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Sample records for caltech researchers create

  1. Caltech campus executive LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Knudsen, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The environment most brain systems of humans and other animals are almost constantly confronted with is complex and continuously changing, with each time step updating a potentially bewildering set of opportunities and demands for action. Far from the controlled, discrete trials used in most neuro- and psychological investigations, behavior outside the lab at Caltech is a seamless and continuous process of monitoring (and error correction) of ongoing action, and of evaluating persistence in the current activity with respect to opportunities to switch tasks as alternatives become available. Prior work on frontopolar and prefrontal task switching, use tasks within the same modality (View a stream of symbols on a screen and perform certain response mappings depending on task rules). However, in thesetask switches' the effector is constant: only the mapping of visual symbols to the specific button changes. In this task, the subjects are choosing what kinds of future action decisions they want to perform, where they can control either which body part will act, or which direction they will orient an instructed body action. An effector choice task presents a single target and the subject selects which effector to use to reach the target (eye or hand). While the techniques available for humans can be less spatially resolved compared to non-human primate neural data, they do allow for experimentation on multiple brain areas with relative ease. Thus, we address a broader network of areas involved in motor decisions. We aim to resolve a current dispute regarding the specific functional roles of brain areas that are often co-activated in studies of decision tasks, dorsal premotor cortex(PMd) and posterior parietal cortex(PPC). In one model, the PPC distinctly drives intentions for action selection, whereas PMd stimulation results in complex multi-joint movements without any awareness of, nor subjective feeling of, willing the elicited movement, thus seems to merely

  2. TERRAscope and CUBE project at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Hiroo; Hauksson, , Egill; Heaton, Tom

    The TERRAscope project of the California Institute of Technology began in 1988 and now has six very broadband seismic stations (PAS, GSC, PFO, SBC, ISA, and SVD) in southern California (Figure 1). The goal of TERRAscope is to provide high-quality broadband data needed for significant advances in both regional and global seismology. TERRAscope will replace the old Caltech seismographic network in southern California, which dates back to the 1920s. In many cases, new stations are deployed in cooperation with local institutions. The goal is to encourage involvement of both students and researchers in the operation of the stations and analysis of new data. The station PAS is a joint project between Caltech, the University of Southern California, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The station SBC was deployed in cooperation with the University of California at Santa Barbara. The station PFO is operated jointly with the University of California at San Diego, and the station SVD was installed and is operated by the USGS. Except for SVD, all of the stations are equipped with a broadband Streckeisen STS-1 seismometer and Quanterra data logger with a 24-bit digitizer and a Kinemetrics FBA-23 strong-motion sensor. The station SVD has a Streckeisen STS-2 seismometer and a Guralp CMG-5 accelerograph. The project is funded mainly by grants from the L. K. Whittier Foundation and the Arco Foundation. In addition to the automatic dial-up data retrieving system called Caltech Gopher (adapted from the IRIS Gopher system) has been implemented. The Caltech Gopher receives mail from NEIC for teleseisms and the SCSN with origin time, location, and magnitude for regional events. The Gopher retrieves data from all six TERRAscope stations for these events. The TERRAscope data reside in an FTP anonymous account (seismo.gps.caltech.edu; password: “your e-mail address”) at the Caltech Seismological Laboratory, and are

  3. Creating a Research Pervasive Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coll. League of California, Sacramento. Commission on Research.

    Designed to promote an institutional environment in which research activities and perspectives are integral to the infrastructure of the community college, this compilation of articles presents strategies for developing and strengthening links between research and decision making. Following a brief introduction to the role of the Community College…

  4. Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for Caltech's Tectonics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L.; Jain, K.; Maloney, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu). Over the past four years, the TO has made a major effort to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) inspire students to learn Earth Sciences, particularly tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about science in the context of TO discoveries, and (3) provide opportunities for graduate students, postdocs, and faculty to do outreach in the local K-12 schools and community colleges. Our work toward these goals includes hosting local high school teachers and students each summer for six weeks of research experience (as part of Caltech's "Summer Research Connection"); organizing and hosting an NAGT conference aimed at Geoscience teachers at community colleges; participating in teacher training workshops (organized by the local school district); hosting tours for K-12 students from local schools as well as from China; and bringing hands-on activities into local elementary, middle, and high school classrooms. We also lead local school students and teachers on geology field trips through nearby canyons; develop education modules for undergraduate classes (as part of MARGINS program); write educational web articles on TO research (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/highlights/), and regularly give presentations to the general public. This year, we started providing content expertise for the development of video games to teach Earth Science, being created by GameDesk Institute. And we have just formed a scientist/educator partnership with a 6th grade teacher, to help in the school district's pilot program to incorporate new national science standards (NSTA's Next Generation Science Standards, current draft), as well as use Project-Based Learning. This presentation gives an overview of these activities.

  5. New X-Ray Detector for Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process that occurs in plasmas where magnetic field lines break and re-attach to form a different topology having lower energy. Since the magnetic field is changing very fast in the reconnection region, Faraday's Law states that there is a large electric field that accelerates electrons which can then create x-rays. X-rays have been previously observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment and in similar experiments. We have assembled a new detector consisting of a scintillator that is more than 10 times the volume of the previous one and a light guide that allows the photomultiplier tube to be 2 meters from the experiment so that electrical noise is reduced. The setup has been tested using a weak natural Thorium source and will soon be mounted on the Caltech jet experiment in front of a kapton vacuum window that allows x-rays to pass. Kapton has good transmission above 5 KeV.

  6. Creating the optimal conditions for rehabilitation research.

    PubMed

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2009-09-01

    Current evidence suggests that productivity in biomedical research depends on the support that the research group enjoys from its parent institution, the composition of the group and the personal attributes of its members and leader. Supportive institutions provide adequate physical resources and allow substantial uninterrupted time for research. The effectiveness of the research group asa whole is also strongly influenced by the group's structure, the professional competence of the group leader, his leadership style and his ability to foster collaboration with other research groups and organizations. There is a good case for a flexible leadership style that is modelled on the situational theory of leadership. In addition, the personal characteristics of the individual members of the research group influence the quality and quantity of the research output. Effective groups are made of motivated individuals with research training and skills that are relevant to the objectives of the research group. Rehabilitation research is fundamentally different from traditional biomedical research. This study discusses how the factors that influence productivity of biomedical research relate to rehabilitation science and practice and examines the conditions that are necessary to create and maintain an academic environment that is conducive to large volume,high-quality research in rehabilitation medicine. PMID:19685576

  7. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes. PMID:24187127

  8. Repurposing the Caltech Robinson Hall Coelostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treffers, Richard R.; Loisos, G.; Ubbelohde, M.; Douglas, S.; Martinez, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the repurposing of the historic coelostat atop Caltech’s Robinson Hall for building lighting, public education and scientific research. The coelostat was originally part of George Ellery Hale’s vision of the Astrophysical Laboratory on the Caltech campus in 1932. The coelostat, designed by Russell Porter, has a 36 inch diameter primary mirror a 30 inch diameter secondary mirror and provides a 24 inch un-vignetted beam of sunlight into the building. Although constructed in the 1930s, due to wartime pressures and other projects, it was used only briefly in the 1970s and never fully realized. Recently Robinson Hall has been fully renovated to house the Ronald and Maxine Linde Center for Global Environmental Science. The coelostat operation was modernized replacing the old motors and automating all the motions. Each morning, if the weather cooperates, the dome slit opens, the mirrors configured and sunlight pours into the building. The beam of sunlight is divided into three parts. One part goes into a refracting telescope which projects a ten inch diameter of the sun onto a ground glass screen visible to the public. A second fraction is distributed to fiber optic fixtures that illuminate some of the basement rooms. The final fraction goes into two laboratories where it is used in experiments monitoring trace constituents of our atmosphere and for solar catalysis experiments. The instrument as originally conceived required at least two human operators. Now it is fully automatic and doing real science

  9. California Institute of Technology: Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program (CECIP) was initiated in 2009. It manages $8 million within an existing fund in the school's endowment, which had been created to finance capital projects. Any member of the Caltech community may submit a project proposal, and projects are considered for approval as long as they have at least a 15…

  10. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  11. Creating High Functioning Schools: Practice and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cano, Yvonne, Ed.; Wood, Fred H., Ed.; Simmons, Jan C., Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers, chosen from those presented within the last 2 years at the annual National Conference on Creating the Quality School, hosted by the Center for the Study of Small/Rural Schools at the University of Oklahoma. The papers are grouped into three sections: leadership for school improvement; classroom practices for school…

  12. Berkeley Researchers Create an Invisibility Cloak

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    A team led by Xiang Zhang, a principal investigator with Berkeley Labs Materials Sciences Division and director of UC Berkeley's Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, has created a carpet cloak from nanostructured silicon that conceals the presence of objects placed under it from optical detection. (Video by Jensen Li) http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/05/01/invisibility-cloak/

  13. How To Create an Independent Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Melanie Jacobs

    This guide explains how to establish a research program within a school and how to get students involved in independent research projects and national research competitions. Chapter 1, "Selling the Program," examines benefits to the community, school, teachers, and students. Chapter 2, "Assessing Your Situation," discusses how independent research…

  14. Creating Research Culture in Caribbean Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore; Simmons, Lynette

    2010-01-01

    Recent expansion of tertiary education in the Caribbean via the creation of two new universities invites reflection on what impedes the creation of research culture, and what enables it. We contend that research culture in the Caribbean comes up against the strictures of post-colonial dependence, university education in the region being largely a…

  15. Practical Engagements and Co-Created Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jennifer Lyn; Seibold, David R.

    2008-01-01

    In this essay we foreground the value of engaging meaningfully with practitioners in our work. We review research by scholars whose work cuts across topics and contexts to gain insight into the power and practice of human communication as it shapes the world in which we live-highlighting work that is at its best because of its co-creation with…

  16. George Ellery Hale, Caltech Astrophysics, and the Hale 200-inch Telescope, 1920-1948

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1998-05-01

    Caltech and the 200-inch Hale telescope on Palomar are two of George Ellery Hale's many creations in Southern California. He brought the California Institute of Technology into existence in 1920; Palomar Observatory was built for it. However, even before Hale had "secured" the funds for the 200-inch, astrophysical research had been underway on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, and it intensified after the Rockefeller grant came through. Interactions between the campus, Palomar Mountain, and Mount Wilson Obervatory (one of Hale's earlier creations) played important roles in determining the course of Caltech astrophysics. Changing funding patterns (from private philanthropy to drought, then "defense" weapons-development programs, and then governmental agencies designed to support scientific research) will be briefly described. The 18-inch Schmidt, built at the Caltech (200-inch Telescope) Shop, went into operation in 1936, the first research telescope on Palomar. The 200-inch, essentially completed, was dedicated in 1948 and went into operation for regularly scheduled research observations near the end of 1949. Its coude spectrograph was completed and put into regular use in stages from 1950 to 1952, Among the most important leaders of Caltech astrophysics up to 1948 and the years immediately after it when the 200-inch went into full operation were Robert A. Millikan, Max Mason, and Lee A. DuBridge. Some of the astrophysicists who worked at Caltech and Palomar were Albert Einstein, Richard C. Tolman, Fritz Zwicky, Ira S. Bowen, John A. Anderson, Sinclair Smith, John Strong, William A. Fowler and, just at the end of this period, Jesse L. Greenstein. Some of the key staff personnel were Russell W. Porter, Don O. Hendrix (on loan), and Byron Hill.

  17. Creating the Future: Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    With the many different technical talents, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to be an important force behind many scientific breakthroughs. The MSFC's annual report reviews the technology developments, research in space and microgravity sciences, studies in space system concepts, and technology transfer. The technology development programs include development in: (1) space propulsion and fluid management, (2) structures and dynamics, (3) materials and processes and (4) avionics and optics.

  18. Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five…

  19. Teaching the Methodology of Computational Science at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    I will describe some of our experiences in designing and teaching a graduate level curriculum on the methodologies of computational science at Caltech, and offer some opinions on the subject in a broader context of the transformation of the academia.

  20. Creating Meaningful Inquiry in Inclusive Classrooms: Practitioners' Stories of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phyllis, Ed.; Whitehurst, Teresa, Ed.; Egerton, Jo, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of teachers as researchers in both special and mainstream school settings has become part of our everyday language. Whilst many educational practitioners will see the need for research within their setting, many may not be familiar with the technical elements they believe are required. "Creating Meaningful Inquiry in…

  1. Applying Brain Research To Create Developmentally Appropriate Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Stephen P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the early childhood and primary learning environments and developmentally appropriate practices in light of the findings of brain research in the mid to late 1990s. Focuses on how the brain works, creating the optimal learning environment, developing classroom learning centers, and presenting meaningful learning experiences. Identifies…

  2. CREATING HEALTHY HOME EATING ENVIRONMENTS: RESULTS FROM FORMATIVE RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The federal Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) provides nutrition education classes to limited-resource families. This study was conducted to inform a new obesity prevention EFNEP component to help families create healthy home food environments. Two formative research studies were...

  3. Viewpoint: The Challenge of Creating Engaged Public Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherwitz, Rick

    2010-01-01

    The quest to create engaged public research universities requires academe to confront a stark reality: inflexible administrative structures, historically embedded practices, status-quo thinking, and inertia. Until these obstacles are overcome, the retreat from public life will not be arrested. In this article, the author provides a sample of the…

  4. Higher Education Technology and Research: Creating Excellence through State Investments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Commission on Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Colleges and universities in New Jersey play a critical role in building and sustaining economic prosperity and quality of life in the state and beyond. Through advancements in technology and research, higher education helps to create new jobs, improve the workforce, develop new knowledge, and boost the overall economy. This report summarizes…

  5. Creating evidence-based research in adapted physical activity.

    PubMed

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five beliefs are individualization, critical thinking, self-determination, program effectiveness, and multifactor complexity. The research model includes conceptualize the problem, conduct research on the process of the problem, conceptualize and specify the intervention, evaluate intervention outcomes, evaluate intervention processes, determine person-by-treatment interactions, determine context-dependent limitations, and investigate factors related to intervention adoption maintenance. The eight steps are explained with reference to two research programs that used a randomized control group design. PMID:22467832

  6. Creating Meaningful Partnerships Between Communities and Environmental Health Researchers

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Rachael; Aguilar, Genevieve C.; de Castro, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Community engagement is a necessary, although challenging, element of environmental health research in communities. To facilitate the engagement process, direct action community organizing agencies can be useful in bringing together communities and researchers. This article describes the preliminary activities that one direct action community organizing agency used in partnership with researchers to improve community engagement in the first 6 months of an environmental health study conducted in a major U.S. city. Activities included developing communication strategies, creating opportunities for researcher–community interaction, and sustaining project momentum. To conduct environmental research that is both scientifically rigorous and relevant to communities, collaborating partners had to develop professional skills and strategies outside of their areas of expertise. PMID:23875568

  7. Successful Undergraduate Research: Creating Win-Win-Win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.; Rhodes, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate involvement in research has the potential to advance science, enhance education, strengthen the research community, and raise general awareness of the importance and impact of scientific understanding. Rather than being competing objectives, these goals are synergistic. Effective research experiences are those that create win-win-win situations: benefits to the student, benefits to the project, and benefits to the scientific community. When structured appropriately, undergraduate research fits into a learner-centered paradigm that puts emphasis on student learning, rather than instructor teaching. Under such a paradigm the student and professor learn together, constructing knowledge by integrating information with critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and use this knowledge to address issues in real-life contexts. Creating such a learning environment requires that the professor be vested in the outcome of the research, that the student take a meta-cognitive approach to the project and work at a level appropriate to her abilities, and that the student understand how her contribution fits into the project and the larger field. All of these factors lead to greater independence, confidence, and productivity on the part of the student. By providing undergraduates with these experiences, we introduce not only future scientists but also non-scientists to the excitement of discovery and the value of scientific research. Currently, we involve undergraduates in our research on the hydrology and geochemistry of a tropical montane cloud forest in Monteverde, Costa Rica. At the start of each student's involvement, we provide her with the big picture: our project goals, the relevant social issues, and the importance of watershed research. Each student then articulates her own educational and project objectives. Together, we choose tasks that match her skills and interests with our scholarly work. Specific activities range from literature review to

  8. Creating Catalytic Collaborations between Theater Artists, Scientists, and Research Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Catalyst Collaborative@MIT (CC@MIT) is a collaboration between MIT and Underground Railway Theater (URT), a company with 30 years experience creating theater through interdisciplinary inquiry and engaging community. CC@MIT is dedicated to creating and presenting plays that deepen public understanding about science, while simultaneously providing artistic and emotional experiences not available in other forms of dialogue about science. CC@MIT engages audiences in thinking about themes in science of social and ethical concern; provides insight into the culture of science and the impact of that culture on society; and examines the human condition through the lens of science that intersects our lives and the lives of scientists. Original productions range from Einstein's Dreams to From Orchids to Octopi -- an evolutionary love story; classics re-framed include The Life of Galileo and Breaking the Code (about Alan Turing). CC@MIT commissions playwrights and scientists to create plays; engages audiences with scientists; performs at MIT and a professional venue near the campus; collaborates with the Cambridge Science Festival and MIT Museum; engages MIT students, as well as youth and children. Artistic Director Debra Wise will address how the collaboration developed, what opportunities are provided by collaborations between theaters and scientific research institutions, and lessons learned of value to the field.

  9. IT Tools for Teachers and Scientists, Created by Undergraduate Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, A. Z.; Perry, S.

    2007-12-01

    Interns in the Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT) program conduct computer science research for the benefit of earthquake scientists and have created products in growing use within the SCEC education and research communities. SCEC/UseIT comprises some twenty undergraduates who combine their varied talents and academic backgrounds to achieve a Grand Challenge that is formulated around needs of SCEC scientists and educators and that reflects the value SCEC places on the integration of computer science and the geosciences. In meeting the challenge, students learn to work on multidisciplinary teams and to tackle complex problems with no guaranteed solutions. Meantime, their efforts bring fresh perspectives and insight to the professionals with whom they collaborate, and consistently produces innovative, useful tools for research and education. The 2007 Grand Challenge was to design and prototype serious games to communicate important earthquake science concepts. Interns broke themselves into four game teams, the Educational Game, the Training Game, the Mitigation Game and the Decision-Making Game, and created four diverse games with topics from elementary plate tectonics to earthquake risk mitigation, with intended players ranging from elementary students to city planners. The games were designed to be versatile, to accommodate variation in the knowledge base of the player; and extensible, to accommodate future additions. The games are played on a web browser or from within SCEC-VDO (Virtual Display of Objects). SCEC-VDO, also engineered by UseIT interns, is a 4D, interactive, visualization software that enables integration and exploration of datasets and models such as faults, earthquake hypocenters and ruptures, digital elevation models, satellite imagery, global isochrons, and earthquake prediction schemes. SCEC-VDO enables the user to create animated movies during a session, and is now part

  10. 350 {mu}m POLARIMETRY FROM THE CALTECH SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, Jessie L.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Kirby, Larry; Hildebrand, Roger H.; Dowell, C. Darren; Davidson, Jacqueline A. E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu

    2010-02-01

    We present a summary of data obtained with the 350 {mu}m polarimeter, Hertz, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We give tabulated results and maps showing polarization vectors and intensity contours. The summary includes over 4300 individual measurements in 56 Galactic sources and two galaxies. Of these measurements, 2153 have P {>=} 3{sigma} {sub p} statistical significance. The median polarization of the entire data set is 1.46%.

  11. Creating Knowledge: A Monopoly? Participatory Research in Development. Participatory Research Network Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Budd, Ed.; And Others

    This book, consisting of 13 papers, deals with the theory, practice, and reactions to participatory research in the area of social research for development. Included in the volume are the following papers: "Breaking the Monopoly of Knowledge: Research Methods, Participation, and Development," by Budd Hall; "Creating Alternative Research Methods:…

  12. Modernization of the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R.; Devora, A.; Hauksson, E.; Johnson, D.; Thomas, V.; Watkins, M.; Yip, R.; Yu, E.; Given, D.; Cone, G.; Koesterer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS/ANSS/ARRA program is providing Government Furnished Equipment (GFE), and two year funding for upgrading the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in southern California that monitors seismicity and provides real-time earthquake information products such as rapid notifications, moment tensors, and ShakeMap. The SCSN has evolved through the years and now consists of several well-integrated components such as Short-Period analog, TERRAscope, digital stations, and real-time strong motion stations, or about 300 stations. In addition, the SCSN records data from about 100 stations provided by partner networks. To strengthen the ability of SCSN to meet the ANSS performance standards, we will install GFE and carry out the following upgrades and improvements of the various components of the SCSN: 1) Upgrade of dataloggers at seven TERRAscope stations; 2) Upgrade of dataloggers at 131 digital stations and upgrade broadband sensors at 25 stations; 3) Upgrade of SCSN metadata capabilities; 4) Upgrade of telemetry capabilities for both seismic and GPS data; and 5) Upgrade balers at stations with existing Q330 dataloggers. These upgrades will enable the SCSN to meet the ANSS Performance Standards more consistently than before. The new equipment will improve station uptimes and reduce maintenance costs. The new equipment will also provide improved waveform data quality and consequently superior data products. The data gaps due to various outages will be minimized, and ‘late’ data will be readily available through retrieval from on-site storage. Compared to the outdated equipment, the new equipment will speed up data delivery by about 10 sec, which is fast enough for earthquake early warning applications. The new equipment also has about a factor of ten lower consumption of power. We will also upgrade the SCSN data acquisition and data center facilities, which will improve the SCSN

  13. Results from the Second Caltech-Jodrell Bank VLBI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Vermeulen, R. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Cohen, M. H.; Henstock, D. R.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Browne, I. W. A.; Patnaik, A.

