice L

    2006-09-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), an intracellular chaperone protein crucial for the proper folding and transport of proteins through the endoplasmic reticulum, has more recent acclaim as a critical regulator of extracellular functions, particularly in mediating cellular migration and as a requirement for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Consistent with these functions, we show that the topical application of CRT has profound effects on the process of wound healing by causing a dose-dependent increase in epithelial migration and granulation tissue formation in both murine and porcine normal and impaired animal models of skin injury. These effects of CRTare substantiated, in vitro, as we show that CRT strongly induces cell migration/wound closure of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, using a wound/scratch plate assay, and stimulates cellular proliferation of human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells, providing mechanistic insight into how CRT functions in repair. Similarly, in both animal models, the histology of the wounds show marked proliferation of basal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts, dense cellularity of the dermis with notably increased numbers of macrophages and well-organized collagen fibril deposition. Thus, CRT profoundly affects the wound healing process by recruiting cells essential for repair into the wound, stimulating cell growth, and increasing extracellular matrix production. PMID:17069011

  6. Novel distribution of calreticulin to cardiomyocyte mitochondria and its increase in a rat model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Jin; Li, Yali; Shan, Hu; Yan, Rui; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Qiuhong; Xue, Jiahong

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • Calreticulin can also be found in cardiomyocyte mitochondria. • The mitochondrial content of calreticulin is increased in DCM hearts. • Increased expression of mitochondrial CRT may induce mitochondrial damage. • Mitochondrial CRT may inhibit the phosphorylation of mitochondrial STAT3. - Abstract: Background: Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca{sup 2+}-binding chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, can also be found in several other locations including the cytosol, nucleus, secretory granules, the outer side of the plasma membrane, and the extracellular matrix. Whether CRT is localized at mitochondria of cardiomyocytes and whether such localization is affected under DCM are still unclear. Methods and results: The DCM model was generated in rats by the daily oral administration of furazolidone for thirty weeks. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic studies demonstrated enlarged left ventricular dimensions and reduced systolic and diastolic function in DCM rats. Immuno-electron microscopy and Western blot showed that CRT was present in cardiomyocyte mitochondria and the mitochondrial content of CRT was increased in DCM hearts (P < 0.05). Morphometric analysis showed notable myocardial apoptosis and mitochondrial swelling with fractured or dissolved cristae in the DCM hearts. Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial membrane potential level of the freshly isolated cardiac mitochondria and the enzyme activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in the model group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), and the myocardial apoptosis index and the caspase activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 were significantly increased (P < 0.05). Pearson linear correlation analysis showed that the mitochondrial content of CRT had negative correlations with the mitochondrial function, and a positive correlation with myocardial apoptosis index (P < 0.001). The protein expression level of cytochrome c and the phosphorylation activity of STAT3 in the mitochondrial fraction were significantly decreased in the model group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that CRT is localized at cardiomyocyte mitochondria and its mitochondrial content is increased in DCM hearts.

  7. Aberrant Calreticulin Expression in Articular Cartilage of Dio2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bomer, Nils; Cornelis, Frederique M. F.; Ramos, Yolande F. M.; den Hollander, Wouter; Lakenberg, Nico; van der Breggen, Ruud; Storms, Lies; Slagboom, P. Eline; Lories, Rik J. U.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify intrinsic differences in cartilage gene expression profiles between wild-type- and Dio2-/--mice, as a mechanism to investigate factors that contribute to prolonged healthy tissue homeostasis. Methods Previously generated microarray-data (Illumina MouseWG-6 v2) of knee cartilage of wild-type and Dio2 -/- -mice were re-analyzed to identify differential expressed genes independent of mechanical loading conditions by forced treadmill-running. RT-qPCR and western blot analyses of overexpression and knockdown of Calr in mouse chondro-progenitor cells (ATDC5) were applied to assess the direct effect of differential Calr expression on cartilage deposition. Results Differential expression analyses of articular cartilage of Dio2-/- (N = 9) and wild-type-mice (N = 11) while applying a cutoff threshold (P < 0.05 (FDR) and FC > |1,5|) resulted in 1 probe located in Calreticulin (Calr) that was found significantly downregulated in Dio2-/- mice (FC = -1.731; P = 0.044). Furthermore, overexpression of Calr during early chondrogenesis in ATDC5 cells leads to decreased proteoglycan deposition and corresponding lower Aggrecan expression, whereas knocking down Calr expression does not lead to histological differences of matrix composition. Conclusion We here demonstrate that the beneficial homeostatic state of articular cartilage in Dio2-/- mice is accompanied with significant lower expression of Calr. Functional analyses further showed that upregulation of Calr expression could act as an initiator of cartilage destruction. The consistent association between Calr and Dio2 expression suggests that enhanced expression of these genes facilitate detrimental effects on cartilage integrity. PMID:27163789

  8. Calreticulin mutants in mice induce an MPL-dependent thrombocytosis with frequent progression to myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Caroline; Pecquet, Christian; Nivarthi, Harini; El-Khoury, Mira; Chachoua, Ilyas; Tulliez, Micheline; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Raslova, Hana; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-03-10

    Frameshift mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are seen in about 30% of essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis patients. To address the contribution of the CALR mutants to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we engrafted lethally irradiated recipient mice with bone marrow cells transduced with retroviruses expressing these mutants. In contrast to wild-type CALR, CALRdel52 (type I) and, to a lesser extent, CALRins5 (type II) induced thrombocytosis due to a megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia. Disease was transplantable into secondary recipients. After 6 months, CALRdel52-, in contrast to rare CALRins5-, transduced mice developed a myelofibrosis associated with a splenomegaly and a marked osteosclerosis. Monitoring of virus-transduced populations indicated that CALRdel52 leads to expansion at earlier stages of hematopoiesis than CALRins5. However, both mutants still specifically amplified the MK lineage and platelet production. Moreover, a mutant deleted of the entire exon 9 (CALRdelex9) did not induce a disease, suggesting that the oncogenic property of CALR mutants was related to the new C-terminus peptide. To understand how the CALR mutants target the MK lineage, we used a cell-line model and demonstrated that the CALR mutants, but not CALRdelex9, specifically activate the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL) to induce constitutive activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5/3/1. We confirmed in c-mpl- and tpo-deficient mice that expression of Mpl, but not of Tpo, was essential for the CALR mutants to induce thrombocytosis in vivo, although Tpo contributes to disease penetrance. Thus, CALR mutants are sufficient to induce thrombocytosis through MPL activation. PMID:26608331

  9. Immunogenic calreticulin exposure occurs through a phylogenetically conserved stress pathway involving the chemokine CXCL8

    PubMed Central

    Sukkurwala, A Q; Martins, I; Wang, Y; Schlemmer, F; Ruckenstuhl, C; Durchschlag, M; Michaud, M; Senovilla, L; Sistigu, A; Ma, Y; Vacchelli, E; Sulpice, E; Gidrol, X; Zitvogel, L; Madeo, F; Galluzzi, L; Kepp, O; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the surface of stressed and dying cancer cells facilitates their uptake by dendritic cells and the subsequent presentation of tumor-associated antigens to T lymphocytes, hence stimulating an anticancer immune response. The chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone (MTX) can stimulate the peripheral relocation of CRT in both human and yeast cells, suggesting that the CRT exposure pathway is phylogenetically conserved. Here, we show that pheromones can act as physiological inducers of CRT exposure in yeast cells, thereby facilitating the formation of mating conjugates, and that a large-spectrum inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptors (which resemble the yeast pheromone receptor) prevents CRT exposure in human cancer cells exposed to MTX. An RNA interference screen as well as transcriptome analyses revealed that chemokines, in particular human CXCL8 (best known as interleukin-8) and its mouse ortholog Cxcl2, are involved in the immunogenic translocation of CRT to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. MTX stimulated the production of CXCL8 by human cancer cells in vitro and that of Cxcl2 by murine tumors in vivo. The knockdown of CXCL8/Cxcl2 receptors (CXCR1/Cxcr1 and Cxcr2) reduced MTX-induced CRT exposure in both human and murine cancer cells, as well as the capacity of the latter-on exposure to MTX-to elicit an anticancer immune response in vivo. Conversely, the addition of exogenous Cxcl2 increased the immunogenicity of dying cells in a CRT-dependent manner. Altogether, these results identify autocrine and paracrine chemokine signaling circuitries that modulate CRT exposure and the immunogenicity of cell death. PMID:23787997

  10. Calreticulin Translocation Aggravates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-associated Apoptosis during Cardiomyocyte Hypoxia/Reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calreticulin (CRT) is major Ca2+-binding chaperone mainly resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. Recently, it has been shown that non-ER CRT regulates a wide array of cellular responses. We previously found that CRT was up-regulated during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) and this study was aimed to investigate whether CRT nuclear translocation aggravates ER stress (ERS)-associated apoptosis during H/R injury in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Methods: Apoptosis rate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage in culture medium were measured as indices of cell injury. Immunofluorescence staining showed the morphological changes of ER and intracellular translocation of CRT. Western blotting or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of target molecules. Results: Compared with control, H/R increased apoptosis rate and LDH activity. The ER became condensed and bubbled, and CRT translocated to the nucleus. Western blotting showed up-regulation of CRT, Nrf2, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), CHOP and caspase-12 expression after H/R. Exogenous CRT overexpression induced by plasmid transfection before H/R increased cell apoptosis, LDH leakage, ER disorder, CRT nuclear translocation and the expression of ERS-associated molecules. However, administration of the ERS inhibitor, taurine, or CRT siRNA alleviated cell injury, ER disorder, and inhibited ERS-associated apoptosis. Conclusions: Our results indicated that during H/R stress, CRT translocation increases cell apoptosis and LDH leakage, aggravates ER disorder, up-regulates expression of nuclear transcription factors, Nrf2 and ATF4, and activates ERS-associated apoptosis. PMID:25635431

  11. A new approach for investigating venom function applied to venom calreticulin in a parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Aisha L; Wheeler, David; Werren, John H

    2015-12-01

    A new method is developed to investigate functions of venom components, using venom gene RNA interference knockdown in the venomous animal coupled with RNA sequencing in the envenomated host animal. The vRNAi/eRNA-Seq approach is applied to the venom calreticulin component (v-crc) of the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Parasitoids are common, venomous animals that inject venom proteins into host insects, where they modulate physiology and metabolism to produce a better food resource for the parasitoid larvae. vRNAi/eRNA-Seq indicates that v-crc acts to suppress expression of innate immune cell response, enhance expression of clotting genes in the host, and up-regulate cuticle genes. V-crc KD also results in an increased melanization reaction immediately following envenomation. We propose that v-crc inhibits innate immune response to parasitoid venom and reduces host bleeding during adult and larval parasitoid feeding. Experiments do not support the hypothesis that v-crc is required for the developmental arrest phenotype observed in envenomated hosts. We propose that an important role for some venom components is to reduce (modulate) the exaggerated effects of other venom components on target host gene expression, physiology, and survival, and term this venom mitigation. A model is developed that uses vRNAi/eRNA-Seq to quantify the contribution of individual venom components to total venom phenotypes, and to define different categories of mitigation by individual venoms on host gene expression. Mitigating functions likely contribute to the diversity of venom proteins in parasitoids and other venomous organisms. PMID:26359852

  12. Helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) protein of Papaya ringspot virus interacts with papaya calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Gao, Le; Pan, Xueying; Wu, Jinyan; Zhou, Peng

    2010-05-01

    Potyviral helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) is a multifunctional protein involved in plant-virus interactions. In this study, we constructed a Carica papaya L. plant cDNA library to investigate the host factors interacting with Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) HC-Pro using a Sos recruitment two-hybrid system (SRS). We confirmed that the full-length papaya calreticulin, designated PaCRT (GenBank accession no. FJ913889), interacts specifically with PRSV HC-Pro in yeast, in vitro and in plant cells using SRS, in vitro protein-binding assay and bimolecular fluorescent complementation assay, respectively. SRS analysis of the interaction between three PaCRT deletion mutants and PRSV HC-Pro demonstrated that the C-domain (residues 307-422), with a high Ca(2+)-binding capacity, was responsible for binding to PRSV HC-Pro. In addition, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay showed that the expression of PaCRT mRNA was significantly upregulated in the primary stage of PRSV infection, and decreased to near-basal expression levels in noninoculated (healthy) papaya plants with virus accumulation inside host cells. PaCRT is a new calcium-binding protein that interacts with potyviral HC-Pro. It is proposed that the upregulated expression of PaCRT mRNA may be an early defence-related response to PRSV infection in the host plant, and that interaction between PRSV HC-Pro and PaCRT may be involved in plant calcium signalling pathways which could interfere with virus infection or host defence. PMID:20447282

  13. Social defeat leads to changes in the endocannabinoid system: An overexpression of calreticulin and motor impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomas-Roig, J; Piscitelli, F; Gil, V; Del Río, J A; Moore, T P; Agbemenyah, H; Salinas-Riester, G; Pommerenke, C; Lorenzen, S; Beißbarth, T; Hoyer-Fender, S; Di Marzo, V; Havemann-Reinecke, U

    2016-04-15

    Prolonged and sustained stimulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis have adverse effects on numerous brain regions, including the cerebellum. Motor coordination and motor learning are essential for animal and require the regulation of cerebellar neurons. The G-protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptor coordinates synaptic transmission throughout the CNS and is of highest abundance in the cerebellum. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the long-lasting effects of chronic psychosocial stress on motor coordination and motor learning, CB1 receptor expression, endogenous cannabinoid ligands and gene expression in the cerebellum. After chronic psychosocial stress, motor coordination and motor learning were impaired as indicated the righting reflex and the rota-rod. The amount of the endocannabinoid 2-AG increased while CB1 mRNA and protein expression were downregulated after chronic stress. Transcriptome analysis revealed 319 genes differentially expressed by chronic psychosocial stress in the cerebellum; mainly involved in synaptic transmission, transmission of nerve impulse, and cell-cell signaling. Calreticulin was validated as a stress candidate gene. The present study provides evidence that chronic stress activates calreticulin and might be one of the pathological mechanisms underlying the motor coordination and motor learning dysfunctions seen in social defeat mice. PMID:26815100

  14. Ectopic expression of a maize calreticulin mitigates calcium deficiency-like disorders in "sCAX1"-expressing tobacco and tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deregulated expression of an Arabidopsis H(+)/Ca(2+) antiporter (sCAX1) in agricultural crops increases total calcium (Ca(2+)) but may result in yield losses due to Ca(2+) deficiency-like symptoms. Here we demonstrate that co-expression of a maize calreticulin (CRT, a Ca(2+) binding protein located ...

  15. Calreticulin variant stratified driver mutational status and prognosis in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Elala, Yoseph C; Lasho, Terra L; Gangat, Naseema; Finke, Christy; Barraco, Daniela; Haider, Mahnur; Abou Hussein, Ahmed K; Hanson, Curtis A; Ketterling, Rhett P; Pardanani, Animesh; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) harbor one of three driver mutations: JAK2, calreticulin (CALR), and MPL; the remaining ( ∼15%) are wild type for all three mutations and are referred to as being "triple negative." Furthermore, CALR mutations in ET are structurally classified as type 1/type 1-like or type 2/type 2-like variants. The objective of the current study was to examine the impact of CALR mutation variant stratified driver mutational status on overall (OS), myelofibrosis-free (MFFS), thrombosis-free, and leukemia-free survival (LFS) in ET; 495 patients (median age 58 years; 61% females) with ET were fully annotated for the their driver mutational status: 321 (65%) harbored JAK2, 109 (22%) CALR, and 12 (2%) MPL mutations and 11% were triple-negative. Among the 109 CALR-mutated cases, 52% were classified as type 1/type 1-like and 48% as type 2/type 2-like. In univariate analysis, triple-negative patients displayed the best and MPL mutated the worst OS (P = 0.007); however, the difference in OS was no longer apparent on multivariable analysis that included age and sex as covariates (P = 0.5). LFS was also similar among the different mutational groups (P = 0.6) whereas MFFS was significantly shorter in MPL-mutated patients on both univariate and multivariable analyses (age-adjusted P = 0.02; HR 7.9, 95% CI 2.0-31.5). Also in multivariable analysis that included thrombosis history, age, and cardiovascular risk factors, the presence of JAK2 or MPL mutations was independently associated with higher risk of thrombosis (P = 0.02; HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.4). In conclusion, driver mutational status in ET does not appear to influence overall or LFS, even after CALR variant stratification. However, the presence of MPL mutations might be associated with a higher risk of fibrotic transformation and the presence of JAK2/MPL mutations with higher risk of thrombosis. Am. J. Hematol. 91:503-506, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890983

  16. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Rita Milone, M; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4+ T-cell interferon γ production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin. PMID:26913599

  17. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Rita Milone, M; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4(+) T-cell interferon ? production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin. PMID:26913599

  18. The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calreticulin is recruited to the uropod during capping of surface receptors in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Sachse, Martin; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Guillén, Nancy

    2008-02-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), an intracellular chaperone protein, is crucial for proper folding and transport of proteins through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It has recently been identified as a critical regulator of some several different cellular functions such as migration, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte- or natural killer cell-mediated lysis. Characterization of CRT isolated from parasites may thus help to decipher the contribution of this protein in the parasites' biology and host-parasite interactions. Here, we report descriptive data on the localization of Entamoeba histolytica's CRT at rest and following cap formation by Concanavalin A. As expected, CRT from E. histolytica localizes in the ER. However, the protein was surprisingly found to localize to the parasite surface and, furthermore, to concentrate in the uropod following activation of surface receptors by capping with Concanavalin A. PMID:18160113

  19. Proteomic screening identifies calreticulin as a miR-27a direct target repressing MHC class I cell surface exposure in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Pucci, B; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Fucci, A; Milone, M R; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Votino, C; Pancione, M; Piepoli, A; Mazzoccoli, G; Binaschi, M; Bigioni, M; Maggi, C A; Fassan, M; Laudanna, C; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the immune response and aberrant expression of microRNAs are emerging hallmarks of tumour initiation/progression, in addition to driver gene mutations and epigenetic modifications. We performed a preliminary survey of independent adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC) miRnoma data sets and, among the most dysregulated miRNAs, we selected miR-27a and disclosed that it is already upregulated in adenoma and further increases during the evolution to adenocarcinoma. To identify novel genes and pathways regulated by this miRNA, we employed a differential 2DE-DIGE proteome analysis. We showed that miR-27a modulates a group of proteins involved in MHC class I cell surface exposure and, mechanistically, demonstrated that calreticulin is a miR-27a direct target responsible for most downstream effects in epistasis experiments. In vitro miR-27a affected cell proliferation and angiogenesis; mouse xenografts of human CRC cell lines expressing different miR-27a levels confirmed the protein variations and recapitulated the cell growth and apoptosis effects. In vivo miR-27a inversely correlated with MHC class I molecules and calreticulin expression, CD8+ T cells infiltration and cytotoxic activity (LAMP-1 exposure and perforin release). Tumours with high miR-27a, low calreticulin and CD8+ T cells' infiltration were associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Our data demonstrate that miR-27a acts as an oncomiRNA, represses MHC class I expression through calreticulin downregulation and affects tumour progression. These results may pave the way for better diagnosis, patient stratification and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26913609

  20. Proteomic screening identifies calreticulin as a miR-27a direct target repressing MHC class I cell surface exposure in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Pucci, B; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Fucci, A; Milone, M R; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Votino, C; Pancione, M; Piepoli, A; Mazzoccoli, G; Binaschi, M; Bigioni, M; Maggi, C A; Fassan, M; Laudanna, C; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the immune response and aberrant expression of microRNAs are emerging hallmarks of tumour initiation/progression, in addition to driver gene mutations and epigenetic modifications. We performed a preliminary survey of independent adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC) miRnoma data sets and, among the most dysregulated miRNAs, we selected miR-27a and disclosed that it is already upregulated in adenoma and further increases during the evolution to adenocarcinoma. To identify novel genes and pathways regulated by this miRNA, we employed a differential 2DE-DIGE proteome analysis. We showed that miR-27a modulates a group of proteins involved in MHC class I cell surface exposure and, mechanistically, demonstrated that calreticulin is a miR-27a direct target responsible for most downstream effects in epistasis experiments. In vitro miR-27a affected cell proliferation and angiogenesis; mouse xenografts of human CRC cell lines expressing different miR-27a levels confirmed the protein variations and recapitulated the cell growth and apoptosis effects. In vivo miR-27a inversely correlated with MHC class I molecules and calreticulin expression, CD8(+) T cells infiltration and cytotoxic activity (LAMP-1 exposure and perforin release). Tumours with high miR-27a, low calreticulin and CD8(+) T cells' infiltration were associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Our data demonstrate that miR-27a acts as an oncomiRNA, represses MHC class I expression through calreticulin downregulation and affects tumour progression. These results may pave the way for better diagnosis, patient stratification and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26913609

  1. Kinase-Catalyzed Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Senevirathne, Chamara; Green, Keith D.; Pflum, Mary Kay H.

    2012-01-01

    Kinase-catalyzed protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in a variety of biological processes. Methods to detect phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides in cellular mixtures will aid in cell biological and signaling research. Our laboratory recently discovered the utility of γ-modified ATP analogues as tools for studying phosphorylation. Specifically, ATP-biotin can be used for labeling and visualizing phosphoproteins from cell lysates. Because the biotin tag is suitable for protein detection, the biotinylation reaction can be applied to multiple phosphoproteomics applications. Herein we report a general protocol for labeling phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins in biological samples using kinase-catalyzed biotinylation. PMID:25177527

  2. The Interaction of Classical Complement Component C1 with Parasite and Host Calreticulin Mediates Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Christian; Ramírez, Galia; Valck, Carolina; Aguilar, Lorena; Maldonado, Ismael; Rosas, Carlos; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Ferreira, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Background 9 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in Latin America, plus more than 300,000 in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Japan. Approximately 30% of infected individuals develop circulatory or digestive pathology. While in underdeveloped countries transmission is mainly through hematophagous arthropods, transplacental infection prevails in developed ones. Methodology/Principal Findings During infection, T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT) translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, TcCRT acts as virulence factor since it binds maternal classical complement component C1q that recognizes human calreticulin (HuCRT) in placenta, with increased parasite infectivity. As measured ex vivo by quantitative PCR in human placenta chorionic villi explants (HPCVE) (the closest available correlate of human congenital T. cruzi infection), C1q mediated up to a 3–5-fold increase in parasite load. Because anti-TcCRT and anti-HuCRT F(ab′)2 antibody fragments are devoid of their Fc-dependent capacity to recruit C1q, they reverted the C1q-mediated increase in parasite load by respectively preventing its interaction with cell-bound CRTs from both parasite and HPCVE origins. The use of competing fluid-phase recombinant HuCRT and F(ab′)2 antibody fragments anti-TcCRT corroborated this. These results are consistent with a high expression of fetal CRT on placental free chorionic villi. Increased C1q-mediated infection is paralleled by placental tissue damage, as evidenced by histopathology, a damage that is ameliorated by anti-TcCRT F(ab′)2 antibody fragments or fluid-phase HuCRT. Conclusions/Significance T. cruzi infection of HPCVE is importantly mediated by human and parasite CRTs and C1q. Most likely, C1q bridges CRT on the parasite surface with its receptor orthologue on human placental cells, thus facilitating the first encounter between the parasite and the fetal derived placental tissue. The results presented here have several potential translational medicine aspects, specifically related with the capacity of antibody fragments to inhibit the C1q/CRT interactions and thus T. cruzi infectivity. PMID:23991234

  3. The root-knot nematode calreticulin Mi-CRT is a key effector in plant defense suppression.

    PubMed

    Jaouannet, M; Magliano, M; Arguel, M J; Gourgues, M; Evangelisti, E; Abad, P; Rosso, M N

    2013-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are obligate biotrophic parasites that settle close to the vascular tissues in roots, where they induce the differentiation of specialized feeding cells and maintain a compatible interaction for 3 to 8 weeks. Transcriptome analyses of the plant response to parasitic infection have shown that plant defenses are strictly controlled during the interaction. This suggests that, similar to other pathogens, RKN secrete effectors that suppress host defenses. We show here that Mi-CRT, a calreticulin (CRT) secreted by the nematode into the apoplasm of infected tissues, plays an important role in infection success, because Mi-CRT knockdown by RNA interference affected the ability of the nematodes to infect plants. Stably transformed Arabidopsis thaliana plants producing the secreted form of Mi-CRT were more susceptible to nematode infection than wild-type plants. They were also more susceptible to infection with another root pathogen, the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica. Mi-CRT overexpression in A. thaliana suppressed the induction of defense marker genes and callose deposition after treatment with the pathogen-associated molecular pattern elf18. Our results show that Mi-CRT secreted in the apoplasm by the nematode has a role in the suppression of plant basal defenses during the interaction. PMID:22857385

  4. Combating HER2-overexpressing breast cancer through induction of calreticulin exposure by Tras-Permut CrossMab

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Moyan; Zhao, Lichao; LingHu, RuiXia; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Jiao, Shunchang; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Junlan

    2015-01-01

    Although trastuzumab has succeeded in breast cancer treatment, acquired resistance is one of the prime obstacles for breast cancer therapies. There is an urgent need to develop novel HER2 antibodies against trastuzumab resistance. Here, we first rational designed avidity-imporved trastuzumab and pertuzumab variants, and explored the correlation between the binding avidity improvement and their antitumor activities. After characterization of a pertuzumab variant L56TY with potent antitumor activities, a bispecific immunoglobulin G-like CrossMab (Tras-Permut CrossMab) was generated from trastuzumab and binding avidity-improved pertuzumab variant L56TY. Although, the antitumor efficacy of trastuzumab was not enhanced by improving its binding avidity, binding avidity improvement could significantly increase the anti-proliferative and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities of pertuzumab. Further studies showed that Tras-Permut CrossMab exhibited exceptional high efficiency to inhibit the progression of trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer. Notably, we found that calreticulin (CRT) exposure induced by Tras-Permut CrossMab was essential for induction of tumor-specific T cell immunity against tumor recurrence. These data indicated that simultaneous blockade of HER2 protein by Tras-Permut CrossMab could trigger CRT exposure and subsequently induce potent tumor-specific T cell immunity, suggesting it could be a promising therapeutic strategy against trastuzumab resistance. PMID:25949918

  5. Calreticulin is required for responding to stress, foraging, and fertility in the white-tip nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Wei, Lihui; Chen, Huaigu; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) regulates a wide array of cellular responses in physiological and pathological processes. A full-length cDNA-encoding CRT protein, namely AbCRT-1, was isolated from Aphelenchoides besseyi, an ectoparasitic plant nematode and the agent of white tip disease of rice. The deduced amino acid sequence of AbCRT-1 was highly homologous with other nematode CRTs, and showed the closest evolutionary relationship with BxCRT-1. In-situ hybridization showed that AbCRT-1 is specifically located in the oesophageal gland and gonads of A. besseyi, suggesting its potential role in parasitism and reproduction. Quantity real-time PCR analysis showed that AbCRT-1 is highly expressed in female nematodes but poorly expressed in eggs, juveniles, and male nematodes. Exposing the nematode to relatively low osmotic stress promotes the transcription of AbCRT-1 whereas extreme desiccation suppresses the transcription significantly. Nematodes in which AbCRT-1 mRNA level had been knocked down by soaking them in AbCRT-1 dsRNA solution distributed randomly and did not aggregate temporally, with a decreased capacity of food discernment. Thus the affected nematodes were markedly less fecund. These results demonstrate that AbCRT-1 is required in A. besseyi for responding to stress, foraging, and fertility. PMID:25999293

  6. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates doxorubicin‑induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting calreticulin expression in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Lin, Xiao-Long; He, Jun; Tan, Tian-Ping; Wu, Shao-Jian; Yu, Shan; Chen, Li; Chen, Yu-Dan; Fu, Hong-Yun; Yuan, Cong; Li, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent and currently available antitumor therapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited by the occurrence of cardiotoxicity. Preliminary evidence indicates that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may exert protective effects against DOX cardiotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether calreticulin (CRT) is involved in the cardioprotection of H2S against DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity. DOX was observed to markedly induce injuries, including cytotoxicity and apoptosis, and also enhance the expression level of CRT. Notably, pretreatment of H9c2 cells with sodium hydrosulfide (a donor of H2S) significantly attenuated the decreased cell viability, the increased apoptosis rate and the increased expression level of CRT in H9c2 cells. In addition, pretreatment of H9c2 cells with N‑acetyl‑L‑cysteine, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prior to exposure to DOX, markedly decreased the expression of CRT. These results indicate that exogenous H2S attenuates DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting CRT expression in H9c2 cardiac cells. PMID:26134131

  7. Occurrence of calreticulin during the exchange of nucleohistones into protamine-type proteins in Chara vulgaris spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Popłońska, Katarzyna

    2013-02-01

    During spermiogenesis of an alga Chara vulgaris, which resembles that of animals, nucleohistones are replaced by protamine-type proteins. This exchange takes place in a spermatid nucleus during the key V spermiogenesis stage, in which rough endoplasmic reticulum is the site of protamine-type protein synthesis and is also the pathway guiding the proteins to their destination, nucleus. In the present work, it was shown that a chaperon protein, calreticulin (CRT), abundantly present at this significant V stage of spermiogenesis in a few cellular compartments, i.e., a nucleus, lumen of cisternae, and vesicles of significantly swollen ER as well as outside these structures, e.g., in Golgi apparatus, could have taken part in the process of exchange of nuclear proteins. Colocalization of two proteins, protamine-type proteins, crucial for reproduction, and CRT, was especially visible in a nucleus, mainly on its peripheries where condensed chromatin was present. Localization of protamine-type proteins and CRT in nucleus is in agreement with our previous results showing that protamine-type proteins were twofold more labelled in the peripheral area in comparison to the nucleus center occupied by noncondensed chromatin. The role of CRT in the reproduction of both plants and animals is also discussed. PMID:22198493

  8. Abundant accumulation of the calcium-binding molecular chaperone calreticulin in specific floral tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D E; Glaunsinger, B; Bohnert, H J

    1997-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a calcium-binding protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with an established role as a molecular chaper-one. An additional function in signal transduction, specifically in calcium distribution, is suggested but not proven. We have analyzed the expression pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana CRTs for a comparison with these proposed roles. Three CRT genes were expressed, with identities of the encoded proteins ranging from 54 to 86%. Protein motifs with established functions found in CRTs of other species were conserved. CRT was found in all of the cells in low amounts, whereas three distinct floral tissues showed abundant expression: secreting nectaries, ovules early in development, and a set of subepidermal cells near the abaxial surface of the anther. Localization in the developing endosperm, which is characterized by high protein synthesis rates, can be reconciled with a specific chaperone function. Equally, nectar production and secretion, a developmental stage marked by abundant ER, may require abundant CRT to accommodate the traffic of secretory proteins through the ER. Localization of CRT in the anthers, which are degenerating at the time of maximum expression of CRT, cannot easily be reconciled with a chaperone function but may indicate a role for CRT in anther maturation or dehiscence. PMID:9159940

  9. A new monoclonal antibody (CAL2) detects CALRETICULIN mutations in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded bone marrow biopsies.

    PubMed

    Stein, H; Bob, R; Dürkop, H; Erck, C; Kämpfe, D; Kvasnicka, H-M; Martens, H; Roth, A; Streubel, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnostic of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) discovered CALRETICULIN (CALR) mutations as a major driver in these disorders. In contrast to JAK2 mutations being mainly associated with polycythaemia vera, CALR mutations are only associated with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and essential thrombocythaemia (ET). CALR mutations are present in the majority of PMF and ET patients lacking JAK2 and MPL mutations. As these CALR mutations are absent from reactive bone marrow (BM) lesions their presence indicates ET or PMF. So far these mutations are detectable only by molecular assays. Their molecular detection is cumbersome because of the great CALR mutation heterogeneity. Therefore, the availability of a simple assay would be of great help. All CALR mutations reported lead to a frameshift generating a new 36 amino-acid C-terminus. We generated a monoclonal antibody (CAL2) to this C-neoterminus by immunizing mice with a representative peptide and compared its performance with Sanger sequencing data in 173 MPNs and other BM diseases. There was a 100% correlation between the molecular and the CAL2 immunohistochemical (IHC) assays. Thus, the detection of CALR mutations by the CAL2 IHC is a specific, sensitive, rapid, simple and low-cost method. PMID:26202929

  10. A molluscan calreticulin ortholog from Haliotis discus discus: Molecular characterization and transcriptional evidence for its role in host immunity.

    PubMed

    Udayantha, H M V; Godahewa, G I; Bathige, S D N K; Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Jeong, Hyung-Bok; Lim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Jehee

    2016-05-20

    Calreticulin (CALR), a Ca(2+) binding chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mainly involved in Ca(2+) storage and signaling. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and immune responses of CALR homolog from disk abalone (AbCALR). The full length AbCALR cDNA (1837 bp) had an ORF of 1224 bp. According to the multiple alignments analysis, N- and P-domains were highly conserved in all the selected members of CALRs. In contrast, the C-domain which terminated with the characteristic ER retrieval signal (HDEL) was relatively less conserved. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all the selected molluscan homologs clustered together. Genomic sequence of AbCALR revealed that cDNA sequence was dispersed into ten exons interconnected with nine introns. AbCALR mRNA expression shows the significant (P < 0.05) up-regulation of AbCALR transcripts in hemocytes upon bacterial (Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio parahaemolyticus), viral (Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus; VHSV) and immune stimulants (LPS and poly I:C) challenges at middle and/or late phases. These results collectively implied that AbCALR is able to be stimulated by pathogenic signals and might play a potential role in host immunity. PMID:27086846

  11. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  12. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  13. A Nematode Calreticulin, Rs-CRT, Is a Key Effector in Reproduction and Pathogenicity of Radopholus similis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Wang, Ke; Xie, Hui; Wang, Yan-Tao; Wang, Dong-Wei; Xu, Chun-Lin; Huang, Xin; Wang, De-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Radopholus similis is a migratory plant-parasitic nematode that causes severe damage to many agricultural and horticultural crops. Calreticulin (CRT) is a Ca2+-binding multifunctional protein that plays key roles in the parasitism, immune evasion, reproduction and pathogenesis of many animal parasites and plant nematodes. Therefore, CRT is a promising target for controlling R. similis. In this study, we obtained the full-length sequence of the CRT gene from R. similis (Rs-crt), which is 1,527-bp long and includes a 1,206-bp ORF that encodes 401 amino acids. Rs-CRT and Mi-CRT from Meloidogyne incognita showed the highest similarity and were grouped on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree. Rs-crt is a multi-copy gene that is expressed in the oesophageal glands and gonads of females, the gonads of males, the intestines of juveniles and the eggs of R. similis. The highest Rs-crt expression was detected in females, followed by juveniles, eggs and males. The reproductive capability and pathogenicity of R. similis were significantly reduced after treatment with Rs-crt dsRNA for 36 h. Using plant-mediated RNAi, we confirmed that Rs-crt expression was significantly inhibited in the nematodes, and resistance to R. similis was significantly improved in transgenic tomato plants. Plant-mediated RNAi-induced silencing of Rs-crt could be effectively transmitted to the F2 generation of R. similis; however, the silencing effect of Rs-crt induced by in vitro RNAi was no longer detectable in F1 and F2 nematodes. Thus, Rs-crt is essential for the reproduction and pathogenicity of R. similis. PMID:26061142

  14. The Ca(2+) status of the endoplasmic reticulum is altered by induction of calreticulin expression in transgenic plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, S.; Wyatt, S. E.; Love, J.; Thompson, W. F.; Robertson, D.; Boss, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores in plant cells, we generated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; NT1) suspension cells and Arabidopsis plants with altered levels of calreticulin (CRT), an ER-localized Ca(2+)-binding protein. NT1 cells and Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a maize (Zea mays) CRT gene in both sense and antisense orientations under the control of an Arabidopsis heat shock promoter. ER-enriched membrane fractions from NT1 cells were used to examine how altered expression of CRT affects Ca(2+) uptake and release. We found that a 2.5-fold increase in CRT led to a 2-fold increase in ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+) accumulation in the ER-enriched fraction compared with heat-shocked wild-type controls. Furthermore, after treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin, ER microsomes from NT1 cells overproducing CRT showed a 2-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) released, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) retained compared with wild type. These data indicate that altering the production of CRT affects the ER Ca(2+) pool. In addition, CRT transgenic Arabidopsis plants were used to determine if altered CRT levels had any physiological effects. We found that the level of CRT in heat shock-induced CRT transgenic plants correlated positively with the retention of chlorophyll when the plants were transferred from Ca(2+)-containing medium to Ca(2+)-depleted medium. Together these data are consistent with the hypothesis that increasing CRT in the ER increases the ER Ca(2+) stores and thereby enhances the survival of plants grown in low Ca(2+) medium.

  15. Role of calreticulin in the sensitivity of myocardiac H9c2 cells to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kondo, Takahito

    2006-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca2+-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac apoptosis in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In the present study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on susceptibility to apoptosis under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. Under oxidative stress due to H2O2, the CRT-overexpressing cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis compared with controls. In the overexpressing cells, the levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were significantly increased by H2O2, whereas in controls, only a slight increase was observed. The H2O2-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the increase in [Ca2+]i caused by thapsigargin in control cells but was suppressed by BAPTA-AM, a cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator in the CRT-overexpressing cells, indicating the importance of the level of [Ca2+]i in the sensitivity to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Suppression of CRT by the introduction of the antisense cDNA of CRT enhanced cytoprotection against oxidative stress compared with controls. Furthermore, we found that the levels of activity of calpain and caspase-12 were elevated through the regulation of [Ca2+]i in the CRT-overexpressing cells treated with H2O2 compared with controls. Thus we conclude that the level of CRT regulates the sensitivity to apoptosis under oxidative stress due to H2O2 through a change in Ca2+ homeostasis and the regulation of the Ca2+-calpain-caspase-12 pathway in myocardiac cells. PMID:16135540

  16. Artificial feeding of Rhipicephalus microplus female ticks with anti calreticulin serum do not influence tick and Babesia bigemina acquisition.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sandra; Merino, Octávio; Lérias, Joana; Domingues, Nuno; Mosqueda, Juan; de la Fuente, José; Domingos, Ana

    2015-02-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous ectoparasites considered the principal vectors of disease among animals. Rhipicephalus microplus and R. annulatus ticks are the most important vectors for Babesia bigemina and B. bovis, two of the most important intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites species in cattle, responsible for babesiosis which together with anaplasmosis account for substantial economic losses in the livestock industry worldwide. Anti-tick vaccines are a proved alternative to traditional tick and tick borne diseases control methods but are still limited primarily due to the lack of effective antigens. Subsequently to the identification of antigens the validation is a laborious work often expensive. Tick artificial feeding, is a low cost alternative to test antigens allowing achieving critical data. Herein, R. microplus females were successfully artificially fed using capillary tubes. Calreticulin (CRT) protein, which in a previous study has been identified as being involved in B. bigemina infection in R. annulatus ticks, was expressed as recombinant protein (rCRT) in an E. coli expression system and antibodies raised against rCRT. Anti-rCRT serum was supplemented to a blood meal, offered to partially engorged R. microplus females and their effect in feeding process as well as infection by B. bigemina was analyzed. No significant reductions in tick and egg weight were observed when ticks fed with anti-rCRT serum. Furthermore, B. bigemina infection levels did not show a statistically significant decrease when ticks fed with anti-rCRT antibodies. Results suggest that CRT is not a suitable candidate for cattle vaccination trials. PMID:25262467

  17. Amblyomma americanum tick calreticulin binds C1q but does not inhibit activation of the classical complement cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini; Mulenga, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized Amblyomma americanum (Aam) tick calreticulin (CRT) homolog in tick feeding physiology. In nature, different tick species can be found feeding on the same animal host. This suggests that different tick species found feeding on the same host can modulate the same host anti-tick defense pathways to successfully feed. From this perspective it’s plausible that different tick species can utilize universally conserved proteins such as CRT to regulate and facilitate feeding. CRT is a multi-functional protein found in most taxa that is injected into the vertebrate host during tick feeding. Apart from it’s current use as a biomarker for human tick bites, role(s) of this protein in tick feeding physiology have not been elucidated. Here we show that annotated functional CRT amino acid motifs are well conserved in tick CRT. However our data show that despite high amino acid identity levels to functionally characterized CRT homologs in other organisms, AamCRT is apparently functionally different. Pichia pastoris expressed recombinant (r) AamCRT bound C1q, the first component of the classical complement system, but it did not inhibit activation of this pathway. This contrast with reports of other parasite CRT that inhibited activation of the classical complement pathway through sequestration of C1q. Furthermore rAamCRT did not bind factor Xa in contrast to reports of parasite CRT binding factor Xa, an important protease in the blood clotting system. Consistent with this observation, rAamCRT did not affect plasma clotting or platelet aggregation aggregation. We discuss our findings in the context of tick feeding physiology. PMID:25454607

  18. A Nematode Calreticulin, Rs-CRT, Is a Key Effector in Reproduction and Pathogenicity of Radopholus similis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wang, Ke; Xie, Hui; Wang, Yan-Tao; Wang, Dong-Wei; Xu, Chun-Lin; Huang, Xin; Wang, De-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Radopholus similis is a migratory plant-parasitic nematode that causes severe damage to many agricultural and horticultural crops. Calreticulin (CRT) is a Ca2+-binding multifunctional protein that plays key roles in the parasitism, immune evasion, reproduction and pathogenesis of many animal parasites and plant nematodes. Therefore, CRT is a promising target for controlling R. similis. In this study, we obtained the full-length sequence of the CRT gene from R. similis (Rs-crt), which is 1,527-bp long and includes a 1,206-bp ORF that encodes 401 amino acids. Rs-CRT and Mi-CRT from Meloidogyne incognita showed the highest similarity and were grouped on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree. Rs-crt is a multi-copy gene that is expressed in the oesophageal glands and gonads of females, the gonads of males, the intestines of juveniles and the eggs of R. similis. The highest Rs-crt expression was detected in females, followed by juveniles, eggs and males. The reproductive capability and pathogenicity of R. similis were significantly reduced after treatment with Rs-crt dsRNA for 36 h. Using plant-mediated RNAi, we confirmed that Rs-crt expression was significantly inhibited in the nematodes, and resistance to R. similis was significantly improved in transgenic tomato plants. Plant-mediated RNAi-induced silencing of Rs-crt could be effectively transmitted to the F2 generation of R. similis; however, the silencing effect of Rs-crt induced by in vitro RNAi was no longer detectable in F1 and F2 nematodes. Thus, Rs-crt is essential for the reproduction and pathogenicity of R. similis. PMID:26061142

  19. A calreticulin-dependent nuclear export signal is involved in the regulation of liver receptor homologue-1 protein folding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Ming; Feng, Shan-Jung; Lai, Tsai-Chun; Hu, Meng-Chun

    2015-10-15

    As an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family, liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1) controls a tremendous range of transcriptional programmes that are essential for metabolism and hormone synthesis. Our previous studies have shown that nuclear localization of the LRH-1 protein is mediated by two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that are karyopherin/importin-dependent. It is unclear whether LRH-1 can be actively exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In the present study, we describe a nuclear export domain containing two leucine-rich motifs [named nuclear export signal (NES)1 and NES2] within the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Mutation of leucine residues in NES1 or NES2 abolished nuclear export, indicating that both NES1 and NES2 motifs are essential for full nuclear export activity. This NES-mediated nuclear export was insensitive to the chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) or to CRM1 knockdown. However, knockdown of calreticulin (CRT) prevented NES-mediated nuclear export. Furthermore, our data show that CRT interacts with LRH-1 and is involved in the nuclear export of LRH-1. With full-length LRH-1, mutation of NES1 led to perinuclear accumulation of the mutant protein. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that these perinuclear aggregates were co-localized with the centrosome marker, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), ubiquitin and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), indicating that the mutant was misfolded and sequestered into aggresome-like structures via the autophagic clearance pathway. Our study demonstrates for the first time that LRH-1 has a CRT-dependent NES which is not only required for cytoplasmic trafficking, but also essential for correct protein folding to avoid misfolding-induced aggregation. PMID:26268559

  20. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  1. Iodine-Catalyzed Polysaccharide Esterification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review is provided of the recent reports to use iodine-catalyzed esterification reaction to produce esters from polysaccharides. The process entails reaction of the polysaccharide with an acid anhydride in the presence of a catalytic level of iodine, and in the absence of additional solvents. T...

