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1

77 FR 27833 - Requirements for Recognizing the Aviation and Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering Award  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering Award AGENCY: Office of the Secretary...Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering) Award...students who develop unique scientific and engineering innovations in aerospace. With...

2012-05-11

2

Caltech Micromachining Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Entirely different and exotic machining techniques are required for creating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other extremely small devices. The Caltech Micromachining Laboratory maintains this archive of research highlights and papers on its homepage, including a paper on a MEMS-driven flapping wing for a palm-sized aerial vehicle.

1969-12-31

3

Caltech campus executive LDRD.  

SciTech Connect

The environment most brain systems of humans and other animals are almost constantly confronted with is complex and continuously changing, with each time step updating a potentially bewildering set of opportunities and demands for action. Far from the controlled, discrete trials used in most neuro- and psychological investigations, behavior outside the lab at Caltech is a seamless and continuous process of monitoring (and error correction) of ongoing action, and of evaluating persistence in the current activity with respect to opportunities to switch tasks as alternatives become available. Prior work on frontopolar and prefrontal task switching, use tasks within the same modality (View a stream of symbols on a screen and perform certain response mappings depending on task rules). However, in thesetask switches' the effector is constant: only the mapping of visual symbols to the specific button changes. In this task, the subjects are choosing what kinds of future action decisions they want to perform, where they can control either which body part will act, or which direction they will orient an instructed body action. An effector choice task presents a single target and the subject selects which effector to use to reach the target (eye or hand). While the techniques available for humans can be less spatially resolved compared to non-human primate neural data, they do allow for experimentation on multiple brain areas with relative ease. Thus, we address a broader network of areas involved in motor decisions. We aim to resolve a current dispute regarding the specific functional roles of brain areas that are often co-activated in studies of decision tasks, dorsal premotor cortex(PMd) and posterior parietal cortex(PPC). In one model, the PPC distinctly drives intentions for action selection, whereas PMd stimulation results in complex multi-joint movements without any awareness of, nor subjective feeling of, willing the elicited movement, thus seems to merely help execute the chosen action.

Shepodd, Timothy J.; Knudsen, Tamara

2013-01-01

4

Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2004 February Cornell University and the California Institute of Technology signed an agreement that will lead to the construction and operation of a 25 m class telescope for submillimeter astronomy at a high altitude site in the Andean highlands of the Atacama desert in northern Chile. Scheduled for completion at the beginning of the next decade, this Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT) will be the largest and most sensitive facility of its class as well as the highest altitude astronomical facility on Earth. Light in the universe appears in three spectral major spectral features: the microwave cosmic background radiation, the direct optical radiation from stars, and the far infrared and submillimeter radiation from dust cocoons surrounding sites of star formation in both nearby and distant galaxies. The CCAT is will explore this important submillimeter range to study cosmic origins, from planets to the distant universe. Primary topics include include studies of distant luminous galaxies, circumstellar debris disks, star formation, the cosmic background radiation, the interstellar medium, and Kuiper belt objects. For many of these areas, the CCAT will be particularly effective in carrying out large scale surveys. The CCAT will provide a platform for state of the art instrumentation, including bolometer cameras, spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. These focal plane instruments will complement the capabilities of interferometer arrays, such as ALMA. Large format, large bandwidth bolometer cameras offer unequalled sensitivity and mapping speed. Moderate resolution spectrometers provide rapid, wide bandwidth spectra with integral imaging in some cases. These direct detection instruments do not lend themselves to large scale interferometry, so require a large telescope for profitable deployment. High frequency heterodyne receiver arrays excel at detailed spectral mapping to study, for example, gas kinematics and astrochemistry. In all cases, advances in device fabrication and system integration promise instruments for CCAT with fields of view many times larger than existing instruments. During the CCATs scientific lifetime, bolometer arrays will become available that are many times larger than present instruments. To accommodate these large format cameras, the Ritchey-Chrétien optical design is optimized for a wide, 15' diameter, field of view. Two Naysmyth foci outboard of the elevation bearings provide ample space for instruments. To achieve high aperture efficiency for short wavelength (350-200 ?m) observations, the surface accuracy goal is ? 10 ?m rms. The pointing and tracking specifications are commensurate. To attain these goals, the telescope will be enclosed in a Calotte style dome and an active surface adjustment system will be used with closed loop positioning of the primary mirror panels. Edge sensors and laser metrology are among the techniques under study for measuring and maintaining the panel alignment. In recent years, the high Andes near the village of San Pedro de Atacama in the desert of northern Chile have been recognized as a superb site for submillimeter astronomy. Observing conditions at the high altitude (? 5000 m) sites in the region are substantially better than on Mauna Kea. Several projects have been established in the vicinity and the international ALMA project is now under construction there. Adjoining the ALMA site, several mountain peaks rise 500-600 m above the surrounding terrain. Even better conditions likely prevail on these peaks. The CCAT project is evaluating observing conditions on the most promising of these peaks.

Lis, Dariusz C.; Radford, Simon J. E.; Ccat Project

5

78 FR 13743 - Requirements for the Recognizing Aviation and Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering (RAISE) Award AGENCY: Office of the...innovative thinking in aerospace science and engineering. With this award, the Secretary of...Aerospace Innovation in Science and Engineering) Award will recognize innovative...

2013-02-28

6

The Caltech Political Military Exercise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Caltech political military exercise (PME) is a game in which players assume roles of leaders of various countries and attempt to act as they think these leaders would in a time of international crises. The main purposes of the exercise are (1) to provide students with an experience in crisis diplomacy and policy formation, and (2) to provide a…

Munger, E. S.; And Others

7

The Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT) is a 25-m diameter, submillimeter telescope being designed for a mountaintop site above the Atacama Plateau in Chile. Observations with CCAT from 200 microns to 2 millimeters will enable astronomers to address fundamental questions on topics ranging local star formation and interstellar processes to the formation of galaxies at the highest redshifts. By virtue of its high (18,300 ft.), dry site, large collecting area, precise surface, and large-format cameras enabled by rapid advances in detector technology, CCAT will have a high mapping speed for surveys, providing an essential complement to ALMA. The CCAT consortium includes Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado, the University of Waterloo (representing a Canadian university consortium, including the University of British Columbia), and the United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre, with additional partners anticipated.

Glenn, Jason

2009-01-01

8

Limitless Horizons. Careers in Aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A manual is presented for use by counselors in career guidance programs. Pertinent information is provided on choices open in aerospace sciences, engineering, and technology. Accredited institutions awarding degrees in pertinent areas are listed as well as additional sources of aerospace career information. NASA's role and fields of interest are emphasized.

Lewis, M. H.

1980-01-01

9

Quasars and the Caltech-Carnegie Connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A collaborative relationship existed between the California Institute of Technology(Caltech) and the Carnegie Institution of Washington (Carnegie) beginning in 1946, when a formal agreement was made between the two groups of trustees. This agreement was designed to integrate Mount Wilson Observatory with the new unfinished Palomar Observatory into a single scientific entity. During the period from 1946 to 1979, much astronomical research was done at both institutions as a direct result of this collaboration. Part of this research included the first identification of a radio source with an apparently stellar object by Allan Sandage of Carnegie and Thomas Matthews of Caltech in 1960, and the first identification of the spectral lines from a radio source associated with such an object by Maarten Schmidt of Caltech in 1963. This paper examines how the discovery of these objects, which came to be known as quasars, and the subsequent research on these objects, impacted the relationship between Caltech and Carnegie, such that the relationship was formally dissolved in 1980. In this paper, the controversy surrounding the discovery and the interpretation of quasars is examined to provide further understanding about the working relationship when the two institutions were formally collaborating. Some of the data used in this paper were drawn from interviews of the researchers themselves, and this research forms part of a dissertation for a PhD degree from James Cook University in Townsville, Australia.

Waluska, Edward R.

2006-12-01

10

Quasars and the Caltech-Carnegie Connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A collaborative relationship existed between the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Carnegie Institution of Washington (Carnegie) beginning in 1946, when a formal agreement was signed between the two groups of trustees. This agreement was designed to integrate Mount Wilson Observatory and the new unfinished Palomar Observatory into a single scientific entity. During the period from 1946 to 1979, much astronomical research was done at both institutions as a direct result of this collaboration. Part of this research included the first identification of a radio source with an apparently stellar object by Allan Sandage of Carnegie and Thomas Matthews of Caltech in 1960, and the first identification of spectral lines at large redshift from a radio source associated with such an object by Maarten Schmidt of Caltech in 1963. This paper examines how the discovery of these objects - which came to be known as quasars - and subsequent research an them, indirectly had an impact an the relationship between Caltech and Carnegie by leading to an environment of increased competitiveness that eventually resulted in the formal dissolution of the relationship in 1980. In this paper, the controversy surrounding the discovery and the interpretation of quasars is examined to provide further understanding about the working relationship when the two institutions were formally collaborating. Some of the data used in this paper were drawn from personal correspondence and interviews with the researchers themselves, and this research forms part of a dissertation for a Ph.D. degree in the Centre for Astronomy at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

Waluska, Edward R.

2007-07-01

11

Repurposing the Caltech Robinson Hall Coelostat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the repurposing of the historic coelostat atop Caltech’s Robinson Hall for building lighting, public education and scientific research. The coelostat was originally part of George Ellery Hale’s vision of the Astrophysical Laboratory on the Caltech campus in 1932. The coelostat, designed by Russell Porter, has a 36 inch diameter primary mirror a 30 inch diameter secondary mirror and provides a 24 inch un-vignetted beam of sunlight into the building. Although constructed in the 1930s, due to wartime pressures and other projects, it was used only briefly in the 1970s and never fully realized. Recently Robinson Hall has been fully renovated to house the Ronald and Maxine Linde Center for Global Environmental Science. The coelostat operation was modernized replacing the old motors and automating all the motions. Each morning, if the weather cooperates, the dome slit opens, the mirrors configured and sunlight pours into the building. The beam of sunlight is divided into three parts. One part goes into a refracting telescope which projects a ten inch diameter of the sun onto a ground glass screen visible to the public. A second fraction is distributed to fiber optic fixtures that illuminate some of the basement rooms. The final fraction goes into two laboratories where it is used in experiments monitoring trace constituents of our atmosphere and for solar catalysis experiments. The instrument as originally conceived required at least two human operators. Now it is fully automatic and doing real science

Treffers, Richard R.; Loisos, G.; Ubbelohde, M.; Douglas, S.; Martinez, M.

2013-01-01

12

Caltech Control and Dynamical Systems (CDS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Caltech Control and Dynamical Systems (CDS) program provides training in mathematics, dynamics, and control, applied in the areas of science and engineering. The website describes the program's theoretical and applied research. It provides links to websites of selected multi-investigator projects such as Software Enabled Control (DARPA), Institute for Quantum Information (NSF), Quantum Communication Networks (MURI), Center for Multiscale Modeling and Simulation (CIT, NSF), and Adaptive Ocean Sampling Network (ONR). Information on seminars and meetings as well as some older technical reports are also archived online.

13

Caltech Control and Dynamical Systems (CDS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Caltech Control and Dynamical Systems (CDS) program provides training in mathematics, dynamics, and control, applied in the areas of science and engineering. The website describes the program's theoretical and applied research. It provides links to websites of selected multi-investigator projects such as Software Enabled Control (DARPA), Institute for Quantum Information (NSF), Quantum Communication Networks (MURI), Center for Multiscale Modeling and Simulation (CIT, NSF), and Adaptive Ocean Sampling Network (ONR). Information on seminars and meetings as well as some older technical reports are also archived online.

2006-02-01

14

Caltech Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory Technical Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Institute of Technology Library System and the Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory provides the Caltech Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory Technical Reports Web site. Visitors will find access to technical reports by browsing the categorized sets from the Center for Research on the Prevention of Natural Disasters, Dynamics Laboratory, Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory, and the Soil Mechanics Laboratory, as well as the section entitled Policy Documents. The materials can also be viewed by year (going back to 1952) or fully searched to gain access to the full-text reports, which include offerings like Impact of Seismic Risk on Lifetime Property Values. Although the topics covered are somewhat limited on the site, those interested will appreciate the well organized and informative resources provided.

15

A Caltech Submillimeter Observatory Active Optics System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active surface correction of the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) primary mirror has been accomplished. The Dish Surface Optimization System (DSOS) has been designed and built to operate at the CSO, on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The DSOS is the only active optics system of its kind in the world. There are 99 steel rod standoffs that interface the dish panels to its backing structure. Each standoff is now fitted with a heating/cooling assembly. Applying a controlled potential to each of the 99 assemblies adjusts the surface of the dish. Heating elongates and cooling shortens the standoffs, providing the push or pull on the primary's panel surface. The needed correction for each standoff, for a given elevation, is determined from prior holography measurements of the dish surface. Without the DSOS the optimum surface accuracy was 25 ?m RMS, yielding a beam efficiency of 33% at the 350 ?m wavelength range. With the DSOS on, this has been improved to 10 ?m RMS. The best beam efficiency obtained is 56%, with an average beam efficiency of 53%. The DSOS has been in operation on the CSO since February 2003. Observers using SHARC-II (Dowell et al. 2003; a 384 pixel submillimeter high angular resolution camera) and the 850 GHz heterodyne receiver, have been able to detect new weak and/or distant objects with the help of this unique active optics system.

Leong, M.; Peng, R.; Yoshida, H.; Chamberlin, R.; Phillips, T. G.

2009-12-01

16

Aerospace Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This pdf contains a syllabus for a course on aerospace systems as part of the Aerospace Technology Program. This course covers an introduction to expendable and reusable Space Launch Vehicle (SLV) systems including hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, propulsion, mechanical, HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), and ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support Systems). How systems interact with computer and data acquisition systems is also covered.

2011-08-11

17

Caltech Seminar Series on Energy Consumption in Private Transportation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Caltech Seminar Series was concerned primarily with means of reducing the huge amount of valuable oil burned in private cars. Topics discussed include means to produce vehicles that have: Lower weight with adequate space and safety; efficient, low pol...

J. R. Pierce

1974-01-01

18

Aerospace America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Selected articles from the current issue of The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' journal Aerospace America are now available free online. The journal is intended for those in the aviation and defense industries.

2005-11-02

19

The Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmological utility of type Ia Supernovae prompted numerous studies of these events, and they are now well characterized observationally, both as individual objects and as a population. In contrast, all other types of supernovae (i.e. core-collapse events) are not as well observationally characterized. While some individual events have been studied in great detail (e.g. SN 1987A or SN 1998bw), the global properties of the core-collapse SN population are little known. However, in recent years, major drivers for change have emerged, among them the verification of the connection between core-collapse supernovae and long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), the possible utility of some core-collapse supernovae (type II-P) as independent cosmological probes, and studies of core-collapse supernovae as high redshift targets for missions like the Supernova Acceleration Probe and the James Webb Space Telescope. The Caltech Core-Collapse Project is a large observational program using the Hale 200 inch and the robotic 60 inch telescopes at Palomar observatory to obtain optical photometry, spectroscopy and IR photometry of ˜ 50 nearby core-collapse supernovae. The program is designed to provide a complete sample of core-collapse events, with well-defined selection criteria and uniform, high-quality optical/IR observations, as well as radio and X-ray light curves for some events. We will use this sample to characterize the little-studied properties of core-collapse supernovae as a population. The sample will be used as a comparison set for studies of supernovae associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts, to promote and calibrate the use of supernovae II-P for cosmography, and to set the stage for investigations of supernovae at high-z using coming space missions such as the Supernova Acceleration Probe and the James Webb Space Telescope. Z reference Dahlen, T., & Fransson, C. 1999, A&A, 350, 349 reference Dahlen, T., et al. 2004, ApJ, 613, 189 reference Gal-Yam, A., Maoz, D., & Sharon, K. 2002, MNRAS, 332, 37 reference Gal-Yam, A., et al. 2004a, PASP, 116, 597 reference Gal-Yam, A., et al. 2004b, ApJ, 609, L59 reference Hjorth, J., et al. 2003, Nature, 423, 847 reference Hamuy, M., & Pinto. P. A. 2002, ApJ, 566, L63 reference Leonard, D. C., et al. 2004, IAU Circ, 8405 reference Matheson, T., et al. 2003, ApJ, 599, 394 reference Perlmutter, S., et al. 1999 ApJ, 517, 565 reference Poznanski, D., et al. 2002, PASP, 114, 833 reference Riess, A., et al. 1998, AJ, 116, 1009 reference Riess, A., et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 reference Sharon, K. 2003, M.Sc. Thesis, Tel Aviv University reference Stanek, K., et al. 2003, ApJ, 591, L17 reference Sullivan, M., et al. 2000, MNRAS, 319, 549

Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, D. W.; Leonard, D. C.; Moon, D.-S.; Sand, D. J.; Soderberg, A. M.

2005-12-01

20

Aerospace Medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

Davis, Jeffrey R.

2006-01-01

21

Caltech Researchers Create Highly Absorbing, Flexible Solar Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Caltech press release covers the development of solar cells that can absorb light and convert its energy efficiently thanks to a silicon wire design. The new cells, in addition to being extremely efficient, are also flexible in form, making them useful for consumer installation after further research.

2010-10-02

22

Preliminary Results from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present preliminary results from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP), a large observational program focused on the study of core-collapse SNe. Uniform, high-quality NIR and optical photometry and multi-epoch optical spectroscopy have been obtained using the 200? Hale and robotic 60? telescopes at Palomar, for a sample of 50 nearby core-collapse SNe. The combination of both well-sampled optical light curves

Avishay Gal-Yam; S. B. Cenko; D. B. Fox; D. C. Leonard; D.-S. Moon; D. J. Sand; A. M. Soderberg

2007-01-01

23

Preliminary Results from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present preliminary results from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP), a large observational program focused on the study of core-collapse SNe. Uniform, high-quality NIR and optical photometry and multi-epoch optical spectroscopy have been obtained using the 200'' Hale and robotic 60'' telescopes at Palomar, for a sample of 50 nearby core-collapse SNe. The combination of both well-sampled optical light curves

Avishay Gal-Yam; S. B. Cenko; D. B. Fox; D. C. Leonard; D.-S. Moon; D. J. Sand; A. M. Soderberg

2007-01-01

24

350 {mu}m POLARIMETRY FROM THE CALTECH SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect

We present a summary of data obtained with the 350 {mu}m polarimeter, Hertz, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We give tabulated results and maps showing polarization vectors and intensity contours. The summary includes over 4300 individual measurements in 56 Galactic sources and two galaxies. Of these measurements, 2153 have P {>=} 3{sigma} {sub p} statistical significance. The median polarization of the entire data set is 1.46%.

Dotson, Jessie L. [NASA Ames Research Center, Astrophysics Branch, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Vaillancourt, John E. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kirby, Larry; Hildebrand, Roger H. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Dowell, C. Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Davidson, Jacqueline A. [University of Western Australia (Australia)], E-mail: jessie.dotson@nasa.gov, E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu

2010-02-01

25

Aerospace gerontology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relevancy of gerontology and geriatrics to the discipline of aerospace medicine is examined. It is noted that since the shuttle program gives the facility to fly passengers, including specially qualified older persons, it is essential to examine response to acceleration, weightlessness, and re-entry over the whole adult lifespan, not only its second quartile. The physiological responses of the older person to weightlessness and the return to Earth gravity are reviewed. The importance of the use of the weightless environment to solve critical problems in the fields of fundamental gerontology and geriatrics is also stressed.

Comfort, A.

1982-01-01

26

The Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope status and technical progress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Five partners have currently joined a Consortium to develop the Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT.) Included are Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the University of Colorado at Boulder, the United Kingdom as represented by the Astronomy Technology Centre (ATC), and Canada as represented by the Universities of British Columbia and Waterloo. This consortium has continued work toward the design of the telescope and instrumentation, pursued fund raising, and further developed the science case for CCAT. An Engineering Design Phase is being planned for 2009-2011 with construction planned to begin shortly thereafter. CCAT continues as a wide field (20 arc min) FOV telescope operating from a shortest wavelength of 200µ. Testing has continued near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor in the Atacama Region of Chile above 5600 meters altitude and data indicates significantly lower water vapor in the seeing column than measured at the ALMA site on the plateau below. Work over the past two years has included research on manufacturing methods for optical segments, extensive study of mirror alignment sensing and control techniques, additional concepts for major structures, and further development of instrumentation.

Sebring, Thomas A.; Radford, Simon; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Glenn, Jason; Woody, David

2008-08-01

27

Award Monitoring  

NSF Publications Database

Management Framework: Award Monitoring National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General September 30, 2003 OIG 03-2-015 MEMORANDUM DATE: September 30, 2003 TO: Thomas N. Cooley Chief Financial Officer FROM: Deborah H. Cureton Associate Inspector General for Audit SUBJECT: Management Framework: Award Monitoring Attached please find our final report on Management Framework: Award Monitoring.

28

Aerospace Materials and Processes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center presents materials on aerospace materials and processes. Topics discussed include structural materials, metal types, metalworking processes, corrosion and corrosion prevention, fluid lines and composites.

2011-09-22

29

Z-Spec's first light at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the success of our first engineering run with Z-Spec, a new millimeter spectrograph on the 10 m Caltech Submillimeter Telescope during the first week of June 2005. The bolometric instrument is indeed the first of its kind, covering the atmospheric window from 187 to 310 GHz at the spectral resolution of 250 400, and will provide a critical follow-up study for discoveries by SCUBA and Bolocam. We present the spectrum of an ultra-luminous infrared galaxy NGG 6240 obtained by Z-Spec. Z-Spec serves as a prototype for future far-IR spectrometers on a cold space telescope where large gains in sensitivity are expected.

Nguyen, H.; Bradford, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, J.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Dragovan, M.; Duband, L.; Earle, L.; Glenn, J.; Hirstov, V.; Matsuhara, H.; Naylor, B.; Zmuidinas, J.

2006-04-01

30

Aerospace bibliographic control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current and historical aerospace bibliographic control techniques are surveyed with emphasis on the NASA experience. Topics covered include early NACA and NASA bibliographic control, NASA historical research, STAR and IAA, NASA/RECON, NASA selective dissemination of information, the NASA Library Network, and the NASA Technology Utilization System. Consideration is also given to aerospace serials control, NASA subject categories, foreign aerospace bibliographic control, and aerospace picture, film, and microfiche control. An extensive, partially annotated bibliography is provided.

Buchan, R. L.; Eckert, P. F.

1985-01-01

31

Changing Aerospace Landscape  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center presents an overview of recent technological innovations in aerospace by NASA and other organizations. It is four and a half minutes long and one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

2011-07-27

32

Heterodyne Instrumentation Upgrade at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under development at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is a dual polarization, continuous comparison (correlation) receiver. The instrument has two beams on the sky; a reference and a signal beam. Using only cooled reflecting optics, two polarizing grids, and a quadrature hybrid coupler, the sky beams are coupled to four tunerless SIS mixers (both polarizations). The 4-8 GHz mixer IF outputs are, after amplification, correlated against each other. In principle, this technique results in flat baselines with very low RMS noise and is especially well suited for high redshift Galaxy work. At the same time an upgrade is planned to the existing facility heterodyne instrumentation. Dual frequency mode receivers are under development for the 230/460 GHz and 345/660 GHz atmospheric windows. The higher frequency receivers are implemented in a balanced configuration, which reduces both the LO power requirement and noise. Each mixer has 4 GHz of IF bandwidth and can be controled remotely. Not only do these changes greatly enhance the spectroscopic capabilities of the CSO, they also enable the observatory to be integrated into the Harvard-Smithsonian Submillimeter Array (SMA) as an additional baseline.

Kooi, Jacob W.; Kovacs, Attila; Kaye, Steven M.; Dama, J.; Edgar, Michael L.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Phillips, Thomas G.

2003-02-01

33

Heterodyne Instrumentation Development for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under development at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is a dual polarization, continuous comparison (correlation) receiver. The instrument has two beams on the sky; a reference and a signal beam. Using only cooled reflecting optics, two polarizing grids, and a quadrature hybrid coupler, the sky beams are coupled to four tunerless SIS mixers (both polarizations). The 4-8 GHz mixer IF outputs are, after amplification, correlated against each other. In principle, this technique results in flat baselines with very low RMS noise and is especially well suited for high red shift Galaxy work. At the same time an upgrade is planned to the existing facility heterodyne instrumentation. Dual frequency mode receivers have been development for the 230/460 GHz and 345/660 GHz atmospheric windows. The higher frequency receivers are implemented in a balanced configuration, which reduces both the LO power requirement and noise. Each mixer has 4 GHz of IF bandwidth and can be controlled remotely. Not only do these changes greatly enhance the spectroscopic capabilities of the CSO, they also enable the observatory to be integrated into the Harvard-Smithsonian Submillimeter Array (SMA) as an additional baseline. Installation is expected to commence in the Fa11 2003.

Kooi, Jacob W.; Kovacs, Attila; Phillips, T. G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

2003-04-01

34

New submillimeter polarimetry results from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past year we have mapped the polarization of thermal emission at 350 \\micron\\ of 12 galactic molecular clouds with the University of Chicago's array polarimeter Hertz (Schleuning et al 1997, Dowell et al 1997) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Polarimetry of thermal emission is proving to be a powerful method to investigate magnetic fields (eg Schleuning 1997, Dotson 1996) and dust properties (eg Hildebrand & Dragovan 1995) in molecular clouds. Here we will present polarization maps of the observed sources which include 3 galactic center clouds (the dust ring, M-0.13-0.08, M-0.02-0.07) and several high mass star formation regions (SgrB2, M17, DR21 and NGC 2024). In the elongated clouds DR21 and NGC 2024, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the cloud along its length. In the DR21 Main region, we resolve an apparent hourglass field geometry. We will also briefly discuss global trends observed in the data set.

Dotson, J. L.; Novak, G.; Dowell, C. D.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Schleuning, D. A.

1997-12-01

35

A monolithic Si bolometer array for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are developing a submillimeter continuum camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) located on Mauna Kea. The camera will employ a monolithic Si bolometer array which was developed by Moseley et al. at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The camera will be cooled to a temperature of about 300 mK in a He-3 cryostat, and will operate primarily at wavelengths of 350 and 450 micrometers. We plan to use a bolometer array with 1x24 directly illuminated pixels, each pixel of dimension 1x2 sq mm, which is about half of the F/4 beam size at these wavelengths. Each pixel is 10 to 12 micrometers thick and is supported only by four thin Si legs formed by wet chemical etch. The pixels are doped n-type by phosphorus implantation, compensated by boron implantation. Signals from the bolometer pixels are first amplified by cryogenically cooled FET's. The signals are further amplified by room-temperature amplifiers and then separately digitized by 16 bit A/D converters with differential inputs. The outputs of the A/D converters are fed into a digital signal processing board via fiber-optic cables. The electronics and data acquisition system were designed by the Goddard group. We will report the status of this effort.

Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Serabyn, E.; Phillips, T. G.; Moseley, S. H.

1994-01-01

36

Supercomputing in Aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics addressed include: numerical aerodynamic simulation; computational mechanics; supercomputers; aerospace propulsion systems; computational modeling in ballistics; turbulence modeling; computational chemistry; computational fluid dynamics; and computational astrophysics.

Kutler, Paul; Yee, Helen

1987-01-01

37

1992 Children's Book Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists the winners of the 1992 children's book awards, including the Newbery Award, the Caldecott Award, the Coretta Scott King Awards (for author and for illustrator), and the Mildred L. Batchelder Award. (LRW)

School Library Media Annual (SLMA), 1992

1992-01-01

38

National Marine Educators Association Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Award information and nomination form for NMEA awards: Outstanding Teacher Award, James Centorino Award (non-traditional educator award), Marine Education Award, and Honorary Member Award. Nominations are due May 1.

2010-12-03

39

National Marine Educators Association Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Award information and nomination form for NMEA awards: Outstanding Teacher Award, James Centorino Award (non-traditional educator award), Marine Education Award, and Honorary Member Award. Nominations are due May 1.

40

Aerospace Sponsored Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Broad guidelines for the direction and emphasis of the overall research and development activities at Aerospace Corporation are periodically developed to assess in detail the trends in relevant technologies and their application to military space systems....

1994-01-01

41

Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

1985-01-01

42

Aerospace bibliography, seventh edition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space travel, planetary probes, applications satellites, manned spaceflight, the impacts of space exploration, future space activities, astronomy, exobiology, aeronautics, energy, space and the humanities, and aerospace education are covered.

Blashfield, J. F. (compiler)

1983-01-01

43

Introduction to Aerospace Neurology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The bottom line in aerospace neurology is the evaluation for the: (1) potential of sudden incapacitation, e.g., post traumatic seizures; (2) possibility of a sudden neurological deficit which would prevent the aircrew member from performing their job and ...

M. S. Katchen

1991-01-01

44

Aerospace Manufacturing Education (AME)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NSF funded Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project's mission is to "develop and disseminate curricula modules to enhance manufacturing technician and engineering programs in higher education with relevant aerospace manufacturing examples." The project is developing curricula modules to prepare manufacturing technology practitioners for the aerospace industry and increase the number of interested candidates for aerospace manufacturing jobs. Curricula modules are being developed and used by two-year colleges for student education and by industry for in-house training of employees. Visitors will find the downloadable curriculum modules (after a quick and free registration form) on the left side of the homepage, as well as further info about the project, its partners, and advisors.

2010-09-20

45

George Ellery Hale, Caltech Astrophysics, and the Hale 200-inch Telescope, 1920-1948  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Caltech and the 200-inch Hale telescope on Palomar are two of George Ellery Hale's many creations in Southern California. He brought the California Institute of Technology into existence in 1920; Palomar Observatory was built for it. However, even before Hale had "secured" the funds for the 200-inch, astrophysical research had been underway on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, and it intensified after the Rockefeller grant came through. Interactions between the campus, Palomar Mountain, and Mount Wilson Obervatory (one of Hale's earlier creations) played important roles in determining the course of Caltech astrophysics. Changing funding patterns (from private philanthropy to drought, then "defense" weapons-development programs, and then governmental agencies designed to support scientific research) will be briefly described. The 18-inch Schmidt, built at the Caltech (200-inch Telescope) Shop, went into operation in 1936, the first research telescope on Palomar. The 200-inch, essentially completed, was dedicated in 1948 and went into operation for regularly scheduled research observations near the end of 1949. Its coude spectrograph was completed and put into regular use in stages from 1950 to 1952, Among the most important leaders of Caltech astrophysics up to 1948 and the years immediately after it when the 200-inch went into full operation were Robert A. Millikan, Max Mason, and Lee A. DuBridge. Some of the astrophysicists who worked at Caltech and Palomar were Albert Einstein, Richard C. Tolman, Fritz Zwicky, Ira S. Bowen, John A. Anderson, Sinclair Smith, John Strong, William A. Fowler and, just at the end of this period, Jesse L. Greenstein. Some of the key staff personnel were Russell W. Porter, Don O. Hendrix (on loan), and Byron Hill.