    1993-12-01

    We present results from the second Caltech-Jodrell Bank VLBI survey (CJ2). This is a Mark 2 snapshot VLBI survey of flat- and peaked-spectrum sources. The CJ2 survey extends the morphological study of the Pearson & Readhead (1988, ApJ, 328, 114) and Caltech-Jodrell Bank (Polatidis et al. 1993, Xu et al. 1993 submitted to ApJ, hereafter CJ) surveys to 400 sources. The CJ2 survey has three cosmological goals: 1) to populate the proper motion--redshift diagram for superluminal sources; 2) to populate the size--redshift diagram for compact sources (both diagrams can be used to estimate the deceleration parameter, q_0); and 3) to search for small-separation gravitationally-lensed systems and hence to look directly for mass concentrations in the unexplored range of 10(6) - 10(9) \\solmass. Approximately 10% of the sources are found to be interesting, unusual objects worth further study. The CJ2 sample is drawn from the Patnaik et al. (1992, MNRAS, 254, 655) list of ~ 900 compact flat-spectrum sources north of delta = 35° with 6 cm flux densities greater than 200 mJy. We have selected the strongest 197 of these sources subject to the further criteria that they are out of the galactic plane (|b| > 10°), flat-spectrum (alpha flatter than -0.5), and have not been previously observed in the PR or CJ surveys. All 197 sources have now been successfully imaged at 6 cm with ~ 1 mas resolution and a typical dynamic range of 500:1. The vast majority (171/197) of these sources have core-jet morphologies and are therefore well suited for the cosmological tests described above. Roughly 9% (18/197) are candidate compact symmetric objects. This group of sources is not well understood and is of considerable current interest (Readhead et al. 1993, ApJ, in press).

  14. Mendeley: Creating Communities of Scholarly Inquiry through Research Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaugg, Holt; West, Richard E.; Tateishi, Isaku; Randall, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Mendeley is a free, web-based tool for organizing research citations and annotating their accompanying PDF articles. Adapting Web 2.0 principles for academic scholarship, Mendeley integrates the management of the research articles with features for collaborating with researchers locally and worldwide. In this article the features of Mendeley are…

  15. Creating and Supporting a Mixed Methods Health Services Research Team

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Barbara; Cohen, Lauren W; Elliot, Amy E; Grabowski, David C; Fishman, Nancy W; Sharkey, Siobhan S; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Horn, Susan D; Kemper, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To use the experience from a health services research evaluation to provide guidance in team development for mixed methods research. Methods. The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE) team was organized by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to evaluate The Green House nursing home culture change program. This article describes the development of the research team and provides insights into how funders might engage with mixed methods research teams to maximize the value of the team. Results. Like many mixed methods collaborations, the THRIVE team consisted of researchers from diverse disciplines, embracing diverse methodologies, and operating under a framework of nonhierarchical, shared leadership that required new collaborations, engagement, and commitment in the context of finite resources. Strategies to overcome these potential obstacles and achieve success included implementation of a Coordinating Center, dedicated time for planning and collaborating across researchers and methodologies, funded support for in-person meetings, and creative optimization of resources. Conclusions. Challenges are inevitably present in the formation and operation of effective mixed methods research teams. However, funders and research teams can implement strategies to promote success. PMID:24138774

  16. How a Research Conference Created New Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Wiessner, Colleen Aalsburg; Storberg-Walker, Julia; Chapman, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The study presents preliminary findings from research begun at the 2005 Academy of Human Resource Development International Research Conference held in Estes Park, CO, USA. The qualitative case study captures what new learning occurred as a result of the conference and how the new learning at the conference occurred.…

  17. Issues in Creating a Corpus for EAP Pedagogy and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Kosem, Iztok

    2007-01-01

    UK universities are accepting increasing numbers of students whose L1 is not English on a wide range of programmes at all levels. These students require additional support and training in English, focussing on their academic disciplines. Corpora have been used in EAP since the 1980s, mainly for research, but a growing number of researchers and…

  18. Formerly incarcerated women create healthy lives through participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Mickey L; Warner-Robbins, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    The specific purpose of the participatory action research study was to facilitate formerly incarcerated women who participate in Welcome Home Ministries (WHM) to develop their own plans and specific strategies, and to take action to build their own healthy futures. The research had a duel purpose of joint generation of knowledge and intervention relative to women's capacity building. The research intervention was the creation, implementation, and follow-up of a future search conference. The outcomes, conclusions, and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:11845765

  19. Using ADS for Creating Bibliographies of Research Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egret, D.; Laurenceau, A.; Accomazzi, A.

    2015-04-01

    Institutions often have a need for maintaining "institutional bibliographies," a list of all papers published by individuals affiliated with the institution. Using the Observatoire de Paris (France) as an example, we show how this can be done, using the services of the ADS and other bibliographic databases. In this specific case, we are able to quantify the success rate in creating the extensive list of the scientific output of the institution by each source database. Our analysis helps identify the current limitations and ambiguities in the contents and format of the affiliation/address field, as produced by the authors and modified by journal editors and database managers. We advocate for the development of an authoritative list of astronomical institutions that can be used by the ADS and publishers as a controlled field in order to significantly improve the efficiency of affiliation queries.

  20. Selecting and Creating Mathematical Tasks: From Research To Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Margaret Schwan; Stein, Mary Kay

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the selection and creation of mathematical tasks, drawing on QUASAR's research on mathematical tasks and experiences with teachers and teacher educators. Presents examples of task analysis and issues that teachers should reflect on. (ASK)

  1. Creating a transatlantic research enterprise for preventing Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khachaturian, Zaven S.; Camí, Jordi; Andrieu, Sandrine; Avila, Jesús; Rovira, Mercè Boada; Breteler, Monique; Froelich, Lutz; Gauthier, Serge; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Larson, Eric B.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Martinez-Lage, José Manuel; Petersen, Ronald C.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sunyer, Jordi; Vellas, Bruno; Bain, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    In recognition of the global problem posed by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, an international think-tank meeting was convened by Biocat, the Pasqual Maragall Foundation, and the Lou Ruvo Brain Institute in February 2009. The meeting initiated the planning of a European Union-North American collaborative research enterprise to expedite the delay and ultimate prevention of dementing disorders. The key aim is to build parallel and complementary research infrastructure that will support international standardization and inter-operability among researchers in both continents. The meeting identified major challenges, opportunities for research resources and support, integration with ongoing efforts, and identification of key domains to influence the design and administration of the enterprise. PMID:19560106

  2. Research Question, Study Design and Continuous Research Education and Training Exercises (CREATE) Program

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Tal; Sharma, Pooja; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The clinical research project starts with identifying the optimal research question, one that is ethical, impactful, feasible, scientifically sound, novel, relevant, and interesting. The project continues with the design of the study to answer the research question. Such design should be consistent with ethical and methodological principles, and make optimal use of resources in order to have the best chances of identifying a meaningful answer to the research question. Physicians and other healthcare providers are optimally positioned to identify meaningful research questions the answer to which could make significant impact on healthcare delivery. The typical medical education curriculum, however, lacks solid training in clinical research. We propose CREATE (Continuous Research Education And Training Exercises) as a peer- and group-based, interactive, analytical, customized, and accrediting program with didactic, training, mentoring, administrative, and professional support to enhance clinical research knowledge and skills among healthcare professionals, promote the generation of original research projects, increase the chances of their successful completion and potential for meaningful impact. The key features of the program are successive intra- and inter-group discussions and confrontational thematic challenges among participating peers aimed at capitalizing on the groups’ collective knowledge, experience and skills, and combined intellectual processing capabilities to optimize choice of research project elements and stakeholder decision-making. PMID:26855934

  3. Creating and sustaining a military women's Health Research Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; Trego, Lori; Rychnovsky, Jacqueline; Steele, Nancy; Foradori, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, four doctorate military nurse scientists representing the triservices (Army, Navy, and Air Force) identified a common interest in the health and care of all women in the armed forces. For 7 years, the team's shared vision to improve servicewomen's health inspired them to commit to a rigorous schedule of planning, developing, and implementing an innovative program that has the capability of advancing scientific knowledge and influencing health policy and practice through research. The ultimate goal of the Military Women's Health Research Interest Group (MWHRIG) is to support military clinicians and leaders in making evidence-based practice and policy decisions. They developed a 4-pronged approach to cultivate the science of military women's healthcare: evaluate the existing evidence, develop a research agenda that addresses gaps in knowledge, facilitate the collaboration of multidisciplinary research, and build the bench of future researchers. The MWHRIG has been a resource to key leaders; its value has been validated by multiservice and multidisciplinary consultations. However, the journey to goal attainment has only been achieved by the enduring commitment of these MWHRIG leaders and their passion to ensure the health and wellbeing of the many women who serve in the United States military. This article describes their journey of dedication. PMID:26101911

  4. A Model For Creating Innovators Through Freshman Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, Donald E.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Students come to the College of Natural Sciences because they want to do research, not because they want to sit in the classroom. The University of Texas Freshman Research Initiative (FRI) is designed to leverage this desire. It motivates, stimulates and educates the next generation of scientists by getting them directly involved in cutting edge research in their first year of college. They initially contribute to a group project designed for them to build the skills needed for research. Within the first year they develop a more independent project. After four years with the Astronomy Stream of the FRI, our first group has graduated. Three of the six have produced honors theses and a fourth is working on one this fall. Three were Dean's Honored Graduates. Of these two were female and one male. Two are in graduate programs and one is admitted to medical school. One won the George Mitchell Award as the outstanding undergraduate student at the University of Texas. Subsequent classes hold similar promise. The success at recruiting and retaining these students, with minorities and women well represented, is traceable to at least three key factors. First, the research introduces them to the transformative and addictive joy of knowing something about the universe that no one, past or present, has ever known before. Second it gives them a context for the knowledge they gain in the classroom. Third it allows them to develop a network of peers and mentors. The mentors are layered, with upper division undergraduates serving as the first line, then graduate students, post docs and faculty. They always have access to help in their research and in their class work. The end result is that they perform significantly better in the classroom than their peers that are not involved in an FRI stream. We will discuss future plans for the FRI: how we plan to expand to larger groups and how the concept can be exported to other universities.

  5. Creating Learning Experiences: The Role of Instructional Theory and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Bruce R.; Calhoun, Emily F.

    This is an introduction to some of the teaching models that have been developed and studied through modern educational research. Some models are designed to accomplish specific objectives, such as teaching students to form and attain concepts; some have generic applications that adapt to a range of learning styles and curriculum areas.…

  6. Creating the Academic Commons: Guidelines for Learning, Teaching, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Thomas H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Today's library is still at the heart of all university activities, helping students and faculty become better learners, teachers, and researchers. In recent years there has emerged the formalizing of one or more of these activities into an Academic Commons. These centers of information have been labeled variously but they all share a commonality:…

  7. Creating Knowledge: Reflections on Research Involving Creative Product and Exegesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaven, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on subject English, this article considers the role that "creative output" in the form of narrative fiction and poetry might play in the field of educational research. Drawing on philosophical insights from Biesta, and combining these with Nussbaum's articulation of the importance of literature to education, a case is made for…

  8. Creating the Future: "New Directions" in American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brint, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This paper assesses the causes and consequences of recent American efforts to configure the research university as an engine of economic and social change. Drawing upon interviews and strategic plans, the paper describes recent policies to encourage "interdisciplinary creativity," in a context of increasing income from private gifts and endowments.

  9. Creating Vocational Streams: What Will It Take? Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This report is part of a wider three-year program of research, "Vocations: the link between post-compulsory education and the labour market," which is investigating the educational and occupational paths that people take, and how their study relates to their work. In particular, this strand has been investigating the application of…

  10. Creating Simulations for An "Introduction to Research Methods" Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the production of a software program for Master of Education students studying the "Introduction to Research Methods" course at a tertiary institution in Hong Kong. The course was originally delivered in a lecture mode, which proved unsatisfactory in providing sufficient learning support for the students. The paper describes…

  11. Artificial-life researchers try to create social reality.

    PubMed

    Flam, F

    1994-08-12

    Some scientists, among them cosmologist Stephen Hawking, argue that computer viruses are alive. A better case might be made for many of the self-replicating silicon-based creatures featured at the fourth Conference on Artificial Life, held on 5 to 8 July in Boston. Researchers from computer science, biology, and other disciplines presented computer programs that, among other things, evolved cooperative strategies in a selfish world and recreated themselves in ever more complex forms. PMID:17782127

  12. A monolithic Si bolometer array for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Serabyn, E.; Phillips, T. G.; Moseley, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a submillimeter continuum camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) located on Mauna Kea. The camera will employ a monolithic Si bolometer array which was developed by Moseley et al. at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The camera will be cooled to a temperature of about 300 mK in a He-3 cryostat, and will operate primarily at wavelengths of 350 and 450 micrometers. We plan to use a bolometer array with 1x24 directly illuminated pixels, each pixel of dimension 1x2 sq mm, which is about half of the F/4 beam size at these wavelengths. Each pixel is 10 to 12 micrometers thick and is supported only by four thin Si legs formed by wet chemical etch. The pixels are doped n-type by phosphorus implantation, compensated by boron implantation. Signals from the bolometer pixels are first amplified by cryogenically cooled FET's. The signals are further amplified by room-temperature amplifiers and then separately digitized by 16 bit A/D converters with differential inputs. The outputs of the A/D converters are fed into a digital signal processing board via fiber-optic cables. The electronics and data acquisition system were designed by the Goddard group. We will report the status of this effort.

  13. The Caltech Tomography Database and Automatic Processing Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ding, H Jane; Oikonomou, Catherine M; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe the Caltech Tomography Database and automatic image processing pipeline, designed to process, store, display, and distribute electron tomographic data including tilt-series, sample information, data collection parameters, 3D reconstructions, correlated light microscope images, snapshots, segmentations, movies, and other associated files. Tilt-series are typically uploaded automatically during collection to a user's "Inbox" and processed automatically, but can also be entered and processed in batches via scripts or file-by-file through an internet interface. As with the video website YouTube, each tilt-series is represented on the browsing page with a link to the full record, a thumbnail image and a video icon that delivers a movie of the tomogram in a pop-out window. Annotation tools allow users to add notes and snapshots. The database is fully searchable, and sets of tilt-series can be selected and re-processed, edited, or downloaded to a personal workstation. The results of further processing and snapshots of key results can be recorded in the database, automatically linked to the appropriate tilt-series. While the database is password-protected for local browsing and searching, datasets can be made public and individual files can be shared with collaborators over the Internet. Together these tools facilitate high-throughput tomography work by both individuals and groups. PMID:26087141

  14. Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for the Caltech Tectonics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L.; Nadin, E.; Avouac, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates. The timescales of these processes span from a few tens of seconds (the typical duration of an earthquake) to tens of millions of years (the time it takes to build mountains). Over the past four years, the TO has brought together 15 Caltech faculty from different fields, several visiting scientists from around the globe, and a few tens of graduate students and postdoctoral students, collaborating on scientific projects. A major objective of the TO now is to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) stimulate the interest of students and the general public in Earth Sciences, particularly in the study of tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about TO discoveries and advancements, and (3) make available the data and techniques developed by the TO for use in classrooms of all levels. To this effect, we have been developing our website for accessibility by the general public and writing educational web articles on TO research. A recent well-visited example is "The science behind the recent 2008 earthquake in China." We distribute animations that illustrate the mechanisms of earthquakes and tsunamis, and the various techniques used by TO scientists in their scientific investigations. The TO website also provides access to geodetic data collected by TO instruments and to the source models of recent large earthquakes as analyzed by TO scientists. The TO hosts tours of its facilities for local elementary school students and is working on developing education modules for high school and undergraduate classes. We are now working on a plan to offer short courses over the summer for undergraduate and graduate students in other institutions, in order to train them to analyze a variety of data and use techniques developed by TO scientists.

  15. Creating Research Environments in the 1980's. Midwest Nursing Research Conference (5th, Madison, Wisconsin, April 13-14, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Funk, Sandra N., Ed.

    Prepared to stimulate and advance nursing research in postsecondary education, the papers included in these proceedings offer a variety of perspectives on the outlook for nursing research in the 1980s. The following papers are presented: (1) "Creating Research Environments for the 1980s," by Geraldene Felton; (2) "Creating an Environment for…

  16. South Asian Nomads--A Literature Review. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This review of literature on South Asian nomads is part of a series of monographs on educational access published by the Consortium for Research on Educational Access Transitions and Equity (CREATE). In the context of India, most recent work has focused on access to the education system for the poor. CREATE research in India has focused on …

  17. The Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory at Caltech and the creation of the modern rocket motor (1936-1946): How the dynamics of rocket theory became reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibit, Benjamin Seth

    This thesis explores and unfolds the story of discovery in rocketry at The California Institute of Technology---specifically at Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory---in the 1930s and 1940s. Caltech was home to a small group of engineering students and experimenters who, beginning in the winter of 1935--1936, formed a study and research team destined to change the face of rocket science in the United States. The group, known as the Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory (GALCIT, for short) Rocket Research Group, invented a new type of solid-rocket propellant, made distinct and influential discoveries in the theory of rocket combustion and design, founded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and incorporated the first American industrial concern devoted entirely to rocket motor production: The Aerojet Corporation. The theoretical work of team members, Frank Malina, Hsueh-shen Tsien, Homer J. Stewart, and Mark Mills, is examined in this thesis in detail. The author scrutinizes Frank Malina's doctoral thesis (both its assumptions and its mathematics), and finds that, although Malina's key assertions, his formulae, hold, his work is shown to make key assumptions about rocket dynamics which only stand the test of validity if certain approximations, rather than exact measurements, are accepted. Malina studied the important connection between motor-nozzle design and thrust; in his Ph.D. thesis, he developed mathematical statements which more precisely defined the design/thrust relation. One of Malina's colleagues on the Rocket Research Team, John Whiteside Parsons, created a new type of solid propellant in the winter of 1941--1942. This propellant, known as a composite propellant (because it simply was a relatively inert amalgam of propellant and oxidizer in non-powder form), became the forerunner of all modern solid propellants, and has become one of the seminal discoveries in the field of Twentieth Century rocketry. The latter chapters of this dissertation discuss the

  18. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  19. Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning. Research on Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abawi, Lindy, Ed.; Conway, Joan, Ed.; Henderson, Robyn, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of…

  20. Cultivating Research Pedagogies with Adolescents: Created Spaces, Engaged Participation, and Embodied Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissman, Kelly K.; Staples, Jeanine M.; Vasudevan, Lalitha; Nichols, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper conceptualizes an approach to adolescent literacies research we call "research pedagogies." This approach recognizes the pedagogical features of the research process and includes three dimensions: created spaces, engaged participation, and embodied inquiry. By drawing upon and sometimes recasting foundational anthropological…

  1. Participatory Action Research: creating an effective prevention curriculum for adolescents in the Southwestern US.

    PubMed

    Gosin, M N; Dustman, P A; Drapeau, A E; Harthun, M L

    2003-06-01

    Existing research confirms a need to seek strategies that combine the strengths of researchers and community to create effective prevention curricula for youth. This article describes how components of Participatory Action Research (PAR) methodology were used to create the keepin' it REAL Drug Resistance Strategies (DRS) curriculum designed for a diverse Southwestern US youth population. School community participants were involved in multiple stages of creation and implementation. The research team developed a systematic process for creating lessons built upon strong theoretical foundations, while teachers and students contributed lesson modifications and evaluations, suggestions for supplemental activities, and the actual production of instructional videos. While the experimental design and some methodological constraints served to limit school community involvement in some phases of the DRS project, this article describes how PAR methodology ensured that researchers collaborated with school community members to create this promising drug prevention curriculum. Results of the REAL experiment, discussion of the use of this methodology, implications and recommendations for future research also are included. PMID:12828237

  2. Doing community research without a community: creating safe space for rape survivors.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rebecca; Sefl, Tracy; Wasco, Sharon M; Ahrens, Courtney E

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes how the values of a feminist research team influenced methodological decisions in a study of rape survivors. Building upon concepts from community psychology and urban sociology, the authors created a community-based research design that respected the emotional needs of rape survivors without sacrificing methodological rigor. We developed relationships with community members in diverse settings, such as nail and hair salons, child care centers, churches, and bookstores, to advertise the study and recruit participants. Consistent with feminist approaches to interviewing, our goal was to create a safe setting for survivors to tell their stories. Although the purpose of this study was research rather than intervention, most survivors reported that participating in these interviews was healing. Our experiences in this project suggest that allowing values to influence the process of research may have beneficial outcomes for both researchers and participants. PMID:15212183

  3. Proposing an Argument for Research Questions that Could Create Permeable Boundaries within Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Hayes, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we discuss how carefully developed research questions may support qualitative researchers by providing boundaries for their study designs. These boundaries could indicate a researcher's epistemological and theoretical connections and support his or her research choices. Although these boundaries are permeable and in flux,…

  4. Caltech CRPC Outreach Programs for Minorities and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifkin, Adam

    In 1992, the National Research Council recommended that the computer science and engineering community should enrich its talent pool by reaching out to women and minorities, both underrepresented in the field. This paper describes four such outreach programs sponsored by the National Science Foundation's Center for Research on Parallel Computation…

  5. Research on the Use of Technology in the Education of the Learning Disabled: Project CREATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Robert A.