  2. Adjuvanticity of a Recombinant Calreticulin Fragment in Assisting Anti-β-Glucan IgG Responses in T Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Ji; Long, Kai; Dong, Hong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Polysaccharide-encapsulated fungi are the chief source of diseases in immunocompromised hosts such as those infected with human immunodeficiency virus or neutropenia patients. Currently available polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines are mainly T cell dependent and are usually ineffective in weakened immune systems. In this study, laminarin, a well-characterized β-1,3-glucan, was conjugated with a prokaryotically expressed recombinant fragment (amino acids [aa] 39 to 272) of calreticulin (rCRT/39–272), which exhibits extraordinarily potent immunogenicity and adjuvanticity in experimental animals. The resultant conjugate reserves the immunostimulatory effect of rCRT/39–272 on naïve murine B cells and is capable of eliciting anti-β-glucan IgG (mostly IgG1) responses in not only BALB/c mice but also athymic nude mice. Laminarin-CRT-induced mouse antibodies (Abs) are able to bind with Candida albicans and inhibit its growth in vitro. In addition, vaccination with laminarin-CRT partially protects mice from lethal C. albicans challenge. These results imply that rCRT/39–272 could be used as an ideal carrier or adjuvant for carbohydrate vaccines aimed at inducing or boosting IgG responses to fungal infections in immunodeficient hosts. PMID:23408527

  3. Calreticulin discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site of Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 ligand.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Makoto; Adachi, Yuka; Ito, Yukishige; Totani, Kiichiro

    2015-10-23

    Calreticulin (CRT) is well known as a lectin-like chaperone that recognizes Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9)-glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, whether CRT can directly interact with the aglycone moiety (protein portion) of the glycoprotein remains controversial. To improve our understanding of CRT interactions, structure-defined G1M9-derivatives with different aglycones (-OH, -Gly-NH2, and -Gly-Glu-(t)Bu) were used as CRT ligands, and their interactions with recombinant CRT were analyzed using thermal shift analysis. The results showed that CRT binds strongly to a G1M9-ligand in the order -Gly-Glu-(t)Bu > -Gly-NH2 > -OH, which is the same as that of the reglucosylation of Man9GlcNAc2 (M9)-derivatives by the folding sensor enzyme UGGT (UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase). Our results indicate that, similar to UGGT, CRT discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site, suggesting a similar mechanism mediating the recognition of aglycone moieties in the ER glycoprotein quality control system. PMID:26362185

  4. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  5. BEND3 is involved in the human-specific repression of calreticulin: Implication for the evolution of higher brain functions in human.

    PubMed

    Aghajanirefah, A; Nguyen, L N; Ohadi, M

    2016-01-15

    Recent emerging evidence indicates that changes in gene expression levels are linked to human evolution. We have previously reported a human-specific nucleotide in the promoter sequence of the calreticulin (CALR) gene at position -220C, which is the site of action of valproic acid. Reversion of this nucleotide to the ancestral A-allele has been detected in patients with degrees of deficit in higher brain cognitive functions. This mutation has since been reported in the 1000 genomes database at an approximate frequency of <0.0004 in humans (rs138452745). In the study reported here, we present update on the status of rs138452745 across evolution, based on the Ensembl and NCBI databases. The DNA pulldown assay was also used to identify the proteins binding to the C- and A-alleles, using two cell lines, SK-N-BE and HeLa. Consistent with our previous findings, the C-allele is human-specific, and the A-allele is the rule across all other species (N=38). This nucleotide resides in a block of 12-nucleotides that is strictly conserved across evolution. The DNA pulldown experiments revealed that in both SK-N-BE and HeLa cells, the transcription repressor BEN domain containing 3 (BEND3) binds to the human-specific C-allele, whereas the nuclear factor I (NFI) family members, NF1A, B, C, and X, specifically bind to the ancestral A-allele. This binding pattern is consistent with a previously reported decreased promoter activity of the C-allele vs. the A-allele. We propose that there is a link between binding of BEND3 to the CALR rs138452745 C-allele and removal of NFI binding site from this nucleotide, and the evolution of human-specific higher brain functions. To our knowledge, CALR rs138452745 is the first instance of enormous nucleotide conservation across evolution, except in the human species. PMID:26481236

  6. Gold-catalyzed naphthalene functionalization.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pedro J; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Rivilla, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The complexes IPrMCl (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, M = Cu, 1a; M = Au, 1b), in the presence of one equiv of NaBAr'(4) (Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl), catalyze the transfer of carbene groups: C(R)CO(2)Et (R = H, Me) from N(2)C(R)CO(2)Et to afford products that depend on the nature of the metal center. The copper-based catalyst yields exclusively a cycloheptatriene derivative from the Buchner reaction, whereas the gold analog affords a mixture of products derived either from the formal insertion of the carbene unit into the aromatic C-H bond or from its addition to a double bond. In addition, no byproducts derived from carbene coupling were observed. PMID:21647320

  7. The generality of kinase-catalyzed biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Senevirathne, Chamara; Embogama, D Maheeka; Anthony, Thilani A; Fouda, Ahmed E; Pflum, Mary Kay H

    2016-01-01

    Kinase-catalyzed protein phosphorylation is involved in a wide variety of cellular events. Development of methods to monitor phosphoproteins in normal and diseased states is critical to fully characterize cell signaling. Towards phosphoprotein analysis tools, our lab reported kinase-catalyzed labeling where γ-phosphate modified ATP analogs are utilized by kinases to label peptides or protein substrates with a functional tag. In particular, the ATP-biotin analog was developed for kinase-catalyzed biotinylation. However, kinase-catalyzed labeling has been tested rigorously with only a few kinases, preventing use of ATP-biotin as a general tool. Here, biotinylation experiments, gel or HPLC-based quantification, and kinetic measurements indicated that twenty-five kinases throughout the kinome tree accepted ATP-biotin as a cosubstrate. With this rigorous characterization of ATP-biotin compatibility, kinase-catalyzed labeling is now immediately useful for studying phosphoproteins and characterizing the role of phosphorylation in various biological events. PMID:26672511

  8. In Silico and In Vitro Studies on the Protein-Protein Interactions between Brugia malayi Immunomodulatory Protein Calreticulin and Human C1q

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunita; Gupta, Smita; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Verma, Anita; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Filarial parasites modulate effective immune response of their host by releasing a variety of immunomodulatory molecules, which help in the long persistence of the parasite within the host. The present study was aimed to characterize an immunomodulatory protein of Brugia malayi and its interaction with the host immune component at the structural and functional level. Our findings showed that Brugia malayi Calreticulin (BmCRT) is responsible for the prevention of classical complement pathway activation via its interaction with the first component C1q of the human host. This was confirmed by inhibition of C1q dependent lysis of immunoglobulin-sensitized Red Blood Cells (S-RBCs). This is possibly the first report which predicts CRT-C1q interaction on the structural content of proteins to explain how BmCRT inhibits this pathway. The molecular docking of BmCRT-C1q complex indicated that C1qB chain (IgG/M and CRP binding sites on C1q) played a major role in the interaction with conserved and non-conserved regions of N and P domain of BmCRT. Out of 37 amino acids of BmCRT involved in the interaction, nine amino acids (Pro126, Glu132, His147, Arg151, His153, Met154, Lys156, Ala196 and Lys212) are absent in human CRT. Both ELISA and in silico analysis showed the significant role of Ca+2 in BmCRT-HuC1q complex formation and deactivation of C1r2–C1s2. Molecular dynamics studies of BmCRT-HuC1q complex showed a deviation from ∼0.4 nm to ∼1.0 nm. CD analyses indicated that BmCRT is composed of 49.6% α helix, 9.6% β sheet and 43.6% random coil. These findings provided valuable information on the architecture and chemistry of BmCRT-C1q interaction and supported the hypothesis that BmCRT binds with huC1q at their targets (IgG/M, CRP) binding sites. This interaction enables the parasite to interfere with the initial stage of host complement activation, which might be helpful in parasites establishment. These results might be utilized for help in blocking the C1q/CRT interaction and preventing parasite infection. PMID:25184227

  9. Trypsin-Catalyzed Deltamethrin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Chunrong; Fang, Fujin; Chen, Lin; Yang, Qinggui; He, Ji; Zhou, Dan; Shen, Bo; Ma, Lei; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Zhu, Changliang

    2014-01-01

    To explore if trypsin could catalyze the degradation of non-protein molecule deltamethrin, we compared in vitro hydrolytic reactions of deltamethrin in the presence and absence of trypsin with ultraviolet-visible (UV/Vis) spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In addition, acute oral toxicity of the degradation products was determined in Wistar rats. The results show that the absorption peak of deltamethrin is around 264 nm, while the absorption peaks of deltamethrin degradation products are around 250 nm and 296 nm. In our GC setting, the retention time of undegraded deltamethrin was 37.968 min, while those of deltamethrin degradation products were 15.289 min and 18.730 min. The LD50 of deltamethrin in Wistar rats is 55 mg/kg, while that of deltamethrin degradation products is 3358 mg/kg in female rats and 1045 mg/kg in male rates (61-fold and 19-fold reductions in toxicity), suggesting that trypsin could directly degrade deltamethrin, which significantly reduces the toxicity of deltamethrin. These results expand people's understanding of the functions of proteases and point to potential applications of trypsin as an attractive agent to control residual pesticides in the environment and on agricultural products. PMID:24594869

  10. Advances in lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Filippou, Michalis; Koukouritaki, Maria; Parapouli, Maria; Theodorou, Leonidas G; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Afendra, Amalia; Pandey, Ashok; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2013-12-01

    Lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions are among the most significant chemical and biochemical processes of industrial relevance. Lipases catalyze hydrolysis as well as esterification reactions. Enzyme-catalyzed esterification has acquired increasing attention in many applications, due to the significance of the derived products. More specifically, the lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions attracted research interest during the past decade, due to an increased use of organic esters in biotechnology and the chemical industry. Lipases, as hydrolyzing agents are active in environments, which contain a minimum of two distinct phases, where all reactants are partitioned between these phases, although their distribution is not fixed and changes as the reaction proceeds. The kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed reactions is governed by a number of factors. This article presents a thorough and descriptive evaluation of the applied trends and perspectives concerning the enzymatic esterification, mainly for biofuel production; an emphasis is given on essential factors, which affect the lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction. Moreover, the art of using bacterial and/or fungal strains for whole cell biocatalysis purposes, as well as carrying out catalysis by various forms of purified lipases from bacterial and fungal sources is also reviewed. PMID:23954307

  11. Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-05-05

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  12. Oligonucleotide formation catalyzed by mononucleotide matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Pb(2+)-containing precipitates of mononucleotides form matrices which catalyze the self-condensation of nucleotide 5-prime-phosphorimidazolides and their condensation with nucleosides. The reactions exhibit base-pairing specificity between matrix nucleotide and substrate, and usually follow the Watson-Crick pairing rules. Although purine polynucleotides do not facilitate the oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotide monomers in solution, it is interesting that purine-containing matrices do catalyze such a reaction. The significance of the results in the context of the prebiotic evolution of polynucleotides is discussed.

  13. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  14. Low pressure nickel catalyzed methanol carbonylation

    SciTech Connect

    Rizkalla, N.

    1986-03-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methanol carbonylation process to acetic acid, developed by Monsanto, was an important contribution to organic chemical processing. Prior to the development of Monsanto's technology, carbonylation of methanol was practiced by BASF in a higher pressure, lower selectivity, cobalt-catalyzed process. The cobalt catalyst required a system pressure of 7500 to 10,000 psig. This process was based on W. Reppe's discovery that the ''iron group'' can catalyze the carbonylation of methanol in the presence of a limited amount of halide. The rhodium process is highly selective and operates under mild reaction pressure, 500 to 1000 psig. However, because of the high price of rhodium, an expensive and elaborate rhodium recovery section is an integrated part of the new acetic acid plant. This is a big financial burden especially in a scaled down plant because the same size of recovery section has to be used in the small plant. It is evident that the next improvement in this technology is to develop a process catalyzed by a less expensive but as selective and as active catalyst as rhodium.

  15. Copper-Catalyzed Hydroamination of Terminal Allenes.

    PubMed

    Blieck, Rémi; Bahri, Janet; Taillefer, Marc; Monnier, Florian

    2016-03-18

    The ligand-free copper-catalyzed hydroamination of allenes has been accomplished in the presence of cyclic secondary amines or anilines derivatives. This novel methodology undergoes the selective generation of (E)-allylamines under smooth conditions with total regio- and stereoselectivity. PMID:26959973

  16. Copper Hydride Catalyzed Reductive Claisen Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kong Ching; Ng, Elvis; Wong, Wing-Tak; Chiu, Pauline

    2016-03-01

    An efficient reductive Claisen rearrangement, catalyzed by in situ generated copper hydride and stoichiometric in diethoxymethylsilane, has been developed. Yields of up to 95 % with good to excellent diastereoselectivities were observed in this reaction. Mechanistic studies showed that the stereospecific rearrangement proceeded via a chair transition state of (E)-silyl ketene acetals as intermediates and not via the copper enolates. PMID:26780971

  17. Data, Leadership, and Catalyzing Culture Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, R. Todd; Trower, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    It is crucial to understand today's tenure-track workers so that colleges and universities can continue to attract and retain a large subset of them by understanding and supporting their satisfaction and success at work. In this article, the authors talk about data, leadership, and catalyzing culture change. They discuss data use in the academy

  18. Microorganisms detected by enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vango, S. P.; Weetall, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Enzymes detect the presence of microorganisms in soils. The enzyme lysozymi is used to release the enzyme catalase from the microorganisms in a soil sample. The catalase catalyzes the decomposition of added hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen which is detected manometrically. The partial pressure of the oxygen serves as an index of the samples bacteria content.

  19. Data, Leadership, and Catalyzing Culture Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, R. Todd; Trower, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    It is crucial to understand today's tenure-track workers so that colleges and universities can continue to attract and retain a large subset of them by understanding and supporting their satisfaction and success at work. In this article, the authors talk about data, leadership, and catalyzing culture change. They discuss data use in the academy…

  20. Acid catalyzed Michael additions to artemisitene.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Weiss, E; Kyle, D E; Ziffer, H

    2000-07-17

    A series of 14-substituted-artemisinin and 9-epiartemisinin derivatives was prepared by a titanium-tetrachloride catalyzed addition of trimethylsilyl enol ethers to artemisitene. Several compounds were four to seven times more active than artemisinin against Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:10915061

  1. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  2. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  3. Stop-catalyzed baryogenesis beyond the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Andrey; Perelstein, Maxim; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Winslow, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nonminimal supersymmetric models that predict a tree-level Higgs mass above the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) bound are well motivated by naturalness considerations. Indirect constraints on the stop sector parameters of such models are significantly relaxed compared to the MSSM; in particular, both stops can have weak-scale masses. We revisit the stop-catalyzed electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) scenario in this context. We find that the LHC measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates already rule out the possibility of stop-catalyzed EWB. We also introduce a gauge-invariant analysis framework that may generalize to other scenarios in which interactions outside the gauge sector drive the electroweak phase transition.

  4. Enzyme-catalyzed processes in organic solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Zaks, A; Klibanov, A M

    1985-01-01

    Three different lipases (porcine pancreatic, yeast, and mold) can vigorously act as catalysts in a number of nearly anhydrous organic solvents. Various transesterification reactions catalyzed by porcine pancreatic lipase in hexane obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The dependence of the catalytic activity of the enzyme in organic media on the pH of the aqueous solution from which it was recovered is bell-shaped, with the maximum coinciding with the pH optimum of the enzymatic activity in water. The catalytic power exhibited by the lipases in organic solvents is comparable to that displayed in water. In addition to transesterification, lipases can catalyze several other processes in organic media including esterification, aminolysis, acyl exchange, thiotransesterification, and oximolysis; some of these reactions proceed to an appreciable extent only in nonaqueous solvents. PMID:3858815

  5. Metal-catalyzed etching of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela

    2014-03-01

    We present a comparative investigation on the etching of graphene catalyzed by Fe and Cu. With combined evidence from scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the strikingly different etching behaviors between Fe and Cu are governed by their distinct interactions with carbon. Due to the strong Fe-C interactions, graphene is severely damaged through not only catalytic carbon hydrogenation but also carbon dissolution into Fe alone. In contrast, due to the weak Cu-C interactions and non-wetting behavior of Cu on graphene, Cu particles etch channels in graphene through carbon hydrogenation and the width of the channel width is much narrower than the diameter of catalytic particle. This work provides unprecedented insights into the metal-catalyzed carbon hydrogenation.

  6. Palladium-catalyzed amination of aryl nonaflates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevin W; Mendez-Perez, Maria; Priego, Julian; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2003-12-12

    The first detailed study of the palladium-catalyzed amination of aryl nonaflates is reported. Use of ligands 2-4 and 6 allows for the catalytic amination of electron-rich and -neutral aryl nonaflates with both primary and secondary amines. With use of Xantphos 5, the catalytic amination of a variety of functionalized aryl nonaflates resulted in excellent yields of anilines; even 2-carboxymethyl aryl nonaflate is effectively coupled with a primary alkylamine. Moderate yields were obtained when coupling halo-aryl nonaflates with a variety of amines, where in most cases the aryl nonaflate reacted in preference to the aryl halide. Overall, aryl nonaflates are an effective alternative to triflates in palladium-catalyzed C-N bond-forming processes due to their increased stability under the reaction conditions. PMID:14656080

  7. Antiproton catalyzed microfission/fusion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Pi-Ren; Lewis, Raymond A.; Smith, Gerald A.; Newton, Richard; Dailey, James; Werthman, W. Lance; Chakrabarti, Suman

    1994-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) utilizing an antiproton catalyzed hybrid fission/fusion target is discussed as a potential energy source for interplanetary propulsion. A proof-of-principle experiment underway at Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB and antiproton trapping experiments at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, are presented. The ICAN propulsion concept is described and results of performance analyses are reviewed. Future work to further define the ICAN concept is outlined.

  8. Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkenylzincation of Unfunctionalized Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junliang; Yoshikai, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    While transition metal catalyzed addition reactions of arylmetal reagents to unfunctionalized alkynes have been extensively developed in the last decade, analogous reactions using alkenylmetal reagents remain rare regardless of their potential utility for the synthesis of unsymmetrical 1,3-dienes. Reported herein is the development of a cobalt/diphosphine catalyst which promotes efficient and stereoselective addition of alkenylzinc reagents to unfunctionalized internal alkynes. The resulting dienylzinc species serve as versatile intermediates for further synthetic transformations. PMID:26555023

  9. Mechanism of salicylate hydroxylase-catalyzed decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Katagiri, M

    1981-02-13

    Salicylate hydroxylase (salicylate, NADH: oxygen oxidoreductase (1-hydroxylating, decarboxylating), EC 1.14.13.1) in Pseudomonas putida catalyzed hydroxylation of the substrate analogue, salicylaldehyde, to form catechol and formate with stoichiometric consumption of NADH and O2. Consequently, a study of primary product derived from the carboxyl group of the authentic substrate, salicylate, was undertaken. The experimental results revealed that CO2 not H2CO3, was produced first. PMID:7213760

  10. Nonmetal catalyzed hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Ashley, Andrew E

    2014-11-12

    Solutions of the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 in 1,4-dioxane are found to effectively catalyze the hydrogenation of a variety of ketones and aldehydes. These reactions, the first to allow entirely metal-free catalytic hydrogenation of carbonyl groups under relatively mild reaction conditions, are found to proceed via a "frustrated Lewis pair" mechanism in which the solvent, a weak Brønsted base yet moderately strong donor, plays a pivotal role. PMID:25333722

  11. Microwave-assisted FLP-catalyzed hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Tussing, S; Paradies, J

    2016-03-30

    FLP-catalyzed hydrogenations of 15 substrates were compared using microwave irradiation and conventional heating. The direct comparison revealed that a rate acceleration of up to 2.5 was achieved in the presence of microwaves. This heating method is particularly promising for the hydrogenation of nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Acridine, quinines and especially 1-methyl indole were reduced very efficiently under mild conditions and only 4 bar hydrogen pressure in high yields. PMID:26580129

  12. Reductive Cyclopropanations Catalyzed by Dinuclear Nickel Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You-Yun; Uyeda, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Dinuclear Ni complexes supported by naphthyridine-diimine (NDI) ligands catalyze the reductive cyclopropanation of alkenes with CH2 Cl2 as the methylene source. The use of mild terminal reductants (Zn or Et2 Zn) confers significant functional-group tolerance, and the catalyst accommodates structurally and electronically diverse alkenes. Mononickel catalysts bearing related N chelates afford comparatively low cyclopropane yields (≤20 %). These results constitute an entry into catalytic carbene transformations from oxidized methylene precursors. PMID:26822193

  13. Calcium-Catalyzed Dynamic Multicomponent Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Stopka, Tobias; Niggemann, Meike

    2015-10-16

    The reversible formation of covalent bonds enabled by the remarkably high Lewis acidity of our calcium-based catalyst system was used for the development of a new type of multicomponent reaction. Accordingly, a pharmacologically interesting bicyclic amine was amplified from a highly efficient dynamic equilibrium. The product is formed with full diastereoselectivity, and as typical for our calcium-catalyzed reactions, precautions for the exclusion of air and moisture are unnecessary. PMID:26439888

  14. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  15. Imidazole catalyzes chlorination by unreactive primary chloramines

    PubMed Central

    Roemeling, Margo D.; Williams, Jared; Beckman, Joseph S.; Hurst, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid and simple chloramines (RNHCl) are stable biologically-derived chlorinating agents. In general, the chlorination potential of HOCl is much greater than that of RNHCl, allowing it to oxidize or chlorinate a much wider variety of reaction partners. However, in this study we demonstrate by kinetic analysis that the reactivity of RNHCl can be dramatically promoted by imidazole and histidyl model compounds via intermediary formation of the corresponding imidazole chloramines. Two biologically relevant reactions were investigated—loss of imidazole-catalyzed chlorinating capacity and phenolic ring chlorination using fluorescein and the tyrosine analog, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). HOCl reacted stoichiometrically with imidazole, N-acetylhistidine (NAH), or imidazoleacetic acid to generate the corresponding imidazole chloramines which subsequently decomposed. Chloramine (NH2Cl) also underwent a markedly accelerated loss in chlorinating capacity when NAH was present, although in this case NAHCl did not accumulate, indicating that the catalytic intermediate must be highly reactive. Mixing HOCl with 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) led to very rapid loss in chlorinating capacity via formation of a highly reactive chlorinium ion (MeImCl+) intermediate; this behavior suggests that the reactive forms of the analogous imidazole chloramines are their conjugate acids, e.g., the imidazolechlorinium ion (HImCl+). HOCl-generated imidazole chloramine (ImCl) reacted rapidly with fluorescein in a specific acid-catalyzed second order reaction to give 3′-monochloro and 3′,5′-dichloro products. Equilibrium constants for the transchlorination reactions: HOCl + HIm = H2O + ImCl and NH2Cl + HIm = NH3 + ImCl were estimated from the dependence of the rate constants upon [HIm]/[HOCl] and literature data. Acid catalysis again suggests that the actual chlorinating agent is HImCl+; consistent with this interpretation, MeIm markedly catalyzed fluorescein chlorination by HOCl. Time-dependent imidazole-catalyzed HPA chlorination by NH2Cl was also demonstrated by product analyses. Quantitative assessment of the data suggests that physiological levels of histidyl groups will react with primary chloramines to generate a flux of imidazole chloramine sufficient to catalyze biological chlorination via HImCl+, particularly in environments that generate high concentrations of HOCl such as the neutrophil phagosome. PMID:25660996

  16. Association of HTLV Tax proteins with TAK1-binding protein 2 and RelA in calreticulin-containing cytoplasmic structures participates in Tax-mediated NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Avesani, Francesca; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Turci, Marco; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Sampaio, Carla; Bidoia, Carlo; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Bex, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2 despite having a similar genome and closely related transactivating oncoproteins. Both Tax-1 protein from HTLV-1 and Tax-2 from HTLV-2 activate the NF-κB pathway. The mechanisms involved in Tax-1 deregulation of this signalling pathway have been thoroughly investigated, but little is known about regulation by Tax-2. We have compared the interaction of Tax-1 and Tax-2 with two key NF-κB signalling factors: TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2), an adaptor involved in the activation of TAK1 kinase, and RelA, the active subunit of the canonical RelA/p50 NF-κB transcription factor. Tax-2 formed stable complexes with both RelA and TAB2. These two NF-κB factors colocalized with Tax proteins in dotted cytoplasmic structures targeted by calreticulin, a multi-process calcium-buffering chaperone. Co-expression of RelA and/or TAB2 markedly increased Tax-mediated NF-κB activation. These findings provide new insights into the role of RelA, TAB2 and Tax in the deregulation of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:20875659

  17. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  18. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Synthesis of Cyanidophosphates.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Kevin; Ellinger, Stefan; Harloff, Jörg; Schulz, Axel; Sievert, Katharina; Täschler, Christoph; Villinger, Alexander; Zur Täschler, Cornelia

    2016-03-14

    Salts containing new cyanido(fluorido)phosphate anions of the general formula [PF6-n (CN)n ](-) (n=1-4) were synthesized by a very mild Lewis-acid-catalyzed synthetic protocol and fully characterized. All [PF6-n (CN)n ](-) (n=1-4) salts could be isolated on a preparative scale. It was also possible to detect the [PF(CN)5 ](-) but not the [P(CN)6 ](-) anion. The best results with respect to purity, yield, and low cost were obtained when the F(-) /CN(-) substitution reactions were carried out in ionic liquids. PMID:26849385

  19. Ir-Catalyzed enantioselective group transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Andrew G; Blakey, Simon B

    2015-10-01

    Recently, several novel iridium complexes have been shown to catalyse group transfer reactions in a highly selective fashion. Rhodium complexes, and in particular dirhodium tetracarboxylate salts, have proven to be a remarkably useful class of catalysts for these reactions through several decades of development. Recent results suggest that iridium may offer opportunities to address challenges in this chemistry and provide complementary reactivity patterns. This tutorial review outlines the recent developments in Ir-catalyzed enantioselective group transfer chemistry with highlights on examples which display this unique reactivity. PMID:26051004

  20. Metal-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions for Indoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie Jack; Gribble, Gordon W.

    Metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions for indoles are reviewed. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions are the most widely explored and applied of all metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Applications of Kumada coupling, Negishi coupling, Suzuki coupling, Stille coupling, Sonogashira reaction, the Heck reaction, carbonylation, and C-N bond formation reactions in indoles are summarized. In addition, other transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions using copper, rhodium, iron, and nickel in indole synthesis are also discussed.

  1. Biginelli Reaction Catalyzed by Copper Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Manika; Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF4 and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ∼15 minutes) from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate) and urea (or thiourea). ). Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs) and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency. PMID:22912792

  2. Biginelli reaction catalyzed by copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Manika; Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF(4) and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ~15 minutes) from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate) and urea (or thiourea). ). Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs) and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency. PMID:22912792

  3. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea led to the discovery of the first Mn-catalyzed direct aliphatic C-H fluorination reactions utilizing simple, nucleophilic fluoride salts. Mechanistic studies and DFT calculations have revealed a trans-difluoromanganese(IV) species as the key fluorine transfer intermediate. In addition to catalyzing normal (19)F-fluorination reactions, manganese salen complexes were found to enable the incorporation of radioactive (18)F fluorine via C-H activation. This advance represented the first direct Csp(3)-H bond (18)F labeling with no-carrier-added [(18)F]fluoride and facilitated the late-stage labeling of drug molecules for PET imaging. Given the high reactivity and enzymatic-like selectively of metalloporphyrins, we envision that this new Heteroatom-Rebound Catalysis (HRC) strategy will find widespread application in the C-H functionalization arena and serve as an effective tool for forming new carbon-heteroatom bonds at otherwise inaccessible sites in target molecules. PMID:26042637

  4. Tax Posttranslational Modifications and Interaction with Calreticulin in MT-2 Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastian; Alberti, Carolina; Barriga, Andres; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Ramírez, Eugenio; Ferreira, Arturo; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The human retrovirus human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Axonal degeneration in HAM/TSP patients occurs without neuron infection, with the secreted viral Tax protein proposed to be involved. We previously found that Tax secreted into the culture medium of MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-infected cell line) produced neurite retraction in neuroblastoma cells differentiated to neuronal type. To assess the relevance of Tax posttranslational modifications on this effect, we addressed the question of whether Tax secreted by MT-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HTLV-1-infected subjects is modified. The interaction of Tax with calreticulin (CRT) that modulates intracellular Tax localization and secretion has been described. We studied Tax localization and modifications in MT-2 cells and its interaction with CRT. Intracellular Tax in MT-2 cells was assessed by flow cytometry, corresponding mainly to a 71-kDa protein followed by western blot. This protein reported as a chimera with gp21 viral protein—confirmed by mass spectrometry—showed no ubiquitination or SUMOylation. The Tax–CRT interaction was determined by confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation. Extracellular Tax from HAM/TSP PBMCs is ubiquitinated according to western blot, and its interaction with CRT was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. A positive correlation between Tax and CRT secretion was observed in HAM/TSP PBMCs and asymptomatic carriers. For both proteins inhibitors and activators of secretion showed secretion through the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi complex. Tax, present in PBMC culture medium, produced neurite retraction in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that Tax, whether ubiquitinated or not, is active for neurite retraction. PMID:24321043

  5. Iron-catalyzed amination of alcohols assisted by Lewis acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui-Jie; Ng, Teng Wei; Zhao, Yu

    2015-07-28

    An efficient Lewis acid-assisted, iron-catalyzed amination of alcohols using borrowing hydrogen methodology was developed. In particular, silver fluoride was identified to be a highly effective additive to overcome the low efficiency in the amination of secondary alcohols catalyzed by Knölker's complex. PMID:26111504

  6. Representing Rate Equations for Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2011-01-01

    Rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are derived and presented in a way that makes it easier for the nonspecialist to see how the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction depends upon kinetic constants and concentrations. This is done with distribution equations that show how the rate of the reaction depends upon the relative quantities of

  7. Titanium-catalyzed C-F activation of fluoroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, Moritz F; Lentz, Dieter

    2010-04-01

    Detox: air-stable titanocene difluoride efficiently catalyzes the chemoselective hydrodefluorination of fluoroalkenes at room temperature leading to hydrofluoroalkenes in high yields (see scheme: Cp=cyclopentadienyl). This is a rare example of the catalyzed conversion of fluoroalkenes into less-fluorinated compounds, which have a lower climatic impact, and is a potential method for breaking down toxic perfluoroalkenes. PMID:20229554

  8. Representing Rate Equations for Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2011-01-01

    Rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are derived and presented in a way that makes it easier for the nonspecialist to see how the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction depends upon kinetic constants and concentrations. This is done with distribution equations that show how the rate of the reaction depends upon the relative quantities of…

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: ENVIROFUELS DIESEL FUEL CATALYZER FUEL ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested EnviroFuels diesel fuel additive, called the Diesel Fuel Catalyzer. EnviroFuels has stated that heavy-duty on and off road diesel engines are the intended market for the catalyzer. Preliminary tests conducted indicate...

  10. Acid-Catalyzed Isomerization of Carvone to Carvacrol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Mattingly, Shawn P.

    2005-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol, first reported by Ritter and Ginsburg, is especially well suited with a permanent-magnet FT instrument. The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol produced a 61% yield after a three hour reflux with 30% aqueous sulfuric acid.

  11. Tin-catalyzed hydrophosphination of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, John P W; Bange, Christine A; Waterman, Rory

    2016-04-14

    Simple tin derivatives, Cp*2SnCl2 (1) and Ph2SnCl2 (2), catalyze the hydrophosphination of alkene substrates with diphenylphosphine. Competitive dehydrocoupling to give Ph4P2 was observed, but this side reaction can be mitigated when the catalysis is conducted under an H2 atmosphere. Efforts to prepare stable tin bis(phosphido) compounds commonly resulted in decomposition to Ph4P2. Lewis acidic inorganic tin compounds do not show dehydrocoupling reactivity. It was found that the Lewis acid, B(C6F5)3, is able to engage in the hydrophosphination of alkenes, but it is poorly effective under the conditions tested. PMID:26763199

  12. [Thymidylate synthase-catalyzed reaction mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rode, Wojciech; Jarmuńa, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase ThyA (EC 2.1.1.45;-encoded by the Tyms gene), having been for 60 years a molecular target in chemotherapy, catalyses the dUMP pyrimidine ring C(5) methylation reaction, encompassing a transfer of one-carbon group (the methylene one, thus at the formaldehyde oxidation level) from 6R-N5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, coupled with a reduction of this group to the methyl one, with concomitant generation of 7,8-dihydrofolate and thymidylate. New facts are presented, concerning (i) molecular mechanism of the catalyzed reaction, including the substrate selectivity mechanism, (ii) mechanism of inhibition by a particular inhibitor, N4-hydroxy-dCMP, (iii) structural properties of the enzyme, (iv) cellular localization, (v) potential posttranslational modifications of the enzyme protein and their influence on the catalytic properties and (vi) non-catalytic activities of the enzyme. PMID:26677574

  13. Catalyzed modified clean fractionation of switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Cybulska, Iwona; Brudecki, Grzegorz P; Hankerson, Brett R; Julson, James L; Lei, Hanwu

    2013-01-01

    Switchgrass was used as a lignocellulosic feedstock for second generation ethanol production, after pretreatment using sulfuric acid-catalyzed modified clean fractionation based on NREL's (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) original procedure. Optimization of temperature, catalyst concentration and solvent composition was performed using Response Surface Methodology, and 59.03 ± 7.01% lignin recovery, 84.85 ± 1.34% glucose, and 44.11 ± 3.44% aqueous fraction xylose yields were obtained at 140.00 °C, 0.46% w/w catalyst concentration, 36.71% w/w ethyl acetate concentration, and 25.00% w/w ethanol concentration. The cellulose fraction did not inhibit the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and resulted in an ethanol yield of 89.60 ± 2.1%. PMID:23131627

  14. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  15. RNA-Catalyzed RNA Ligation on an External RNA Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the hc ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes ligation of the 3' end of an RNA substrate to the 5' end of the ribozyme, were utilized to evolve a ribozyme that catalyzes ligation reactions on an external RNA template. The evolved ribozyme catalyzes the joining of an oligonucleotide 3'-hydroxyl to the 5'-triphosphate of an RNA hairpin molecule. The ribozyme can also utilize various substrate sequences, demonstrating a largely sequence-independent mechanism for substrate recognition. The ribozyme also carries out the ligation of two oligonucleotides that are bound at adjacent positions on a complementary template. Finally, it catalyzes addition of mononucleoside '5-triphosphates onto the '3 end of an oligonucleotide primer in a template-dependent manner. The development of ribozymes that catalyze polymerase-type reactions contributes to the notion that an RNA world could have existed during the early history of life on Earth.

  16. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer goods could provide a mechanism that promotes the degradation of these materials once these products reach landfills.

  17. Uroporphyrinogen oxidation catalyzed by human cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, P R; Gorman, N; Tsyrlov, I B; Fuhr, U; Walton, H S; Sinclair, J F

    1998-10-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda is associated with excess hepatic production of uroporphyrin. Oxidation of uroporphyrinogen to uroporphyrin was previously demonstrated to be specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2. Here, we investigated the ability of human CYP1A2 to catalyze uroporphyrinogen oxidation (UROX). UROX activity in human liver microsomes was maximally only 10% of the activity in microsomes from livers of untreated mice. There was a poor correlation of UROX activity with methoxyresorufin demethylation, an activity catalyzed predominantly by CYP1A2 and strongly correlated with immunodetectable CYP1A2. With CYP forms expressed in HepG2 cells, the methoxyresorufin demethylation and (ethoxyresorufin deethylation) activities of murine and human CYP1A2 forms were similar, but UROX activity catalyzed by human CYP1A2 was only 15-20% of the activity catalyzed by murine CYP1A2. Human CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 expressed in lymphoblastoid cells all catalyzed UROX. In insect cells, CYP1A2 was more active in catalyzing UROX than was CYP1A1, CYP2E, CYP3A4, or CYP3A5. Human CYP1A2 expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with rat CYP oxidoreductase also catalyzed UROX. Reconstituted human CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 were active in catalyzing UROX, with reconstituted CYP1A2 having the highest specific activity obtained in this study. From inhibitor studies, it was concluded that some of the UROX activity in the insect cell microsomes was attributable to expressed CYP and some to an unidentified source. These results indicate that human CYP1A2 is active in catalyzing UROX but has lower activity than the murine orthologue. The results also indicate that most of the UROX activity found in human liver microsomes is not due to CYP1A2. PMID:9763408

  18. NEW CORDIERITE DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS FOR CATALYZED AND NON-CATALYZED APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, G; Cutler, W; Tao, T Chiffey, A; Phillips, P; Twigg, M; Walker, A

    2003-08-24

    Cordierite diesel particulate filters provide an economical approach to diesel emissions control. However, further reduction in the pressure drop of catalyzed and non-catalyzed cordierite filters is desirable. In order to derive a fundamental understanding of the relationship between clean and sootloaded pressure drop and the pore microstructure of the ceramic, and to optimize the microstructure for filter performance, cordierite filters have been fabricated spanning an extended range in porosity, pore size distribution, and pore connectivity. Analysis of the results has been applied to the development of several new cordierite diesel particulate filters that possess a unique combination of high filtration efficiency, high strength, and very low clean and soot-loaded pressure drop. Furthermore, catalyst systems have been developed that result in a minimal pressure drop increase of the catalyzed filter. Optimization of porosity and cell geometry has enabled fabrication o f filters with either high or low thermal mass appropriate to the regeneration strategy employed for a given engine management system.

  19. Biotransformations catalyzed by the genus rhodococcus

    SciTech Connect

    Warhurst, A.M.; Fewson, C.A. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococci display a diverse range of metabolic capabilities and they are a ubiquitous feature of many environments. They are able to degrade short-chain, long-chain, and halogenated hydrocarbons, and numerous aromatic compounds, including halogenated and other substituted aromatics, heteroaromatics, hydroaromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. They possess a wide variety of pathways for degrading and modifying aromatic compounds, including dioxygenase and monooxygenase ring attack, and cleavage of catechol by both ortho- and meta-routes, and some strains posses a modified 3-oxoadipate pathway. Biotransformations catalyzed by rhodococci include steroid modification, enantioselective synthesis, and the transformation of nitriles to amides and acids. Tolerance of rhodococci to starvation, their frequent lack of catabolite repression, and their environmental persistence make them excellent candidates for bioremediation treatments. Some strains can produce poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate)s, others can accumulate cesium, and still others are the source of useful enzymes such as phenylalanine dehydrogenase and endoglycosidases. Other actual or potential applications of rhodococci include desulfurization of coal, bioleaching, use of their surfactants in enhancement of oil recovery and as industrial dispersants, and the construction of biosensors.