Osterbrock, D. E.

1998-05-01

46

Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

Morris, Virginia L.

1995-01-01

47

California Institute of Technology: Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program (CECIP) was initiated in 2009. It manages $8 million within an existing fund in the school's endowment, which had been created to finance capital projects. Any member of the Caltech community may submit a project proposal, and projects are considered for approval as long as they have at least a 15…

Caine, Rebecca

2011-01-01

48

Geological and Planetary Sciences Library at Caltech (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is the home of Caltech's geological and planetary sciences library system. It is a collection of materials in the fields of Earth and planetary geology, geophysics, geochemistry, seismology, earthquakes, and paleontology. Links to sites for each of these subjects are provided, as well as links to agencies, databases, glossaries, other libraries, online journals, organizations, publishers, and specific subject information.

49

New Molecular Species In Comet C/1995 (Hale-Bopp) Observed with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We present millimeter-wave observations of HNCO, HC3N, SO, NH2CHO, H(13)CN, and H3O(+) in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) obtained in February-April, 1997 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). HNCO, first detected at the CSO in comet C/1996 B2 (Hy...

D. Benford, D. Bockelee-Morvan, D. Despois, D. C. Lis, D. M. Mehringer, H. Rauer, J. Crovisier, M. Gardner, N. Biver, P. Colom, T. G. Phillips

1998-01-01

50

Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 4th edition of the Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiolo...

K. Wade M. J. Antunano

2010-01-01

51

Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiology, diving medicine...

M. J. Antunano

1993-01-01

52

Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 3rd edition of the Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiolo...

K. Wade M. J. Antunano

2007-01-01

53

Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

Whitaker, A. F. (editor)

1995-01-01

54

1991 Children's Book Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists the winners of the 1991 children's book awards, including the Newbery Award (Jerry Spinelli); the Caldecott Award (David Macaulay); the Coretta Scott King Award (Mildred Taylor, author; Leo and Diane Dillon, illustrators); and the Mildred L. Batchelder Award (Rafik Shami, author; translated from Arabic by Rika Lesser). (LRW)

School Library Media Annual (SLMA), 1991

1991-01-01

55

1993 Children's Book Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists the 1993 winners of the following book awards for children's literature: the Newbery Award, the Caldecott Award, and the Coretta Scott King Awards for author and illustrator. No presentation for the Mildred L. Batchelder Award was given in 1993. (LRW)

Horowitz, Marjorie, Comp.

1993-01-01

56

Ethics in the Aerospace Workplace  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center defines ethics and explains how they apply to a potential member of the aerospace industry. This four and a half minute video is one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

2011-07-27

57

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following areas of NASA's responsibilities are examined: (1) the Space Transportation System (STS) operations and evolving program elements; (2) establishment of the Space Station program organization and issuance of requests for proposals to the aerospace industry; and (3) NASA's aircraft operations, including research and development flight programs for two advanced X-type aircraft.

1985-01-01

58

Aerospace Bibliography, Fifth Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fifth edition of NASA's Aerospace Bibliography presents to elementary and secondary school teachers and to general adult readers an updated list of books, references, periodicals, and other educational materials related to space flight and space science. The arrangement of this edition differs markedly from that of previous editions. Users…

National Aerospace Education Council, Washington, DC.

59

Aerospace Bibliography, Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This third edition bibliography lists books and teaching aids related to aeronautics and space. Aeronautics titles are limited to aerospace-related research subjects, and books on astronomy to those directly related to space exploration. Also listed are pertinent references like pamphlets, films, film strips, booklets, charts, pictures,…

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

60

Aerospace applications of batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has developed battery technology to meet the demanding requirements for aerospace applications; specifically, the space vacuum, launch loads, and high duty cycles. Because of unique requirements and operating environments associated with space applications, NASA has written its own standards and specifications for batteries.

Habib, Shahid

1993-01-01

61

Distances to Type IIP Supernovae from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, Hamuy & Pinto (2002) proposed a correlation between the expansion velocity and luminosity of Type II-Plateau Supernovae (SNe II-P). This correlation makes SNe II-P candidates for use as standard candles. As part of the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP), we have obtained an independent sample of SNe II-P at modest redshift (z 0.001-0.04), and here present preliminary distance results based

J. Emilio Enriquez; D. C. Leonard; A. Gal-Yam; S. B. Cenko; D. B. Fox; D. Moon; D. Sand; A. Soderberg

2009-01-01

62

Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for Caltech's Tectonics Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu). Over the past four years, the TO has made a major effort to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) inspire students to learn Earth Sciences, particularly tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about science in the context of TO discoveries, and (3) provide opportunities for graduate students, postdocs, and faculty to do outreach in the local K-12 schools and community colleges. Our work toward these goals includes hosting local high school teachers and students each summer for six weeks of research experience (as part of Caltech's "Summer Research Connection"); organizing and hosting an NAGT conference aimed at Geoscience teachers at community colleges; participating in teacher training workshops (organized by the local school district); hosting tours for K-12 students from local schools as well as from China; and bringing hands-on activities into local elementary, middle, and high school classrooms. We also lead local school students and teachers on geology field trips through nearby canyons; develop education modules for undergraduate classes (as part of MARGINS program); write educational web articles on TO research (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/highlights/), and regularly give presentations to the general public. This year, we started providing content expertise for the development of video games to teach Earth Science, being created by GameDesk Institute. And we have just formed a scientist/educator partnership with a 6th grade teacher, to help in the school district's pilot program to incorporate new national science standards (NSTA's Next Generation Science Standards, current draft), as well as use Project-Based Learning. This presentation gives an overview of these activities.

Kovalenko, L.; Jain, K.; Maloney, J.

2012-12-01

63

Distances to Type II-P Supernovae from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, Hamuy & Pinto (2002) proposed a correlation between the expansion velocity and luminosity of Type II-Plateau Supernovae (SNe II-P). This correlation makes SNe II-P candidates for use as standard candles. As part of the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP), we have obtained an independent sample of SNe II-P at modest redshift (z 0.001-0.04), and here present preliminary distance results based on the Hamuy & Pinto relation.

Emilio Enriquez, J.; Leonard, D. C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, D. B.; Moon, D.; Sand, D.; Soderberg, A.

2009-01-01

64

Children's Book Awards Annual 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication reviews the books from the major national children's book awards and lists. The following awards are covered: John Newberry Awards, Randolph Caldecott Awards, Coretta Scott King Awards, Mildred L. Batchelder Awards, Pura Belpre, Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. The lists are…

Berman, Matt; Dupuy, Marigny J.

65

Aerospace safety advisory panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

1994-01-01

66

1994 Children's Book Awards and Children's Choice Book Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first of two articles on book awards for children's literature lists major awards for 1994, including the Newbery Award, the Caldecott Award, the Coretta Scott King Awards for author and illustrator, and the Mildred L. Batchelder Award. The second article lists, by state, children's and young adult books chosen by children to receive awards.…

School Library Media Annual (SLMA), 1994

1994-01-01

67

Nanotechnology research for aerospace applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology is impacting the future of the military and aerospace. The increasing demands for high performance and property-specific applications are forcing the scientific world to take novel approaches in developing programs and accelerating output. CONTACT or Consortium for Nanomaterials for Aerospace Commerce and Technology is a cooperative nanotechnology research program in Texas building on an infrastructure that promotes collaboration between

Forrest J. Agee; Karen Lozano; Jose M. Gutierrez; Mircea Chipara; Ram Thapa; Alice Chow

2009-01-01

68

Aerospace Materials Failure Modes Presentation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides an overview of aerospace materials failure modes. The presentation will allow students to examine the question: "How can aircraft structural materials fail?" The materials used in constructing aircraft are examined, including metals, ceramics, plastics/elastomers and composites.

2011-10-10

69

Aerospace Activities and Language Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how science activities can be used to stimulate language development in the elementary grades. Two aerospace activities are described involving liquid nitrogen and the launching of a weather balloon which integrate aerospace interests into the development of language skills. (BR)

Jones, Robert M.; Piper, Martha

1975-01-01

70

Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program (STI) has made its journal, Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), available on the Web. Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports is an abstract journal, listing citations with abstracts for aerospace-related reports obtained from worldwide sources. It is published bi-weekly and announces documents that have recently been entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical (STI) Database. Documents include NASA contractor and grantee reports, NASA-owned patents and patent applications, other government, university, and private reports, and domestic and foreign dissertations. It also contains subject term and personal author indexes. STAR can be found along with other STI documents and indexes, such as STI Bulletins, Aerospace Medicine and Biology, Aerospace Engineering, and the NASA video catalog. A freely available Adobe Acrobat reader is required to read the publications. Download the reader from Adobe through the link at the STI site or visit the Adobe Acrobat download page at the URL below.

1996-01-01

71

Initial results from the Caltech/DSRI balloon-borne isotope experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Caltech/DSRI balloon-borne High Energy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope (HEIST) was flown successfully from Palestine, Texas on 14 May 1984. The experiment was designed to measure cosmic ray isotopic abundances from neon through iron, with incident particle energies from approximately 1.5 to 2.2 GeV/nucleon, depending on the element. During approximately 38 hours at float altitude, 10 to the 5th events were recorded with Z or = 6 and incident energies 1.5 GeV/nucleon. We present results from the ongoing data analysis associated with both the pre-flight Bevalac calibration and the flight data.

Schindler, S. M.; Buffington, A.; Christian, E. C.; Grove, J. E.; Lau, K. H.; Stone, E. C.; Rasmussen, I. L.; Laursen, S.

1985-01-01

72

Hutchinson Award to Schindler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

David William Schindler is the 1985 recipient of the Hutchinson Award, given annually by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. It is awarded to an active scientist in limnology and oceanography in recognition for outstanding research.

O'Brien, W. John

73

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. Awards for other sections and focus groups will be announced in future issues of Eos.

2012-07-01

74

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. See also “Outstanding Student Paper Awards” published previously (Eos, 93(27), 253-254) and in future issues of Eos.

2012-07-01

75

The Minor Suit Award.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes creation of a tongue-in-cheek award for those who would rather sue than try to resolve problems through negotiation and communication. Nominates specific cases tried in 1982, 1983, and 1984 to receive the award. (Author/PGD)

Zirkel, Perry A.

1985-01-01

76

NSTA Awards & Competitions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Site provides information on awards and grants for teachers of all grade levels and disciplines. Also links to information on student awards and competitions, as well as other NSTA resources and information.

77

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

1993-01-01

78

Aerospace Robotics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL), operated at Stanford University, focuses its research "on improving robotic performance through the application of feedback control, integrated sensing systems, and task-level autonomy." The systems designed at ARL allow the human operator to have varying levels of control over the robot. Specifically, the robot performs given tasks until it reaches a point that it can not perform on its own. The human can then intervene and direct the robot manually. A comprehensive list of all ARL publications is available on the Web site, ranging from the 1960's to 2002 (many of the publications after 1990 are available for download). There are even movies of laboratory experiments and demonstrations that can be downloaded and viewed. The Projects section explains the various research projects currently underway.

2000-01-01

79

Aerospace Human Factors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

Jordan, Kevin

1999-01-01

80

The John Muir Award.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

White, Graham

2002-01-01

81

Hancock County Awards Gala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

2008-01-01

82

Prime Contract Awards, FY-68.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1968-01-01

83

Prime Contract Awards, FY-69.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1969-01-01

84

Prime Contract Awards, FY-71.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1971-01-01

85

Prime Contract Awards, FY-70.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1970-01-01

86

Prime Contract Awards, FY-64.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1964-01-01

87

Prime Contract Awards, FY-74.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1974-01-01

88

Prime Contract Awards, FY-72.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1972-01-01

89

Prime Contract Awards, FY-73.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This DIOR report lists Military Prime Contract Procurement actions and Defense Small Business Subcontract Payments. Sections include awards by type of contract awards to small business, awards by procurement program, awards for experimental, developmental...

1973-01-01

90

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a 5-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASAs safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are "one deep." The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting "brain drain" could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning.

1999-01-01

91

SHARC II, a Second Generation 350 Micron Camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of a new facility 350 micron camera (`SHARC II') for the 10 m Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is underway. The camera will feature a 12x32 array of doped silicon Pop-Up Bolometers -- scheduled for delivery from NASA-Goddard to Caltech toward the end of 2001 -- cooled with 3He to 0.3 K. Detector absorption resonances, filters, and anti-reflection coatings are optimized for 350 microns. The pixels will sub-sample the diffraction pattern of the CSO with a spacing of 5 arcsec (0.7 lambda/D). We are implementing `total power' amplifiers to allow scanned observations with good image reconstruction fidelity and sensitivity. The expected point-source sensitivity of SHARC II in excellent weather is 0.5 Jy s-1/2, an improvement of a factor of 2 over the existing SHARC (Wang et al. 1996; Benford et al. 1999). We report on an engineering run with the camera at the CSO in September 2000 using a partial (16-pixel) detector array.

Dowell, C. D.; Collins, W.; Gardner, M.; Kovacs, A.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Yoshida, H.; Allen, C.; Jhabvala, M.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Voellmer, G.

2001-05-01

92

Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

Colony, J. A.

1976-01-01

93

Aerospace management techniques: Commercial and governmental applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A guidebook for managers and administrators is presented as a source of useful information on new management methods in business, industry, and government. The major topics discussed include: actual and potential applications of aerospace management techniques to commercial and governmental organizations; aerospace management techniques and their use within the aerospace sector; and the aerospace sector's application of innovative management techniques.

Milliken, J. G.; Morrison, E. J.

1971-01-01

94

33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored t...

D. R. C. Sevilla E. A. C. Boesiger E. C. C. Litty

1999-01-01

95

Polyimides: Thermally Stable Aerospace Polymers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An up to date review of available commercial and experimental high temperature polyimide resins which show potential for aerospace applications is presented. Current government research trends involving the use of polyimides as matrix resins for structura...

A. K. St.Clair

1980-01-01

96

Norwegian Aerospace Activities: an Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Excerpts from a Governmental Investigation concerning Norwegian participation in the European Space Organization (ESA) is presented. The implications and advantages of such a move and a suggestion for the reorganization of Norwegian Aerospace activity is given.

Arnesen, T. (editor); Rosenberg, G. (editor)

1986-01-01

97

Current Status in Aerospace Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Recent NASA aerospace medicine technology developments; Non-fatal ejection vertebral fracture and its prevention; Management of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis-associated-antigen; Syringomyelia and flying fitness; The biostack experiment on A...

W. L. Jones

1973-01-01

98

Aerospace Applications of Magnetic Bearings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advant...

J. Downer J. Goldie V. Gondhalekar R. Hockney

1994-01-01

99

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Annual Report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) presents results of activities during calendar year 2001. The year was marked by significant achievements in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs and encouraging accomplishments by the Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Unfortunately, there were also disquieting mishaps with the X-43, a LearJet, and a wind tunnel. Each mishap was analyzed in an orderly process to ascertain causes and derive lessons learned. Both these accomplishments and the responses to the mishaps led the Panel to conclude that safety and risk management is currently being well served within NASA. NASA's operations evidence high levels of safety consciousness and sincere efforts to place safety foremost. Nevertheless, the Panel's safety concerns have never been greater. This dichotomy has arisen because the focus of most NASA programs has been directed toward program survival rather than effective life cycle planning. Last year's Annual Report focused on the need for NASA to adopt a realistically long planning horizon for the aging Space Shuttle so that safety would not erode. NASA's response to the report concurred with this finding. Nevertheless, there has been a greater emphasis on current operations to the apparent detriment of long-term planning. Budget cutbacks and shifts in priorities have severely limited the resources available to the Space Shuttle and ISS for application to risk-reduction and life-extension efforts. As a result, funds originally intended for long-term safety-related activities have been used for operations. Thus, while safety continues to be well served at present, the basis for future safety has eroded. Section II of this report develops this theme in more detail and presents several important, overarching findings and recommendations that apply to many if not all of NASA's programs. Section III of the report presents other significant findings, recommendations and supporting material applicable to specific program areas. Appendix A presents a list of Panel members. Appendix B contains the reaction of the ASAP to NASA's response to the calendar year 2000 findings and recommendations. In accordance with a practice started last year, this Appendix includes brief narratives as well as classifications of the responses as 'open,' 'closed,' or 'continuing.' Appendix C details the Panel's activities during the reporting period.

2002-01-01

100

Polyimides: Thermally stable aerospace polymers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An up to date review of available commercial and experimental high temperature polyimide resins which show potential for aerospace applications is presented. Current government research trends involving the use of polyimides as matrix resins for structural composites are discussed. Both the development of polyimides as adhesives for bonding metals and composites, and as films and coatings for use in an aerospace environment are reviewed. In addition, future trends for polyimides are proposed.

St.clair, A. K.

1980-01-01

101

32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

1998-01-01

102

Aerospace safety advisory panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

1995-01-01

103

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

1989-03-01

104

Ames Fellows Award - Mark  

NASA Video Gallery

Dr. Hans Mark is a leading expert in the fields of aerospace design and national defense policy. From 1969 to 1977, he served as Director of the NASA Ames Research Center. During his tenure, Ames b...

105

Type II Supernova Light Curves from the Caltech Core Collapse Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present our analysis of a sample of type II supernova light curves measured by the Caltech Core Collapse Project (CCCP). CCCP is a large observational program which made use of the robotic 60" and the Hale 200" telescopes to obtain optical photometry, spectroscopy and IR photometry of 50 nearby core-collapse supernovae. It provides a complete sample of core-collapse events, with well-defined selection criteria, and uniform, high-quality optical/IR observations. Our goal is to characterize the little-studied properties of core-collapse supernovae as a population. We attempt to describe the light curves of type II SNe of all subtypes using only a few empirically derived parameters, with the aspiration of explaining most of our light curves with a single tunable formula. Eventually, associating a physical meaning to each of the parameters may help to better understand the mechanisms underlying the diversity in type II SN light curves.

Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, A.; Kiewe, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, D. B.; Moon, D.; Sand, D. J.; Soderberg, A. M.

2009-12-01

106

Measurements of radiated noise in the Caltech high-speed water tunnel. Part 2: Radiated noise from cavitating hydrofoils  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is the second part of a report on recent measurements of hydrodynamic noise in the Caltech High-Speed Water Tunnel. In the first part, results for noise radiated from fully wetted turbulent boundary layers were presented. In this part the results for cavitating flows are described. Because of the greater intensity of cavitation-produced noise, the signal to noise, ratio

S. J. Barker

1975-01-01

107

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a five-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASA's safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are 'one deep.' The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting 'brain drain' could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. The major NASA programs are also limited in their ability to plan property for the future. This is of particular concern for the Space Shuttle and ISS because these programs are scheduled to operate well into the next century. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning. For example, the section on computer hardware and software contains specific findings related to required longer range safety-related actions. NASA can be proud of its accomplishments this past year, but must remain ever vigilant, particularly as ISS assembly begins to accelerate. The Panel will continue to focus on both the short- and long-term aspects of risk management and safety planning. This task continues to be made manageable and productive by the excellent cooperation the Panel receives from both NASA and its contractors. Particular emphasis will continue to be directed to longer term workforce and program planning issues as well as the immediate risks associated with ISS assembly and the initial flights of the X-33 and X-34. Section 2 of this report presents specific findings and recommendations generated by ASAP activities during 1998. Section 3 contains more detailed information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendix A is a current roster of Panel members, consultants, and staff. Appendix B contains NASA's response to the findings and recommendations from the 1997 ASAP Annual Report. Appendix C details the fact-finding activities of the Panel in 1998. During the year, Mr. Richard D. Blomberg was elected chair of the Panel and Vice Admiral (VADM) Robert F Dunn was elected deputy chair. VADM Bernard M. Kauderer moved from consultant to member. Mr. Charles J. Donlan retired from the Panel after many years of meritorious service. Ms. Shirley C. McCarty and Mr. Robert L. ('Hoot') Gibson joined the Panel as consultants.

1999-01-01

108

Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine, August 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiology, diving medicine...

M. J. Antunano K. Wade

2001-01-01

109

Advanced Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Aerospace manufacturing industry segment is facing problems of a "graying" workforce. In addition they face the challenges of increasing productivity and integrating new materials accentuating the need to attract new engineers to the manufacturing workplace. This paper describes a project funded by the National Science Foundation to examine the changing needs of the aerospace manufacturing industries, and to develop curricula materials to address those needs. These materials will be in the public domain and fit into existing engineering and manufacturing technology programs. The project is a joint venture between El Camino College, Wichita Area Technical College, Oregon Institute of Technology and Purdue University, and is supported by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, The Boeing Company, Northrop Grumman Corp., Bell Helicopter, Lockheed Martin Corp., and other leading aerospace companies. The first phase of this project involved conducting interviews with new manufacturing engineers and their mangers, and results of these interviews are included.

Anderson, John

2009-07-13

110

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other changes to the Panel composition during the past year were: the resignation of Mr. Dennis E. Fitch as a Consultant; the appointment of Mr. Roger D. Schaufele as a Consultant; and the assignment of Ms. Susan M. Smith as Staff Assistant.

1998-01-01

111

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents the results of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) activities during 2002. The format of the report has been modified to capture a long-term perspective. Section II is new and highlights the Panel's view of NASA's safety progress during the year. Section III contains the pivotal safety issues facing NASA in the coming year. Section IV includes the program area findings and recommendations. The Panel has been asked by the Administrator to perform several special studies this year, and the resulting white papers appear in Appendix C. The year has been filled with significant achievements for NASA in both successful Space Shuttle operations and International Space Station (ISS) construction. Throughout the year, safety has been first and foremost in spite of many changes throughout the Agency. The relocation of the Orbiter Major Modifications (OMMs) from California to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) appears very successful. The transition of responsibilities for program management of the Space Shuttle and ISS programs from Johnson Space Center (JSC) to NASA Headquarters went smoothly. The decision to extend the life of the Space Shuttle as the primary NASA vehicle for access to space is viewed by the Panel as a prudent one. With the appropriate investments in safety improvements, in maintenance, in preserving appropriate inventories of spare parts, and in infrastructure, the Space Shuttle can provide safe and reliable support for the ISS for the foreseeable future. Indications of an aging Space Shuttle fleet occurred on more than one occasion this year. Several flaws went undetected in the early prelaunch tests and inspections. In all but one case, the problems were found prior to launch. These incidents were all handled properly and with safety as the guiding principle. Indeed, launches were postponed until the problems were fully understood and mitigating action could be taken. These incidents do, however, indicate the need to analyze the Space Shuttle certification criteria closely. Based on this analysis, NASA can determine the need to receritfy the vehicles and to incorporate more stringent inspections throughout the process to minimize launch schedule impact. A highly skilled and experience workforce will be increasingly important for safe and reliable operations as the Space Shuttle vehicles and infrastructure continue to age.

2002-01-01

112

Awarding Monopoly Franchises  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors analyze how to award a monopoly franchise when the objective is to maximize expected consumers' surplus net of transfer payments to the producer. Potential producers initially possess independent private information about uncertain production costs. Only the chosen producer subsequently observes realized production costs. After awarding the franchise to the producer with the lowest expected costs, prices are optimally

Michael H. Riordan; David E. M. Sappington

1987-01-01

113

MERIT Award Criteria  

Cancer.gov

MERIT Award Criteria The MERIT Award (R37) program provides a means to recognize the most outstanding R01 applications from superior researchers. Program staff and/or members of the National Cancer Advisory Board will identify candidates for the MERIT

114

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. See also "Outstanding Student Paper Awards" published previously (Eos, 93(27), 253-254; Eos, 93(28), 260-261; and Eos, 93(30), 293).

2012-07-01

115

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. See also “Outstanding Student Paper Awards” published previously (Eos, 93(27), 253-254 Eos, 93(28), 260-261) and in future issues of Eos.

2012-07-01

116

Aluminum-lithium for aerospace  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J. [Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, VA (United States)

1996-10-01

117

Computers and the aerospace engineer  

SciTech Connect

The use of computers in aerospace for design and analysis is described, and examples of project enhancements are presented. NASA is working toward the design of a numerical test cell that will allow integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. It is noted that with continuing advances in computer technology, including areas such as three-dimensional computer-aided design, finite element analysis, supercomputers, and artificial intelligence, the possibilities seem limitless for the aerospace engineer. Research projects are currently underway for design and/or reconfiguration of the V-22, B-767, SCRAMJET engines, F-16, and X29A using these techniques.

Trego, L.E.

1990-03-01

118

Second Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards.

Whitaker, A. F.; Clark-Ingram, M.; Hessler, S. L.

1997-01-01

119

Second Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mandated elimination of CFC'S, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application, verification, compliant coatings including corrosion protection system and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards.

Whitaker, A. F. (Editor); Clark-Ingram, M. (Editor)

1997-01-01

120

Aerospace Fastener Applications, Part 2: Instructor Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides instructor notes to accompany a presentation on fastener applications in the aerospace industry. These notes are intended for use along with the PowerPoint presentation on the topic which is available for download here. These materials focus on use of rivets in the aerospace industry, including their identification and installation, as well as basic aerospace fasteners applications. Testing and standardization of materials is also covered.

2011-11-16

121

Science & Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2000  

NSF Publications Database

... 2000 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2000 ... pdf) Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2000 This report is available in hypertext (.htm ...

122

e-AIRS: Aerospace integrated research systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

While developing information technology and improving engineering environment, modern aerospace technology requires even larger scale computing and data management. However, the technology faces difficulty to use isolated resources. Therefore, needs arise to construct network based and integrated design and analysis system. In order to provide a uniform aerospace development infrastructure, three perspectives are required (i.e., integration and management of aerospace

Min-Joong Jeong; Kum Won Cho; Kyoung-Yun Kim

2007-01-01

123

Introduction to Composites: An Aerospace Manufacturing Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides an overview of composite materials from the aerospace manufacturing perspective. The document includes 38 slides and covers composite material structure and components, compares aluminum to composites, the advantages and disadvantages of using composites in the aerospace industry, composite applications and manufacturing techniques and subsequent composite models.

Anderson, J.

2011-11-16

124

The Tony Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 50th Annual Tony Awards ceremony will take place June 2, 1996. These awards are given to "recognize a person, or a production, or those in the realm of theatre that have achieved a degree of excellence in their fields." The Tony awards Web site is divided into four parts: 96 Awards, highlighted by a complete list of nominees in all categories; A Look Back, with a browsable and searchable archive of all award winners from 1947-1995, and a picture gallery that contains photos, posters, costume designs, or set designs down through the years; Spotlight, which has a long story on Antoinette Perry, for whom the awards were named; and Center Stage, which includes a general chat room, as well as a back stage area where you can chat with the stars. This is a well done, exhaustive, graphically beautiful site for those who follow the awards. http://www.tonys.org/index.html Less graphical entrance: http://www.tonys.org/siteindex.html

125

New directions in aerospace packaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The packaging of electronic devices for aerospace applications is discussed. Consideration is given to the problems encountered in dual-in-line packaging; surface mounting; and pin-grid-arrays. Some limitations of Leadless Chip Carrier (LLC) packages are discussed with respect to reliability; standardization; and handling and testing.

Kanz, J. W.

126

Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

1994-01-01

127

35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

128

Estimating Costs Of Aerospace Construction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report presents brief descriptions of techniques, instructional and reference literature, computer hardware and software, and compilations of data used to estimate costs of specially equipped buildings and other aerospace construction projects. Descriptions replete with practical examples. Experiences gained in estimating costs of specific projects included.

Brown, Joseph A.

1994-01-01

129

Careers in the Aerospace Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document briefly presents career information in the field of aerospace industry. Employment exists in three areas: (1) professional and technical occupations in research and development (engineers, scientists, and technicians); (2) administrative, clerical, and related occupations (engineers, scientists, technicians, clerks, secretaries,…

Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Office of General Aviation.

130

Development of lightweight, stiff, stable, replicated glass mirrors for the Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 25 m aperture Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT) will be the first segmented telescope of its size and precision. A new technology was required to be able to economically manufacture the segments for the primary mirror. This technology had to be a low cost, low risk, volume manufacturing process in addition to meeting all of the optical and mechanical requirements. The segments had to be lightweight (10-15 kg/m2), have high specific stiffness and be thermally stable. The segments had to have sufficient robustness for practical transport and use and be compatible with high-reflectivity coatings. ITT has designed a replicated, lightweight glass mirror solution to these manufacturing problems. This technology can be used to fabricate segments for CCAT. It can be used to fabricate segments for visible wavelength segmented telescopes or any other application requiring lightweight optics in large quantities. This technology enables the fabrication of large, lightweight mirror segments in a few weeks to a couple of months, depending on the figure requirements. This paper discusses the design of these mirrors and presents demonstrated results to date, including a 0.5 m diameter, 8 kg/m2 borosilicate mirror blank and 0.2 m diameter replicated borosilicate mirrors.

Strafford, David N.; DeSmitt, Steven M.; Kupinski, Peter T.; Sebring, Thomas A.

2006-06-01

131

SHARP: The SHARC-II polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II) is a 12 × 32 pixel camera used with the 10 meter diameter Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We have deployed an optics module between the telescope and camera which converts SHARC-II into a sensitive imaging polarimeter, "SHARP." The camera and polarimeter currently operate at wavelengths of 350 and 450 ?m we are planning an additional passband at 620 ?m. The incident beam is split into two orthogonally polarized components by the SHARP optics module and re-imaged onto opposite ends of the SHARC-II array. The result is a dual-beam 12 × 12 pixel polarimeter. The modular nature of the optics design allows the user to easily switch between polarimeter and camera modes during a single observing session. Here we review the optical design of SHARP, report on the instrument's performance, and review our data reduction methodology. SHARP will be used to study the magnetic field structure and dust emission properties in young stellar objects, Galactic clouds, and external galaxies. We present the first polarimetric maps of celestial sources made from SHARP observations and compare them to previous results. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST 02-41356 and 05-05230 to Northwestern University and 05-05124 to the University of Chicago.