    Project CREATE was a 4-year federally funded research program which sought to determine ways in which computer technology could improve the education of learning-disabled students. Early work on the project centered on the development of a theoretical and conceptual foundation; a hierarchical conceptual model was constructed that related school…

  6. Poverty, Equity and Access to Education in Bangladesh. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 51

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Altaf; Zeitlyn, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Bangladesh has made great improvements in the scale and quality of access to education in recent years and gender equality has almost been achieved in primary education (World Bank, 2008). Evidence from CREATE's nationwide community and school survey (ComSS) confirms results from other research (such as Al-Samarrai, 2009) which suggests that…

  7. Status of a Novel 4-Band Submm/mm Camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozian, Omid; Day, P.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S.; Kumar, S.; LeDuc, H. G.; Mazin, B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Schlaerth, J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Vayonakis, A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2007-12-01

    Submillimeter observations are important to the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Determination of the spectral energy distribution in the millimeter and submillimeter regimes allows important and powerful diagnostics. To this end, we are undertaking the construction of a 4-band (750, 850, 1100, 1300 microns) 8-arcminute field of view camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The focal plane will make use of three novel technologies: photolithographic phased array antennae, on-chip band-pass filters, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID). The phased array antenna design obviates beam-defining feed horns. On-chip band-pass filters eliminate band-defining metal-mesh filters. Together, the antennae and filters enable each spatial pixel to observe in all four bands simultaneously. MKIDs are highly multiplexable background-limited photon detectors. Readout of the MKID array will be done with software-defined radio (See poster by Max-Moerbeck et al.). This camera will provide an order-of-magnitude larger mapping speed than existing instruments and will be comparable to SCUBA 2 in terms of the detection rate for dusty sources, but complementary to SCUBA 2 in terms of wavelength coverage. We present results from an engineering run with a demonstration array, the baseline design for the science array, and the status of instrument design, construction, and testing. We anticipate the camera will be available at the CSO in 2010. This work has been supported by NASA ROSES APRA grants NNG06GG16G and NNG06GC71G, the NASA JPL Research and Technology Development Program, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  8. Creating a Culture of Research in Teacher Education: Learning Research within Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mary F.; Haigh, Mavis A.

    2012-01-01

    In some international contexts, for example in South Africa, Norway, Australia and New Zealand, teacher education has recently shifted into the academy. Concurrently research performance funding measures have been introduced. Both changes have placed pressure on teacher educators to become "research active". The literature indicates that teacher…

  9. Electing Research: Creating a Research Elective Is a Great Way to Teach In-Depth Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Mary Hoffman, was having a hard time teaching in-depth research skills to her middle school students, due to time limitations. So last fall, she approached her principal with an unprecedented idea: to offer kids a semester-long elective on research. What better way to teach comprehensive, analytical skills to those who really wanted a challenge?…

  10. Learning from Past Infrastructure to Embrace Friction and Create the Research Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In creating international organizations, we are often seeking to create new scientific infrastructure. Yet infrastructure is never truly planned or designed up front. It evolves through a staged process that can involve complex dynamics, unanticipated consequences, and significant friction between individuals, organizations, and systems. Collaborators may agree on general directions or principles, but they do not necessarily have common goals. Coalition style politics emerge that can both ameliorate and exacerbate the friction, but it is through this multifaceted perspective that we achieve greater understanding. The Research Data Alliance embraces this complex dynamic. It has no overarching plan or architecture, but it provides core principles and a "neutral place" that provide enough alignment to move forward while still recognizing the value of friction. The focus is on building and implementing bridges or gateways that connect disparate systems, organizations, and processes in order to create more interconnection and increase data sharing. This presentation will describe this approach adopted by RDA and the initial products created--both technical and social. More importantly, it will illustrate how these products have been adopted at multiple scales and suggest ways forward toward a rapid evolution of a data-sharing infrastructure.

  11. Retention of Women in Geoscience Undergraduate and Graduate Education at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    Institutional barriers encountered by women in undergraduate and graduate schools may take many forms, but can also be as simple as a lack of community support. In the 1990's the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) made a commitment to the retention of women in their graduate and undergraduate schools. Their program included mentoring, focussed tutoring, self-esteem support groups, and other retention efforts. Under this program, the attrition rate of women has dramatically slowed. In this paper, we will discuss recent data from the American Geological Institude chronicling the enrollment and successes of women in the geosciences, the program instituted by Caltech, possible causes of attrition among women in the geosciences, as well as potential programs to address these problems. We will also present, from the nationwide study, data on geoscience departments which have been relatively successful at retaining and graduating women in Earth and Space Sciences.

  12. Creating a three-parent child: an educational paradigm for the responsible conduct of research.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Ruth L; Benston, Shawna; Loike, John D

    2014-12-01

    The field of assisted reproduction is renowned for its remarkable advances and constant pushing forward of research boundaries in an effort to offer innovative and effective methods for enhancing fertility. Accompanying these advances, however, are physiological, psychological, and bioethical consequences that must be considered. These concomitant advances and consequences make assisted reproduction an excellent educational paradigm for inculcating responsible conduct in both research and clinical practice. Ultimately, responsible conduct rests on the ethical researcher and clinician. Here, we present the as-yet unapproved, contentious assisted reproductive technology of mitochondrial replacement transfer (MRT) as an ideal educational platform to foster the responsible conduct of research by advancing dialogue among multi-disciplinary scholars, researchers, and students. Using a likely future case, we present the basic science, legal, and ethical considerations, and the pedagogical principles and strategies for using MRT as an effective educational paradigm. Society will benefit when the ethical issues inherent in creating children with three genetic parents as well as germline interference are discussed across multiple academic levels that include researchers, legal experts, bioethicists, and government-appointed commissions. Furthermore, undergraduate and graduate students should be included because they will likely determine the ethical fates of these biotechnologies. While emerging assisted reproduction technologies such as MRT are highly complex and will take years to be readily available for patients in need, now is the time to consider their scientific, legal, ethical, and cultural/religious implications for ensuring the responsible conduct of research. PMID:25574276

  13. Creating a Three-Parent Child: An Educational Paradigm for the Responsible Conduct of Research

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Ruth L.; Benston, Shawna; Loike, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The field of assisted reproduction is renowned for its remarkable advances and constant pushing forward of research boundaries in an effort to offer innovative and effective methods for enhancing fertility. Accompanying these advances, however, are physiological, psychological, and bioethical consequences that must be considered. These concomitant advances and consequences make assisted reproduction an excellent educational paradigm for inculcating responsible conduct in both research and clinical practice. Ultimately, responsible conduct rests on the ethical researcher and clinician. Here, we present the as-yet unapproved, contentious assisted reproductive technology of mitochondrial replacement transfer (MRT) as an ideal educational platform to foster the responsible conduct of research by advancing dialogue among multi-disciplinary scholars, researchers, and students. Using a likely future case, we present the basic science, legal, and ethical considerations, and the pedagogical principles and strategies for using MRT as an effective educational paradigm. Society will benefit when the ethical issues inherent in creating children with three genetic parents as well as germline interference are discussed across multiple academic levels that include researchers, legal experts, bioethicists, and government-appointed commissions. Furthermore, undergraduate and graduate students should be included because they will likely determine the ethical fates of these biotechnologies. While emerging assisted reproduction technologies such as MRT are highly complex and will take years to be readily available for patients in need, now is the time to consider their scientific, legal, ethical, and cultural/religious implications for ensuring the responsible conduct of research. PMID:25574276

  14. Incentives to create and sustain healthy behaviors: technology solutions and research needs.

    PubMed

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Aldag, Matt; Centola, Damon; Edinborough, Elton; Ghannadian, Jason D; Haught, Andrea; Jackson, Theresa; Kinn, Julie; Kunkler, Kevin J; Levine, Betty; Martindale, Valerie E; Neal, David; Snyder, Leslie B; Styn, Mindi A; Thorndike, Frances; Trabosh, Valerie; Parramore, David J

    2014-12-01

    Health-related technology, its relevance, and its availability are rapidly evolving. Technology offers great potential to minimize and/or mitigate barriers associated with achieving optimal health, performance, and readiness. In support of the U.S. Army Surgeon General's vision for a "System for Health" and its Performance Triad initiative, the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center hosted a workshop in April 2013 titled "Incentives to Create and Sustain Change for Health." Members of government and academia participated to identify and define the opportunities, gain clarity in leading practices and research gaps, and articulate the characteristics of future technology solutions to create and sustain real change in the health of individuals, the Army, and the nation. The key factors discussed included (1) public health messaging, (2) changing health habits and the environmental influence on health, (3) goal setting and tracking, (4) the role of incentives in behavior change intervention, and (5) the role of peer and social networks in change. This report summarizes the recommendations on how technology solutions could be employed to leverage evidence-based best practices and identifies gaps in research where further investigation is needed. PMID:25469962

  15. Creating A Culture Of Scientific Inquiry Through Research Experiences For Teachers And Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjorski, N.; Hall, M.

    2006-12-01

    Creating A Culture Of Scientific Inquiry (CACOSI) is a National Science Foundation funded pilot project designed to help middle and high school teachers and students achieve a scientific understanding of their world through authentic short and long-term classroom and field research experiences. Throughout the past year CACOSI had reached out to several Northern New Mexico minority-serving schools to implement inquiry- based projects in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade classrooms such as weather, earthquake, and schoolyard ecosystem monitoring. Professional scientists were also introduced into the classroom to act as teachers and mentors of the science process and help expose students to scientific career opportunities. Additionally, CACOSI has developed a one-week residential Summer Science Camp to introduce the students and teachers to hands-on Earth and environmental science investigations with the assistance of professional scientists in the field. Development of this camp significantly strengthened and expanded the partnerships that have been created over the past three years and will allow us to expand the CACOSI project to include more field-based exploration during the 2006-2007 school year across two school systems. Throughout this project we have found that consistent teacher support is required to implement authentic research projects in the classroom. The summer science camp was particularly helpful to the teachers in developing their comfort with the inherent unpredictability of hands-on field research projects. This year we are working with the schools to take the students and teachers out of the classroom setting into the field for one day each month with professional scientists' assistance. This will allow us to explore more intensive field investigations and overcome some of the barriers created by the classroom structure and schedule.

  16. Creating an Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Martin-Gill, Christian; Callaway, Clifton W.; Angus, Derek C.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Emergency medical services (EMS) providers deliver the initial care for millions of people in the United States each year. The Institute of Medicine noted a deficit in research necessary to improve prehospital care, created by the existence of data silos, absence of long-term outcomes, and limited stakeholder engagement in research. This article describes a regional effort to create a high-performing infrastructure in southwestern Pennsylvania addressing these fundamental barriers. Methods Regional EMS records from 33 agencies in January 2011 were linked to hospital-based electronic health records (EHRs) in a single nine-hospital system, with manual review of matches for accuracy. The use of community stakeholder engagement was included to guide scientific inquiry, as well as 2-year follow up for patient-centered outcomes. Results Local EMS medicine stakeholders emphasized the limits of single-agency EMS research, and suggested that studies focus on improving cross-cutting, long-term outcomes. Guided by this input, more than 95% of EMS records (2,675 out of 2,800) were linked to hospital-based EHRs. More than 80% of records were linked to 2-year mortality, with more deaths among EMS patients with prehospital hypotension (30.5%) or respiratory distress (19.5%) than chest pain (5.4%) or non-specific complaints (9.4%). Conclusions A prehospital comparative effectiveness research infrastructure composed of patient-level EMS data, EHRs at multiple hospitals, long-term outcomes, and community stakeholder perspectives is feasible and may be scalable to larger regions and networks. The lessons learned and barriers identified offer a roadmap to answering community and policy-relevant research questions in prehospital care. PMID:24842512

  17. Creating an institutional resource for research education and career development: a novel model from Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cynthia D; McCracken, Karen; Samuels, Mary; Orwoll, Eric

    2014-06-01

    We have created an education and career development program within the CTSA structure at OHSU that serves the entire institution. We believe that this is unusual in scope among CTSA programs and has contributed to an increase in career development funding and research skills among fellows and faculty. While the key element is the institutional scope, important elements include: Tailoring programs of emphasis to points of inflection on the career pathway. Minimizing barriers to education by creating a flexible, tuition-free program. An integrated one-stop education and career development approach. An institutional program for career development award applicants as well as recipients. This career development program was developed within the context of a midsize health science university but the overall strategy may be applied to other CTSAs to simplify and reduce costs of education program development. PMID:24750958

  18. Creating a controlled vocabulary for the ethics of human research: towards a biomedical ethics ontology.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, David; Arp, Robert; Fostel, Jennifer; Smith, Barry

    2009-03-01

    ONTOLOGIES DESCRIBE REALITY IN SPECIFIC domains in ways that can bridge various disciplines and languages. They allow easier access and integration of information that is collected by different groups. Ontologies are currently used in the biomedical sciences, geography, and law. A Biomedical Ethics Ontology (BMEO) would benefit members of ethics committees who deal with protocols and consent forms spanning numerous fields of inquiry. There already exists the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI); the proposed BMEO would interoperate with OBI, creating a powerful information tool. We define a domain ontology and begin to construct a BMEO, focused on the process of evaluating human research protocols. Finally, we show how our BMEO can have practical applications for ethics committees. This paper describes ongoing research and a strategy for its broader continuation and cooperation. PMID:19374479

  19. Creating a Community to Strengthen the Broader Impacts of Condensed Matter Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenwalla, Shireen; Bosley, Jocelyn; Voth, Gregory; Smith, Leigh

    The Broader Impacts (BI) merit criteria set out by the National Science Foundation are essential for building the public support necessary for science to flourish. Condensed matter physicists (CMP) have made transformative impacts on our society, but these are often invisible to the public. Communicating the societal benefits of our research can be challenging, because CMP consists of many independent research groups for whom effective engagement in the public arena is not necessarily a forte. Other BI activities, such as engaging K-12 students and teachers to increase scientific literacy and strengthen the STEM workforce, may be very effective, but these are often isolated and short in duration. To increase the visibility of CMP and to make the implementation of BI activities more efficient, we have created a website with two sides: a public side to communicate to a broad audience exciting scientific discoveries in CMP and the technologies they enable, and a private side for condensed matter researchers to communicate with one another about effective broader impact activities. Here we discuss the content of the new website, and the best practices we have identified for communicating the excitement of CMP research to the broadest possible audience. Nsf-DMR 1550737, 1550724 and 1550681.

  20. Creating Authentic Research Centers In Secondary Classrooms And Retaining The Best Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D.; McHenry, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    My name is David Rodriguez. I am a middle school science teacher with 18 years of teaching experience both in Leon County, Florida and in Guinea West Africa, and South Africa. I am a National Board Certified Teacher. Richard McHenry is a high school Chemistry Advance Placement teacher with over 25 years of teaching experience, also in Leon County, Florida. Rich is a National Board Certified Teacher as well. We participated in a Research Experience For Teachers (RET) program at the National High Magnetic Field Lab in Tallahassee, Florida in 2001 and 2002. This experience has had a profound impact on our teaching, and on our student's learning. During our experience, it became clear to us that there is great importance in how scientists approach their research. We discussed this approach with teams of scientists, and asked them how they thought it could be modeled in classrooms. As teachers, we have been convinced of the value of cooperative learning for years, but to assign roles in cooperative groups similar to the roles that are created in a research science setting has improved student learning. Each team of students is assigned a project manager, data analyst, engineer, and principal investigator. The role of each scientist is specific. As a result of our RET experience, Rich also created a new program in his high school class in which students write scientific papers at the end of each grading period that outline the achievements and lab experiences completed during that period. The importance of publishing research and communicating with the greater scientific community are highlighted through this unique experience. These papers go through a peer review process within the school, and are then sent to the National High Magnetic Field Lab for further review provided by scientists and educators. I was also involved in an atmospheric research project during my RET program that utilized teachers and students throughout the state in the collection of data

  1. Are We Covering Our Own Backyards?: An Analysis of Local Research Guides Created by Academic Business Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This study examines local research guides created by academic business librarians to assist patrons with researching the communities (towns, cities, and regions) where their schools are located. A key finding is that only 33% of the libraries surveyed provide guides to local research, while 80% provide guides to international research. (Contains 2…

  2. Incommensurability and Multi-paradigm Grounding in Design Science Research: Implications for Creating Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Dirk S.

    The problem identification-design-build-evaluate-theorize structure of design science research has been proposed as an approach to creating knowledge in information systems and in broader organizational and social domains. Although the approach has merit, the philosophical foundations of two specific components warrant attention. First, the grounding of design theory on potentially incommensurate kernel theories may produce incoherent design theory. In addition, design theory has no strong logical connection to kernel theories, and so cannot be used to test or validate the contributing kernel theories. Second, the philosophical grounding of evaluation may inadvertently shift from functionally based measures of utility and efficiency, to evaluation based on the pragmatic fulfillment of multidimensional human actions as people encounter information systems, resulting in evaluation errors. Although design and evaluation from a single paradigm is not desirable, sufficient, or representative of design science research, multi-paradigm grounding of design and evaluation must be realized and used consciously by the research community if the design science approach is to remain a legitimate approach to knowledge creation.

  3. Entering Research: A course that creates community and structure for beginning undergraduate researchers in the STEM disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balster, N.

    2009-12-01

    significantly more confident in their ability to identify scientific misconduct (p<0.01), as well as in their ability to make connections between their research experience and their biology or physical sciences coursework (p<0.01). The Entering Research students self-reported greater skill in developing a research project, conducting a research project, and analyzing data (p<0.05). There were similar significant gains in knowledge. Importantly, almost a third of the students enrolled in Entering Research indicate that they would not have pursued independent research without the support of the course. This course was equally rewarding to faculty facilitators who were also assessed as part of this three-year study. The results of this study demonstrate the value in a course that supports beginning undergraduate research. We hypothesize that the implementation of similar courses at other institutions will increase the attraction of science to diverse students, and provide a mechanism for creating community and connections that transcended individual research projects.

  4. Creating Authentic Geoscience Research Experiences for Underrepresented Students in Two-Year Undergraduate Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.

    2014-12-01

    With community college and two-year program students playing pivotal roles in advancing the nation's STEM agenda now and throughout the remainder of this young millennia, it is incumbent on educators to devise innovative and sustainable STEM initiatives to attract, retain, graduate, and elevate these students to four-year programs and beyond. Involving these students in comprehensive, holistic research experiences is one approach that has paid tremendous dividends. The New York City College of Technology (City Tech) was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) supplemental grant to integrate a community college/two-year program component into its existing REU program. The program created an inviting and supportive community of scholars for these students, nurtured them through strong, dynamic mentoring, provided them with the support structures needed for successful scholarship, and challenged them to attain the same research prominence as their Bachelor degree program companions. Along with their colleagues, the community college/two-year program students were given an opportunity to conduct intensive satellite and ground-based remote sensing research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST) at City College and its CREST Institute Center for Remote Sensing and Earth System Science (ReSESS) at City Tech. This presentation highlights the challenges, the rewards, and the lessons learned from this necessary and timely experiment. Preliminary results indicate that this paradigm for geoscience inclusion and high expectation has been remarkably successful. (The program is supported by NSF REU grant #1062934.)