  20. Cyclophilin catalyzes protein folding in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Matouschek, A; Rospert, S; Schmid, K; Glick, B S; Schatz, G

    1995-01-01

    Cyclophilins are a family of ubiquitous proteins that are the intracellular target of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A. Although cyclophilins catalyze peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerization in vitro, it has remained open whether they also perform this function in vivo. Here we show that Cpr3p, a cyclophilin in the matrix of yeast mitochondria, accelerates the refolding of a fusion protein that was synthesized in a reticulocyte lysate and imported into the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. The fusion protein consisted of the matrix-targeting sequence of subunit 9 of F1F0-ATPase fused to mouse dihydrofolate reductase. Refolding of the dihydrofolate reductase moiety in the matrix was monitored by acquisition of resistance to proteinase K. The rate of refolding was reduced by a factor of 2-6 by 2.5 microM cyclosporin A. This reduced rate of folding was also observed with mitochondria lacking Cpr3p. In these mitochondria, protein folding was insensitive to cyclosporin A. The rate of protein import was not affected by cyclosporin A or by deletion of Cpr3p. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7603990

  1. Titanium Catalyzed Perchlorate Reduction and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Bonnesen, Peter V; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V; Brown, Gilbert M

    2006-01-01

    This work provides a proof-of-principle demonstration that Ti(III)-catalyzed electrochemical techniques could potentially be used for reduction of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in small waste streams, such as the regeneration of selective anion-exchange resins that are loaded with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. The technique may not be directly applied for the treatment of large volumes of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}-contaminated water at relatively low concentrations because of its slow reaction kinetics and the use of chemical reagents. Further studies are needed to optimize the reaction conditions in order to achieve a complete reduction of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and the regeneration of spent resin beds. Alternative complexing and reducing agents may be used to enhance the reaction completeness of sorbed ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in the resin and to overcome potential clogging of micropores within the resin beads resulting from the precipitation of TiO{sub 2}.

  2. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed hydroxylations: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Dordick, J S; Klibanov, A M; Marletta, M A

    1986-05-20

    The hydroxylation of phenol to hydroquinone and catechol in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid and oxygen catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase was studied under conditions where the product yield was high and the side reactions were minimal. The reaction is partially uncoupled with a molar ratio of dihydroxyfumaric acid consumed to hydroxylated products of 12:1. Hydrogen peroxide does not participate in the reaction as evidenced by the lack of effect of catalase and by the direct addition of hydrogen peroxide. Conversely, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are involved as their scavengers are potent inhibitors. Experiments were all consistent with the involvement of compound III (oxygenated ferrous complex) of peroxidase in the reaction. Compound III is stable in the presence of phenol alone but decomposes rapidly in the presence of both phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid with the concomitant formation of product. Therefore, phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid must be present with compound III in order for the hydroxylation reaction to occur. A mechanism consistent with the experimental results is proposed. PMID:3718931

  3. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  4. Thioglycoside hydrolysis catalyzed by {beta}-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hong; Byers, Larry D.

    2007-10-26

    Sweet almond {beta}-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) has been shown to have significant thioglycohydrolase activity. While the K{sub m} values for the S- and O-glycosides are similar, the k{sub cat} values are about 1000-times lower for the S-glycosides. Remarkably, the pH-profile for k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl thioglucoside (pNPSG) shows the identical dependence on a deprotonated carboxylate (pK{sub a} 4.5) and a protonated group (pK{sub a} 6.7) as does the pH-profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding O-glycoside. Not surprisingly, in spite of the requirement for the presence of this protonated group in catalytically active {beta}-glucosidase, thioglucoside hydrolysis does not involve general acid catalysis. There is no solvent kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of pNPSG.

  5. Peptide Bond Formation Mechanism Catalyzed by Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Marti, Sergio; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Bertran, Juan

    2015-09-23

    In this paper we present a study of the peptide bond formation reaction catalyzed by ribosome. Different mechanistic proposals have been explored by means of Free Energy Perturbation methods within hybrid QM/MM potentials, where the chemical system has been described by the M06-2X functional and the environment by means of the AMBER force field. According to our results, the most favorable mechanism in the ribosome would proceed through an eight-membered ring transition state, involving a proton shuttle mechanism through the hydroxyl group of the sugar and a water molecule. This transition state is similar to that described for the reaction in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 8708-8719), but the reaction mechanisms are noticeably different. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally determined catalytic effect of ribosome that can be explained by the different behavior of the two environments. While the solvent reorganizes during the chemical process involving an entropic penalty, the ribosome is preorganized in the formation of the Michaelis complex and does not suffer important changes along the reaction, dampening the charge redistribution of the chemical system. PMID:26325003

  6. Hydrolase-catalyzed biotransformations in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gorke, Johnathan T; Srienc, Friedrich; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2008-03-14

    Hydrolases show good catalytic activity in deep eutectic solvents, despite the presence of urea, which can denature enzymes, or alcohols, which can interfere with hydrolase-catalyzed reactions. PMID:18309428

  7. Enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed synthesis of indenopyrones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Quan; Zhang, Han-Ming; Wang, Dong-Ling; Sun, De-Qun; Ye, Song

    2015-06-28

    The chiral N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed [4 + 2] cyclization of α-chloroaldehydes and arylidene indanediones was developed, giving the corresponding indenopyrones in good yields with high diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities. PMID:26006112

  8. Protein Hydroxylation Catalyzed by 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Oxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Markolovic, Suzana; Wilkins, Sarah E.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational hydroxylation of prolyl and lysyl residues, as catalyzed by 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases, was first identified in collagen biosynthesis. 2OG oxygenases also catalyze prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylation of the hypoxia-inducible factors that play important roles in the adaptive response to hypoxia. Subsequently, they have been shown to catalyze N-demethylation (via hydroxylation) of Nϵ-methylated histone lysyl residues, as well as hydroxylation of multiple other residues. Recent work has identified roles for 2OG oxygenases in the modification of translation-associated proteins, which in some cases appears to be conserved from microorganisms through to humans. Here we give an overview of protein hydroxylation catalyzed by 2OG oxygenases, focusing on recent discoveries. PMID:26152730

  9. Efficient monophosphorus ligands for palladium-catalyzed Miyaura borylation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenjun; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Zhang, Yongda; Wei, Xudong; Savoie, Jolaine; Patel, Nitinchandra D; Yee, Nathan K; Senanayake, Chris H

    2011-03-18

    In combination with the Bedford Pd precursor, the new biaryl monophosphorus ligand 5 was efficient for palladium-catalyzed Miyaura borylation of sterically hindered aryl bromides at low catalyst loadings. PMID:21319836

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE BASE CATALYZED DECOMPOSITION (BCD) PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes laboratory-scale, pilot-scale, and field performance data on BCD (Base Catalyzed Decomposition) and technology, collected to date by various governmental, academic, and private organizations.

  11. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  12. Characterization of Na+-montmorillonite-catalyzed reaction of racemic ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Urata, Hidehito; Fujimori, Mami; Aono, Chie; Hrada, Emi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Yamakawa, Tomomi; Akagi, Masao

    2005-01-01

    We have reported that the oligomerization of racemic mononucleotides catalyzed by montmorillonite clay proceeds efficiently and gives up to 8-mer. Here, we attempted to identify the dimer products to show the characteristics of the racemic reaction. The results suggested that homochiral pApAs are formed in somewhat higher yield than heterochiral pApAs. Therefore, the oligomerization of racemic mononucleotides catalyzed by montmorillonite shows the homochiral selectivity. PMID:17150660

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling of Alkenes, Aldehydes, and Silyl Triflates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-sze; Ho, Chun-Yu; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    A full account of two recently developed nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions of alkenes, aldehydes and silyl triflates is presented. These reactions provide either allylic alcohol or homoallylic alcohol derivatives selectively, depending on the ligand employed. These processes are believed to be mechanistically distinct from Lewis acid-catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions, and several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis are discussed. PMID:16939275

  14. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  15. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and motivate volunteers ensures that we are able to collect quality data, cost effectively, and in a fraction of the traditional timeframe.

  16. Rate equations of solid-catalyzed reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mezaki, R.; Inoue, H.

    1991-01-01

    Rate Equations of Solid-Catalyzed Reactions, edited by Mezaki and Inoue, contains a comprehensive compilation of kinetic rate expressions for a large number of relevant catalytic reaction systems. Mezaki and Inoue should be commended for their effort. For the practicing catalytic engineer the book should serve as a quick reference guide for assessing the functional dependence of rate on various operating conditions for a catalytic reaction system of interest. Even in this age of computer-aid literature searches this book should reduce the typically large activation barrier and search time associated with locating kinetic rate expressions for a particular reaction system. It is a recommended reference book for all whom are involved in the business of catalytic reactions. However, its format is not amenable for teaching. The book is structured according to the reaction system type. Chapter (1) focuses on synthesis (e.g., of sulfur trioxide, ammonia, methanol), (2) on hydrogenations (e.g., of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ethylene, cyclohexene), (3) on hydrogenolysis (of low molecular weight alkanes such as ethane and/or pentane), (4) on hydrocracking (of higher molecular weight components such as n-hexane and n-dodecane), (5) on dehydrogenation (e.g., of ethanol, ethane, cyclohexane), (6) on complete oxidation (e.g., of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, alkanes, and olefins), (7) on partial oxidation (e.g., of methanol, ethylene, xylenes, and ammonia), (8) on isomerization (e.g., of methane, ethane, and cyclohexane), (10) on decomposition of ammonia and nitric oxide, (11) on dehydration of various alcohols, (12) on cumene cracking, and (13) on other key reactions such as water-gas shift and nitric oxide reduction.

  17. Group V sensitive vapor-liquid-solid growth of Au-catalyzed and self-catalyzed III-V nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new theoretical model that treats the group V sensitive growth rates and structures of Au-catalyzed and self-catalyzed III-V nanowires within a single kinetic picture. It is shown that Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires can grow with a time-independent radius within a wide range of parameters. At high V/III flux ratios, the vapor-liquid-solid growth of Au catalyzed III-V nanowires is controlled by surface diffusion of the group III adatoms, while at low V/III flux ratios it becomes nucleation-limited. Conversely, self-catalyzed III-V nanowires cannot grow with a time-independent droplet size and instead such nanowires may either swell or shrink or converge to a certain stationary radius depending on the V/III flux ratio. Quite importantly, the results are presented in a concise analytical form which is convenient for comparison with experimental data or prior theoretical works. We demonstrate how the model fits the data obtained previously for Au- and Ga-catalyzed GaAs nanowires.

  18. Gold-catalyzed rearrangements and beyond.

    PubMed

    Obradors, Carla; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2014-03-18

    Cycloisomerizations of enynes are probably the most representative carbon-carbon bond forming reactions catalyzed by electrophilic metal complexes. These transformations are synthetically useful because chemists can use them to build complex architectures under mild conditions from readily assembled starting materials. However, these transformations can have complex mechanisms. In general, gold(I) activates alkynes in the presence of any other unsaturated functional group by forming an (η(2)-alkyne)-gold complex. This species reacts readily with nucleophiles, including electron-rich alkenes. In this case, the reaction forms cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like intermediates. These can come from different pathways depending on the substitution pattern of the alkyne and the alkene. In the absence of external nucleophiles, 1,n-enynes can form products of skeletal rearrangement in fully intramolecular reactions, which are mechanistically very different from metathesis reactions initiated by the [2 + 2] cycloaddition of a Grubbs-type carbene or other related metal carbenes. In this Account, we discuss how cycloisomerization and addition reactions of substituted enynes, as well as intermolecular reactions between alkynes and alkenes, are best interpreted as proceeding through discrete cationic intermediates in which gold(I) plays a significant role in the stabilization of the positive charge. The most important intermediates are highly delocalized cationic species that some chemists describe as cyclopropyl gold(I) carbenes or gold(I)-stabilized cyclopropylmethyl/cyclobutyl/homoallyl carbocations. However, we prefer the cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene formulation for its simplicity and mnemonic value, highlighting the tendency of these intermediates to undergo cyclopropanation reactions with alkenes. We can add a variety of hetero- and carbonucleophiles to the enynes in the presence of gold(I) in intra- or intermolecular reactions, leading to the corresponding adducts with high stereoselectivity through stereospecific anti-additions. We have also developed stereospecific syn-additions, which probably occur through similar intermediates. The attack of carbonyl groups at the cyclopropyl carbons of the intermediate cyclopropyl gold(I) carbenes initiates a particularly interesting group of reactions. These trigger a cascade transformation that can lead to the formation of two C-C and one C-O bonds. In the fully intramolecular process, this stereospecific transformation has been applied for the synthesis of natural sesquiterpenoids such as (+)-orientalol F and (-)-englerin A. Intra- and intermolecular trapping of cyclopropyl gold(I) carbenes with alkenes leads to the formation of cyclopropanes with significant increase in the molecular complexity, particularly in cases in which this process combines with the migration of propargylic alkoxy and related OR groups. We have recently shown this in the stereoselective total synthesis of the antiviral sesquiterpene (+)-schisanwilsonene by a cyclization/1,5-acetoxy migration/intermolecular cyclopropanation. In this synthesis, the cyclization/1,5-acetoxy migration is faster than the alternative 1,2-acyloxy migration that would result in racemization. PMID:24175907

  19. Palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Kevin H

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides. PMID:26007192

  20. Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkylation of Aromatic Amines by Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Rösler, Sina; Ertl, Michael; Irrgang, Torsten; Kempe, Rhett

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of inexpensive, Earth-abundant metals in typical noble-metal-mediated chemistry is a major goal in homogeneous catalysis. A sustainable or green reaction that has received a lot of attention in recent years and is preferentially catalyzed by Ir or Ru complexes is the alkylation of amines by alcohols. It is based on the borrowing hydrogen or hydrogen autotransfer concept. Herein, we report on the Co-catalyzed alkylation of aromatic amines by alcohols. The reaction proceeds under mild conditions, and selectively generates monoalkylated amines. The observed selectivity allows the synthesis of unsymmetrically substituted diamines. A novel Co complex stabilized by a PN5 P ligand catalyzes the reactions most efficiently. PMID:26474443

  1. Atom transfer and rearrangement reactions catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J.

    1999-05-10

    Methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) catalyzes the desulfurization of thiiranes by triphenylphosphine. Enormous enhancement in rate is observed when the catalyst is pretreated with hydrogen sulfide prior to the reaction. Using 2-mercaptomethylthiophenol as a ligand, the author synthesized several model complexes to study the mechanism of this reaction. With suitable model systems, they were able to show that the active catalyst is a Re(V) species. The reactions are highly stereospecific and very tolerant to functional groups. As part of the studies, he synthesized and crystallographically characterized the first examples of neutral terminal and bridging Re(V)sulfidocomplexes. Some of these complexes undergo fast oxygen atom transfer reactions with organic and inorganic oxidants. Studies on these model complexes led them to the discovery that MTO catalyzes the selective oxidation of thiols to disulfides. This report contains the Introduction; ``Chapter 6: Isomerization of Propargylic Alcohols to Enones and Enals Catalyzed by Methylrhenium Trioxide``; and Conclusions.

  2. Transition metal catalyzed borylation of functional π-systems

    PubMed Central

    SHINOKUBO, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Borylated functional π-systems are useful building blocks to enable efficient synthesis of novel molecular architectures with beautiful structures, intriguing properties and unique functions. Introduction of boronic ester substituents to a variety of extended π-systems can be achieved through either iridium-catalyzed direct C–H borylation or the two-step procedure via electrophilic halogenation followed by palladium-catalyzed borylation. This review article focuses on our recent progress on borylation of large π-conjugated systems such as porphyrins, perylene bisimides, hexabenzocoronenes and dipyrrins. PMID:24492644

  3. Radiation catalyzed conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C.E.; Bennett, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of water production dependence on tritium concentration and external radiation fields has been made for the tritium-in-air concentration range of 0.01 to 1 Ci/m/sup 3/. Results of reactions taking place under static conditions (in Pyrex flasks at 20/sup 0/C) indicate that: (1) self-catalyzed rates may be first-order-dependent on tritium concentration; and (2) external radiation fields may cause a virtual steady-state condition to occur (in terms of additional self-catalyzed water production).

  4. Microbial-Catalyzed Biotransformation of Multifunctional Triterpenoids Derived from Phytonutrients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Tan, Huey Ling; Sultan, Sadia; Mohd Faridz, Muhammad Afifi Bin; Mohd Shah, Mohamad Azlan Bin; Nurfazilah, Sharifah; Hussain, Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-catalyzed biotransformations have considerable potential for the generation of an enormous variety of structurally diversified organic compounds, especially natural products with complex structures like triterpenoids. They offer efficient and economical ways to produce semi-synthetic analogues and novel lead molecules. Microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi could catalyze chemo-, regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations of diverse triterpenoid substrates that are extremely difficult to produce by chemical routes. During recent years, considerable research has been performed on the microbial transformation of bioactive triterpenoids, in order to obtain biologically active molecules with diverse structures features. This article reviews the microbial modifications of tetranortriterpenoids, tetracyclic triterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:25003642

  5. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated) asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C–C, C–N, C–O and other carbon–heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C–C and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:26734106

  6. New Palladium-Catalyzed Approaches to Heterocycles and Carbocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qinhua Huang

    2004-12-19

    The tert-butylimines of o-(1-alkynyl)benzaldehydes and analogous pyridinecarbaldehydes have been cyclized under very mild reaction conditions in the presence of I{sub 2}, ICl, PhSeCl, PhSCl and p-O{sub 2}NC{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCl to give the corresponding halogen-, selenium- and sulfur-containing disubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines, respectively. Monosubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines have been synthesized by the metal-catalyzed ring closure of these same iminoalkynes. This methodology accommodates a variety of iminoalkynes and affords the anticipated heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields. The Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-(1-alkynyl)arylaldimines in the presence of various alkenes provides an efficient way to synthesize a variety of 4-(1-alkenyl)-3-arylisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields. The introduction of an ortho-methoxy group on the arylaldimine promotes the Pd-catalyzed cyclization and stabilizes the resulting Pd(II) intermediate, improving the yields of the isoquinoline products. Highly substituted naphthalenes have been synthesized by the palladium-catalyzed annulation of a variety of internal alkynes, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step under relatively mild reaction conditions. This method has also been used to synthesize carbazoles, although a higher reaction temperature is necessary. The process involves arylpalladation of the alkyne, followed by intramolecular Heck olefination and double bond isomerization. This method accommodates a variety of functional groups and affords the anticipated highly substituted naphthalenes and carbazoles in good to excellent yields. Novel palladium migratiodarylation methodology for the synthesis of complex fused polycycles has been developed, in which one or more sequential Pd-catalyzed intramolecular migration processes involving C-H activation are employed. The chemistry works best with electron-rich aromatics, which is in agreement with the idea that these palladium-catalyzed C-H activation reactions parallel electrophilic aromatic substitution. A relatively efficient synthesis of cyclopropanes has been developed using palladium-catalyzed C-H activation chemistry, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step. This method involves the palladium-catalyzed activation of relatively unreactive C-H bonds, and provides a very efficient way to synthesize cyclopropapyrrolo[1,2-a]indoles, analogues of the mitomycin antibiotics.

  7. Molecular Mechanism by which One Enzyme Catalyzes Two Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    Unlike ordinary enzymes, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolase/phosphatase (FBPA/P) catalyzes two distinct reactions : (1) the aldol condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to FBP, and (2) the dephosphorylation of FBP to fructose-6-phosphate. We solved the crystal structures of FBPA/P in complex with DHAP (its aldolase form) and FBP (its phosphatase form). The crystal structures revealed that FBPA/P exhibits the dual activities through a dramatic conformational change in the active-site architecture. Our findings expand the conventional concept that one enzyme catalyzes one reaction.

  8. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  9. Zinc-catalyzed cyclopropenation of alkynes via 2-furylcarbenoids.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez, Mara J; Lpez, Luis A; Vicente, Rubn

    2014-11-01

    An unprecedented cyclopropenation reaction of alkynes catalyzed by ZnCl2 is reported. While Simmons-Smith-type carbenoids failed in the [2 + 1]-cycloaddition with alkynes, the use of enynones as the carbene source enables the preparation of substituted 2-furyl cyclopropene derivatives with remarkable scope. PMID:25338218

  10. Synthesis of Indolizine Derivatives by Pd-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongyu; Alper, Howard

    2015-09-18

    An efficient synthesis of indolizine derivatives by palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of propargylic pyridines has been developed. The reaction can be conducted at room temperature and under 3 bar of CO in the presence of Pd2(dba)3 or Pd/C. The catalyst Pd/C could be easily removed from the reaction and recycled. PMID:26331787

  11. Enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed synthesis of trifluoromethyldihydropyridinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Ling; Liang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Kun-Quan; Sun, De-Qun; Ye, Song

    2015-06-01

    The enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed [4 + 2] cyclocondensation of α-chloroaldehydes and trifluoromethyl N-Boc azadienes was developed, giving the corresponding 3,4-disubstituted-6-trifluoromethyldihydropyridin-2(1H)-ones in good yields with exclusive cis-selectivities and excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:25933360

  12. Selective iron-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wienhöfer, Gerrit; Westerhaus, Felix A; Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2012-05-18

    A novel iron-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of alkynes to the corresponding alkenes applying formic acid as a hydrogen donor is reported. An in situ combination of Fe(BF(4))(2)·6H(2)O and tetraphos allows for highly selective hydrogenation of a broad range of aromatic and aliphatic alkynes tolerating different functional groups. PMID:22498907

  13. Cu-Catalyzed Fluorination of Diaryliodonium Salts with KF

    PubMed Central

    Ichiishi, Naoko; Canty, Allan J.; Yates, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    A mild Cu-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of unsymmetrical diaryliodonium salts with KF is described. This protocol preferentially fluorinates less sterically hindered aromatic rings. The reaction exhibits a broad substrate scope and proceeds with high chemoselectivity and functional group tolerance. DFT calculations implicate a CuI/CuIII catalytic cycle. PMID:24063629

  14. Iridium-catalyzed enantioselective allylic alkylation with functionalized organozinc bromides.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, James Y; Sarlah, David; Carreira, Erick M

    2015-06-22

    Iridium-catalyzed enantioselective allylic alkylation of branched racemic carbonates with functionalized alkylzinc bromide reagents is described. Enabled by a chiral Ir/(P,olefin) complex, the method described allows allylic substitution with various primary and secondary alkyl nucleophiles with excellent regio- and enantioselectivities. The developed reaction was showcased in a concise, asymmetric synthesis of (-)-preclamol. PMID:25969352

  15. Solvent-free lipase-catalyzed preparation of diacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nikolaus; Mukherjee, Kumar D

    2004-08-25

    Various methods have been applied for the enzymatic preparation of diacylglycerols that are used as dietary oils for weight reduction in obesity and related disorders. Interesterification of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with commercial preparations of monoacylglycerols, such as Monomuls 90-O18, Mulgaprime 90, and Nutrisoft 55, catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) in vacuo at 60 degrees C led to extensive (from 60 to 75%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with Nutrisoft, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM in vacuo at 60 degrees C, also led to extensive (from 60 to 70%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM and lipases from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM) and Candida antarctica (lipase B, Novozym 435), also provided diacylglycerols, however, to a lower extent (40-45%). Glycerolysis of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme TL and Novozym 435, led to diacylglycerols to the extent of

  16. Palladium(0)-catalyzed methylenecyclopropanation of norbornenes with vinyl bromides.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiangang; Bao, Weiliang

    2014-05-16

    Highly strained methylenecyclopropane derivatives have been achieved via a novel and efficient Pd(0)-catalyzed domino reaction. The formal [2 + 1] cycloaddition reaction of vinyl bromides to norbornenes involves a Heck-type coupling and a C(sp(2))-H bond activation. PMID:24784731

  17. Copper-catalyzed direct C-H fluoroalkenylation of heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Rousée, Kevin; Schneider, Cédric; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Levacher, Vincent; Hoarau, Christophe; Couve-Bonnaire, Samuel; Pannecoucke, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed direct C-H fluoroalkenylation of heterocycles using various gem-bromofluoroalkenes as electrophiles is reported. This efficient method offers step-economical, low-cost and stereocontrolled access to relevant heteroarylated monofluoroalkenes. The synthesis of fluorinated analogues of biomolecules and therapeutic agents for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as application is reported. PMID:26603641

  18. N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed synthesis of oxime esters.

    PubMed

    Enders, Dieter; Grossmann, André; Van Craen, David

    2013-01-01

    A triazolium salt derived N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzes the redox esterification reaction between α-β-unsaturated aldehydes and oximes. The resulting saturated oxime esters were obtained in very good yields for a broad range of aliphatic, aromatic and heteroaromatic substrates. PMID:23104187

  19. Asymmetric NHC-catalyzed redox ?-amination of ?-aroyloxyaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James E; Daniels, David S B; Smith, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    Asymmetric ?-amination through an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed redox reaction of ?-aroyloxyaldehydes with N-aryl-N-aroyldiazenes to form ?-hydrazino esters with high enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee) is reported. The hydrazide products are readily converted into enantioenriched N-aryl amino esters through samarium(II) iodide mediated N-N bond cleavage. PMID:24215115

  20. Copper/Guanidine-Catalyzed Asymmetric Alkynylation of Isatins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quangang; Tang, Yu; Huang, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-04-18

    The highly enantioselective alkynylation of isatins, catalyzed by a bifunctional guanidine/CuI catalyst under mild reaction conditions, is described. The reaction is broad in scope with respect to alkyl/aryl-substituted terminal alkynes and substituted isatins, thus affording bioactive propargylic alcohols in excellent yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:26991133

  1. Metal-Catalyzed Cleavage of tRNA[superscript Phe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which students assay metal-catalyzed hydrolysis of tRNA[superscript Phe]

  2. Catalyzing Graduate Teaching Assistants' Laboratory Teaching through Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond-Robinson, Janet; Rodriques, Romola A. Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of a laboratory teaching apprenticeship program designed to improve graduate teaching assistant (GTA) performance. To catalyze GTAs as laboratory teachers we constructed learning goals, synthesized previous literature into a design model and a developmental path, and built two instruments to measure 12 strategic pedagogical…

  3. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Trifluoromethylation of Methylenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Chen, Kai; Yu, Liu-Zhu; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Shi, Min

    2015-12-18

    Copper(I)-catalyzed intramolecular trifluoromethylation of methylenecyclopropanes has been developed to produce a variety of CF3-substituted dihydronaphthalenes in moderate to good yields, relying on the construction of C(sp(2))-CF3 bonds under mild conditions. The reactions proceed through a radical process under copper(I) catalysis with a good compatibility for the functional group. PMID:26635072

  4. Nature's Strategy for Catalyzing Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Hideaki

    2016-04-21

    The enzymes catalyzing a Diels-Alder-type reaction have been attractive targets for organic chemists for years. Recently, Zheng et al. (2016) reported the structure of a formal monofunctional Diels-Alderase PyrI4 complexed with the product and unveiled a detailed catalytic mechanism of a highly important enzyme. PMID:27105277

  5. Development of a Lewis Base Catalyzed Selenocyclization Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, William

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Lewis base activation of selenium Lewis acids has been effectively reduced to practice in the Lewis base catalyzed selenofunctionalization of unactivated olefins. In this reaction, the weakly acidic species, "N"-phenylselenyl succinimide, is cooperatively activated by the addition of a "soft" Lewis base donor (phosphine sulfides,…

  6. Catalyzing Graduate Teaching Assistants' Laboratory Teaching through Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond-Robinson, Janet; Rodriques, Romola A. Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of a laboratory teaching apprenticeship program designed to improve graduate teaching assistant (GTA) performance. To catalyze GTAs as laboratory teachers we constructed learning goals, synthesized previous literature into a design model and a developmental path, and built two instruments to measure 12 strategic pedagogical

  7. Silver-catalyzed protodecarboxylation of heteroaromatic carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pengfei; Sanchez, Carolina; Cornella, Josep; Larrosa, Igor

    2009-12-17

    A simple and highly efficient protodecarboxylation procedure for a variety of heteroaromatic carboxylic acids catalyzed by Ag(2)CO(3) and AcOH in DMSO is described. This methodology can also perform the selective monoprotodecarboxylation of several aromatic dicarboxylic acids. PMID:19924891

  8. Gold catalyzed cyclization of alkyne-tethered dihydropyrimidones.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren E; Dai, Peng; Porco, John A; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-19

    Dihydropyrimidones are an important class of biologically active heterocycles accessible from the multicomponent Biginelli condensation. Further manipulation of the dihydropyrimidone skeleton gives access to unique heterocycles. Presented herein is a Au-catalyzed cyclization of alkyne-tethered dihydropyrimidones to yield pyridopyrimidones. PMID:21749159

  9. Gold-catalyzed propargylic substitutions: Scope and synthetic developments

    PubMed Central

    Debleds, Olivier; Gayon, Eric; Vrancken, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Summary This personal account summarizes our recent developments in gold-catalyzed direct substitutions on propargylic (allylic, benzylic) alcohols, with various nucleophiles (and bi-nucleophiles) based on the σ- and/or π-acidity of gold(III) complexes. Synthetic developments are also briefly described. PMID:21804883

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed C–H activation of thioxanthones

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thioxanthones – being readily available in one step from thiosalicylic acid and arenes – were used in ruthenium-catalyzed C–H-activation reaction to produce 1-mono- or 1,8-disubstituted thioxanthones in good to excellent yields. Scope and limitation of this reaction are presented. PMID:25977717

  11. Metal-Catalyzed Cleavage of tRNA[superscript Phe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which students assay metal-catalyzed hydrolysis of tRNA[superscript Phe]…

  12. Copper-Catalyzed S-C/S-N Bond Interconversions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian; Cheng, Hanchao; Dong, Shunxi; Bolm, Carsten

    2016-04-11

    Under an atmosphere of dioxygen, copper-catalyzed de-alkylation/amination sequences provide sulfonimidamides from unprotected sulfoximines in moderate to good yields. Mechanistic studies suggest the involvement of radicals in both the C-S bond cleavage and the formation of the new N-S bond. PMID:26892735

  13. N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Convenient Benzonitrile Assembly.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qianfa; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The benzonitrile unit is widely found in natural products, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Synthesis of benzonitriles has received considerable interests from the chemical community over the last few decades. Present synthetic protocols mainly rely on the pre-existing benzene core to install a cyano moiety. A new NHC-catalyzed [4 + 2]-benzannulation protocol is reported to assemble the benzonitrile framework. PMID:27082312

  14. Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Frances Helen; Baker, Ralph Thomas

    2010-01-12

    A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric [R.sup.1R.sup.2B--NR.sup.3R.sup.4].sub.n product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources.

  15. Palladium-catalyzed selective fluorination of o-carboranes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zaozao; Quan, Yangjian; Xie, Zuowei

    2013-08-21

    A Pd(II)-catalyzed direct selective fluorination reaction of carboranes using a F(+) reagent has been developed, leading to a series of polyfluorocarboranes in high isolated yields. The mechanism involving electrophilic B-H activation, oxidation of Pd(II) by F(+) species, and reductive elimination is proposed. PMID:23927629

  16. ACID CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF HYPERBRANCHED POLY(GLYCEROL-DIACID) OLIGOMERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel oligomeric prepolymers were synthesized by acid-catalyzed condensation of glycerol with iminodiacetic, azelaic, or succinic acid. The prepolymers were obtained, on average in 62% yield and were characterized by 13C NMR, 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and GPC. The synthesized oligomers ...

  17. Flavin-catalyzed insertion of oxygen into rhenium-methyl bonds.

    PubMed

    Pouy, Mark J; Milczek, Erika M; Figg, Travis M; Otten, Brooke M; Prince, Bruce M; Gunnoe, T Brent; Cundari, Thomas R; Groves, John T

    2012-08-01

    Flavins and related molecules catalyze organic Baeyer-Villiger reactions. Combined experimental and DFT studies indicate that these molecules also catalyze the insertion of oxygen into metal-carbon bonds through a Baeyer-Villiger-like transition state. PMID:22827584

  18. Kinetics of Imidazole Catalyzed Ester Hydrolysis: Use of Buffer Dilutions to Determine Spontaneous Rate, Catalyzed Rate, and Reaction Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate kinetics experiment using buffer dilutions to determine spontaneous rate, catalyzed rate, and reaction order. The reaction utilized is hydrolysis of p-nitro-phenyl acetate in presence of imidazole, which has been shown to enhance rate of the reaction. (Author/JN)

  19. 4-Dimenthylaminopyridine or Acid-Catalyzed Synthesis of Esters: A Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Annemieke W. C.; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    A set of highly atom-economic experiments was developed to highlight the differences between acid- and base-catalyzed ester syntheses and to introduce the principles of atom economy. The hydrochloric acid-catalyzed formation of an ester was compared with the 4-dimethylaminopyradine-catalyzed ester synthesis.

  20. The RimL transacetylase provides resistance to translation inhibitor microcin C.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Teymur; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Semenova, Ekaterina; Mukhamedyarov, Damir; Datsenko, Kirill A; Metlitskaya, Anastasija; Vondenhoff, Gaston H; Tikhonov, Anton; Agarwal, Vinayak; Nair, Satish; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-10-01

    Peptide-nucleotide antibiotic microcin C (McC) is produced by some Escherichia coli strains. Inside a sensitive cell, McC is processed, releasing a nonhydrolyzable analog of aspartyl-adenylate, which inhibits aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. The product of mccE, a gene from the plasmid-borne McC biosynthetic cluster, acetylates processed McC, converting it into a nontoxic compound. MccE is homologous to chromosomally encoded acetyltransferases RimI, RimJ, and RimL, which acetylate, correspondingly, the N termini of ribosomal proteins S18, S5, and L12. Here, we show that E. coli RimL, but not other Rim acetyltransferases, provides a basal level of resistance to McC and various toxic nonhydrolyzable aminoacyl adenylates. RimL acts by acetylating processed McC, which along with ribosomal protein L12 should be considered a natural RimL substrate. When overproduced, RimL also makes cells resistant to albomycin, an antibiotic that upon intracellular processing gives rise to a seryl-thioribosyl pyrimidine that targets seryl-tRNA synthetase. We further show that E. coli YhhY, a protein related to Rim acetyltransferases but without a known function, is also able to detoxify several nonhydrolyzable aminoacyl adenylates but not processed McC. We propose that RimL and YhhY protect bacteria from various toxic aminoacyl nucleotides, either exogenous or those generated inside the cell during normal metabolism. PMID:25002546

  1. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins.

  2. Cytochrome c catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl glycine

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, Jeffrey M.; Driscoll, William J.; Mueller, Gregory P.

    2008-01-11

    Long chain fatty acyl glycines are an emerging class of biologically active molecules that occur naturally and produce a wide array of physiological effects. Their biosynthetic pathway, however, remains unknown. Here we report that cytochrome c catalyzes the synthesis of N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) from arachidonoyl coenzyme A and glycine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The identity of the NAGly product was verified by isotope labeling and mass analysis. Other heme-containing proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, were considerably less effective in generating arachidonoyl glycine as compared to cytochrome c. The reaction catalyzed by cytochrome c in vitro points to its potential role in the formation of NAGly and other long chain fatty acyl glycines in vivo.

  3. Iron-catalyzed diboration and carboboration of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naohisa; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Nakamura, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    An iron-catalyzed diboration reaction of alkynes with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2pin2) and external borating agents (MeOB(OR)2) affords diverse symmetrical or unsymmetrical cis-1,2-diborylalkenes. The simple protocol for the diboration reaction can be extended to the iron-catalyzed carboboration of alkynes with primary and, unprecedentedly, secondary alkyl halides, affording various tetrasubstituted monoborylalkenes in a highly stereoselective manner. DFT calculations indicate that a boryliron intermediate adds across the triple bond of an alkyne to afford an alkenyliron intermediate, which can react with the external trapping agents, borates and alkyl halides. In situ trapping experiments support the intermediacy of the alkenyl iron species using radical probe stubstrates. PMID:25631242

  4. Ruthenium-catalyzed cascade C-H functionalization of phenylacetophenones.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vaibhav P; Garca-Lpez, Jos-Antonio; Greaney, Michael F

    2014-02-01

    Three orthogonal cascade C?H functionalization processes are described, based on ruthenium-catalyzed C?H alkenylation. 1-Indanones, indeno indenes, and indeno furanones were accessed through cascade pathways by using arylacetophenones as substrates under conditions of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2 }2 ] and stoichiometric Cu(OAc)2 . Each transformation uses C?H functionalization methods to form C?C bonds sequentially, with the indeno furanone synthesis featuring a C?O bond formation as the terminating step. This work demonstrates the power of ruthenium-catalyzed alkenylation as a platform reaction to develop more complex transformations, with multiple C?H functionalization steps taking place in a single operation to access novel carbocyclic structures. PMID:24453063

  5. Transition-metal-catalyzed C-S bond coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin-Fa; Liu, Yi-Chen; Badsara, Satpal Singh

    2014-03-01

    Sulfur-containing molecules such as thioethers are commonly found in chemical biology, organic synthesis, and materials chemistry. While many reliable methods have been developed for preparing these compounds, harsh reaction conditions are usually required in the traditional methods. The transition metals have been applied in this field, and the palladium-catalyzed coupling of thiols with aryl halides and pseudo halides is one of the most important methods in the synthesis of thioethers. Other metals have also been used for the same purpose. Here, we summarize recent efforts in metal-catalyzed C-S bond cross-coupling reactions, focusing especially on the coupling of thiols with aryl- and vinyl halides based on different metals. PMID:24443103

  6. Actinide-Catalyzed Intermolecular Addition of Alcohols to Carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Batrice, Rami J; Kefalidis, Christos E; Maron, Laurent; Eisen, Moris S

    2016-02-24

    The unprecedented actinide-catalyzed addition of alcohols to carbodiimides is presented. This represents a rare example of thorium-catalyzed transformations of an alcoholic substrate and the first example of uranium complexes showing catalytic reactivity with alcohols. Using the uranium and thorium amides U[N(SiMe3)2]3 and [(Me3Si)2N]2An[κ(2)-(N,C)-CH2Si(CH3)2N(SiMe3)] (An = Th or U), alcohol additions to unsaturated carbon-nitrogen bonds are achieved in short reaction times with excellent selectivities and high to excellent yields. Computational studies, supported by experimental thermodynamic data, suggest plausible models of the profile of the reaction which allow the system to overcome the high barrier of scission of the actinide-oxygen bond. Accompanied by experimentally determined kinetic parameters, a plausible mechanism is proposed for the catalytic cycle. PMID:26844823

  7. Copper-Catalyzed Intramolecular Oxidative Amination of Unactivated Internal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Peng; Xu, Fan; Qian, Xiang-Yang; Yohannes, Yared; Song, Jinshuai; Lu, Xin; Xu, Hai-Chao

    2016-03-18

    A copper-catalyzed oxidative amination of unactivated internal alkenes has been developed. The Wacker-type oxidative alkene amination reaction is traditionally catalyzed by a palladium through a mechanism involving aminopalladation and β-hydride elimination. Replacing the precious and scarce palladium with a cheap and abundant copper for this transformation has been challenging because of the difficulty associated with the aminocupration of internal alkenes. The combination of a simple copper salt, without additional ligand, as the catalyst and Dess-Martin periodinane as the oxidant, promotes efficiently the oxidative amination of allylic carbamates and ureas bearing di- and trisubstituted alkenes leading to oxazolidinones and imidazolidinones. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggested a hybrid radical-organometallic mechanism involving an amidyl radical cyclization to form the key C-N bond. PMID:26878987

  8. Cross-ligation and exchange reactions catalyzed by hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Y; Koizumi, M; Sekiguchi, A; Ohtsuka, E

    1993-01-01

    The negative strand of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus (sTobRV(-)) contains a hairpin catalytic domain that shows self-cleavage and self-ligation activities in the presence of magnesium ions. We describe here that the minimal catalytic domain can catalyze a cross-ligation reaction between two kinds of substrates in trans. The cross-ligated product increased when the reaction temperature was decreased during the reaction from 37 degrees C to 4 degrees C. A two-stranded hairpin ribozyme, divided into two fragments between G45 and U46 in a hairpin loop, showed higher ligation activity than the nondivided ribozyme. The two stranded ribozyme also catalyzed an exchange reaction of the 3'-portion of the cleavage site. Images PMID:8441626

  9. Iron-Catalyzed Intramolecular C(sp(2) )-H Amination.

    PubMed

    Alt, Isabel T; Plietker, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The nucleophilic iron complex Bu4 N[Fe(CO)3 (NO)] (TBA[Fe]) catalyzes the direct intramolecular C-H amination of ?-azidobiaryls and (azidoaryl)alkenes into the corresponding carbazoles and indoles, respectively, under mild conditions and with low catalyst loadings. These features and the broad functional-group tolerance render this method a particularly attractive alternative to established noble-metal-based procedures. PMID:26663257

  10. Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of aryltrimethylsilyl chiral alcohols.