Vaillancourt, John E.; Attard, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Houde, M.; Kirby, L.; Krejny, M.; Li, H.; Novak, G.; Shinnaga, H.

2006-12-01

132

Wind Resource Evaluation at the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind resources are evaluated at the Caltech Field Laboratory in order to understand how an array of vertical-axis wind turbines extracts energy from the flow. A tower with sonic anemometers placed every meter over the turbine's rotor height is deployed in upwind and downwind positions relative to the array of turbines to obtain the three dimensional wind velocity vectors. Upwind of the array, far enough to be considered free stream, the measured velocity profile represents the turbulent boundary layer flow at the site. Downwind, the measured wind velocities are reduced significantly and display a smaller variance over the rotor height. The topmost sensor, located above the top of the rotor height, reports flow velocities close to the free stream quantities. Sweeps and ejections are both present in the downwind velocity profile. The talk will present the data from these field measurements, discuss the similarities and differences to canopy flows and draw conclusions about the interaction between the wind turbine array and the flow.

Mulligan, Quinn; Kinzel, Matthias; Dabiri, John

2011-11-01

133

Optics for MUSIC: a new (sub)millimeter camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will present the design and implementation, along with calculations and some measurements of the performance, of the room-temperature and cryogenic optics for MUSIC, a new (sub)millimeter camera we are developing for the Caltech Submm Observatory (CSO). The design consists of two focusing elements in addition to the CSO primary and secondary mirrors: a warm off-axis elliptical mirror and a cryogenic (4K) lens. These optics will provide a 14 arcmin field of view that is diffraction limited in all four of the MUSIC observing bands (2.00, 1.33, 1.02, and 0.86 mm). A cold (4K) Lyot stop will be used to define the primary mirror illumination, which will be maximized while keeping spillover at the sub 1% level. The MUSIC focal plane will be populated with broadband phased antenna arrays that efficiently couple to factor of (see manuscript) 3 in bandwidth,1, 2 and each pixel on the focal plane will be read out via a set of four lumped element filters that define the MUSIC observing bands (i.e., each pixel on the focal plane simultaneously observes in all four bands). Finally, a series of dielectric and metal-mesh low pass filters have been implemented to reduce the optical power load on the MUSIC cryogenic stages to a quasi-negligible level while maintaining good transmission in-band.

Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran P.; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Hollister, Matt I.; Leduc, Henry G.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

2010-07-01

134

Lightning Protection Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This technical memorandum provides lightning protection engineering guidelines and technical procedures used by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch for aerospace vehicles. The overviews illustrate the technical support available to project managers, chief engineers, and design engineers to ensure that aerospace vehicles managed by MSFC are adequately protected from direct and indirect effects of lightning. Generic descriptions of the lightning environment and vehicle protection technical processes are presented. More specific aerospace vehicle requirements for lightning protection design, performance, and interface characteristics are available upon request to the MSFC Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch, mail code EL23.

Goodloe, C. C.

1999-01-01

135

Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP) Observations of Type IIn Supernovae: Typical Properties and Implications for Their Progenitor Stars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) are rare events, constituting only a few percent of all core-collapse SNe, and the current sample of well-observed SNe IIn is small. Here, we study the four SNe IIn observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). The CCCP SN sample is unbiased to the extent that object selection was not influenced by target SN properties.

Michael Kiewe; Avishay Gal-Yam; Iair Arcavi; Douglas C. Leonard; J. Emilio Enriquez; S. Bradley Cenko; Derek B. Fox; Dae-Sik Moon; David J. Sand; Alicia M. Soderberg

2012-01-01

136

Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP) observations of type IIn supernovae: typical properties and implications for their progenitor stars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type IIn Supernovae (SNe IIn) are rare events, constituting only a few\\u000apercent of all core-collapse SNe, and the current sample of well observed SNe\\u000aIIn is small. Here, we study the four SNe IIn observed by the Caltech\\u000aCore-Collapse Project (CCCP). The CCCP SN sample is unbiased to the extent that\\u000aobject selection was not influenced by target SN

Michael Kiewe; Avishay Gal-Yam; Iair Arcavi; Douglas C. Leonard; J. Emilio Enriquez; S. Bradley Cenko; Derek B. Fox; Dae-Sik Moon; David J. Sand; Alicia M. Soderberg

2010-01-01

137

Award Management and Reporting  

Cancer.gov

This section contains links compiled by NCI's Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) to help investigators learn more about managing their grant awards and complying with NIH reporting requirements.

138

Fixed Amount Award  

NSF Publications Database

... Arlington, VA 22230 FIXED AMOUNT AWARD (FAA GC-1) GENERAL CONDITIONS This fixed amount is subject to ... The grant letter specifies a pre-determined fixed amount of NSF support for the project described in ...

139

Scholastic Photography Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents 13 winning photographs by secondary students participating in the annual Scholastic Photography Awards competition conducted by Scholastic Magazines, Inc., and sponsored by the Eastman Kodak Company. Top winners receive scholarships. (SJL)

Art Education, 1981

1981-01-01

140

IAHS announces Tison Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the Hamburg General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) appointed an Ad Hoc Award Committee consisting of I. Rodriguez-Iturbe (Venezuela), Chairman, T. O'Donnell (UK), and A. Ivan Johnson (USA). The charge to the committee was to develop recommendations to use $13,000 presented to IAHS by the Exeter Scientific Assembly Organizing Committee in memory of the late L. J. Tison. The IAHS Bureau approved an annual prize to recognize the scientific contributions of young hydrologists to IAHS, with $750 of investment income used for an annual Tison Award in accordance with the following rules: The IAHS Tison Award aims to promote excellence in research by young hydrologists. The award will be announced annually and will be presented in a public ceremony during either an IUGG/IAHS General Assembly or an IAHS Scientific Assembly.

141

The AIDA Award  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recipient of an award as an outstanding South Australian science teacher discusses the relationships between the teacher's role, the public view of science, and the nature of science in his acceptance address. (AL)

South Australian Science Teachers Journal, 1971

1971-01-01

142

Coordination in Split Award Auctions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors analyze split award procurement auctions in which a buyer divides full production between two suppliers or awards all production to a single supplier, and suppliers have private cost information. An intriguing feature of split awards is that the equilibrium bids are implicitly coordinated. Because a split award price is the sum of offered split prices, each supplier can

James J Anton; Dennis A Yao

1992-01-01

143

BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prestigious BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards are awarded annually to one teacher from each state of Australia. The awards recognise and value the time and effort that teachers give to the profession and to students conducting scientific research projects. This paper examines the Science Award scheme to identify the characteristics common to…

Chittleborough, Gail; Campbell, Coral

2012-01-01

144

NASA Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity 1989 highlights. The 1989 recipient: Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Excellence Award for Productivity and Quality is the result of NASA's desire to encourage superior quality and the continuous improvement philosophy in the aerospace industry. It is awarded to NASA contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers who have demonstrated sustained excellence, customer orientation, and outstanding achievements in a total quality management (TQM) environment. The 'highlights' booklet is intended to transfer successful techniques demonstrated by the performance and quality of major NASA contractors.

1990-01-01

145

Third Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, other ozone depleting chemicals, and specific hazardous materials is well underway. The phaseout of these chemicals has mandated changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. We are beyond discovery and initiation of these new developments and are now in the implementation phase. This conference provided a forum for materials and processes engineers, scientists, and managers to describe, review, and critically assess the evolving replacement and clean propulsion technologies from the standpoint of their significance, application, impact on aerospace systems, and utilization by the research and development community. The use of these new technologies, their selection and qualification, their implementation, and the needs and plans for further developments are presented.

Whitaker, A. F. (Editor); Cross, D. R. (Editor); Caruso, S. V. (Editor); Clark-Ingram, M. (Editor)

1999-01-01

146

38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

2006-01-01

147

37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

2004-01-01

148

Damping in aerospace composite materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental results are presented on specimens of carbon and Kevlar fibers in epoxy resin, materials used in many aerospace structures (control surfaces and wings in aircraft, large antennas in spacecraft, etc.). Some experimental methods of estimating damping ratios are first reviewed, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain. Some damping factor estimates from experimental tests are then shown; in order to evaluate the effects of the aerospace environment, damping factors have been obtained in a typical range of temperature, namely between +120 C and -120 C, and in the pressure range from room pressure to 10 exp -6 torr. Finally, a theoretical approach for predicting the bounds of the damping coefficients is shown, and prediction data are compared with experimental results.

Agneni, A.; Balis Crema, L.; Castellani, A.

149

39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

2008-01-01

150

Status of a Novel 4-Band Submm/mm Camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Submillimeter observations are important to the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Determination of the spectral energy distribution in the millimeter and submillimeter regimes allows important and powerful diagnostics. To this end, we are undertaking the construction of a 4-band (750, 850, 1100, 1300 microns) 8-arcminute field of view camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The focal plane will make use of three novel technologies: photolithographic phased array antennae, on-chip band-pass filters, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID). The phased array antenna design obviates beam-defining feed horns. On-chip band-pass filters eliminate band-defining metal-mesh filters. Together, the antennae and filters enable each spatial pixel to observe in all four bands simultaneously. MKIDs are highly multiplexable background-limited photon detectors. Readout of the MKID array will be done with software-defined radio (See poster by Max-Moerbeck et al.). This camera will provide an order-of-magnitude larger mapping speed than existing instruments and will be comparable to SCUBA 2 in terms of the detection rate for dusty sources, but complementary to SCUBA 2 in terms of wavelength coverage. We present results from an engineering run with a demonstration array, the baseline design for the science array, and the status of instrument design, construction, and testing. We anticipate the camera will be available at the CSO in 2010. This work has been supported by NASA ROSES APRA grants NNG06GG16G and NNG06GC71G, the NASA JPL Research and Technology Development Program, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Noroozian, Omid; Day, P.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S.; Kumar, S.; LeDuc, H. G.; Mazin, B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Schlaerth, J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Vayonakis, A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

2007-12-01

151

Modernization of the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network - ARRA and Beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USGS/ANSS/ARRA program provided equipment and funding to upgrade the equipment and infrastructure of the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). The SCSN is a modern digital seismic network that provides real-time earthquake information products such as rapid notifications, moment tensors, and ShakeMap. ARRA funds were used to modernize 178 of 300 SCSN stations, upgrade telemetry hubs, and build a state-of-the-art microwave telemetry backbone. With these upgrades complete, we are taking the next step of upgrading the analog short-period stations to digital short-period stations and adding strong motion sensors to them. We also are installing NetQuakes strong motion instruments to fill gaps in our urban recording capability. The ARRA-funded upgrades allow the SCSN to meet the ANSS Performance Standards more consistently than before. The new equipment makes the SCSN stations more homogeneous, significantly boosts station uptimes, reduces maintenance costs, and improves waveform data quality. The new data-loggers send data with reduced delays, which is critical for earthquake early warning applications. Station data quality was checked before each upgrade allowing sensor and site problems to be found, so that they could be addressed and data quality could be improved during the upgrade site visit. Data quality checks also were performed during the upgrade work and station metadata was changed in real time as work progressed. Sensor orientations were checked at over 115 sites using an OCTANS gyro-compass and mis-orientations were documented and corrected. To further take advantage of the ARRA-supplied equipment, we have developed scripts to take advantage of features from the new Q330 data-loggers: automatic detection of out-of-range mass positions with automatic recentering, and automatic data requests to fill data gaps. We also expanded the features and extended the utility of our Station Information System (SIS).

Thomas, V. I.; Bhadha, R.; Crummey, J.; Curtis, W.; Devora, A.; Flores, I.; Given, D. D.; Hauksson, E.; Johnson, D.; Koesterer, C.; Lydeen, S.; Sutton, D.; Watkins, M.; Yu, E.

2011-12-01

152

SHARC II: A Caltech Submillimeter Observatory Facility Camera with 384 Pixels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

SHARC II is a background-limited 350 micron and 450 micron facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory undergoing commissioning in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12 x 32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard. Each 1 mm x 1 mm pixel is coated with a 400 Omega/square bismuth film and located lambda/4 above a reflective backshort to achieve greater than 75% absorption efficiency. The pixels cover the focal plane with greater than 90% filling factor. At 350 microns, the SHARC II pixels are separated by 0.65 lambda/D. In contrast to the silicon bolometers in the predecessor of SHARC II, each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which lowers the 1/f knee of tile detector noise to less than 0.03 Hz, under load, at tile bath temperature of 0.36 K. The bolometers are AC-biased and read in 'total power' mode to take advantage of the improved stability. Each bolometer is biased through a custom approx. 130 MOmega CrSi load resistor at 7 K and read with a commercial JFET at 120 K. The JFETs and load resistors are integrated with the detectors into a single assembly to minimize microphonic noise. Electrical connection across the 0.36 K to 4 K and 4 K to 120 K temperature interfaces is accomplished with lithographed metal wires on dielectric substrates. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 micron of 1 Jy Hz(sup -1/2) or better. The new camera should be at least 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to the prior instrument.

Dowell, C. Darren; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda; Freund, Minoru; Gardner, Matthew B.; Groseth, Jeffrey; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kovacs, Attila; Lis, Dariusz C.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.

2002-01-01

153

SHARC II: a Caltech submillimeter observatory facility camera with 384 pixels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SHARC II is a background-limited 350 ?m and 450 ?m facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory undergoing commissioning in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12 × 32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard. Each 1 mm × 1 mm pixel is coated with a 400 ?/square bismuth film and located ?/4 above a reflective backshort to achieve >75% absorption efficiency. The pixels cover the focal plane with >90% filling factor. At 350 ?m, the SHARC II pixels are separated by 0.65 ?/D. In contrast to the silicon bolometers in the predecessor of SHARC II, each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which lowers the 1/f knee of the detector noise to <0.03 Hz, under load, at the bath temperature of 0.36 K. The bolometers are AC-biased and read in 'total power' mode to take advantage of the improved stability. Each bolometer is biased through a custom ~130 M? CrSi load resistor at 7 K and read with a commercial JFET at 120 K. The JFETs and load resistors are integrated with the detectors into a single assembly to minimize microphonic noise. Electrical connection across the 0.36 K to 4 K and 4 K to 120 K temperature interfaces is accomplished with lithographed metal wires on dielectric substrates. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 ?m of 1 Jy Hz-1/2 or better. The new camera should be at least 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to the prior instrument.

Dowell, Charles D.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, R. Sachidananda; Freund, Minoru M.; Gardner, Matthew; Groseth, Jeff; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Kovacs, Attila; Lis, Dariusz C.; Moseley, Samuel H., Jr.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Voellmer, George M.; Yoshida, Hiroshige

2003-02-01

154

NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Established by Congress after the Apollo spacecraft fire in January 1967, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) is an independent group of experts tasked with advising "the NASA Administrator and Congress on all safety-related issues -- design, development, manufacturing, flight preparation, and missions operations -- concerning NASA's human space flight programs." The ASAP homepage features the text of previous annual reports and general information about the Panel and its activities.

155

30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

1996-01-01

156

30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter\\/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

O. H. Jr. Bradley; J. F. Rogers

1996-01-01

157

Aerospace Materials Quality Control: Instructor Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project is intended to accompany a PowerPoint presentation on the topic of quality control of materials used in the aerospace industry. That presentation is available for download here. The presentation and notes will help students understand why quality control is important in this field. They also include details about aerospace QC teams and techniques, including non-destructive testing. These instructor notes also include links to a number of useful online references.

2012-11-14

158

Aerospace Fastener Applications, Part 1: Instructor Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides instructor notes to accompany a presentation on fastener applications in the aerospace industry. These notes are intended for use along with the PowerPoint presentation on the topic which is available for download here. These materials cover aerospace fasteners and their specifications, including the specifics of bolts, nuts, rivets and their applications in the industry.

2011-11-16

159

The Need for an Aerospace Pharmacy Residency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph poster presentation reviews the rationale for a call for a new program in residency for aerospace pharmacy. Aerospace medicine provides a unique twist on traditional medicine, and a specialty has evolved to meet the training for physicians, and it is becoming important to develop such a program for training in pharmacy designed for aerospace. The reasons for this specialist training are outlined and the challenges of developing a program are reviewed.

Bayuse, T.; Schuyler, C.; Bayuse, Tina M.

2007-01-01

160

Proceedings of the 31. intersociety energy conversion engineering conference. Volume 1: Aerospace power systems, aerospace technologies  

SciTech Connect

The 117 papers contained in Volume 1 are arranged topically as follows --(A) Aerospace Power Systems: Environmental effects; Space power systems and applications; Terrestrial applications of aerospace power; Aircraft power; Space station power; Electromechanical actuators; Automation; Computer simulation; and Integrated solar upper stage; (B) Aerospace Power Technologies: Batteries for aerospace power; Electric propulsion and the space environment; Wireless energy transmission; Power electronics; and Static and dynamic space energy conversion. Papers within the scope of the data base have been processed separately.

Chetty, P.R.K.; Jackson, W.D.; Dicks, E.B. [eds.

1996-12-31

161

Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999  

NSF Publications Database

... Awards: 1999 Hypertext Format Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999 Portable Document ... Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999 This report is available in hypertext (.htm) and ...

162

Microelectronics packaging research directions for aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Roadmap begins with an assessment of needs from the microelectronics for aerospace applications viewpoint. Needs Assessment is divided into materials, packaging components, and radiation characterization of packaging.

Galbraith, L.

2003-01-01

163

Aerospace Activities in the Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes 17 activities which are aerospace oriented and yet provide an interdisciplinary approach to learning. Some of the activities described involve paper airplanes, parachutes, model rockets, etc. (BR)

Jones, Robert M.; Wiggins, Kenneth E.

1974-01-01

164

NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program Update  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of NASA's Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program is to: develop, maintain and provide tools for the validation and assessment of aerospace battery technologies; accelerate the readiness of technology advances and provide infusion paths for emerging technologies; provide NASA projects with the required database and validation guidelines for technology selection of hardware and processes relating to aerospace batteries; disseminate validation and assessment tools, quality assurance, reliability, and availability information to the NASA and aerospace battery communities; and ensure that safe, reliable batteries are available for NASA's future missions.

Manzo, Michelle; ODonnell, Patricia

1997-01-01

165

Caltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey. XI. The Merger Rate to Redshift 1 from Kinematic Pairs.  

PubMed

The rate of mass accumulation due to galaxy merging depends on the mass, density, and velocity distribution of galaxies in the near neighborhood of a host galaxy. The fractional luminosity in kinematic pairs combines all of these effects in a single estimator that is relatively insensitive to population evolution. Here we use a k-corrected and evolution-compensated volume-limited sample having an R-band absolute magnitude of Mk,eRCaltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey and 3000 from the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology field galaxy survey to measure the rate and redshift evolution of merging. The combined sample has an approximately constant comoving number and luminosity density from redshift 0.1 to 1.1 (OmegaM=0.2, OmegaLambda=0.8); hence, any merger evolution will be dominated by correlation and velocity evolution, not density evolution. We identify kinematic pairs with projected separations less than either 50 or 100 h-1 kpc and rest-frame velocity differences of less than 1000 km s-1. The fractional luminosity in pairs is modeled as fL&parl0;Deltav,rp,Mk,er&parr0;&parl0;1+z&parr0;mL, where &sqbl0;fL,mL&sqbr0; are &sqbl0;0.14+/-0.07,0+/-1.4&sqbr0; and &sqbl0;0.37+/-0.7,0.1+/-0.5&sqbr0; for rp/=0.2M*) is 0.02+/-0.01&parl0;1+z&parr0;0.1+/-0.5M* Gyr-1. Present-day high-luminosity galaxies therefore have accreted approximately 0.15M* of their mass over the approximately 7 Gyr to redshift 1. Since merging is likely only weakly dependent on the host mass, the fractional effect, deltaM&solm0;M approximately 0.15M*&solm0;M, is dramatic for lower mass galaxies but is, on the average, effectively perturbative for galaxies above 1M*. PMID:10702118

Carlberg; Cohen; Patton; Blandford; Hogg; Yee; Morris; Lin; Hall; Sawicki; Wirth; Cowie; Hu; Songaila

2000-03-20

166

Hard X-ray imaging survey of the Galactic plane with the Caltech gamma-ray imaging payload GRIP-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a two-day balloon flight during October 1995, the Caltech coded aperture gamma ray imaging payload (GRIP-2) imaged various fields in the Galactic plane and center in the 25 to 600 keV energy band. The large phoswich detector, the 15 deg field of view, the 30 arcmin angular resolution and 6 arcmin point source localization capability of GRIP-2 provides the possibility of surveying the accreting binary population of the Galaxy at high energy. The instrument is described and preliminary imaging results are reported on. The capabilities of this instrument for hard X-ray/gamma ray imaging are demonstrated.

Corbel, S.; Cook, W. R.; Harrison, F. A.; Prince, T. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Wang, S.

1997-01-01

167

Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

2010-01-01

168

Aerospace materials for nonaerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many of the flame-resistant nonmetallic materials that were developed for the Apollo and Skylab programs are discussed for commercial and military applications. Interchanges of information are taking place with the government agencies, industries, and educational institutions, which are interested in applications of fire-safe nonmetallic materials. These materials are particularly applicable to the design of aircraft, mass transit interiors, residential and public building constructions, nursing homes and hospitals, and to other fields of fire safety applications. Figures 22, 23 and 24 show the potential nonaerospace applications of flame-resistant aerospace materials are shown.

Johnston, R. L.; Dawn, F. S.

1974-01-01

169

Adaptive control with aerospace applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Robust and adaptive control techniques have a rich history of theoretical development with successful application. Despite the accomplishments made, attempts to combine the best elements of each approach into robust adaptive systems has proven challenging, particularly in the area of application to real world aerospace systems. In this research, we investigate design methods for general classes of systems that may be applied to representative aerospace dynamics. By combining robust baseline control design with augmentation designs, our work aims to leverage the advantages of each approach. This research contributes the development of robust model-based control design for two classes of dynamics: 2nd order cascaded systems, and a more general MIMO framework. We present a theoretically justified method for state limiting via augmentation of a robust baseline control design. Through the development of adaptive augmentation designs, we are able to retain system performance in the presence of uncertainties. We include an extension that combines robust baseline design with both state limiting and adaptive augmentations. In addition we develop an adaptive augmentation design approach for a class of dynamic input uncertainties. We present formal stability proofs and analyses for all proposed designs in the research. Throughout the work, we present real world aerospace applications using relevant flight dynamics and flight test results. We derive robust baseline control designs with application to both piloted and unpiloted aerospace system. Using our developed methods, we add a flight envelope protecting state limiting augmentation for piloted aircraft applications and demonstrate the efficacy of our approach via both simulation and flight test. We illustrate our adaptive augmentation designs via application to relevant fixed-wing aircraft dynamics. Both a piloted example combining the state limiting and adaptive augmentation approaches, and an unpiloted example with adaptive augmentation show the ability of our approach to retain desired performance in the presence of relevant system uncertainty. Finally, we present alternative adaptive augmentation design developed to mitigate time delays at the system input and which demonstrates significant improvement over an existing widely used adaptive augmentation approach when applied to fixed wing aircraft dynamics.

Gadient, Ross

170

British aerospace begins update effort  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among the advanced production technologies selected for installation by British Aerospace Corporation's Aircraft Group are: semi-automated carbon fiber production, super plastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF-DB) of bond titanium and aluminum alloys, and introduction of direct numerical control of manufacturing processes and a CAD/CAM program. Development programs for these technologies are discussed, including a water jet carbon fiber cutting machine, a carbon fiber second fuselage that is easier to assemble, a new forming press for SPF-DB components, a pilot program for SPF-DB production which includes a 500-ton forming press, and numerically controlled robots and machine tools.

1982-05-01

171

Aerospace Medical Support in Russia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the role of the flight surgeon in support of aerospace medical support operations at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), also known as Star City, in Russia. The flight surgeon in this role is the medical advocate for non-russian astronauts, and also provides medical care for illness and injury for astronauts, family members, and guests as well as civil servants and contractors. The flight surgeon also provides support for hazardous training. There are various photos of the area, and the office, and some of the equipment that is used.

Castleberry, Tara; Chamberlin, Blake; Cole, Richard; Dowell, Gene; Savage, Scott

2011-01-01

172

Cognitive engineering in aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress that was made with respect to the objectives and goals of the research that is being carried out in the Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory (CSEL) under a Cooperative Agreement with NASA Ames Research Center is described. The major objective of this project is to expand the research base in Cognitive Engineering to be able to support the development and human-centered design of automated systems for aerospace applications. This research project is in support of the Aviation Safety/Automation Research plan and related NASA research goals in space applications.

Woods, David D.

1993-01-01

173

Awards of Excellence, 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents annotations of seven Awards of Excellence presented in 1993 by Career Placement Council to recognize excellence in media, educational programming, and research related to career planning and employment of college graduates in categories of Audiovisual Programs, Publications for Students, Research, and Educational Programming within an…

Allen, Claudia

1993-01-01

174

NCI Director's Awards 2008  

Cancer.gov

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS Lawrence J. Ray, J.D. For exceptional leadership and service to the Office of Management for the implementation of new procedures and reorganization constructing a vitalized and effective administrative operation. James H. Doroshow, M.D. Provided leadership for NCI’s early drug discovery and development, and transforming clinical cancer research across the entire spectrum of therapeutic oncology.

175

NCI OA Contract Awards  

Cancer.gov

This is a searchable database of contracts awarded by the NCI Office of Acquisitions since Fiscal Year 1995. The database is searchable by the Contract Number, the Contractor's Name, or the Title of the Contract. When searching by Contractor or Title, it is NOT neccesary to enter the complete name or title.

176

The Ogre Awards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes the Ogre Awards, an ambitious storytelling event she developed for The Harker School during the 1996-1997 school year. Although it has evolved over these twelve years, the concept of the event is as follows: three of the four homeroom classes (averaging twenty-two students each) perform a segment of a…

Davis, Enid

2008-01-01

177

Award honors Duggal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shakti P. Duggal, a widely respected member of the international cosmic ray community, was a member of the scientific staff of the Bartol Research Foundation for 22 years prior to his untimely death in 1982 at the age of 50. In his memory an award has been established by his colleagues and friends to honor outstanding work by a young scientist in the field of cosmic ray physics. The first biennial award, consisting of $1,000 and a plaque, will be presented at the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC), to be held in La Jolla, Calif., August 10-24, 1985.The intent of this award is to inspire young cosmic ray scientists at an early stage of their careers. The recipient will not have attained the age of 36 on January 1 of the year of the ICRC at which the award will be presented. Subject to this limitation, any person from anywhere in the world who has contributed to the field of cosmic ray physics is eligible for consideration. Selection of the prize winner will be made by an international committee consisting of John Simpson, University of Chicago; Peter Fowler, University of Bristol; Michelle Casse, Center for Nuclear Studies, Saclay, France; Arnold Wolfendale, University of Durham; and Martin Pomerantz, Bartol Research Foundation, University of Delaware.

178

Outstanding student paper award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Geomagnetism & Paleomagnetism Section presented an outstanding student paper award to Stefanie Brachfeld at the 1999 AGU Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June. Stefanie presented a paper titled “Secondary Normalization for Removing Magnetic Grain Size Bias from Relative Paleointensity Data: New Data from the North American Holocene.”

179

NCI Cancer Bulletin Awards  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Cancer Bulletin, an award-winning online newsletter published by the National Cancer Institute from January 2004 through January 2013, provided the latest news about cancer research, including research supported by NCI, other federal agencies, and institutions from across the nation and around the world.

180

IT Summit 2010 - Award Winners  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA CIO Linda Cureton announces this year?s IT Summit award winners. These awards recognize achievement in six key areas for contributions that have aided in NASA achieving mission goals and objec...

181

Nanotechnology research for aerospace applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanotechnology is impacting the future of the military and aerospace. The increasing demands for high performance and property-specific applications are forcing the scientific world to take novel approaches in developing programs and accelerating output. CONTACT or Consortium for Nanomaterials for Aerospace Commerce and Technology is a cooperative nanotechnology research program in Texas building on an infrastructure that promotes collaboration between universities and transitioning to industry. The participants of the program include the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), five campuses of the University of Texas (Brownsville, Pan American, Arlington, Austin, and Dallas), the University of Houston, and Rice University. Through the various partnerships between the intellectual centers and the interactions with AFRL and CONTACT's industrial associates, the program represents a model that addresses the needs of the changing and competitive technological world. Into the second year, CONTACT has expanded to twelve projects that cover four areas of research: Adaptive Coatings and Surface Engineering, Nano Energetics, Electromagnetic Sensors, and Power Generation and Storage. This paper provides an overview of the CONTACT program and its projects including the research and development of new electrorheological fluids with nanoladen suspensions and composites and the potential applications.

Agee, Forrest J.; Lozano, Karen; Gutierrez, Jose M.; Chipara, Mircea; Thapa, Ram; Chow, Alice

2009-04-01

182

Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small

Dwaine Coates

1992-01-01

183

The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

1992-01-01

184

Aerospace Power Technology for Potential Terrestrial Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace technology that is being developed for space and aeronautical applications has great potential for providing technical advances for terrestrial power systems. Some recent accomplishments arising from activities being pursued at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Centers is described in this paper. Possible terrestrial applications of the new aerospace technology are also discussed.

Lyons, Valerie J.

2012-01-01

185

High Flight. Aerospace Activities, K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following discussions of Oklahoma aerospace history and the history of flight, interdisciplinary aerospace activities are presented. Each activity includes title, concept fostered, purpose, list of materials needed, and procedure(s). Topics include planets, the solar system, rockets, airplanes, air travel, space exploration, principles of flight,…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

186

The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

Mancini, Ron (compiler)

1993-01-01

187

The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

Rohn, Douglas A. (compiler)

1994-01-01

188

Damping material technology for aerospace application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vibration and noise in many cases cause serious problems in the aerospace industry. Damping materials and techniques are the most effective measures for vibration absorption and noise attenuation. In this paper, the fundamental principles and design philosophy of damping structures, as well as the properties of some damping materials developed by China and their applications, especially in the aerospace field, are briefly introduced.