  5. Video diaries on social media: Creating online communities for geoscience research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, V.

    2013-12-01

    Making video clips is an engaging way to learn and teach geoscience. As smartphones become increasingly common, it is relatively straightforward for students to produce ';video diaries' by recording their research and learning experience over the course of a science module. Instead of keeping the video diaries for themselves, students may use the social media such as Facebook for sharing their experience and thoughts. There are some potential benefits to link video diaries and social media in pedagogical contexts. For example, online comments on video clips offer useful feedback and learning materials to the students. Students also have the opportunity to engage in geoscience outreach by producing authentic scientific contents at the same time. A video diary project was conducted to test the pedagogical potential of using video diaries on social media in the context of geoscience outreach, undergraduate research and teaching. This project formed part of a problem-based learning module in field geophysics at an archaeological site in the UK. The project involved i) the students posting video clips about their research and problem-based learning in the field on a daily basis; and ii) the lecturer building an online outreach community with partner institutions. In this contribution, I will discuss the implementation of the project and critically evaluate the pedagogical potential of video diaries on social media. My discussion will focus on the following: 1) Effectiveness of video diaries on social media; 2) Student-centered approach of producing geoscience video diaries as part of their research and problem-based learning; 3) Learning, teaching and assessment based on video clips and related commentaries posted on Facebook; and 4) Challenges in creating and promoting online communities for geoscience outreach through the use of video diaries. I will compare the outcomes from this study with those from other pedagogical projects with video clips on geoscience, and

  6. Next Generation Scientists - Creating opportunities for high school students through astronomical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Madeline; Cebulla, Hannah; Powers, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Through various opportunities and experiences with extracurricular scientific research, primarily astronomical research with programs like NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP), and the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), we have noticed a change in our learning style, career path, and general outlook on the scientific community that we strongly believe could also be added to the lives of many other high school students given similar opportunities. The purpose of our poster is to emphasize the importance of granting high school students opportunities to explore different styles and methods of learning. We believe that although crucial, a basic high school education is not enough to expose young adults to the scientific community and create enough interest for a career path. As a result, we wish to show that more of these programs and opportunities should be offered to a greater number of students of all ages, allowing them to explore their passions, develop their understanding of different fields, and determine the paths best suited to their interests. Within our poster, we will emphasize how these programs have specifically impacted our lives, what we hope to see in the future, and how we hope to attain the growth of such opportunities. We include such proposals as; increasing outreach programs, expanding the exposure of young students to the sciences, both in the classroom and out, allowing high school students to participate in active scientific research, and involving students in hands-on activities/experiments within school clubs, the classroom, at home, or at local events. Spreading these opportunities to directly interact with the sciences in similar manners as that of professional scientists will allow students to discover their interests, realize what being a scientist truly entails, and allow them to take the first steps into following their career paths.

  7. Creating a Teacher-Student Research Program Using the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.; Pompea, S.; Thaller, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) have created a program for teacher and student research using observing time on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The participating teachers attended a fall, 2004 workshop to become familiar with the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) archives, and to receive training in infrared astronomy and observational techniques. The teachers will also attend a workshop offered by the SSC to learn about the observation planning process, and telescope and instrument capabilities. This program has as its goals the fundamental NASA goals of inspiring and motivating students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as to engage the public in shaping and sharing the experience of exploration and discovery. Our educational plan addresses the NASA objectives of improving student proficiency in science and improving science instruction by providing a unique opportunity to a group of teachers and students to observe with the SST and work with the SST archival data. This program allows a team of 12 teachers and their students to utilize up to 3 hours of Director's discretionary observing time on the Spitzer Space Telescope for educational observations. Leveraging on a well-established teacher professional development, the SSC is offering this program to teachers in the Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRRBSE), an ongoing program at the NOAO. This NSF-sponsored program touches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middle and high school teachers. The Spitzer educational research program also reaches an additional national audience of students through an informal education program based at the University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp, directed by Dr. Don McCarthy. During this camp, the teachers and their students will learn about the SST through the vast amount of data available in the Spitzer archives.

  8. Creating Open Education Resources for Teaching and Community Development through Action Research: The Milk Production and Hygiene Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ssajjakambwe, Paul; Setumba, Christopher; Kisaka, Stevens; Bahizi, Gloria; Vudriko, Patrick; Kabasa, John D.; Kaneene, John B.

    2013-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of the AgShare program is the application of an information loop of action research in the training of graduate students to generate new and practical educational materials and interventions for creating open education research (OER) modules for teaching at universities, and for designing interventions and training…

  9. A Vision for the Future of Environmental Research: Creating Environmental Intelligence Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, E. J.

    2002-12-01

    being in the context of global, national and regional stewardship. These societal needs lead to a vision that uses a regional framework as a stepping-stone to a comprehensive national or global capability. The development of a comprehensive regional framework depends on a new approach to environmental research - the creation of regional Environmental Intelligence Centers. A key objective is to bring a demanding level of discipline to "forecasting" in a broad arena of environmental issues. The regional vision described above is designed to address a broad range of current and future environmental issues by creating a capability based on integrating diverse observing systems, making data readily accessible, developing an increasingly comprehensive predictive capability at the spatial and temporal scales appropriate for examining societal issues, and creating a vigorous intersection with decision-makers. With demonstrated success over a few large-scale regions of the U.S., this strategy will very likely grow into a national capability that far exceeds current capabilities.

  10. Creating & using specimen images for collection documentation, research, teaching and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouthe, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    In this age of digital media, there are many opportunities for use of good images of specimens. On-line resources such as institutional web sites and global sites such as PaleoNet and the Paleobiology Database provide venues for collection information and images. Pictures can also be made available to the general public through popular media sites such as Flickr and Facebook, where they can be retrieved and used by teachers, students, and the general public. The number of requests for specimen loans can be drastically reduced by offering the scientific community access to data and specimen images using the internet. This is an important consideration in these days of limited support budgets, since it reduces the amount of staff time necessary for giving researchers and educators access to collections. It also saves wear and tear on the specimens themselves. Many institutions now limit or refuse to send specimens out of their own countries because of the risks involved in going through security and customs. The internet can bridge political boundaries, allowing everyone equal access to collections. In order to develop photographic documentation of a collection, thoughtful preparation will make the process easier and more efficient. Acquire the necessary equipment, establish standards for images, and develop a simple workflow design. Manage images in the camera, and produce the best possible results, rather than relying on time-consuming editing after the fact. It is extremely important that the images of each specimen be of the highest quality and resolution. Poor quality, low resolution photos are not good for anything, and will often have to be retaken when another need arises. Repeating the photography process involves more handling of specimens and more staff time. Once good photos exist, smaller versions can be created for use on the web. The originals can be archived and used for publication and other purposes.

  11. NanTroSEIZE in 3-D: Creating a Virtual Research Experience in Undergraduate Geoscience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.; Bangs, N. L.; Moore, G. F.; Tobin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Marine research programs, both large and small, have increasingly added a web-based component to facilitate outreach to K-12 and the public, in general. These efforts have included, among other activities, information-rich websites, ship-to-shore communication with scientists during expeditions, blogs at sea, clips on YouTube, and information about daily shipboard activities. Our objective was to leverage a portion of the vast collection of data acquired through the NSF-MARGINS program to create a learning tool with a long lifespan for use in undergraduate geoscience courses. We have developed a web-based virtual expedition, NanTroSEIZE in 3-D, based on a seismic survey associated with the NanTroSEIZE program of NSF-MARGINS and IODP to study the properties of the plate boundary fault system in the upper limit of the seismogenic zone off Japan. The virtual voyage can be used in undergraduate classes at anytime, since it is not directly tied to the finite duration of a specific seagoing project. The website combines text, graphics, audio and video to place learning in an experiential framework as students participate on the expedition and carry out research. Students learn about the scientific background of the program, especially the critical role of international collaboration, and meet the chief scientists before joining the sea-going expedition. Students are presented with the principles of 3-D seismic imaging, data processing and interpretation while mapping and identifying the active faults that were the likely sources of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan in 1944 and 1948. They also learn about IODP drilling that began in 2007 and will extend through much of the next decade. The website is being tested in undergraduate classes in fall 2009 and will be distributed through the NSF-MARGINS website (http://www.nsf-margins.org/) and the MARGINS Mini-lesson section of the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) (http

  12. Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists studying cellular processes have long sought to measure redox modifications because they provide one of the normal layers of cell control. But redox disruption or oxidative stress at the cellular level can also create a pathway to diseases like

  13. Creating Cost-Effective DNA Size Standards for Use in Teaching and Research Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    I have devised a method with which a molecular size standard can be readily manufactured using Lambda DNA and PCR. This method allows the production of specific sized DNA fragments and is easily performed in a standard molecular biology laboratory. The material required to create these markers can also be used to provide a highly robust and…

  14. CREATE: Center for Research and Evaluation in the Application of Technology to Education. Second Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    The second annual report of the 4-year Project CREATE describes activities toward the Project's overall objective of determining how effective microcomputer and related technologies can be in improving the education of learning disabled students. During the second year examination of factors understood to contribute to the beneficial use of…

  15. Formative Research on Creating Smoke-free Homes in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle Crozier; Butler, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The home is a significant place for exposure to secondhand smoke for children and non-smoking adults. This study explored factors that would convince families to adopt household smoking bans and actions to create and maintain smoke-free homes. Interviews were conducted with adults in 102 households in rural Georgia. Participating families had a…

  16. The Challenges of Creating a Gold Standard for De-identification Research

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Allen C.; Kayaalp, Mehmet; Dodd, Zeyno A.; Sagan, Pamela; McDonald, Clement J.

    2014-01-01

    We created a Gold Standard corpus comprised over 20,000 records of annotated narrative clinical reports for use in the training and evaluation of NLM Scrubber, a de-identification software system for medical records. Our experience with designing the corpus demonstrated the conceptual complexity of the task. PMID:25954338

  17. Investigating the Possibilities of Creating a Community of Practice. Action Research in Three Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flogaitis, Evgenia; Nomikou, Christina; Naoum, Elli; Katsenou, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The educational approach views the community of practice as a community of teachers and students who share common rules and values, information and experiences through dialogue and collaboration. Three doctoral theses are in progress at the University of Athens which study the possibilities of creating a community of practice in three different…

  18. Entrepreneurial Education: Creating a Usable Economic Community Base. Rural Research Report. Volume 15, Issue 8, Spring 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lori E.

    2004-01-01

    If small businesses are the engines of our economy, then entrepreneurs are the sparks that ignite those engines. This research report will explain how entrepreneurship education programs can help students create and establish their own business. The paper defines entrepreneurship education, outlines the major components of entrepreneurship…

  19. Interdisciplinary Research for Teaching and Learning Mathematics in Rural Schools: Considerations for Creating a Mathematics and Vocational Education Research Agenda. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Hobart L.

    This paper provides a foundation for researchers in mathematics education and vocational education (now commonly called career and technical education) to begin exploring an interdisciplinary research agenda that will create new knowledge and innovations for living and working in rural areas in the 21st century. The need for interdisciplinary…

  20. Preliminary Results from the Second Caltech-Jodrell Bank VLBI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Vermeulen, R. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Cohen, M. H.; Henstock, D. R.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Browne, I. W. A.; Patnaik, A.

    1993-05-01

    We present preliminary results from the second Caltech-Jodrell Bank VLBI survey (CJ2). This is a Mark 2 snapshot VLBI survey of flat- and peaked-spectrum sources. The CJ2 survey extends the morphological study of the Pearson & Readhead (1988, ApJ, 328, 114 and Pearson et al. 1993, these proceedings -- hereafter PR) and Caltech-Jodrell Bank (Xu et al. 1992, BAAS, 24, 1300 hereafter CJ) surveys to 400 sources. The CJ2 survey has three new cosmological goals: 1) to populate the proper motion--redshift diagram for superluminal sources; 2) to populate the size--redshift diagram for compact sources (both diagrams can be used to estimate the deceleration parameter, q_0); and 3) to search for small-separation gravitationally-lensed systems and hence to look directly for mass concentrations in the unexplored range of 10(6) - 10(9) \\solmass. We expect this survey, like the previous large VLBI surveys, will reveal 5-10% of the sources to be interesting, unusual objects worth further study. The CJ2 sample is drawn from the Patnaik et al. (1992, MNRAS, 254, 655) list of ~ 900 compact flat-spectrum sources north of delta = 35° with 6 cm flux densities greater than 200 mJy. We have selected the strongest 200 of these sources subject to the further criteria that they are out of the galactic plane (|b| > 10°), flat-spectrum (alpha flatter than -0.5), and have not been previously observed in the PR or CJ surveys. So far 76 sources have been successfully imaged at 6 cm with ~ 1 mas resolution and a typical dynamic range of 500:1. The vast majority (63/76) of these sources have core-jet morphologies and are therefore well suited for the cosmological tests described above. Roughly 12% (9/76) are candidate compact symmetric (CS) sources. This group of sources is not well understood and is of considerable current interest (Readhead et al. 1993, these proceedings).

  1. Formative research on creating smoke-free homes in rural communities

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle Crozier; Butler, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The home is a significant place for exposure to secondhand smoke for children and non-smoking adults. This study explored factors that would convince families to adopt household smoking bans and actions to create and maintain smoke-free homes. Interviews were conducted with adults in 102 households in rural Georgia. Participating families had a young adolescent and included households with a mix of smokers and non-smokers and smoking ban status. Families reported they would consider a total ban to protect children from secondhand smoke and protect family members if they got sick. Few described difficulties in enforcement with over half of smokers accepting the rules. Situations that made it hard to enforce restrictions were if there was a visitor who smoked, a smoker who had cravings, and bad weather outside when the smoker desired to smoke. Smokers explained that family members could assist them in quitting by talking to them, not purchasing cigarettes for them, not smoking around them, and supporting them. Ideas for promoting smoke-free homes were having a no smoking sign, saying no to visitors who want to smoke, removing ashtrays, and creating a place outside for smokers. These findings can inform interventions designed to create and maintain smoke-free households. PMID:18222939

  2. Qualitative Research in Education: The Origins, Debates, and Politics of Creating Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview and discussion of qualitative research in education by analyzing the roles of researchers, the history of the field, its use in policymaking, and its future influence on educational reform. The article begins by describing the unique position that qualitative educational researchers have in higher education, as…

  3. Understanding, Selecting, and Integrating a Theoretical Framework in Dissertation Research: Creating the Blueprint for Your "House"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Cynthia; Osanloo, Azadeh

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical framework is one of the most important aspects in the research process, yet is often misunderstood by doctoral candidates as they prepare their dissertation research study. The importance of theory-driven thinking and acting is emphasized in relation to the selection of a topic, the development of research questions, the…

  4. Using Email Interviews in Qualitative Educational Research: Creating Space to Think and Time to Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Nalita

    2016-01-01

    The article explores how the Internet and email offer space for participants to think and make sense of their experiences in the qualitative research encounter. It draws on a research study that used email interviewing to generate online narratives to understand academic lives and identities through research encounters in virtual space. The…

  5. Developmental Research Methods: Creating Knowledge from Instructional Design and Development Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rita C.; Klein, James D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide direction to those entertaining a developmental research project. There are two categories of developmental research, both of which are examined here. The two types vary in terms of the extent to which the conclusions resulting from the research are generalizable or contextually specific. This article…

  6. Creating a Research Agenda in Career Counselling: The Place of Action Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard A.; Domene, Jose F.

    2012-01-01

    After identifying historical and current problems in career counselling research, we propose a research agenda based on contextual action theory. This theory has been used as a framework for research in the career field and for general counselling practice. It is advantageous for several reasons including its conceptual basis, its detailed…

  7. The Brave New World of Virtual Organization: Creating a Distributed Environment for Research Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Robert; Eyerly, Raymond W.

    1997-01-01

    Looks at how Pennsylvania State University is examining its evolving research administration infrastructure and investigating electronic research administration. Discusses use of total quality management techniques to view research administration as a single process, determine the best organizational level for various activities, and remove…

  8. Factional Stories: Creating a Methodological Space for Collaborative Reflection and Inquiry in Music Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallio, Alexis Anja

    2015-01-01

    Stories have been one means by which qualitative researchers have attempted to engage participants and construct, analyze and present data or findings in a meaningful way. In this article, I look at the impetus for, and potentials of crafting and sharing researcher-written "factional stories" with research participants as a…

  9. Creating a Dialogic Space for Research: A Reading Conference in a Chinese Complementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on research carried out in a Chinese complementary school in Scotland. The research focused on children's experience of learning to read Chinese and on the strategies that they used to support their learning. Here, I provide an account of one particular aspect of this research, namely the creation of a dialogic space for…

  10. Creating Participatory Discourse for Teaching and Research in Early Childhood Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siry, Christina A.; Lang, Diane E.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted with second grade students and pre-service teachers. This study examined the possibilities for engaging children in critical discourse about their classroom science experiences. At the heart of this discussion lies the desire to provide a space for teachers and children to develop relationships and to explore the learning of science together. Themes that emerged include: (1) on-going, focused, critical dialogue between children and teachers supported children in developing agency in the classroom, and (2) on-going conversations created the opportunity for children to reveal their ways of knowing and developing interpretations of the practice of science.

  11. Optics for MUSIC: a new (sub)millimeter camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran P.; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Hollister, Matt I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    We will present the design and implementation, along with calculations and some measurements of the performance, of the room-temperature and cryogenic optics for MUSIC, a new (sub)millimeter camera we are developing for the Caltech Submm Observatory (CSO). The design consists of two focusing elements in addition to the CSO primary and secondary mirrors: a warm off-axis elliptical mirror and a cryogenic (4K) lens. These optics will provide a 14 arcmin field of view that is diffraction limited in all four of the MUSIC observing bands (2.00, 1.33, 1.02, and 0.86 mm). A cold (4K) Lyot stop will be used to define the primary mirror illumination, which will be maximized while keeping spillover at the sub 1% level. The MUSIC focal plane will be populated with broadband phased antenna arrays that efficiently couple to factor of (see manuscript) 3 in bandwidth,1, 2 and each pixel on the focal plane will be read out via a set of four lumped element filters that define the MUSIC observing bands (i.e., each pixel on the focal plane simultaneously observes in all four bands). Finally, a series of dielectric and metal-mesh low pass filters have been implemented to reduce the optical power load on the MUSIC cryogenic stages to a quasi-negligible level while maintaining good transmission in-band.

  12. New Molecular Species In Comet C/1995 (Hale-Bopp) Observed with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Mehringer, D. M.; Benford, D.; Gardner, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Colom, P.; Crovisier, J.; Despois, D.; Rauer, H.

    1998-01-01

    We present millimeter-wave observations of HNCO, HC3N, SO, NH2CHO, H(13)CN, and H3O(+) in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) obtained in February-April, 1997 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). HNCO, first detected at the CSO in comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake), is securely confirmed in comet Hale-Bopp via observations of three rotational transitions. The derived abundance with respect to H2O is (4-13) x 10(exp -4). HC3N, SO, and NH2CHO are detected for the first time in a comet. The fractional abundance of HC3N based on observations of three rotational lines is (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -4). Four transitions of SO are detected and the derived fractional abundance, (2-8) x 10(exp -3), is higher than the upper limits derived from UV observations of previous comets. Observations of NH2CHO imply a fractional abundance of (1-8) x 10(exp -4). H3O(+) is detected for the first time from the ground. The H(13)CN (3-2) transition is also detected and the derived HCN/H(13)CN abundance ratio is 90 +/- 15, consistent with the terrestrial C-13/C-12 ratio. in addition, a number of other molecular species are detected, including HNC, OCS, HCO(+), CO(+), and CN (the last two are first detections in a comet at radio wavelengths).

  13. Towards a mature measurement environment: Creating a software engineering research environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    Software engineering researchers are building tools, defining methods, and models; however, there are problems with the nature and style of the research. The research is typically bottom-up, done in isolation so the pieces cannot be easily logically or physically integrated. A great deal of the research is essentially the packaging of a particular piece of technology with little indication of how the work would be integrated with other prices of research. The research is not aimed at solving the real problems of software engineering, i.e., the development and maintenance of quality systems in a productive manner. The research results are not evaluated or analyzed via experimentation or refined and tailored to the application environment. Thus, it cannot be easily transferred into practice. Because of these limitations we have not been able to understand the components of the discipline as a coherent whole and the relationships between various models of the process and product. What is needed is a top down experimental, evolutionary framework in which research can be focused, logically and physically integrated to produce quality software productively, and evaluated and tailored to the application environment. This implies the need for experimentation, which in turn implies the need for a laboratory that is associated with the artifact we are studying. This laboratory can only exist in an environment where software is being built, i.e., as part of a real software development and maintenance organization. Thus, we propose that Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) type activities exist in all organizations to support software engineering research. We describe the SEL from a researcher's point of view, and discuss the corporate and government benefits of the SEL. The discussion focuses on the benefits to the research community.