    PubMed

    Palmeira, Dayvson J; Abreu, Juliana C; Andrade, Leandro H

    2011-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of aryltrimethylsilyl chiral alcohols through a transesterification reaction was studied. The optimal conditions found for the kinetic resolution of m- and p-aryltrimethylsilyl chiral alcohols, led to excellent results, high conversions (c = 50%), high enantiomeric ratios (E > 200) and enantiomeric excesses for the remaining (S)-alcohol and (R)-acetylated product (>99%). However, kinetic resolution of o-aryltrimethylsilyl chiral alcohols did not occur under the same conditions applied to the other isomers. PMID:22113578

  11. Palladium Catalyzed Intramolecular Acylcyanation of Alkenes Using α-Iminonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Rondla, Naveen R.; Ogilvie, Jodi M.; Pan, Zhongda

    2014-01-01

    Reported here is a palladium catalyzed intramolecular acylcyanation of alkenes using α-iminonitriles. Through this method, highly functionalized indanones are synthesized in moderate to high yields using Pd(PPh3)4, without need for any additional ligands, and a common Lewis acid (ZnCl2). Additionally, the reaction tolerates substitution at various positions on the aromatic ring including electron donating, and electron withdrawing groups. PMID:24980625

  12. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of trisubstituted allylic and homoallylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jian; Liu, Xiaowu; Zhang, Shaolin; Jiang, Shuang; Huang, Minhao; Wu, Xiaoxing; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-04-27

    An efficient copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of trisubstituted allylic and homoallylic alcohols with Togni's reagent has been developed. This strategy, accompanied by a double-bond migration, leads to various branched CF3-substituted alcohols by using readily available trisubstituted cyclic/acyclic alcohols as substrates. Moreover, for alcohols in which β-H elimination is prohibited, CF3-containing oxetanes are isolated as the sole product. PMID:25810003

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of N-Aryl Carbamates

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Park, Nathaniel H.; Fors, Brett P.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of aryl carbamates was achieved by introducing alcohols into the reaction of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of ArX (X = Cl, OTf) with sodium cyanate. The use of aryl triflates as electrophilic components in this transformation allowed for an expanded substrate scope for direct synthesis of aryl isocyanates. This methodology provides direct access to major carbamate protecting groups, S-thiocarbamates, and diisocyanate precursors to polyurethane materials. PMID:23441814

  14. Rhodium(II)-catalyzed enantioselective synthesis of troponoids.

    PubMed

    Murarka, Sandip; Jia, Zhi-Jun; Merten, Christian; Daniliuc, Constantin-G; Antonchick, Andrey P; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-06-22

    We report a rhodium(II)-catalyzed highly enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between the carbonyl moiety of tropone and carbonyl ylides to afford troponoids in good to high yields with excellent enantioselectivity. We demonstrate that α-diazoketone-derived carbonyl ylides, in contrast to carbonyl ylides derived from diazodiketoesters, undergo [6+3] cycloaddition reactions with tropone to yield the corresponding bridged heterocycles with excellent stereoselectivity. PMID:25959033

  15. Nickel-catalyzed Negishi alkylations of styrenyl aziridines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Yang; Doyle, Abigail G

    2012-06-13

    A nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction between N-sulfonyl aziridines and organozinc reagents is reported. The catalytic system comprises an inexpensive and air-stable Ni(II) source and dimethyl fumarate as ligand. Regioselective synthesis of β-substituted amines is possible under mild and functional-group-tolerant conditions. The stereoselectivity of the reaction is consistent with a stereoconvergent mechanism wherein the sulfonamide directs C-C bond formation. PMID:22414150

  16. Copper-catalyzed carboxylation reactions using carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Du, Gaixia; Xi, Chanjuan

    2016-04-12

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), as a waste of manufacture, is a cheap and abundant C1 source. Utilization of CO2 for synthesis of carboxylic acids has been developed. Transition-metal complexes play a key role in catalytic carboxylation reactions employing CO2. This review summarizes recent advances in copper-catalyzed carboxylation reactions using CO2. The contents are arranged based on various substrates: organometallic reagents, aryl iodides, sodium sulfinates, terminal alkynes, arenes, heteroarenes, and unsaturated substrates. PMID:27035704

  17. Palladium-Catalyzed Cyclization of Alkenes with Organohalides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xue-Qiang; Liu, Dan; Xing, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Ji, Shun-Jun

    2016-02-19

    A palladium-catalyzed tandem C-Br/C-H functionalization and cyclization of alkenes with organohalides is reported. This reaction provides an operationally simple method for the synthesis of various fluorene, pyrroloindole, and benzoxazine derivatives, which are useful pharmaceutical framework and photoelectronic devices. Two new C-C/O bonds, a quaternary carbon center and a new ring, are simultaneously formed in this one-pot reaction. PMID:26836399

  18. Synthesis of Aryldifluoroamides by Copper-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Arlow, Sophie I; Hartwig, John F

    2016-03-24

    A copper-catalyzed coupling of aryl, heteroaryl, and vinyl iodides with α-silyldifluoroamides is reported. The reaction forms α,α-difluoro-α-aryl amides from electron-rich, electron-poor, and sterically hindered aryl iodides in high yield and tolerates a variety of functional groups. The aryldifluoroamide products can be transformed further to provide access to a diverse array of difluoroalkylarenes, including compounds of potential biological interest. PMID:26929068

  19. Iron-Catalyzed α-Alkylation of Ketones with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Saravanakumar; Sortais, Jean-Baptiste; Beller, Matthias; Darcel, Christophe

    2015-11-23

    A general and benign iron-catalyzed α-alkylation reaction of ketones with primary alcohols has been developed. The key to success of the reaction is the use of a Knölker-type complex as catalyst (2 mol %) in the presence of Cs2 CO3 as base (10 mol %) under hydrogen-borrowing conditions. Using 2-aminobenzyl alcohol as alkylation reagent allows for the "green" synthesis of quinoline derivatives. PMID:26403489

  20. Copper-catalyzed stereoselective conjugate addition of alkylboranes to alkynoates

    PubMed Central

    Wakamatsu, Takamichi; Nagao, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Summary A copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of alkylboron compounds (alkyl-9-BBN, prepared by hydroboration of alkenes with 9-BBN-H) to alkynoates to form β-disubstituted acrylates is reported. The addition occurred in a formal syn-hydroalkylation mode. The syn stereoselectivity was excellent regardless of the substrate structure. A variety of functional groups were compatible with the conjugate addition. PMID:26734092

  1. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bijay

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  2. Sonochemical enzyme-catalyzed regioselective acylation of flavonoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-04-01

    This work compares a highly efficient and alternative method of sonication-assisted lipase catalyzed acylation of quercetin-3-O-glucoside and phloretin-2'-glucoside, using Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozyme 435(®)), with a range of fatty acids. In this study, sonication-assisted irradiation coupled with stirring has been found to be more efficient and economical than conventional reaction conditions. Sonication-assisted acylation accelerated the reactions and reduced the time required by 4-5 folds. PMID:26829593

  3. Synthesis of Graphite Encapsulated Metal Nanoparticles and Metal Catalyzed Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWal, R. L.; Dravid, V. P.

    1999-01-01

    This work focuses on the growth and inception of graphite encapsulated metal nanoparticles and metal catalyzed nanotubes using combustion chemistry. Deciphering the inception and growth mechanism(s) for these unique nanostructures is essential for purposeful synthesis. Detailed knowledge of these mechanism(s) may yield insights into alternative synthesis pathways or provide data on unfavorable conditions. Production of these materials is highly desirable given many promising technological applications.

  4. Copper-catalyzed olefinic C-H difluoroacetylation of enamides.

    PubMed

    Caillot, Gilles; Dufour, Jérémy; Belhomme, Marie-Charlotte; Poisson, Thomas; Grimaud, Laurence; Pannecoucke, Xavier; Gillaizeau, Isabelle

    2014-06-01

    Copper-catalyzed olefinic difluoroacetylation of enamides via direct C-H bond functionalization using BrCF2CO2Et is reported for the first time. It constitutes an efficient radical-free method for the regioselective synthesis of β-difluoroester substituted enamides which exhibits broad substrate scope, and thus demonstrates its potent application in a late stage fluorination strategy. PMID:24760345

  5. Rh catalyzed olefination and vinylation of unactivated acetanilides.

    PubMed

    Patureau, Frederic W; Glorius, Frank

    2010-07-28

    In the catalyzed oxidative olefination of acetanilides (oxidative-Heck coupling), Rh offers great advantages over more common Pd catalysts. Lower catalyst loadings, large functional group tolerance (in particular to halides), and higher reactivity of electron-neutral olefins (styrenes) are some of the attractive features. Most interestingly, even ethylene reacts to yield the corresponding acetanilido-styrene. Moreover, the Cu(II) oxidant can also be utilized in catalytic amounts with air serving as the terminal oxidant. PMID:20593901

  6. Cobalt-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of 1,1-Diarylethenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Chenhui; Ji, Chonglei; Lu, Zhan

    2016-04-01

    Highly enantioselective cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of 1,1-diarylethenes was developed by using bench-stable chiral oxazoline iminopyridine-cobalt complexes as precatalysts. A unique o-chloride effect was observed to achieve high enantioselectivity. Easy removal as well as further transformations of the chloro group make this protocol a potentially useful alternative to synthesize various chiral 1,1-diarylethanes. This process can be successfully performed under 1 atm of hydrogen at room temperature on gram scale. PMID:26974555

  7. Bi(OTf)3-Catalyzed Multicomponent α-Amidoalkylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Angelika E; Manolikakes, Georg

    2015-06-19

    A bismuth(III) triflate catalyzed three-component synthesis of α-substituted amides starting from amides, aldehydes, and (hetero)arenes is reported. The reaction has a broad substrate scope, encompassing formaldehyde as well as aryl and alkyl aldehydes. Low catalyst loadings are required, and water is formed as the only side product. The scope and limitation of this method will be discussed. PMID:25996906

  8. Carrier gas effects on aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yue; Hainey, Mel; Won, Dongjin; Weng, Xiaojun; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Redwing, Joan M

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowire growth under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition conditions requires higher reactor pressures than gold-catalyzed growth, but the reasons for this difference are not well understood. In this study, the effects of reactor pressure and hydrogen partial pressure on silicon nanowire growth using an aluminum catalyst were studied by growing nanowires in hydrogen and hydrogen/nitrogen carrier gas mixtures at different total reactor pressures. Nanowires grown in the nitrogen/hydrogen mixture have faceted catalyst droplet tips, minimal evidence of aluminum diffusion from the tip down the nanowire sidewalls, and significant vapor-solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. In comparison, wires grown in pure hydrogen show less well-defined tips, evidence of aluminum diffusion down the nanowire sidewalls at increasing reactor pressures and reduced vapor-solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. The results are explained in terms of a model wherein the hydrogen partial pressure plays a critical role in aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth by controlling hydrogen termination of the silicon nanowire sidewalls. For a given reactor pressure, increased hydrogen partial pressures increase the extent of hydrogen termination of the sidewalls which suppresses SiH4 adsorption thereby reducing vapor-solid deposition of silicon but increases the surface diffusion length of aluminum. Conversely, lower hydrogen partial pressures reduce the hydrogen termination and also increase the extent of SiH4 gas phase decomposition, shifting the nanowire growth window to lower growth temperatures and silane partial pressures. PMID:26900836

  9. Stau-catalyzed big-bang nucleosynthesis reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Masayasu; Kino, Yasushi; Hiyama, Emiko

    2010-06-01

    We study the new type of big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) reactions that are catalyzed by a hypothetical long-lived negatively charged, massive leptonic particle (called X{sup -}) such as the supersymmetric (SUSY) particle stau, the scalar partner of the tau lepton. It is known that if the X{sup -} particle has a lifetime of tau{sub X} > or approx. 10{sup 3} s, it can capture a light element previously synthesized in standard BBN and form a Coulombic bound state and induces various types of reactions in which X{sup -} acts as a catalyst. Some of these X{sup -} catalyzed reactions have significantly large cross sections so that the inclusion of the reactions into the BBN network calculation can markedly change the abundances of some elements. We use a high-accuracy three-body calculation method developed by the authors and provide precise cross sections and rates of these catalyzed BBN reactions for use in the BBN network calculation.

  10. Carrier gas effects on aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yue; Hainey, Mel, Jr.; Won, Dongjin; Weng, Xiaojun; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowire growth under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition conditions requires higher reactor pressures than gold-catalyzed growth, but the reasons for this difference are not well understood. In this study, the effects of reactor pressure and hydrogen partial pressure on silicon nanowire growth using an aluminum catalyst were studied by growing nanowires in hydrogen and hydrogen/nitrogen carrier gas mixtures at different total reactor pressures. Nanowires grown in the nitrogen/hydrogen mixture have faceted catalyst droplet tips, minimal evidence of aluminum diffusion from the tip down the nanowire sidewalls, and significant vapor-solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. In comparison, wires grown in pure hydrogen show less well-defined tips, evidence of aluminum diffusion down the nanowire sidewalls at increasing reactor pressures and reduced vapor-solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. The results are explained in terms of a model wherein the hydrogen partial pressure plays a critical role in aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth by controlling hydrogen termination of the silicon nanowire sidewalls. For a given reactor pressure, increased hydrogen partial pressures increase the extent of hydrogen termination of the sidewalls which suppresses SiH4 adsorption thereby reducing vapor-solid deposition of silicon but increases the surface diffusion length of aluminum. Conversely, lower hydrogen partial pressures reduce the hydrogen termination and also increase the extent of SiH4 gas phase decomposition, shifting the nanowire growth window to lower growth temperatures and silane partial pressures.

  11. Protection of wood from microorganisms by laccase-catalyzed iodination.

    PubMed

    Schubert, M; Engel, J; Thöny-Meyer, L; Schwarze, F W M R; Ihssen, J

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, Norway spruce wood (Picea abies L.) was reacted with a commercial Trametes versicolor laccase in the presence of potassium iodide salt or the phenolic compounds thymol and isoeugenol to impart an antimicrobial property to the wood surface. In order to assess the efficacy of the wood treatment, a leaching of the iodinated and polymerized wood and two biotests including bacteria, a yeast, blue stain fungi, and wood decay fungi were performed. After laccase-catalyzed oxidation of the phenols, the antimicrobial effect was significantly reduced. In contrast, the enzymatic oxidation of iodide (I(-)) to iodine (I(2)) in the presence of wood led to an enhanced resistance of the wood surface against all microorganisms, even after exposure to leaching. The efficiency of the enzymatic wood iodination was comparable to that of a chemical wood preservative, VP 7/260a. The modification of the lignocellulose by the laccase-catalyzed iodination was assessed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The intensities of the selected lignin-associated bands and carbohydrate reference bands were analyzed, and the results indicated a structural change in the lignin matrix. The results suggest that the laccase-catalyzed iodination of the wood surface presents an efficient and ecofriendly method for wood protection. PMID:22865075

  12. Protection of Wood from Microorganisms by Laccase-Catalyzed Iodination

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J.; Thöny-Meyer, L.; Schwarze, F. W. M. R.; Ihssen, J.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, Norway spruce wood (Picea abies L.) was reacted with a commercial Trametes versicolor laccase in the presence of potassium iodide salt or the phenolic compounds thymol and isoeugenol to impart an antimicrobial property to the wood surface. In order to assess the efficacy of the wood treatment, a leaching of the iodinated and polymerized wood and two biotests including bacteria, a yeast, blue stain fungi, and wood decay fungi were performed. After laccase-catalyzed oxidation of the phenols, the antimicrobial effect was significantly reduced. In contrast, the enzymatic oxidation of iodide (I−) to iodine (I2) in the presence of wood led to an enhanced resistance of the wood surface against all microorganisms, even after exposure to leaching. The efficiency of the enzymatic wood iodination was comparable to that of a chemical wood preservative, VP 7/260a. The modification of the lignocellulose by the laccase-catalyzed iodination was assessed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The intensities of the selected lignin-associated bands and carbohydrate reference bands were analyzed, and the results indicated a structural change in the lignin matrix. The results suggest that the laccase-catalyzed iodination of the wood surface presents an efficient and ecofriendly method for wood protection. PMID:22865075

  13. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when

  14. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  15. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy

    2012-06-29

    The efficient and selective preparation of organic molecules is critical for mankind. For the future, it is of paramount importance to find catalysts able to transform abundant and cheap feedstocks into useful compounds. Acyclic and heterocyclic nitrogen-containing derivatives are common components of naturally occurring compounds, agrochemicals, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals; they are also useful intermediates in a number of industrial processes. One of the most widely used synthetic strategies, allowing the formation of an N-C bond, is the addition of an N-H bond across a carbon-carbon multiple bond, the so-called hydroamination reaction. This chemical transformation fulfills the principle of “green chemistry” since it ideally occurs with 100% atom economy. Various catalysts have been found to promote this reaction, although many limitations remain; one of the most prominent is the lack of methods that permit the use of NH3 and NH2NH2 as the amine partners. In fact, ammonia and hydrazine have rarely succumbed to homogeneous catalytic transformations. Considering the low cost and abundance of ammonia (136 million metric tons produced in 2011) and hydrazine, catalysts able to improve the reactivity and selectivity of the NH3- and NH2NH2-hydroamination reaction, and more broadly speaking the functionalization of these chemicals, are highly desirable. In the last funded period, we discovered the first homogeneous catalysts able to promote the hydroamination of alkynes and allenes with ammonia and the parent hydrazine. The key feature of our catalytic systems is that the formation of catalytically inactive Werner complexes is reversible, in marked contrast to most of the known ammonia and hydrazine transition metal complexes. This is due to the peculiar electronic properties of our neutral ancillary ligands, especially their strong donating capabilities. However, our catalysts currently require high temperatures and long reaction times. To address this issue, we have developed several new families of carbon- and boron-based ligands, which are even better donors. The corresponding metal complexes (particularly gold, rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium) of all these species will be tested in the Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkynes, allenes, and also alkenes with ammonia and hydrazine. We will also develop metal-free catalytic processes for the functionalization of ammonia and hydrazine. By possessing both a lone pair of electrons and an accessible vacant orbital, singlet carbenes resemble and can mimic the chemical behavior of transition metals. Our preliminary results demonstrate that specially designed carbenes can split the N–H bond of ammonia by an initial nucleophilic activation that prevents the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, which is the major hurdle for the transition metal catalyzed functionalization of NH3. The use of purely organic compounds as catalysts will eliminate the major drawbacks of transition-metal-catalysis technology, which are the excessive cost of metal complexes (metal + ligands) and in many cases the toxicity of the metal.

  16. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Moon, Hong S; Kapteyn, Jeremy; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Stewart, Neal C.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  17. A Link between Protein Structure and Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnson, Brian J.; Colby, Thomas D.; Chin, Jodie K.; Goldstein, Barry M.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1997-11-01

    We present evidence that the size of an active site side chain may modulate the degree of hydrogen tunneling in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Primary and secondary kH/kT and kD/kT kinetic isotope effects have been measured for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 25 degrees C. As reported in earlier studies, the relationship between secondary kH/kT and kD/kT isotope effects provides a sensitive probe for deviations from classical behavior. In the present work, catalytic efficiency and the extent of hydrogen tunneling have been correlated for the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed hydride transfer among a group of site-directed mutants at position 203. Val-203 interacts with the opposite face of the cofactor NAD+ from the alcohol substrate. The reduction in size of this residue is correlated with diminished tunneling and a two orders of magnitude decrease in catalytic efficiency. Comparison of the x-ray crystal structures of a ternary complex of a high-tunneling (Phe-93 --> Trp) and a low-tunneling (Val-203 --> Ala) mutant provides a structural basis for the observed effects, demonstrating an increase in the hydrogen transfer distance for the low-tunneling mutant. The Val-203 --> Ala ternary complex crystal structure also shows a hyperclosed interdomain geometry relative to the wild-type and the Phe-93 --> Trp mutant ternary complex structures. This demonstrates a flexibility in interdomain movement that could potentially narrow the distance between the donor and acceptor carbons in the native enzyme and may enhance the role of tunneling in the hydride transfer reaction.

  18. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems. PMID:26881922

  19. Complex Biotransformations Catalyzed by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Liu, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) superfamily currently comprises thousands of proteins that participate in numerous biochemical processes across all kingdoms of life. These proteins share a common mechanism to generate a powerful 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates a highly diverse array of biotransformations. Recent studies are beginning to reveal the role of radical AdoMet proteins in the catalysis of highly complex and chemically unusual transformations, e.g. the ThiC-catalyzed complex rearrangement reaction. The unique features and intriguing chemistries of these proteins thus demonstrate the remarkable versatility and sophistication of radical enzymology. PMID:21771780

  20. Can Chlorine Anion Catalyze the Reaction fo HOCl with HCl?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, S. L.; Francisco, J. S.; Mebel, A. M.; Morokuma, K.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of HOCl + HCl -> Cl2 + H20 in the presence of Cl has been studied using ab initio methods. This reaction has been shown to have a high activation barrier of 46.5 kcal/mol. The chlorine anion, Cl- is found to catalyze the reaction, viz. two mechanisms. The first involves Cl- interacting through the concerted four-center transition state of the neutral reaction. The other mechanism involves the formation of a HCl-HOCl-Cl- intermediate which dissociates into Cl2 + Cl- + H20. The steps are found to have no barriers. The overall exothermicity is 15.5 kcal/mol.

  1. Low-Pressure Cobalt-Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydrovinylation of Vinylarenes.

    PubMed

    Movahhed, Sohajl; Westphal, Julia; Dindaroğlu, Mehmet; Falk, Anna; Schmalz, Hans-Günther

    2016-05-23

    An efficient and practical protocol for the enantioselective cobalt-catalyzed hydrovinylation of vinylarenes with ethylene at low (1.2 bar) pressure has been developed. As precatalysts, stable [L2 CoCl2 ] complexes are employed that are activated in situ with Et2 AlCl. A modular chiral TADDOL-derived phosphine-phosphite ligand was identified that allows the conversion of a broad spectrum of substrates, including heterocyclic vinylarenes and vinylferrocene, to smoothly afford the branched products with up to 99 % ee and virtually complete regioselectivity. Even polar functional groups, such as OH, NH2 , CN, and CO2 R, are tolerated. PMID:26998912

  2. A palladium-catalyzed carbonylation approach to acid chloride synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quesnel, Jeffrey S; Arndtsen, Bruce A

    2013-11-13

    We describe a new approach to acid chloride synthesis via the palladium-catalyzed carbonylation of aryl iodides. The combination of sterically encumbered phosphines (P(t)Bu3) and CO coordination has been found to facilitate the rapid carbonylation of aryl iodides into acid chlorides via reductive elimination from ((t)Bu3P)(CO)Pd(COAr)Cl. The formation of acid chlorides can also be exploited to perform traditional aminocarbonylation reactions under exceptionally mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure), and with a range of weakly nucleophilic substrates. PMID:24144068

  3. Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Nitro-Mannich Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Alex W; Chambers, Alan; Hawkins, Alison; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    A new chemoselective reductive nitro-Mannich cyclization reaction sequence of nitroalkyl-tethered lactams has been developed. Relying on the rapid and chemoselective iridium(I)-catalyzed reduction of lactams to the corresponding enamine, subsequent nitro-Mannich cyclization of tethered nitroalkyl functionality provides direct access to important alkaloid natural-product-like structures in yields up to 81 % and in diastereoselectivities that are typically good to excellent. An in-depth understanding of the reaction mechanism has been gained through NMR studies and characterization of reaction intermediates. The new methodology has been applied to the total synthesis of (±)-epi-epiquinamide in four steps. PMID:25399919

  4. Directed nickel-catalyzed negishi cross coupling of alkyl aziridines.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Daniel K; Huang, Chung-Yang Dennis; Doyle, Abigail G

    2013-09-11

    Herein we report a nickel-catalyzed C-C bond-forming reaction between simple alkyl aziridines and organozinc reagents. This method represents the first catalytic cross-coupling reaction employing a nonallylic and nonbenzylic Csp(3)-N bond as an electrophile. Key to its success is the use of a new N-protecting group (cinsyl or Cn) bearing an electron-deficient olefin that directs oxidative addition and facilitates reductive elimination. Studies pertinent to elucidation of the mechanism of cross coupling are also presented. PMID:23961769

  5. Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution of Simple Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Ryosuke; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a nickel-catalyzed allylic substitution process of simple alkenes whereby an important structural motif, a 1,4-diene, was prepared. A key for this success is the use of an appropriate Ni-phosphine complex and a stoichiometric amount of silyl triflate. Reactions of 1-alkyl-substituted alkenes consistently provided 1,1-disubstituted alkenes with high selectivity. Insight into the reaction mechanism as well as miscellaneous application of the developed catalytic process is also documented. PMID:21387565

  6. Iridium-Catalyzed (Z)-Trialkylsilylation of Terminal Olefins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Biao; Falck, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    A complex of commercial [Ir(OMe)(cod)]2 and 4,4-di-tert-butyl-2,2-bipyridine (dtbpy) catalyzes the Z-selective, dehydrative silylation of terminal alkenes, but not 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, with triethylsilane or benzyldimethylsilane in THF at 40 °C. Yields and Z-stereoselectivity were significantly improved by 2-norbornene, in contrast with other sacrificial alkenes. The reaction is compatible with many functional groups including epoxides, ketones, amides, alcohols, esters, halides, ketals and silanes. a,b-Unsaturated esters were unreactive. The reaction probably proceeds through a Heck-type mechanism. PMID:20136153

  7. The Palladium-Catalyzed Trifluoromethylation of Vinyl Sulfonates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Jin; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of cyclohexenyl sulfonates has been developed. Various cyclohexenyl triflates and nonaflates underwent trifluoromethylation under mild reaction conditions using a catalyst system composed of Pd(dba)2 or [(allyl)PdCl]2 and the monodentate biaryl phosphine ligand tBuXPhos. The trifluoromethyl anion (CF3−) or its equivalent for the process was generated in situ from TMSCF3 in combination with KF or TESCF3 in combintion with RbF. PMID:22111687

  8. Stereoretentive Copper (II) Catalyzed Ritter Reactions of Secondary Cycloalkanols

    PubMed Central

    Al-huniti, Mohammed H.

    2013-01-01

    A Ritter-like coupling reaction of cyclic alcohols and both aryl and alkyl nitriles to form amides catalyzed by copper (II) triflate is described. These reactions proceed in good yields under mild and often solvent-free conditions. With 2- and 3-substituted cycloalkanols, amide products are formed with near complete retention of configuration. This is likely due to fast nucleophilic capture of a non-planar carbocations (hyperconjomers) stabilized by ring hyperconjugation. A critical aspect of this novel catalytic cycle is the in situ activation of the alcohol substrates by thionyl chloride to form chlorosulfites. PMID:24376393

  9. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Lignin: Separation of Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneault, A.; Johnson, D. K.; Chornet, E.

    2007-12-01

    In our quest for fractionating lignocellulosic biomass and valorizing specific constitutive fractions, we have developed a strategy for the separation of 12 added value monomers generated during the hydrolytic based-catalyzed depolymerization of a Steam Exploded Aspen Lignin. The separation strategy combines liquid-liquid-extraction (LLE), followed by vacuum distillation, liquid chromatography (LC) and crystallization. LLE, vacuum distillation and flash LC were tested experimentally. Batch vacuum distillation produced up to 4 fractions. Process simulation confirmed that a series of 4 vacuum distillation columns could produce 5 distinct monomer streams, 3 of which require further chromatography and crystallization for purification.

  10. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roman Vladimirovich Rozhkov

    2004-12-19

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a {beta}-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in {beta}-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the {alpha}-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  11. Nickel-Catalyzed Negishi Cross-Coupling of Bromodifluoroacetamides.

    PubMed

    Tarui, Atsushi; Shinohara, Saori; Sato, Kazuyuki; Omote, Masaaki; Ando, Akira

    2016-03-01

    A nickel-catalyzed Negishi coupling of bromodifluoroacetamides with arylzinc reagents has been developed. This reaction allows access to difluoromethylated aromatic compounds containing a variety of aryl groups and amide moieties. Furthermore, highly effective transformation of the functionalized difluoromethyl group (-CF2CONR(1)R(2)) was realized via microwave-assisted reduction under mild conditions. The notable features of this strategy are its generality and its use of a low-cost nickel catalyst and ligand; thus, this reaction provides a facile method for applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26910536

  12. Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective CH Bromination

    PubMed Central

    Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective CH bromination procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta CH bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot bromination/arylation and bromination/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and meta-alkenylated products, respectively, in a single step. PMID:26288217

  13. Photoredox-Catalyzed Intramolecular Aminodifluoromethylation of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuxiao; Tang, Xiaojun; Thomoson, Charles S; Dolbier, William R

    2015-07-17

    A photoredox catalyzed aminodifluoromethylation of unactivated alkenes has been developed in which HCF2SO2Cl is used as the HCF2 radical source. Sulfonamides were active nucleophiles in the final step of a tandem addition/oxidation/cyclization process to form pyrrolidines, and esters were found to cyclize to form lactones. Thus, a variety of pyrrolidines and lactones were obtained in moderate to excellent yield. In order for the cyclization reactions to be efficient, a combination of a copper catalyst (Cu(dap)2Cl) and silver carbonate was crucial to suppressing a competing chloro, difluoroalkylation process. PMID:26120767

  14. A Lewis Acid Catalyzed Annulation to 2,1-Benzisoxazoles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report here a new, atom economical annulation to 2,1-benzisoxazole scaffolds via the BF3·Et2O-catalyzed reaction of glyoxylate esters and nitrosoarenes. The developed method represents a convergent route to this compound class from previously unexplored inputs and provides a range of 2,1-benzisoxazoles in moderate to high yields under convenient conditions. Along with exploration of substrate scope, initial mechanistic investigation through 18O labeling and the synthesis of a reaction intermediate provides evidence for an unusual umpolung addition of glyoxylates to nitrosobenzenes with high O-selectivity, followed by a new type of Friedel–Crafts cyclization. PMID:25157596

  15. Gold-Catalyzed Anti-Markovnikov Selective Hydrothiolation of Unactivated Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Taichi; Fujiwara, Keiko; Higashimae, Shinya; Nomoto, Akihiro; Ogawa, Akiya

    2016-05-01

    Despite the widespread use of transition-metal catalysts in organic synthesis, transition-metal-catalyzed reactions of organosulfur compounds, which are known as catalyst poisons, have been difficult. In particular, the transition-metal-catalyzed addition of organosulfur compounds to unactivated alkenes remains a challenge. A novel gold-catalyzed hydrothiolation of unactivated alkenes is presented, which proceeds effectively to give the anti-Markovnikov-selective adducts in good yields and in a regioselective manner. PMID:27057590

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell with internal reforming, catalyzed interconnect for use therewith, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Guan, Jie; Minh, Nguyen

    2010-06-08

    A catalyzed interconnect for an SOFC electrically connects an anode and an anodic current collector and comprises a metallic substrate, which provides space between the anode and anodic current collector for fuel gas flow over at least a portion of the anode, and a catalytic coating on the metallic substrate comprising a catalyst for catalyzing hydrocarbon fuel in the fuel gas to hydrogen rich reformate. An SOFC including the catalyzed anodic inter-connect, a method for operating an SOFC, and a method for making a catalyzed anodic interconnect are also disclosed.

  17. Cu-Catalyzed Click Reaction in Carbohydrate Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vinod K; Mishra, Bhuwan B; Mishra, Kunj B; Mishra, Nidhi; Singh, Anoop S; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC), popularly known as the "click reaction", serves as the most potent and highly dependable tool for facile construction of simple to complex architectures at the molecular level. Click-knitted threads of two exclusively different molecular entities have created some really interesting structures for more than 15 years with a broad spectrum of applicability, including in the fascinating fields of synthetic chemistry, medicinal science, biochemistry, pharmacology, material science, and catalysis. The unique properties of the carbohydrate moiety and the advantages of highly chemo- and regioselective click chemistry, such as mild reaction conditions, efficient performance with a wide range of solvents, and compatibility with different functionalities, together produce miraculous neoglycoconjugates and neoglycopolymers with various synthetic, biological, and pharmaceutical applications. In this review we highlight the successful advancement of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry in glycoscience and its applications as well as future scope in different streams of applied sciences. PMID:26796328

  18. Metalloporphyrin solubility: a trigger for catalyzing reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ishai; Schlautman, Mark A

    2004-02-01

    Metalloporphyrins are well known for their electron-transfer roles in many natural redox systems. In addition, several metalloporphyrins and related tetrapyrrole macrocycles complexed with various core metals have been shown to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of certain organic compounds, thus demonstrating the potential for using naturally occurring metalloporphyrins to attenuate toxic and persistent chlorinated organic pollutants in the environment. However, despite the great interest in reductive dechlorination reactions and the wide variety of natural and synthetic porphyrins currently available, only soluble porphyrins, which comprise a small fraction of this particular family of organic macrocycles, have been used as electron-transfer shuttles in these reactions. Results from the present study clearly demonstrate that metalloporphyrin solubility is a key factor in their ability to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and its daughter compounds. Additionally, we show that certain insoluble and nonreactive metalloporphyrins can be activated as catalysts merely by changing solution conditions to bring about their dissolution. Furthermore, once a metalloporphyrin is fully dissolved and activated, tetrachloroethylene transformation proceeds rapidly, giving nonchlorinated and less toxic alkenes as the major reaction products. Results from the present study suggest that if the right environmental conditions exist or can be created, specific metalloporphyrins may provide a solution for cleaning up sites that are contaminated with chlorinated organic pollutants. PMID:14982369

  19. Mechanism of Rhodium-Catalyzed Formyl Activation: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoling; Bai, Ruopeng; Liu, Song; Shan, Chunhui; Chen, Changguo; Lan, Yu

    2016-03-18

    Metal-catalyzed transfer hydroformylation is an important way of cleaving C-C bonds and constructing new double bonds. The newly reported density functional theory (DFT) method, M11-L, has been used to clarify the mechanism of the rhodium-catalyzed transfer hydroformylation reported by Dong et al. DFT calculations depict a deformylation and formylation reaction pathway. The deformylation step involves an oxidative addition to the formyl C-H bond, deprotonation with a counterion, decarbonylation, and β-hydride elimination. After olefin exchange, the formylation step takes place via olefin insertion into the Rh-H bond, carbonyl insertion, and a final protonation with the conjugate acid of the counterion. Theoretical calculations indicate that the alkalinity of the counterion is important for this reaction because both deprotonation and protonation occur during the catalytic cycle. A theoretical study into the formyl acceptor shows that the driving force of the reaction is correlated with the stability of the unsaturated bond in the acceptor. Our computational results suggest that alkynes or ring-strained olefins could be used as formyl acceptors in this reaction. PMID:26909857

  20. Hydrogen sensing by enzyme-catalyzed electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Brent J; Fan, Z Hugh; Burgdorf, Tanja; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2005-08-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is a possible future alternative to current fossil-based transportation fuels; however, its lower explosive limit in air requires a reliable sensor to detect leaks wherever H2 is produced, stored, or used. Most current H2 sensors employ palladium or its alloy as the sensing element, featuring high operating temperature and limited selectivity. In this study, we report using soluble hydrogenase (SH) of aerobic beta-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha strain H16 to accomplish ambient, electrochemical detection of H2. Gas samples were collected in a solution containing SH that catalyzed the oxidation of H2. The electrons released during the H2 oxidation reaction were accepted by benzyl viologen (BV2+). The product of the redox reaction, BV+, was then detected using chronoamperometry. Using this sensing scheme, we demonstrate detection of H2 ranging from 1 to 100%. In addition, enzyme kinetics and the effect of oxygen on signal response were studied. Our results indicate that it is feasible to develop a sensor to detect H2 in the atmosphere that is based on enzyme-catalyzed electrochemical detection. PMID:16053311

  1. Lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis – A green polymer chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is a short comprehensive review describing in vitro polyester synthesis catalyzed by a hydrolysis enzyme of lipase, most of which has been developed for these two decades. Polyesters are prepared by repeated ester bond-formation reactions; they include two major modes, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers such as cyclic esters (lactones) and condensation polymerization via the reaction between a carboxylic acid or its ester group and an alcohol group. Polyester synthesis is, therefore, a reaction in reverse way of in vivo lipase catalysis of ester bond-cleavage with hydrolysis. The lipase-catalyzed polymerizations show very high chemo-, regio-, and enantio-selectivities and involve various advantageous characteristics. Lipase is robust and compatible with other chemical catalysts, which allows novel chemo-enzymatic processes. New syntheses of a variety of functional polyesters and a plausible reaction mechanism of lipase catalysis are mentioned. The polymerization characteristics are of green nature currently demanded for sustainable society, and hence, desirable for conducting ‘green polymer chemistry’. PMID:20431260

  2. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, M.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl{sub 3}) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report.

  3. Can proteins and crystals self-catalyze methyl rotations?

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Baudry, Jerome

    2005-10-01

    The {chi} (C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}}) torsional barrier in the dipeptide alanine (N-methyl-l-alanyl-N-methylamide) crystal was investigated using ab initio calculations at various levels of theory, molecular mechanics, and molecular dynamics. For one of the two molecules in the asymmetric unit the calculations suggest that rotation around the ? dihedral angle is catalyzed by the crystal environment, reducing by up to 2kT the torsional barrier in the crystal with respect to that in the gas phase. This catalytic effect is present at both low and room temperature and originates from a van der Waals destabilization of the minima in the methyl dihedral potential coming from the nonbonded environment of the side chain. Screening of a subset of the Protein Data Bank with a pharmacophore model reproducing the crystal environment around this side chain methyl identified a protein containing an alanine residue with an environment similar to that in the crystal. Calculations indicate that this ? torsional barrier is also reduced in the protein at low temperature but not at room temperature. This suggests that environment-catalyzed rotation of methyl groups can occur both in the solid phase and in native biological structures, though this effect might be temperature-dependent. The relevance of this catalytic effect is discussed in terms of its natural occurrence and its possible contribution to the low-frequency vibrational modes of molecules.

  4. Porous silicon formation during Au-catalyzed etching

    SciTech Connect

    Algasinger, Michael; Bernt, Maximilian; Koynov, Svetoslav; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-04-28

    The formation of black nano-textured Si during the Au-catalyzed wet-chemical etch process was investigated with respect to photovoltaic applications. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images recorded at different stages of the etch process exhibit an evolution of a two-layer structure, consisting of cone-like Si hillocks covered with a nano-porous Si (np-Si) layer. Optical measurements confirm the presence of a np-Si phase which appears after the first ?10?s of the etch process and continuously increases with the etch time. Furthermore, the etch process was investigated on Si substrates with different doping levels (?0.01100 ? cm). SEM images show a transition from the two-layer morphology to a structure consisting entirely of np-Si for higher doping levels (<0.1 ? cm). The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the model of a local electrochemical etch process. A better understanding of the metal-catalyzed etch process facilitates the fabrication of black Si on various Si substrates, which is of significant interest for photovoltaic applications.

  5. Small molecule screening in context: Lipid-catalyzed amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Hebda, James A; Magzoub, Mazin; Miranker, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) is a 37-residue hormone cosecreted with insulin by the β-cells of the pancreas. Amyloid fiber aggregation of IAPP has been correlated with the dysfunction and death of these cells in type II diabetics. The likely mechanisms by which IAPP gains toxic function include energy independent cell membrane penetration and induction of membrane depolarization. These processes have been correlated with solution biophysical observations of lipid bilayer catalyzed acceleration of amyloid formation. Although the relationship between amyloid formation and toxicity is poorly understood, the fact that conditions promoting one also favor the other suggests related membrane active structural states. Here, a novel high throughput screening protocol is described that capitalizes on this correlation to identify compounds that target membrane active species. Applied to a small library of 960 known bioactive compounds, we are able to report identification of 37 compounds of which 36 were not previously reported as active toward IAPP fiber formation. Several compounds tested in secondary cell viability assays also demonstrate cytoprotective effects. It is a general observation that peptide induced toxicity in several amyloid diseases (such as Alzhiemer’s and Parkinson’s) involves a membrane bound, preamyloid oligomeric species. Our data here suggest that a screening protocol based on lipid-catalyzed assembly will find mechanistically informative small molecule hits in this subclass of amyloid diseases. PMID:25043951

  6. Mechanistic investigation of palladium-catalyzed amidation of aryl halides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Ren, Ying; Jia, Jianfeng; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2016-03-01

    A mechanistic investigation using Becke3LYP density functional theory (DFT) was carried out on the palladium-catalyzed amidition of bromobenzene and (t)Bu-isocyanide. The whole catalytic cycle consists of five steps: oxidative addition, migratory insertion, anion exchange, reductive elimination, and hydrogen migration. The rate-determining step is oxidative addition, with a small Gibbs free energy of 14.6 kcal mol(-1). In the migratory insertion step, (t)Bu-isocyanide provides an important source of carboxy and amino groups to establish the amide group. For anion exchange, path 1a is suggested as the most favorable pathway with the help of the base, and water provides a source of oxygen which is perfectly in line with experimental observations. Finally, in the hydrogen migration step, we illustrate that the six-membered ring path is energetically favored due to the assisting influence of water. In addition, our calculations indicate that using dimethyl sulfoxide as a solvent does not change the rate-determining step. Graphical Abstract Palladium-catalyzed amidation. PMID:26860502

  7. Ionic Liquid Catalyzed Electrolyte for Electrochemical Polyaniline Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, A. I.; Im, Hyunsik; Jung, Woong; Kim, Hyungsang; Kim, Byungchul; Yu, Kook-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Sang; Hwang, Sung-Min

    2013-05-01

    The effect of different wt.% of ionic liquid "1,6-bis (trimethylammonium-1-yl) hexane tetrafluoroborate" in 0.5 M LiClO4+PC electrolyte on the supercapacitor properties of polyaniline (PANI) thin film are investigated. The PANI film is synthesized using electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfuric acid. The electrochemical properties of the PANI thin film are studied by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The optimum amount of the ionic liquid is found to be 2 wt.% which provides better ionic conductivity of the electrolyte. The highest specific capacitance of 259 F/g is obtained using the 2 wt.% electrolyte. This capacitance remains at up to 208 F/g (80% capacity retention) after 1000 charge-discharge cycles at a current density of 0.5 mA/g. The PANI film in the 2 wt.% ionic liquid catalyzed 0.5 M LiClO4+PC electrolyte shows small electrochemical resistance, better rate performance and higher cyclability. The increased ionic conductivity of the 2 wt.% ionic liquid catalyzed electrolyte causes a reduction in resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface, which can be useful in electrochemically-preferred power devices for better applicability.