Wang, Manxia

1992-07-01

189

Optical Information Processing for Aerospace Applications 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current research in optical processing, and determination of its role in future aerospace systems was reviewed. It is shown that optical processing offers significant potential for aircraft and spacecraft control, pattern recognition, and robotics. It is demonstrated that the development of optical devices and components can be implemented in practical aerospace configurations.

Stermer, R. L. (compiler)

1984-01-01

190

The 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by NASA Johnson Space Center and held at the South Shore Harbour Conference Facility on May 17-19, 1995, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

Schneider, William C. (editor)

1995-01-01

191

George M. Low Trophy: NASA's quality and excellence award. 1992 recipients: Honeywell Clearwater, IBM Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The George M. Low Trophy is awarded to current NASA contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers in the aerospace industry who have demonstrated sustained excellence and outstanding achievements in quality and productivity for three or more years. The objectives of the award are to increase public awareness of the importance of quality and productivity to the Nation's aerospace program and industry in general; encourage domestic business to continue efforts to enhance quality, increase productivity, and thereby strengthen competitiveness; and provide the means for sharing the successful methods and techniques used by the applicants with other American enterprises. Information is given on candidate eligibility for large businesses, the selection process, the nomination letter, and the application report. The 1992 highlights and recipients are included.

1992-01-01

192

George M. Low trophy NASA's quality and excellence award, 1992. Application guidelines: Large business  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The George M. Low Trophy is awarded to current NASA contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers in the aerospace industry who have demonstrated sustained excellence and outstanding achievements in quality and productivity for three or more years. The objectives of the award are to increase public awareness of the importance of quality and productivity to the Nation's aerospace program and industry in general; encourage domestic business to continue efforts to enhance quality, increase productivity, and thereby strengthen competitiveness; and provide the means for sharing the successful methods and techniques used by the applicants with other American enterprises. Information is given on candidate eligibility for large businesses, the selection process, the nomination letter, and the application report.

1992-01-01

193

ASAP Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is the First Quarterly Report for the newly reconstituted Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP). The NASA Administrator rechartered the Panel on November 18,2003, to provide an independent, vigilant, and long-term oversight of NASA's safety policies and programs well beyond Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle. The charter was revised to be consistent with the original intent of Congress in enacting the statute establishing ASAP in 1967 to focus on NASA's safety and quality systems, including industrial and systems safety, risk-management and trend analysis, and the management of these activities.The charter also was revised to provide more timely feedback to NASA by requiring quarterly rather than annual reports, and by requiring ASAP to perform special assessments with immediate feedback to NASA. ASAP was positioned to help institutionalize the safety culture of NASA in the post- Stafford-Covey Return to Flight environment.

2004-01-01

194

Novel Nanolaminates for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nanolaminate manufacturing (NLM) is a new way of developing materials whose properties can far exceed those of homogeneous materials. Traditional alloys, composites and bulk laminates tend to average the properties of the materials from which they were made. With nanostructured materials, the high density of interfaces between dissimilar materials results in novel material properties. For example, materials made -from alternating nanoscale layers of metals and oxides have exhibited thermal conductivities far below those of the oxides themselves. Also, metallic nanolaminates can have peak strengths 100 times lager than the bulk constituent metals. Recent work at MSFC has focused on the development of nickel/aluminum oxide (Ni/Al2O3)) nanolaminates. Ni/Al2O3 nanolaminates are expected to have better strength, creep and fatigue resistance, oxygen compatibility, and corrosion resistance than the traditional metal-matrix composites of this material, which has been used in a variety of aerospace applications. A chemical vapor deposition (CW) system has been developed and optimized for the deposition of nanolaminates. Nanolaminates with layer thicknesses between 10 and 300 nm have been successfully grown and characterization has included scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) Nanolaminates have a large variety of potential applications. They can be tailored to have both very small and anisotropic thermal conductivities and are promising as thermal coatings for both rock$ engine components and aerobraking structures. They also have the potential to be used in aerospace applications where strength at high temperatures, corrosion resistance or resistance to hydrogen embrittlement is important. Both CVD and magnetron sputtering facilities are available for the deposition of nanolayered materials. Characterization equipment includes SEM, AFM, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and mechanical tensile pull testing.

Volz, Martin; Mazuruk, consty

2006-01-01

195

Conceptual design for aerospace vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The designers of aircraft and more recently, aerospace vehicles have always struggled with the problems of evolving their designs to produce a machine which would perform its assigned task(s) in some optimum fashion. Almost invariably this involved dealing with more variables and constraints than could be handled in any computationally feasible way. With the advent of the electronic digital computer, the possibilities for introducing more variable and constraints into the initial design process led to greater expectations for improvement in vehicle (system) efficiency. The creation of the large scale systems necessary to achieve optimum designs has, for many reason, proved to be difficult. From a technical standpoint, significant problems arise in the development of satisfactory algorithms for processing of data from the various technical disciplines in a way that would be compatible with the complex optimization function. Also, the creation of effective optimization routines for multi-variable and constraint situations which could lead to consistent results has lagged. The current capability for carrying out the conceptual design of an aircraft on an interdisciplinary bases was evaluated to determine the need for extending this capability, and if necessary, to recommend means by which this could be carried out. Based on a review of available documentation and individual consultations, it appears that there is extensive interest at Langley Research Center as well as in the aerospace community in providing a higher level of capability that meets the technical challenges. By implication, the current design capability is inadequate and it does not operate in a way that allows the various technical disciplines to participate and cooperately interact in the design process. Based on this assessment, it was concluded that substantial effort should be devoted to developing a computer-based conceptual design system that would provide the capability needed for the near-term as well as framework for development of more advanced methods to serve future needs.

Gratzer, Louis B.

1989-01-01

196

The 1990 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the proceedings of the 21st annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on December 4-6, 1990. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers as well as participation in like kind from the European Space Agency member nations. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, silver-zinc, lithium based chemistries, and advanced technologies as they relate to high reliability operations in aerospace applications.

Kennedy, L.M.

1991-05-01

197

The 1990 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 21st annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on December 4-6, 1990. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers as well as participation in like kind from the European Space Agency member nations. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, silver-zinc, lithium based chemistries, and advanced technologies as they relate to high reliability operations in aerospace applications.

Kennedy, Lewis M. (compiler)

1991-01-01

198

The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

1983-01-01

199

Review on integrated health management for aerospace plane  

Microsoft Academic Search

The references at home and abroad are summarized in this paper. This paper introduces the basic concept and the application significance of aerospace plane, the main differences between the aerospace plane and general aircraft, integrated health management system and its compositions of aerospace plane , the development status of health management for aerospace plane in domestic and foreign countries. Especially

Li Yi-bo; Liu Jin-ying

2011-01-01

200

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

2003-01-01

201

Outstanding Student Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

2004-04-01

202

Outstanding student paper awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hydrology Section presented six outstanding student paper awards at the 2000 AGU Spring Meeting in Washington, D.C., last June.Wade T. Crow presented a poster titled Impacts of Upscaling Soil Moisture During SGP 97. He received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in 1995, and a M.S.E.in civil and environmental engineering from Princeton University in 1998. Wade is currently completing his Ph.D. at Princeton. His dissertation work, supervised by Eric F Wood, focuses on spatial scale issues surrounding both the retrieval of soil moisture imagery by microwave remote sensors and the eventual assimilation of this imagery into hydrologic models.

203

Hutchinson Award to Eville Gorham  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eville Gorham, Regents Professor of Ecology and Botany at the University of Minnesota, is the 1986 recipient of the Hutchinson Award. The medallion and certificate that constitute the award are given annually by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) in recognition of outstanding research. The award was presented to Gorham by G.E. Hutchinson (Yale University, New Haven, Conn.) at a banquet in Newport, R.I., during the ASLO summer meeting.

Nixon, Scott W.

204

2011 Aerospace Medical Certification Statistical Handbook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The annual Aerospace Medical Certification Statistical Handbook reports descriptive characteristics of all active U.S. civil aviation airmen and the aviation medical examiners (AMEs) that perform the required medical examinations. The 2011 annual handbook...

A. Norris R. Johnson V. Skaggs

2013-01-01

205

New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

Slenski, George

1994-09-01

206

The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various mechanisms in aerospace engineering were presented at this conference. Specifications, design, and use of spacecraft and missile components are discussed, such as tail assemblies, radiometers, magnetormeters, pins, reaction wheels, ball bearings, actuators, mirrors, nutation dampers, airfoils, solar arrays, etc.

1977-01-01

207

Unification: An international aerospace information opportunity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace industry. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a new view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace database, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.; Carroll, Bonnie C.

1992-01-01

208

The 24th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

1990-01-01

209

Hybrid Techniques for Complex Aerospace Electromagnetics Problems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Important aerospace electromagnetics problems include the evaluation of antenna performance on aircraft and the prediction and control of the aircraft's electromagnetic signature. Due to the ever increasing complexity and expense of aircraft design, aeros...

J. Aberle

1993-01-01

210

University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report includes descriptions of research facilities and progress reports on projects currently underway at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS). Experimental facilities include the Aeroacoustics Laboratory, the Air Cushio...

1991-01-01

211

New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

Slenski, George

1994-01-01

212

The 25th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Twenty-two papers are documented regarding aeronautical and spacecraft hardware. Technological areas include actuators, latches, cryogenic mechanisms, vacuum tribology, bearings, robotics, ground support equipment for aerospace applications, and other mechanisms.

1991-01-01

213

The 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous topics related to aerospace mechanisms were discussed. Deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, hydraulic actuators, positioning mechanisms, electric motors, communication satellite instruments, redundancy, lubricants, bearings, space stations, rotating joints, and teleoperators are among the topics covered.

1986-01-01

214

Unification: An international aerospace information issue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace business. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace data base, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

1991-01-01

215

The 12th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mechanisms developed for various aerospace applications are discussed. Specific topics covered include: boom release mechanisms, separation on space shuttle orbiter/Boeing 747 aircraft, payload handling, spaceborne platform support, and deployment of spaceborne antennas and telescopes.

1979-01-01

216

Aerospace Medicine and Biology: Cumulative index, 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in the Supplements 190 through 201 of 'Aerospace Medicine and Biology: A Continuing Bibliography.' It includes three indexes-subject, personal author, and corporate source.

1980-01-01

217

Integration of Pyrotechnics into Aerospace Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The application of pyrotechnics to aerospace systems has been resisted because normal engineering methods cannot be used in design and evaluation. Commonly used approaches for energy sources, such as electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic, do not apply to ex...

L. J. Bement M. L. Schimmel

1993-01-01

218

Aerospace Safety and Quality Course Syllabus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This pdf contains a syllabus for a course on safety and quality as part of the Aerospace Technology Program. Topics include toxic and hazardous substances, occupational and environmental health, and personal protective equipment.

2011-08-01

219

The cryomechanical design of MUSIC: a novel imaging instrument for millimeter-wave astrophysics at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MUSIC (Multicolor Submillimeter kinetic Inductance Camera) is a new facility instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (Mauna Kea, Hawaii) developed as a collaborative effect of Caltech, JPL, the University of Colorado at Boulder and UC Santa Barbara, and is due for initial commissioning in early 2011. MUSIC utilizes a new class of superconducting photon detectors known as microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs), an emergent technology that offers considerable advantages over current types of detectors for submillimeter and millimeter direct detection. MUSIC will operate a focal plane of 576 spatial pixels, where each pixel is a slot line antenna coupled to multiple detectors through on-chip, lumped-element filters, allowing simultaneously imaging in four bands at 0.86, 1.02, 1.33 and 2.00 mm. The MUSIC instrument is designed for closed-cycle operation, combining a pulse tube cooler with a two-stage Helium-3 adsorption refrigerator, providing a focal plane temperature of 0.25 K with intermediate temperature stages at approximately 50, 4 and 0.4 K for buffering heat loads and heat sinking of optical filters. Detector readout is achieved using semi-rigid coaxial cables from room temperature to the focal plane, with cryogenic HEMT amplifiers operating at 4 K. Several hundred detectors may be multiplexed in frequency space through one signal line and amplifier. This paper discusses the design of the instrument cryogenic hardware, including a number of features unique to the implementation of superconducting detectors. Predicted performance data for the instrument system will also be presented and discussed.

Hollister, Matthew I.; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Leduc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Nguyen, Hien Trong; Noroozian, Omid; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

2010-07-01

220

NASA Ames aerospace systems directorate research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Systems Directorate is one of four research directorates at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Directorate conducts research and technology development for advanced aircraft and aircraft systems in intelligent computational systems and human-machine systems for aeronautics and space. The Directorate manages research and aircraft technology development projects, and operates and maintains major wind tunnels and flight simulation facilities. The Aerospace Systems Directorate's research and technology as it relates to NASA agency goals and specific strategic thrusts are discussed.

Albers, James A.

1991-01-01

221

Probability and Statistics in Aerospace Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This monograph was prepared to give the practicing engineer a clear understanding of probability and statistics with special consideration to problems frequently encountered in aerospace engineering. It is conceived to be both a desktop reference and a refresher for aerospace engineers in government and industry. It could also be used as a supplement to standard texts for in-house training courses on the subject.

Rheinfurth, M. H.; Howell, L. W.

1998-01-01

222

Aerospace Materials Failure Modes Instructor Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Microsoft Word document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project is intended to accompany a PowerPoint presentation on aerospace materials failure modes. That PowerPoint document may be found here along with other accompanying materials. In the presentation and accompanying notes, the materials used in constructing aircraft are examined, including metals, ceramics, plastics/elastomers and composites; specifically, this unit examines how materials may fail and how to avoid failures.

2012-11-19

223

The 1999 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 32nd annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on November 16-18, 1999. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the US Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-hydrogen, nickel-cadmium, lithium-ion, and silver-zinc technologies.

Brewer, J. C. (Compiler)

2000-01-01

224

The 2001 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 34th annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center, November 27-29, 2001. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the US Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind. The subjects covered included nickel-hydrogen, nickel-cadmium, lithium-ion, and silver-zinc technologies.

Brewer, Jeff C. (Compiler)

2002-01-01

225

The 2000 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 33nd annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on November 14-16, 2000. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-hydrogen, lithium-ion, lithium-sulfur, and silver-zinc technologies.

Brewer, J. C. (Compiler)

2001-01-01

226

Crew factors in the aerospace workplace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of technological change in the aerospace workplace on pilot performance are discussed. Attention is given to individual and physiological problems, crew and interpersonal problems, environmental and task problems, organization and management problems, training and intervention problems. A philosophy and conceptual framework for conducting research on these problems are presented and two aerospace studies are examined which investigated: (1) the effect of leader personality on crew effectiveness and (2) the working undersea habitat known as Aquarius.

Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. C.

1990-01-01

227

Graphite Nanoreinforcements for Aerospace Nanocomposites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New advances in the reinforcement of polymer matrix composite materials are critical for advancement of the aerospace industry. Reinforcements are required to have good mechanical and thermal properties, large aspect ratio, excellent adhesion to the matrix, and cost effectiveness. To fulfill the requirements, nanocomposites in which the matrix is filled with nanoscopic reinforcing phases having dimensions typically in the range of 1nm to 100 nm show considerably higher strength and modulus with far lower reinforcement content than their conventional counterparts. Graphite is a layered material whose layers have dimensions in the nanometer range and are held together by weak Van der Waals forces. Once these layers are exfoliated and dispersed in a polymer matrix as nano platelets, they have large aspect ratios. Graphite has an elastic modulus that is equal to the stiffest carbon fiber and 10-15 times that of other inorganic reinforcements, and it is also electrically and thermally conductive. If the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with excellent mechanical properties, superior thermal stability, and very good electrical and thermal properties at very low reinforcement loadings.

Drzal, Lawrence T.

2005-01-01

228

Aerospace Technology Innovation. Volume 10  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Whether finding new applications for existing NASA technologies or developing unique marketing strategies to demonstrate them, NASA's offices are committed to identifying unique partnering opportunities. Through their efforts NASA leverages resources through joint research and development, and gains new insight into the core areas relevant to all NASA field centers. One of the most satisfying aspects of my job comes when I learn of a mission-driven technology that can be spun-off to touch the lives of everyday people. NASA's New Partnerships in Medical Diagnostic Imaging is one such initiative. Not only does it promise to provide greater dividends for the country's investment in aerospace research, but also to enhance the American quality of life. This issue of Innovation highlights the new NASA-sponsored initiative in medical imaging. Early in 2001, NASA announced the launch of the New Partnerships in Medical Diagnostic Imaging initiative to promote the partnership and commercialization of NASA technologies in the medical imaging industry. NASA and the medical imaging industry share a number of crosscutting technologies in areas such as high-performance detectors and image-processing tools. Many of the opportunities for joint development and technology transfer to the medical imaging market also hold the promise for future spin back to NASA.

Turner, Janelle (Editor); Cousins, Liz (Editor); Bennett, Evonne (Editor); Vendette, Joel (Editor); West, Kenyon (Editor)

2002-01-01

229

Materials Selection for Aerospace Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A systematic design-oriented, five-step approach to material selection is described: 1) establishing design requirements, 2) material screening, 3) ranking, 4) researching specific candidates and 5) applying specific cultural constraints to the selection process. At the core of this approach is the definition performance indices (i.e., particular combinations of material properties that embody the performance of a given component) in conjunction with material property charts. These material selection charts, which plot one property against another, are introduced and shown to provide a powerful graphical environment wherein one can apply and analyze quantitative selection criteria, such as those captured in performance indices, and make trade-offs between conflicting objectives. Finding a material with a high value of these indices maximizes the performance of the component. Two specific examples pertaining to aerospace (engine blades and pressure vessels) are examined, both at room temperature and elevated temperature (where time-dependent effects are important) to demonstrate the methodology. The discussion then turns to engineered/hybrid materials and how these can be effectively tailored to fill in holes in the material property space, so as to enable innovation and increases in performance as compared to monolithic materials. Finally, a brief discussion is presented on managing the data needed for materials selection, including collection, analysis, deployment, and maintenance issues.

Arnold, Steven M.; Cebon, David; Ashby, Mike

2012-01-01

230

NASA's Aero-Space Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation reviews the three pillars and the associated goals of NASA's Aero-Space Technology Enterprise. The three pillars for success are: (1) Global Civil Aviation, (2) Revolutionary Technology Leaps, (3) Advanced Space Transportation. The associated goals of the first pillar are to reduce accidents, emissions, and cost, and to increase the aviation system capacity. The goals of the second pillar are to reduce transoceanic travel time, revolutionize general aviation aircraft, and improve development capacity. The goals associated with the third pillar are to reduce the launch cost for low earth orbit and to reduce travel time for planetary missions. In order to meet these goals NASA must provide next-generation design capability for new and or experimental craft which enable a balance between reducing components of the design cycle by up to 50% and or increasing the confidence in design by 50%. These next-generation design tools, concepts, and processes will revolutionize vehicle development. The presentation finally reviews the importance of modeling and simulation in achieving the goals.

Milstead, Phil

2000-01-01

231

Split Awards, Procurement, and Innovation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many procurement settings, it is possible for a buyer to split a production award between suppliers. In this article, we develop a model of split-award procurement auctions in which the split choice is endogenous. We characterize the set of equilibrium bids and allocations for optimizing agents in an environment in which suppliers are fully informed about each other's costs.

James J. Anton; Dennis A. Yao

1989-01-01

232

Directory of Awards. FY 1986.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides awards for education and research in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering. This publication contains information on fiscal year 1986 awards. An introductory section reviews the goals of NSF's education program and the long-range goals of the Directorate for Science and Engineering Education.…

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Science and Engineering Education.

233

Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

2010-01-01

234

The Association's awards and medals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Association's first award was inaugurated and funded by Walter Goodacre in 1929. Since then, four other awards have been introduced to honour the names of prominent figures in the Association, and to acknowledge those whose work and achievements have benefited the Association or astronomy in general.

Marriott, R. A.

2000-02-01

235

Young Investigator Award symposium.  

PubMed

This article highlights the research presented at the inaugural meeting of Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for future Treatment Strategies. This meeting was held on May 6-8, 2008 in Volterra, Italy. It is an international meeting dedicated to developing preventive strategies and pharmacotherapeutic remedies for stress- and alcohol-related disorders. For the first time, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) conferred a Young Investigator Award to promote the work of young researchers and highlight their outstanding achievements in the fields of addiction medicine and stress disorders. The awardees were Dr. Katie Witkiewitz (University of Washington), Dr. Andrew Holmes (NIAAA), Dr. Lara A. Ray (Brown University), Dr. James Murphy (University of Memphis), and Dr. Heather Richardson (The Scripps Research Institute). The symposium was chaired by Drs. Fulton Crews and Antonio Noronha. PMID:19913193

Witkiewitz, Katie; Holmes, Andrew; Ray, Lara A; Murphy, James G; Richardson, Heather N; Chen, Yi-Chyan; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Cruz, Maureen T; Roberto, Marisa

2009-11-01

236

38 CFR 3.852 - Institutional awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Institutional awards. 3.852 Section 3.852 Pensions, Bonuses... Incompetents, Guardianship and Institutional Awards § 3.852 Institutional awards. (a) When an incompetent veteran...

2013-07-01

237

Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator's Awards  

SciTech Connect

U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its Coalition awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

Not Available

2002-05-01

238

Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards (1986).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Subcommittee reviewed 113 papers nominated by EPA's Office of Research and Development for the 1986 Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards; 34 were recommended for awards. The Subcommittee noted that more papers were nominated for awards this...

1987-01-01

239

The 2005 Alan T. Waterman Award  

NSF Publications Database

The Alan T. Waterman Award is the highest honor awarded by the National Science Foundation. Since ... Program Contact: Susan E. Fannoney Alan T. Waterman Award Committee National Science Foundation 4201 ...

240

Mobile Computing for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of commercial computer technology in specific aerospace mission applications can reduce the cost and project cycle time required for the development of special-purpose computer systems. Additionally, the pace of technological innovation in the commercial market has made new computer capabilities available for demonstrations and flight tests. Three areas of research and development being explored by the Portable Computer Technology Project at NASA Ames Research Center are the application of commercial client/server network computing solutions to crew support and payload operations, the analysis of requirements for portable computing devices, and testing of wireless data communication links as extensions to the wired network. This paper will present computer architectural solutions to portable workstation design including the use of standard interfaces, advanced flat-panel displays and network configurations incorporating both wired and wireless transmission media. It will describe the design tradeoffs used in selecting high-performance processors and memories, interfaces for communication and peripheral control, and high resolution displays. The packaging issues for safe and reliable operation aboard spacecraft and aircraft are presented. The current status of wireless data links for portable computers is discussed from a system design perspective. An end-to-end data flow model for payload science operations from the experiment flight rack to the principal investigator is analyzed using capabilities provided by the new generation of computer products. A future flight experiment on-board the Russian MIR space station will be described in detail including system configuration and function, the characteristics of the spacecraft operating environment, the flight qualification measures needed for safety review, and the specifications of the computing devices to be used in the experiment. The software architecture chosen shall be presented. An analysis of the performance characteristics of wireless data links in the spacecraft environment will be discussed. Network performance and operation will be modeled and preliminary test results presented. A crew support application will be demonstrated in conjunction with the network metrics experiment.

Alena, Richard; Swietek, Gregory E. (Technical Monitor)

1994-01-01

241

Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2001 ... pdf) Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2001 This report is available in hypertext (.htm ...

242

Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2002  

NSF Publications Database

... 2002 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2002 ... pdf) Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 2002 This report is available in hypertext (.htm ...

243

Advanced Materials and Coatings for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the application area of aerospace tribology, researchers and developers must guarantee the highest degree of reliability for materials, components, and systems. Even a small tribological failure can lead to catastrophic results. The absence of the required knowledge of tribology, as Professor H.P. Jost has said, can act as a severe brake in aerospace vehicle systems-and indeed has already done so. Materials and coatings must be able to withstand the aerospace environments that they encounter, such as vacuum terrestrial, ascent, and descent environments; be resistant to the degrading effects of air, water vapor, sand, foreign substances, and radiation during a lengthy service; be able to withstand the loads, stresses, and temperatures encountered form acceleration and vibration during operation; and be able to support reliable tribological operations in harsh environments throughout the mission of the vehicle. This presentation id divided into two sections: surface properties and technology practice related to aerospace tribology. The first section is concerned with the fundamental properties of the surfaces of solid-film lubricants and related materials and coatings, including carbon nanotubes. The second is devoted to applications. Case studies are used to review some aspects of real problems related to aerospace systems to help engineers and scientists to understand the tribological issues and failures. The nature of each problem is analyzed, and the tribological properties are examined. All the fundamental studies and case studies were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

2004-01-01

244

Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

Coates, Dwaine

1992-01-01

245

Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

Coates, Dwaine

1992-02-01

246

Machine intelligence and autonomy for aerospace systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present volume discusses progress toward intelligent robot systems in aerospace applications, NASA Space Program automation and robotics efforts, the supervisory control of telerobotics in space, machine intelligence and crew/vehicle interfaces, expert-system terms and building tools, and knowledge-acquisition for autonomous systems. Also discussed are methods for validation of knowledge-based systems, a design methodology for knowledge-based management systems, knowledge-based simulation for aerospace systems, knowledge-based diagnosis, planning and scheduling methods in AI, the treatment of uncertainty in AI, vision-sensing techniques in aerospace applications, image-understanding techniques, tactile sensing for robots, distributed sensor integration, and the control of articulated and deformable space structures.

Heer, Ewald (editor); Lum, Henry (editor)

1988-01-01

247

Knowledge-based diagnosis for aerospace systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The need for automated diagnosis in aerospace systems and the approach of using knowledge-based systems are examined. Research issues in knowledge-based diagnosis which are important for aerospace applications are treated along with a review of recent relevant research developments in Artificial Intelligence. The design and operation of some existing knowledge-based diagnosis systems are described. The systems described and compared include the LES expert system for liquid oxygen loading at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the FAITH diagnosis system developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the PES procedural expert system developed at SRI International, the CSRL approach developed at Ohio State University, the StarPlan system developed by Ford Aerospace, the IDM integrated diagnostic model, and the DRAPhys diagnostic system developed at NASA Langley Research Center.

Atkinson, David

1988-01-01

248

Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research efforts to reduce the dependence of the aerospace industry on strategic metals, such as cobalt (Co), columbium (Cb), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr), by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components for gas turbine engines are addressed. Thrusts in three technology areas are identified: near term activities in the area of strategic element substitution; intermediate-range activities in the area of materials processing; and long term, high risk activities in the area of 'new classes' of high temprature metallic materials. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is examined along with the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that will contain a minimum of the stragetic metals.

Stephens, J. R.

1981-01-01

249

Wireless Sensing Opportunities for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wireless sensors and sensor networks is an emerging technology area with many applications within the aerospace industry. Integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles is needed to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicle, yet often high costs, weight, size and other constraints prevent the incorporation of instrumentation onto spacecraft. This paper presents a few of the areas such as IVHM, where new wireless sensing technology is needed on both existing vehicles as well as future spacecraft. From ground tests to inflatable structures to the International Space Station, many applications could receive benefits from small, low power, wireless sensors. This paper also highlights some of the challenges that need to overcome when implementing wireless sensor networks for aerospace vehicles.

Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

2007-01-01

250

Heart-Lung Interactions in Aerospace Medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Few of the heart-lung interactions that are discussed have been studied in any detail in the aerospace environment, but is seems that many such interactions must occur in the setting of altered accelerative loadings and pressure breathing. That few investigations are in progress suggests that clinical and academic laboratory investigators and aerospace organizations are further apart than during the pioneering work on pressure breathing and acceleration tolerance in the 1940s. The purpose is to reintroduce some of the perennial problems of aviation physiology as well as some newer aerospace concerns that may be of interest. Many possible heart-lung interactions are pondered, by necessity often drawing on data from within the aviation field, collected before the modern understanding of these interactions developed, or on recent laboratory data that may not be strictly applicable. In the field of zero-gravity effects, speculation inevitably outruns the sparse available data.

Guy, Harold J. B.; Prisk, Gordon Kim

1991-01-01

251

Directory of aerospace safety specialized information sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A directory is presented to make available to the aerospace safety community a handbook of organizations and experts in specific, well-defined areas of safety technology. It is designed for the safety specialist as an aid for locating both information sources and individual points of contact (experts) in engineering related fields. The file covers sources of data in aerospace design, tests, as well as information in hazard and failure cause identification, accident analysis, materials characteristics, and other related subject areas. These 171 organizations and their staff members, hopefully, should provide technical information in the form of documentation, data and consulting expertise. These will be sources that have assembled and collated their information, so that it will be useful in the solution of engineering problems. One of the goals of the project in the United States that have and are willing to share data of value to the aerospace safety community.

Fullerton, E. A.; Rubens, L. S.

1973-01-01

252

Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

2010-01-01

253

Metal Matrix Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Metal matrix composites (MMC) are attractive materials for aerospace applications because of their high specific strength, high specific stiffness, and lower thermal expansion coefficient. They are affordable since complex parts can be produced by low cost casting process. As a result there are many commercial and Department of Defense applications of MMCs today. This seminar will give an overview of MMCs and their state-of-the-art technology assessment. Topics to be covered are types of MMCs, fabrication methods, product forms, applications, and material selection issues for design and manufacture. Some examples of current and future aerospace applications will also be presented and discussed.

Bhat, Biliyar N.; Jones, C. S. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

254

Robotic surface finishing of aerospace models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Robotic surface finishing methods are being developed for use in the aerospace industry. The application goals include wind tunnel model and other complex part surface finishing. Removal of scallops left from milling, shaping, and polishing typically done by artisans is expensive and error prone. Automatically generated tool trajectories drastically reduce robot path programming efforts. A wide variety of parts may be processed and new parts may be processed with little or no additional programming effort, making this method particularly well-suited to the high mix aerospace manufacturing environment.

Fitzgerald, Mick

1990-10-01

255

NASA aerospace database subject scope: An overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Outlined here is the subject scope of the NASA Aerospace Database, a publicly available subset of the NASA Scientific and Technical (STI) Database. Topics of interest to NASA are outlined and placed within the framework of the following broad aerospace subject categories: aeronautics, astronautics, chemistry and materials, engineering, geosciences, life sciences, mathematical and computer sciences, physics, social sciences, space sciences, and general. A brief discussion of the subject scope is given for each broad area, followed by a similar explanation of each of the narrower subject fields that follow. The subject category code is listed for each entry.