  14. Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Research, teaching, service, and public outreach--all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning--disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must…

  15. Strategic Capacity Building for Australian Educational Research: Creating Spaces for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides some background information about the Strategic Capacity Building for Australian Educational Research initiative: a joint program of work sponsored by the Australian Association for Research in Education and the Australian Council of Deans of Education. In addition, it offers some broader analysis of the contexts within which…

  16. Tensions in Creating Possibilities for Youth Voice in School Choice: An Ethnographer's Reflexive Story of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotnam-Kappel, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The following article relates a reflexive ethnographic research project that focuses on youth voice in relation to the process of choosing a high school and a language of instruction in Ontario, Canada. The purpose of this methodological article is to relate a story of research and explore the tensions between theory and practice experienced by a…

  17. SPARC: Creating Innovative Models and Environments for Scholarly Research and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Heather

    2008-01-01

    The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), a strategic initiative founded by the Association of Research Libraries, is a catalyst for promoting a scholarly communication environment that is more open, financially tenable, and supportive of the current research and information needs of academe. Established in response to…

  18. Working Together, Creating Knowledge: The University-Industry Research Collaboration Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum, Washington, DC.

    This document provides a detailed assessment of the opportunities and challenges facing university-industry research collaborations. This report represents a synthesis of the work and findings of this initiative. It analyzes several of the critical issues facing research collaborations between industry and universities and offers suggestions to…

  19. Corpus-based Approach to Creating a Semantic Lexicon for Clinical Research Eligibility Criteria from UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhihui; Duffy, Robert; Johnson, Stephen; Weng, Chunhua

    2010-01-01

    We describe a corpus-based approach to creating a semantic lexicon using UMLS knowledge sources. We extracted 10,000 sentences from the eligibility criteria sections of clinical trial summaries contained in ClinicalTrials.gov. The UMLS Metathesaurus and SPECIALIST Lexical Tools were used to extract and normalize UMLS recognizable terms. When annotated with Semantic Network types, the corpus had a lexical ambiguity of 1.57 (=total types for unique lexemes / total unique lexemes) and a word occurrence ambiguity of 1.96 (=total type occurrences / total word occurrences). A set of semantic preference rules was developed and applied to completely eliminate ambiguity in semantic type assignment. The lexicon covered 95.95% UMLS-recognizable terms in our corpus. A total of 20 UMLS semantic types, representing about 17% of all the distinct semantic types assigned to corpus lexemes, covered about 80% of the vocabulary of our corpus. PMID:21347142

  20. Creating a 21st Century Community through the Teacher Research Experience (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, E.; Beine, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the spring of 2009, I participated in PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) funded by the National Science Foundation and managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States. I assisted in hands-on research being performed by scientists with OASIS (Ocean, Atmosphere, Sea Ice and Snowpack) during their field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. Although I was in the field for only 3 weeks, it was merely a beginning to a transformation that took place not only in me, but also among all of those involved. The PolarTREC program embodies the principles fundamental to the 21st Century skill-set that we want our students to possess. The job market is changing for graduates, and education is striving to provide students with the skills necessary to thrive in the future. To ensure the success of students the International Society for Technology Education (ISTE) has defined 21st Century Skills. They are incorporated into many educational standards (such as the Arizona Educational Technology Standards) and they are practiced by the teachers, researchers, students and the PolarTREC community. They are:

    • Creativity and Innovation
    • Communication and Collaboration
    • Research and Information Literacy
    • Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
    • Digital Citizenship
    • Technology Operations and Concepts

  1. Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Amy; Geary, Janis; Goodman, Karen J

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to

  2. Creating a transdisciplinary research center to reduce cardiovascular health disparities in Baltimore, Maryland: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa A; Boulware, L Ebony; Miller, Edgar R; Golden, Sherita Hill; Carson, Kathryn A; Noronha, Gary; Huizinga, Mary Margaret; Roter, Debra L; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Bone, Lee R; Levine, David M; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Charleston, Jeanne; Kim, Miyong; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Aboumatar, Hanan; Halbert, Jennifer P; Ephraim, Patti L; Brancati, Frederick L

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) disparities continue to have a negative impact on African Americans in the United States, largely because of uncontrolled hypertension. Despite the availability of evidence-based interventions, their use has not been translated into clinical and public health practice. The Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities is a new transdisciplinary research program with a stated goal to lower the impact of CVD disparities on vulnerable populations in Baltimore, Maryland. By targeting multiple levels of influence on the core problem of disparities in Baltimore, the center leverages academic, community, and national partnerships and a novel structure to support 3 research studies and to train the next generation of CVD researchers. We also share the early lessons learned in the center's design. PMID:24028238

  3. Creating a Framework for Online Cancer Services Research to Facilitate Timely and Interdisciplinary Applications

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Pamela; Eastin, Matthew S

    2005-01-01

    Researchers from a wide array of disciplines have conducted engaging and informative studies in recent years concerning the use of the Internet for cancer-related services. Typically, these publications provide key data related to utilization statistics, how online information can be used, what users want or expect from the Internet, outcomes or impacts, and quality and credibility of websites. These are important themes for understanding online cancer issues. However, this special issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research seeks to recast these themes in a way that will facilitate pragmatic and applied means of employing data in prescriptive and interdisciplinary ways. This issue includes 14 papers that exemplify applications for the research framework recommended in this paper. This framework includes an expanded focus on the development and design of online cancer services, online consumer behavior/communication, behavior change, and living with cancer. PMID:15998625

  4. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets.

    PubMed

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within "Big Data". Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  5. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: Towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets

    PubMed Central

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within “Big Data”. Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  6. Galileo Educational Network: Creating, Researching, and Supporting 21st Century Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    School and classroom structures designed to meet the needs of the industrial past cannot "maintain the temperature required for sustaining life." Recent learning sciences research findings compel educators to invent new learning environments better suited to meet the demands of the 21st century. These new learning environments require different…

  7. Creating a Research-Rich Chemistry Curriculum with an Integrated, Upper-Level-Undergraduate Laboratory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Liz U.; Hales, David A.; Teague, M. Warfield

    2007-01-01

    A new research-rich chemistry curriculum with an integrated, upper-level undergraduate laboratory program has recently been developed to impart better understanding to the students. The program is called Advanced techniques in Experimental Chemistry and helps prepare students for more real-world problems.

  8. Creating "Visual Legacies": Infographics as a Means of Interpreting and Sharing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Charee M.

    2015-01-01

    Guided by the principle "good data presentation is timeless," (Cressey, 2014, p.305), this unit project challenges students to engage an alternative means of sharing communication research and to realize the potential for their presentations to become "visual legacies" through the creation of infographics. Students encounter…

  9. Celebrating the Past, Creating the Future: 50 Years of Community College Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Haley, Alicia; Eddy, Pamela L.; Antczak, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The Council for the Study of Community Colleges (CSCC) celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2008. This article summarizes the establishment of the Council and sets it in the context of the development of the community college movement. Highlights of research conducted by CSCC members to address contemporary issues facing community colleges are…

  10. Collaborative Research Seed Grants for Integrating Knowledges and Creating New Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating different ways of knowing in research and management has the potential to bring creativity to environmental problem-solving through integrating ways of knowing and innovation via co-producing knowledge. To gain these benefits, North Carolina Sea Grant Extension offers small annual grants called Fisheries Resource Grants to paired…

  11. Counseling-Related Research in Counseling Psychology: Creating Bricks, Not Edifices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.; Berman, Margit; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Conoley, Collie W.; Duan, Changming; Whiston, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Three counseling psychology colleagues (Lichtenberg, 2011; Mallinckrodt, 2011; Murdock, 2011 [all this issue]) provide differing perspectives about the findings from our target article (Scheel et al., 2011) of the decline of published counseling-related research in our major journals. In this rejoinder we respond to each author's viewpoints…

  12. Participatory Action Research: Creating Spaces for Beginning Conversations in Sexual Health Education for Young Australian Muslims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanjakdar, Fida

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at the role participatory action research played in beginning curriculum conversations in sexual health for young Australian Muslims. Sexual health education has been the cause of much dissension among the local, national and international Muslim community. There is also a general lack of consensus in many Australian Islamic…

  13. Student Staff Partnership to Create an Interdisciplinary Science Skills Course in a Research Intensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolmer, Cherie; Sneddon, Peter; Curry, Gordon; Hill, Bob; Fehertavi, Szonja; Longbone, Charlotte; Wallace, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the development of a multidisciplinary lesson plan aimed at developing science skills for Physics and Astronomy, Geographical and Earth Sciences, and Chemistry students at a research intensive Scottish university. The lesson plan was co-developed with a small group of staff and undergraduate students from these…

  14. Developing Youth Systems: Creating Transformational Change for Our Nation's Young People. Research Brief Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Promise, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Good schools are essential, but not sufficient for the long-term academic, economic, and civic success of our nation's young people. Rather, an integrated set of supports is needed in families, in all facets of communities, and in schools. Research, community wisdom, and common sense tell us that families, schools, and the broader community need…

  15. The Paradox of the Diffusion of Innovations Research: Creating More Communication Bottlenecks Than Breaking Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melkote, Srinivas R.; Babbili, Anantha S.

    The paradox of the diffusion of innovations research is that in its efforts to find ways and means of breaking the communication constraint in Third World countries, it has generated many bottlenecks that cumulatively constitute the major constraint: lack of an efficient system for delivering adequate and reliable information, knowledge, and…

  16. Creating the Future of Evidence-Based Nutrition Recommendations: Case Studies from Lipid Research.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Johanna T; Rubin, Kristin H; Fritsche, Kevin L; Psota, Tricia L; Liska, DeAnn J; Harris, William S; Montain, Scott J; Lyle, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Strategic translational research is designed to address research gaps that answer specific guidance questions. It provides translational value with respect to nutrition guidance and regulatory and public policy. The relevance and the quality of evidence both matter in translational research. For example, design decisions regarding population, intervention, comparator, and outcome criteria affect whether or not high-quality studies are considered relevant to specific guidance questions and are therefore included as evidence within the context of systematic review frameworks used by authoritative food and health organizations. The process used in systematic reviews, developed by the USDA for its Nutrition Evidence Library, is described. An eating pattern and cardiovascular disease (CVD) evidence review is provided as an example, and factors that differentiated the studies considered relevant and included in that evidence base from those that were excluded are noted. Case studies on ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) and industrial trans-FAs illustrate key factors vital to relevance and translational impact, including choice of a relevant population (e.g., healthy, at risk, or diseased subjects; general population or high-performance soldiers); dose and form of the intervention (e.g., food or supplement); use of relevant comparators (e.g., technically feasible and realistic); and measures for both exposure and outcomes (e.g., inflammatory markers or CVD endpoints). Specific recommendations are provided to help increase the impact of nutrition research on future dietary guidance, policy, and regulatory issues, particularly in the area of lipids. PMID:27422509

  17. SHARC II: A Caltech Submillimeter Observatory Facility Camera with 384 Pixels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, C. Darren; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda; Freund, Minoru; Gardner, Matthew B.; Groseth, Jeffrey; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kovacs, Attila; Lis, Dariusz C.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    SHARC II is a background-limited 350 micron and 450 micron facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory undergoing commissioning in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12 x 32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard. Each 1 mm x 1 mm pixel is coated with a 400 Omega/square bismuth film and located lambda/4 above a reflective backshort to achieve greater than 75% absorption efficiency. The pixels cover the focal plane with greater than 90% filling factor. At 350 microns, the SHARC II pixels are separated by 0.65 lambda/D. In contrast to the silicon bolometers in the predecessor of SHARC II, each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which lowers the 1/f knee of tile detector noise to less than 0.03 Hz, under load, at tile bath temperature of 0.36 K. The bolometers are AC-biased and read in 'total power' mode to take advantage of the improved stability. Each bolometer is biased through a custom approx. 130 MOmega CrSi load resistor at 7 K and read with a commercial JFET at 120 K. The JFETs and load resistors are integrated with the detectors into a single assembly to minimize microphonic noise. Electrical connection across the 0.36 K to 4 K and 4 K to 120 K temperature interfaces is accomplished with lithographed metal wires on dielectric substrates. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 micron of 1 Jy Hz(sup -1/2) or better. The new camera should be at least 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to the prior instrument.

  18. SHARC II: a Caltech submillimeter observatory facility camera with 384 pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Charles D.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, R. Sachidananda; Freund, Minoru M.; Gardner, Matthew; Groseth, Jeff; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Kovacs, Attila; Lis, Dariusz C.; Moseley, Samuel H., Jr.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Voellmer, George M.; Yoshida, Hiroshige

    2003-02-01

    SHARC II is a background-limited 350 μm and 450 μm facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory undergoing commissioning in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12 × 32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard. Each 1 mm × 1 mm pixel is coated with a 400 Ω/square bismuth film and located λ/4 above a reflective backshort to achieve >75% absorption efficiency. The pixels cover the focal plane with >90% filling factor. At 350 μm, the SHARC II pixels are separated by 0.65 λ/D. In contrast to the silicon bolometers in the predecessor of SHARC II, each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which lowers the 1/f knee of the detector noise to <0.03 Hz, under load, at the bath temperature of 0.36 K. The bolometers are AC-biased and read in 'total power' mode to take advantage of the improved stability. Each bolometer is biased through a custom ~130 MΩ CrSi load resistor at 7 K and read with a commercial JFET at 120 K. The JFETs and load resistors are integrated with the detectors into a single assembly to minimize microphonic noise. Electrical connection across the 0.36 K to 4 K and 4 K to 120 K temperature interfaces is accomplished with lithographed metal wires on dielectric substrates. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 μm of 1 Jy Hz-1/2 or better. The new camera should be at least 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to the prior instrument.

  19. Commentary--Bridging the Research and Practice Gap in Autism: The Importance of Creating Research Partnerships with Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Sarah; Charman, Tony; Faulkner, Rachel; Ragan, Jude; Wallace, Simon; Wittemeyer, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    While the last 10 years have seen a significant increase in research published on early intervention and autism, there is a persistent disconnect between educational research and practice. Governments have invested significant funds in autism education, and a range of approaches have been implemented in schools, but there is limited research…

  20. "Entering Research": A Course that Creates Community and Structure for Beginning Undergraduate Researchers in the STEM Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balster, Nicholas; Pfund, Christine; Rediske, Raelyn; Branchaw, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have been shown to enhance the educational experience and retention of college students, especially those from underrepresented populations. However, many challenges still exist relative to building community among students navigating large institutions. We developed a novel course called "Entering Research" that…

  1. Creating Community

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education describes ways that Lamaze International is helping to create a community for those who share a common interest in promoting, supporting, and protecting natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth. PMID:19936112

  2. A new DoD initiative: the Computational Research and Engineering Acquisition Tools and Environments (CREATE) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, S.; Atwood, C.; Bell, P.; Blacker, T. D.; Dey, S.; Fisher, D.; Fisher, D. A.; Genalis, P.; Gorski, J.; Harris, A.; Hill, K.; Hurwitz, M.; Kendall, R. P.; Meakin, R. L.; Morton, S.; Moyer, E. T.; Post, D. E.; Strawn, R.; Veldhuizen, D. v.; Votta, L. G.; Wynn, S.; Zelinski, G.

    2008-07-01

    In FY2008, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) initiated the Computational Research and Engineering Acquisition Tools and Environments (CREATE) program, a 360M program with a two-year planning phase and a ten-year execution phase. CREATE will develop and deploy three computational engineering tool sets for DoD acquisition programs to use to design aircraft, ships and radio-frequency antennas. The planning and execution of CREATE are based on the 'lessons learned' from case studies of large-scale computational science and engineering projects. The case studies stress the importance of a stable, close-knit development team; a focus on customer needs and requirements; verification and validation; flexible and agile planning, management, and development processes; risk management; realistic schedules and resource levels; balanced short- and long-term goals and deliverables; and stable, long-term support by the program sponsor. Since it began in FY2008, the CREATE program has built a team and project structure, developed requirements and begun validating them, identified candidate products, established initial connections with the acquisition programs, begun detailed project planning and development, and generated the initial collaboration infrastructure necessary for success by its multi-institutional, multidisciplinary teams.

  3. A Temporal Abstraction-based Extract, Transform and Load Process for Creating Registry Databases for Research.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Kurc, Tahsin; Overcash, Marc; Cantrell, Dedra; Morris, Tim; Eckerson, Kristi; Tsui, Circe; Willey, Terry; Quyyumi, Arshed; Eapen, Danny; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Ziemer, David; Saltz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    In the CTSA era there is great interest in aggregating and comparing populations across institutions. These sites likely represent data differently in their clinical data warehouses and other databases. Clinical data warehouses frequently are structured in a generalized way that supports many constituencies. For research, there is a need to transform these heterogeneous data into a shared representation, and to perform categorization and interpretation to optimize the data representation for investigators. We are addressing this need by extending an existing temporal abstraction-based clinical database query system, PROTEMPA. The extended system allows specifying data types of interest in federated databases, extracting the data into a shared representation, transforming it through categorization and interpretation, and loading it into a registry database that can be refreshed. Such a registry's access control, data representation and query tools can be tailored to the needs of research while keeping local databases as the source of truth. PMID:22211179

  4. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  5. Caltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey. XI. The Merger Rate to Redshift 1 from Kinematic Pairs.

    PubMed

    Carlberg; Cohen; Patton; Blandford; Hogg; Yee; Morris; Lin; Hall; Sawicki; Wirth; Cowie; Hu; Songaila

    2000-03-20

    The rate of mass accumulation due to galaxy merging depends on the mass, density, and velocity distribution of galaxies in the near neighborhood of a host galaxy. The fractional luminosity in kinematic pairs combines all of these effects in a single estimator that is relatively insensitive to population evolution. Here we use a k-corrected and evolution-compensated volume-limited sample having an R-band absolute magnitude of Mk,eRCaltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey and 3000 from the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology field galaxy survey to measure the rate and redshift evolution of merging. The combined sample has an approximately constant comoving number and luminosity density from redshift 0.1 to 1.1 (OmegaM=0.2, OmegaLambda=0.8); hence, any merger evolution will be dominated by correlation and velocity evolution, not density evolution. We identify kinematic pairs with projected separations less than either 50 or 100 h-1 kpc and rest-frame velocity differences of less than 1000 km s-1. The fractional luminosity in pairs is modeled as fL&parl0;Deltav,rp,Mk,er&parr0;&parl0;1+z&parr0;mL, where &sqbl0;fL,mL&sqbr0; are &sqbl0;0.14+/-0.07,0+/-1.4&sqbr0; and &sqbl0;0.37+/-0.7,0.1+/-0.5&sqbr0; for rp/=0.2M*) is 0.02+/-0.01&parl0;1+z&parr0;0.1+/-0.5M* Gyr-1. Present-day high-luminosity galaxies therefore have accreted approximately 0.15M* of their mass over the approximately 7 Gyr to redshift 1. Since merging is likely only weakly dependent on the host mass, the fractional effect, deltaM&solm0;M approximately 0.15M*&solm0;M, is dramatic for lower mass

  6. Ethical dilemmas created by the criminalization of status behaviors: case examples from ethnographic field research with injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, David; Khoshnood, Kaveh; Stopka, Tom; Shaw, Susan; Santelices, Claudia; Singer, Merrill

    2002-02-01

    The criminalization of behaviors such as the ingestion of certain mood-altering drugs creates ethical dilemmas for researchers studying those behaviors. The Syringe Access, Use, and Discard (SAUD) project is designed to uncover microcontextual factors that influence HIV and hepatitis risk behaviors of injection drug users. The article presents seven ethical dilemmas encountered using ethnographic methods: issues involving syringe replacement at injection locales, risks of participants' arrest, potential disruptions in participants' supply routes, risks of research staff arrest, threats to the protection of confidentiality, issues surrounding informed consent in working with addicts, and the confiscation of potentially incriminating information by police. The article concludes with a discussion of the limitations of traditional ethical frameworks, such as utilitarianism, for resolving these dilemmas and recommends instead improving public health professionals' capacity for practical reasoning (phronesis) through the greater use of case studies in public health curricula. PMID:11822551

  7. Human embryonic stem cell research: why the discarded-created-distinction cannot be based on the potentiality argument.