  8. Lewis acid catalyzed trans-hydrostannation of acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Asao, Naoki; Liu, Jian-Xiu; Sudoh, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    1995-12-31

    A Lewis acid such as ZrCl{sub 4} or HfCl{sub 4} catalyzed the hydrostannation of acetylenes 1 to produce the trans-hydrostannation products 2 regio- and stereoselectively. The use of non-polar solvents such as toluene or hexane was essential for obtaining high stereoselectivity and chemical yield. Since ZrCl{sub 4} or HfCl{sub 4} is not soluble in such solvents, this hydrostannation process was carried out in heterogeneous system. The reactions of internal acetylenes proceeded smoothly, although the use of stoichiometric amounts of ZrCl{sub 4} gave better results. The ZrCl{sub 4} catalyzed hydrostannation of 1-octyne with Bu{sub 3}SnH was monitored by {sup 1}H and {sup 119}Sn NMR spectroscopy, and it was found that an equilibrium process was involved in ZrCl{sub 4}-Bu{sub 3}SnH system and that a complex formed from Bu{sub 3}SnH and ZrCl{sub 4} would be a reactive species.

  9. The mechanisms of platinum-catalyzed silicon nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, N.; Knittel, P.; Biskupek, J.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.; Strehle, S.

    2016-02-01

    Platinum (Pt) has been known as a catalyst material for vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) synthesis since the mid 1960s with the potential to grow electronic grade silicon nanowires (SiNWs). In contrast to gold-based growth, Pt-catalyzed SiNW synthesis has rarely been studied, most likely due to higher synthesis temperatures and the formation of multiple Pt silicide phases. Here we present the growth of SiNWs from a Pt catalyst deposited by a focused ion or electron beam, which opens new strategies for the assembly of Pt-catalyzed SiNW-based devices, as well as SiNW growth from Pt nanoparticles and thin films. We show that single-crystalline SiNWs exhibit either the well-known catalyst tip or a polycrystalline silicon tip so far not reported. The local Pt concentration was found to be one key parameter triggering the growth mode. The proposed growth model for both types of SiNWs is based on a solid-state silicide-mediated crystallization rather than VLS. The discussion of the growth modes is supported by a variation of several growth parameters and SiNW synthesis using the substrate materials silicon nitride, single-crystalline silicon, fused silica, and sapphire.

  10. Montmorillonite Clay-Catalyzed Synthesis of RNA Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Miyakawa, S.; Huang, W.; Joshi, P.

    2005-12-01

    It is proposed that catalysis had a central role in the origins of life. This will be illustrated using the montmorillonite clay-catalyzed synthesis of oligomers of RNA from activated monomers, (Ferris and Ertem, 1993) a possible step in the origin of the RNA world (Ferris, 2005). Structural analysis of oligomers formed in the reaction of the activated monomer of 5'-AMP with that of 5'-CMP demonstrated that the oligomers formed were not produced by random synthesis but rather the sequences observed were directed by the montmorillonite catalyst (Miyakawa and Ferris, 2003). RNA oligomers containing up to 40 mers have been synthesized in reactions performed in water at 25 oC in the presence of montmorillonite (Huang and Ferris, 2003). Analysis of the structure elements in these oligomers from the 7 to 39 mers showed that they did not vary. Reaction of D, L-mixtures of the activated monomers of A and U resulted in the formation of greater amounts of the homochiral amounts of dimers and trimers of A than would be expected if there was no selectivity in the reaction. A limited number of the dimers and trimers of U were also formed but here the selectivity was for the formation of an excess of heterochiral products (Joshi et al., 2000). A postulate that explains why homochiral trimers of U are not formed and the significance of catalysis in prebiotic synthesis will be discussed. Ferris, J.P. (2005) Origins of life, molecular basis of. In R.A. Meyers, Ed. Encyclopedia of Molecular Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, 10. Wiley-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, Germany. Ferris, J.P., and Ertem, G. (1993) Montmorillonite catalysis of RNA oligomer formation in aqueous solution. A model for the prebiotic formation of RNA. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 115, 12270-12275. Huang, W., and Ferris, J.P. (2003) Synthesis of 35-40 mers of RNA oligomers from unblocked monomers. A simple approach to the RNA world. Chem. Commun., 1458-1459. Joshi, P.C., Pitsch, S., and Ferris, J.P. (2000) Homochiral selection in the montmorillonite-catalyzed and uncatalyzed prebiotic synthesis of RNA. Chem. Commun., 2497-2498. Miyakawa, S., and Ferris, J.P. (2003) Sequence- and Regioselectivity in the montmorillonite-catalyzed synthesis of RNA. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 125, 8202-8208.

  11. ENZYME-CATALYZED GEL-FORMATION OF GELATIN AND CHITOSAN. POTENTIAL FOR IN SITU APPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the ability of two enzymes to catalyze the formation of gels from solutions of gelatin and chitosan. A microbial transglutaminase, currently under investigation for food applications, was observed to catalyze the formation of strong and permanent gels from gelatin solutions. Chitosan w...

  12. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  13. From anilines to isatins: oxidative palladium-catalyzed double carbonylation of C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Duan, Zhengli; Zhang, Xueye; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Mengfan; Jiang, Ru; Zeng, Hongyao; Liu, Chao; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-02-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed C-H double carbonylation introduces two adjacent carbonyl groups for the synthesis of isatins from readily available anilines. The reaction proceeds under atmospheric pressure of CO with high regioselectivity and without any additives. Density functional theory investigations indicate that the palladium-catalyzed double carbonylation catalytic cycle is plausible. PMID:25521770

  14. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylation of o-iodoanilines for synthesis of isatoic anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sha; Chen, Ming; Zhao, Mi-Na; Du, Wei; Ren, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Yao-Yu; Guan, Zheng-Hui

    2014-05-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed oxidative double carbonylation of o-iodoanilines for the synthesis of isatoic anhydrides has been developed. The reaction employs readily available o-iodoanilines as the starting materials and proceeds under mild conditions. For extension, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of anthranilic acids was developed for the synthesis of substituted isatoic anhydrides in high to excellent yields. PMID:24720706

  15. Synthesis of acylphosphonates by a palladium-catalyzed phosphonocarbonylation reaction of aryl iodides with phosphites.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yusuke; Ishida, Naoki; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    Acylphosphonates are conveniently synthesized from aryl iodides by a palladium-catalyzed reaction with dialkyl phosphites under an atmospheric pressure of carbon monoxide. The reaction demonstrates the first example of the use of phosphorus nucleophiles in related metal-catalyzed carbonylation reactions. PMID:25414042

  16. IONIC LIQUIDS: THE PROSPECTS OF ENZYME-CATALYZED GLYCOSYLATIONS WITHOUT WATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reversing the hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by glycosidases has great potential for the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of new glycoconjugates. Hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds requires water as a co-reactant, and the reverse reaction (referred to as transglycosylation) is therefore favored by low- or non...

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Hydroamination of Internal Alkynes with Anilines and Amines.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomoki; Sonehara, Taro; Minakawa, Maki; Kawatsura, Motoi

    2016-03-18

    The copper-catalyzed regioselective intermolecular hydroamination of the aryl and trifluoromethyl group or electron-withdrawing group substituted internal alkynes with amines has been accomplished. The reaction was effectively catalyzed by the ligand-free Cu(OTf)2 and afforded the intended amine derivatives in good yields after treatment of NaBH3CN. PMID:26954725

  18. Phage Selection Assisted by Sfp Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Catalyzed Site-Specific Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Zhou, Han; Zhang, Mengnan; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTase) Sfp and AcpS catalyze a highly efficient reaction that conjugates chemical probes of diverse structures to proteins. PPTases have been widely used for site-specific protein labeling and live cell imaging of the target proteins. Here we describe the use of PPTase catalyzed protein labeling in protein engineering by facilitating high throughput phage selection. PMID:25560074

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of 2-Silylethynyl Phenols and Anilines via 1,2-Silicon Migration.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Noguchi, Keiichi; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2016-04-01

    It has been established that a cationic rhodium(I)/BINAP complex catalyzes the cycloisomerization of 2-silylethynylphenols, leading to 3-silylbenzofurans, via 1,2-silicon migration. Similarly, the cycloisomerization of 2-silylethynylanilines, leading to 3-silylindoles, via 1,2-silicon migration was catalyzed by a cationic rhodium(I)/H8-BINAP complex. PMID:27002692

  20. Palladium- and Copper-Catalyzed Solution Phase Synthesis of a Diverse Library of Isoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudipta; Roy, Sujata; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Hill, David; Larock, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    The solution phase synthesis of a 111 member isoquinoline library is described. The isoquinoline scaffold has been accessed through the palladium- and copper-catalyzed cyclization of iminoalkynes and the palladium-catalyzed iminoannulation of internal alkynes, followed by diversification of hydroxyl functionality where it is present. PMID:19728736

  1. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (−)-Nardoaristolone B via a Gold(I)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first enantioselective total synthesis of (−)-nardoaristolone B is accomplished by the implementation of an enantio- and diastereoselective copper(I)-catalyzed conjugate addition/enolate trapping sequence and a gold(I)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization (intermolecular oxidant), employed for the first time in total synthesis. PMID:25563976

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling of Perfluorobenzoates with Aryl Halides and Sulfonates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A Ni-catalyzed method for the coupling of perfluorobenzoates with aryl halides and pseudohalides is described. Aryl iodides, bromides, chlorides, triflates, and tosylates participate in these transformations to afford the products in good yields. Penta-, tetra-, and trifluorinated biaryl compounds are obtained using these newly developed Ni-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions. PMID:25700128

  3. Calcium-catalyzed pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass components.

    PubMed

    Case, Paige A; Truong, Chi; Wheeler, M Clayton; DeSisto, William J

    2015-09-01

    The present study examines the effect of calcium pretreatment on pyrolysis of individual lignocellulosic compounds. Previous work has demonstrated that the incorporation of calcium compounds with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis has a significant effect on the oxygen content and stability of the resulting oil. The aim of this work was to further explore the chemistry of calcium-catalyzed pyrolysis. Bench-scale pyrolysis of biomass constituents, including lignin, cellulose and xylan is performed and compared to the oils produced from pyrolysis of the same components after calcium pretreatment. The resulting oils were analyzed by quantitative GC-MS and SEC. These analyses, together with data collected from previous work provide evidence which was used to develop proposed reaction pathways for pyrolysis of calcium-pretreatment biomass. PMID:26038329

  4. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanova, L. N.; Bom, V. R.; Demin, A. M.; Demin, D. L.; Eijk, C. W. E. van; Filchagin, S. V.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. Grishechkin, S. K.; Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D.; Kuryakin, A. V.; Medved', S. V.; Musyaev, R. K.; Rudenko, A. I.; Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G.

    2009-02-15

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  5. Olefin hydroaryloxylation catalyzed by pincer-iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Guan, Changjian; Wang, David Y; Li, Bo; Lease, Nicholas; Steffens, Andrew M; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2013-10-01

    Aryl alkyl ethers, which are widely used throughout the chemical industry, are typically produced via the Williamson ether synthesis. Olefin hydroaryloxylation potentially offers a much more atom-economical alternative. Known acidic catalysts for hydroaryloxylation, however, afford very poor selectivity. We report the organometallic-catalyzed intermolecular hydroaryloxylation of unactivated olefins by iridium "pincer" complexes. These catalysts do not operate via the hidden Brønsted acid pathway common to previously developed transition-metal-based catalysts. The reaction is proposed to proceed via olefin insertion into an iridium-alkoxide bond, followed by rate-determining C-H reductive elimination to yield the ether product. The reaction is highly chemo- and regioselective and offers a new approach to the atom-economical synthesis of industrially important ethers and, potentially, a wide range of other oxygenates. PMID:24028199

  6. Dissecting Anion Effects in Gold(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Anna; Obradors, Carla; Lebœuf, David; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    From a series of gold complexes of the type [t-BuXPhosAu(MeCN)]X (X=anion), the best results in intermolecular gold(I)-catalyzed reactions are obtained with the complex with the bulky and soft anion BAr4F− [BAr4F−=3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenylborate] improving the original protocols by 10–30% yield. A kinetic study on the [2+2] cycloaddition reaction of alkynes with alkenes is consistent with an scenario in which the rate-determining step is the ligand exchange to generate the (η2-phenylacetylene)gold(I) complex. We have studied in detail the subtle differences that can be attributed to the anion in this formation, which result in a substantial decrease in the formation of unproductive σ,π-(alkyne)digold(I) complexes by destabilizing the conjugated acid formed. PMID:26190958

  7. Hemoglobin-catalyzed fluorometric method for the determination of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Lin; Li, Hua; Wang, Yi; Gou, Rong; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fang, Yudong; Chen, Fengmei

    2016-01-01

    A new spectrofluorometric method for the determination of glutathione based on the reaction catalyzed by hemoglobin was reported. The reaction product gave a highly fluorescent intensity with the excitation and emission wavelengths of 320.0 nm and 413.0 nm, respectively. The optimum experimental conditions were investigated. Results showed that low concentration glutathione enhanced the fluorescence intensity significantly. The line ranges were 1.0 × 10-6-1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 of glutathione and 6.0 × 10-10 mol L-1-1.0 × 10-8 mol L-1, respectively. The detection limit was calculated to be 1.1 × 10-11 mol L-1. The recovery test by the standard addition method gave values in the range of 90.78%-102.20%. This method was used for the determination of glutathione in synthetic and real samples with satisfactory results.

  8. Palladium-catalyzed pentannulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Avlasevich, Yuri; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus

    2011-11-01

    We present a new and versatile one-step synthesis of a series of small molecular chromophores based on cyclopentannulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Easily available pyrene, anthracene, and perylene bromides serve as starting materials for the reactions. The formation of the five-membered ring is achieved by the straightforward palladium(0)-catalyzed carbannulation with various substituted acetylenes. This approach is applicable either to single or multiple annulation procedures leading to hitherto inaccessible PAH topologies. According to the resulting products of the diverse reactions, a mechanistic explanation is proposed. UV/Vis absorption as well as cyclovoltammetric measurements were performed for characterization demonstrating the value of this annulation technique. Optical absorptions of up to 780 nm and absorption coefficients ranging from 8000 to 34,000 M(-1) cm(-1) were detected. PMID:21956345

  9. Acid-catalyzed reactions of epoxides for atmospheric nanoparticle growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; Guo, Song; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Zhang, Annie L; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-11-01

    Although new particle formation accounts for about 50% of the global aerosol production in the troposphere, the chemical species and mechanism responsible for the growth of freshly nucleated nanoparticles remain largely uncertain. Here we show large size growth when sulfuric acid nanoparticles of 4-20 nm are exposed to epoxide vapors, dependent on the particle size and relative humidity. Composition analysis of the nanoparticles after epoxide exposure reveals the presence of high molecular weight organosulfates and polymers, indicating the occurrence of acid-catalyzed reactions of epoxides. Our results suggest that epoxides play an important role in the growth of atmospheric newly nucleated nanoparticles, considering their large formation yields from photochemical oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds. PMID:25338124

  10. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  11. Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of Diazoesters with Organozinc Reagents.

    PubMed

    Panish, Robert; Selvaraj, Ramajeyam; Fox, Joseph M

    2015-08-21

    Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions of diazoesters with organozinc reagents are described. Diorganozinc reagents participate in reactions with diazo compounds by two distinct, catalyst-dependent mechanisms. With bulky diisopropylethyl acetate ligands, the reaction mechanism is proposed to involve initial formation of a Rh-carbene and subsequent carbozincation to give a zinc enolate. With Rh2(OAc)4, it is proposed that initial formation of an azine precedes 1,2-addition by an organozinc reagent. This straightforward route to the hydrazone products provides a useful method for preparing chiral quaternary α-aminoesters or pyrazoles via the Paul-Knorr condensation with 1,3-diketones. Crossover and deuterium labeling experiments provide evidence for the mechanisms proposed. PMID:26241081

  12. Synthesis of Rosin Acid Starch Catalyzed by Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rihui; Li, He; Long, Han; Su, Jiating; Huang, Wenqin

    2014-01-01

    Rosin, an abundant raw material from pine trees, was used as a starting material directly for the synthesis of rosin acid starch. The esterification reaction was catalyzed by lipase (Novozym 435) under mild conditions. Based on single factor experimentation, the optimal esterification conditions were obtained as follows: rosin acid/anhydrous glucose unit in the molar ratio 2 : 1, reaction time 4 h at 45°C, and 15% of lipase dosage. The degree of substitution (DS) reaches 0.098. Product from esterification of cassava starch with rosin acid was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and iodine coloration analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the morphology and crystallinity of the cassava starch were largely destroyed. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that thermal stability of rosin acid starch decreased compared with native starch. PMID:24977156

  13. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  14. Enantioselective Cyclizations of Silyloxyenynes Catalyzed by Cationic Metal Phosphine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brazeau, Jean-François; Zhang, Suyan; Colomer, Ignacio; Corkey, Britton K.; Toste, F. Dean

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of complementary methods for enantioselective transition-metal-catalyzed cyclization with silyloxyenynes has been accomplished using chiral phosphine ligands. Under palladium catalysis, 1,6-silyloxyenynes bearing a terminal alkyne led to the desired 5-membered ring with high enantioselectivities (up to 91% ee). As for reactions under cationic gold catalysis, 1,6- and 1,5-silyloxyenynes bearing an internal alkyne furnished the chiral cyclopentane derivatives with excellent enantiomeric excess (up to 94% ee). Modification of the substrate by incorporating an α,β-unsaturation led to the discovery of a tandem cyclization. Remarkably, using silyloxy-1,3-dien-7-ynes under gold catalysis conditions provided the bicyclic derivatives with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (up to >20:1 dr and 99% ee). PMID:22296571

  15. Enantioselective cyclizations of silyloxyenynes catalyzed by cationic metal phosphine complexes.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Jean-François; Zhang, Suyan; Colomer, Ignacio; Corkey, Britton K; Toste, F Dean

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of complementary methods for enantioselective transition metal-catalyzed cyclization with silyloxyenynes has been accomplished using chiral phosphine ligands. Under palladium catalysis, 1,6-silyloxyenynes bearing a terminal alkyne led to the desired five-membered ring with high enantioselectivities (up to 91% ee). As for reactions under cationic gold catalysis, 1,6- and 1,5-silyloxyenynes bearing an internal alkyne furnished the chiral cyclopentane derivatives with excellent enantiomeric excess (up to 94% ee). Modification of the substrate by incorporating an α,β-unsaturation led to the discovery of a tandem cyclization. Remarkably, using silyloxy-1,3-dien-7-ynes under gold catalysis conditions provided the bicyclic derivatives with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (up to >20:1 dr and 99% ee). PMID:22296571

  16. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  17. Oligonucleotide synthesis catalyzed by the Zn/2+/ ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawai, H.; Orgel, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments are reported in which Zn(2+) ion catalyzed the formation of oligonucleotides from nucleoside phosphorimidazolides in aqueous solution, even in the absence of a template. Specifically, the imidazolides (ImpU or ImpA) polymerized to form ImpApA, and pApA, pApApA, and pApApApA, or the analogous uracil compounds. In addition, the expected hydrolysis products of the hydrolysis of ImpA were formed (pA, imidazole). Judging from the ratio of pA(n) over pA (with and without zinc ion), this ion increased the efficiency of phosphodiester-bond formation by up to 10 times. Possible mechanisms for the reaction are tentatively proposed.

  18. The pyrite iron cycle catalyzed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Dumett, Miguel A; Keener, James P

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we study a model of the biotic pyrite iron cycle catalyzed by bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, in mining activity sites waste dumps. Chemical reactions, reaction rates and the population growth model are mostly taken from the existing literature. Analysis of the corresponding dynamical system shows the existence of up to four non-trivial steady state solutions. The stability of the equilibria solutions is determined, finding up to two coexisting stable solutions. Two Hopf bifurcations and a region of parameter space in which there are stable periodic solutions are found. In addition, we find a homoclinic bifurcation which gives rise to a stable periodic orbit of large period. The existence of these stable oscillatory solutions gives a possible explanation for the oscillations of bacteria concentration and pH for the iron cycle, described in Jaynes et al. (Water Resour Res 20:233-242, 1984). PMID:23852143

  19. Photodecomposition of chloroform catalyzed by unmodified MCM-41 mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Peña, Laura A; Chan, Alissa M; Cohen, Larissa R; Hou, Karen; Harvey, Brent M; Hoggard, Patrick E

    2014-01-01

    Unactivated MCM-41 mesoporous silica catalyzes the photodecomposition of chloroform to phosgene and hydrogen chloride under near-UV (λ > 360 nm) irradiation. The rate of photodecomposition increases toward an asymptotic limit as the O(2) partial pressure is increased. Deuterochloroform does not decompose under the same experimental conditions. Low concentrations of both cyclohexane and ethanol quench the photodecomposition, whereas water, up to its solubility limit, does not. Dissolved tetraalkylammonium salts suppress photodecomposition. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which light absorption by an SiO(2) defect yields an electron-deficient oxygen atom, which then abstracts hydrogen from chloroform. The resulting CCl(3) radicals react with oxygen to form a peroxy radical that decomposes, eventually yielding phosgene and hydrogen chloride. PMID:24460571

  20. The promise and challenge of iron-catalyzed cross coupling.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Benjamin D; Fürstner, Alois

    2008-11-18

    Transition metal catalysts, particularly those derived from the group VIII-X metals, display remarkable efficiency for the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds through the reactions of suitable nucleophiles with organic electrophilic partners. Within this subset of the periodic table, palladium and nickel complexes offer the broadest utility, while additionally providing the deepest mechanistic insight into thus-termed "cross-coupling reactions". The mammoth effort devoted to palladium and nickel catalysts over the past 30 years has somewhat obscured reports of alternative metal complexes in this arena. As cross-coupling reactions have evolved into a critical support for modern synthetic chemistry, the search for alternative catalysts has been taken up with renewed vigor.When the current generation of synthetic chemists reflects back to the origins of cross coupling for inspiration, the well-documented effect of iron salts on the reactivity of Grignard reagents with organic electrophiles surfaces as a fertile ground for alternative catalyst development. Iron possesses the practical benefits more befitting an alkali or alkaline earth metal, while displaying the unique reactivity of a d-block element. Therefore the search for broadly applicable iron catalysts for cross coupling is an increasingly important goal in modern synthetic organic chemistry.This Account describes the evolution of iron-catalyzed cross coupling from its inception in the work of Kochi to the present. Specific emphasis is placed on reactivity and synthetic applications, with selected examples from acyl-, alkenyl-, aryl-, and alkyl halide/pseudohalide cross coupling included. The typical reaction partners are Grignard reagents, though organomanganese, -copper, and -zinc derivatives have also been used in certain cases. Such iron-catalyzed processes occur very rapidly even at low temperature and therefore are distinguished by broad functional group compatibility. Furthermore, recent advances in carbon-heteroatom bond formation and studies relevant to the general reactivity of in situ generated and structurally defined "low-valent" iron catalysts are presented.The preparative aspects of iron-catalyzed cross coupling are encouraging, but the inclination to classify these processes within the characteristic reaction manifold is premature, as mechanistic studies have evolved at a comparatively slow pace. A typical protocol for cross coupling employs an Fe(+2) or Fe(+3) precatalyst, which is reduced in situ by the organometallic nucleophile. The nature of the resulting active component(s) is still best described, more than 30 years later, in Kochi's original terms as a "reduced form of soluble iron". Despite huge gaps in our current knowledge, three distinct mechanisms have been formulated, largely based on empirical evidence: a "canonical" cross-coupling process, a manifold wherein alkylation of an organoiron intermediate replaces transmetalation as a key step, and finally a proposal reliant on the formation of nucleophilic ate complexes. Conjecture and speculation abound, but precisely what constitutes the catalytic cycle in iron-catalyzed cross coupling remains an extremely challenging unanswered question. PMID:18588321

  1. Laccase-catalyzed oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuejiao; Bai, Rubing; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Wang, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic polymerization of phenolic compounds (catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone) was carried out using laccase. The mechanism of polymerization and the structures of the polymers were evaluated in terms of UV-Vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The molecular weights of the produced polyphenols were determined with GPC. The results showed that the phenolic monomers firstly turned into quinone intermediates by laccase catalysis. Through further oxidation, the intermediates formed covalent bonds. Finally, catechol units were linked together with ether bonds, and both resorcinol and hydroquinone units were linked together with C-C bonds. The number-average molecular weights of the polyphenols ranged from 1,000 to 1,400 Da (corresponding to the degree of polymerization that varied from 10 to 12) with a lower polydispersity value of about 1.10, showing selective polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by laccase. PMID:23996120

  2. WILDCAT: a catalyzed D-D tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed D-D, tokamak, commercial, fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing D-T designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete, conceptual design.

  3. Decomposition of peracetic acid catalyzed by vanadium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.P.; Gekhman, A.E.; Moiseev, I.I.; Polotryuk, O.Y.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of peracetic acid (AcOOH) in acetic acid (AcOH) catalyzed by vanadium complexes. It is shown that peractic acid in acetic acid solutions of ammonium anadate decomposes with the predominant formation of 0/sub 2/ and small amounts of CO/sub 2/, the yield of which increases with increasing temperature and peracetic acid concentration. Both reactions proceed without the formation of free radicals in amounts detectable by ESR spectroscopy. The rate of oxygen release under conditions in which the formation of CO/sub 2/ is insignificant obeys a kinetic equation indicating the intermediate formation of a complex between V/sup 5 +/ ions and peracetic acid and the slow conversion of this complex into the observed products.

  4. Alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed silver deposition for electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo; Hernndez-Santos, David; Gonzlez-Garca, Mara Begoa; Costa-Garca, Agustn

    2007-07-15

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is one of the most used enzymatic labels for the development of ELISAs, immunosensors, DNA hybridization assays, etc. This enzyme catalyzes the dephosphorylation of a substrate into a detectable product usually quantified by optical or electrochemical measurements. This work is based on a substrate (3-indoxyl phosphate) that produces a compound able to reduce silver ions in solution into a metallic deposit, which is localized where the enzymatic label AP is attached. The deposited silver is electrochemically stripped into solution and measured by anodic stripping voltammetry. Its application to an enzymatic genosensor on streptavidin-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes for the detection of virulence nucleic acid determinants of autolysin gene, exclusively present on the genome of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, is described. Compared with the direct voltammetric detection of indigo carmine, the anodic stripping voltammetry of silver ions is 14-fold more sensitive. PMID:17569504

  5. The general base in the thymidylate synthase catalyzed proton abstraction.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ananda K; Islam, Zahidul; Krueger, Jonathan; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-12-14

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TSase), an important chemotherapeutic drug target, catalyzes the formation of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), a precursor of one of the DNA building blocks. TSase catalyzes a multi-step mechanism that includes the abstraction of a proton from the C5 of the substrate 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (dUMP). Previous studies on ecTSase proposed that an active-site residue, Y94 serves the role of the general base abstracting this proton. However, since Y94 is neither very basic, nor connected to basic residues, nor located close enough to the pyrimidine proton to be abstracted, the actual identity of this base remains enigmatic. Based on crystal structures, an alternative hypothesis is that the nearest potential proton-acceptor of C5 of dUMP is a water molecule that is part of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) network comprised of several water molecules and several protein residues including H147, E58, N177, and Y94. Here, we examine the role of the residue Y94 in the proton abstraction step by removing its hydroxyl group (Y94F mutant). We investigated the effect of the mutation on the temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and found that these KIEs are more temperature dependent than those of the wild-type enzyme (WT). These results suggest that the phenolic -OH of Y94 is a component of the transition state for the proton abstraction step. The findings further support the hypothesis that no single functional group is the general base, but a network of bases and hydroxyls (from water molecules and tyrosine) sharing H-bonds across the active site can serve the role of the general base to remove the pyrimidine proton. PMID:25912171

  6. Cyclic peptide formation catalyzed by an antibody ligase.

    PubMed

    Smithrud, D B; Benkovic, P A; Benkovic, S J; Roberts, V; Liu, J; Neagu, I; Iwama, S; Phillips, B W; Smith, A B; Hirschmann, R

    2000-02-29

    Cyclic hexapeptides represent a class of compounds with important, diverse biological activities. We report herein that the antibody 16G3 catalyzes the cyclization of d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-Phe small middle dotp-nitrophenyl ester (8a) to give c-(d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-l-Phe) (11a). The antibody does not, however, catalyze either epimerization or hydrolysis. The resulting rate enhancement of the cyclization by 16G3 (22-fold) was sufficient to form the desired product in greater than 90% yield. In absolute rate terms, the turnover of 16G3 is estimated to be 2 min(-1). The background rate of epimerization of 8a was reduced from 10 to 1% and hydrolysis from 50 to 4% in the presence of 16G3. As expected, the catalytic effects of 16G3 were blocked by the addition of an amount of the hapten equal to twice the antibody concentration. We also synthesized three diastereomers of 8a: the d-Trp(1)-d-Phe(6) (8b), l-Trp(1)-l-Phe(6) (8c), and l-Trp(1)-d-Phe(6) (8d) hexapeptides as well as d-Trp'-l-Trp(6) (12) and d-Phe'-l-Phe(6) (13). As expected, the rate enhancement by 16G3 was greatest for 8a, because the stereochemistry of Trp(1) and Phe(6) matches that of the corresponding residues on the hapten used to induce the biosynthesis of 16G3. A model of the variable domain of 16G3 was generated from the primary sequence using the antibody structural database to guide the model construction. The resulting model provided support for some previously proposed interpretations of the kinetic data, while providing valuable new insights for others. PMID:10688882

  7. Cathodic oxygen reduction catalyzed by bacteria in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rabaey, Korneel; Read, Suzanne T; Clauwaert, Peter; Freguia, Stefano; Bond, Philip L; Blackall, Linda L; Keller, Jurg

    2008-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to combine wastewater treatment efficiency with energetic efficiency. One of the major impediments to MFC implementation is the operation of the cathode compartment, as it employs environmentally unfriendly catalysts such as platinum. As recently shown, bacteria can facilitate sustainable and cost-effective cathode catalysis for nitrate and also oxygen. Here we describe a carbon cathode open to the air, on which attached bacteria catalyzed oxygen reduction. The bacteria present were able to reduce oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor using electrons provided by the solid-phase cathode. Current densities of up to 2.2 A m(-2) cathode projected surface were obtained (0.303+/-0.017 W m(-2), 15 W m(-3) total reactor volume). The cathodic microbial community was dominated by Sphingobacterium, Acinetobacter and Acidovorax sp., according to 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Isolates of Sphingobacterium sp. and Acinetobacter sp. were obtained using H(2)/O(2) mixtures. Some of the pure culture isolates obtained from the cathode showed an increase in the power output of up to three-fold compared to a non-inoculated control, that is, from 0.015+/-0.001 to 0.049+/-0.025 W m(-2) cathode projected surface. The strong decrease in activation losses indicates that bacteria function as true catalysts for oxygen reduction. Owing to the high overpotential for non-catalyzed reduction, oxygen is only to a limited extent competitive toward the electron donor, that is, the cathode. Further research to refine the operational parameters and increase the current density by modifying the electrode surface and elucidating the bacterial metabolism is warranted. PMID:18288216

  8. Protoporphyrin IX catalyzed hydrogen peroxide to generate singlet oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Sun, Qiyin; Su, Jihui; Han, Jihui; Zhang, Quanshi; Jin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the role of protoporphyrin IX (pPIX) in mitochondrial metabolism of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods: O2 - specific fluorescent markers DMA (9,10-dimerthylanthracence) and SOSG (Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green reagent) were used for measurement of singlet oxygen (1O2). Catalyzing conversion of H2O2 into 1O2 by pPIX was monitored in vitro under varied H2O2 content, temperature, and PH value in the reaction. Ex vivo mitochondrial model was used to analyze effects of ferrochelatase (FECH) and high energy X-rays on this catalytic reaction. Results: In complete dark, measurable 1O2 was generated when 1.5 mM of H2O2 was incubated with 24 μM of pPIX H2O2 at 37°C for 3 hours. Mitochondrial yield of H2O2 was 0.11±0.03 nmole/mg/min. Mitochondrial FECH significantly improve the catalytic ability of pPIX converting H2O2 into 1O2. At presence of high-energy X-ray, incubation of 14.4 μM of pPIX with 0.54 μM of H2O2 also generated 1O2, during which the fluorescence density of 1.05 μM of DMA decreased by 41.5% (P < 0.05). This conversion was not observed when pPIX was replaced with structurally similar hematoporphyrin. Conclusion: pPIX can catalyze conversion of H2O2 into 1O2. PMID:26221221

  9. Multimethylation of Rickettsia OmpB Catalyzed by Lysine Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Abeykoon, Amila; Wang, Guanghui; Chao, Chien-Chung; Chock, P. Boon; Gucek, Marjan; Ching, Wei-Mei; Yang, David C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of rickettsial OmpB (outer membrane protein B) has been implicated in bacterial virulence. Rickettsial methyltransferases RP789 and RP027-028 are the first biochemically characterized methyltransferases to catalyze methylation of outer membrane protein (OMP). Methylation in OMP remains poorly understood. Using semiquantitative integrated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, we characterize methylation of (i) recombinantly expressed fragments of Rickettsia typhi OmpB exposed in vitro to trimethyltransferases of Rickettsia prowazekii RP027-028 and of R. typhi RT0101 and to monomethyltransferases of R. prowazekii RP789 and of R. typhi RT0776, and (ii) native OmpBs purified from R. typhi and R. prowazekii strains Breinl, RP22, and Madrid E. We found that in vitro trimethylation occurs at relatively specific locations in OmpB with consensus motifs, KX(G/A/V/I)N and KT(I/L/F), whereas monomethylation is pervasive throughout OmpB. Native OmpB from virulent R. typhi contains mono- and trimethyllysines at locations well correlated with methylation in recombinant OmpB catalyzed by methyltransferases in vitro. Native OmpBs from highly virulent R. prowazekii strains Breinl and RP22 contain multiple clusters of trimethyllysine in contrast to a single cluster in OmpB from mildly virulent R. typhi. Furthermore, OmpB from the avirulent strain Madrid E contains mostly monomethyllysine and no trimethyllysine. The native OmpB from Madrid E was minimally trimethylated by RT0101 or RP027-028, consistent with a processive mechanism of trimethylation. This study provides the first in-depth characterization of methylation of an OMP at the molecular level and may lead to uncovering the link between OmpB methylation and rickettsial virulence. PMID:24497633

  10. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24977336

  11. Spectroscopic and QM/MM investigations of Chloroperoxidase catalyzed degradation of orange G.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; He, Qinghao; Huang, Yi; Wang, Xiaotang

    2016-04-15

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO), a heme-thiolate protein, from Caldariomyces fumago catalyzes a plethora of reactions including halogenation, dismutation, epoxidation, and oxidation. Although all CPO-catalyzed reactions go through a common intermediate, compound I, different mechanisms are followed in subsequent transformations. To understand the mechanism of CPO-catalyzed halide-dependent degradation of orange G, the role of halide and pH was systematically investigated. It is revealed that formation and protonation of compound X, a long-sought after hypochlorite heme adduct intermediate existed during CPO-catalyzed halide-dependent reactions, significantly lowers the reaction barrier and increases the efficiency of CPO-catalyzed orange G degradation. The extremely acidic optimal reaction pH suggests the protonation of a residue, presumably, Glu 183 in CPO catalysis. Halide dependent studies showed that Kcat is higher in the presence of Br(-) than in the presence of Cl(-). The degradation products of orange G indicate the cleavage at a single position of orange G, demonstrating a high regioselectivity of CPO-catalyzed degradation. Based on our kinetic, NMR and QM/MM studies, the mechanism of CPO-catalyzed orange G degradation was proposed. PMID:26926259

  12. Recent advances in osmium-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Chelucci, Giorgio; Baldino, Salvatore; Baratta, Walter

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: A current issue in metal-catalyzed reactions is the search for highly efficient transition-metal complexes affording high productivity and selectivity in a variety of processes. Moreover, there is also a great interest in multitasking catalysts that are able to efficiently promote different organic transformations by careful switching of the reaction parameters, such as temperature, solvent, and cocatalyst. In this context, osmium complexes have shown the ability to catalyze efficiently different types of reactions involving hydrogen, proving at the same time high thermal stability and simple synthesis. In the catalytic reduction of C?X (X = O, N) bonds by both hydrogenation (HY) and transfer hydrogenation (TH) reactions, the most interest has been focused on homogeneous systems based on rhodium, iridium, and in particular ruthenium catalysts, which have proved to catalyze chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenations with remarkable efficiency. By contrast, osmium catalysts have received much less attention because they are considered less active on account of their slower ligand exchange kinetics. Thus, this area remained almost neglected until recent studies refuted these prejudices. The aim of this Account is to highlight the impressive developments achieved over the past few years by our and other groups on the design of new classes of osmium complexes and their applications in homogeneous catalytic reactions involving the hydrogenation of carbon-oxygen and carbon-nitrogen bonds by both HY and TH reactions as well as in alcohol deydrogenation (DHY) reactions. The work described in this Account demonstrates that osmium complexes are emerging as powerful catalysts for asymmetric and non-asymmetric syntheses, showing a remarkably high catalytic activity in HY and TH reactions of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and esters as well in DHY reactions of alcohols. Thus, for instance, the introduction of ligands with an NH function, possibly in combination with a pyridine ring, led to a new family of [OsCl2(PP)(NN)] (NN = diamine, 2-aminomethylpyridine; PP = diphosphine) and pincer [OsCl(CNN)(PP)] (HCNN = 6-aryl-2-aminomethylpyridine, 2-aminomethylbenzo[h]quinoline) complexes, which are outstanding catalysts for (asymmetric) HY and TH of carbonyl compounds and DHY of alcohols with turnover numbers and turnover frequencies up to 10(5) and 10(6) h(-1), respectively. In addition, PNN osmium complexes containing the 2-aminomethylpyridine motif have been found to be among the most active catalysts for HY of esters. These complexes have shown catalytic activities that are comparable and in some cases superior to those reported for analogous ruthenium systems. These results give an idea of the potential of Os complexes for the design of new highly productive and robust catalysts for the synthesis of chiral and nonchiral alcohols and amines as well as ketones from alcohols. Thus, we hope that this report will promote increased interest in the chemistry of these metal complexes, opening novel opportunities for new catalytic processes as well as the improvement of existing ones. PMID:25650714

  13. Fundamentals of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions of environmental importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Subodh Shrinivas

    Reaction kinetics and spectroscopic characterization are valuable tools for understanding heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions. The objective of this work was to apply the tools of catalysis and reaction kinetics to understand the fundamentals of chemical surface phenomena for environmentally important reactions. This thesis presents our work in two areas of catalytic reactions for pollution abatement---"chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) treatment chemistry" and "sulfur-tolerant auto exhaust catalysts." The ozone depletion potential of CFCs has resulted in a great interest in the academic and industrial communities to find replacements for these chemicals. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are amongst the best "environmentally benign" candidates for CFC replacement. One selective pathway for the synthesis of HFCs is via the hydrodechlorination of CFCs. This route has the added benefit of destroying harmful CFC stockpiles and converting them into more useful chemicals. The work in Chapter 3 shows that parallel hydrogenation pathways starting from a common CF2 species can explain the formation of the products CH2F2 and CH4 for the hydrodechlorination of CF2Cl2 over Pd/AlF3. Transient kinetics experiments using C2H4 as a trapping agent for surface carbenes have provided evidence for the presence of CH2 species on the catalyst surface during this reaction. The absence of either coupling products or trapped products containing F suggests that the rate of hydrogenation of surface CF2 species is faster than that of surface CH2 species. Another important class of CFC reactions is oxide-catalyzed disproportionations to control the number and position of halogen atoms in the CFC/HFC molecule. Chapter 4 combines the use of reaction kinetics tools and spectroscopic characterization techniques to understand the adsorption and reaction of CF3CFCl 2 over gamma-Al2O3. The CF3CFCl 2 reaction over gamma-Al2O3 lead to a modification of the gamma-Al2O3 surface due to fluorination and the modified surface possessed sites that readily catalyzed the disproportionation of CF3CFCl2 at 353 K. FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor the remarkable transformations taking place on the surface of Al 2O3. The identity and reactivity of surface fluoroacetate intermediates was determined and correlated to the changes in the oxide surface properties. One of the biggest challenges for automotive exhaust catalysts is the deactivation caused by sulfur present in the exhaust gas. There is enormous interest in developing new materials and catalysts that can destroy tailpipe pollutants in the presence of SO2. Work presented in Chapter 5 shows the promise of formulating new molecularly-mixed oxide materials with improved tolerance to sulfur than conventional CeO2. Characterization of the CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 mixed oxides after using different sulfur-treatment protocols showed that crystallite growth was the dominant phenomenon, which lead to activity loss in CeO2, on exposure to SO2. The incorporation of ZrO2 into the CeO2 lattice provided stability against sintering and helped maintain the activity of CeO2-ZrO2 over short times on stream.