1993-01-01

256

Second Conference on NDE for Aerospace Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nondestructive evaluation and inspection procedures must constantly improve rapidly in order to keep pace with corresponding advances being made in aerospace material and systems. In response to this need, the 1989 Conference was organized to provide a forum for discussion between the materials scientists, systems designers, and NDE engineers who produce current and future aerospace systems. It is anticipated that problems in current systems can be resolved more quickly and that new materials and structures can be designed and manufactured in such a way as to be more easily inspected and to perform reliably over the life cycle of the system.

Woodis, Kenneth W. (compiler); Bryson, Craig C. (compiler); Workman, Gary L. (compiler)

1990-01-01

257

Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference: Exectutive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The papers from this conference are being published in a separate volume as NASA CP-3298.

Whitaker, A. F. (editor)

1995-01-01

258

The 1993 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the proceedings of the 26th annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on 16-18 Nov. 1993. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium based technologies, as well as advanced technologies including various bipolar designs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers from this report.

Brewer, J.C.

1994-02-01

259

The 1992 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the proceedings of the 23rd annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on November 15-19, 1992. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium based technologies, as well as advanced technologies including sodium-sulfur and various bipolar designs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this proceedings.

Brewer, J.C.

1993-02-01

260

The 1995 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the proceedings of the 28th annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on 28-30 Nov. 1995. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, nickel-metal hybride, and lithium based technologies, as well as flight and ground test data. Nickel-hydrogen modeling was also covered. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this proceedings.

Brewer, J.C.

1996-02-01

261

Aerospace Applications of Integer and Combinatorial Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in formulating and solving integer and combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem, for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on an orbiting platform and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

1995-01-01

262

The 1998 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 31st annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on October 27-29, 1998. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-hydrogen, silver-hydrogen, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium-based technologies, as well as results from destructive physical analyses on various cell chemistries.

Brewer, Jeffrey C. (Compiler)

1999-01-01

263

The 1993 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the 26th annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on 16-18 Nov. 1993. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium based technologies, as well as advanced technologies including various bipolar designs.

Brewer, Jeffrey C. (compiler)

1994-01-01

264

Aerospace applications on integer and combinatorial optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in formulating and solving integer and combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem. for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on an orbiting platform and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

1995-01-01

265

Aerospace applications of integer and combinatorial optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in solving combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem, for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on a large space structure and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

1995-01-01

266

Reach and its Impact: NASA and US Aerospace Communities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

REACH is a European law that threatens to impact materials used within the US aerospace communities, including NASA. The presentation briefly covers REACH and generally, its perceived impacts to NASA and the aerospace community within the US.

Rothgeb, Matthew J.

2011-01-01

267

Aerospace engineers: We're tomorrow-minded people  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brief job-related autobiographical sketches of engineers working on NASA aerospace projects are presented. Career and educational guidance is offered to students thinking about entering the aerospace field.

Lewis, M. H.

1981-01-01

268

Aerospace Technicians: We're Tomorrow-Minded People  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brief job-related autobiographical sketches of technicians working on NASA aerospace projects are presented. Career and educational guidance is offered to students thinking about entering the field of aerospace technology.

Lewis, M. H.

1981-01-01

269

A Low Noise NbTiN-Based 850 GHz SIS Receiver for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have developed a niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) based superconductor- insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver to cover the 350 micron atmospheric window. This frequency band lies entirely above the energy gap of niobium (700 GHz), a commonly used SIS superconductor. The instrument uses an open structure twin-slot SIS mixer that consists of two Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions, NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning elements, and a NbTiN ground plane. The optical configuration is very similar to the 850 GHz waveguide receiver that was installed at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) in 1997. To minimize front-end loss, we employed reflecting optics and a cooled beamsplitter at 4 K. The instrument has an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of 205K DSB at 800 GHz and 410K DSB at 900 GHz. The degradation in receiver sensitivity with frequency is primarily due to an increase in the mixer conversion loss, which is attributed to the mismatch between the SIS junction and the twin-slot antenna impedance. The overall system performance has been confirmed through its use at the telescope to detect a wealth of new spectroscopic lines.

Kooi, J. W.; Kawamura, J.; Chen, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Pardo, J. R.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Phillips, T. G.; Bumble, B.; Stern, J.; LeDuc, H. G.

2000-01-01

270

CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES  

SciTech Connect

We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Leonard, Douglas C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Moon, Dae-Sik [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Sand, David J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kiewe, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scheps, Raphael [King's College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1ST (United Kingdom); Birenbaum, Gali [12 Amos St, Ramat Chen, Ramat Gan 52233 (Israel); Chamudot, Daniel [20 Chen St, Petach Tikvah 49520 (Israel); Zhou, Jonathan, E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [101 Dunster Street, Box 398, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-09-10

271

The National Science Board's 2005 Public Service Awards  

NSF Publications Database

... NSB Public Service Awards NSB Public Service Awards NSB Public Service Awards NSB Public Service ... Public Service Awards: Information on the NSB Public Service Awards: Information on the NSB Public ...

272

1986 Honeywell Futurist Awards Competition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consists of three essays from the 1986 Honeywell Futurist Award competition. Discusses the use of the Molecular Matrix Chip to make computer communication more accessible, and thus to promote citizenship. (CH)

Schmidt, Bryan J.

1986-01-01

273

2012 ASHG Awards and Addresses  

PubMed Central

Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of the Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these addresses is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the Presidential Address and the addresses for the William Allan and Curt Stern Awards. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

2013-01-01

274

National Academy of Engineering Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news release from the National Academies reports on the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) awards, which "recognize three achievements that have altered the course of world history, improved the quality of life for millions, and created educational experiences that have transformed hundreds of engineers into community leaders." Those honored include the designers of a spy satellite, a scientist who invented biosensors, and innovators in engineering and technology education. The site provides short biographical information on each awardee and background on the awards.

2005-11-07

275

National Academy of Engineering Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This news release from the National Academies reports on the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) awards, which "recognize three achievements that have altered the course of world history, improved the quality of life for millions, and created educational experiences that have transformed hundreds of engineers into community leaders." Those honored include the designers of a spy satellite, a scientist who invented biosensors, and innovators in engineering and technology education. The site provides short biographical information on each awardee and background on the awards.

276

32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National...AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a)...

2010-07-01

277

32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National...AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a)...

2013-07-01

278

Children's Books: Awards and Prizes. 1975 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field including major international and foreign awards of English-speaking countries. It is revised biennially. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each entry includes a brief history of the award. With a few exceptions, all the winners from the first to the most recent as of June…

Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

279

Children's Books: Awards & Prizes. 1975 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A biennial compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field, this book includes major international and foreign awards of English-speaking countries. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each entry includes a brief history of the award and, with a few exceptions, the titles of all winners from the first to the most recent, as of June…

Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

280

Kreemer Receives 2010 Geodesy Section Award  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corné Kreemer received the 2010 Geodesy Section Award at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13-17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is given in recognition of major advances in geodesy. It is a great pleasure for us to cite Corné Kreemer for the 2010 Geodesy Section Award, which is awarded to early- to middle-career scientists to recognize major

Geoffrey Blewitt; William Holt; Corné Kreemer

2011-01-01

281

Applications of aerospace technology in biology and medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Medical products utilizing and incorporating aerospace technology were studied. A bipolar donor-recipient model for medical transfer is presented. The model is designed to: (1) identify medical problems and aerospace technology which constitute opportunities for successful medical products; (2) obtain early participation of industry in the transfer process; and (3) obtain acceptance by medical community of new medical products based on aerospace technology.

Beall, H. C.; Beadles, R. L.; Brown, J. N., Jr.; Clingman, W. H.; Courtney, M. W.; Rouse, D. J.; Scearce, R. W.

1979-01-01

282

HASA: Hypersonic Aerospace Sizing Analysis for the Preliminary Design of Aerospace Vehicles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A review of the hypersonic literature indicated that a general weight and sizing analysis was not available for hypersonic orbital, transport, and fighter vehicles. The objective here is to develop such a method for the preliminary design of aerospace veh...

G. J. Harloff B. M. Berkowitz

1988-01-01

283

17 CFR 165.7 - Procedures for award applications and Commission award determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Procedures for award applications and Commission award...Procedures for award applications and Commission award...on the Commission's Web site a âNotice...monitor the Commission Web site for such Notices...file Form WB-APP, Application for Award for...

2013-04-01

284

Thermoplastic Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of composites materials with thermoplastic matrix (PEEK/IM7, TPI/IM7 and PPS/IM7) used for aerospace applications have been analyzed as function of two different process techniques: compression molding and fiber placement process ``hot gas assisted.''

Casula, G.; Lenzi, F.; Vitiello, C.

2008-08-01

285

Digital Simulation of an Aerospace Vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid development of computer technology and the creation of new engineering oriented languages have established that general purpose digital computers are increasingly suitable for simulation of the dynamics of large physical systems. In the Aerospace Vehicle Simulation (AVS) Program, an effort has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, to simulate continuous and discrete dynamics of

J. R. Mitchell; J. W. Moore; H. H. Trauboth

1967-01-01

286

MEMS pressure sensors for aerospace applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) pressure sensors have been designed, fabricated and characterized. The fabrication process is fully compatible with IC (integrated circuit) fabrication such that multifunctional microelectronics can be directly integrated on the same chip for advanced aerospace applications. These pressure sensors are designed based on the piezoresistive sensing principle on surface micromachined polysilicon thin diaphragms. Both square- and circular-shape diaphragms

Liwei Lin; Weijie Yun

1998-01-01

287

Aerospace Medicine and Biology: 1983 cumulative index  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in the Supplements 242 through 253 of Aerospace Medicine and Biology: A Continuing Bibliography. It includes six indexes--subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, report number, and accession number.

1984-01-01

288

Aerospace Science Education, A Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide was developed by the Alaska State Department of Education for the purpose of aiding elementary and secondary school teachers in incorporating elements of aerospace science in the classroom. The section of the guide designed for elementary school teachers includes chapters under the headings: Aircraft, Airports, Weather,…

Hilburn, Paul

289

OTEC - Aerospace and ocean engineering in partnership  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contributions of aerospace know-how to the development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology are discussed. The use of aluminum and titanium for heat transfer, development of a suitable OTEC heat exchanger, structural analysis of the 120 ft diam cold water pipe (to extend 2000 ft into the ocean and retain structural integrity under buffeting by wave, current, and pumping

J. G. Wenzel

1977-01-01

290

Theory of Aircraft Flight. Aerospace Education II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This revised textbook, one in the Aerospace Education II series, provides answers to many questions related to airplanes and properties of air flight. The first chapter provides a description of aerodynamic forces and deals with concepts such as acceleration, velocity, and forces of flight. The second chapter is devoted to the discussion of…

Elmer, James D.

291

Aircraft of Today. Aerospace Education I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This textbook gives a brief idea about the modern aircraft used in defense and for commercial purposes. Aerospace technology in its present form has developed along certain basic principles of aerodynamic forces. Different parts in an airplane have different functions to balance the aircraft in air, provide a thrust, and control the general…

Savler, D. S.

292

The 17th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft tether, magnetic bearing suspension, explosive welding, and a deployable/retractable mast are also described.

1983-01-01

293

Aluminum-Beryllium Alloys for Aerospace Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A family of low density, high elastic modulus aluminum-beryllium alloys is under development in order to meet the requirements of advanced aerospace designs. These alloys are aluminum based with 10 to 75 percent beryllium and combine the high specific sti...

D. Hashiguchi A. N. Ashurst F. C. Grensing J. M. Marder

1992-01-01

294

Aerospace Curriculum: Applied Basic Electricity Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center presents a technician skills workshop on applied basic electricity. The PDF document includes 148 slides with text and graphics depicting best practices in electric safety. It also includes basic electrical formulas and calculations for reference.

2010-10-19

295

The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

1987-01-01

296

Advanced Engineering Environments: Implications for Aerospace Manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are significant challenges facing today's aerospace industry. Global competition, more complex products, geographically-distributed design teams, demands for lower cost, higher reliability and safer vehicles, and the need to incorporate the latest technologies quicker all face the developer of aerospace systems. New information technologies offer promising opportunities to develop advanced engineering environments (AEEs) to meet these challenges. Significant advances in the state-of-the-art of aerospace engineering practice are envisioned in the areas of engineering design and analytical tools, cost and risk tools, collaborative engineering, and high-fidelity simulations early in the development cycle. These advances will enable modeling and simulation of manufacturing methods, which will in turn allow manufacturing considerations to be included much earlier in the system development cycle. Significant cost savings, increased quality, and decreased manufacturing cycle time are expected to result. This paper will give an overview of the NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment, the agency initiative to develop an AEE, with a focus on the anticipated benefits in aerospace manufacturing.

Thomas, D.

2001-01-01

297

The 18th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics concerning aerospace mechanisms, their functional performance, and design specifications are presented. Discussed subjects include the design and development of release mechanisms, actuators, linear driver/rate controllers, antenna and appendage deployment systems, position control systems, and tracking mechanisms for antennas and solar arrays. Engine design, spaceborne experiments, and large space structure technology are also examined.

1984-01-01

298

Aerospace Management, Volume 5 Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are articles and reports dealing with aspects of the aerospace programs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Of major concern are the technological and managerial challenges within the space station and space shuttle programs. Other reports are given on: (1) medical experiments, (2) satellites, (3) international…

Kaprielyan, S. Peter

299

International Space Programs. Aerospace Education III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "International Space Programs." The guide is organized according to specific chapters in the textbook. It provides guidelines for teachers in terms of objectives, behavioral objectives, suggested outlines, orientation, suggested key points, instructional…

Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

300

The 17th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft tether, magnetic bearing suspension, explosive welding, and a deployable/retractable mast are also described. For individual titles, see N83-24882 through N83-24906.

Not Available

1983-05-01

301

Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

Coard, E. A.

302

Non-Destructive Evaluation of Aerospace Composites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Five methods of non-destructive material evaluation (NDE) were used to inspect various forms of damage commonly found in aerospace fiberglass composites: voids, edge and sub-surface delaminations, surface burning, and cracking. The images produced by X-ra...

J. D. Johnson

2009-01-01

303

Aerospace Concepts at the Elementary Level  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents materials compiled to assist the elementary teacher in preparing teaching units in aerospace education. Suggests specific and general objectives and lists important concepts and questions pertaining to areas such as: history of flight, weather and flying, airplanes, jets, rockets, space travel, and the solar system. (MLH)

Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

1975-01-01

304

Nanocrystalline Materials from Aerospace Machining Chips  

Microsoft Academic Search

The creation of nanostructured materials with enhanced mechanical properties by controlled chip formation has been demonstrated. The present study examines the microstructure and mechanical properties of chips from various alloys -Waspaloy AMS 5704, Inconel 718, Al 6061-T6, and titanium - produced in aerospace machining operations. While the deformation conditions with respect to chip formation may be 'less than controlled' in

Y. Uluca; B. C. Rao; M. Ravi; T. L. Brown; J. B. Mann; S. Chandrasekar; W. D. Compton

305

Thermal Expansion Properties of Aerospace Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thermal expansion properties of materials used in aerospace systems are compiled into a single handbook. The data, derived from experimental measurements supplemented by information from literature sources, are presented in charts and tables arranged in two sections, covering cryogenic and elevated temperatures.

Green, E. F.

1969-01-01

306

The 15th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technological areas covered include: aerospace propulsion; aerodynamic devices; crew safety; space vehicle control; spacecraft deployment, positioning, and pointing; deployable antennas/reflectors; and large space structures. Devices for payload deployment, payload retention, and crew extravehicular activities on the space shuttle orbiter are also described.

1981-01-01

307

End Leakage of Aerospace Homopolar Alternators  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accurate knowledge of the magnetic field distribution is of great importance in finding the best designs for electrical machinery. It is the purpose of this paper to present a new numerical method for the determination of three-dimensional flux distribution in the end zone of a highspeed aerospace homopolar alternator, and for the calculation of end leakage reactance. The new

MULUKUTLA S. SARMA

1970-01-01

308

Information processing for aerospace structural health monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology provides a means to significantly reduce life cycle of aerospace vehicles by eliminating unnecessary inspections, minimizing inspection complexity, and providing accurate diagnostics and prognostics to support vehicle life extension. In order to accomplish this, a comprehensive SHM system will need to acquire data from a wide variety of diverse sensors including strain gages, accelerometers, acoustic

Peter F. Lichtenwalner; Edward V. White; Erwin W. Baumann

1998-01-01

309

Bearing and Gear Steels for Aerospace Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Research in metallurgy and processing for bearing and gear steels has resulted in improvements in rolling-element bearing and gear life for aerospace application by a factor of approximately 200 over that obtained in the early 1940's. The selection and sp...

E. V. Zaretsky

1990-01-01

310

Aerospace Meteorology Lessons Learned Relative to Aerospace Vehicle Design and Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace Meteorology came into being in the 1950s as the development of rockets for military and civilian usage grew in the United States. The term was coined to identify those involved in the development of natural environment models, design/operational requirements, and environment measurement systems to support the needs of aerospace vehicles, both launch vehicles and spacecraft. It encompassed the atmospheric environment of the Earth, including Earth orbit environments. Several groups within the United States were active in this area, including the Department of Defense, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and a few of the aerospace industry groups. Some aerospace meteorology efforts were similar to those being undertaken relative to aviation interests. As part of the aerospace meteorology activities a number of lessons learned resulted that produced follow on efforts which benefited from these experiences, thus leading to the rather efficient and technologically current descriptions of terrestrial environment design requirements, prelaunch monitoring systems, and forecast capabilities available to support the development and operations of aerospace vehicles.

Vaughan, William W.; Anderson, B. Jeffrey

2004-01-01

311

Aerospace Nickel-Cadmium Cell Verification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the early years of satellites, NASA successfully flew "NASA-Standard" nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) cells manufactured by GE/Gates/SAFF on a variety of spacecraft. In 1992 a NASA Battery Review Board determined that the strategy of a NASA Standard Cell and Battery Specification and the accompanying NASA control of a standard manufacturing control document (MCD) for Ni-Cd cells and batteries was unwarranted. As a result of that determination, standards were abandoned and the use of cells other than the NASA Standard was required. In order to gain insight into the performance and characteristics of the various aerospace Ni-Cd products available, tasks were initiated within the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program that involved the procurement and testing of representative aerospace Ni-Cd cell designs. A standard set of test conditions was established in order to provide similar information about the products from various vendors. The objective of this testing was to provide independent verification of representative commercial flight cells available in the marketplace today. This paper will provide a summary of the verification tests run on cells from various manufacturers: Sanyo 35 Ampere-hour (Ali) standard and 35 Ali advanced Ni-Cd cells, SAFr 50 Ah Ni-Cd cells and Eagle-Picher 21 Ali Magnum and 21 Ali Super Ni-CdTM cells from Eagle-Picher were put through a full evaluation. A limited number of 18 and 55 Ali cells from Acme Electric were also tested to provide an initial evaluation of the Acme aerospace cell designs. Additionally, 35 Ali aerospace design Ni-MH cells from Sanyo were evaluated under the standard conditions established for this program. Ile test program is essentially complete. The cell design parameters, the verification test plan and the details of the test result will be discussed.

Manzo, Michelle A.; Strawn, D. Michael; Hall, Stephen W.

2001-01-01

312

Aerospace applications of mass market MEMS products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerospace applications of MEMS products, originally developed for automotive mass markets, are discussed. Various sensor examples with a high dual use potential are presented: inertial sensing, flow and gas sensing, robust micro sensors including SiC- and GaN-based devices, as well as first approaches towards flexible and distributed microsystems. In Europe the automotive industry is one of the main MEMS market drivers, simply because of the sheer size of this market and Europe's strong position in this industrial field. Main MEMS activities are development and integration of vehicle dynamics sensing systems, passenger safety and navigation systems, air and fuel intake systems, as well as sensor systems for exhaust gas after treatment and climate control. Benefits on the customer side are increased safety, passenger comfort and reduced fuel consumption. Benefits on the manufacturer's side are increased sub-system integration, modularity and reduced production cost. In the future the aerospace industry is likely to benefit from the introduction of micro-systems for the same reasons as the automotive industry. Interests of the aerospace industry are increasing safety and reliability of airplane operation, health and state monitoring of fuselage and airplane subsystems as well as improving service and maintenance procedures. In comparison to automotive applications, the numbers of devices needed is likely to be much smaller, however, new challenges arise in so far as distributed sensing and actuating microsystems will be needed. The idea is to identify and to exploit synergies between automotive mass market MEMS applications and lower-volume aerospace ones. The effort necessary to meet aerospace requirements and the extent of necessary trade-offs in customizing automotive MEMS is addressed considering the above-mentioned examples.

Bauer, Karin; Kroetz, Gerhard; Schalk, Josef; Mueller, Gerhard

2002-07-01

313

PMR Extended Shelf Life Technology Given 2000 R and D 100 Award  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for extending the shelf life of PMR polyimide solutions and prepregs received an R&D 100 Award this year. PMR polyimides, in particular PMR-15, have become attractive materials for a variety of aerospace applications because of their outstanding high-temperature stability and performance. PMR-15 can be used in components with exposures to temperatures as high as 290 C, which leads to substantial reductions in weight, as much as 30 percent over metal components. PMR-15 composites are used widely in aerospace applications ranging from ducts and external components in aircraft engines to an engine access door for the Space Shuttle Main Engine. A major barrier to more widespread use of these materials is high component costs. Recent efforts at Glenn have addressed the various factors that contribute to these costs in an attempt to more fully utilize these lightweight, high-temperature materials.

Meador, Michael A.

2001-01-01

314

29 CFR 102.143 - âAdversary adjudicationâ defined; entitlement to award; eligibility for award.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...âAdversary adjudicationâ defined; entitlement to award; eligibility for award. 102.143 Section 102.143 Labor Regulations...RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Awards of Fees and Other Expenses § 102.143...

2013-07-01

315

Stennis group receives NESC award  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering & Safety Center recently presented its Group Achievement Award to a Stennis team in recognition of technical excellence in evaluating the operational anomalies and reliability improvements associated with the space shuttle engine cut-off system. Stennis employees receiving the award were: (standing, l to r) Freddie Douglas (NASA), George Drouant (Jacobs Technology Inc.), Fred Abell (Jacobs), Robert Drackett (Jacobs) and Mike Smiles (NASA); (seated, l to r): Binh Nguyen (Jacobs), Stennis Director Gene Goldman and Joseph Lacker (NASA). Phillip Hebert of NASA is not pictured.

2009-01-01

316

Aerospace Applications of Optimization under Uncertainty  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley Research Center develops new methods and investigates opportunities for applying optimization to aerospace vehicle design. This paper describes MDO Branch experiences with three applications of optimization under uncertainty: (1) improved impact dynamics for airframes, (2) transonic airfoil optimization for low drag, and (3) coupled aerodynamic/structures optimization of a 3-D wing. For each case, a brief overview of the problem and references to previous publications are provided. The three cases are aerospace examples of the challenges and opportunities presented by optimization under uncertainty. The present paper will illustrate a variety of needs for this technology, summarize promising methods, and uncover fruitful areas for new research.

Padula, Sharon; Gumbert, Clyde; Li, Wu

2006-01-01

317

Aerospace Applications of Optimization under Uncertainty  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley Research Center develops new methods and investigates opportunities for applying optimization to aerospace vehicle design. This paper describes MDO Branch experiences with three applications of optimization under uncertainty: (1) improved impact dynamics for airframes, (2) transonic airfoil optimization for low drag, and (3) coupled aerodynamic/structures optimization of a 3-D wing. For each case, a brief overview of the problem and references to previous publications are provided. The three cases are aerospace examples of the challenges and opportunities presented by optimization under uncertainty. The present paper will illustrate a variety of needs for this technology, summarize promising methods, and uncover fruitful areas for new research.

Padula, Sharon; Gumbert, Clyde; Li, Wu

2003-01-01

318

IT Data Mining Tool Uses in Aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data mining has a broad spectrum of uses throughout the realms of aerospace and information technology. Each of these areas has useful methods for processing, distributing, and storing its corresponding data. This paper focuses on ways to leverage the data mining tools and resources used in NASA's information technology area to meet the similar data mining needs of aviation and aerospace domains. This paper details the searching, alerting, reporting, and application functionalities of the Splunk system, used by NASA's Security Operations Center (SOC), and their potential shared solutions to address aircraft and spacecraft flight and ground systems data mining requirements. This paper also touches on capacity and security requirements when addressing sizeable amounts of data across a large data infrastructure.

Monroe, Gilena A.; Freeman, Kenneth; Jones, Kevin L.

2012-01-01

319

MEMS sensing and control: an aerospace perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future advanced fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft will incorporate smart microsensors to monitor flight integrity and provide flight control inputs. This paper provides an overview of Honeywell's MEMS technologies for aerospace applications of sensing and control. A unique second-generation polysilicon resonant microbeam sensor design is described. It incorporates a micron-level vacuum-encapsulated microbeam to optically sense aerodynamic parameters and to optically excite the sensor pick off: optically excited self-resonant microbeams form the basis for a new class of versatile, high- performance, low-cost MEMS sensors that uniquely combine silicon microfabrication technology with optoelectronic technology that can sense dynamic pressure, acceleration forces, acoustic emission, and many other aerospace parameters of interest. Honeywell's recent work in MEMS tuning fork gyros for inertial sensing and a MEMS free- piston engine are also described.

Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Arch, David K.; Yang, Wei; Cabuz, Cleopatra; Hocker, Ben; Johnson, Burgess R.; Wilson, Mark L.

2000-06-01

320

Sputtering and ion plating for aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sputtering and ion plating technologies are reviewed in terms of their potential and present uses in the aerospace industry. Sputtering offers great universality and flexibility in depositing any material or in the synthesis of new ones. The sputter deposition process has two areas of interest: thin film and fabrication technology. Thin film sputtering technology is primarily used for aerospace mechanical components to reduce friction, wear, erosion, corrosion, high temperature oxidation, diffusion and fatigue, and also to sputter-construct temperature and strain sensors for aircraft engines. Sputter fabrication is used in intricate aircraft component manufacturing. Ion plating applications are discussed in terms of the high energy evaporant flux and the high throwing power. Excellent adherence and 3 dimensional coverage are the primary attributes of this technology.

Spalvins, T.

1981-01-01

321

Sputtering and ion plating for aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sputtering and ion plating technologies are reviewed in terms of their potential and present uses in the aerospace industry. Sputtering offers great universality and flexibility in depositing any material or in the synthesis of new ones. The sputter deposition process has two areas of interest: thin film and fabrication technology. Thin film sputtering technology is primarily used for aerospace mechanical components to reduce friction, wear, erosion, corrosion, high temperature oxidation, diffusion and fatigue, and also to sputter-construct temperature and strain sensors for aircraft engines. Sputter fabrication is used in intricate aircraft component manufacturing. Ion plating applications are discussed in terms of the high energy evaporant flux and the high throwing power. Excellent adherence and 3-dimensional coverage are the primary attributes of this technology.

Spalvins, T.

1981-01-01

322

NASA aerospace flight battery systems program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major objective of the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program is to provide NASA with the policy and posture to increase and ensure the safety, performance and reliability of batteries for space power systems. The program plan has been modified in the past year to reflect changes in the agency's approach to battery related problems that are affecting flight programs. Primary attention in the Battery Program is being devoted to the development of an advanced nickel-cadmium cell design and the qualification of vendors to produce cells for flight programs. As part of a unified Battery Program, the development of a nickel-hydrogen standard and primary cell issues are also being pursued to provide high performance NASA Standards and space qualified state-of-the-art primary cells. The resolution of issues is being addressed with the full participation of the aerospace battery community.

Manzo, Michelle A.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

1990-01-01

323

Aerospace Curriculum: Composites Inspection and Repair Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center presents a technician skills workshop on composites inspection and repair. Composites are two or more materials working together, each contributing its own structural properties yet retaining its unique identity. The PDF document includes 84 slides with graphics and text illustrating what composites are, their characteristics, advantages and disadvantages, related materials, shop safety and composite damage, inspection and repair.

Kane, Steve

2011-09-22

324

MEMS sensing and control: an aerospace perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future advanced fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft will incorporate smart microsensors to monitor flight integrity and provide flight control inputs. This paper provides an overview of Honeywell's MEMS technologies for aerospace applications of sensing and control. A unique second-generation polysilicon resonant microbeam sensor design is described. It incorporates a micron-level vacuum-encapsulated microbeam to optically sense aerodynamic parameters

Jeffrey N. Schoess; David K. Arch; Wei Yang; Cleopatra Cabuz; Ben Hocker; Burgess R. Johnson; Mark L. Wilson

2000-01-01

325

Explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents the results of works of the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute and other Soviet organizations on the development of technology for explosion-welding of multilayer transition pieces and pipes used in the manufacture of aerospace products. Equipment and accessories used for this technology are described; in particular, a powerful explosion chamber of a tubular structure for up to 200 kg of explosives is presented. Information is also given about linear explosion separation devices.

Volgin, L. A.; Koroteev, A. Ia.; Malakovich, A. P.; Petushkov, V. G.; Sitalo, V. G.; Novikov, V. K.

326

Aerospace applications of nickel-cadmium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Some recent NASA applications of Ni-Cd batteries are Magellan, Topex/Poseidon, and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite. Each of these automated spacecraft has a design lifetime of at least 3 years. Characteristics of the battery systems for each of these applications are given. Other topics discussed include the NASA standard Ni-Cd battery, the aerospace flight battery systems program, and the impact of the pending OHSA ruling.

Habib, S. (NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-05-01

327

Integration of pyrotechnics into aerospace systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of pyrotechnics to aerospace systems has been resisted because normal engineering methods cannot be used in design and evaluation. Commonly used approaches for energy sources, such as electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic, do not apply to explosive and pyrotechnic devices. This paper introduces the unique characteristics of pyrotechnic devices, describes how functional evaluations can be conducted, and demonstrates an engineering approach for pyrotechnic integration. Logic is presented that allows evaluation of two basic types of pyrotechnic systems to demonstrate functional margin.

Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

1993-01-01

328

Aerospace Numerical Simulation and Digital Prototyping Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A High End Digital Prototyping system (HEDP) designed for aerospace numerical simulation is introduced in this paper. This system is a problem solving environment equipped with capability of parallel mesh generation, immersive visual steering, large-scale visualization and parallel computation. All enabling technologies are realized as separate modules and coupled through a software bus, which makes them integrated seamlessly. Detailed design principles and a numerical simulation of turbulent combustion in the HyShot Scramjet whitin the HEDP system is addressed.

Zheng, Yao; Xie, Lijun; Zou, Jianfeng; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Jifa

2010-05-01

329

Bearing and gear steels for aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research in metallurgy and processing for bearing and gear steels has resulted in improvements in rolling-element bearing and gear life for aerospace application by a factor of approximately 200 over that obtained in the early 1940's. The selection and specification of a bearing or gear steel is dependent on the integration of multiple metallurgical and physical variables. For most aerospace bearings, through-hardened VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel is the material of preference. For gears, the preferential material is case-carburized VAR AISI 9310. However, the VAR processing for this material is being replaced by VIM-VAR processing. Since case-carburized VIM-VAR M-50NiL incorporates the desirable qualities of both the AISI M-50 and AISI 9310 materials, optimal life and reliability can be achieved in both bearings and gears with a single steel. Hence, this material offers the promise of a common steel for both bearings and gears for future aerospace applications.

Zaretsky, Erwin V.

1990-01-01

330

Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The annual Campus Technology Innovators awards recognize higher education institutions that take true initiative--even out-and-out risk--to better serve the campus community via technology. These top-notch university administrators, faculty, and staff demonstrate something more than a "job well done"; their vision and leadership have taken…

Grush, Mary; Villano, Matt

2009-01-01

331

AGU receives Crystal Bridge Award  

Microsoft Academic Search

On 23 June the San Francisco Travel Association presented AGU with its Crystal Bridge Award, given to honor major convention customers who bring outstanding events with significant impact to San Francisco, Calif. For the past 43 years, AGU has held its Fall Meeting in San Francisco; for the past 17 years the meeting has been at San Francisco's Moscone Center.

Brenda Weaver

2011-01-01

332

Impact on Learning Award, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes winners of the title award, K-12 school facilities that have solved real-world problems through design, engineering, and technology solutions. Winners were named in the following categories: accessibility, accommodating technology, energy efficient/hi-performance buildings, furniture and equipment for learning, historic preservation,…

School Planning & Management, 2002

2002-01-01

333

Upside's Hot 100 Awards: 1999  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The business technology magazine Upside Today authors this list of the "hottest private high-tech companies of 1999." Upside editors considered entrepreneurial passion as well as the "staying power" of companies to be top criteria for the Hot 100 Awards. Each listing includes a company profile with homepage links where available.

334

ExploraVision Awards Competition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A competition for students of all interest, skill, and ability levels to encourage students to combine their imaginations with the tools of science to create and explore a vision of a future technology. Site includes information for teachers and young inventors. Prizes awarded for top inventions in several age categories. Read bios and quotes from past winners and see past invention ideas.

335

SPORE Award: Open Source Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Science essay describing the work of the Open Source Physics Project published in conjunction with the AAAS awarding the OSP Project a Science Prize for Online Resources in Education (SPORE) for its development of online tools that bring interactive computer-based modeling to students at many levels.

Christian, Wolfgang; Franciscouembre; Barbato, Lyle

2011-12-09

336

Student Merit Awards: High School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Student Merit Award Program was designed to motivate, stimulate and reward students for their study and achievement outside the mathematics classroom by providing enrichment material on a variety of mathematical topics. In general, these topics are either not found in the standard curriculum or represent a more in-depth study of standard…

Sachs, Leroy, Ed.

337

Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator Awards 2003  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator awards winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The recipients will receive their awards at the Clean Cities Conference in Palm Springs, CA.

Not Available

2003-06-01

338

Fixed Amount Award Conditions (FAA GC-1)  

NSF Publications Database

... NSF) FIXED AMOUNT AWARD (FAA GC-1) GENERAL CONDITIONS July 01, 2002 This fixed amount award is ... The grant letter specifies a pre-determined fixed amount of NSF support for the project described in ...

339

Fixed Amount Award (FAA FDP) - June 1999  

NSF Publications Database

... Arlington, VA 22230 FIXED AMOUNT AWARD (FAA FDP) GENERAL CONDITIONS This fixed amount award is ... The grant letter specifies a pre-determined fixed amount of NSF support for the project described in ...

340

42 CFR 52c.5 - Grant awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grant awards. 52c.5 Section 52c.5 ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.5 Grant awards. (a) Within the limits...

2012-10-01

341

Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards (1985).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Subcommittee reviewed 92 papers nominated by EPA's Office of Research and Development for the 1985 Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards; 24 were recommended for awards. The Subcommittee's comments included general observations about the nom...

1986-01-01

342

Radi? receives Cryosphere Young Investigator Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Valentina Radi? received the 2011 Cryosphere Young Investigator Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for “a significant contribution to cryospheric science and technology.”

Hock, Regine; Clarke, Garry

2012-05-01

343

Stanley receives 2010 William Gilbert Award: Response  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sabine Stanley received the William Gilbert Award at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13-17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

Sabine Stanley

2011-01-01

344

Veverka receives 2011 Whipple Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Joseph Veverka received the 2011 Whipple Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes an individual who has made an outstanding contribution in the field of planetary science.

Veverka, Joseph

2012-05-01

345

Kitanidis receives 2011 Hydrologic Sciences Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peter Kitanidis received the 2011 Hydrologic Sciences Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for outstanding contributions to the science of hydrology.

Dagan, Gedeon

2012-04-01

346

Kitanidis receives 2011 Hydrologic Sciences Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peter Kitanidis received the 2011 Hydrologic Sciences Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for outstanding contributions to the science of hydrology.

Kitanidis, Peter

2012-04-01

347

Radi? receives Cryosphere Young Investigator Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Valentina Radi? received the 2011 Cryosphere Young Investigator Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for “a significant contribution to cryospheric science and technology.”

Radi?, Valentina

2012-05-01

348

Veverka receives 2011 Whipple Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Joseph Veverka received the 2011 Whipple Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes an individual who has made an outstanding contribution in the field of planetary science.

Leshin, Laurie

2012-05-01

349

Kirschvink receives 2011 William Gilbert Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Joseph Kirschvink received the William Gilbert Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

Weiss, Benjamin P.

2012-04-01

350

Kirschvink receives 2011 William Gilbert Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Joseph Kirschvink received the William Gilbert Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

Kirschvink, Joseph L.

2012-04-01

351

Stanley receives 2010 William Gilbert Award: Citation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sabine Stanley received the William Gilbert Award at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13-17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

Benjamin P. Weiss

2011-01-01

352

1996 Graduate Fellowship Awards File Formats  

NSF Publications Database

... Awards File Formats Type : Dir of Awards NSF Org: EHR Date : March 27, 1996 File : gf96info This is ... documentation for the ".dlm" files: The record length is 105. All data is delimited by commas and ...

353

Sylvanus Albert Reed Award: Eastman N. Jacobs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sylvanus Albert Reed Award - Eastman N. Jacobs: In 1937, Eastman N. Jacobs, one of Langley's most adventurous researchers, received the Sylvanus Albert Reed Award for his contributions to the aerodynamic improvement of airfoils.

1937-01-01

354

Chambers Receives 2008 Geodesy Section Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Don P. Chambers received the 2008 Geodesy Section Award at the 2008 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is given in recognition of major advances in geodesy.

Nerem, R. Steven; Chambers, Don P.

2009-04-01

355

Glossary Term Detail : Sole Source Award  

Cancer.gov

Skip navigation.. Extramural Glossary Advanced Search Quick Nav: Terms Terms (PDF Format) Acronyms Help About Contact Sole Source Award A new award, neither urgent nor unsolicited, which is not competed. See Also Sole Source Acquisition Home Con

356

The 2004 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics covered include: Super NiCd(TradeMark) Energy Storage for Gravity Probe-B Relativity Mission; Hubble Space Telescope 2004 Battery Update; The Development of Hermetically Sealed Aerospace Nickel-Metal Hydride Cell; Serial Charging Test on High Capacity Li-Ion Cells for the Orbiter Advanced Hydraulic Power System; Cell Equalization of Lithium-Ion Cells; The Long-Term Performance of Small-Cell Batteries Without Cell-Balancing Electronics; Identification and Treatment of Lithium Battery Cell Imbalance under Flight Conditions; Battery Control Boards for Li-Ion Batteries on Mars Exploration Rovers; Cell Over Voltage Protection and Balancing Circuit of the Lithium-Ion Battery; Lithium-Ion Battery Electronics for Aerospace Applications; Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit; Lithium Ion Battery Cell Bypass Circuit Test Results at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory; High Capacity Battery Cell By-Pass Switches: High Current Pulse Testing of Lithium-Ion; Battery By-Pass Switches to Verify Their Ability to Withstand Short-Circuits; Incorporation of Physics-Based, Spatially-Resolved Battery Models into System Simulations; A Monte Carlo Model for Li-Ion Battery Life Projections; Thermal Behavior of Large Lithium-Ion Cells; Thermal Imaging of Aerospace Battery Cells; High Rate Designed 50 Ah Li-Ion Cell for LEO Applications; Evaluation of Corrosion Behavior in Aerospace Lithium-Ion Cells; Performance of AEA 80 Ah Battery Under GEO Profile; LEO Li-Ion Battery Testing; A Review of the Feasibility Investigation of Commercial Laminated Lithium-Ion Polymer Cells for Space Applications; Lithium-Ion Verification Test Program; Panasonic Small Cell Testing for AHPS; Lithium-Ion Small Cell Battery Shorting Study; Low-Earth-Orbit and Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit Testing of 80 Ah Batteries under Real-Time Profiles; Update on Development of Lithium-Ion Cells for Space Applications at JAXA; Foreign Comparative Technology: Launch Vehicle Battery Cell Testing; 20V, 40 Ah Lithium Ion Polymer Battery for the Spacesuit; Low Temperature Life-Cycle Testing of a Lithium-Ion Battery for Low-Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft; and Evaluation of the Effects of DoD and Charge Rate on a LEO Optimized 50 Ah Li-Ion Aerospace Cell.

2006-01-01

357

Fiscal Year 1995 Career Program Awards  

NSF Publications Database

The access for the web is url http://www.nsf.gov/ and then: The locations are as follows: News of Interest Button select noteworth items select fy95 career awards Org&staff button select cross-cutting select fy95 career awards Grants handling/program areas button select program areas select cross-cutting select fy95 career awards ***************************************************************** FY 1995 Career Awards STATE INSTITUTION PI LAST NAME PI FIRST NAME TITLE PROPOSAL NUMBER ...

358

Hiroko Nishimura Receives Niigata Nippo Culture Award  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an article from The Physiologist. "APS member Hiroko Nishimura has been awarded the Niigata Nippo Culture Award. She is the first female to receive this honor in the science-scholarly activity division. The award ceremony was held on November 1, 2007, in Niigata, Japan."

2008-02-01

359

42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public...HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds, the Secretary may award training grants for training...

2012-10-01

360

Student Papers and Awards (SIG ED).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a session that recognized student award winners in the information science field, including the UMI (University Microfilms International) Doctoral Dissertation Award; the ISI (Institute for Scientific Information) Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Scholarship; and the Pratt-Severn Best Student Research Paper Award. (LRW)

Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 2000

2000-01-01

361

Standout Performances: The NACE Annual Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Profiles NACE's 1999 Employer of the Year, Academy of Fellows inductees, Kauffman Award honoree, and Awards of Excellence recipients. Also profiles Awards of Excellence recipients for the following categories: Publications for Students, Adiovisual Programs, Educational Programming, and Technical Innovations. (Author/JDM)

Journal of Career Planning & Employment, 1999

1999-01-01

362

Cost Reduction Incentive Awards. 1981 Winners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brief descriptions of 47 college programs recognized for awards in the National Association of College and University Officers/U. S. Steel Foundation Cost Reduction Incentive Awards Program are given. They include awards for: shower stall repair; chemical waste exchange; vibrating alarms for hearing-imparied; self-funding insurance consortium;…

National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

363

Advanced Technological Education Program: 1998 Awards and Activities  

NSF Publications Database

... III. Maps New Awards Centers of Excellence Distribution of Active and New Awards by State IV ... New Awards by Field of Technology Active and New Awards by State Principal Investigators V. ATE ...

364

48 CFR 15.507 - Protests against award.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Protests against award. 15.507 Section 15.507 Federal...CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Preaward, Award, and Postaward Notifications, Protests, and Mistakes 15.507 Protests against award. (a) Protests against award...

2013-10-01

365

Introduction: Aims and Requirements of Future Aerospace Vehicles. Chapter 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goals and system-level requirements for the next generation aerospace vehicles emphasize safety, reliability, low-cost, and robustness rather than performance. Technologies, including new materials, design and analysis approaches, manufacturing and testing methods, operations and maintenance, and multidisciplinary systems-level vehicle development are key to increasing the safety and reducing the cost of aerospace launch systems. This chapter identifies the goals and needs of the next generation or advanced aerospace vehicle systems.

Rodriguez, Pedro I.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

366

Index of aerospace mechanisms symposia proceedings 1-19  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This index, organized in five sections (by symposium, by title, by author, by subject, and by project), brings together information on the first 19 Aerospace Mechanisms symposia. Key words are included, cross-referencing all the symposia, and the eighteenth and nineteenth symposia are cross-indexed by project. The Aerospace Mechanisms symposia are devoted to discussions of design, fabrication, test, and operational use of aerospace mechanisms; this is the first index that compiles information on symposia held from 1966 through 1985.

Rinaldo, A.; Wilson, J.

1986-01-01

367

Implementation of Tsiolkovsky's ideas concerning the development of aerospace vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of an aerospace vehicle is examined as an example of an implementation of Tsiolkovsky's ideas concerning 'winged rockets'. The advantages of aerospace vehicles over carrier rockets are reviewed. These include reusability, a substantial reduction in take-off mass, an improvement in the payload/take-off mass ratio, and the ability to use conventional air strips. Programs aimed at developing an aerospace vehicle that are currently conducted in the USA, Great Britain, Germany, and Russia are briefly reviewed.

Volk, I. P.; Nikolaevskii, B. A.

368

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 39: The role of computer networks in aerospace engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were gathered in a mail survey, conducted in Spring 1993, that was distributed to aerospace engineers performing a wide variety of jobs. Results from the mail survey provide a snapshot of the current use of computer networks in the aerospace industry, suggest factors associated with the use of networks, and identify perceived impacts of networks on aerospace engineering work and communication.

Bishop, Ann P.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

1994-01-01

369

Announcing the 2013 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believe that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of Fluid Mechanics, Measurement Science, Precision Measurement, Sensors and Sensing Systems, and Optical and Laser-based Techniques. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2013 Award Winner—Fluid Mechanics Extraction of skin-friction fields from surface flow visualizations Tianshu Liu Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA The skin friction or wall shear stress, ? w, for a wall bounded turbulent flow is a quantity of fundamental importance. It is the basis for the wall unit, ?/u ? (kinematic viscosity/friction velocity: [? w/? ]1/2), which establishes the intrinsic length scale in the flow. The selected paper [1] provides a comprehensive review of—and builds upon—prior techniques to obtain ? w values over an area of interest for flow past complex geometries. The quantities that can be measured by optical imaging are shown to be related to the skin friction by the optical flow equation, which in turn is solved numerically as an inverse problem via the variational approach. The paper provides a well defined set of guidelines for other investigators. Detailed examples of skin-friction measurements using luminescent oil films as well as temperature- and pressure-sensitive paints are presented. Quantitative uncertainty estimates are included in the paper. Given the importance of the wall shear stress (skin friction) in fluid mechanics and the notorious difficulty of measuring this quantity directly, this paper is expected to be a seminal contribution. The paper was one of four in the special feature on Wall Shear Stress organized by Professor A Naguib in the December 2013 issue. 2013 Award Winner—Measurement Science Analysis of calibration-free wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy for practical gas sensing using tunable diode lasers K Sun, X Chao, R Sur, C S Goldenstein, J B Jeffries and R K Hanson High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA In the previous two years, the Measurement Science Award has gone to important papers in diagnostic fields, namely particle image velocimetry (PIV [2]) and x-ray micro-computed tomographic systems [3]. This year's award [4] goes to another diagnostic field, infrared spectroscopy for practical gas sensing. Infrared spectroscopy is a very important topic for measurement science, concerned with the monitoring of gases in our environment. Over two decades, this form of spectroscopy has been enabled with the development of tunable diode lasers (TDLs). Hence, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is now an established method for in situ measurements of gas composition, temperature, pressure and velocity. Gases such as ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide and monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride and sulfur dioxide can all be monitored by commercially available systems. Some advances have been associated with improvements in infrared detectors or in the properties of some diode lasers. For homogeneous gases, the interpretation using the Beer–Lambert law and direct absorption (DA) is quite straightforward. DA is the preferred method when an absorption line can be found in the infrared region with an isolated transition of sufficient strength, and with a linewidth small enough to allow the laser to be wavelength-scanned on the absorption line, and just off it (as

Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Peters, Kara

2014-07-01

370

Chemical Gas Sensors for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemical sensors often need to be specifically designed (or tailored) to operate in a given environment. It is often the case that a chemical sensor that meets the needs of one application will not function adequately in another application. The more demanding the environment and specialized the requirement, the greater the need to adapt exiting sensor technologies to meet these requirements or, as necessary, develop new sensor technologies. Aerospace (aeronautic and space) applications are particularly challenging since often these applications have specifications which have not previously been the emphasis of commercial suppliers. Further, the chemical sensing needs of aerospace applications have changed over the years to reflect the changing emphasis of society. Three chemical sensing applications of particular interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which illustrate these trends are launch vehicle leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire detection. Each of these applications reflects efforts ongoing throughout NASA. As described in NASA's "Three Pillars for Success", a document which outlines NASA's long term response to achieve the nation's priorities in aerospace transportation, agency wide objectives include: improving safety and decreasing the cost of space travel, significantly decreasing the amount of emissions produced by aeronautic engines, and improving the safety of commercial airline travel. As will be discussed below, chemical sensing in leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire detection will help enable the agency to meet these objectives. Each application has vastly different problems associated with the measurement of chemical species. Nonetheless, the development of a common base technology can address the measurement needs of a number of applications.

Hunter, Gary W.; Liu, C. C.

1998-01-01

371

U.S. Aerospace Industry: Progress in Implementing Aerospace Commission Recommendations, and Remaining Challenges.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. aerospace industry's wide-ranging activities--including commercial aviation, national security, and space exploration--make it critical to the economic health and strategic strength of our nation. However, the industry faces challenges, such as a...

2006-01-01

372

Aerospace Force Defending America in the 21st Century a White Paper on Aerospace Integration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Aerospace Force: Defending America in the 21st Century is a white paper and a key pillar to the new Air Force Vision. At the dawn of the new millennium, the Air Force is directing its strategic vision to meet the nation's requirements within a rapidly...

F. W. Peters M. E. Ryan

2000-01-01

373

75 FR 30282 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes...airworthiness directive (AD) for all Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes...publications listed in this AD. ADDRESSES: Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in...

2010-06-01

374

75 FR 12468 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes...airworthiness directive (AD) for all Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes...through Friday, except Federal holidays. Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in...

2010-03-16

375

76 FR 721 - Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Model G-1159 Airplanes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Model G-1159 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...certain Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Model G-1159 airplanes. The existing AD requires...to Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Model G- 1159 airplanes, was published in the...

2011-01-06

376

Structural Optimization of Conceptual Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace vehicle structures must be optimized for mass to maximize the mission payload. During the conceptual design phase, structures must be optimized to accurately predict the mass of the design. Analysis methods that are used in sizing members should allow for the selection of a variety of metallic and composite materials and user-defined geometry constraints. Rapid vehicle structural analysis is often necessary to improve the fidelity and the results that are obtained during the preliminary design. Recent experiences are highlighted that utilize the Collier Research Corporation's Hypersizer toolset to optimize structural concepts.

Hrinda, Glenn Andrew

2008-01-01

377

National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program to develop the technology for reusable airbreathing hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles is addressed. Information on the following topics is presented in viewgraph form: (1) the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program schedule; (2) the NASP program organization; (3) competitive strategy; (4) propulsion options; (5) wind tunnel data available for NASP; (6) ground track of envelope expansion; and (7) altitude vs. Mach number. A NASP/Space Shuttle comparison, NASP configuration matrix, and the propulsion concept of a high speed scramjet are also briefly addressed.

Tank, Ming H.

1991-01-01

378

An Integrated International Aerospace Medical Information System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Integrated International Aerospace Medical Information System (IIASMIS) is proposed. Such a system is needed to allow all appropriate resources to be brought to bear on the medical problems that must be solved for safe extended manned missions. Existing medical data bases are reviewed. The suggested approach involves the formation of an international working group that would determine the scope of the problem, identify the real needs, and design the top-level architecture of the system. Participants would develop national data bases independently. A prototype system would be developed and evaluated; upon satisfactory operation, it would be expanded to include all active partners.

Schneider, W. C.; Rigterink, P.; Goodwin, C.

379

Interdisciplinary optimum design. [of aerospace structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Problems related to interdisciplinary interactions in the design of a complex engineering systems are examined with reference to aerospace applications. The interdisciplinary optimization problems examined include those dealing with controls and structures, materials and structures, control and stability, structure and aerodynamics, and structure and thermodynamics. The discussion is illustrated by the following specific applications: integrated aerodynamic/structural optimization of glider wing; optimization of an antenna parabolic dish structure for minimum weight and prescribed emitted signal gain; and a multilevel optimization study of a transport aircraft.

Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Haftka, Raphael T.

1986-01-01

380

Algor finite element modeling tools aid aerospace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerospace engineers have found Algor, a finite element analysis software package from Algor in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a useful design and modelling tools. In one case, Applied Analysis & Technology has used Algor software to perform a transient heat transfer analysis on the engine duct assembly of a high-performance jet to determine whether the design would survive on the actual environmental conditions. In another example, Algor software was used to analyze a bulkhead in a commercial jet engine. Because Algor software has become more flexible and easier to use, if has emerged as the fundamental tool for analysis.

Binder, John D.

1995-05-01

381

Education World: Grants and Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Education World (reported on in the February 22, 2002 NSDL Scout Report for the Physical Sciences) is a website that is intended to be "a home for educators on the Internet, a place where teachers could gather and share ideas." This section of Education World provides information on grants and awards available for teachers. The site includes a number of resources to help educators performing grant writing. Links to external sites with lists of grant opportunities for education are also included.

382

Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work of Dr Todd Evans, another significant mentor of mine, as winner of this prestigious award? Then, it happened. The paper covers several key topics related to high beta tokamak physics. For me, the greatest satisfaction in receiving this award is because it was the first Nuclear Fusion Award to recognize research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The achievement of record stability parameters in a mega-Ampere class spherical torus (ST) device reported in the paper represents a multi-year effort, contributed to by the entire research team. Research to maintain such plasmas for an indefinite period continues today. Understanding RWM stabilization physics is crucial for this goal, and leveraging the high beta ST operating space uniquely tests theory for application to future STs and to tokamaks in general, including advanced operational scenarios of ITER. For instance, the RWM was found to have significant amplitude in components with the toroidal mode number greater than unity. This has important implications for general active RWM control. Evidence that the RWM passive stabilization physics and marginal stability criterion are indeed more complex than originally thought was shown in this paper. Present work shows the greater complexity has a direct impact on how we should extrapolate RWM stabilization to future devices. The paper also reported the qualitative observation of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), followed by a companion paper by our group in 2006 reporting the quantitative observation of this effect and comparison to theory. The physics of this interesting and important phenomenon was introduced to me by Professor J. Callen (who has given an overview talk at this conference including this subject) and Professor Kerchung Shaing of the University of Wisconsin, to whom I am quite indebted. The paper also reported the first measurement of resonant field amplification at high beta in the NSTX, following work of the Columbia University group at DIII-D during that period. My greatest hope

Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

2011-01-01

383

EDITORIAL: The Nuclear Fusion Award The Nuclear Fusion Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nuclear Fusion Award ceremony for 2009 and 2010 award winners was held during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. This time, both 2009 and 2010 award winners were celebrated by the IAEA and the participants of the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The Nuclear Fusion Award is a paper prize to acknowledge the best distinguished paper among the published papers in a particular volume of the Nuclear Fusion journal. Among the top-cited and highly-recommended papers chosen by the Editorial Board, excluding overview and review papers, and by analyzing self-citation and non-self-citation with an emphasis on non-self-citation, the Editorial Board confidentially selects ten distinguished papers as nominees for the Nuclear Fusion Award. Certificates are given to the leading authors of the Nuclear Fusion Award nominees. The final winner is selected among the ten nominees by the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board voting confidentially. 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2009 award, the papers published in the 2006 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, most of which are magnetic confinement experiments, theory and modeling, while one addresses inertial confinement. Sabbagh S.A. et al 2006 Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 635-44 La Haye R.J. et al 2006 Cross-machine benchmarking for ITER of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive Nucl. Fusion 46 451-61 Honrubia J.J. et al 2006 Three-dimensional fast electron transport for ignition-scale inertial fusion capsules Nucl. Fusion 46 L25-8 Ido T. et al 2006 Observation of the interaction between the geodesic acoustic mode and ambient fluctuation in the JFT-2M tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 512-20 Plyusnin V.V. et al 2006 Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 277-84 Pitts R.A. et al 2006 Far SOL ELM ion energies in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 82-98 Berk H.L. et al 2006 Explanation of the JET n = 0 chirping mode Nucl. Fusion 46 S888-97 Urano H. et al 2006 Confinement degradation with beta for ELMy HH-mode plasmas in JT-60U tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 781-7 Izzo V.A. et al 2006 A numerical investigation of the effects of impurity penetration depth on disruption mitigation by massive high-pressure gas jet Nucl. Fusion 46 541-7 Inagaki S. et al 2006 Comparison of transient electron heat transport in LHD helical and JT-60U tokamak plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 133-41 Watanabe T.-H. et al 2006 Velocity-space structures of distribution function in toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence Nucl. Fusion 46 24-32 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2010 award, the papers published in the 2007 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, all of which are magnetic confinement experiments and theory. Rice J.E. et al 2007 Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks Nucl. Fusion 47 1618-24 Lipschultz B. et al 2007 Plasma-surface interaction, scrape-off layer and divertor physics: implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 1189-205 Loarer T. et al 2007 Gas balance and fuel retention in fusion devices Nucl. Fusion 47 1112-20 Garcia O.E et al 2007 Fluctuations and transport in the TCV scrape-off layer Nucl. Fusion 47 667-76 Zonca F. et al 2007 Electron fishbones: theory and experimental evidence Nucl. Fusion 47 1588-97 Maggi C.F. et al 2007 Characteristics of the H-mode pedestal in improved confinement scenarios in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and JT-60U Nucl. Fusion 47 535-51 Yoshida M. et al 2007 Momentum transport and plasma rotation profile in toroidal direction in JT-60U L-mode plasmas Nucl. Fusion 47 856-63 Zohm H. et al 2007 Control of MHD instabilities by ECCD: ASDEX Upgrade results and implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 228-32 Snyder P.B. et al 2007 Stability and dynamics of the edge pedestal in the low collisionality regime: physics mechanisms for steady-state ELM-free operation Nucl. Fusion 47 961-8 Urano H. et al 2007 H-mode pedestal structure in the variation of toroidal rotation and toroidal f

Kikuchi, M.

2011-01-01

384

Hybrid techniques for complex aerospace electromagnetics problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Important aerospace electromagnetics problems include the evaluation of antenna performance on aircraft and the prediction and control of the aircraft's electromagnetic signature. Due to the ever increasing complexity and expense of aircraft design, aerospace engineers have become increasingly dependent on computer solutions. Traditionally, computational electromagnetics (CEM) has relied primarily on four disparate techniques: the method of moments (MoM), the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, the finite element method (FEM), and high frequency asymptotic techniques (HFAT) such as ray tracing. Each of these techniques has distinct advantages and disadvantages, and no single technique is capable of accurately solving all problems of interest on computers that are available now or will be available in the foreseeable future. As a result, new approaches that overcome the deficiencies of traditional techniques are beginning to attract a great deal of interest in the CEM community. Among these new approaches are hybrid methods which combine two or more of these techniques into a coherent model. During the ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program a hybrid FEM/MoM computer code was developed and applied to a geometry containing features found on many modern aircraft.

Aberle, Jim

1993-01-01

385

Ultrahigh-strength steels for aerospace applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ultrahigh-strength steels used in aerospace applications are primarily alloys developed 25 or more years ago, which would seem to illustrate the conservatism of alloy producers. However, the now widespread use of AF1410, which was developed in the mid-1970s, suggests that new alloys will be adopted for aerospace applications if their mechanical properties are markedly superior to incumbent alloys. Given the excellent properties of the secondary hardening steels such as AF1410, it would appear that the greatest need is for alloys with yield strengths of 1,725 MPa and higher, which have improved fracture toughness and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking. Control of sulfide-type inclusions, coupled with low sulfur levels, may be a means of achieving quite reasonable toughness at high strength levels. Improving resistance to stress-corrosion cracking appears to be a more difficult problem, but it is hoped that a general solution for the case of intergranular fracture by stress-corrosion cracking will arise from ongoing fundamental studies of the effects of segregating impurities and alloying additions on grain boundary cohesion.

Garrison, W. M.

1990-05-01

386

Hybrid techniques for complex aerospace electromagnetics problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Important aerospace electromagnetics problems include the evaluation of antenna performance on aircraft and the prediction and control of the aircraft's electromagnetic signature. Due to the ever increasing complexity and expense of aircraft design, aerospace engineers have become increasingly dependent on computer solutions. Traditionally, computational electromagnetics (CEM) has relied primarily on four disparate techniques: the method of moments (MoM), the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, the finite element method (FEM), and high frequency asymptotic techniques (HFAT) such as ray tracing. Each of these techniques has distinct advantages and disadvantages, and no single technique is capable of accurately solving all problems of interest on computers that are available now or will be available in the foreseeable future. As a result, new approaches that overcome the deficiencies of traditional techniques are beginning to attract a great deal of interest in the CEM community. Among these new approaches are hybrid methods which combine two or more of these techniques into a coherent model. During the ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program a hybrid FEM/MoM computer code was developed and applied to a geometry containing features found on many modern aircraft.