    PubMed

    Devolder, Katrien

    2005-04-01

    Discussions about the use and derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells are a stumbling block in developing public policy on stem cell research. On the one hand there is a broad consensus on the benefits of these cells for science and biomedicine; on the other hand there is the controversial issue of killing human embryos. I will focus on the compromise position that accepts research on spare embryos, but not on research embryos ('discarded-created-distinction', from now on d-c-d). I will point out that this viewpoint is hard to maintain. The main focus is that the 'revealed beliefs' of its defenders are inconsistent with their 'professed beliefs', more specifically with their main argument, i.e. the potentiality argument. I will point out that (1) the defenders of d-c-d actually grant a relative moral status to the human embryo, (2) this moral status is dependent on internal and external criteria of potentiality, (3) potentiality seen as a variable value that also depends on external criteria cannot justify d-c-d, and (4) an approach to human embryonic stem cell-research that would also allow the use of research embryos is more compatible with the feelings, attitudes and values of those who currently defend d-c-d and, therefore, could lead to a broader consensus and to actions that alleviate individual human suffering. PMID:15945151

  8. Creating Griffith Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its

  9. Creating Learning Experiences that Promote Informal Science Education: Designing Conservation-Focused Interactive Zoo Exhibits through Action Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenda, Peter

    Research on exhibit design over the past twenty years has started to identify many different methods to increase the learning that occurs in informal education environments. This study utilized relevant research on exhibit design to create and study the effectiveness of a mobile interactive exhibit at the Seneca Park Zoo that promotes socialization, engagement in science, and conservation-related practices among guests. This study will serve as one component of a major redesign project at the Seneca Park Zoo for their Rocky Coasts exhibit. This action research study targeted the following question, "How can interactive exhibits be designed to promote socialization, engagement in science, and real-world conservation-related practices (RCPs) among zoo guests?" Specific research questions included: 1. In what ways did guests engage with the exhibit? 2. In what ways were guests impacted by the exhibit? a) What evidence exists, if any, of guests learning science content from the exhibit? b) What evidence exists, if any, of guests being emotionally affected by the exhibit? c) What evidence exists, if any, of guests changing their RCPs after visiting the exhibit? Data were collected through zoo guest surveys completed by zoo guests comparing multiple exhibits, interviews with guests before and after they used the prototype exhibit, observations and audio recordings of guests using the prototype exhibit, and follow-up phone interviews with guests who volunteered to participate. Data were analyzed collaboratively with members of the zoo's exhibit Redesign Team using grounded theory qualitative data analysis techniques to find patterns and trends among data. Initial findings from data analysis were used to develop shifts in the exhibit in order to increase visitor engagement and learning. This process continued for two full action research spirals, which resulted in three iterations of the prototype exhibit. The overall findings of this study highlight the ways in which

  10. Experimental and analytical studies of merging plasma loops on the Caltech solar loop experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela

    and personal factors and perceptions with emphasis on mentors' influence; (5) Negative influence of salary difference with respect to private practitioners. The findings of this study were similar to the available studies on foreign-trained dentists and to most of the studies already done on domestically trained dentists. The major factors found were comparable with the up-to-date literature. The elevated research drive, the intellectual challenges, the work environment, the desire to teach, and the mentors' influence were among those which mirrored almost perfectly the other studies. Some fine differences were found for foreign-trained dentists, such as a lighter financial burden caused by smaller student debt and the irrelevance of military practice experience. The study provides a number of suggestions for enhancing the recruiting and retaining process for dental academia: (1) Support and enhance the research capacity of dental schools; (2) Create structures to develop mentors; (3) Invest to build prestige; (4) Find creative ways to offset lower salaries; (5) Foster a pleasant academic working environment; (6) Use international activities to recruit international dentists. The study revealed factors that have been influential in participants' decisions to choose an academic career, in general and at Pacific. It is hoped that this study will be a useful reference in the increasingly difficult endeavor of adding and retaining world-class dental educators.

  11. How to create innovation by building the translation bridge from basic research into medicinal drugs: an industrial perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The global healthcare industry is undergoing substantial changes and adaptations to the constant decline of approved new medical entities. This decrease in internal research productivity is resulting in a major decline of patent-protected sales (patent cliff) of most of the pharmaceutical companies. Three major global adaptive trends as driving forces to cope with these challenges are evident: cut backs of internal research and development jobs in the western hemisphere (Europe and USA), following the market growth potential of Asia by building up internal or external research and development capabilities there and finally, ‘early innovation hunting’ with an increased focus on identifying and investing in very early innovation sources within academia and small start-up companies. Early innovation hunting can be done by different approaches: increased corporate funding, establishment of translational institutions to bridge innovation, increasing sponsored collaborations and formation of technology hunting groups for capturing very early scientific ideas and concepts. This emerging trend towards early innovation hunting demands special adaptations from both the pharmaceutical industry and basic researchers in academia to bridge the translation into new medicines which deliver innovative medicines that matters to the patient. This opinion article describes the different modalities of cross-fertilisation between basic university or publicly funded institutional research and the applied research and development activities within the pharmaceutical industry. Two key factors in this important translational bridge can be identified: preparation of both partnering organisations to open up for new and sometime disruptive ideas and creation of truly trust-based relationships between the different groups allowing long-term scientific collaborations while acknowledging that value-creating differences are an essential factor for successful collaboration building. PMID

  12. How to create innovation by building the translation bridge from basic research into medicinal drugs: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Germann, Paul G; Schuhmacher, Alexander; Harrison, Juan; Law, Ronald; Haug, Kevin; Wong, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The global healthcare industry is undergoing substantial changes and adaptations to the constant decline of approved new medical entities. This decrease in internal research productivity is resulting in a major decline of patent-protected sales (patent cliff) of most of the pharmaceutical companies. Three major global adaptive trends as driving forces to cope with these challenges are evident: cut backs of internal research and development jobs in the western hemisphere (Europe and USA), following the market growth potential of Asia by building up internal or external research and development capabilities there and finally, 'early innovation hunting' with an increased focus on identifying and investing in very early innovation sources within academia and small start-up companies. Early innovation hunting can be done by different approaches: increased corporate funding, establishment of translational institutions to bridge innovation, increasing sponsored collaborations and formation of technology hunting groups for capturing very early scientific ideas and concepts. This emerging trend towards early innovation hunting demands special adaptations from both the pharmaceutical industry and basic researchers in academia to bridge the translation into new medicines which deliver innovative medicines that matters to the patient. This opinion article describes the different modalities of cross-fertilisation between basic university or publicly funded institutional research and the applied research and development activities within the pharmaceutical industry. Two key factors in this important translational bridge can be identified: preparation of both partnering organisations to open up for new and sometime disruptive ideas and creation of truly trust-based relationships between the different groups allowing long-term scientific collaborations while acknowledging that value-creating differences are an essential factor for successful collaboration building. PMID:23496921

  13. Factors Predicting the Use of Technology: Findings From the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE)

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D.; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18–91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption. PMID:16768579

  14. Creating culturally responsive family therapy models and research: introducing the use of responsive evaluation as a method.

    PubMed

    Seponski, Desiree M; Bermudez, J Maria; Lewis, Denise C

    2013-01-01

    Models of marriage and family therapy (MFT) typically reflect Western values and norms, and although cultural adaptations are made, many models/frameworks continue to be inappropriate or inadequate for use with non-Western cultures. Worldwide, therapists are examining ways of using MFT models in a culturally sensitive manner, especially when working with clients who are seen as having minority status or perceived as "other" by the dominant group. This essay suggests the use of responsive evaluation as a theoretically consistent methodology for creating and evaluating culturally responsive therapies. This approach rigorously evaluates each unique client/therapist context, culture, power, needs, and beliefs. We describe responsive evaluation and discuss how each component addresses the research needs of examining culturally responsive family therapies. A case illustration is offered delineating the process of conducting culturally responsive therapy with a Cambodian sample using solution-focused and narrative therapy. PMID:25073841

  15. [Concept extraction of graduate research by modified grounded theory approach and creating of rubric oriented to performance evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Sone, Tomomichi; Kohno, Takeyuki; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

      A revised core curriculum model for pharmaceutical education, developed on the basis of the principles of outcome-based education, will be introduced in 2015. Inevitably, appropriate assessments of students' academic achievements will be required. Although evaluations of the cognitive domain can be carried out by paper tests, evaluation methods for the attitude domain and problem-solving abilities need to be established. From the viewpoint of quality assurance for graduates, pharmaceutical education reforms have become vital to evaluation as well as learning strategies. To evaluate student academic achievements on problem-solving abilities, authentic assessment is required. Authentic assessment is the evaluation that mimics the context tried in work and life. Specifically, direct evaluation of performances, demonstration or the learners' own work with integrated variety knowledge and skills, is required. To clarify the process of graduate research, we obtained qualitative data through focus group interviews with six teachers and analyzed the data using the modified grounded theory approach. Based on the results, we clarify the performance students should show in graduate research and create a rubric for evaluation of performance in graduate research. PMID:25743905

  16. Using The Results From Research on Undergraduate Learning in Cosmology to Create an Immersive Web-Based Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, Kim

    2012-03-01

    Powerful new observations and advances in computation and visualization have led to a revolution in our understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of the universe. These gains have been vast, but their impact on education has been limited. We are bringing these tools and advances to the teaching of cosmology through research on undergraduate learning in cosmology as well as the development of a series of web-based cosmology learning modules. In addition to the open-ended written surveys administered at multiple institutions, additional data from a single minority-serving institution includes in-depth student interviews, homework assignments, lab responses, and exams gathered throughout an introductory astronomy course. Topics include the structure, composition, and evolution of the universe as in in the open-ended surveys, with an additional study of student perceptions of distances. Results are consistent with the surveys at the beginning of the course and indicate that while students do make strides toward scientific understanding over the semester, they frequently retain some critical misunderstandings. Furthermore, results indicate that using ``authentic'' lab experiences with ``real'' data can address the common student pre-course ideas that scientific conclusions are simply ``made up.'' Informed by our research on student learning, we have created a series of cosmology learning modules in which students master the scientific concepts and reasoning processes that lead to our current understanding of the universe, through interactive tasks, prediction and reflection, experimentation, and model building.

  17. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  18. Creating Science Education Specialists and Scientific Literacy in Students through a Successful Partnership among Scientists, Science Teachers, and Education Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metoyer, S.; Prouhet, T.; Radencic, S.

    2007-12-01

    studies, survey results, and descriptive categories. Costs and benefits to the scientist are discussed through the use of case studies, surveys, and observations. Third, student learning outcomes from a case study are presented. It is argued that the partnership created the opportunity for the integration of imaginative tools of science (specifically GIS in the case study) and authentic science inquiry. The last component is the discussion of the various tools of science utilized by the scientists for their research, taught to the science teachers by the scientists, and then taught to the students by the science teachers. At each step the technology was modified to fit the levels and applications of the specific science teacher, the grade level taught, and the content area taught. Examples of imaginative tools utilized include Geographic Information System (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), Google Earth, time-lapse photography, digital microscopy, and Excel. In summary, by examining this collaborative partnership through the lens of the scientists, the science teachers, and the science teachers' students it is evident that this partnership has created new science education specialists and can ultimately improve scientific literacy in K-12 students. Reference: NRC (2005). How Students Learn. The National Academies Press. Washington D.C.

  19. The cryomechanical design of MUSIC: a novel imaging instrument for millimeter-wave astrophysics at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, Matthew I.; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Nguyen, Hien Trong; Noroozian, Omid; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    MUSIC (Multicolor Submillimeter kinetic Inductance Camera) is a new facility instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (Mauna Kea, Hawaii) developed as a collaborative effect of Caltech, JPL, the University of Colorado at Boulder and UC Santa Barbara, and is due for initial commissioning in early 2011. MUSIC utilizes a new class of superconducting photon detectors known as microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs), an emergent technology that offers considerable advantages over current types of detectors for submillimeter and millimeter direct detection. MUSIC will operate a focal plane of 576 spatial pixels, where each pixel is a slot line antenna coupled to multiple detectors through on-chip, lumped-element filters, allowing simultaneously imaging in four bands at 0.86, 1.02, 1.33 and 2.00 mm. The MUSIC instrument is designed for closed-cycle operation, combining a pulse tube cooler with a two-stage Helium-3 adsorption refrigerator, providing a focal plane temperature of 0.25 K with intermediate temperature stages at approximately 50, 4 and 0.4 K for buffering heat loads and heat sinking of optical filters. Detector readout is achieved using semi-rigid coaxial cables from room temperature to the focal plane, with cryogenic HEMT amplifiers operating at 4 K. Several hundred detectors may be multiplexed in frequency space through one signal line and amplifier. This paper discusses the design of the instrument cryogenic hardware, including a number of features unique to the implementation of superconducting detectors. Predicted performance data for the instrument system will also be presented and discussed.

  20. A new high transmission inlet for the Caltech nano-RDMA for size distribution measurements of sub-3 nm ions at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchin, A.; Downard, A. J.; Kangasluoma, J.; Nieminen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Steiner, G.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Flagan, R. C.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-06-01

    Reliable and reproducible measurements of atmospheric aerosol particle number size distributions below 10 nm require optimized classification instruments with high particle transmission efficiency. Almost all DMAs have an unfavorable potential gradient at the outlet (e.g. long column, Vienna type) or at the inlet (nano-radial DMA). This feature prevents them from achieving a good transmission efficiency for the smallest nanoparticles. We developed a new high transmission inlet for the Caltech nano-radial DMA (nRDMA) that increases the transmission efficiency to 12 % for ions as small as 1.3 nm in mobility equivalent diameter (corresponding to 1.2 × 10-4 m2 V-1 s-1 in electrical mobility). We successfully deployed the nRDMA, equipped with the new inlet, in chamber measurements, using a Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) and a booster Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) as a counter. With this setup, we were able to measure size distributions of ions between 1.3 and 6 nm, corresponding to a mobility range from 1.2 × 10-4 to 5.8 × 10-6 m2 V-1 s-1. The system was modeled, tested in the laboratory and used to measure negative ions at ambient concentrations in the CLOUD 7 measurement campaign at CERN. We achieved a higher size resolution than techniques currently used in field measurements, and maintained a good transmission efficiency at moderate inlet and sheath air flows (2.5 and 30 LPM, respectively). In this paper, by measuring size distribution at high size resolution down to 1.3 nm, we extend the limit of the current technology. The current setup is limited to ion measurements. However, we envision that future research focused on the charging mechanisms could extend the technique to measure neutral aerosol particles as well, so that it will be possible to measure size distributions of ambient aerosols from 1 nm to 1 μm.

  1. The Sector-Wide Approach in Bangladesh Primary Education: A Critical View. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Manzoor

    2011-01-01

    This monograph, in the CREATE Pathways to Access series, is about the modality of cooperation and programme management in primary education in Bangladesh, based specifically on the experience of the Second Primary Education Development Programme (PEDP II). It is not intended to be an assessment of PEDP II accomplishments, but key information and a…

  2. Age in Grade Congruence and Progression in Basic Education in Bangladesh. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 48

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Altaf

    2010-01-01

    In Bangladesh gross and net enrolment rates are used to measure overage and underage enrolment in the education system. However, due to the limits of these methods in exploring the issue of age in grade, the paper uses the CREATE Community and School Survey (COMSS) data from Bangladesh. COMSS was a longitudinal survey of 6,696 households with…

  3. Creating Open Education Resources for Teaching and Community Development through Action Research: An Overview of the Makerere AgShare Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneene, John B.; Ssajjakambwe, Paul; Kisaka, Stevens; Miller, RoseAnn; Kabasa, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The AgShare Phase I Program, conducted at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, was formed to create open education resources for teaching and community development through action research. The study was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of investigators from fields of veterinary medicine and agri-business. Two master of science students…

  4. Characterization of a submillimeter high-angular-resolution camera with a monolithic silicon bolometer array for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Serabyn, E.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Moseley, S. H.; Boyce, K.; Szymkowiak, A.; Allen, C.; Mott, B.; Gygax, J.

    1996-12-01

    We constructed a 24-pixel bolometer camera operating in the 350- and 450- mu m atmospheric windows for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). This instrument uses a monolithic silicon bolometer array that is cooled to approximately 300 mK by a single-shot 3He refrigerator. First-stage amplification is provided by field-effect transistors at approximately 130 K. The sky is imaged onto the bolometer array by means of several mirrors outside the Dewar and a cold off-axis elliptical mirror inside the cryostat. The beam is defined by cold aperture and field stops, which eliminates the need for any condensing horns. We describe the instrument, present measurements of the physical properties of the bolometer array, describe the performance of the electronics and the data-acquisition system, and demonstrate the sensitivity of the instrument operating at the observatory. Approximate detector noise at 350 mu m is 5 \\times 10-15 W/\\radicalHz\\end-radical, referenced to the entrance of the Dewar, and the CSO system noise-equivalent flux density is approximately 4 Jy/\\radicalHz\\end-radical. These values are within a factor of 2.5 of the background limit.

  5. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  6. A Low Noise NbTiN-Based 850 GHz SIS Receiver for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, J. W.; Kawamura, J.; Chen, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Pardo, J. R.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Phillips, T. G.; Bumble, B.; Stern, J.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) based superconductor- insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver to cover the 350 micron atmospheric window. This frequency band lies entirely above the energy gap of niobium (700 GHz), a commonly used SIS superconductor. The instrument uses an open structure twin-slot SIS mixer that consists of two Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions, NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning elements, and a NbTiN ground plane. The optical configuration is very similar to the 850 GHz waveguide receiver that was installed at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) in 1997. To minimize front-end loss, we employed reflecting optics and a cooled beamsplitter at 4 K. The instrument has an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of 205K DSB at 800 GHz and 410K DSB at 900 GHz. The degradation in receiver sensitivity with frequency is primarily due to an increase in the mixer conversion loss, which is attributed to the mismatch between the SIS junction and the twin-slot antenna impedance. The overall system performance has been confirmed through its use at the telescope to detect a wealth of new spectroscopic lines.

  7. Creating Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  8. Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN): Infrastructure upgrade to support Earthquake Early Warning (EEW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R. J.; Hauksson, E.; Boese, M.; Felizardo, C.; Thomas, V. I.; Yu, E.; Given, D. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in Southern California and performs the following tasks: 1) Operates remote seismic stations and the central data processing systems in Pasadena; 2) Generates and reports real-time products including location, magnitude, ShakeMap, aftershock probabilities and others; 3) Responds to FEMA, CalOES, media, and public inquiries about earthquakes; 4) Manages the production, archival, and distribution of waveforms, phase picks, and other data at the SCEDC; 5) Contributes to development and implementation of the demonstration EEW system called CISN ShakeAlert. Initially, the ShakeAlert project was funded through the US Geological Survey (USGS) and in early 2012, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation provided three years of new funding for EEW research and development for the US west coast. Recently, we have also received some Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) funding to enhance the EEW capabilities for the local UASI region by making our system overall faster, more reliable and redundant than the existing system. The additional and upgraded stations will be capable of decreasing latency and ensuring data delivery by using more reliable and redundant telemetry pathways. Overall, this will enhance the reliability of the earthquake early warnings by providing denser station coverage and more resilient data centers than before. * Seismic Datalogger upgrade: replaces existing dataloggers with modern equipment capable of sending one-second uncompressed packets and utilizing redundant Ethernet telemetry. * GPS upgrade: replaces the existing GPS receivers and antennas, especially at "zipper array" sites near the major faults, with receivers that perform on-board precise point positioning to calculate position and velocity in real time and stream continuous data for use in EEW calculations. * New co-located seismic/GPS stations: increases station density and reduces early warning delays that are incurred by travel

  9. Create a Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchen, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson that introduced students to graphic art as a career path. Explains that the students met a graphic artist and created a logo for a pretend client. Explains that the students researched logos. (CMK)

  10. Langley Research Highlights 1999: Advanced Aerospace Technology Clouds That Help Create the Ozone Hole Capturing Comet Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications made by NASA Langley Research Center and its university partners and industry colleagues during 1999. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. The Center's historic national role since 1917 continues in Aerospace Technology research with an additional major role in Earth Science research. Langley also partners closely with other NASA Centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Space Science and the Human Exploration and Development of Space. A color version is available at http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1999/. For further information, contact Dennis Bushnell, Senior Scientist, Mail Stop 110, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199, (757)-864-8987, e-mail address: d.m.bushnell@larc.nasa.gov.