  14. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density increase was shown to quickly saturate with cell mass attached on the electrode. Based on recent modelling data that suggested that the electrode currents might be limited by the poor electrical conductivity of the anode, the power density versus electrical conductivity of a yeast-immobilized anode was investigated. Introduction of high aspect ratio carbon fiber filaments to the immobilization matrix increased the electrical conductivity of the anode. Although a higher electrical conductivity clearly led to an increase in power densities, it was shown that the principal limitation to power density increase was coming from proton transfer limitations in the immobilized anode. Partial overcoming of the gradients lead a power density of ca. 250 microW cm-2, which is the highest reported for yeast powered MFCs. A yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cell was investigated as a power source for low power sensors using raw tree sap. It was shown that yeast can efficiently utilize the sucrose present in the raw tree sap to produce electricity when excess salt is added to the medium. Therefore the salinity of a potential energy source is an important consideration when MFCs are being considered for energy harvesting from natural sources.

  15. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Direct Arylation of Pyridines and Quinolines

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Ashley; Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-07-29

    The pyridine and quinoline nuclei are privileged scaffolds that occupy a central role in many medicinally relevant compounds. Consequently, methods for their expeditious functionalization are of immediate interest. However, despite the immense importance of transition-metal catalyzed cross-coupling for the functionalization of aromatic scaffolds, general solutions for coupling 2-pyridyl organometallics with aryl halides have only recently been presented. Direct arylation at the ortho position of pyridine would constitute an even more efficient approach because it eliminates the need for the stoichiometric preparation and isolation of 2-pyridyl organometallics. Progress towards this goal has been achieved by activation of the pyridine nucleus for arylation via conversion to the corresponding pyridine N-oxide or N-iminopyridinium ylide. However, this approach necessitates two additional steps: activation of the pyridine or quinoline starting material, and then unmasking the arylated product. The use of pyridines directly would clearly represent the ideal situation both in terms of cost and simplicity. We now wish to document our efforts in this vein, culminating in an operationally simple Rh(I)-catalyzed direct arylation of pyridines and quinolines. We recently developed an electron-rich Rh(I) system for catalytic alkylation at the ortho position of pyridines and quinolines with alkenes. Therefore, we initially focused our attention on the use of similarly electron-rich Rh(I) catalysts for the proposed direct arylation. After screening an array of electron-rich phosphine ligands and Rh(I) salts, only marginal yields (<20%) of the desired product were obtained. Much more efficient was an electron-poor Rh(I) system with [RhCl(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2} as precatalyst (Table 1). For the direct arylation of picoline with 3,5-dimethyl-bromobenzene, addition of P(OiPr){sub 3} afforded a promising 40% yield of the cross coupled product 1a (entry 1). The exclusion of phosphite additive proved even more effective, with the yield of 1a improving to 61% (entry 2). Further enhancement in yield was not observed upon the inclusion of other additives such as MgO (entry 3), various organic bases (entries 4, 5), or a protic acid source (entry 6). Absolute concentration proved very important, with the best results being obtained at relatively high concentrations of the aryl bromide (compare entries 7 and 8). A marginal improvement was observed upon running the reaction with 6 equivalents of 2-methyl pyridine (entry 9). The reaction temperature could also be increased to 175 or 190 C while maintaining reaction yield, to enable the reaction time to be reduced to 24 h (entries 10 and 11). In summary, we have developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed strategy for the direct arylation of pyridines and quinolines. The heterocycle is used without the need for prefunctionalization, and all reaction components are inexpensive and readily available. The strategy represents an expeditious route to an important class of bis(hetero)aryls and should be of broad utility.

  16. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of carbon, seen here in cross section. They form a nested series of concentric cylinders, much like the growth rings on a tree. This sample was obtained by the supported catalyst method, whereby the nanoscale catalysts are dispersed on a substrate providing their support. The substrate with catalyst particles was immersed within an acetylene diffusion flame to which nitrogen had been added to eliminate soot formation. Upon removal from the flame, the nanotubes were dispersed on a holder suitable for electron microscopy. Although not seen in the figure, the tube diameter reflects that of the catalyst particle.

  17. Effective alkaline metal-catalyzed oxidative delignification of hybrid poplar

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bansal, Namita; Stoklosa, Ryan J.; Fountain, Mackenzie; Ralph, John; Hodge, David B.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-02-09

    Background: Strategies to improve copper-catalyzed alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Cu-AHP) pretreatment of hybrid poplar were investigated. These improvements included a combination of increasing hydrolysis yields, while simultaneously decreasing process inputs through (i) more efficient utilization of H2O2 and (ii) the addition of an alkaline extraction step prior to the metal-catalyzed AHP pretreatment. We hypothesized that utilizing this improved process could substantially lower the chemical inputs needed during pretreatment. Results: Hybrid poplar was pretreated utilizing a modified process in which an alkaline extraction step was incorporated prior to the Cu-AHP treatment step and H2O2 was added batch-wise over the course of 10more » h. Our results revealed that the alkaline pre-extraction step improved both lignin and xylan solubilization, which ultimately led to improved glucose (86 %) and xylose (95 %) yields following enzymatic hydrolysis. An increase in the lignin solubilization was also observed with fed-batch H2O2 addition relative to batch-only addition, which again resulted in increased glucose and xylose yields (77 and 93 % versus 63 and 74 %, respectively). Importantly, combining these strategies led to significantly improved sugar yields (96 % glucose and 94 % xylose) following enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, we found that we could substantially lower the chemical inputs (enzyme, H2O2, and catalyst), while still maintaining high product yields utilizing the improved Cu-AHP process. This pretreatment also provided a relatively pure lignin stream consisting of ≥90 % Klason lignin and only 3 % xylan and 2 % ash following precipitation. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (2D HSQC) NMR and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the solubilized lignin was high molecular weight (Mw ≈ 22,000 Da) and only slightly oxidized relative to lignin from untreated poplar. In conclusion: This study demonstrated that the fed-batch, two-stage Cu-AHP pretreatment process was effective in pretreating hybrid poplar for its conversion into fermentable sugars. Results showed sugar yields near the theoretical maximum were achieved from enzymatically hydrolyzed hybrid poplar by incorporating an alkaline extraction step prior to pretreatment and by efficiently utilizing H2O2 during the Cu-AHP process. Significantly, this study reports high sugar yields from woody biomass treated with an AHP pretreatment under mild reaction conditions.« less

  18. Exploring chain length selectivity in HIC-catalyzed polycondensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Feder, David; Gross, Richard A

    2010-03-01

    Polyester synthesis activity of immobilized Humicola insolens (HiC) was systematically studied with three-series of substrates varying in (i) omega-hydroxyalkanoic acid (omegaHA), (ii) alpha,omega-n-alkane diol, and (iii) alpha,omega-n-alkane diacid chain length. Covalent immobilization of HiC on Amberzyme oxirane (AO) resin (i.e., AO-HiC) was prepared. HiC-AO's activity for omegaHA substrates with 6, 10, 12, and 16 carbons was C16 > C12, where C10-omegaHA and C6-omegaHA were not polymerized. In contrast, N435's activity for omegaHA substrates was C16 = C12 > C10, where C6-omegaHA was not polymerized. HiC-AO activity for copolymerization of sebacic acid (C10-diacid) with alpha,omega-n-alkane diols with 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 8-carbon chain lengths was C8 > C6, where C3, C4, and C5 diols were not polymerized. N435's relative activity for diol substrates was C8 = C6 = C5 > C4 > C3. HiC-AO activity for copolymerizations of 1,8-octanediol with alpha,omega-n-alkane diacids with 6-, 8-, 9-, 10-, and 13-carbon chain lengths was C13 = C10, where HiC showed little activity for C6, C8, and C9 diacid copolymerization. N435 displayed similar activity for all these diacid chain lengths. Thus, N435 has a broader substrate promiscuity than HiC-AO. This is most apparent for shorter chain length omegaHA, diol, and diacid monomers. These trends were similarly observed for a series of small molecule esterification reactions. Comparison of HiC-AO- and N435-catalyzed C16-HA homopolymerization at 8 h gave polymers with M(n) 40.4 and 25.5 kg/mol, respectively. Furthermore, HiC-AO- and N435-catalyzed copolymerization of 1,8-octanediol/C13-diacid polymerizations at 8 h gave polymers with M(n) of 11.0 and 9.6 kg/mol, respectively. PMID:20095578

  19. Bonding by Hydroxide-Catalyzed Hydration and Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung

    2008-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive method for bonding solid objects exploits hydroxide-catalyzed hydration and dehydration to form silicate-like networks in thin surface and interfacial layers between the objects. The method can be practiced at room temperature or over a wide range of temperatures. The method was developed especially to enable the formation of precise, reliable bonds between precise optical components. The bonds thus formed exhibit the precision and transparency of bonds formed by the conventional optical-contact method and the strength and reliability of high-temperature frit bonds. The method also lends itself to numerous non-optical applications in which there are requirements for precise bonds and/or requirements for bonds, whether precise or imprecise, that can reliably withstand severe environmental conditions. Categories of such non-optical applications include forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. The method is applicable to materials that either (1) can form silicate-like networks in the sense that they have silicate-like molecular structures that are extensible into silicate-like networks or (2) can be chemically linked to silicate-like networks by means of hydroxide-catalyzed hydration and dehydration. When hydrated, a material of either type features surface hydroxyl (-OH) groups. In this method, a silicate-like network that bonds two substrates can be formed either by a bonding material alone or by the bonding material together with material from either or both of the substrates. Typically, an aqueous hydroxide bonding solution is dispensed and allowed to flow between the mating surfaces by capillary action. If the surface figures of the substrates do not match precisely, bonding could be improved by including a filling material in the bonding solution. Preferably, the filling material should include at least one ingredient that can be hydrated to have exposed hydroxyl groups and that can be chemically linked, by hydroxide catalysis, to a silicate-like network. The silicate-like network could be generated in situ from the filling material and/or substrate material, or could be originally present in the bonding material.

  20. Evaluating Transition-Metal Catalyzed Transformations for the Synthesis of Laulimalide

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Amans, Dominique; Seganish, W. Michael; Chung, Cheol K.

    2009-01-01

    Laulimalide is a structurally unique 20-membered marine macrolide displaying microtubule stabilizing activity similar to that of paclitaxel and the epothilones. The use of atom economical transformations such as a rhodium-catalyzed cycloisomerization to form the endocyclic dihydropyran, a dinuclear zinc-catalyzed asymmetric glycolate aldol to prepare the syn 1,2-diol and an intramolecular ruthenium-catalyzed alkene-alkyne coupling to build the macrocycle enabled us to synthesize laulimalide via an efficient and convergent pathway. The designed synthetic route also allowed us to prepare an analogue of the natural product that possesses significant cytotoxic activity. PMID:19891433

  1. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Hdinger, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fissile fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the requirement to maintain a critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in {sup 238}U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fission. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results seen, the engine design presented is inadequate. Limitations introduced by the reaction fluid far outweigh the simplicity-of-design gained. Despite this, the basic idea of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of spacecraft propulsion warrants further study.

  2. Deoxycholic acid transformations catalyzed by selected filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Kollerov, V V; Lobastova, T G; Monti, D; Deshcherevskaya, N O; Ferrandi, E E; Fronza, G; Riva, S; Donova, M V

    2016-03-01

    More than 100 filamentous fungi strains, mostly ascomycetes and zygomycetes from different phyla, were screened for the ability to convert deoxycholic acid (DCA) to valuable bile acid derivatives. Along with 11 molds which fully degraded DCA, several strains were revealed capable of producing cholic acid, ursocholic acid, 12-keto-lithocholic acid (12-keto-LCA), 3-keto-DCA, 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA as major products from DCA. The last metabolite was found to be a new compound. The ability to catalyze the introduction of a hydroxyl group at the 7(α/β)-positions of the DCA molecule was shown for 32 strains with the highest 7β-hydroxylase activity level for Fusarium merismoides VKM F-2310. Curvularia lunata VKM F-644 exhibited 12α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and formed 12-keto-LCA from DCA. Acremonium rutilum VKM F-2853 and Neurospora crassa VKM F-875 produced 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA, respectively, as major products from DCA, as confirmed by MS and NMR analyses. For most of the positive strains, the described DCA-transforming activity was unreported to date. The presented results expand the knowledge on bile acid metabolism by filamentous fungi, and might be suitable for preparative-scale exploitation aimed at the production of marketed bile acids. PMID:26718089

  3. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  4. Studies on the catalyzed interconversions of vitamin A derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rando, R.R.; Chang, A.

    1983-05-04

    The kinetics of I/sub 2/-catalyzed isomerization of the retinal isomers were studied. The all-trans isomer formed 13-cis-retinal rapidly with a rate constant of 1.9 X 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/. The reverse reaction occurred with a rate constant of 4.5 X 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/. The 11-cis isomer was first converted to all-trans-retinal with a rate constant of 3.1 X 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, although the 13-cis isomer was also rapidly formed. The 9-cis isomer was isomerized to the 9-cis, 13-cis isomer before the other isomers were generated and the 13-cis isomer was converted to its all-trans congener prior to the formation of the other isomers. Similar results appear to occur when other methods of catalysis are used. This isomerization about the C/sub 13/-C/sub 14/ doubled bond appears to be a kinetically favored event, eliminating the possibility that 11-cis might be a kinetic product formed from the all-trans isomer. At equilibrium, only 0.1% of 11-cis-retinal is found. Equilibration of all-trans-retinol palmitate also generated very little of the 11-cis isomer (less than or equal to0.2%) 11-cis-retinol palmitate at equilibrium. The implications of these results for an 11-cis-retinal regeneration mechanism in the eye are discussed.

  5. Kinetics of phenolic polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase in organic media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.P.; Huang, G.L; Yu, Y.T.

    1995-07-05

    Phenolic polymerization was carried out by enzymatic catalysis in organic media, and its kinetics was studied by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phenols and aromatic amines with electron-withdrawing groups could hardly be polymerized by HRP catalysis, but phenols and aromatic amines with electron-donating groups could easily by polymerized. The reaction rate of either the para-substituted substrate or meta-substituted substrate was higher than that of ortho-substituted substrate. When ortho-position of hydroxy group of phenols was occupied by an electron-donating group and if another electron-donating group occupied para-position of hydroxy group, the reaction rate increased. Horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase could easily catalyze the polymerization, but chloroperoxidase and laccase failed to yield polymers. Metallic ions such as Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 3+}, and Cu{sup 2+} could poison horseradish peroxidase to various extents, but ions such as Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} were not found to inhibit the reaction.

  6. Polysilsesquioxanes through base-catalyzed redistribution of oligohydridosiloxanes

    SciTech Connect

    RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR; ASSINK,ROGER A.; LANG,DAVID P.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.

    2000-05-01

    Organopolysilsesquioxanes have recently gained much interest as materials for low-K dielectrics, ceramic precursors and photoresists. Typical sol-gel synthesis of polysilsesquioxanes involves the hydrolysis of organotricholorosilanes and/or organotrialkoxysilanes in the presence of acid or base catalysts and organic solvents. However, under sol-gel conditions most organotrialkoxysilanes do not afford silsesquioxane gels. This limits the range of organic functionalities that can be introduced into these hybrid organic-inorganic materials. An alternative route to polysilsesquioxanes is through oligohydridosiloxanes. Catalytic disproportionation, by titanium complexes, of linear or cyclic oligomers of methylhydridosiloxanes can lead to polymethylsilsesquioxanes. The authors have shown that disproportionation of oligomethylhydridosiloxanes can also be catalyzed by tetrabutylammonium hydroxide to yield polymethylsilsesquioxanes (scheme 1). This replaces the step-growth sol-gel polymerization process of organotrialkoxysilanes, which requires solvent, stoichiometric water and produces alcohol and water condensation by-products. Tetraalkylammonium hydroxides, as catalysts, are also attractive because they readily decompose by heating above 150 C; thus, they can be easily removed from the final materials. In this paper the authors report on both the catalytic and stoichiometric redistribution of organohydridosiloxanes to produce polysilsesquioxane foams and gels of the formula (RSiO{sub 1.5}){sub n} which otherwise cannot be obtained through traditional sol-gel means.

  7. Alkoxycarbonylation and amidation of aryl iodides catalyzed by palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumagin, N.A.; Gulevich, Yu.V.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1987-01-20

    The authors report their results concerning the carbonylation of aryl iodides in the presence of various types of metal alkoxides, such as Et/sub 3/SnOMe, Al(OPr)/sub 3/, Mg(OMe)/sub 2/, and NaOMe, as well as in the presence of a tin amide, Me/sub 3/SnNET/sub 2/. In order to determine the optimum conditions for the reaction process, they first investigated the effect of solvent and Pd catalyst on the alkoxycarbonylation of 4-NO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/I. The tin derivative Et/sub 3/SnOMe was used as the nucleophilic reagent. Reaction progress was followed by the disappearance of the starting material and also by the formation of the reaction product, 4-NO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/CO/sub 2/Me. Tin and sodium alkoxides, as well as tin amides, can be used as coreagents in the palladium complex-catalyzed carbonylation of aryl iodides. The use of such powerful nucleophiles as metal alkoxides and amides permits the carbonylation reactions to be carried out under milder conditions and at faster rates than those described in the literature. A mechanism for the alkoxycarbonylation and amidation of aryl halides has been proposed based on results obtained using stoichiometric reactions of palladium complexes.

  8. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of chemoenzymatic catalyzed monoepoxide biolubricant: optimization and physicochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Salimon, Jumat; Salih, Nadia; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2012-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12)-10(13)-monoepoxy 12(9)-octadecanoic acid (MEOA) was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14) and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC) (4.91%) of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL of H(2)O(2), 120 mg of Novozym 435, and 7 h of reaction time. In order to develop better-quality biolubricants, pour point (PP), flash point (FP), viscosity index (VI), and oxidative stability (OT) were determined for LA and MEOA. The results showed that MEOA exhibited good low-temperature behavior with PP of -41(°)C. FP of MEOA increased to 128(°)C comparing with 115(°)C of LA. In a similar fashion, VI for LA was 224 generally several hundred centistokes (cSt) more viscous than MEOA 130.8. The ability of a substance to resist oxidative degradation is another important property for biolubricants. Therefore, LA and MEOA were screened to measure their OT which was observed at 189 and 168(°)C, respectively. PMID:22346338

  10. Production of Chemoenzymatic Catalyzed Monoepoxide Biolubricant: Optimization and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Salimon, Jumat; Salih, Nadia; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2012-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12)-10(13)-monoepoxy 12(9)-octadecanoic acid (MEOA) was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14) and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC) (4.91%) of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL of H2O2, 120 mg of Novozym 435, and 7 h of reaction time. In order to develop better-quality biolubricants, pour point (PP), flash point (FP), viscosity index (VI), and oxidative stability (OT) were determined for LA and MEOA. The results showed that MEOA exhibited good low-temperature behavior with PP of −41°C. FP of MEOA increased to 128°C comparing with 115°C of LA. In a similar fashion, VI for LA was 224 generally several hundred centistokes (cSt) more viscous than MEOA 130.8. The ability of a substance to resist oxidative degradation is another important property for biolubricants. Therefore, LA and MEOA were screened to measure their OT which was observed at 189 and 168°C, respectively. PMID:22346338

  11. Predictive modeling of metal-catalyzed polyolefin processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Neeraj Prasad

    2003-10-01

    This dissertation describes the essential modeling components and techniques for building comprehensive polymer process models for metal-catalyzed polyolefin processes. The significance of this work is that it presents a comprehensive approach to polymer process modeling applied to large-scale commercial processes. Most researchers focus only on polymerization mechanisms and reaction kinetics, and neglect physical properties and phase equilibrium. Both physical properties and phase equilibrium play key roles in the accuracy and robustness of a model. This work presents the fundamental principles and practical guidelines used to develop and validate both steady-state and dynamic simulation models for two large-scale commercial processes involving the Ziegler-Natta polymerization to produce high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP). It also provides a model for the solution polymerization of ethylene using a metallocene catalyst. Existing modeling efforts do not include physical properties or phase equilibrium in their calculations. These omissions undermine the accuracy and predictive power of the models. The forward chapters of the dissertation discuss the fundamental concepts we consider in polymer process modeling. These include physical and thermodynamic properties, phase equilibrium, and polymerization kinetics. The later chapters provide the modeling applications described above.

  12. Recent trends in protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lombard, C; Saulnier, J; Wallach, J M

    2005-10-01

    Enzymatic peptide syntheses may be either thermodynamically- or kinetically-controlled. The former may be catalyzed by any proteases; the latter is limited to serine and cysteine proteases. This methodology is quite stereospecific and avoids side chain protection but is suffering of some drawbacks. Thus, only two industrial processes are by now developed: the production of aspartame and the conversion of porcine into human insulin. However, recent improvements have been carried out in different directions: 1-Search for proteases with high and/or new P'1 and P1 specificities. 2-Protease engineering to promote synthesis towards hydrolysis and to enlarge specificity. 3-Development of mimetic or "inverse" substrates to limit further hydrolysis of synthesized peptide. 4-Change of the physical state of reactants. Three axes have mainly be explored: solid-solid conversion, use of cross-linked enzyme crystals (CLEC) and enzyme immobilization. 5-Modification of experimental conditions. The principal and recent developments deal with: heterogeneous catalysis, synthesis in low water-containing organic solvents, in ionic liquids or at subzero temperatures. This review will illustrate these new orientations with examples described in the recent literature. PMID:16522174

  13. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  14. Ab initio study of ice catalyzation of HOCl + HCl reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.F.; Liu, C.B.

    2000-06-15

    The observations by Farman et al. revealed remarkable depletions in the total atmospheric ozone content in Antarctica. The observed total ozone decreased smoothing during the spring season from about 1975. Satellite observations have proved Antarctic ozone depletions over a very extended region, in general agreement with the local ground-based data of Farman et al. It was suggested that heterogeneous reactions occurring on particles in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a central role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Experiments proved that the reaction of HOCl + HCl was very slow in the gas phase, but on ice surface it was rapid. In this work the ice catalysis of HOCl + HCl reaction was investigated by using ab initio molecular orbital theory. The authors applied the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field and the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory with the basis sets of 6-31G* to the model system. The complexes and transition state were obtained along the reaction with and without the presence of ice surface. By comparing the results, a possible catalyzation mechanism of ice on the reaction is proposed.

  15. A Personal Adventure in Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, John David

    2010-03-01

    Luis Alvarez and colleagues discovered muon-catalyzed fusion of hydrogen isotopes by chance in late 1956. On sabbatical leave at Princeton University during that year, I read the first public announcement of the discovery at the end of December in that well-known scientific journal, The New York Times. A nuclear theorist by prior training, I was intrigued enough in the phenomenon to begin some calculations. I describe my work here, my interaction with Alvarez, and a summary of the surprising developments, both before and after Alvarez’s discovery. The rare proton-deuteron ( p-d) fusion events in Alvarez’s liquid-hydrogen bubble chamber occurred only because of the natural presence of a tiny amount of deuterium (heavy hydrogen). Additionally, the fusion rate, once the proton-deuteron-muon ( pdμ - ) molecular ion has been formed, is sufficiently slow that only rarely does an additional catalytic act occur. A far different situation occurs for muons stopping in pure deuterium or a deuterium-tritium ( d- t) mixture where the fusion rates are many orders of magnitude larger and the molecular-formation rates are large compared to the muon’s decay rate. The intricate interplay of atomic, molecular, and nuclear science, together with highly fortuitous accidents in the molecular dynamics and the hope of practical application, breathed life into a seeming curiosity. A small but vigorous worldwide community has explored these myriad phenomena in the past 50 years.

  16. Acid-Catalyzed Amine-Borane Reduction of Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevin E.; Kelly, Henry C.

    1996-12-01

    The rate of reduction of nitrite by trimethylamine-borane was followed by observing the decrease in nitrite absorbance under pseudo-first-order conditions. The reaction is acid-catalyzed and exhibits a first-order dependence on both amine-borane and total nitrite concentration. The molar equivalence of NaNO(2) to (CH(3))(3)NBH(3) = 2:1. Equimolar amounts of hydrogen and nitrous oxide are formed, and the molar ratio of nitrite reacted to N(2)O produced is 2:1. In concentrated HCl or H(2)SO(4), a correlation of rate with the Hammett acidity function, h(o), is observed. The reaction is subject to a pronounced inversesolvent isotope effect (k(D)()2(O)/k(H)()2(O) approximately 2.7) and a modest normal substrate effect (k((CH)()3())()3(N.BH)()3/k((CH)()3())()3(N.BD)()3 approximately 1.4). The reaction is first-order in H(3)O(+) in the region pH 0.7-2.7, but a second-order dependence is observed above pH 4 with the transition occurring at pH approximately pK(a) for HNO(2). Results are consistent with a mechanistic model involving preequilibration protonation of molecular nitrous acid followed by rate-limiting hydride attack on H(2)ONO(+) or free NO(+) to produce nitrosyl hydride as a reactive intermediate. PMID:11666911

  17. Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

  18. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Viggiano, Albert A; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A(+) + B(-) + e(-) → A + B + e(-). Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl(3)(-) and POCl(2)(-)) and one diatomic species (Br(2)(-)) each with two monatomic cations (Ar(+)and Kr(+)) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions (~1 × 10(-18) cm(6) s(-1) at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br(2)(-) [(5.5 ± 2) × 10(-19) cm(6) s(-1) at 300 K]. PMID:21766935

  19. Molecular mechanisms of cobalt-catalyzed hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Several cobalt complexes catalyze the evolution of hydrogen from acidic solutions, both homogeneously and at electrodes. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these transformations remain unresolved, largely owing to the fact that key reactive intermediates have eluded detection. One method of stabilizing reactive intermediates involves minimizing the overall reaction free-energy change. Here, we report a new cobalt(I) complex that reacts with tosylic acid to evolve hydrogen with a driving force of just 30 meV/Co. Protonation of CoI produces a transient CoIII-H complex that was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The CoIII-H intermediate decays by second-order kinetics with an inverse dependence on acid concentration. Analysis of the kinetics suggests that CoIII-H produces hydrogen by two competing pathways: a slower homolytic route involving two CoIII-H species and a dominant heterolytic channel in which a highly reactive CoII-H transient is generated by CoI reduction of CoIII-H. PMID:22949704

  20. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  1. Lipase catalyzed esterification of glycidol in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Martins, J F; Da Ponte, M N; Barreiros, S

    1993-08-01

    We studied the resolution of racemic glycidol through esterification with butyric acid catalyzed by porcine pancreatic lipase in organic media. A screening of seven solvents (log P values between 0.49 and 3.0, P being the n-octanol-water partition coefficient of the solvent) showed that neither log P nor the logarithm of the molar solubility of water in the solvent provides good correlations between enantioselectivity and the properties of the organic media. Chloroform was one of the best solvents as regards the enantiomeric purity (e. p.) of the ester produced. In this solvent, the optimum temperature for the reaction was determined to be 35 degrees C. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at a water content of 13 +/- 2% (w/w). The enantiomeric purity obtained was 83 +/- 2% of (S)-glycidyl butyrate and did not depend on the alcohol concentration or the enzyme water content for values of these parameters up to 200 mM and 25% (w/w), respectively. The reaction was found to follow a BiBi mechanism. PMID:18613050

  2. Electrophoresis-chemiluminescence detection of phenols catalyzed by hemin.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lu; Zhu, Jinkun; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2014-09-01

    Based on the catalytic activity of hemin, an efficient biocatalyst, an indirect capillary electrophoresis-chemiluminescence (CE-CL) detection method for phenols using a hemin-luminol-hydrogen peroxide system was developed. Through a series of static injection experiments, hemin was found to perform best in a neutral solution rather than an acidic or alkaline medium. Although halide ions such as Br(-) and F(-) could further enhance the CL signal catalyzed by hemin, it is difficult to apply these conditions to this CE-CL detection system because of the self-polymerization of hemin, as it hinders the CE process. The addition of concentrated ammonium hydroxide to an aqueous/dimethyl sulfoxide solution of hemin-luminol afforded a stable CE-CL baseline. The indirect CE-CL detection of five phenols using this method gave the following limits of detections: 4.8 × 10(-8) mol/L (o-sec-butylphenol), 4.9 × 10(-8) mol/L (o-cresol), 5.4 × 10(-8) mol/L (m-cresol), 5.3 × 10(-8) mol/L (2,4-dichlorophenol) and 7.1 × 10(-8) mol/L (phenol). PMID:24115262

  3. Iodine-catalyzed prins cyclization of homoallylic alcohols and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kachi R Kishore Kumar; Rosa, Iara M L; Doriguetto, Antnio C; Bastos, Erick L; Silva, Luiz F

    2013-01-01

    The iodine-catalyzed Prins cyclization of homoallylic alcohols and aldehydes was investigated under metal-free conditions and without additives. Anhydrous conditions and inert atmosphere are not required. The reaction of 2-(3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1-yl)propan-1-ol and 21 aldehydes (aliphatic and aromatic) in CH?Cl? in the presence of 5 mol % of iodine gave 1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[f]isochromenes in 54%-86% yield. Under similar conditions, the Prins cyclization of six alcohols containing an endocyclic double bond (primary, secondary, or tertiary) led to dihydropyrans in 52%-91% yield. The acyclic homoallylic alcohols gave 4-iodo-tetrahydropyran in 29%-41% yield in the presence of 50 mol % of iodine. This type of substrate is the main limitation of the methodology. The relative configuration of the products was assigned by NMR and X-ray analysis. The mechanism and the ratio of the products are discussed, based on DFT calculations. PMID:24025458

  4. Manganese peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative degradation of vanillylacetone.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sangpill; Lee, Chang-Ha; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Park, Kwangyong

    2008-06-01

    When 4-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-2-butanone (vanillylacetone) was tested for manganese peroxidase (MnP)-catalyzed oxidation, it was found to be degraded with the cleavage of an aromatic ring. Among numerous products of vanillylacetone oxidation, four major ones were purified by thin-layer chromatography and identified using mass spectroscopy (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Three of them maintained the aromatic ring structure and were identified as 4-[6,2'-dihydroxy-5,3'-dimethoxy-5'-(3-oxo-butyl)-biphenyl]-butan-2-one, 4-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-buten-2-one, and 4-[6,2'-dihydroxy-5,3'-dimethoxy-5'-(3-oxo-butyl)-biphenyl]-3-buten-2-one. Even though the fourth product could not be purified to a single compound, data from infrared spectroscopy showed that it did not have a benzene ring. From MS and NMR analysis, 3-(3-oxo-butyl)-hexa-2,4-dienedioic acid-1-methyl ester was tentatively suggested as the dominant species. The reaction mechanism was suggested on the basis of the structural information of these products. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on aromatic ring cleavage of the phenolic compound by MnP. PMID:18472135

  5. Ultrasound enhances lipase-catalyzed synthesis of poly (ethylene glutarate).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoman; Bansode, Sneha Ramrao; Ribeiro, Artur; Abreu, Ana S; Oliveira, César; Parpot, Pier; Gogate, P R; Rathod, V K; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-07-01

    The present work explores the best conditions for the enzymatic synthesis of poly (ethylene glutarate) for the first time. The start-up materials are the liquids; diethyl glutarate and ethylene glycol diacetate, without the need of addition of extra solvent. The reactions are catalyzed by lipase B from Candida antarctica immobilized on glycidyl methacrylate-ter-divinylbenzene-ter-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 40°C during 18h in water bath with mechanical stirring or 1h in ultrasonic bath followed by 6h in vacuum in both the cases for evaporation of ethyl acetate. The application of ultrasound significantly intensified the polyesterification reaction with reduction of the processing time from 24h to 7h. The same degree of polymerization was obtained for the same enzyme loading in less time of reaction when using the ultrasound treatment. The degree of polymerization for long-term polyesterification was improved approximately 8-fold due to the presence of sonication during the reaction. The highest degree of polymerization achieved was 31, with a monomer conversion of 96.77%. The ultrasound treatment demonstrated to be an effective green approach to intensify the polyesterification reaction with enhanced initial kinetics and high degree of polymerization. PMID:26964978

  6. Process Intensification in Base-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Tsouris, Costas; Jennings, Hal L

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is considered a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. Recent interest has resulted in biodiesel manufacture becoming more widely undertaken by commercial enterprises that are interested in minimizing the cost of feedstock materials and waste production, as well as maximizing the efficiency of production. Various means to accelerate batch processing have been investigated. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has experience in developing process intensification methods for nuclear separations, and this paper will discuss how technologies developed for very different applications have been modified for continuous reaction/separation of biodiesel. In collaboration with an industrial partner, this work addresses the aspect of base-catalyzed biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. In particular, we have found that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the transesterification process and have developed a continuous two-phase reactor for online production of a methyl ester and glycerol. Enhancing the mass transfer has additional benefits such as being able to use an alcohol-to-oil phase ratio closer to stoichiometric than in conventional processing, hence minimizing the amount of solvent that has to be recycled and reducing post-processing clean up costs. Various technical issues associated with the application of process intensification technology will be discussed, including scale-up from the laboratory to a pilot-scale undertaking.

  7. Palladium-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation of Enol Carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Xu, Jiayi; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed decarboxylative asymmetric allylic alkylation (DAAA) of allyl enol carbonates as a highly chemo-, regio- and enantio-selective process for the synthesis of ketones bearing either a quaternary or a tertiary α-stereogenic center has been investigated in detail. Chiral ligand L4 was found to be optimal in the DAAA of a broad scope of cyclic and acyclic ketones including simple aliphatic ketones with more than one enolizable proton. The allyl moiety of the carbonates has been extended to a variety of cyclic or acyclic di-substituted allyl groups. Our mechanistic studies reveal that, similar to the direct allylation of lithium enolates, the DAAA reaction proceeds through an “outer sphere” SN2 type of attack on the π-allylpalladium complex by the enolate. An important difference between the DAAA reaction and the direct allylation of lithium enolates is that in the DAAA reaction, the nucleophile and the electrophile were generated simultaneously. Since the π-allylpalladium cation must serve as the counterion for the enolate, the enolate probably exists as a tight-ion-pair. This largely prevents the common side reactions of enolates associated with the equilibrium between different enolates. The much milder reaction conditions as well as the much broader substrate scope also represent the advantages of the DAAA reaction over the direct allylation of preformed metal enolates. PMID:19928805

  8. Coalification by clay-catalyzed oligomerization of plant monomers. [Methylisoeugenol

    SciTech Connect

    Orchin, M.; Wilson, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    During this reporting period, we have obtained a model of montmorillonite clay, and this model has been of great assistance in visualizing how the chemistry of substrate molecules might be altered as it occurs on the surface of the clay. A stereochemical representation of this montmorillonite model is shown. In our previous report, we indicated that the dimerization of methylisoeugenol with the montmorillonite clay K-10 afforded a variety of indanes and indenes which were formed via acid-catalyzed processes. In addition, we have now observed a pair of naphthalene isomers. This observation lends strong support to the hypothesis that radical cation Diels-Alder dimerizations occur on the surface of the montmorillonite clay K-10. Furthermore, when the dimerization is conducted in homogeneous media, only two indanes are formed. However, when this same dimerization is conducted on the surface of K-10, six indanes are produced. Based upon these considerations, the distribution of indane isomers might indicate that dimerization is taking place both in the homogeneous medium surrounding the clay and on the surface of the clay. Samples of K-10 were pretreated with DBU, dicyclohexylamine, triphenylamine, and triton-B. The pretreatments completely inhibited indane formation. In addition, the partially neutralization of K-10 by the pretreatment with finely ground Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was attempted. This procedure did not alter the ratios of indanes products from those observed with the untreated K-10.

  9. Out of the fog: Catalyzing integrative capacity in interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Piso, Zachary; O'Rourke, Michael; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2016-04-01

    Social studies of interdisciplinary science investigate how scientific collaborations approach complex challenges that require multiple disciplinary perspectives. In order for collaborators to meet these complex challenges, interdisciplinary collaborations must develop and maintain integrative capacity, understood as the ability to anticipate and weigh tradeoffs in the employment of different disciplinary approaches. Here we provide an account of how one group of interdisciplinary fog scientists intentionally catalyzed integrative capacity. Through conversation, collaborators negotiated their commitments regarding the ontology of fog systems and the methodologies appropriate to studying fog systems, thereby enhancing capabilities which we take to constitute integrative capacity. On the ontological front, collaborators negotiated their commitments by setting boundaries to and within the system, layering different subsystems, focusing on key intersections of these subsystems, and agreeing on goals that would direct further investigation. On the methodological front, collaborators sequenced various methods, anchored methods at different scales, validated one method with another, standardized the outputs of related methods, and coordinated methods to fit a common model. By observing the process and form of collaborator conversations, this case study demonstrates that social studies of science can bring into critical focus how interdisciplinary collaborators work toward an integrated conceptualization of study systems. PMID:27083087

  10. MEMS-Based Satellite Micropropulsion Via Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Thomas, Michael A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques offer great potential in satisfying the mission requirements for the next generation of "micro-scale" satellites being designed by NASA and Department of Defense agencies. More commonly referred to as "nanosats", these miniature satellites feature masses in the range of 10-100 kg and therefore have unique propulsion requirements. The propulsion systems must be capable of providing extremely low levels of thrust and impulse while also satisfying stringent demands on size, mass, power consumption and cost. We begin with an overview of micropropulsion requirements and some current MEMS-based strategies being developed to meet these needs. The remainder of the article focuses the progress being made at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center towards the development of a prototype monopropellant MEMS thruster which uses the catalyzed chemical decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide as a propulsion mechanism. The products of decomposition are delivered to a micro-scale converging/diverging supersonic nozzle which produces the thrust vector; the targeted thrust level approximately 500 N with a specific impulse of 140-180 seconds. Macro-scale hydrogen peroxide thrusters have been used for satellite propulsion for decades; however, the implementation of traditional thruster designs on a MEMS scale has uncovered new challenges in fabrication, materials compatibility, and combustion and hydrodynamic modeling. A summary of the achievements of the project to date is given, as is a discussion of remaining challenges and future prospects.

  11. Metabolism of Monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney; Hooper, Caroline Lee

    1978-01-01

    The essential oil from mature leaves of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) contains up to 15% (—)-menthyl acetate, and leaf discs converted exogenous (—)-[G-3H]menthol into this ester in approximately 15% yield of the incorporated precursor. Leaf extracts catalyzed the acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation of (—)-[G-3H]menthol and the product of this transacetylase reaction was identified by radiochromatographic techniques. Transacetylase activity was located mainly in the 100,000g supernatant fraction, and the preparation was partially purified by combination of Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and chromatography on O-diethylaminoethyl-cellulose. The transacetylase had a molecular weight of about 37,000 as judged by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, and a pH optimum near 9. The apparent Km and velocity for (—)-menthol were 0.3 mm and 16 nmol/hr· mg of protein, respectively. The saturation curve for acetyl coenzyme A was sigmoidal, showing apparent saturation near 0.1 mm. Dithioerythritol was required for maximum activity and stability of the enzyme, and the enzyme was inhibited by thiol directed reagents such as p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Diisopropylfluorophosphate also inhibited transacylation suggesting the involvement of a serine residue in catalysis. The transacylase was highly specific for acetyl coenzyme A; propionyl coenzyme A and butyryl coenzyme A were not nearly as efficient as acyl donors (11% and 2%, respectively). However, the enzyme was much less selective with regard to the alcohol substrate, suggesting that the nature of the acetate ester synthesized in mint is more dependent on the type of alcohol available than on the specificity of the transacetylase. This is the first report on an enzyme involved in monoterpenol acetylation in plants. A very similar enzyme, catalyzing this key reaction in the metabolism of menthol, was also isolated from the flowers of peppermint. PMID:16660375

  12. Silver-catalyzed PuO sub 2 dissolution with persulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, F D; Barney, G S; Cooper, T D; Duchsherer, M J

    1991-06-01

    This report consists of 14 slides and associated narrative for a presentation to be given at the 15th Annual Actinide Separations Conference on silver-catalyzed PuO{sub 2} dissolution with persulfate. (JL)

  13. 53. VIEW LOOKING S.E. AT THE CATALYZER BUILDINGS, COOLING SHEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW LOOKING S.E. AT THE CATALYZER BUILDINGS, COOLING SHEDS AND ABSORPTION BUILDINGS IN THE BACKGROUND. MAY 29, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  14. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylation reaction of aryl bromides with 2-hydroxyacetophenones to form flavones.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Flavone of the month: a general and efficient method for the palladium-catalyzed carbonylative synthesis of flavones has been developed. Starting from aryl bromides and 2-hydroxyacetophenones, the corresponding flavones have been isolated in good yields. PMID:22927053

  15. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS II

    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  16. Highly enantioselective [4 + 2] cyclization of chloroaldehydes and 1-azadienes catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Jian, Teng-Yue; Sun, Li-Hui; Ye, Song

    2012-11-14

    Highly functionalized dihydropyridinones were synthesized via the N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed enantioselective [4 + 2] annulation of α-chloroaldehydes and azadienes. Hydrogenation of the resulted dihydropyridinones afforded the corresponding piperidinones with high enantiopurity. PMID:23023792

  17. Copper-catalyzed aerobic synthesis of 2-arylpyridines from acetophenones and 1,3-diaminopropane.

    PubMed

    Xi, Long-Yi; Zhang, Ruo-Yi; Liang, Shuai; Chen, Shan-Yong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-10-17

    A copper-catalyzed reaction providing direct access to 2-arylpyridines from acetophenones and 1,3-diaminopropane is described. A range of electronically diverse acetophenones undergo this transformation, affording 2-arylpyridines in good yields. PMID:25285847

  18. Copper-catalyzed allylation of α,α-difluoro-substituted organozinc reagents.

    PubMed

    Zemtsov, Artem A; Kondratyev, Nikolay S; Levin, Vitalij V; Struchkova, Marina I; Dilman, Alexander D

    2014-01-17

    A method for the coupling of organozinc reagents, difluorocarbene, and allylic electrophiles is described. The reaction involves insertion of difluorocarbene into the carbon-zinc bond followed by copper-catalyzed allylic substitution. PMID:24432717

  19. Palladium catalyzed cyclizations of oxime esters with 1,2-disubstituted alkenes: synthesis of dihydropyrroles.

    PubMed

    Race, Nicholas J; Bower, John F

    2013-09-01

    Pd-catalyzed cyclizations of oxime esters with 1,2-dialkylated alkenes provide an entry to chiral dihydropyrroles. Substrate and catalyst controlled strategies for selective product formation (vs alternative pyrroles) are outlined. PMID:23981032

  20. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  1. Exploiting the Pd- and Ru-Catalyzed Cycloisomerizations: Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)-Allocyathin B2

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Dong, Li; Schroeder, Gretchen M.