Aberle, Jim

1993-12-01

387

Advanced electromagnetic methods for aerospace vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High- and low-frequency methods to analyze various radiation elements located on aerospace vehicles with combinations of conducting, nonconducting, and energy absorbing surfaces and interfaces. The focus was on developing fundamental concepts, techniques, and algorithms which would remove some of the present limitations in predicting radiation characteristics of antennas on complex aerospace vehicles. In order to accomplish this, the following subjects were examined: (1) the development of techniques for rigorous analysis of surface discontinuities of metallic and nonmetallic surfaces using the equivalent surface impedance concept and Green's function; (2) the effects of anisotropic material on antenna radiation patterns through the use of an equivalent surface impedance concept which is incorporated into the existing numerical electromagnetics computer codes; and (3) the fundamental concepts of precipitation static (P-Static), such as formulations and analytical models. A computer code was used to model the P-Static process on a simple structure. Measurement techniques were also developed to characterized the electrical properties at microwave frequencies. Samples of typical materials used in airframes were tested and the results are included.

Balanis, Constantine A.; Choi, Jachoon; El-Sharawy, El-Budawy; Hashemi-Yeganeh, Shahrokh; Birtcher, Craig R.

1990-01-01

388

Comments on a military transatmospheric aerospace plane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The conceptual design of a military transatmospheric aerospace plane candidate involves the selection of the mission(s), operating environment, operational concept, payload definition, specific design choices, and a close look at the technology base. A broad range of missions and concepts were reviewed prior to the selection of the mission and concepts presented in this paper. The mission selected was CONUS based global strike. The flight profile selected was a boost-glide-skip unrefuled global range trajectory. Two concepts were selected. The first was a rocket-powered design and the second was a combined air-breathing and rocket powered design. The rocket-powered configuration is a high lift-to-drag ratio modified lifting body. The rocket engine is an advanced dual fuel linear aero-spike. The air-breathing powered configuration is a modified waverider configuration. The engine for the air-breather is a rocket based combined cycle engine. Performance and technology readiness comparisons are presented for the two concepts. The paper closes with a discussion of lessons learned about military transatmospheric aerospace planes over the past twenty years.

Chase, R. L.

1997-01-01

389

NASA aerospace pyrotechnically actuated systems: Program plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Aerospace Pyrotechnically Actuated Systems (PAS) Program, a focused technology program, is being initiated to enhance the reliability, safety, and performance of pyrotechnically actuated systems. In broad terms, this Program Plan presents the approach that helps to resolve concerns raised by the NASA/DOD/DOE Aerospace Pyrotechnic Steering Committee. This Plan reflects key efforts needed in PAS technology. The resources committed to implement the Program will be identified in the Program Implementation Plan (PIP). A top level schedule is included along with major Program milestones and products. Responsibilities are defined in the PIP. The Plan identifies the goals and detailed objectives which define how those goals are to be accomplished. The Program will improve NASA's capabilities to design, develop, manufacture, and test pyrotechnically actuated systems for NASA's programs. Program benefits include the following: advanced pyrotechnic systems technology developed for NASA programs; hands-on pyrotechnic systems expertise; quick response capability to investigate and resolve pyrotechnic problems; enhanced communications and intercenter support among the technical staff; and government-industry PAS technical interchange. The PAS Program produces useful products that are of a broad-based technology nature rather than activities intended to meet specific technology objectives for individual programs. Serious problems have occurred with pyrotechnic devices although near perfect performance is demanded by users. The lack of a program to address those problems in the past is considered a serious omission. The nature of problems experienced as revealed by a survey are discussed and the origin of the program is explained.

Schulze, Norman R.

1992-01-01

390

Chemical Microsensor Development for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous aerospace applications, including low-false-alarm fire detection, environmental monitoring, fuel leak detection, and engine emission monitoring, would benefit greatly from robust and low weight, cost, and power consumption chemical microsensors. NASA Glenn Research Center has been working to develop a variety of chemical microsensors with these attributes to address the aforementioned applications. Chemical microsensors using different material platforms and sensing mechanisms have been produced. Approaches using electrochemical cells, resistors, and Schottky diode platforms, combined with nano-based materials, high temperature solid electrolytes, and room temperature polymer electrolytes have been realized to enable different types of microsensors. By understanding the application needs and chemical gas species to be detected, sensing materials and unique microfabrication processes were selected and applied. The chemical microsensors were designed utilizing simple structures and the least number of microfabrication processes possible, while maintaining high yield and low cost. In this presentation, an overview of carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and hydrogen/hydrocarbons (H2/CxHy) microsensors and their fabrication, testing results, and applications will be described. Particular challenges associated with improving the H2/CxHy microsensor contact wire-bonding pad will be discussed. These microsensors represent our research approach and serve as major tools as we expand our sensor development toolbox. Our ultimate goal is to develop robust chemical microsensor systems for aerospace and commercial applications.

Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Lukco, Dorothy; Chen, Liangyu; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.

2013-01-01

391

Excimer laser processing of aerospace alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The affect of varying a wide range of excimer laser parameters on the average etch rate per shot of aerospace alloys (Al, Ti and Ni) has been investigated. The parameters found to most profoundly influence the etch rate were, the laser fluence (up to 70 J/cm2), pulse length (20 - 160 nsec FWHM), gas environment, beam spot size (35 - 300 micrometers ) and material thickness (0.4 - 1.8 mm). Optimization of these parameters has produced an increase in average etch rate per shot from 0.05 to 1.5 micrometers with Ti alloy (2 TA - 10). Such increases in etch rate are seen to occur above a relatively well defined 'critical' fluence for thick samples which it is postulated corresponds to the transition from a largely vaporization dominated to a vaporization/melt expulsion regime. Information is also included on the quality of the processing and on the extent of the laser affected zone around the processed area. Potential aerospace application areas identified and discussed include drilling multiple hole arrays for producing porous surfaces for drag reduction on aircraft and the cutting and profiling of alloy/glass fiber composites (GLARE).

Scott, Graeme; Henry, K.

1993-04-01

392

Trajectory optimization for the National aerospace plane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While continuing the application of the inverse dynamics approach in obtaining the optimal numerical solutions, the research during the past six months has been focused on the formulation and derivation of closed-form solutions for constrained hypersonic flight trajectories. Since it was found in the research of the first year that a dominant portion of the optimal ascent trajectory of the aerospace plane is constrained by dynamic pressure and heating constraints, the application of the analytical solutions significantly enhances the efficiency in trajectory optimization, provides a better insight to understanding of the trajectory and conceivably has great potential in guidance of the vehicle. Work of this period has been reported in four technical papers. Two of the papers were presented in the AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference (Hilton Head, SC, August, 1992) and Fourth International Aerospace Planes Conference (Orlando, FL, December, 1992). The other two papers have been accepted for publication by Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, and will appear in 1993. This report briefly summarizes the work done in the past six months and work currently underway.

Lu, Ping

1993-01-01

393

A First Course in Software Engineering for Aerospace Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software is a critical component of mission capability in all aerospace systems. This capability is realized directly through the use of onboard software, and enabled through the use of software on ground support systems. Students attending an aerospace engineering program come with a highly diversified background in software development ranging from novice user to expert programmer. A first course in

Kristina Lundqvist; Jayakanth Srinivasan

2006-01-01

394

Introduction to Fastener Technology: An Aerospace Manufacturing Perspective (Part 2)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides an overview of fastener technology from the aerospace manufacturing perspective. This is part two of a three-part presentation; the other documents may be found here.This document includes 23 slides and covers permanent fastening technologies (welding, adhesive bonding and riveting) and temporary fastening technologies (threaded and non-threaded).

2011-11-14

395

5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Records are presented from the 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology. Topics included pollution prevention, inspection methods, advanced materials, aerospace materials and technical standards,materials testing and evaluation, advanced manufacturing,development in metallic processes, synthesis of nanomaterials, composite cryotank processing, environmentally friendly cleaning, and poster sessions.

Cook, M. B. (Editor); Stanley, D. Cross (Editor)

2003-01-01

396

The aerospace technology laboratory (a perspective, then and now)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The physical changes that have taken place in aerospace facilities since the Wright brothers' accomplishment 78 years ago are highlighted. For illustrative purposes some of the technical facilities and operations of the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. These simulation facilities were designed to support research and technology studies in aerospace propulsion.

Connors, J. F.; Hoffman, R. G.

1982-01-01

397

75 FR 39911 - Aerospace Supplier Development Mission to China  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) supplying the...Chinese aerospace firms, including those...consolidation and lean manufacturing. Many traditional...As the larger firms move into aerospace...divisions'' engaged in manufacturing, design and engineering...programs with Chinese firms ``risk...

2010-07-13

398

Aerospace Plane Design Challenge: Credible Computational Fluid Dynamics Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is necessary in the design processes of all current aerospace plane programs. Single-stage-to-orbit (STTO) aerospace planes with air-breathing supersonic combustion are going to be largely designed by means of CFD. The c...

U. B. Mehta

1990-01-01

399

Electropneumatic Control Systems for Aerospace Nuclear Propulsion Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes recent advances in electropneumatic control systems for aerospace nuclear propulsion. The capabilities, limitations, and recognized problem areas are defined and reviewed, and reasons for the selection of this type of control systems are discussed. The potential of electropneumatic control systems for broader aerospace applications is discussed, where less emphasis may be placed on environmental restrictions but more

C. B. Sung; J. R. Farron

1962-01-01

400

Scenario Planning in the Aerospace Business Environment - the VIBES Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air transport has a considerable impact on tourism, trade and other aspects of society, and the industry that constructs and maintains aircraft is a major employer and wealth generator. Many nations have made substantial investments aimed at developing and retaining world- class aerospace design and manufacturing capabilities; if these resources are to be deployed to best effect, the aerospace industry

Richard Farr; Johanna Bramham; Bart MacCarthy

2005-01-01

401

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 10: The NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The role of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge DIffusion Research Project in helping to maintain U.S. competitiveness is addressed. The phases of the project are examined in terms of the focus, emphasis, subjects, methods, and desired outcomes. The importance of the project to aerospace R&D is emphasized.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1991-01-01

402

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 41: Technical communication practices of Dutch and US aerospace engineers and scientists: International perspective on aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The studies had the following objectives: (1) to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions, (2) to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists, (3) to investigate their use of libraries and technical information centers, (4) to investigate their use of and the importance to them of computer and information technology, (5) to examine their use of electronic networks, and (6) to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. Self-administered (mail) questionnaires were distributed to Dutch aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR) in the Netherlands, the NASA Ames Research Center in the U.S., and the NASA Langley Research Center in the U.S. Responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this paper.

Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

1994-01-01

403

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 19: Computer and information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To remain a world leader in aerospace, the US must improve and maintain the professional competency of its engineers and scientists, increase the research and development (R&D) knowledge base, improve productivity, and maximize the integration of recent technological developments into the R&D process. How well these objectives are met, and at what cost, depends on a variety of factors, but largely on the ability of US aerospace engineers and scientists to acquire and process the results of federally funded R&D. The Federal Government's commitment to high speed computing and networking systems presupposes that computer and information technology will play a major role in the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. However, we know little about information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The use of computer and information technology by US aerospace engineers and scientists in academia, government, and industry is reported.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.

1992-01-01

404

Technical communications in aerospace - An analysis of the practices reported by U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow of scientific and technical information (STI) at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels is studied. The responses of U.S and European aerospace engineers and scientists to questionnaires concerning technical communications in aerospace are examined. Particular attention is given to the means used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Demographic data about the survey respondents are provided. The methods used to communicate technical data and the sources utilized to solve technical problems are described. The importance of technical writing skills and the use of computer technology in the aerospace field are discussed. The derived data are useful for R&D and information managers in order to improve access to and utilization of aerospace STI.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

1990-01-01

405

Awards set for study abroad  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Senior Scholar Fulbright awards for university teaching and postdoctoral research in 1984-85 are available in all academic fields for terms of 2-10 months in more than 100 countries. Applications and information may be obtained after April 15, 1983, on college and university campuses from the graduate dean, chief academic officer, or the international programs office. Interested persons also may write to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars, 11 Dupont Circle, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036 (telephone: 202-833-4985). Please specify the country and field of interest.

406

Graduate Fellowship Awards for Fiscal Year 1996  

NSF Publications Database

Title : Graduate Fellowship Awards for Fiscal Year 1996 Type : Dir of Awards NSF Org: EHR Date : September 3, 1996 File : gf96rawd NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM FOR FISCAL YEAR 1996 FELLOWSHIP AWARDS This list has been arranged alphabetically with the following information: name, current field, baccalaureate institution, and proposed graduate institution. Adams, Jesse David E/MECHANCL NEVADA, UNIV OF PURDUE UNIVERSITY/IN Agler, Heather Lynn E/BIOENGR SOUTH CAROLINA, ...

407

Notre Dame Awards Achievements in Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Notre Dame Australia’s, Fremantle Campus Law School recently held their annual awards night.\\u000aAwards were sponsored by prominent law firms and given for outstanding achievements by students.\\u000aOne student recipient, Tom French, received an award for both Best Second Year Student (Freehills Prize) and also theGeraldine Byrne Prize, which is given to a student who has made

Michelle Ebbs

2006-01-01

408

Nominations for Renewable Natural Resources Awards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Renewable Natural Resources Foundation (RNRF) is seeking nominations for three annual awards that honor interdisciplinary achievements in renewable natural resources fields. The RNRF is a consortium of 14 educational, professional, and scientific organizations, including AGU. The RNRF's Sustained Achievement Award honors the long-term contributions of an individual to the protection and conservation of natural resources. The Outstanding Achievement Award recognizes a single project, publication, piece of legislation, or similar concrete achievement that occurred within the last three years.

2006-03-01

409

State Award Summary Fiscal Year 1995 Award Report By State And Institution Fiscal Year 1995  

NSF Publications Database

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AWARD REPORT BY STATE AND INSTITUTION FISCAL YEAR 1995 (Excludes Reimbursables) Alaska INSTITUTION TOTAL RESEARCH SUPPORT ED. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AWARD REPORT BY STATE AND INSTITUTION FISCAL YEAR 1995 (Excludes Reimbursables) Arizona INSTITUTION TOTAL RESEARCH SUPPORT ED.

410

Kreemer Receives 2010 Geodesy Section Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corné Kreemer received the 2010 Geodesy Section Award at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13-17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is given in recognition of major advances in geodesy. It is a great pleasure for us to cite Corné Kreemer for the 2010 Geodesy Section Award, which is awarded to early- to middle-career scientists to recognize major advances in geodesy. Both of us have been very fortunate to have worked with Corné during this first phase of his career, starting with Bill Holt at State University of New York at Stony Brook and now with Geoff Blewitt at University of Nevada, Reno.

Blewitt, Geoffrey; Holt, William; Kreemer, Corné

2011-06-01

411

Aerospace Flywheel Technology Development for IPACS Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) are cooperating under a space act agreement to sponsor the research and development of aerospace flywheel technologies to address mutual future mission needs. Flywheel technology offers significantly enhanced capability or is an enabling technology. Generally these missions are for energy storage and/or integrated power and attitude control systems (IPACS) for mid-to-large satellites in low earth orbit. These missions require significant energy storage as well as a CMG or reaction wheel function for attitude control. A summary description of the NASA and AFRL flywheel technology development programs is provided, followed by specific descriptions of the development plans for integrated flywheel system tests for IPACS applications utilizing both fixed and actuated flywheel units. These flywheel system development tests will be conducted at facilities at AFRL and NASA Glenn Research Center and include participation by industry participants Honeywell and Lockheed Martin.

McLallin, Kerry L.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Fausz, Jerry; Bauer, Robert D.

2001-01-01

412

An adaptive guidance algorithm for aerospace vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The specifications for proposed space transportation systems are placing more emphasis on developing reusable avionics subsystems which have the capability to respond to vehicle evolution and diverse missions while at the same time reducing the cost of ground support for mission planning, contingency response and verification and validation. An innovative approach to meeting these goals is to specify the guidance problem as a multi-point boundary value problen and solve that problem using modern control theory and nonlinear constrained optimization techniques. This approach has been implemented as Gamma Guidance (Hardtla, 1978) and has been successfully flown in the Inertial Upper Stage. The adaptive guidance algorithm described in this paper is a generalized formulation of Gamma Guidance. The basic equations are presented and then applied to four diverse aerospace vehicles to demonstrate the feasibility of using a reusable, explicit, adaptive guidance algorithm for diverse applications and vehicles.

Bradt, J. E.; Hardtla, J. W.; Cramer, E. J.

413

Fatigue crack propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reviews fracture mechanics-based, damage tolerant characterizations and predictions of fatigue crack growth in aerospace aluminum alloys. The results of laboratory experimentation and micromechanical modeling are summarized in the areas of 1) the wide range crack growth rate response of conventional aluminum alloys, 2) fatigue crack closure, 3) the fatigue behavior of advanced monolithic aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites, 4) the short crack problem, 5) environmental fatigue, and 6) variable amplitude loading. Uncertainties and necessary research are identified. This work provides a foundation for the development of fatigue resistant alloys and life prediction codes for new structural designs and extreme environments, as well as to counter the problem of aging components.

Gangloff, Richard P.; Piascik, Robert S.; Dicus, Dennis L.; Newman, James C., Jr.

1994-05-01

414

Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years of the project. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed. A theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modelling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide a embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

1994-01-01

415

Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars. Part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program was established by Dr. Samuel E. Massenberg in 1986. The program has increased from 20 participants in 1986 to 114 participants in 1995. The program is LaRC-unique and is administered by Hampton University. The program was established for the benefit of undergraduate juniors and seniors and first-year graduate students who are pursuing degrees in aeronautical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, material science, computer science, atmospheric science, astrophysics, physics, and chemistry. Two primary elements of the LARSS Program are: (1) a research project to be completed by each participant under the supervision of a researcher who will assume the role of a mentor for the summer, and (2) technical lectures by prominent engineers and scientists. Additional elements of this program include tours of LARC wind tunnels, computational facilities, and laboratories. Library and computer facilities will be available for use by the participants.

Schwan, Rafaela (Compiler)

1995-01-01

416

Optical Measurements for Intelligent Aerospace Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is growing interest in applying intelligent technologies to aerospace propulsion systems to reap expected benefits in cost, performance, and environmental compliance. Cost benefits span the engine life cycle from development, operations, and maintenance. Performance gains are anticipated in reduced fuel consumption, increased thrust-toweight ratios, and operability. Environmental benefits include generating fewer pollutants and less noise. Critical enabling technologies to realize these potential benefits include sensors, actuators, logic, electronics, materials, and structures. For propulsion applications, the challenge is to increase the robustness of these technologies so that they can withstand harsh temperatures, vibrations, and grime while providing extremely reliable performance. This paper addresses the role that optical metrology is playing in providing solutions to these challenges. Optics for ground-based testing (development cycle), flight sensing (operations), and inspection (maintenance) are described. Opportunities for future work are presented.

Mercer, Carolyn R.

2003-01-01

417

Development of Sensors for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advances in technology have led to the availability of smaller and more accurate sensors. Computer power to process large amounts of data is no longer the prevailing issue; thus multiple and redundant sensors can be used to obtain more accurate and comprehensive measurements in a space vehicle. The successful integration and commercialization of micro- and nanotechnology for aerospace applications require that a close and interactive relationship be developed between the technology provider and the end user early in the project. Close coordination between the developers and the end users is critical since qualification for flight is time-consuming and expensive. The successful integration of micro- and nanotechnology into space vehicles requires a coordinated effort throughout the design, development, installation, and integration processes

Medelius, Pedro

2005-01-01

418

Internally Cooled Monolithic Silicon Nitride Aerospace Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A set of rapid prototyping (RP) processes have been combined with gelcasting to make ceramic aerospace components that contain internal cooling geometry. A mold and core combination is made using a MM6Pro (Sanders Prototyping, Inc.) and SLA-250/40 (3Dsystems, Inc.). The MM6Pro produces cores from ProtoBuild (trademarked) wax that are dissolved in room temperature ethanol following gelcasting. The SLA-250/40 yields epoxy/acrylate reusable molds. Parts produced by this method include two types of specimens containing a high density of thin long cooling channels, thin-walled cylinders and plates, as well as a model hollow airfoil shape that can be used for burner rig evaluation of coatings. Both uncoated and mullite-coated hollow airfoils has been tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig with cooling air demonstrating internal cooling and confirming the effectiveness of mullite coatings.

Best, Jonathan E.; Cawley, James D.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.; Lang, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

419

Formal Safety Certification of Aerospace Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In principle, formal methods offer many advantages for aerospace software development: they can help to achieve ultra-high reliability, and they can be used to provide evidence of the reliability claims which can then be subjected to external scrutiny. However, despite years of research and many advances in the underlying formalisms of specification, semantics, and logic, formal methods are not much used in practice. In our opinion this is related to three major shortcomings. First, the application of formal methods is still expensive because they are labor- and knowledge-intensive. Second, they are difficult to scale up to complex systems because they are based on deep mathematical insights about the behavior of the systems (t.e., they rely on the "heroic proof"). Third, the proofs can be difficult to interpret, and typically stand in isolation from the original code. In this paper, we describe a tool for formally demonstrating safety-relevant aspects of aerospace software, which largely circumvents these problems. We focus on safely properties because it has been observed that safety violations such as out-of-bounds memory accesses or use of uninitialized variables constitute the majority of the errors found in the aerospace domain. In our approach, safety means that the program will not violate a set of rules that can range for the simple memory access rules to high-level flight rules. These different safety properties are formalized as different safety policies in Hoare logic, which are then used by a verification condition generator along with the code and logical annotations in order to derive formal safety conditions; these are then proven using an automated theorem prover. Our certification system is currently integrated into a model-based code generation toolset that generates the annotations together with the code. However, this automated formal certification technology is not exclusively constrained to our code generator and could, in principle, also be integrated with other code generators such as RealTime Workshop or even applied to legacy code. Our approach circumvents the historical problems with formal methods by increasing the degree of automation on all levels. The restriction to safety policies (as opposed to arbitrary functional behavior) results in simpler proof problems that can generally be solved by fully automatic theorem proves. An automated linking mechanism between the safety conditions and the code provides some of the traceability mandated by process standards such as DO-178B. An automated explanation mechanism uses semantic markup added by the verification condition generator to produce natural-language explanations of the safety conditions and thus supports their interpretation in relation to the code. It shows an automatically generated certification browser that lets users inspect the (generated) code along with the safety conditions (including textual explanations), and uses hyperlinks to automate tracing between the two levels. Here, the explanations reflect the logical structure of the safety obligation but the mechanism can in principle be customized using different sets of domain concepts. The interface also provides some limited control over the certification process itself. Our long-term goal is a seamless integration of certification, code generation, and manual coding that results in a "certified pipeline" in which specifications are automatically transformed into executable code, together with the supporting artifacts necessary for achieving and demonstrating the high level of assurance needed in the aerospace domain.

Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

2005-01-01

420

Artificial Immune System Approaches for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) combine a priori knowledge with the adapting capabilities of biological immune system to provide a powerful alternative to currently available techniques for pattern recognition, modeling, design, and control. Immunology is the science of built-in defense mechanisms that are present in all living beings to protect against external attacks. A biological immune system can be thought of as a robust, adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. Biological immune systems use a finite number of discrete "building blocks" to achieve this adaptiveness. These building blocks can be thought of as pieces of a puzzle which must be put together in a specific way-to neutralize, remove, or destroy each unique disturbance the system encounters. In this paper, we outline AIS models that are immediately applicable to aerospace problems and identify application areas that need further investigation.

KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

421

Ride evaluation in aerospace and surface vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vibration environment in a wide range of aerospace and surface vehicles is examined, and definitions related to ride evaluation are reviewed. Three provinces of research and application of ride data are recognized: (1) ride affecting passenger and operator comfort; (2) ride affecting human efficiency; and (3) ride affecting the health and safety of occupants occupationally or repeatedly exposed. Specific reference is made to the proposed ISO guide on human exposure to whole-body vibration. The applications as well as the advantages and limitations of this guide for evaluating vehicle ride are discussed. The derivation of the limits is reviewed with regard to the supporting data and the compromises necessary for wide applicability. Special discussions are included of the frequency and time dependence of these limits and approaches in progress for adjusting them according to different criteria of application.

Broderson, A. B.; Vongierke, H. E.; Guignard, J. C.

1972-01-01

422

Physics in Aerospace and Military Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerospace, which includes both commercial and military applications, provides a wide variety of challenging opportunities in physics. I have worked primarily in the area of sensors with projects including airport baggage scanners and defect detection for the Space Shuttle. In my current role on the Army's Future Combat Systems, we use physical models to predict battlefield sensor performance. This talk will focus on the physical principles involved in modeling electro-optical sensor performance, including the fundamental concept of minimum resolvable contrast and minimum resolvable temperature curves. I will also touch upon my experiences at Boeing and give an overview of the range of physics-related projects at Boeing. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited, TACOM 15 SEP 2006, case 06-188

Tat, Hong

2006-12-01

423

Predicting Production Costs for Advanced Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For early design concepts, the conventional approach to cost is normally some kind of parametric weight-based cost model. There is now ample evidence that this approach can be misleading and inaccurate. By the nature of its development, a parametric cost model requires historical data and is valid only if the new design is analogous to those for which the model was derived. Advanced aerospace vehicles have no historical production data and are nowhere near the vehicles of the past. Using an existing weight-based cost model would only lead to errors and distortions of the true production cost. This paper outlines the development of a process-based cost model in which the physical elements of the vehicle are soared according to a first-order dynamics model. This theoretical cost model, first advocated by early work at MIT, has been expanded to cover the basic structures of an advanced aerospace vehicle. Elemental costs based on the geometry of the design can be summed up to provide an overall estimation of the total production cost for a design configuration. This capability to directly link any design configuration to realistic cost estimation is a key requirement for high payoff MDO problems. Another important consideration in this paper is the handling of part or product complexity. Here the concept of cost modulus is introduced to take into account variability due to different materials, sizes, shapes, precision of fabrication, and equipment requirements. The most important implication of the development of the proposed process-based cost model is that different design configurations can now be quickly related to their cost estimates in a seamless calculation process easily implemented on any spreadsheet tool.

Bao, Han P.; Samareh, J. A.; Weston, R. P.

2002-01-01

424

An observation of the Galactic center hard X-ray source, 1E 1740.7-2942, with the Caltech coded-aperture telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Galactic center region hard X-ray source IE 1740.7-2942 has been observed with the Caltech Gamma-Ray Imaging Payload (GRIP) from Alice Springs, Australia, on 1988 April 12 and on 1989 April 3 and 4. We report here results from the 1989 measurements based on 14 hr of observation of the Galactic center region. The observations showed IE 1740.7-2942 to be in its normal state, having a spectrum between 35 and 200 keV characterized by a power law with an exponent of -2.2 +/- 0.3 and flux at 100 keV of (7.0 +/- 0.7) x 10 exp -5 sq cm s keV. No flux was detected above 200 keV. A search for time variability in the spectrum of IE 1740.7-2942 on one hour time scales showed no evidence for variability.

Heindl, William A.; Cook, Walter R.; Grunsfeld, John M.; Palmer, David M.; Prince, Thomas A.; Schindler, Stephen M.; Stone, Edward C.

1993-01-01

425

Chen receives First Scarf Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the AGU 1992 Spring Meeting in Montreal, Margaret Wei-Mei Chen will be presented with the Space Physics and Aeronomy section's F.L. Scarf Award for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar-planetary science. Chen will receive a cash award of $1,000 and present an invited paper on the subject of her dissertation in a SPA-Magnetospheric Physics session at the meeting.Chen received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, in September 1990. Her dissertation on “The Polar Wind and Ionic Outflow” involved the oretical analysis, numerical simulations, and comparison with observational data. Advised by Maha Ashour-Abdalla, Chen incorporated kinetic processes such as ion heating into a macroscopic hydrodynamical model of the polar wind in order to investigate “non-classical” effects in the polar wind. She also worked closely on this subject with Thomas E. Holzer of the NCAR High Altitude Observatory. In collaboration with William K. Peterson of Lockheed and Thomas E. Moore of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Chen analyzed measurements from the Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft of upflowing ion streams in the polar cap region. These data were used to guide the theoretical modeling.

Roelof, Edmond C.

426

34 CFR 690.67 - Receiving up to two Scheduled Awards during a single award year.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Receiving up to two Scheduled Awards during a single award year. 690.67 Section 690.67 Education...GRANT PROGRAM Determination of Federal Pell Grant Awards § 690.67 Receiving up to two Scheduled...

2010-07-01

427

Great Web Sites for Kids...The Awesome WebSite Awards (AWArds) Winners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains AWArds (Awesome WebSite Awards), a program to encourage educators to collaborate on lessons that teach young children how to evaluate the Web sites they encounter. Students themselves nominate sites for the AWArds, and a panel of judges selects winners in three categories. (LRW)

Small, Ruth; Arnone, Marilyn

2000-01-01

428

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace research and development (R/D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D is explored from the perspective of the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The following three assumptions frame this exploration: (1) knowledge production, transfer, and utilization are equally important components of the aerospace R&D process; (2) the diffusion of knowledge resulting from federally funded aerospace R&D is indispensable for the U.S. to remain a world leader in aerospace; and (3) U.S. government technical reports, produced by NASA and DOD, play an important, but as yet undefined, role in the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D. A conceptual model for federally funded aerospace knowledge diffusion, one that emphasizes U.S. goverment technical reports, is presented. Data regarding three research questions concerning the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists are also presented.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1991-01-01

429

Outsourcing within aerospace manufacturing enterprises: A phenomenological study and outsourcing leadership model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many aerospace workers believe transferring work projects abroad has an erosive effect on the U.S. aerospace industry (Pritchard, 2002). This qualitative phenomenological study examines factors for outsourcing decisions and the perceived effects of outsourcing on U.S. aerospace workers. The research sample consists of aerospace industry leaders and nonleaders from the East Coast, Midwest, and West Coast of the United States.

Enrique Sampson Jr.