  11. Creating a research base for nursing education: an interpretive review of conventional, critical, feminist, postmodern, and phenomenologic pedagogies.

    PubMed

    Ironside, P M

    2001-03-01

    The National League for Nursing Priorities for Nursing Education Research calls educators (1) to increase their pedagogic literacy to meet the challenges of the changing social, health care, and educational worlds and (2) to develop research-based pedagogies for nursing. This interpretive review of conventional, critical, feminist, postmodern, and phenomenologic pedagogies facilitates the pedagogic literacy of faculty members and provides a background for research-based nursing education. An example of a research-based pedagogy, Narrative Pedagogy, which developed through interpretive (hermeneutic) studies of the lived experiences of students, teachers, and clinicians in nursing education, is explicated. PMID:11225051

  12. Towards an ecology of eating disorders: creating sustainability through the integration of scientific research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Clinton, David

    2010-01-01

    The field of eating disorders is currently at a crossroads and faces important challenges of sustainability. These challenges include problems with the current diagnostic classification of eating disorders and the divide between scientific research and clinical practice. If not addressed, there is a danger that the field will fail to evolve adaptively, risking increased stagnation and reduced relevance. To meet these challenges, researchers and clinicians must work toward a more holistic ecology of eating disorders based on the interaction of theory, research and practice. The present paper proposes six steps towards increased sustainability based on developing clinically relevant diagnosis, using systematic quality assurance, expanding the scope of treatment research and the definition of evidence, promoting therapist development, as well as stimulating diversity and discourse. If we rise to the occasion and face these challenges, then we will be better equipped to meet the evolving needs of clinicians, researchers, and most importantly patients. PMID:20054876

  13. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  14. Sustainable economic development: Strategies for creating jobs while conserving natural resources and protecting the environment. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.G.

    1996-12-01

    Sustainable economic development is a departure from traditional economic development. It requires a change from linear, short-term to cyclical, long-term thinking--whether this thinking is applied to understanding industrial processes, the nature of products and waste, energy, or new business development. This publication provides practical assistance to the economic development community by contributing to a new generation of economic development strategies: (1) Increase profitability and save jobs in business, industry, and government by preventing pollution and reducing waste. (2) Develop new jobs in recycling-based manufacturing, demanufacturing, and remanufacturing industries and ecoindustrial parks. (3) Create jobs and new buinsesses through energy-efficiency investments in the public and private sectors. (4) Expand renewable energy technologies and manufacturing. (5) Capture markets in green businesses and environmental technologies. The publication includes annotated bibliographies and appendices with additional resources or technical discussions for each strategy.

  15. The Downside of Relying on Research Outputs to Assess Business Faculty Performance: Comments from Down Under regarding "Facilitating and Creating Synergies between Teaching and Research: The Role of the Academic Administrator"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Ross L.

    2012-01-01

    This commentary presents an Australian perspective on Balkin and Mello's "Facilitating and Creating Synergies between Teaching and Research: The Role of the Academic Administrator." It addresses one particularly important aspect of the separation of teaching and research in business schools; namely, the increasing dominance of discipline-based…

  16. Children and Families in an Era of Rapid Change: Creating a Shared Agenda for Researchers, Practitioners and Policy Makers. Summary of Conference Proceedings: Head Start's National Research Conference (4th, Washington, DC, July 9-12, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb-Parker, Faith, Ed.; Hagen, John, Ed.; Robinson, Ruth, Ed.; Clark, Cheryl, Ed.

    This report summarizes the conference proceedings of the fourth Head Start National Research Conference. The focus of the conference was on creating a shared agenda for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers related to serving children and families in an era of rapid change. Keynote topics and speakers are: "Countering the Health Effects of…

  17. Using Community Based Participatory Research to Create a Culturally Grounded Intervention for Parents and Youth to Prevent Risky Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe González; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Harthun, Mary L.; Valdez, Hector

    2011-01-01

    The principal goal of this article is to contribute to the field of prevention science by providing a sequential description of how Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) was used to develop a parent education curriculum aimed at preventing and decreasing adolescent drug use and risky sexual behaviors. CBPR principles are outlined, and information is provided on the unique contributions of researchers and community members who came together to develop this parent education program. Focus group information is presented as an exemplar to illustrate how thematic content from focus groups was used to inform the development of this parent education curriculum. A step by step description is given to facilitate replication of this process by other prevention researchers who are interested in applying this CBPR approach to develop a culturally responsive parent education intervention. PMID:21107693

  18. Creating Documentaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Augie

    1994-01-01

    Explains production techniques involved in making student documentaries on video. Highlights include student research; script writing; narration; the use of interviews; incorporating visual materials such as maps and photographs; camera techniques; demonstrations; editing; and time limits. (Contains six references.) (LRW)

  19. Teachers in the desert: Creating ecological research opportunities for teachers and students on the US-Mexico border

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable research provides evidence for the value of teaching science using enhanced context strategies. These strategies include making learning relevant to students by using real-world examples and problems as well as taking students out of the classroom to learn about the topic. Unfortunately...

  20. Research and Teaching: Methods for Creating and Evaluating 3D Tactile Images to Teach STEM Courses to the Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasper, Eric; Windhorst, Rogier; Hedgpeth, Terri; Van Tuyl, Leanne; Gonzales, Ashleigh; Martinez, Britta; Yu, Hongyu; Farkas, Zolton; Baluch, Debra P.

    2015-01-01

    Project 3D IMAGINE or 3D Image Arrays to Graphically Implement New Education is a pilot study that researches the effectiveness of incorporating 3D tactile images, which are critical for learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, into entry-level lab courses. The focus of this project is to increase the participation and…

  1. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  2. A National Plan for Energy Research, Development & Demonstration: Creating Energy Choices for the Future, 1976. Volume 1: The Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report presents a plan developed by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) concerning future energy sources. The plan summarizes ERDA's current views on the energy technologies the U.S. will need to achieve long-term energy independence. The role of the private sector in the development and commercialization of new energy…

  3. Real Apprenticeships: Creating a Revolution in English Skills. Research by The Boston Consulting Group for the Sutton Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Ian; Jones, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This research by the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) for Sutton Trust examined the English education system and its apprenticeship programs. BCG reported that the UK is failing nearly half its young people by providing inadequate vocational opportunities. BSG presents key findings that include: (1) more than four in ten people have only low level…

  4. Creating the Context and Employing Best Practices for Teacher Professional Development: A Brief Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2013-01-01

    A review of the research on teacher professional development identified an emerging consensus on important contextual and implementation characteristics that can promote or inhibit teachers' use of new knowledge and skills in their classroom practice. Findings suggest that professional development is best viewed as one component in an overall…

  5. Creating the Perfect Storm in Professional Development: The Experiences of Two American Teachers and a University Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Amy S.; Kurumada, Katie Simon; Fisher, Teresa; Zisook, Karla

    2011-01-01

    The present article discusses the impact of a localized and generative model of professional development on the teaching lives of two American elementary school teachers and a university research team. Within the framework of the ethic of care, the study focused on the construction of relationships between university team members and teachers that…

  6. Transforming the Undergraduate Research Experience through Sustained Mentoring: Creating a Strong Support Network and a Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Erika T.; Holmes, Raquell M.; Wirkus, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how sustained mentoring together with rigorous collaborative learning and community building contributed to successful mathematical research and individual growth in the Applied Mathematical Sciences Summer Institute (AMSSI), a program that focused on women, underrepresented minorities, and individuals from small teaching…

  7. Creating an Environment Conducive to Active and Collaborative Learning: Redesigning Introduction to Sociology at a Large Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, C. C.; Prohaska, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003 a Southeastern research university undertook the redesign of an introductory sociology course in order to improve student success by adding active and collaborative learning activities that gave students greater responsibility for learning. The new "hybrid" course provides most course materials online, requires electronic submission of…

  8. Using a Participatory Action Research Approach to Create a Universally Designed Inclusive High School Science Course: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dymond, Stacy K.; Renzaglia, Adelle; Rosenstein, Amy; Chun, Eul Jung; Banks, Ronald A.; Niswander, Vicki; Gilson, Christie L.

    2006-01-01

    Case study methodology was used in combination with a participatory action research (PAR) approach to examine the process of redesigning one high school science course to incorporate the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and to promote access to the general curriculum. The participants included one general education teacher and two…

  9. Access to Basic Education in Ghana: Politics, Policies and Progress. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Angela W.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph examines the history and politics of educational reform in Ghana. Using data from interviews conducted with senior policy-makers, implementers and researchers, as well as documentary sources, to explore the drivers and inhibitors of change at the political, bureaucratic and grass-roots levels. The monograph explores the nature of…

  10. A new high-transmission inlet for the Caltech nano-RDMA for size distribution measurements of sub-3 nm ions at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchin, Alessandro; Downard, Andy; Kangasluoma, Juha; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Steiner, Gerhard; Manninen, Hanna E.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Flagan, Richard C.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-06-01

    Reliable and reproducible measurements of atmospheric aerosol particle number size distributions below 10 nm require optimized classification instruments with high particle transmission efficiency. Almost all differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) have an unfavorable potential gradient at the outlet (e.g., long column, Vienna type) or at the inlet (nano-radial DMA), preventing them from achieving a good transmission efficiency for the smallest nanoparticles. We developed a new high-transmission inlet for the Caltech nano-radial DMA (nRDMA) that increases the transmission efficiency to 12 % for ions as small as 1.3 nm in Millikan-Fuchs mobility equivalent diameter, Dp (corresponding to 1.2 × 10-4 m2 V-1 s-1 in electrical mobility). We successfully deployed the nRDMA, equipped with the new inlet, in chamber measurements, using a particle size magnifier (PSM) and as a booster a condensation particle counter (CPC). With this setup, we were able to measure size distributions of ions within a mobility range from 1.2 × 10-4 to 5.8 × 10-6 m2 V-1 s-1. The system was modeled, tested in the laboratory and used to measure negative ions at ambient concentrations in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) 7 measurement campaign at CERN. We achieved a higher size resolution (R = 5.5 at Dp = 1.47 nm) than techniques currently used in field measurements (e.g., Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS), which has a R ˜ 2 at largest sizes, and R ˜ 1.8 at Dp = 1.5 nm) and maintained a good total transmission efficiency (6.3 % at Dp = 1.5 nm) at moderate inlet and sheath airflows (2.5 and 30 L min-1, respectively). In this paper, by measuring size distributions at high size resolution down to 1.3 nm, we extend the limit of the current technology. The current setup is limited to ion measurements. However, we envision that future research focused on the charging mechanisms could extend the technique to measure neutral aerosol particles as well, so that it will be possible

  11. An unexplored ethical issue in clinical research: disclosure of individual findings in the Creando Posibilidades [Creating Possibilities] study.

    PubMed

    Stein, Karen Farchaus; Keller, Colleen; Fishstrom, Astrid

    2013-06-01

    Individual disclosure refers to the presumptive ethical responsibility of an investigator to communicate to a study participant information that was collected as a part of a research study protocol and is specific to the individual. Currently, there are no federal regulatory guidelines specifying the conditions and management of disclosure of health-related individual-specific information. In this report, the authors discuss the challenges associated with individual disclosure in the context of a longitudinal descriptive study. Arguments favoring disclosure and those challenging disclosure as a general ethical duty are presented. Finally, strategies for addressing individual disclosure are discussed using a research exemplar in which risk behaviors related to health outcomes were measured. PMID:23408475

  12. Creating a Research Experience for Undergraduates that meets the Student Halfway: The REU Site on Sustainable Land and Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Hill, K. M.; Berthelote, A. R.; Ito, E.; Pellerin, H.; Howes, T.; Myrbo, A.

    2012-12-01

    There are excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in research programs across the country, but often they suffer from a lack of applicants from underrepresented groups and non-traditional students. Potential applicants are out there, but too often they are lost through the recruitment and application process. We present the results here of a decade of experience in reaching the students where they are at, metaphorically and physically. Each aspect of the REU recruitment and application process will be considered in terms of barriers to participation that occur before the student even applies, in the program design and application process. We examine the application itself, the recruiting process, reaching students through their mentors and student organizations, the non-traditional student, and how programs can be constructed that allow for a wider diversity of participants. The Research Experience for Undergraduates on Sustainable Land and Water Resources strives to meet the student at least halfway through our unique program design. Our team-orientated REU places teams of students at three sites: Salish Kootenai College on the Flathead Reservation in Montana, the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation in Northern Minnesota, and at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Students from across the country participate in research related to land and water resources while also learning about the sustainable management practices of these communities. Every effort is made to include the non-traditional student, including parents, through the design of the program, the materials we recruit with, and our application process. Students learn about all aspects of research, from experimental design, to field and laboratory practices, to modeling and quantitative analysis. In addition, all of our mentors are encouraged to work as a team to meet the individual needs of the students in our program—academic, cultural, and social

  13. The Caltech-NRAO Stripe 82 Survey (CNSS). I. The Pilot Radio Transient Survey In 50 deg2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, K. P.; Hallinan, G.; Bourke, S.; Horesh, A.; Myers, S. T.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Levitan, D. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Bellm, E.; Laher, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    We have commenced a multiyear program, the Caltech-NRAO Stripe 82 Survey (CNSS), to search for radio transients with the Jansky VLA in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 region. The CNSS will deliver five epochs over the entire ˜270 deg2 of Stripe 82, an eventual deep combined map with an rms noise of ˜40 μJy and catalogs at a frequency of 3 GHz, and having a spatial resolution of 3″. This first paper presents the results from an initial pilot survey of a 50 deg2 region of Stripe 82, involving four epochs spanning logarithmic timescales between 1 week and 1.5 yr, with the combined map having a median rms noise of 35 μJy. This pilot survey enabled the development of the hardware and software for rapid data processing, as well as transient detection and follow-up, necessary for the full 270 deg2 survey. Data editing, calibration, imaging, source extraction, cataloging, and transient identification were completed in a semi-automated fashion within 6 hr of completion of each epoch of observations, using dedicated computational hardware at the NRAO in Socorro and custom-developed data reduction and transient detection pipelines. Classification of variable and transient sources relied heavily on the wealth of multiwavelength legacy survey data in the Stripe 82 region, supplemented by repeated mapping of the region by the Palomar Transient Factory. A total of {3.9}-0.9+0.5% of the few thousand detected point sources were found to vary by greater than 30%, consistent with similar studies at 1.4 and 5 GHz. Multiwavelength photometric data and light curves suggest that the variability is mostly due to shock-induced flaring in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Although this was only a pilot survey, we detected two bona fide transients, associated with an RS CVn binary and a dKe star. Comparison with existing legacy survey data (FIRST, VLA-Stripe 82) revealed additional highly variable and transient sources on timescales between 5 and 20 yr, largely

  14. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Janis; Jardine, Cynthia G.; Guebert, Jenilee; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Background Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK). Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. Objective This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Design Review. Results Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Conclusions Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements. PMID:23986896

  15. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Caroline S; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A; Mattsson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries. PMID:26230622

  16. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattsson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have “small world” properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit “structural holes” by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries. PMID:26230622

  17. Creating a flipbook as a medium of instruction based on the research on activity test of kencur extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monika, Icha; Yeni, Laili Fitri; Ariyati, Eka

    2016-02-01

    This research aimed to reveal the validity of the flipbook as a medium of learning for the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade based on the results of the activity test of kencur (Kaempferia galanga) extract to control the growth of the Fusarium oxysporum fungus. The research consisted of two stages. First, testing the validity of the medium of flipbook through validation by seven assessors and analyzed based on the total average score of all aspects. Second, testing the activity of the kencur extract against the growth of Fusarium oxysporum by using the experimental method with 10 treatments and 3 repetitions which were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The making of the flipbook medium was done through the stages of analysis for the potential and problems, data collection, design, validation, and revision. The validation analysis on the flipbook received an average score of 3.7 and was valid to a certain extent, so it could be used in the teaching and learning process especially in the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade of the senior high school.

  18. Merging person-centered care with translational research to improve the lives of older adults: creating community-based nursing research networks.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nikki L; Penrod, Janice; Milone-Nuzzo, Paula

    2014-10-01

    Translational research is a leading trend in science with the aim of bridging the research-practice gap to significantly speed the implementation of effective interventions in clinical practice. Integrating the values and preferences of older adults and their families into this process is critical to the success of translational research. Engaging communities in meaningful research is an important part of advancing translational science in which older adults are partners in developing solutions to the health needs of individuals within communities. The current article describes one approach to developing an infrastructure (i.e., community-based nursing research network) to support patient-centered care within translational research. Nurses are uniquely poised and prepared to assume leadership roles in community-based research networks to support a true collaboration among stakeholders that prizes the voices of older adults and integrates them into practice efforts. PMID:25275784

  19. Merging Person-Centered Care with Translational Research to Improve the Lives of Older Adults: Creating Community Based Nursing Research Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nikki L.; Penrod, Janice; Milone-Nuzzo, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Translational research is a leading trend in science with the aim of bridging the research-practice gap in order to significantly speed the implementation of effective interventions in clinical practice. Integrating the values and preferences of older adults and their families in this process is critical to the success of translational research. Engaging communities in meaningful research is an important part of advancing translational science in which the older adult is a partner in developing solutions to the health needs of individuals within communities. This article describes one approach to developing an infrastructure to support patient-centered care within translational research, establishing a Community Based Nursing Research Network. Nurses throughout our communities are uniquely poised and prepared to assume leadership roles in community based research networks in order to support a true collaboration among stakeholders which prizes the voices of our older adults and integrates them into practice efforts. PMID:25275784

  20. Creating New Technologists of Research in the 1960s: The Case of the Reproduction of Automated Chromatography Specialists and Practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerontas, Apostolos

    2014-08-01

    Chromatographic instrumentation has been really influential in shaping the modern chemical practice, and yet it has been largely overlooked by history of science.Gas chromatography in the 1960s was considered the analytical technique closer to becoming dominant, and being the first automated chromatography set the standards that all the subsequent chromatographic instrumentation had to fulfill. Networks of specialists, groups of actors, corporate strategies and the analytical practice itself, were all affected and in many ways because of the entrance of gas chromatography in the chemical laboratory and in the instrumentation market. This paper gives a view of the early history of the gas chromatography instrumentation, relates it to the broader research-technology phenomenon and discusses issues of education and group reproduction in the case of the groups of technologists of the era. The chaotic elements of knowledge transfer during the instrumentation revolution in chemistry are being highlighted and they are being connected to the observable radical innovation of the period.

  1. Creating supportive nutrition environments for population health impact and health equity: an overview of the Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network's efforts.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Heidi M; Kim, Sonia A

    2012-09-01

    Childhood obesity is a major threat to individual health and society overall. Policies that support healthier food and beverage choices have been endorsed by many decision makers. These policies may reach a large proportion of the population or in some circumstances aim to reduce nutrition disparities to ensure health equity. The Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN) evaluates policy as a tool to improve food and beverage environments where Americans live, work, play, and learn. The network aspires to address research and evaluation gaps related to relevant policies, create standardized research tools, and help build the evidence base of effective policy solutions for childhood obesity prevention with a focus on reach, equity, cost effectiveness, and sustainability. PMID:22898166

  2. The Cool Club: Creating engaging, experimental and creative encounters between young minds and polar researchers at SPRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, S. M.; Pope, A.

    2011-12-01

    Whilst the scientific case for current climate change is compelling, the consequences of climate change have largely failed to permeate through to individuals. This lack of public awareness of the science and the potential impacts could be considered a key obstacle to action. The possible reasons for such limited success centre on the issue that climate change is a complex subject, and that a wide ranging academic, political and social research literature on the science and wider implications of climate change has failed to communicate the key issues in an accessible way. These failures to adequately communicate both the science and the social science of climate change at a number of levels results in ';communication gaps' that act as fundamental barriers to both understanding and engagement with the issue. Meyer and Land (2003) suggest that learners can find certain ideas and concepts within a discipline difficult to understand and these act as a barrier to deeper understanding of a subject. To move beyond these threshold concepts, they suggest that the expert needs to support the learner through a range of learning experiences that allows the development of learning strategies particular to the individual. Meyer and Land's research into these threshold concepts has been situated within Economics, but has been suggested to be more widely applicable though there has been no attempt to either define or evaluate threshold concepts to climate change science. By identifying whether common threshold concepts exist specifically in climate science for cohorts of either formal or informal learners, scientists will be better able to support the public in understanding these concepts by changing how the knowledge is communicated to help overcome these barriers to learning. This paper reports on the findings of a study that examined the role of threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science in a UK University and considers its implications for wider

  3. [Creating a local collection of professional reports. A stake in the engineering of diploma education and research in continuing education].