    2008-01-01

    Pd and Ru catalyzed cycloisomerizations of 1,6-enynes are compared and contrasted. Such considerations led to the enantioselective synthesis of a cyathin terpenoid, (+)-allocyathin B2 (1). The synthesis features a Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation (AAA) to install the initial quaternary center, a Ru-catalyzed diastereoselective cycloisomerization to construct the six-membered ring, and a diastereoselective hydroxylative Knoevenagel reaction to introduce the final hydroxyl group. We demonstrate for the first time a mechanism-based stereochemical divergence in Pd- and Ru-catalyzed cycloisomerization reactions as well as in creation of alkene geometry with alkynes bearing a carboalkoxy group. Mechanistic rationalization is proposed for these observations. PMID:16028937

  2. A Photoinduced Cobalt-Catalyzed Synthesis of Pyrroles through in Situ-Generated Acylazirines.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Stefan; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Opatz, Till

    2016-05-20

    Tetrasubstituted pyrroles can be synthesized in a one-pot procedure from isoxazoles. The process includes the photoinduced in situ formation of acylazirines combined with a subsequent cobalt(II)-catalyzed ring expansion with 1,3-diketones. PMID:27081704

  3. Pd-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization on the Indole and Pyrrole Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Elizabeth M.; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    This review details recent developments in the Pd-catalyzed C-H bond arylation and alkenylation of indoles and pyrroles, aromatic heterocycles that are frequently displayed in natural products and medicinal agents.

  4. Gold-catalyzed reactions of 2-alkynyl-phenylamines with alpha,beta-enones.

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, Maria; Arcadi, Antonio; Aschi, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Gabriele; Marinelli, Fabio

    2005-03-18

    [reaction: see text] The gold-catalyzed reaction of 2-alkynyl-phenylamines with alpha,beta-enones represents a new general one-pot entry into C-3-alkyl-indoles by sequential reactions. Gold-catalyzed sequential cyclization/alkylation, N-alkylation/cyclization, or N-alkylation/cyclization/alkylation reactions leading to different indoles can be directed by changing the 2-alkynyl-phenylamine 1/alpha,beta-enone 3 ratio and the reaction temperature. Unusual gold-catalyzed rearrangement reaction of indoles are observed at 140 degrees C. New gold-catalyzed formation of propargyl-alkyl ether under mild conditions and the hydration reaction of N-acetyl-2-ethynyl-phenylamine are reported. PMID:15760214

  5. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroamination of Allenes with Ureas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Lee, Seong Du; Widenhoefer, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Enantioselective intramolecular hydroamination of N-allenyl ureas catalyzed by an enantiomerically enriched bis(gold) phosphine complex forms pyrrolidine derivatives in good yield with up to 93% ee. PMID:21909160

  6. OXIDATIVE 4-DECHLORINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED PHENOLS IS CATALYZED BY EXTRACELLULAR FUNGAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extracellular lignin peroxidases (ligninases) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium catalyzed H2O2-dependent spectral changes in several environmentally significant polychlorinated phenols: 2,4-dichloro-,2,4,5-trichloro-, and pentachlorophenol. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry s...

  7. Phosphine-free palladium-catalyzed direct bisarylation of pyrroles with aryl iodides on water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Beom Shin; Bae, Hyun Jung; Chung, Young Keun

    2015-05-15

    The Pd-catalyzed bisarylation of pyrroles with aryl iodides on water is described. The reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions, i.e., relatively low temperature (40 °C) and phosphine-free. PMID:25919427

  8. Triazole-assisted ruthenium-catalyzed C-H arylation of aromatic amides.

    PubMed

    Al Mamari, Hamad H; Diers, Emelyne; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-07-28

    Site-selective ruthenium(II)-catalyzed direct arylation of amides was achieved through C?H cleavages with modular auxiliaries, derived from easily accessible 1,2,3-triazoles. The triazolyldimethylmethyl (TAM) bidentate directing group was prepared in a highly modular fashion through copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and allowed for ruthenium-catalyzed C?H arylations on arenes and heteroarenes, as well as alkenes, by using easy-to-handle aryl bromides as the arylating reagents. The triazole-assisted C?H activation strategy was found to be widely applicable, to occur under mild reaction conditions, and the catalytic system was tolerant of important electrophilic functionalities. Notably, the flexible triazole-based auxiliary proved to be a more potent directing group for the optimized ruthenium(II)-catalyzed direct arylations, compared with pyridyl-substituted amides or substrates derived from 8-aminoquinoline. PMID:24957002

  9. Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Amino Phosphonates via Pd-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhong; Wu, Bo; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Mu-Wang; Zhou, Yong-Gui

    2016-02-19

    A highly enantioselective palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of a series of linear and cyclic α-iminophosphonates has been achieved, providing efficient access to optically active α-aminophosphonates with up to 99% ee. PMID:26827611

  10. Synergistic Catalysis: Pd(II) Catalyzed Oxidation of 1,4-Dihydroquinones in the Pd(II) Catalyzed 1,4-Oxidation of Cyclic 1,3-Dienes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Schmidt, Michael A; Eastgate, Martin D

    2016-04-15

    Palladium(II) carboxylate salts have been shown to catalyze the oxidation of various hydroquinones to benzoquinones in the presence of t-BuOOH. This new catalytic system has been integrated into the oxidative 1,4-functionalization of cyclic 1,3-dienes where the palladium plays a remarkable dual role, catalyzing both the diene oxidation itself and the regeneration of the active quinone oxidant, which is required for diene functionalization. These new conditions offer considerable increases in reaction rate over prior art and allow a significant decrease in the equivalents of the nucleophilic carboxylate required for full conversion. PMID:26925844

  11. Triazole-Directed Pd-Catalyzed C(sp(2))-H Oxygenation of Arenes and Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Irastorza, Aitziber; Aizpurua, Jesús M; Correa, Arkaitz

    2016-03-01

    Selective Pd-catalyzed C(sp(2))-H oxygenation of 4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles is described. Unlike previous metal-catalyzed C-H functionalization events, which preferentially occur at the activated heterocyclic C-H bond, the regioselective oxygenation of the arene/alkene moiety is now achieved featuring the unconventional role of a simple triazole scaffold as a modular and selective directing group. PMID:26910636

  12. Synthesis of ortho-acylphenols through the palladium-catalyzed ketone-directed hydroxylation of arenes.

    PubMed

    Mo, Fanyang; Trzepkowski, Louis J; Dong, Guangbin

    2012-12-21

    Ketone in charge: a formal ketone-directed palladium-catalyzed ortho-hydroxylation of arenes has been developed as an effective approach to access o-acylphenols from simple arylketones. A Pd-catalyzed oxidative ortho-carbonylation reaction using ketone directing groups to access a ketal-lactone motif is also demonstrated. The ubiquity and versatile nature of ketones make these methods attractive. BTI=PhI(TFA)(2); DCE=1,2-dichloroethane. PMID:23161515

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Dearomative Cyclocarbonylation by C-N Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Guoying; Huang, Hanmin

    2015-09-01

    A fundamentally novel approach to bioactive quinolizinones is based on the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular cyclocarbonylation of allylamines. [Pd(Xantphos)I2 ], which features a very large bite angle, has been found to facilitate the rapid carbonylation of azaarene-substituted allylamines into bioactive quinolizinones in good to excellent yields. This transformation represents the first dearomative carbonylation and is proposed to proceed by palladium-catalyzed CN bond activation, dearomatization, CO insertion, and a Heck reaction. PMID:26200664

  14. Copper-Catalyzed (2+1) Annulation of Acetophenones with Maleimides: Direct Synthesis of Cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Srimanta; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2015-12-01

    A practical copper-catalyzed direct oxidative cyclopropanation of electron-deficient alkenes with acetophenone derivatives is reported. The dehydrogenative annulation involves a double C-H bond functionalization at the α-position of the ketone using di-tert-butyl peroxide as oxidant. The broad scope of the reaction and excellent functional-group tolerance is demonstrated for the stereoselective synthesis of fused cyclopropanes. The developed transformation revealed an unprecedented reactivity for copper-catalyzed processes. PMID:26094848

  15. Thiolated uridine substrates and templates improve the rate and fidelity of ribozyme-catalyzed RNA copying.

    PubMed

    Prywes, Noam; Michaels, Yale S; Pal, Ayan; Oh, Seung Soo; Szostak, Jack W

    2016-05-01

    Ribozyme-catalyzed RNA polymerization is inefficient and error prone. Here we demonstrate that two alternative bases, 2-thio-uridine (s(2)U) and 2-thio-ribo-thymidine (s(2)T), improve the rate and fidelity of ribozyme catalyzed nucleotide addition as NTP substrates and as template bases. We also demonstrate the functionality of s(2)U and s(2)T-containing ribozymes. PMID:27109314

  16. An electrochemical nickel-catalyzed arylation of 3-amino-6-chloropyridazines.

    PubMed

    Sengmany, Stéphane; Vitu-Thiebaud, Arnaud; Le Gall, Erwan; Condon, Sylvie; Léonel, Eric; Thobie-Gautier, Christine; Pipelier, Muriel; Lebreton, Jacques; Dubreuil, Didier

    2013-01-18

    3-Amino-6-aryl- and 3-amino-6-heteroarylpyridazines have been obtained in generally good yield using a nickel-catalyzed electrochemical cross-coupling between 3-amino-6-chloropyridazines and aryl or heteroaryl halides at room temperature. Comparative experiments involving classical palladium-catalyzed reactions, such as Suzuki, Stille, or Negishi cross-couplings, reveal that the electrochemical method can constitute a reliable alternative tool for biaryl formation. A possible reaction mechanism is proposed on the basis of electrochemical analyses. PMID:23241172

  17. A concise synthetic approach to brazilin via Pd-catalyzed allylic arylation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon

    2015-04-14

    A short synthetic route to the trimethyl ether of brazilin was developed in 6 steps from 7-methoxychromene with 78% overall yield. Regioselective installation of a formyl group onto 7-methoxychromene followed by reduction and acetylation afforded allylic acetate. Palladium-catalyzed allylic coupling of allylic acetate with arylboronic acid provided direct access to 3-benzylchromene which was converted to the target molecule upon ensuing dihydroxylation and acid-catalyzed cyclization in a highly concise manner. PMID:25767080

  18. The Biginelli Reaction Is a Urea-Catalyzed Organocatalytic Multicomponent Reaction.

    PubMed

    Puripat, Maneeporn; Ramozzi, Romain; Hatanaka, Miho; Parasuk, Waraporn; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-17

    The recently developed artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method was applied to search systematically all possible multicomponent pathways for the Biginelli reaction mechanism. The most favorable pathway starts with the condensation of the urea and benzaldehyde, followed by the addition of ethyl acetoacetate. Remarkably, a second urea molecule catalyzes nearly every step of the reaction. Thus, the Biginelli reaction is a urea-catalyzed multicomponent reaction. The reaction mechanism was found to be identical in both protic and aprotic solvents. PMID:26066623

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  20. Cobalt-Catalyzed Carbonylative Cyclization of Pyridinyl Diazoacetates for the Synthesis of Pyridoisoquinolinones.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yonghyeon; Kim, Sunghwa; Jeon, Bongkeun; Lee, Phil Ho

    2016-01-01

    Dicobalt octacarbonyl-catalyzed carbonylative cyclization of pyridinyl diazoacetates is developed for the synthesis of pyridoisoquinolinones under mild conditions (room temperature) in a carbon monoxide atmosphere. Moreover, a synthetic method for various pyridoisoquinolinones from ethylpyridinyl aryl acetates is demonstrated through diazotization using TsN3 and DBU followed by Co-catalyzed carbonylation to generate ketene intermediates, which can subsequently undergo intramolecular cyclization under mild conditions in a carbon monoxide atmosphere in a semi-one-pot fashion. PMID:26653102

  1. Transition-metal-catalyzed facile access to 3,11-dialkylfulminenes for transistor applications.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Maekawa, Hiroyuki; Hamao, Shino; Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Roy, David; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2015-02-01

    Novel [6]phenacenes (fulminenes) with two long alkyl chains at the axis positions were synthesized. This short synthesis comprises the following three steps: (1) ruthenium-catalyzed direct C-H bond arylation; (2) conversion of directing groups by Wittig reaction; and (3) bismuth- or gold-catalyzed cyclization of vinyl ether. Organic field-effect transistor devices fabricated with a thin film of 3,11-di(tetradecyl)fulminene exhibited typical p-channel normally-off properties. PMID:25633847

  2. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Addition/Cyclization of Activated Alkenes with Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Su-Li; Chen, Chao; Wang, Haijun; Liang, Yong-Min

    2016-02-01

    A silver-catalyzed decarboxylative addition/aryl migration/desulfonylation of N-phenyl-N-(phenylsulfonyl)methacrylamide with primary, secondary, and tertiary carboxylic acids was described. The protocol provides an efficient approach for the synthesis of α-all-carbon quaternary stereocenters amides and isoquinolinediones. It was proposed that the radical generated from the silver-catalyzed decarboxylation was involved in the sequence reaction. PMID:26760053

  3. Copper-catalyzed oxidative homo- and cross-coupling of Grignard reagents using diaziridinone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingguang; Xiong, Tao; Han, Wenyong; Shi, Yian

    2014-12-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions are among the most powerful synthetic transformations. This paper describes an efficient copper-catalyzed homo- and cross-coupling of Grignard reagents with di-tert-butyldiaziridinone as oxidant under mild conditions, giving the coupling products in good to excellent yields. The reaction process has a broad substrate scope and is also effective for the C(sp)-C(sp(3)) coupling. PMID:25420218

  4. Fronts and pulses in an enzymatic reaction catalyzed by glucose oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Míguez, David G.; Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2007-01-01

    Waves and patterns in living systems are often driven by biochemical reactions with enzymes as catalysts and regulators. We present a reaction–diffusion system catalyzed by the enzyme glucose oxidase that exhibits traveling wave patterns in a spatially extended medium. Fronts and pulses propagate as a result of the coupling between the enzyme-catalyzed autocatalytic production and diffusion of hydrogen ions. A mathematical model qualitatively explains the experimental observations. PMID:17420460

  5. Kinetics of catalyzed sodium borohydride hydrolysis and fuel cell applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Joshua C.

    Metal boride catalysts have been developed through reduction of (Ni, Co, and Ru) metal salts with sodium borohydride solutions. The resulting metal borides were determined to be Ni3B, Co3B, and elemental Ru by use of XRD analysis. SEM images give the particle size of the catalyst to be in the range or 65-150nm. Optimum heat treatment for the samples was determined to be 150°C for Ni3B, 200°C for Co3B, and 400°C for Ru. Ruthenium catalysts were found to have the greatest catalytic activity followed by cobalt boride and nickel boride. Hydrolysis testing with nickel boride catalysts has shown that the maximum hydrolysis rate as a function of sodium borohydride occurs at 5-10 wt% NaBH 4 when considered in solution with 5 wt% NaOH. The hydrolysis rate increases for the nickel boride catalyst with increasing NaOH concentration. Tests were performed at elevated pressures and showed that reaction rate could be controlled and even stopped with sufficient hydrogen pressures on the order of 10 MPa. Decreases in system pressure cause the reaction rate to increase, which tends to maintain the system at the equilibrium pressure. Thus, a high pressure hydrogen generator is considered. 210mg of Co3B catalyst in a 30 wt% solution of sodium borohydride can produce 30kW of hydrogen electrical power equivalent if utilized within a fuel cell operating at 40% efficiency. A semi-empirical isotherm model has been developed to accurately calculate the reaction rate for a Co3B catalyzed reaction as a function of temperature (35-80°C) and pressure (0.1-10MPa).

  6. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Amidozirconium-Catalyzed Carbonyl Hydroboration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Wang, Zhuoran; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas; Kandel, Kapil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-11-04

    The hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones using a silica-supported zirconium catalyst is reported. Reaction of Zr(NMe2)4 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) provides the catalytic material Zr(NMe2)n@MSN. Exhaustive characterization of Zr(NMe2)n@MSN with solid-state (SS)NMR and infrared spectroscopy, as well as through reactivity studies, suggests its surface structure is primarily ≡SiOZr(NMe2)3. The presence of these nitrogen-containing zirconium sites is supported by 15N NMR spectroscopy, including natural abundance 15N NMR measurements using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) SSNMR. The Zr(NMe2)n@MSN material reacts with pinacolborane (HBpin) to provide Me2NBpin and the material ZrH/Bpin@MSN that is composed of interacting surface-bonded zirconium hydride and surface-bonded borane ≡SiOBpinmore » moieties in an approximately 1:1 ratio, as well as zirconium sites coordinated by dimethylamine. The ZrH/Bpin@MSN is characterized by 1H/2H and 11B SSNMR and infrared spectroscopy and through its reactivity with D2. The zirconium hydride material or the zirconium amide precursor Zr(NMe2)n@MSN catalyzes the selective hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones with HBpin in the presence of functional groups that are often reduced under hydroboration conditions or are sensitive to metal hydrides, including olefins, alkynes, nitro groups, halides, and ethers. Remarkably, this catalytic material may be recycled without loss of activity at least eight times, and air-exposed materials are catalytically active. These supported zirconium centers are robust catalytic sites for carbonyl reduction and that surface-supported, catalytically reactive zirconium hydride may be generated from zirconium-amide or zirconium alkoxide sites.« less

  7. Mechanism of base-catalyzed Schiff base deprotonation in halorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, J.K.

    1986-10-21

    It has been shown earlier that the deprotonation of the Schiff base of illuminated halorhodopsin proceeds with a much lower pK/sub a/ than that of the unilluminated pigment and the reversible protonation change is catalyzed by azide and cyanate. The authors have studied the kinetics of the proton-transfer events with flash spectroscopy and compared a variety of anionic bases with different pK/sub a/ with regard to the apparent binding constants and the catalytic activities. The results suggest a general base catalysis mechanism in which the anionic bases bind with apparently low affinity to halorhodopsin, although with some degree of size- and/or shape-dependent specificity. The locus of the catalysis is accessible from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not at site I, where various anions bind and shift the pK/sub a/ of the deprotonation. Neither is it at site II, where a few specific anions (like chloride) bind to the all-trans pigment. It may be concluded that while the all-trans pigment loses its Schiff base proton very rapidly at its pK/sub a/, there is a kinetic barrier to this deprotonation in the 13-cis photointermediate that can be partially overcome by the reversible protonation of an extrinsic anionic base, which shuttles protons between the interior of the protein and the aqueous medium. The need for an extrinsic proton acceptor for efficient deprotonation of the Schiff base of halorhodopsin is one of the main differences between this pigment and the analogous retinal protein, bacteriorhodopsin.

  8. Copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrani, Abeer Ahmed

    The click reaction concept, introduced in 2001, has since spurred the rapid development and reexamination of efficient, high yield reactions which proceed rapidly under mild conditions. Prior to the discovery of facile copper catalysis in 2002, the thermally activated azide-alkyne or Huisgen cycloaddition reaction was largely ignored following its discovery in large part due to its slow kinetics, requirement for elevated temperature and limited selectivity. Now, arguably, the most prolific and capable of the click reactions, the copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is extremely efficient and affords exquisite control of the reaction. The orthogonally and chemoselectivity of this reaction enable its wide utility across varied scientific fields. Despite numerous inherent advantages and widespread use for small molecule synthesis and solution-based polymer chemistry, it has only recently and rarely been utilized to form polymer networks. This work focuses on the synthesis, mechanisms, and unique attributes of the CuAAC reaction for the fabrication of functional polymer networks. The photo-reduction of a series of copper(II)/amine complexes via ligand metal charge transfer was examined to determine their relative efficiency and selectivity in catalyzing the CuAAC reaction. The aliphatic amine ligands were used as an electron transfer species to reduce Cu(II) upon irradiation with 365 nm light while also functioning as an accelerating agent and as protecting ligands for the Cu(I) that was formed. Among the aliphatic amines studied, tertiary amines such as triethylamine (TEA), tetramethyldiamine (TMDA), N,N,N',N",N"-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDTA), and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTETA) were found to be the most effective. The reaction kinetics were accelerated by increasing the PMDETA : Cu(II) ratio with a ratio of ligand to Cu(II) of 4:1 yielding the maximum conversion in the shortest time. The sequential and orthogonal nature of the photo-CuAAC reaction and a chain-growth acrylate homopolymerization were demonstrated and used to form branched polymer structures. A bulk, organic soluble initiation system consisting of a Cu(II) salt and a primary amine was also examined in both model reactions and in bulk polymerizations. The system was shown to be highly efficient, leading to nearly complete CuAAC polymerization at ambient temperature. Increasing the ratio of amine to copper from 1 to 4 increases the CuAAC reaction rate significantly from 4 mM/min for 1:1 ratio of Cu(II):hexyalmine to 14mM/min for 1:4 ratio. The concentration dependence of the amine on the reaction rate enables the polymerization rate to be controlled simply by manipulating the hexylamine concentration. Sequential thiol--acrylate and photo-CuAAC click reactions were utilized to form two-stage reactive polymer networks capable of generating wrinkles in a facile manner. The click thiol-Michael addition reaction was utilized to form a cross-linked polymer with residual, reactive alkyne sites that remained tethered throughout the network. The latent, unreacted alkyne sites are subsequently reacted with diazide monomers via a photoinduced Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction to increase the cross-link density. Increased cross-linking raised the modulus and glass transition temperature from 1.6 MPa and 2 °C after the thiol-acrylate reaction to 4.4 MPa and 22 °C after the CuAAC reaction, respectively. The double click reaction approach led to micro-wrinkles with well-controlled wavelength and amplitude of 8.50 +/- 1.6 and 1.4 μm, respectively, for a polymer with a 1280 μm total film thickness. Additionally, this approach further enables spatial selectivity of wrinkle formation by photo-patterning. The CuAAC-based polymerization was also used to design smart, responsive porous materials from well-defined CuAAC networks, which possesses a high glass transition temperature (Tg= 115°C) due to the formation of the triazole linkages. The toughness, recovery, fixity, and shape memory attributes of this material were examined. The unique recovery behavior of the porous CuAAC material is characterized by its ability to recover plastic deformation upon heating. The tough and stiff nature of the glassy CuAAC polymer networks translates into desirable high compressive strain shape memory foams. The CuAAC foam exhibited excellent shape-memory behavior and was able to recover through each of five successive cycles of 80% compression at ambient temperature, presenting a significant volume change and resistance to fracture. In addition, the glassy CuAAC foam was able to withstand more than 10 cycles of compression to 50% strain and subsequent recovery at ambient temperature, indicative of ductile behavior in the glassy state.

  9. Growth and characterization of gold catalyzed SiGe nanowires and alternative metal-catalyzed Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Potié, Alexis; Baron, Thierry; Dhalluin, Florian; Rosaz, Guillaume; Salem, Bassem; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Kogelschatz, Martin; Gentile, Pascal; Oehler, Fabrice; Montès, Laurent; Kreisel, Jens; Roussel, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The growth of semiconductor (SC) nanowires (NW) by CVD using Au-catalyzed VLS process has been widely studied over the past few years. Among others SC, it is possible to grow pure Si or SiGe NW thanks to these techniques. Nevertheless, Au could deteriorate the electric properties of SC and the use of other metal catalysts will be mandatory if NW are to be designed for innovating electronic. First, this article's focus will be on SiGe NW's growth using Au catalyst. The authors managed to grow SiGe NW between 350 and 400°C. Ge concentration (x) in Si1-xGex NW has been successfully varied by modifying the gas flow ratio: R = GeH4/(SiH4 + GeH4). Characterization (by Raman spectroscopy and XRD) revealed concentrations varying from 0.2 to 0.46 on NW grown at 375°C, with R varying from 0.05 to 0.15. Second, the results of Si NW growths by CVD using alternatives catalysts such as platinum-, palladium- and nickel-silicides are presented. This study, carried out on a LPCVD furnace, aimed at defining Si NW growth conditions when using such catalysts. Since the growth temperatures investigated are lower than the eutectic temperatures of these Si-metal alloys, VSS growth is expected and observed. Different temperatures and HCl flow rates have been tested with the aim of minimizing 2D growth which induces an important tapering of the NW. Finally, mechanical characterization of single NW has been carried out using an AFM method developed at the LTM. It consists in measuring the deflection of an AFM tip while performing approach-retract curves at various positions along the length of a cantilevered NW. This approach allows the measurement of as-grown single NW's Young modulus and spring constant, and alleviates uncertainties inherent in single point measurement. PMID:21711709

  10. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Amidozirconium-Catalyzed Carbonyl Hydroboration

    SciTech Connect

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Wang, Zhuoran; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas; Kandel, Kapil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-11-04

    The hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones using a silica-supported zirconium catalyst is reported. Reaction of Zr(NMe2)4 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) provides the catalytic material Zr(NMe2)n@MSN. Exhaustive characterization of Zr(NMe2)n@MSN with solid-state (SS)NMR and infrared spectroscopy, as well as through reactivity studies, suggests its surface structure is primarily ≡SiOZr(NMe2)3. The presence of these nitrogen-containing zirconium sites is supported by 15N NMR spectroscopy, including natural abundance 15N NMR measurements using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) SSNMR. The Zr(NMe2)n@MSN material reacts with pinacolborane (HBpin) to provide Me2NBpin and the material ZrH/Bpin@MSN that is composed of interacting surface-bonded zirconium hydride and surface-bonded borane ≡SiOBpin moieties in an approximately 1:1 ratio, as well as zirconium sites coordinated by dimethylamine. The ZrH/Bpin@MSN is characterized by 1H/2H and 11B SSNMR and infrared spectroscopy and through its reactivity with D2. The zirconium hydride material or the zirconium amide precursor Zr(NMe2)n@MSN catalyzes the selective hydroboration of aldehydes and ketones with HBpin in the presence of functional groups that are often reduced under hydroboration conditions or are sensitive to metal hydrides, including olefins, alkynes, nitro groups, halides, and ethers. Remarkably, this catalytic material may be recycled without loss of activity at least eight times, and air-exposed materials are catalytically active. These supported zirconium centers are robust catalytic sites for carbonyl reduction and that surface-supported, catalytically reactive zirconium hydride may be generated from zirconium-amide or zirconium alkoxide sites.

  11. Rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jing-Cherng; Nicholas, K.M.

    1992-06-17

    The complex [Rh(NBD)(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 3}]BF{sub 4} (2; NBD = norbornadiene) has been found to serve as a precatalyst for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to formic acid at moderate temperatures in THF solution, with turnover numbers of 10-60/day. Water accelerates formic acid production, whereas PMe{sub 2}Ph is an inhibitor. Kinetic studies show that the rate of formic acid appearance in first order each in [2], pH{sub 2}, and p{sub CO2} in the range 50-300 psi (following prehydrogenation). In situ high-pressure IR and NMR experiments reveal that the addition of H{sub 2} to [Rh(NBD)(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 3}]BF{sub 4} (2) produces rhodium dihydride complexes [H{sub 2}Rh(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 3}(S)]BF{sub 4}(4, 5; S = H{sub 2}O, THF) and [H{sub 2}Rh(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 4}]BF{sub 4} (3). IR and NMR studies of the reaction of 3-5 with CO{sub 2} indicate that 3 is unreactive toward CO{sub 2} but that 4 and 5 insert CO{sub 2} to give species 6 and 7, formulated as formato complexes [HRh(S)(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}-OCHO)]BF{sub 4}, respectively; complexes 6 and 7 are also detected under catalytic conditions by IR spectroscopy. Aquo dihydride complex 4 has been found to insert CO{sub 2} more rapidly than the THF complex 5. [H{sub 2}Rh(PMe{sub 2}Ph){sub 3}(S)]BF{sub 4} (4, 5) also catalyze the decomposition of formic acid to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Combined kinetic and spectroscopic results suggest that reductive elimination of formic acid from the intermediate formato complexes is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle. 30 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Contaminated Groundwater Remediation by Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate Oxidants System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Wang, Y.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    A binary oxidant system, catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O82-), was investigated for use in in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) applications. Trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,4-dioxane were used as target contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the catalytic efficiency between ferrous ion (Fe2+) and base (NaOH), oxidant decomposition rates, and contaminant degradation efficiency. For the base-catalyzed H2O2-S2O82- system, oxidant release was moderate and sustained over the entire test period of 96 hours. Conversely, the oxidants were depleted within 24 hours for the Fe2+-catalyzed system. Solution pH decreased slightly for the Fe2+-catalyzed system, whereas the pH increased for the base-catalyzed system. The rates of degradation for TCE and 1,4-dioxane are compared as a function of system conditions. The results of this study indicate that the binary H2O2-S2O82- oxidant system is effective for oxidation of the tested contaminants.

  13. Asymmetric oxidation of sulfides catalyzed by titanium and vanadium complexes in the synthesis of biologically active sulfoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volcho, Konstantin P.; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F.

    2009-05-01

    Published data on the asymmetric synthesis of chiral biologically active sulfoxides by oxidation of appropriate sulfides catalyzed by titanium and vanadium complexes are generalized. Bibliography — 87 references.

  14. Bulk Gold-Catalyzed Reactions of Isocyanides, Amines, and Amine N-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik; Angelici, Robert; Woo, Keith L.

    2012-01-26

    Bulk gold powder (5–50 μm particles) catalyzes the reactions of isocyanides with amines and amine N-oxides to produce ureas. The reaction of n-butyl isocyanide (nBu–N≡C) with di-n-propylamine and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide in acetonitrile, which was studied in the greatest detail, produced 3-butyl-1,1-dipropylurea (O═C(NHnBu)(NnPr2)) in 99% yield at 60 °C within 2 h. Sterically and electronically different isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides react successfully under these conditions. Detailed studies support a two-step mechanism that involves a gold-catalyzed reaction of adsorbed isocyanide with the amine N-oxide to form an isocyanate (RN═C═O), which rapidly reacts with the amine to give the urea product. These investigations show that bulk gold, despite its reputation for poor catalytic activity, is capable of catalyzing these reactions.

  15. Primary product of the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Kazunga, C.; Aitken, M.D.; Gold, A.

    1999-05-01

    Peroxidases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of various phenolic substrates by hydrogen peroxide. They are common enzymes in soil and are also available commercially, so that they have been proposed as agents of phenolic pollutant transformation both in the environment and in engineered systems. Previous research on the peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) has suggested that tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (chloranil) is the principal product and that a considerable fraction of the PCP added to reaction mixtures appears to be resistant to oxidation. In experiments employing alternative methods of product separation and analysis, the authors found that both of these observations are artifacts of extraction and analytical methods used in previous studies. The major product of the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol from pH 4--7 was 2,3,4,5,6-pentachloro-4-pentachlorophenoxy-2,5-cyclohexadienone (PPCHD), which is formed by the coupling of two pentachlorophenoxyl radicals.

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in cycloadditions, inspiration from the recent "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Shu, Xing-Zhong; Shu, Dongxu; Schienebeck, Casi M; Tang, Weiping

    2012-12-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters offers versatile entries to allene and vinyl carbene intermediates for various fascinating subsequent transformations. Most π-acidic metals (e.g. gold and platinum) are capable of facilitating these acyloxy migration events. However, very few of these processes involve redox chemistry, which are well-known for most other transition metals such as rhodium. The coupling of acyloxy migration of propargylic esters with oxidative addition, migratory insertion, and reductive elimination may lead to ample new opportunities for the design of new reactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent developments in Rh-catalyzed 1,3- and 1,2-acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in a number of cycloaddition reactions. Related Au- and Pt-catalyzed cycloadditions involving acyloxy migration are also discussed. PMID:22895533

  17. Carbon dioxide reduction to methane and coupling with acetylene to form propylene catalyzed by remodeled nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Moure, Vivian R.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2012-01-01

    A doubly substituted form of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (α-70Val→Ala, α-195His→Gln) has the capacity to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to yield methane (CH4). Under optimized conditions, 1 nmol of the substituted MoFe protein catalyzes the formation of 21 nmol of CH4 within 20 min. The catalytic rate depends on the partial pressure of CO2 (or concentration of HCO3−) and the electron flux through nitrogenase. The doubly substituted MoFe protein also has the capacity to catalyze the unprecedented formation of propylene (H2C = CH-CH3) through the reductive coupling of CO2 and acetylene (HC≡CH). In light of these observations, we suggest that an emerging understanding of the mechanistic features of nitrogenase could be relevant to the design of synthetic catalysts for CO2 sequestration and formation of olefins. PMID:23150564

  18. RNA as an RNA Polymerase: Net Elongation of an RNA Primer Catalyzed by the Tetrahymena Ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Michael D.; Cech, Thomas R.

    1988-03-01

    A catalytic RNA (ribozyme) derived from an intervening sequence (IVS) RNA of Tetrahymena thermophila will catalyze an RNA polymerization reaction in which pentacytidylic acid (C5) is extended by the successive addition of mononucleotides derived from a guanylyl-(3', 5')-nucleotide (GpN). Cytidines or uridines are added to C5 to generate chain lengths of 10 to 11 nucleotides, with longer products being generated at greatly reduced efficiency. The reaction is analogous to that catalyzed by a replicase with C5 acting as the primer, GpNs as the nucleoside triphosphates, and a sequence in the ribozyme providing a template. The demonstration that an RNA enzyme can catalyze net elongation of an RNA primer supports theories of prebiotic RNA self-replication.

  19. Continuous In Vitro Evolution of a Ribozyme that Catalyzes Three Successive Nucleotidyl Addition Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Wright, Martin C.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the class I ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes joining of the 3' end of a template bound oligonucleotide to its own 5' end, have been made to evolve in a continuous manner by a simple serial transfer procedure that can be carried out indefinitely. This process was expanded to allow the evolution of ribozymes that catalyze three successive nucleotidyl addition reactions, two template-directed mononucleotide additions followed by RNA ligation. During the development of this behavior, a population of ribozymes was maintained against an overall dilution of more than 10(exp 406). The resulting ribozymes were capable of catalyzing the three-step reaction pathway, with nucleotide addition occurring in either a 5' yieldig 3' or a 3' yielding 5' direction. This purely chemical system provides a functional model of a multi-step reaction pathway that is undergoing Darwinian evolution.

  20. Development of a novel cost effective methanol electrolyzer stack with Pt-catalyzed membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethu, Sundar Pethaiah; Gangadharan, Sasikumar; Chan, Siew Hwa; Stimming, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) based methanol electrolyzer stack with a catalyzed membrane for hydrogen production. The physical and electrochemical properties of the catalyzed membrane, single cell and stack are examined using various characterization techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with EDX and polarization studies. The results demonstrate that the with Pt-catalyzed membrane electrode assembly (MEA) exhibits significantly better performance than a normal MEA. The developed electrolyzer stack produces 102 L h-1 of 99% pure hydrogen without CO and CO2. The excellent stability of the PEM methanol electrolyzer system is demonstrated by running the stack for 2500 h of intermittent operation with constant current density.

  1. Transesterification of oil mixtures catalyzed by microencapsulated cutinase in reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Badenes, Sara M; Lemos, Francisco; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant cutinase from Fusarium solani pisi was used to catalyze the transesterification reaction between a mixture of triglycerides (oils) and methanol in reversed micelles of bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane for the purposes of producing biodiesel. The use of a bi-phase lipase-catalyzed system brings advantages in terms of catalyst re-use and the control of water activity in the medium and around the enzyme micro-environment. Small-scale batch studies were performed to study the influence of the initial enzyme and alcohol concentrations, and the substrates molar ratio. Conversions in excess of 75 were obtained with reaction times under 24 h, which makes this enzymatic process highly competitive when compared to similar lipase catalyzed reactions for biodiesel production using methanol. PMID:19943181

  2. Synthesis of Fused Dibenzofuran Derivatives via Palladium-Catalyzed Domino C-C Bond Formation and Iron-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization/Aromatization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Kartick; Jalal, Swapnadeep; Kundal, Sandip; Jana, Umasish

    2016-02-01

    A range of tetracyclic dibenzofuran derivatives bearing a variety of functional groups was readily synthesized via a two-stage domino strategy starting from propargyl ethers of 2-halo phenol derivatives. The first stage in the strategy involves Pd(0)-catalyzed domino intramolecular carbopalladation/Suzuki coupling via 5-exo-dig cyclization onto the alkyne, leading to 3-methylene-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran derivatives. In the second stage of the domino strategy, an iron(III)-catalyzed cycloisomerization and aromatization reaction produces tetracyclic benzofuran derivatives. This two-step sequence provides efficient access to diversely substituted polycyclic dibenzofuran derivatives in high yields and in an atom-efficient and environmentally friendly manner. Moreover, this strategy was also successfully used for the synthesis of a naturally occurring tetracyclic dibenzofuran, β-brazan. PMID:26728954

  3. Reaction pathways and free energy profiles for cholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 6-monoacetylmorphine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Han, Keli; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2014-04-14

    As the most active metabolite of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) can penetrate into the brain for the rapid onset of heroin effects. The primary enzymes responsible for the metabolism of 6-MAM to the less potent morphine in humans are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The detailed reaction pathways for AChE- and BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of 6-MAM to morphine have been explored, for the first time, in the present study by performing first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations. It has been demonstrated that the two enzymatic reaction processes follow similar catalytic reaction mechanisms, and the whole catalytic reaction pathway for each enzyme consists of four reaction steps. According to the calculated results, the second reaction step associated with the transition state TS2(a)/TS2(b) should be rate-determining for the AChE/BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis, and the free energy barrier calculated for the AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis (18.3 kcal mol(-1)) is 2.5 kcal mol(-1) lower than that for the BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis (20.8 kcal mol(-1)). The free energy barriers calculated for the AChE- and BChE-catalyzed reactions are in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energies (17.5 and 20.7 kcal mol(-1) for the AChE- and BChE-catalyzed reactions, respectively). Further structural analysis reveals that the aromatic residues Phe295 and Phe297 in the acyl pocket of AChE (corresponding to Leu286 and Val288 in BChE) contribute to the lower energy of TS2(a) relative to TS2(b). The obtained structural and mechanistic insights could be valuable for use in future rational design of a novel therapeutic treatment of heroin abuse. PMID:24595354

  4. Advances in nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions to construct carbocycles and heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ashish; Louie, Janis

    2015-08-18

    Transition-metal catalysis has revolutionized the field of organic synthesis by facilitating the construction of complex organic molecules in a highly efficient manner. Although these catalysts are typically based on precious metals, researchers have made great strides in discovering new base metal catalysts over the past decade. This Account describes our efforts in this area and details the development of versatile Ni complexes that catalyze a variety of cycloaddition reactions to afford interesting carbocycles and heterocycles. First, we describe our early work in investigating the efficacy of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands in Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions with carbon dioxide and isocyanate. The use of sterically hindered, electron donating NHC ligands in these reactions significantly improved the substrate scope as well as reaction conditions in the syntheses of a variety of pyrones and pyridones. The high reactivity and versatility of these unique Ni(NHC) catalytic systems allowed us to develop unprecedented Ni-catalyzed cycloadditions that were unexplored due to the inefficacy of early Ni catalysts to promote hetero-oxidative coupling steps. We describe the development and mechanistic analysis of Ni/NHC catalysts that couple diynes and nitriles to form pyridines. Kinetic studies and stoichiometric reactions confirmed a hetero-oxidative coupling pathway associated with this Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition. We then describe a series of new substrates for Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions such as vinylcyclopropanes, aldehydes, ketones, tropones, 3-azetidinones, and 3-oxetanones. In reactions with vinycyclopropanes and tropones, DFT calculations reveal noteworthy mechanistic steps such as a C-C σ-bond activation and an 8π-insertion of vinylcyclopropane and tropone, respectively. Similarly, the cycloaddition of 3-azetidinones and 3-oxetanones also requires Ni-catalyzed C-C σ-bond activation to form N- and O-containing heterocycles. PMID:26200651

  5. Reaction pathways and free energy profiles for cholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 6-monoacetylmorphine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yan; Han, Keli; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2014-01-01

    As the most active metabolite of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) can penetrate into the brain for the rapid onset of heroin effects. The primary enzymes responsible for the metabolism of 6-MAM to the less potent morphine in humans are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The detailed reaction pathways for AChE- and BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of 6-MAM to morphine have been explored, for the first time, in the present study by performing first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations. It has been demonstrated that the two enzymatic reaction processes follow the similar catalytic reaction mechanism, and the whole catalytic reaction pathway for each enzyme consists of four reaction steps. According to the calculated results, the second reaction step associated with the transition state TS2a/TS2b should be rate-determining for the AChE/BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis, and the free energy barrier calculated for the AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis (18.3 kcal/mol) is 2.5 kcal/mol lower than that for the BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis (20.8 kcal/mol). The free energy barriers calculated for the AChE- and BChE-catalyzed reactions are in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energies (17.5 and 20.7 kcal/mol for the AChE- and BChE-catalyzed reactions, respectively). Further structural analysis reveals that the aromatic residues Phe295 and Phe297 in the acyl pocket of AChE (corresponding to Leu286 and Val288 in BChE) contribute to the lower energy of TS2a relative to TS2b. The obtained structural and mechanistic insights could be valuable for use in future rational design of a novel therapeutic treatment of heroin abuse. PMID:24595354

  6. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels. PMID:26176879

  7. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  8. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloadditions of unactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Jordan M; Schmidt, Valerie A; Tondreau, Aaron M; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-08-28

    Cycloadditions, such as the [4+2] Diels-Alder reaction to form six-membered rings, are among the most powerful and widely used methods in synthetic chemistry. The analogous [2+2] alkene cycloaddition to synthesize cyclobutanes is kinetically accessible by photochemical methods, but the substrate scope and functional group tolerance are limited. Here, we report iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloaddition of unactivated alkenes and cross cycloaddition of alkenes and dienes as regio- and stereoselective routes to cyclobutanes. Through rational ligand design, development of this base metal-catalyzed method expands the chemical space accessible from abundant hydrocarbon feedstocks. PMID:26315433

  9. Palladium-catalyzed silyl C(sp3)-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Geng, Weizhi; Wei, Junnian; Ouyang, Kunbing; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2012-02-28

    The first transition-metal-catalyzed activation of silyl C(sp(3))-H bond was realized and synthetically applied. A variety of organic skeletons substituted with SiMe(3) groups could undergo the Pd-catalyzed intramolecular coupling reaction, resulting in an unprecedented synthetic method for yielding six-membered silacycles. It was found that the adjacent Si atom played an essential role for the activation of the C(sp(3))-H bond of the SiMe(3) group; no activation reaction of the C(sp(3))-H bond of the CMe(3) group took place under the same reaction conditions. PMID:22222845

  10. Growth behaviors of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wong, T. L.; Chan, S. K.; Sou, I. K.; Wang, N.; Su, D. S.