2008-01-01

430

Carter G. Woodson Book Awards, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to promote cultural literacy in children and young adults, the Racism and Social Justice Committee of the National Council for the Social Studies created the Carter G. Woodson Book Award. The purpose of the Woodson Award, given annually since 1974, is to promote the writing, publishing, and dissemination of sensitive and accurate…

Social Education, 2010

2010-01-01

431

TEN MASTER TEACHER AND PROGRAM AWARD PROGRAMS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

IN 1966 THE AMERICAN CLASSICAL LEAGUE HONORED THREE TEACHERS WITH ITS MASTER SECONDARY SCHOOL LATIN TEACHER AND PROGRAM AWARD. AMONG THE 32 PROGRAMS CITED FOR RECOGNITION, TEN (INCLUDING THOSE OF THE AWARD WINNERS) POSSESS CLEARLY INNOVATIVE FEATURES. IN BRIEF THEY FEATURE (1) A FIFTH YEAR ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM, LATIN AS INTRODUCTORY TO…

KOVACH, EDITH M.A.

432

Kelley receives 2011 Hisashi Kuno Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Katherine Kelley received the Hisashi Kuno Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes “accomplishments of junior scientists who make outstanding contributions to the fields of volcanology, geochemistry, and petrology.”

Plank, Terry A.

2012-04-01

433

Swift receives 2011 Ocean Sciences Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

James H. Swift received the 2011 Ocean Sciences Section Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is given in recognition of outstanding and long-standing service to the ocean sciences.

Swift, James H.

2012-06-01

434

Swift receives 2011 Ocean Sciences Award: Citation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

James H. Swift received the 2011 Ocean Sciences Section Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is given in recognition of outstanding and long-standing service to the ocean sciences.

Aagaard, Knut

2012-06-01

435

Kelley receives 2011 Hisashi Kuno Award: Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Katherine Kelley received the Hisashi Kuno Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes “accomplishments of junior scientists who make outstanding contributions to the fields of volcanology, geochemistry, and petrology.”

Kelley, Katherine A.

2012-04-01

436

International Science Fair Awards Scholarship Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The attached two-page report lists the fifty-four recipients of the ISEF Scholarship awards in 1997 The report is organized alphabetically by student last name. The awards paid total $106,500, as expected, leaving a zero balance at the end of 1997. These ...

K. Trojano, D. Cousens

1997-01-01

437

Seeking Nominations for COSPAR Awards and Medals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) is seeking candidates to be nominated for COSPAR awards and medals. These awards and medal recognize the outstanding achievements of space scientists throughout the world in a number of areas. It is important to honor the contributions of your colleagues. Therefore, please take a moment to consider nominees for the following:

438

Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data presented in this report shows trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED has been conducted annually for the National Science Foundation…

Hill, Susan T.

439

Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data in this report show trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED is conducted annually for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and four…

Hill, Susan T.

440

1966 Architectural Awards. Buildings With Fallout Shelter.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Award winning designs are presented demonstrating that economical dual-use shelter space can be incorporated in the designs of new buildings without sacrifice of either function or aesthetic values. The eight award winning designs are discussed, and graphic illustration is provided of the nature of dual-use shelter, which contributes to…

Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

441

2009 William T. Pecora Award Ceremony  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The William T. Pecora Award, given annually, is sponsored jointly by the DOI and NASA. The 2009 award was presented December 17 by Dr. Marcia McNutt, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, DOI, and by Dr. Michael Freilich, Director of the Earth Science Division in NASA's Science Mission Directorate...

2010-01-27

442

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 47: The value of computer networks in aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents data on the value of computer networks that were obtained from a national survey of 2000 aerospace engineers that was conducted in 1993. Survey respondents reported the extent to which they used computer networks in their work and communication and offered their assessments of the value of various network types and applications. They also provided information about the positive impacts of networks on their work, which presents another perspective on value. Finally, aerospace engineers' recommendations on network implementation present suggestions for increasing the value of computer networks within aerospace organizations.

Bishop, Ann Peterson; Pinelli, Thomas E.

1995-01-01

443

Mathematical Association of America Writing Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Journal Writing Awards honor the best mathematical writing from their various journals, and they also serve as a repository of great instructional resources for mathematics educators. The awards here include The Carl B. Allendoerfer Awards, the Trevor Evans Awards, and The Lester R. Ford Awards. Visitors can browse through all of the past winners, or they may also view the winning pieces by name. Most visitors may wish to use the subject listing as well, and topics like "Discrete mathematics" and "Analysis" are featured prominently. The archive is easy to use, and visitors will want to tell others working in this field about this resource, as it is one that can be used in a number of different settings and skill levels.

2010-10-01

444

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Coretta Scott King Book Award was founded in 1969 in honor of the late Mrs. Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for her passion and dedication to working for peace. The awards are given to âÂÂoutstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.â Created by the American Library Association, this page provides a variety of resources, including a section on the history of the award and a list of all past award winners. Another great facet of this page is the Coretta Scott King Book Awards Donation Grant. The goal of this program is to increase childrenâÂÂs access to books by building the libraries of nontraditional institutions that provide services to children. Within Resources and Bibliographies, a series of educational materials related to multicultural and diversity resources and collections are also available.

445

Highlighting 2004 award-winning initiatives.  

PubMed

This issue takes a closer look at how five award-winning healthcare organizations are finding--and continually refining--innovative ways to provide high-quality healthcare. One of those organizations is Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton, which recently was named the fourth healthcare winner of the annual Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations recently selected two facilities in the hospital category--Stamford Hospital and Staten Island University Hospital--as recipients of the eighth annual Codman Award for their work in using outcomes measurement to promote quality care. The Reading Hospital and Medical Center received a Cheers Award from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices for its toolkit promoting patient safety. Sentara Healthcare System, top winner of the American Hospital Association's Quest for Quality Award, has been cited for its efforts to align its quality and safety goals with its organizational goals. PMID:15813292

2005-02-01

446

48 CFR 5.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 5.303 Section 5.303 Federal Acquisition...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 5.303 Announcement of contract awards. (a) Public announcement....

2013-10-01

447

46 CFR 350.2 - Special medals and awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Special medals and awards. 350.2 Section 350.2 Shipping ...TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS SEAMEN'S SERVICE AWARDS § 350.2 Special medals and awards. The Secretary of Transportation,...

2013-10-01

448

48 CFR 1405.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 1405.303 Section 1405.303 Federal...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 1405.303 Announcement of contract awards. (a) The CO shall report the...

2013-10-01

449

48 CFR 15.504 - Award to successful offeror.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Award to successful offeror. 15.504 Section...CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Preaward, Award, and Postaward Notifications, Protests, and Mistakes 15.504 Award to successful offeror. The...

2013-10-01

450

48 CFR 605.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 605.303 Section 605.303 Federal...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 605.303 Announcement of contract awards. (a) Contracting officers shall make...

2013-10-01

451

44 CFR 150.8 - Presentation of awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Presentation of awards. 150.8 Section 150.8 Emergency...PREVENTION AND CONTROL PUBLIC SAFETY AWARDS TO PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS § 150.8 Presentation of awards. (a) Presentation of the...

2013-10-01

452

48 CFR 205.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 205.303 Section 205.303 Federal...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 205.303 Announcement of contract awards. (a) Public announcement. (i)...

2013-10-01

453

48 CFR 305.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 305.303 Section 305.303 Federal...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 305.303 Announcement of contract awards. (a) Public announcement. The...

2013-10-01

454

48 CFR 405.303 - Announcement of contract awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Announcement of contract awards. 405.303 Section 405.303 Federal...PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Contract Awards 405.303 Announcement of contract awards. Contracting officers shall make...

2013-10-01

455

40 CFR 46.180 - Acceptance of fellowship award.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Acceptance of fellowship award. 46.180 Section 46.180 Protection...AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Award § 46.180 Acceptance of fellowship award. You must accept your fellowship by...

2013-07-01

456

42 CFR 136.313 - Evaluation and grant awards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...awards and the funding level of such awards will be made after consideration of such factors as the grantee's progress and management practices, and the availability of funds. In all cases, awards require a determination by the Secretary that funding...

2012-10-01

457

48 CFR 18.102 - System for award management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.102 System for award management. Contractors are not required to be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) database for contracts awarded to support...

2013-10-01

458

40 CFR 105.15 - How are award winners recognized?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Section 105.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT Awards Recognition § 105.15 How are award winners recognized? EPA presents...

2013-07-01

459

40 CFR 105.16 - How are award winners publicized?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Section 105.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT Awards Recognition § 105.16 How are award winners publicized? EPA announces...

2013-07-01

460

40 CFR 105.14 - How are award winners notified?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Section 105.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT Awards Recognition § 105.14 How are award winners notified? EPA notifies...

2013-07-01

461

Alan T. Waterman Award - Call for Nominations 2006  

NSF Publications Database

The Alan T. Waterman Award is the highest honor awarded by the National Science Foundation. Since ... Email: anoonan@nsf.gov Announcing the 2006 Alan T. Waterman Award Visit the Web site for Recipients ...

462

Aerospace Structures Technology Damping Design Guide. Volume 1. Technology Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This volume contains a summary of the current technology used in the application of viscoelastic damping to primarily aerospace structures. The topics covered include the fundamentals of damping, the level of the damping present in metals, composites and ...

J. Soovere M. L. Drake

1985-01-01

463

78 FR 1265 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a forthcoming meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory...

2013-01-08

464

Aviation/Aerospace Teacher Education Workshops: Program Development and Implementation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an aviation/aerospace teacher-education workshop that allows elementary school teachers to become familiar with aviation fundamentals and issues and with ways to incorporate aviation topics into their curricula. (JOW)

Green, Mavis F.

1998-01-01

465

Directionally Solidified Eutectic Ceramics for Multifunctional Aerospace Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project addresses the several challenges associated with incorporating structural ceramics in future aerospace applications: the challenges associated with ceramics are improving strength, toughness and creep resistance retaining the mechanical prope...

A. Sayir

2013-01-01

466

Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

Paulikas, G. A.

1974-01-01

467

Modeling of Unilateral Contact Conditions in Aerospace Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Multibody dynamics analysis is a powerful tool for the comprehensive simulation of the dynamic response of various flexible aerospace systems that are important to the Air Force. Systems of arbitrary topology and complexity can be readily modeled; they in...

O. A. Bauchau A. A. Ferri

2005-01-01

468

Modeling Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) Usage in Military Environments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Air Force is developing Modular Aircraft Support System (MASS) program to replace the current Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE). AGE supplies electricity, nitrogen, hydraulics and other support equipment to maintenance activities at the flight lin...

I. Kaya

2002-01-01

469

Military Aerospace Hydraulic Fluids Workshop Proceedings (on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Military Aerospace Hydraulic Fluids Workshop was presented by the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory in order to disseminate information about military hydraulic fluid changes and related issues. There were th...

2000-01-01

470

NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of the Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) Program is to help reduce the dependence of the United States aerospace industry on strategic metals by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components with prime emphasis on components for gas turbine engines. Initial emphasis was placed in the area of strategic element substinction. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel base and cobalt base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is being examined in great detail by means of cooperative university-industry-government research efforts. Investigations are underway in the area of "new classes" of alloys. Specifically, a study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that contain a minimum of the strategic metals. Current plans for the much larger COSAM Program are also presented.

Stephens, J. R.

1980-01-01

471

Titanium Cholla : Lightweight, High-Strength Structures for Aerospace Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aerospace designers seek lightweight, high-strength structures to lower launch weight while creating structures that are capable of withstanding launch loadings. Most 'light-weighting' is done through an expensive, time-consuming, iterative method requiri...

C. J. Atwood D. D. Gill J. H. Robbins P. Dewhurst T. E. Voth

2007-01-01

472

The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1992-01-01

473

Aerospace Power Journal. Volume 16, Number 1, Spring 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Aerospace Power Journal, published quarterly, is the professional flagship publication of the United States Air Force. It is designed to serve as an open forum for the presentation and stimulation of innovative thinking on military doctrine, strategy,...

D. Sartor D. R. Ferguson E. A. Ash S. G. Wierschke

2002-01-01

474

Applied controls research topics in the aerospace industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes applied controls research topics of current interest in the aerospace community. The topics discussed include integrated controls, reconfigurable flight control, aircraft performance improvements, and aircraft\\/missile robust nonlinear control

Kevin A. Wise

1995-01-01

475

The Aerospace Plane Design Challenge: Credible Computational Fluid Dynamics Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerospace plane design challenge is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following topics are included: the CFD design technology development; CFD validation vs. measurable fluid dynamics validation; and discussion of results.

Mehta, Unmeel B.

1991-01-01

476

Probabilistic Lifetime Strength of Aerospace Materials via Computational Simulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a second year effort of a research program are presented. The research included development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic phenomenological c...

L. Boyce J. P. Keating T. B. Lovelace C. C. Bast

1991-01-01

477

Optimum Structural Design Concepts for Aerospace Vehicles: Bibliography and Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Minimum weight design of aerospace structures has evolved during the past two decades into a rather rigorous scientific discipline that permits the rational selection of structural configurations and materials for various design requirements. Because of t...

G. Gerard

1965-01-01

478

Integral Fuel Tank Sealing Practice at British Aerospace (Kingston).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The current integral fuel tank sealing and repair procedures at British Aerospace (Kingston) were reviewed. It describes the materials and processes used in the design and initial manufacture of integral fuel tanks. The methods used for the repair of leak...

G. N. Sheridan

1989-01-01

479

Administrative Report on Training Awards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the tenure of this award, the recipient (David Harker) conducted areas of research which resulted in the award of a doctorate degree (August 1999) from the University of Wyoming. The primary science activity was investigation of silicate dust mineralogy in comets, particularly comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Determination of the dust mineralogy permits us to address an important astrophysical question of relevance to the origins and evolution of solar systems, "Do comets contain relic interstellar dust grains? Since, comets represent the frozen reservoirs of primitive proto-solar dust and ice, we can gain insight into the problem of understanding the formation of protoplanetesimals in the. early solar nebula. Mid-infrared spectrophotometry (7 - 14 micron, R approx. = 180 - 360) of Hale-Bopp was obtained with the NASA/Ames HIFOGS at four distinct epochs pre- and post- perihelion ion from 1996 October through 1997 June. These observations were conducted at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, and were supported by funds from this training grant. The emission at mid-IR wavelengths in cometary comae arises from carbon grains, and small silicate grains which produce resonance features. Hale-Bopp had the strongest silicate feature observed from any comet to date. Theoretical calculations utilizing Mie Scattering Theory were employed to construct Synthetic cometary spectra to fit with the observed HIFOGS 10 microns spectral feature of Hale-Bopp. Our analysis suggests that the observed spectra can be modeled with the Hanner grain size distribution peaked at alpha((sub p) = 0.2 microns of fractal porous grains with porosity parameter D = 2.5. This model spectrum also fits photometry points in the 3 - 5 microns region. Comparison with the ISO SWS spectrum of Hale-Bopp obtained 1996 October reveals that the crystalline olivine grains must be at it temperature hotter than computed from Mie theory.

Woodward, Charles E.

1999-01-01

480

Liquid Nitrogen Removal of Critical Aerospace Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Identification of innovative solutions to unique materials problems is an every-day quest for members of the aerospace community. Finding a technique that will minimize costs, maximize throughput, and generate quality results is always the target. United Space Alliance Materials Engineers recently conducted such a search in their drive to return the Space Shuttle fleet to operational status. The removal of high performance thermal coatings from solid rocket motors represents a formidable task during post flight disassembly on reusable expended hardware. The removal of these coatings from unfired motors increases the complexity and safety requirements while reducing the available facilities and approved processes. A temporary solution to this problem was identified, tested and approved during the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) return to flight activities. Utilization of ultra high-pressure liquid nitrogen (LN2) to strip the protective coating from assembled space shuttle hardware marked the first such use of the technology in the aerospace industry. This process provides a configurable stream of liquid nitrogen (LN2) at pressures of up to 55,000 psig. The performance of a one-time certification for the removal of thermal ablatives from SRB hardware involved extensive testing to ensure adequate material removal without causing undesirable damage to the residual materials or aluminum substrates. Testing to establish appropriate process parameters such as flow, temperature and pressures of the liquid nitrogen stream provided an initial benchmark for process testing. Equipped with these initial parameters engineers were then able to establish more detailed test criteria that set the process limits. Quantifying the potential for aluminum hardware damage represented the greatest hurdle for satisfying engineers as to the safety of this process. Extensive testing for aluminum erosion, surface profiling, and substrate weight loss was performed. This successful project clearly demonstrated that the liquid nitrogen jet possesses unique strengths that align remarkably well with the unusual challenges that space hardware and missile manufacturers face on a regular basis. Performance of this task within the confines of a critical manufacturing facility marks a milestone in advanced processing.

Noah, Donald E.; Merrick, Jason; Hayes, Paul W.

2005-01-01

481

Military and aerospace standards for digital avionics fiber optic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade the maturation of digital avionics fiber optics technology has resulted in the update or creation of several defense\\/aerospace standards that did not exist a decade ago. These new-era standards address airborne\\/aerospace platform fiber optic interconnects including connectors, cables, fibers, splices, cable assemblies, harness installation, digital fiber optic system design, and fiber optic link loss budget design

Mark Beranek; Michael Hackert; Brian McDermott; John Cotterill; Eugene Ebert; Laura Feix; Daniel Martinec

2011-01-01

482

Proceedings of the NASA Aerospace Technology Symposium 2002  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reports are presented from the NASA Aerospace Technology Symposium 2002 on the following: Geo-Referenced Altitude Hold For Latex Ballons; NASA Spaceport Research: Opportunities For space Grant and EPSCoR Involvement; Numerical Simulation Of The Combustion Of Fuel Droplets: Applications, Aircraft/Spacecraft Flight Control, Guidance Navigation; Expertise In System Dynamics and Control, Control Theory and Aerospace Education Ooutreach Opportunities; and Technology For The Improvement Of General Aviation Security: A Needs Assessmemt.

Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Fink, Mary M. (Editor); Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor)

2002-01-01

483

Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force is conducting research in new technologies for next-generation Aerospace Operations Centers (AOCs). The Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC) will support advanced research in information technologies that operate in or are closely tied to AOCs. The VT-AOC will provide a context for developing, demonstrating, and testing new processes and tools in a realistic environment. To generate the

Bradley Dunaway; Tom Broadstock

2003-01-01

484

Where aerospace can serve afresh - Paths to energy independence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The national goal of independence from foreign energy sources, i.e., Mid-east oil, is considered with respect to the relationship between industry and government, and the feasibility of developing new energy technologies. Attention is given to the role the aerospace industry could play in contributing to U.S. energy self-sufficiency. Assets of the aerospace industry include: a proven diversity of engineering talent,

W. M. Hawkins

1978-01-01

485

Human performance in aerospace environments: The search for psychological determinants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program of research into the psychological determinants of individual and crew performance in aerospace environments is described. Constellations of personality factors influencing behavior in demanding environments are discussed. Relationships between attitudes and performance and attitudes and personality are also reported. The efficacy of training in interpersonal relations as a means of changing attitudes and behavior is explored along with the influence of personality on attitude change processes. Finally, approaches to measuring group behavior in aerospace settings are described.

Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

1987-01-01

486

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 26: The relationship between technology policy and scientific and technical information within the US and Japanese aerospace industries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Government technology policy has nurtured the growth of the aerospace industry which is vital to both the U.S. and Japanese economies. Japanese technology policy differs significantly from U.S. technology policy, however, particularly with respect to the production, transfer, and use of scientific and technical information (STI). In this paper, we discuss the unique position of the aerospace industry in the U.S. and Japan, U.S. and Japanese aerospace policy, and the role of STI in the process of aerospace innovation. The information-seeking behaviors of U.S. and Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists are compared. The authors advocate the development of innovation-adoption technology and STI policy goals for U.S. aerospace and the inclusion of an aerospace knowledge diffusion transfer system with an 'active' component for scanning and acquiring foreign aerospace technology and STI.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1993-01-01

487

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 20: Engineers as Information Processors: A Survey of US Aerospace Engineering Faculty and Students.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

U.S. aerospace engineering faculty and students were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Research Project. Faculty and students were viewed as information processors within a conceptual framework of information seeking behavior. Questionn...

M. P. Holland, T. E. Pinelli, R. O. Barclay, J. M. Kennedy

1991-01-01

488

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 55: Career Goals and Educational Preparation of Aerospace Engineering and Science Students: An International Perspective.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are presented of a survey of aerospace engineering and science students conducted in India, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The similarities and differences among aerospace engineering and science students from the five c...

T. E. Pinelli J. M. Kennedy R. O. Barclay

1995-01-01

489

Engineering in the 21st century. [aerospace technology prospects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is presented of the nature of the aerospace technology system that might be expected by the 21st century from a reasonable evolution of the current resources and capabilities. An aerospace employment outlook is provided. The years 1977 and 1978 seem to be marking the beginning of a period of stability and moderate growth in the aerospace industry. Aerospace research and development employment increased to 70,000 in 1977 and is now occupying a near-constant 18% share of the total research and development work force. The changing job environment is considered along with the future of aerospace education. It is found that one trend is toward a more interdisciplinary education. Most trend setters in engineering education recognize that the really challenging engineering problems invariably require the judicious exercise of several disciplines for their solution. Some future trends in aerospace technology are discussed. By the year 2000 space technology will have achieved major advances in four areas, including management of information, transportation, space structures, and energy.

Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

1978-01-01

490

Presidential Award Honors Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentors  

NSF Publications Database

... Presidential Award Honors Science, Mathematics And Engineering Mentors Ten individuals and five ... a $10,000-grant and a commemorative presidential certificate. The mentoring awards recognize a ...

491

NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 30: The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a major role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1992-01-01

492

NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program: Recommendations for Technical Requirements for Inclusion in Aerospace Battery Procurements. Volume 1, Part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group was chartered within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). The Battery Working Group was tasked to complete tasks and to propose proactive work to address battery related, agency-wide issues on an annual basis. In its first year of operation, this proactive program addressed various aspects of the validation and verification of aerospace battery systems for NASA missions. Studies were performed, issues were discussed and in many cases, test programs were executed to generate recommendations and guidelines to reduce risk associated with various aspects of implementing battery technology in the aerospace industry. This document contains Part 2 - Volume I: Recommendations for Technical Requirements for Inclusion in Aerospace Battery Procurements of the program's operations.

Jung, David S.; Manzo, Michelle A.

2010-01-01

493

Multifunctional Carbon Foams for Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbon foams produced by the controlled thermal decomposition of inexpensive coal extracts exhibit a combination of structural and thermal properties that make them attractive for aerospace applications. Their thermal conductivity can be tailored between 0.5 and 100 W/mK through precursor selection/modification and heat treatment conditions; thus, they can serve in either thermal protection or heat transfer systems such as heat exchangers. Because their structure is essentially a 3D random network of graphite-like members, they also can be considered low-cost, easily fabricated replacements for multi-directional structural carbon fiber preforms. Strengths of over 4000 psi in compression are common. Their density can be designed between 0.1 and 0.8 g/cc, and they can be impregnated with a variety of matrices or used, unfilled, in sandwich structures. These foams also exhibit intriguing electrochemical properties that offer potential in high-efficiency fuel cell and battery applications, mandrels and tooling for composite manufacture, ablative performance, and fire resistance. This paper presents the results of research conducted under NASA SBIR Topic 99.04.01, General Aviation Technology, supported from Langley Research Center. The potential of foam design through precursor selection, cell size and density control, density grading, and heat treatment is demonstrated.

Rogers, D. K.; Plucinski, J.

2001-01-01

494

Computational control of flexible aerospace systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed based on several incomplete versions. The verification of the code had been conducted by comparing the results with those examples for which the exact theoretical solutions can be obtained. The theoretical background of the package and the verification examples has been reported in a technical paper submitted to the Joint Applied Mechanics & Material Conference, ASME. A brief USER'S MANUAL had been compiled, which includes three parts: (1) Input data preparation; (2) Explanation of the Subroutines; and (3) Specification of control variables. Meanwhile, a theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modeling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide an embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

1994-12-01

495

Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of monolithic glass and beryllium to produce lightweighted aerospace mirror systems has reached its limits due to the long lead times, high processing costs, environmental effects and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and manufacturing processes are required to meet DoD's directed energy weapons, reconnaissance/surveillance, and secured communications needs. Over the past several years the Air Force, MDA, and NASA has focused their efforts on the fabrication, lightweighting, and scale-up of numerous silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time and cost, and non-destructive evaluation methods being investigated to help eliminate risk. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced engineered materials (far term solutions) such as composites, foams, and microsphere arrays for ultra lightweighting will also be briefly discussed.

Matson, L.; Chen, M.; Deblonk, B.; Palusinski, I.

496

Computational control of flexible aerospace systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this project is to establish a distributed parameter modeling technique for structural analysis, parameter estimation, vibration suppression and control synthesis of large flexible aerospace structures. This report concentrates on the research outputs produced in the last two years. The main accomplishments can be summarized as follows. A new version of the PDEMOD Code had been completed based on several incomplete versions. The verification of the code had been conducted by comparing the results with those examples for which the exact theoretical solutions can be obtained. The theoretical background of the package and the verification examples has been reported in a technical paper submitted to the Joint Applied Mechanics & Material Conference, ASME. A brief USER'S MANUAL had been compiled, which includes three parts: (1) Input data preparation; (2) Explanation of the Subroutines; and (3) Specification of control variables. Meanwhile, a theoretical investigation of the NASA MSFC two-dimensional ground-based manipulator facility by using distributed parameter modeling technique has been conducted. A new mathematical treatment for dynamic analysis and control of large flexible manipulator systems has been conceived, which may provide an embryonic form of a more sophisticated mathematical model for future modified versions of the PDEMOD Codes.

Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Shen, Ji Yao

1994-01-01

497

Silanes as Fuel for Aerospace Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the light of recently revived interest in high energy density fuels for aerospace applications1,2), a new look is being given at unconventional fuels. Among the latter are hydrides, because their hydrogen content and density. Among hydrides silanes are of interest because of their combustion and energetic properties.Silanes are silicon hydrides organized in molecular chains similar to those of hydrocarbons; at STP, lower silanes (SiH4, Si2H6) are gaseous and extremely pyrophoric; with increasing chain length, silanes become liquid from trisilane (Si3H8) on, and therefore easily pumped. Another important feature of silanes is the large amount of hydrogen theoretically available by thermal decomposition: in fact at moderate temperatures (about 500 K) the chains begin to break and at 700 K their decomposition is complete, yielding silicon and gaseous hydrogen, useful for propulsion in combination with air nitrogen and oxygen. This last feature, if confirmed, could identify silanes not only as energy carriers but also components in bi-fuel systems. To assess their theoretical performance, simulations were conducted assuming silanes and/or their thermal decomposition products in combination with various oxidizers and air. Preliminary results are suggestive of their potential for some specialized applications, especially where compactness is at premium.

Simone, Domenico; Bruno, Claudio; Hidding, Bernhard

498

Structural Health Management for Future Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural Health Management (SHM) will be of critical importance to provide the safety, reliability and affordability necessary for the future long duration space missions described in America's Vision for Space Exploration. Long duration missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond cannot be accomplished with the current paradigm of periodic, ground based structural integrity inspections. As evidenced by the Columbia tragedy, this approach is also inadequate for the current Shuttle fleet, thus leading to its initial implementation of on-board SHM sensing for impact detection as part of the return to flight effort. However, future space systems, to include both vehicles as well as structures such as habitation modules, will require an integrated array of onboard in-situ sensing systems. In addition, advanced data systems architectures will be necessary to communicate, store and process massive amounts of SHM data from large numbers of diverse sensors. Further, improved structural analysis and design algorithms will be necessary to incorporate SHM sensing into the design and construction of aerospace structures, as well as to fully utilize these sensing systems to provide both diagnosis and prognosis of structural integrity. Ultimately, structural integrity information will feed into an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) system that will provide real-time knowledge of structural, propulsion, thermal protection and other critical systems for optimal vehicle management and mission control. This paper will provide an overview of NASA research and development in the area of SHM as well as to highlight areas of technology improvement necessary to meet these future mission requirements.

Prosser, W. H.; Allison, S. G.; Woodard, S. E.; Wincheski, R. A.; Cooper, E. G.; Price, D. C.; Hedley, M.; Prokopenko, M.; Scott, D. A.; Tessler, A.

2004-01-01

499

Working at the Ohio Aerospace Institute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Ohio Aerospace Institute is a wonderful place to work. I enjoy coming to work everyday knowing that I will be surrounded by smiling faces. My mentor, Mary Auzenne, is the Program Manager of the LERCIP College Internship Program, however, I spend most of my time working with Akua Soadwa, the Assistant Program Manager. She is in charge of planning, coordinating, and managing every event that is involved with the college internship program such as the socials, picnic, banquet, workshops, and research symposium. My job is to make her job easier. I help out with the planning, coordinating, and managing of these events. When I first got on board Akua was in the process of planning the second social for the interns. The social is a way for the interns to interact with one another as well as to find out more about where the other interns are working at NASA. We ordered the food, went shopping, and set up the Guerin House for the party. I made sign-in sheets, which helped us get a rough count of the attendees. The next event was the Technical Presentation Workshop and the Professional Development Workshop. These workshops are designed to enhance skills of the interns. We were there to sign people in and direct them to the room where the presentation was to take place. I also took pictures of the workshop and provided copies for the presenters, as well as our files.

Szabo, Hortenzia

2004-01-01

500

Compressive strength of delaminated aerospace composites.  

PubMed

An efficient analytical model is described which predicts the value of compressive strain below which buckle-driven propagation of delaminations in aerospace composites will not occur. An extension of this efficient strip model which accounts for propagation transverse to the direction of applied compression is derived. In order to provide validation for the strip model a number of laminates were artificially delaminated producing a range of thin anisotropic sub-laminates made up of 0°, ±45° and 90° plies that displayed varied buckling and delamination propagation phenomena. These laminates were subsequently subject to experimental compression testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) using cohesive elements. Comparison of strip model results with those from experiments indicates that the model can conservatively predict the strain at which propagation occurs to within 10 per cent of experimental values provided (i) the thin-film assumption made in the modelling methodology holds and (ii) full elastic coupling effects do not play a significant role in the post-buckling of the sub-laminate. With such provision, the model was more accurate and produced fewer non-conservative results than FEA. The accuracy and efficiency of the model make it well suited to application in optimum ply-stacking algorithms to maximize laminate strength. PMID:22431756

Butler, Richard; Rhead, Andrew T; Liu, Wenli; Kontis, Nikolaos

2012-04-28