    2008-12-08

    Ultrathin ZnSe nanowires grown by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy show an interesting growth behavior of diameter dependence of growth rates. The smaller the nanowire diameter, the faster is its growth rate. This growth behavior is totally different from that of the nanowires with diameters greater than 60 nm and cannot be interpreted by the classical theories of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. For the Au-catalyzed nanowire growth at low temperatures, we found that the surface and interface incorporation and diffusion of the source atoms at the nanowire tips controlled the growth of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires.

  11. An Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Approach to Nitrones from N-Hydroxyamides.

    PubMed

    Katahara, Seiya; Kobayashi, Shoichiro; Fujita, Kanami; Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Sato, Takaaki; Chida, Noritaka

    2016-04-27

    An Ir-catalyzed reductive formation of functionalized nitrones from N-hydroxyamides was reported. The reaction took place through two types of iridium-catalyzed reactions including dehydrosilylation and hydrosilylation. The method showed high chemoselectivity in the presence of sensitive functional groups, such as methyl esters, and was successfully applied to the synthesis of cyclic and macrocyclic nitrones, which are known to be challenging compounds to access by conventional methods. (1)H NMR studies strongly supported generation of an N-siloxyamide and an N,O-acetal as the actual intermediates. PMID:27071479

  12. Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuzo; Fujiu, Motohiro; Murase, Tatsuya; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Serizawa, Hiroki; Aikawa, Kohsuke

    2013-01-01

    Summary The trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides catalyzed by copper(I) salt with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide and Zn dust was accomplished. The catalytic reactions proceeded under mild reaction conditions, providing the corresponding aromatic trifluoromethylated products in moderate to high yields. The advantage of this method is that additives such as metal fluoride (MF), which are indispensable to activate silyl groups for transmetallation in the corresponding reactions catalyzed by copper salt by using the RuppertPrakash reagents (CF3SiR3), are not required. PMID:24367406

  13. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation for the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Ji, Fanghua; Li, Xianwei; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-11-21

    A direct and facile palladium-catalyzed C-H bond oxidative carbonylation reaction and oxidative cyclization for the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported herein. The intramolecular cyclocarbonylation, through C-H activation and C-C, C-O bond formations under mild conditions, proceeds smoothly with good functional group tolerance in high to excellent yields. The intramolecular palladium-catalyzed direct oxidative C-H bond functionalization for the C-O bond formation is also demonstrated, which provides an efficient approach for the construction of various PAHs. PMID:25353393

  14. A Convenient Palladium-Catalyzed Reductive Carbonylation of Aryl Iodides with Dual Role of Formic Acid.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xinxin; Li, Chong-Liang; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-04-18

    Palladium-catalyzed reductive carbonylation of aryl halides represents a straightforward pathway for the synthesis of aromatic aldehydes. The known reductive carbonylation procedures either require CO gas or complexed compounds as CO sources. In this communication, we developed a palladium-catalyzed reductive carbonylation of aryl iodides with formic acid as the formyl source. As a convenient, practical, and environmental friendly methodology, no additional silane or H2 was required. A variety of aromatic aldehydes were isolated in moderate to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Notably, this is the first procedure on using formic acid as the formyl source. PMID:26934464

  15. Primary-tertiary diamine-catalyzed Michael addition of ketones to isatylidenemalononitrile derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akshay; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2014-01-01

    Simple primary-tertiary diamines easily derived from natural primary amino acids were used to catalyze the Michael addition of ketones with isatylidenemalononitrile derivatives. Diamine 1a in combination with D-CSA as an additive provided Michael adducts in high yield (up to 94%) and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99%). The catalyst 1a was successfully used to catalyze the three-component version of the reaction by a domino Knoevenagel-Michael sequence. The Michael adduct 4a was transformed into spirooxindole 6 by a reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly enantioselective manner. PMID:24991242

  16. Copper-catalyzed aerobic radical C–C bond cleavage of N–H ketimines

    PubMed Central

    Tnay, Ya Lin; Ang, Gim Yean

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report herein studies on copper-catalyzed aerobic radical C–C bond cleavage of N–H ketimines. Treatment of N–H ketimines having an α-sp3 hybridized carbon under Cu-catalyzed aerobic reaction conditions resulted in a radical fragmentation with C–C bond cleavage to give the corresponding carbonitrile and carbon radical intermediate. This radical process has been applied for the construction of oxaspirocyclohexadienones as well as in the electrophilic cyanation of Grignard reagents with pivalonitrile as a CN source. PMID:26664613

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Coupling of Oxime Acetates with Isothiocyanates: A Strategy for 2-Aminothiazoles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zhongzhi; Qi, Chaorong; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-01-15

    A new strategy for 2-aminothiazoles is developed via the copper-catalyzed coupling of oxime acetates with isothiocyanates. Various 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted 2-aminothiazoles were formed smoothly under mild reaction conditions. This process involved copper-catalyzed N-O bond cleavage, activation of vinyl sp(2) C-H bonds, and C-S/C-N bond formations. It is noteworthy that the oxime acetates were used not only as a substrate but also as a single oxidant. PMID:26729578

  18. New Insights in Muon-Catalyzed dd Fusion by using Ortho-Para Controlled Solid Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Akihisa; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Shimomura, Koichiro; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Higemoto, Wataru; Matsuzaki, Teiichiro; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2003-06-01

    For the first time, we observed the dependence of the ddμ formation rate and the dμ hyperfine-transition rate on the ortho-para state in muon-catalyzed fusion in the solid D2 state, and found that the effect is even opposite to a recent theoretical prediction. We also determined the back-decay rate and the hyperfine-transition rate via scattering in solid state by using the ortho-para dependence. A theory to describe properly our experimental result is called for to understand the nature of muon-catalyzed fusion in the solid state.

  19. Synthesis of benzofuranyl and indolyl methyl azides by tandem silver-catalyzed cyclization and azidation.

    PubMed

    Ranjith Kumar, Gadi; Kiran Kumar, Yalla; Kant, Ruchir; Sridhar Reddy, Maddi

    2016-04-26

    Ag(i)-catalyzed synthesis of 2-azidomethyl benzofurans/indoles from linear and readily available hydroxyl/amino-phenyl propargyl alcohols is described via a highly regioselective C-O and C-N bond formation. Control experiments reveal that the reaction involves the sequential Ag(i)-catalyzed 5-exo-dig cyclization and a catalyst free γ-allylic azidation. The synthetic utility of this method has been demonstrated by using the azidomethyl unit of the above synthesized heterocycles as the base for a variety of other functionalizations, such as triazole-, tetrazole-, amide-, amine-, and pyrido-derivatives. PMID:27064507

  20. Nickel(0)-catalyzed intramolecular reductive coupling of alkenes and aldehydes or ketones with hydrosilanes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yukari; Hoshimoto, Yoichi; Kumar, Ravindra; Ohashi, Masato; Ogoshi, Sensuke

    2016-05-01

    A nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and simple alkenes with hydrosilanes has been developed. A variety of silyl-protected 1-indanol derivatives were prepared in a highly diastereoselective manner (up to >99 : 1 dr) by employing a combination of nickel(0)/N-heterocyclic carbene and triethylsilane. The present system was also applied to a reductive coupling with ketones. Preliminary results of a nickel(0)-catalyzed asymmetric three-component coupling reaction of an aldehyde, an alkene, and triethylsilane are also shown. PMID:27077829

  1. Mild Palladium-Catalyzed Cyanation of (Hetero)aryl Halides and Triflates in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A mild, efficient, and low-temperature palladium-catalyzed cyanation of (hetero)aryl halides and triflates is reported. Previous palladium-catalyzed cyanations of (hetero)aryl halides have required higher temperatures to achieve good catalytic activity. This current reaction allows the cyanation of a general scope of (hetero)aryl halides and triflates at 2–5 mol % catalyst loadings with temperatures ranging from rt to 40 °C. This mild method was applied to the synthesis of lersivirine, a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. PMID:25555140

  2. Mechanistic insights into the rhenium-catalyzed alcohol-to-olefin dehydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2013-09-23

    Rhenium-based complexes are powerful catalysts for the dehydration of various alcohols to the corresponding olefins. Here, we report on both experimental and theoretical (DFT) studies into the mechanism of the rhenium-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols to olefins in general, and the methyltrioxorhenium-catalyzed dehydration of 1-phenylethanol to styrene in particular. The experimental and theoretical studies are in good agreement, both showing the involvement of several proton transfers, and of a carbenium ion intermediate in the catalytic cycle. PMID:23946099

  3. Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of ynamides: synthesis of 4-halo-oxazolones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; He, Guangke; Zhu, Guohao; Zhu, Xiaolin; Qiu, Shineng; Zhu, Hongjun

    2015-04-01

    A mild and efficient methodology involving Pd(PPh3)4-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-alkynyl alkyloxycarbamates with CuCl2 or CuBr2 for the synthesis of 4-halo-oxazolones was developed. This reaction exhibiting good functional tolerance provided a new, efficient, and rapid synthetic process to 4-halo-oxazolones. The resulting 4-halo-oxazolones can serve as great potential precursors for the 3,4,5-trisubstituted oxazolones via a Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction. PMID:25756315

  4. Isotope-labeling of the fibril binding compound FSB via a Pd-catalyzed double alkoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Burhardt, Mia N; Taaning, Rolf; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2012-06-15

    We have synthesized two isotopically labeled variants of the β-amyloid binding compound FSB possessing (13)C-labels on the two terminal aryl carboxylic acid moieties. One of these was also fully deuterated on the olefinic spacers. The (13)C-isotope labeling was achieved applying a Pd-catalyzed methoxycarbonylation of the corresponding aryl chlorides with externally (ex situ) generated (13)C-labeled CO. Application of the Shirakawa-Hayashi protocol for the Pd-catalyzed reduction of a dialkyne intermediate using D(2)O allowed for the selective deuterium labeling of the two trans-C,C double bonds of FSB. PMID:22612598

  5. Recent Advances in Metal-Catalyzed C-P Bond Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glueck, David S.

    This chapter describes recent advances in metal-catalyzed C-P bond formation, which may be classified into two types of reactions. In hydrophosphination and related processes, P-H groups add across unsaturated C-X (X = C, N, O) bonds. Phosphination of electrophiles typically results in substitution at sp2 or sp3 carbon; the P-H group is removed, often by a base. The scope of both nucleophilic and electrophilic partners in these processes is surveyed, and the proposed mechanisms and intermediates in the metal-catalyzed reactions are described.

  6. Probability of twin formation on self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires on Si substrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to control the incorporation of twin boundaries in self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires (NWs). Self-catalyzed GaAs NWs were grown on a Si substrate under various arsenic pressures using molecular beam epitaxy and the vapor-liquid-solid method. When the arsenic flux is low, wurtzite structures are dominant in the GaAs NWs. On the other hand, zinc blende structures become dominant as the arsenic flux rises. We discussed this phenomenon on the basis of thermodynamics and examined the probability of twin-boundary formation in detail. PMID:23043754

  7. A modified approach to muon-catalyzed fusion, employing helium-3 as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Cooroo

    2012-09-01

    Muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) or cold fusion, employing hydrogen isotopes, is the only known form of fusion not requiring extremely high temperatures in order to catalyze a reaction. A modified approach utilizing existing and currently developing technology but employing helium-3 as the fuel source is proposed, offering a potential solution to some inherent problems including the need to deal with radioactive materials. A prediction based on Monte Carlo simulations also points to a potential method to partially negate alpha sticking, allowing a greater energy output than input.

  8. Mechanism of maltal hydration catalyzed by. beta. -amylase: Role of protein structure in controlling the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahata, Sumio ); Chiba, S. ); Brewer, C.F.; Hehre, E.J. )

    1991-07-09

    Crystalline (monomeric) soybean and (tetrameric) sweet potato {beta}-amylase were shown to catalyze the cis hydration of maltal ({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol) to form {beta}-2-deoxymaltose. As reported earlier with the sweet potato enzyme, maltal hydration in D{sub 2}O by soybean {beta}-amylase was found to exhibit an unusually large solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect (V{sub H}/V{sub D}=6.5), a reaction rate linearly dependent on the mole fraction of deuterium, and 2-deoxy-(2(a)-{sup 2}H)maltose as product. These results indicate (for each {beta}-amylase) that protonation is the rate-limiting step in a reaction involving a nearly symmetric one-proton transition state and that maltal is specifically protonated from above the double bond. That maltal undergoes cis hydration provides evidence in support of a general-acid-catalyzed, carbonium ion mediated reaction. Of fundamental significance is that {beta}-amylase protonates maltal from a direction opposite that assumed for protonating strach, yet creates products of the same anomeric configuration from both. Such stereochemical dichotomy argues for the overriding role of protein structures is dictating the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase, by limiting the approach and orientation of water or other acceptors to the reaction center.

  9. Molecular iodine catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling reaction between two sp3 C-H bonds using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nobuta, Tomoya; Tada, Norihiro; Fujiya, Akitoshi; Kariya, Atsumasa; Miura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Akichika

    2013-02-01

    A useful method for molecular iodine catalyzed oxidative C-C bond formation between tertiary amines and a carbon nucleophile using hydrogen peroxide as the terminal oxidant is reported. This is the first report of a molecular iodine catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) reaction between two sp(3) C-H bonds. PMID:23331076

  10. Synthesis of the tetracyclic core of berkelic acid using gold(I)-catalyzed hydroarylation and oxidative radical cyclizations.

    PubMed

    Brimble, Margaret A; Haym, Isabell; Sperry, Jonathan; Furkert, Daniel P

    2012-12-01

    A synthetic approach to the tetracyclic core of berkelic acid is reported using gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular hydroarylation and oxidative radical cyclizations to effect the key ring-forming steps. The carboxylic acid was introduced via a late-stage palladium-catalyzed carbonylation to afford the core tetracycle with the correct relative stereochemistry for the natural product. PMID:23186011

  11. Nickel-catalyzed synthesis of (E)-olefins from benzylic alcohol derivatives and arylacetonitriles via C-O activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Yang, Jia; Chen, Tieqiao; Han, Li-Biao

    2016-02-01

    An efficient Ni-catalyzed synthesis of (E)-olefins using the readily available benzylic alcohol derivatives and arylacetonitriles is described. This transformation should proceed via a tandem process involving nickel-catalyzed cross coupling via C-O activation and subsequent stereoselective E2 elimination. PMID:26699396

  12. Shielding of quantum dots using diblock copolymers: implementing copper catalyzed click chemistry to fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkl, Jan-Philip; Ostermann, Johannes; Schmidtke, Christian; Kloust, Hauke; Eggers, Robin; Feld, Artur; Wolter, Christopher; Kreuziger, Anna-Marlena; Flessau, Sandra; Mattoussi, Hedi; Weller, Horst

    2014-03-01

    We describe the design and optimization of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer and its use to provide surface functionalization of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots, QDs). This polymer coating promotes hydrophilicity of the nanocrystals while providing numerous functional groups ideally suited for biofunctionalization of the QDs using copper-catalyzed azide alkyne Husigen 1,3-cyloaddition (i.e., cupper catalyzed "click" reaction). Copper ions are known to quench the fluorescence of QDs in solution. Thus effective shielding of the nanocrystal surface is essential to apply copper-catalyzed reactions to luminescent QDs without drastically quenching their emission. We have applied a strategy based on micellar encapsulation within poly(isoprene-block- ethylene oxide) diblock-copolymers (PI-b-PEO), where three critical factors promote and control the effectiveness of the shielding of copper ion penetration: 1) The excess of PI-b-PEO, 2) the size of PI-b-PEO and 3) insertion of an additional PS-shell grown via seeded emulsion polymerization (EP) reaction. Due to the amphiphilic character of the block-copolymer, this approach provides a shielding layer surrounding the particles, preventing metal ions from reaching the QD surfaces and maintaining high photoluminescence. The effective shielding allowed the use of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-cycloaddition (CuAAC) to hydrophilic and highly fluorescent QDs, opening up great possibilities for the bio functionalization of QDs.

  13. Asymmetric N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed annulation of modified enals with enolizable aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Yetra, Santhivardhana Reddy; Kaicharla, Trinadh; Kunte, Sunita S; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Biju, Akkattu T

    2013-10-18

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed highly enantioselective lactonization of modified enals with enolizable aldehydes, proceeding via the α,β-unsaturated acylazolium intermediates, is reported. The reaction results in the asymmetric synthesis of synthetically important 4,5-disubstituted dihydropyranones. PMID:24093887

  14. Palladium(0)-catalyzed cyclopropanation of benzyl bromides via C(sp3)-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuo-Qing; Shi, Bing-Feng; Bao, Weiliang

    2014-04-11

    A novel and highly efficient Pd(0)-catalyzed domino reaction to prepare cyclopropane derivatives has been established. The process involves a Heck-type coupling reaction and a C(sp(3))-H bond activation. Preliminary DFT calculations suggest that a four-membered palladacycle intermediate is involved. PMID:24575427

  15. Selenium-Catalyzed C(sp3)-H Acyloxylation: Application in the Expedient Synthesis of Isobenzofuranones.

    PubMed

    Krätzschmar, Felix; Kaßel, Martin; Delony, Daniel; Breder, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative Se-catalyzed C(sp3)-H bond acyloxylation has been used to construct a diverse array of isobenzofuranones from simple ortho-allyl benzoic acid derivatives. The synthetic procedure employs mild reaction conditions and gives high chemoselectivity enabled by an inexpensive organodiselane catalyst. The presented approach offers a new synthetic pathway toward the core structures of phthalide natural products. PMID:25808950

  16. Copper(i)-catalyzed olefination of N-sulfonylhydrazones with sulfones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuai; Gao, Yunpeng; Chen, Ri; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-03-15

    The Cu(i)-catalyzed olefination of N-sulfonylhydrazones with sulfones via metal carbene intermediates is reported. This reaction uses readily available starting materials and is operationally simple, thus representing a practical method for the construction of carbon-carbon double bonds. Mechanistically, Cu(i) carbene formation and subsequent carbene migratory insertion are proposed as the key steps. PMID:26932712

  17. Copper-catalyzed arylation of biguanide derivatives via C-N cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Huang, Bo; Bao, Ai-Qing; Li, Xiao; Guo, Shunna; Zhang, Jin-Quan; Xu, Jun-Zhi; Zhang, Rihao; Cui, Dong-Mei

    2015-12-21

    An efficient copper-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of biguanide hydrochloride derivatives with both aryl iodides and bromides under mild conditions has been developed. The reaction occurred in good yields and tolerated aryl halides containing functionalities such as nitriles, sulfonamides, ethers, and halogens. Alkyl and cyclic substituted biguanidines were also well tolerated. PMID:26444146

  18. Acid-catalyzed transformation of ionophore veterinary antibiotics: reaction mechanism and product implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peizhe; Yao, Hong; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John C; Pavlostathis, Spyros G; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2013-07-01

    Ionophore antibiotics (IPAs) are polyether antimicrobials widely used in the livestock industry and may enter the environment via land application of animal waste and agricultural runoff. Information is scarce regarding potential transformation of IPAs under environmental conditions. This study is among the first to identify the propensity of IPAs to undergo acid-catalyzed transformation in mildly acidic aquatic systems and characterize the reactions in depth. The study focused on the most widely used monensin (MON) and salinomycin (SAL), and also included narasin (NAR) in the investigation. All three IPAs are susceptible to acid-catalyzed transformation. MON reacts much more slowly than SAL and NAR and exhibits a different kinetic behavior that is further evaluated by a reversible reaction kinetic model. Extensive product characterization identifies that the spiro-ketal group of IPAs is the reactive site for the acid-catalyzed hydrolytic transformation, yielding predominantly isomeric and other products. Toxicity evaluation of the transformation products shows that the products retain some antimicrobial properties. The occurrence of IPAs and isomeric transformation products is also observed in poultry litter and agricultural runoff samples. Considering the common presence of mildly acidic environments (pH 4-7) in soils and waters, the acid-catalyzed transformation identified in this study likely plays an important role in the environmental fate of IPAs. PMID:23373828

  19. Optimizing the Acid Catalyzed Synthesis of Hyperbranched Poly(Glycerol-diacids) Oligomers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligomeric pre-polymers were synthesized by the acid-catalyzed condensation of glycerol with succinic acid, glutaric acid and azelaic acid in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or dimethylformamide (DMF). The prepolymers were obtained, on average in 84% yield, and were characterized by proton NMR, MALDI-TOF ...

  20. Palladium-Catalyzed Ortho-Arylation of Carbamate-Protected Estrogens.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Robin B; Brenner, Peter B; Durrant, Steven J; Gallagher, Timothy; Méndez-Gálvez, Carolina; Montgomery, Michelle

    2016-05-01

    The palladium-catalyzed ortho-arylation of diethyl carbamate-protected estrone and estriol with aryl iodides gives the 2-arylated analogues. Subsequent removal of the carbamate directing group furnishes 2-arylated estrone, estradiol, or estriol depending on the method used. PMID:27057762

  1. Combining immunolabeling and catalyzed reporter deposition to detect intracellular saxitoxin in a cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Claudia; Fabre, Amelia; Lacerot, Gissell; Bonilla, Sylvia

    2015-10-01

    We combined the use of polyclonal antibodies against saxitoxin with catalyzed reporter deposition to detect production of saxitoxin by the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. The procedure is simple, allows detection of intracellular saxitoxin in cyanobacteria filaments by confocal laser microscopy and is a promising tool to study toxin production and metabolism. PMID:26164741

  2. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: thermodynamics of enzyme-catalyzed and noncatalyzed reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose. Temperature dependence for hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside (4NPX), 4-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-arabi...

  3. Polystyrene-supported TBD catalyzed ring-opening of N-tosylaziridines with silylated nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Satoru; Harada, Takeru; Yasuda, Shiori

    2012-07-01

    Polystyrene-supported TBD (PS-TBD) catalyzes the ring-opening of N-tosylaziridines with silylated nucleophiles to give the corresponding products in high yields. PS-TBD was easily recovered and reused without significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:22614120

  4. Copper-Catalyzed SN2'-Selective Allylic Substitution Reaction of gem-Diborylalkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Qi; Zhang, Ben; Lu, Xi; Liu, Jing-Hui; Lu, Xiao-Yu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2016-03-01

    A Cu/(NHC)-catalyzed SN2'-selective substitution reaction of allylic electrophiles with gem-diborylalkanes is reported. Different substituted gem-diborylalkanes and allylic electrophiles can be employed in this reaction, and various synthetic valuable functional groups can be tolerated. The asymmetric version of this reaction was initially researched with chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands. PMID:26872072

  5. Catalyzing Mass Production of Solar Photovoltaic Cells Using University Driven Green Purchasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of the purchase power of the higher education system to catalyze the economy of scale necessary to ensure market competitiveness for solar photovoltaic electricity. Design/methodology/approach: The approach used here was to first determine the demand necessary to construct "Solar City

  6. Synthesis of Mesoionic Isoquinolines by Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Cheng-Qi; Lin, Hui; Dong, Lin; Xu, Yan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl-substituted benzaldimines underwent a Rh(III) -catalyzed C-H activation and annulation with alkynes to provide novel mesoionic isoquinoline derivatives in moderate to excellent yields using oxygen as an internal anion source. This simple and efficient approach has a broad substrate scope. PMID:26671527

  7. Palladium-catalyzed direct ortho-nitration of azoarenes using NO2 as nitro source.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiawei; Jin, Bo; Sun, Peipei

    2014-09-01

    A palladium-catalyzed direct ortho-nitration reaction of azoarenes was developed in which NO2 was used as both nitro source and oxidant for the first time. The nitration products were converted into o-aminoazoarenes or benzotriazole derivatives by a simple reduction. PMID:25121997

  8. Palladium-catalyzed direct regioselective ortho-phosphonation of aromatic azo compounds with dialkyl phosphites.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gang; Mao, Dan; Wu, Shengying; Wang, Limin

    2014-11-01

    An efficient palladium-catalyzed regioselective C-P bond formation of azo compounds through C-H bond functionalization using dialkyl phosphites as phosphorus source under mild conditions was developed. A series of both symmetrical and unsymmetrical azoarenes were successfully phosphonylated through this procedure with tolerance of a broad range of functional groups. PMID:25296117

  9. Palladium-catalyzed ortho-acylation of 2-benzyl-1,2,3-triazoles with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingshan; He, Ping; Kuang, Chunxiang

    2014-10-14

    A palladium-catalyzed ortho-acylation of 2-benzyl-1,2,3-triazoles with aldehydes as an acyl source was developed. A wide variety of ketones containing 1,2,3-triazoles were obtained in good to excellent yields. This methodology provides a convenient access to the acylation of 2-substituted-1,2,3-triazoles. PMID:25144825

  10. CuCl-catalyzed ortho trifluoromethylation of arenes and heteroarenes with a pivalamido directing group.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shangjun; Chen, Chao; Sun, Zelin; Xi, Chanjuan

    2013-05-18

    The CuCl catalyzed direct trifluoromethylation of sp(2) C-H bonds has been realized, using the Togni reagent as the CF3 source. This reaction achieves the goal of regio-selectively converting C-H into C-CF3 with ecological and readily available starting materials. PMID:23552192

  11. Rhodium-catalyzed direct ortho C-N bond formation of aromatic azo compounds with azides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Yang; Hong, Xiaohu; Tan, Qitao; Xu, Bin

    2014-04-01

    An efficient rhodium-catalyzed regioselective C-N bond formation of azo compounds in good to excellent yields through C-H bond functionalization using azides as the nitrogen source was developed. Alkyl, aryl, and sulfonyl azides could be efficiently assembled in this reaction with excellent functional group tolerance. PMID:24635190

  12. [Ir(P-OP)]-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of diversely substituted C═N-containing heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Rico, José Luis; Vidal-Ferran, Anton

    2013-04-19

    Iridium(I) complexes of enantiomerically pure phosphine-phosphite ligands ([Ir(Cl)(cod)(P-OP)]) efficiently catalyze the enantioselective hydrogenation of diverse C═N-containing heterocyclic compounds (benzoxazines, benzoxazinones, benzothiazinones, and quinoxalinones; 25 examples, up to 99% ee). A substrate-to-catalyst ratio as high as 2000:1 was reached. PMID:23573959

  13. Suppression of superoxide anion generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase with alkyl caffeates and the scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Kubo, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Alkyl caffeates are strong antioxidants and inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. However, it is unclear about the effect of caffeic acid and alkyl caffeates on superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. Effects of caffeic acid and alkyl caffeates on the uric acid formation and O2(-) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase were analyzed. The scavenging activities of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and O2(-) generated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and NADH were examined. Caffeic acid derivatives equally suppressed O2(-) generation, and the suppression is stronger than inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Scavenging activity of O2(-) is low compared to the suppression of O2(-) generation. Suppression of O2(-) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase with caffeic acid derivatives was not due to enzyme inhibition or O2(-) scavenging but due to the reduction of xanthine oxidase molecules. Alkyl caffeates are effective inhibitors of uric acid and O2(-) catalyzed by xanthine oxidase as well as antioxidants for edible oil. PMID:26940252

  14. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in the presence of redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan; An, Eun Suk; Lee, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Keun

    2004-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in aqueous organic solvent was investigated in the presence of a redox mediator. Cardanol is a phenol derivative from a renewable resource mainly having a C15 unsaturated hydrocarbon chain with mostly 1-3 double bonds at a meta position. Unlike soybean peroxidase (SBP), it has been shown that horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not able to perform oxidative polymerization of phenol derivatives having a bulky meta substituent such as cardanol. For the first time, redox mediators have been applied to enable horseradish peroxidase to polymerize cardanol. Veratryl alcohol, N-ethyl phenothiazine, and phenothiazine-10-propionic acid were tested as a mediator. It is surprising that the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol took place in the presence of N-ethyl phenothiazine or phenothiazine-10-propionic acid. However, veratryl alcohol showed no effect. FT-IR and GPC analysis of the product revealed that the structure and properties of polycardanol formed by HRP with a mediator were similar to those by SBP. This is the first work to apply a redox mediator to enzyme-catalyzed oxidative polymerization. Our new finding that oxidative polymerization of a poor substrate, which the enzyme is not active with, can take place in the presence of an appropriate mediator will present more opportunities for the application of enzyme-catalyzed polymerization. PMID:14715000

  15. Synthesis of benzoylacetonitriles from Pd-catalyzed carbonylation of aryl iodides and trimethylsilylacetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Park, Ahbyeol; Lee, Sunwoo

    2012-02-17

    Palladium-catalyzed carbonylation of aryl iodides and trimethylsilylacetonitrile to produce benzoylacetonitrile derivatives through a one-pot, three-component reaction is described. This preparation method provides good yields of the carbonylated products without any additional ligands. It has a broad substrate scope with a high tolerance for a variety of functional groups. PMID:22320234

  16. Palladium-Catalyzed One-Pot Carbonylative Sonogashira Reaction Employing Formic acid as the CO Source.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xinxin; Jiang, Li-Bing; Li, Chong-Liang; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-09-01

    A convenient palladium-catalyzed carbonylative coupling of aryl iodides and terminal alkynes with formic acid as the CO precursor has been developed. A variety of alkynones were obtained in good yields in a one-pot manner for the first time. PMID:26097102

  17. Phosphaannulation by palladium-catalyzed carbonylation of C-H bonds of phosphonic and phosphinic acids.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seohyun; Jeong, Yeonseok; Jeon, Woo Hyung; Lee, Phil Ho

    2014-06-01

    An efficient phosphaannulation by Pd-catalyzed carbonylation of C-H bonds of phosphonic and phosphinic acids for the synthesis of oxaphosphorinanone oxides is reported. These compounds are novel phosphorus heterocyclic scaffolds, thus opening a new avenue to sequential C-C/C-O bond formation in one pot. PMID:24856076

  18. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of N-allylamines for the synthesis of β-lactams.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Heng; Ye, Keyin; Zhang, Guanghui; Zhang, Wangzheng; Duan, Zhengli; You, Shuli; Lei, Aiwen

    2014-02-24

    β-Lactam scaffolds are considered to be ideal building blocks for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. A new palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of N-allylamines for the synthesis of α-methylene-β-lactams is reported. DFT calculations suggest that the formation of β-lactams via a four-membered-ring transition state is favorable. PMID:24474421

  19. A general method for palladium-catalyzed direct carbonylation of indole with alcohol and phenol.

    PubMed

    Lang, Rui; Shi, Lijun; Li, Dengfeng; Xia, Chungu; Li, Fuwei

    2012-08-17

    A novel strategy involving a first oxidative iodination and subsequent Pd(0)-catalyzed carbonylation to yield indole-3-carboxylate has been developed. It showed perfect generality to indole, alcohol, and phenol. The current methodology could also be conveniently applied to the synthesis of biologically active tropisetron from simple indole and tropine. PMID:22839509

  20. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of ethylene and propylene by butyl nitrite and carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Brechot, P.; Chauvin, Y.; Commereuc, D.; Saussine, L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the oxidative carbonylation of ethylene by carbon monoxide and butyl nitrite catalyzed by PdCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2} in the presence of triphenylphosphine, the pentacoordinated tetravalent palladium complex PdCl{sub 2}(COOBu)NO(PPh{sub 3}) has been isolated and has proved to be an intermediate in the catalytic cycle.

  1. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative aminocarbonylation: a new entry to amides via C-H activation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pan; Xia, Chungu; Huang, Hanmin

    2013-07-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed oxidative aminocarbonylation reaction via C(sp(3))-H activation was established, which provides a convenient and general method for the construction of arylacetamides via the carbonylation reaction of alkyl aromatics and amines. By using this protocol, the marketed drug ibuprofen could be easily obtained. PMID:23772652

  2. Novel palladium-catalyzed cascade carboxylative annulation to construct functionalized γ-lactones in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianxiao; Yang, Shaorong; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-02-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed, one-pot, four-step cascade method has been developed to afford functionalized γ-lactones in moderate to good yields. This novel and general methodology represents a rare instance of carbonylation of the C(sp(3))-palladium bond. PMID:24346056

  3. Palladium-catalyzed intermolecular cyclocarbonylation of 2-iodoanilines with the Michael acceptor, diethyl ethoxycarbonylbutendienoate.

    PubMed

    Okuro, Kazumi; Alper, Howard

    2012-05-01

    Palladium-catalyzed intermolecular cyclocarbonylation of 2-iodoanilines with diethyl ethoxycarbonylbutendienoate produces 2,3,3-triethoxycarbonyl-2,3-dihydro-4(1H)-quinolinone derivatives in moderate to good yields. This protocol involves Michael addition and subsequent carbonylation. PMID:22480192

  4. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Radical Addition of Acetophenones to Alkynes in Furan Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Manna, Srimanta; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2015-09-01

    A synthesis of multisubstituted furans from readily available acetophenones and electron-deficient alkynes via direct C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization under radical reaction conditions is described. The developed transformation is catalyzed by copper(I) salts using di-tert-butyl peroxide as an external oxidant. This method offers an efficient access to biologically important scaffolds from simple compounds. PMID:26277912

  5. Kinetic Parameters for the Noncatalyzed and Enzyme-Catalyzed Mutarotation of Glucose Using a Blood Glucometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, John R.; Delgado, Bryan; Jones, Wray

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the conversion of alpha-D-glucose to beta-D-glucose were measured using a blood glucometer. The reaction order, rate constant, and Arrhenius activation energy are reported for the noncatalyzed reaction and turnover number and Michaelis constant are reported for the reaction catalyzed by porcine kidney mutarotase. The…

  6. Treatment Of Polychlorinated Biphenyls In Two Surface Soils Using Catalyzed H2O2 Propagations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two surface soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) collected from Superfund sites in the New England region of the United States, Fletcher Paints and Merrimack Industrial Metals, were evaluated for field treatment at the bench level using catalyzed H2...

  7. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  8. Synthesis of highly substituted acenes through rhodium-catalyzed oxidative coupling of arylboron reagents with alkynes.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Tatsuya; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    The rhodium-catalyzed oxidative 1:2 coupling reactions of arylboronic acids or their esters with alkynes smoothly proceed to produce the corresponding annulated products. Of special note, highly substituted, readily soluble, and tractable anthracene and tetracene derivatives can be obtained selectively from 2-naphthyl- and 2-anthrylboron reagents, respectively. PMID:21395298

  9. Influence of an internal trifluoromethyl group on the rhodium(II)-catalyzed reactions of vinyldiazocarbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Valerij A; Supurgibekov, Murat B; Davies, Huw M L; Sieler, Joachim; Zakharova, Valerija M

    2013-05-01

    Incorporation of a trifluoromethyl group into the structure of 4-(alkoxycarbonyl)vinyldiazocarbonyl compounds greatly decreases the tendency of the carbenoid intermediates formed during Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions to undergo intermolecular processes. Instead, they are prone to experience intramolecular [1,5]- and [1,3]-electrocyclizations to produce reactive cyclopropenes and furans, and these are capable of further transformations. PMID:23614681

  10. Copper-Catalyzed Trifluoromethylazidation of Alkynes: Efficient Access to CF3-Substituted Azirines and Aziridines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhu, Na; Chen, Pinhong; Ye, Jinxing; Liu, Guosheng

    2015-08-01

    A novel method for convenient access to CF3-containing azirines has been developed, and involves a copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylazidation of alkynes and a photocatalyzed rearrangement. Both terminal and internal alkynes are compatible with the mild reaction conditions, thus delivering the CF3-containing azirines in moderate to good yields. The azirines can be converted into various CF3-substituted aziridines. PMID:26088360

  11. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon. PMID:24079531

  12. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Synthesis of α-Acetoxylated Enones from Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tuo; Quan, Xu; Zhu, Can; Andersson, Pher G; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2016-05-01

    We report a palladium-catalyzed oxidative functionalization of alkynes to generate α-acetoxylated enones in one step. A range of functional groups are well-tolerated in this reaction. Mechanistic studies, including the use of (18) O-labeled DMSO, revealed that the ketone oxygen atom in the product originates from DMSO. PMID:27060476

  14. Pd catalyzed insertion of alkynes into cyclic diaryliodoniums: a direct access to multi-substituted phenanthrenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongcheng; Wu, Fuhai; Zhu, Daqian; Luo, Bingling; Wang, Haiwen; Hu, Yumin; Wen, Shijun; Huang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic diaryliodoniums remain unexplored compared to linear iodoniums. In our current work, internal alkynes were for the first time applied to react with cyclic iodoniums, catalyzed by Pd, resulting in a [4 + 2] benzannulation. Our work offers a new strategy to synthesize multi-substituted phenanthrene derivatives which are not easily accessed by conventional methods. PMID:26324765

  15. Palladium-catalyzed decarboxylative generation and asymmetric allylation of α-imino anions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoyan; Ji, Pengfei; He, Chang; Zirimwabagabo, Jean-Olivier; Archibald, Michelle M; Yeagley, Andrew A; Chruma, Jason J

    2014-10-01

    A palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative allylic alkylation of allyl 2,2-diphenylglycinate imines using (S,S)-f-binaphane as a chiral supporting ligand has been developed. This transformation allows for decarboxylative generation and enantioselective allylation of nonenolate α-imino (2-azaallyl anions) to afford α-aryl homoallylic imines. PMID:25243507

  16. An efficient synthesis of quinolines via copper-catalyzed C-N cleavage.

    PubMed

    Xi, Long-Yi; Zhang, Ruo-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Shan-Yong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-04-01

    An efficient method to synthesize substituted quinolines from ketones and 2-amino benzylamines is described. Copper-catalyzed C-N cleavage of amines followed by condensation with ketones deliver quinolines in moderate to high yields. The broad scope of substrates and the use of air as the sole oxidant make this transformation very attractive. PMID:25712024

  17. Synthesis of Oxazocenones via Gold(I)-Catalyzed 8-Endo-Dig Hydroalkoxylation of Alkynamides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several benzoxazocenones have been found to exhibit novel cellular activities. In the present study, we report a gold(I)-catalyzed 8-endo-dig hydroalkoxylation reaction of alkynamides to access analogous oxazocenone scaffolds. This methodology provided an advanced intermediate, which was elaborated to a des-benzo analog of a bioactive benzoxazocenone. PMID:25569027

  18. NHC-Catalyzed Asymmetric Synthesis of Functionalized Succinimides from Enals and α-Ketoamides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Ni, Qijian; Blümel, Marcus; Shu, Tao; Raabe, Gerhard; Enders, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The efficient asymmetric synthesis of highly substituted succinimides from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and α-ketoamides via NHC-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition has been developed. The new scalable protocol significantly expands the utility of NHC catalysis for the synthesis of heterocycles and provides easy access to assemble a wide range of succinimides from simple starting materials. PMID:25877658

  19. BASE-CATALYZED DESTRUCTION OF PCBS-NEW DONORS, NEW TRANSFER AGENTS/CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of hydrogen transfer agents and catalysts to improve the base-catalyzed decomposition of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated. The reaction proceeded only in the presence of base, but the rate of PCB disappearance increased with increasing amount of hydrogen ...

  20. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Ring-opening Polymerization of Epoxidized Soybean Oil in Liquid Carbon Dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) catalyzed by boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3•OEt2), in liquid carbon dioxide, was conducted in an effort to develop useful biobased biodegradable polymers. The resulting polymers (RPESO) were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, diff...