    PubMed

    Fournet, M; Bedin, V; Sanchou, P

    1998-03-01

    The question of the dissertation written during the training is tackled through the entry key offered by the professional dissertations written during the training courses leading to qualification in the framework of a university department of vocational training. 72 professional dissertations, defended between 1993 and 1996, were analysed on the basis of observation sheets filled out by the directors. In reference to the semiotic approach which provides relevant theoretical and methodological materials for the problem posed, we shall show the interest of considering that these documents are, above all, "object-speeches" and must therefore be studied as such. According to the demands to be determined, related to the types of speeches to deliver, the professional dissertations considered as written traces reconstituting the practices and praxis which found them, as well on the professional as on the scientific level, can provide indications for training, in the area of research as well as in the one of praxeology. The written document is thought of as an object of transition from practice to professional praxis, rallying the scientific praxis which is expressed particularly in the writing work. PMID:10595192

  4. SP CREATE. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, J.H.; Seebode, L.

    1998-11-10

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  5. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  6. Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) on River and Coastal Restoration—a Center Approach to Creating a Unique Research Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Campbell, K. M.; Hill, K. M.; Podolak, C.; Bevington, A.; Holm, G. O.; Wilcock, P.; Twilley, R.

    2009-12-01

    At the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), the NSF-sponsored REU on River and Coastal Restoration provides students an intensive research experience in a center environment that incorporates many aspects of the typical graduate student experience at an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center. These include a team-oriented approach in which students work closely with one another while completing their individual research projects, team-mentoring that brings together NCED faculty, staff, and graduate students to meet students’ advising needs, and an approach to research that incorporates field research, laboratory experiments, and an introduction to computational and quantitative methodologies. In addition, students' individual research projects constitute a contribution to larger ongoing field campaigns, allowing them, often for the first time, to understand the role of their own research in a larger context. Students join one of two teams: Team Marmot participates in an ongoing campaign to document the geomorphic response of the Sandy River to the 2007 removal of the Marmot Dam; Team Delta participates in research on coastal restoration of the Mississippi River Delta. After an orientation period at our headquarters, the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minnesota, each team spends the majority of their summer in the field. The teams are then reunited for poster sessions at the end of the summer at which they share the outcomes of their research with one another and the larger NCED and University of Minnesota communities.

  7. UrEDAS Operation in California by SDR in collaboration with Caltech and U.C. Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanamori, H.; Tajima, F.

    2001-12-01

    UrEDAS, Urgent Earthquake Detection and Alarm System, currently used in Japan is an early warning system to issue a warning based on the earthquake parameters determined using a single station data. The objective of this collaboration is to test UrEDAS in a complex fault system in California. Two sets of UrEDAS were installed by SDR, one at the old seismograph darkroom of TriNet PAS station of Caltech and the other, inside the vault of BDSN BKS station of U.C. Berkeley. UrEDAS discriminates between P and S waves immediately after an event detection. If the detected phase is judged to be a P wave, UrEDAS estimates and reports the location, depth and magnitude of the event within three seconds after P wave detection. UrEDAS uses the parameters such as back-azimuth, predominant frequency, apparent incident angle etc for this estimation. This estimate is called "primary estimation". After the arrival of S wave, UrEDAS estimates the hypocentral distance again. This estimate is called "secondary estimation". The reports are automatically e-mailed to interested parties in real-time. At BKS, waveforms are stored on a server and are accessible by scientists. The UrEDAS operation started on 10/14/2000 at PSA, and on 2/28/2001 at BKS. As of 9/3/2001, 219 (PAS) and 126 (BKS) events have been observed and 182 (PAS) and 107 (BKS) events have been detected by P wave. The results can be compared with the CNSS catalog at PAS and BKS. Other events are either detected by S wave, or they are ground noise, or very small earthquakes not listed by CNSS. The magnitudes of the detected earthquake are M1.5 to 8.1 at PAS and M1.3 to 8.1 at BKS. The detection range is about ~100 and ~10,000 km for events with M2.5 and M6, respectively. For events with M > 6.5, the detection range is more than 20,000 km. Thus, almost all the events in the world can be detected. UrEDAS estimates magnitude from the initial period T using the relation M = 3.2logT+5.26. Although PAS and BKS use the same constants

  8. gidakiimanaaniwigamig (Seek To Know)--A Native Youths Science Immersion Program Created Through a Partnership Between a Tribal College, a Research Laboratory and a Science Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Steiner, M.

    2004-12-01

    The National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics, an NSF-sponsored Science and Technology Center, through a partnership between the University of Minnesota, the Science Museum of Minnesota, and the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, has created gidakiimanaaniwigamig (Seek to Know), where students in middle and high school participate in hands-on research projects on topics in environmental science through a series of four yearly seasonal camps combined with field trips and after school programming. Through meetings with Native elders, community leaders and educators, we know that the major issues that must be addressed are student retention, gaps in programming that allow students who have been performing successfully in math and science to drift away from their interest in pursuing STEM careers, and concern about moving away from the community to pursue higher education. After-school and summer programs are an effective means of creating interest in STEM careers, but single-contact programs don't have the long-term impact that will create a bridge from grade school to college and beyond. Often children who have learned to love science in grade school gradually move away from this interest as they enter middle and high school. While a single intervention offered by a science camp or visit to a laboratory can be life-altering, once the student is back in their everyday life they may forget that excitement and get sidetracked from the educational goals they formed based on this single experience. We want to build on the epiphany (science is fun!) with continued interaction that allows the students to grow in their ability to understand and enjoy science. In order to foster STEM careers for underrepresented youths we need to create a sustained, long-term, program that takes youths through programs that stimulate that initial excitement and gradually become more intensive and research-oriented as the youths get older. NCED's approach to these challenges is to

  9. Creating an Interest in Research and Development as a Means of Reducing the Gap between Theory and Practice in Primary Care: An Interventional Study Based on Strategic Communication

    PubMed Central

    Morténius, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D). For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals’ interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals’ interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276) in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care. PMID:25162708

  10. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  11. Development of a polarization resolved spectroscopic diagnostic for measurements of the magnetic field in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma jet experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, Taiichi; Bellan, Paul M.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field strength in current-carrying magnetically confined plasmas are necessary for understanding the underlying physics governing the dynamical behavior. Such a measurement would be particularly useful in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma gun, an experiment used for fundamental studies relevant to spheromak formation, astrophysical jet formation/propagation, solar coronal physics, and the general behavior of twisted magnetic flux tubes that intercept a boundary. In order to measure the field strength in the Caltech experiment, a non-perturbing spectroscopic method is being implemented to observe the Zeeman splitting in the emission spectra. The method is based on polarization-resolving spectroscopy of the Zeeman-split σ components, a technique previously used in both solar and laboratory plasmas. We have designed and constructed an optical system that can simultaneously detect left- and right-circularly polarized emission with both high throughput and small extinction ratio. The system will be used on the 489.5 nm NII line, chosen because of its simple Zeeman structure and minimal Stark broadening.

  12. Creating collaboration opportunities for marine research across the Arctic: The SEARCH-ACCESS partnership and an emerging sea ice prediction research network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, H.; Bitz, C. M.; Gascard, J.; Kaminski, T.; Karcher, M. J.; Kauker, F.; Overland, J. E.; Stroeve, J. C.; Wiggins, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid Arctic environmental and socio-economic change presents major challenges and opportunities to Arctic residents, government agencies and the private sector. The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover, in particular, are in the midst of transformative change, ranging from declines in sea-ice thickness and summer ice extent to threats to coastal communities and increases in maritime traffic and offshore resource development. The US interagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) and the European Arctic Climate Change, Economy and Society (ACCESS) project are addressing both scientific research needs and stakeholder information priorities to improve understanding and responses to Arctic change. Capacity building, coordination and integration of activities at the international level and across sectors and stakeholder groups are major challenges that have to be met. ACCESS and SEARCH build on long-standing collaborations with a focus on environmental change in the Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere system and the most pressing research needs to inform marine policy, resource management and threats to Arctic coastal communities. To illustrate the approach, key results and major conclusions from this international coordination and collaboration effort, we focus on a nascent sea-ice prediction research network. This activity builds on the Arctic Sea Ice Outlook that was initiated by SEARCH and the European DAMOCLES project (a precursor to ACCESS) and has now grown into an international community of practice that synthesizes, evaluates and discusses sea-ice predictions on seasonal to interannual scales. Key goals of the effort which is now entering into a new phase include the comparative evaluation of different prediction approaches, including the combination of different techniques, the compilation of reference datasets and model output, guidance on the design and implementation of observing system efforts to improve predictions and information transfer into private

  13. The missing link: Creating science policies that facilitate the use of research in environmental and water-related decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, L.; Pielke, R.; Sarewitz, D.

    2005-12-01

    Despite all good intentions, it is clear that science intended to serve decision making needs often fails to achieve that purpose. The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina provides a recent, tragic example. The reasons for failures of science to support decision making are varied. Researchers studying forecasts of climate variability have found, for example, cases where information provided is not needed; information is needed but not provided; information lacks regional specificity; information is provided in an inaccessible form; poor communication exists between potential users and providers; there is a lack of trust in information or deliverers; institutional constraints prevent use of new information; and so on. Traditional science policies have institutionalized the separation of the conduct of science from its application and use. It is clear that as long as such a separation, reinforced by tradition, institution and culture, is the dominant paradigm of science policies, the efficient and effective use of science in environmental and water-related decision making will be hampered. We introduce here a research methodology for examining the decision making involved in setting science policies for research aimed at being useful. Based on the economic concept, the notion of "reconciling supply and demand" for information offers a framework for identifying missed opportunities where science policies can be adjusted to improve the usefulness of a given research portfolio. We present results from a case study focused on internal science policies and decision making within the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) projects. The RISA program aims to "expand the range of choices available to private and public communities in a region, by...enabling practical decisions...using research-based knowledge" and so provides an excellent opportunity for harvesting lessons for creating usable science.

  14. The Chandra Deep Survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North Area. II. Results from the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Barger, A. J.; Broos, P. S.; Cowie, L. L.; Townsley, L. K.; Bautz, M. W.; Burrows, D. N.; Chartas, G.; Feigelson, E. D.; Griffiths, R. E.; Lumb, D.; Nousek, J. A.; Ramsey, L. W.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    2001-06-01

    A deep X-ray survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N) and its environs is performed using data collected by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Currently a 221.9 ks exposure is available, the deepest ever presented, and here we give results on X-ray sources located in the 8.6‧×8.7‧ area covered by the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (the ``Caltech area''). This area has (1) deep photometric coverage in several optical and near-infrared bands; (2) extensive coverage at radio, submillimeter, and mid-infrared wavelengths; and (3) some of the deepest and most complete spectroscopic coverage ever obtained. It is also where the X-ray data have the greatest sensitivity; the minimum detectable fluxes in the 0.5-2 keV (soft) and 2-8 keV (hard) bands are ~1.3×10-16 and ~6.5×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively. More than ~80% of the extragalactic X-ray background in the hard band is resolved. The 82 Chandra sources detected in the Caltech area are correlated with more than 25 multiwavelength source catalogs, and the results of these correlations as well as spectroscopic follow-up results obtained with the Keck and Hobby-Eberly Telescopes are presented. All but nine of the Chandra sources are detected optically with R<~26.5. Redshifts are available for 39% of the Chandra sources, including 96% of the sources with R<23 the redshift range is 0.1-3.5, with most sources having z<1.5. Eight of the X-ray sources are located in the HDF-N itself, including two not previously reported. A population of X-ray faint, optically bright, nearby galaxies emerges at soft-band fluxes of <~3×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1. Our multiwavelength correlations have set the tightest constraints to date on the X-ray emission properties of μJy radio sources, mid-infrared sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and very red (R-Ks>5.0) objects. A total of 16 of the 67 1.4 GHz μJy sources in the Caltech area are detected in the

  15. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony; Saldana, Christopher J.; Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John; Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  16. Creating new growth platforms.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Donald L; Doz, Yves L; Sheer, Claude P

    2006-05-01

    Sooner or later, most companies can't attain the growth rates expected by their boards and CEOs and demanded by investors. To some extent, such businesses are victims of their own successes. Many were able to sustain high growth rates for a long time because they were in high-growth industries. But once those industries slowed down, the businesses could no longer deliver the performance that investors had come to take for granted. Often, companies have resorted to acquisition, though this strategy has a discouraging track record. Over time, 65% of acquisitions destroy more value than they create. So where does real growth come from? For the past 12 years, the authors have been researching and advising companies on this issue. With the support of researchers at Harvard Business School and Insead, they instituted a project titled "The CEO Agenda and Growth". They identified and approached 24 companies that had achieved significant organic growth and interviewed their CEOs, chief strategists, heads of R&D, CFOs, and top-line managers. They asked, "Where does your growth come from?" and found a consistent pattern in the answers. All the businesses grew by creating new growth platforms (NGPs) on which they could build families of products and services and extend their capabilities into multiple new domains. Identifying NGP opportunities calls for executives to challenge conventional wisdom. In all the companies studied, top management believed that NGP innovation differed significantly from traditional product or service innovation. They had independent, senior-level units with a standing responsibility to create NGPs, and their CEOs spent as much as 50% of their time working with these units. The payoff has been spectacular and lasting. For example, from 1985 to 2004, the medical devices company Medtronic grew revenues at 18% per year, earnings at 20%, and market capitalization at 30%. PMID:16649700

  17. Creating innovative departments.

    PubMed

    von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2004-12-01

    'Creating an innovative department' as an objective implies further improvements in organization, function, and progression of a surgical unit active in patient care, research, and education. It is of prime importance to stress here the mutual benefits of patient care, research (the basis for future patient care) and education (the channel for training health care professionals in future patient care). Neither innovation (from latin innovare: to renew, revive) nor creation (from latin creare: to make, produce) is something that will fall from heaven without effort any time soon. Hence, a pro-active attitude towards progress is indicated. This requires searching for new ideas, allocation of resources, finding allies, getting focussed, and being persistent. One word says it all: WORK! PMID:15776856

  18. A Case Study of Design-Based Research for Creating a Vision Prototype of a Technology-Based Innovative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yuxin; Harmon, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Design-based research is a burgeoning research paradigm holding the promise of introducing more socially responsible studies to transform education. However, there is a lack of methodological standards and established research processes to inform this type of study. Although there are general principles and procedures on design-based research,…

  19. Creating With Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  20. Collaborating with Space-related Research Institutes, Government Agencies and an Artistic team to create a series of Space-themed public events in Ireland in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, N.; McSweeney, C.; Smyth, N.; O'Neill, S.; Foley, C.; Phelan, R.; Crawley, J.; Henderson, C.; Cullinan, M.; Baxter, S.; Colley, D.; Macaulay, C. J.; Conroy, L.

    2015-10-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives was created, to promote the importance of Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space science industries. These included: (1)'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult, (2) an adaptation of 'To Space' for 13- 17 year old students entitled 'ToSpace for School leavers' and (3) 'My Place in Space', created for families. Blending humour, warmth and humanity and positioning science within story is a highly effective public engagement tool in igniting curiosity across many audience types. The nurturing and investment of artists working within these new cross-disciplinary relationships should be encouraged and supported to further broaden and develop new methodology in public engagement of the planetary sciences.

  1. What Makes for Powerful Classrooms, and How Can We Support Teachers in Creating Them? A Story of Research and Practice, Productively Intertwined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    This article and my career as an educational researcher are grounded in two fundamental assumptions: (a) that research and practice can and should live in productive synergy, with each enhancing the other, and (b) that research focused on teaching and learning in a particular discipline can, if carefully framed, yield insights that have…

  2. Reconceptualising Post-PhD Research Pathways: A Model to Create New Postdoctoral Positions and Improve the Quality of Postdoctoral Training in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, J.; Juniper, S.; Pitman, T.; Thomson, C.

    2008-01-01

    Focusing on the developmental needs of early career postdoctoral fellows--the lifeblood of an internationally competitive research-intensive university--this paper suggests an inextricably linked, two pronged approach to improving research performance at Australian universities. The first is to reconceptualise post-PhD research pathways and in…

  3. Creating and Translating Knowledge about Teaching and Learning in Collaborative School-University Research Partnerships: An Analysis of What Is Exchanged across the Partnerships, by Whom and How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumfield, Vivienne; Butterworth, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Whilst there is a growing body of literature on practitioner research and the role of collaborations and partnerships that include universities in that process, there are relatively few studies examining the role of the university in any depth. We reflect on 12 years of working in school-university collaborative research partnerships through an…

  4. Creating an Implicit Measure of Cognition More Suited to Applied Research: A Test of the Mixed Trial-Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (MT-IRAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael E.; Hayes, Steven C.; Waltz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) is a promising tool for measuring implicit cognitions in applied research. However, the need for training and block effects can limit its capacity to assess effects with individual stimuli and participants, both of which are important for applied research. We developed a modified IRAP, the Mixed…

  5. Creating Highlander Wherever You Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Susan; Mullett, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Highlander Research and Education Center serves as a catalyst for grassroots organizing and movement building. This article focuses on an interview with education coordinator Susan Williams who has worked at Highlander for 26 years. We discuss how others can and do create powerful popular education experiences anywhere, whether they have a…

  6. Can Children Really Create Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereiter, Carl; Scardamalia, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Can children genuinely create new knowledge, as opposed to merely carrying out activities that resemble those of mature scientists and innovators? The answer is yes, provided the comparison is not to works of genius but to standards that prevail in ordinary research communities. One important product of knowledge creation is concepts and tools…

  7. High energy physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-09-01

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory Research and Development Program; Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  8. Creating Environments that Work for All Youth: Increasing the Use of Evidence-Based Strategies by Special Education Teachers. Research to Practice Brief. Volume 5, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutash, Krista; Duchnowski, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    With a goal of increasing the use of evidence-based practices in special education programs and improve student outcomes, a research demonstration project was developed through a unique partnership of special educators, parents, administrators, and investigators. This brief reports on the method, implementation, and initial findings from this…

  9. Creating Dynamic Learning Communities in Synchronous Online Courses: One Approach from the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniels, Melissa; Pfund, Christine; Barnicle, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The ability to convert face-to-face curricula into rigorous and equally rich online experiences is a topic of much investigation. In this paper, we report on the conversion of a face-to-face research mentor training curriculum into a synchronous, online course. Graduate students and postdoc participants from the Center for the Integration of…

  10. Creating "Buddy Partnerships" with 5- and 11-Year Old-Boys: A Methodological Approach to Conducting Participatory Research with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Rachael; Thompson, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    Building on literature concerning participatory research, this article explores the use of "buddy partnership" as a technique to access the voices of young children. In this study, 5- to 6-year-old boys were paired with 11- to 12-year-old boys, and each dyad was asked to contribute towards the creation of an information DVD that would…

  11. The Health and Education Benefits of Universal Primary Education for the Next Generation: Evidence from Tanzania. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 62

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Westbrook, Jo; Hernandez-Fernandez, Jimena

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the importance of increasing women's education as a result of Universal Primary Education and its further impact on improving children's health and educational access in Tanzania. The study uses data from the 2007 Demographic Health Survey for empirical analysis and it is informed by the historical accounts of the…

  12. Preparing Teachers to Create a Mainstream Science Classroom Conducive to the Needs of English-Language Learners: A Feminist Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Gayle; Mast, Colette; Ehlers, Nancy; Franklin, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    A feminist action research team, which consisted of a science educator, an English-language learner (ELL) educator, a first-year science teacher, and a graduate assistant, set a goal to work together to explore the process a beginning teacher goes through to establish a classroom conducive to the needs of middle-level ELL learners. The guiding…

  13. Dropping Out of School in Southern Ghana: The Push-Out and Pull-Out Factors. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 55

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananga, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Addressing school dropout has been one of the most controversial elements of policy since the introduction of free compulsory universal basic education (FCUBE) in Ghana. However, research that utilises qualitative biographical detail surrounding irregular attendance and the critical events in the process that lead to dropout in Ghana is limited. I…

  14. Girls' Access to Education in China: Actors, Cultures and the Windmill of Development Management. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaojun Grace

    2010-01-01

    The world has a mixed record towards achieving EFA [Education for All] and the MDGs [Millennium Development Goals] in relation to the targets on gender equity in basic education. For researchers and practitioners, this raises the question of which factors influence the processes leading to the improvement of access and quality of girls' education…

  15. The Administrator as Superhero: A Commentary on Balkin and Mello's "Facilitating and Creating Synergies between Teaching and Research: The Role of the Academic Administrator"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewicki, Roy J.

    2012-01-01

    As a way to achieve better alignment of the ongoing teaching-research activity gap in business schools, David Balkin and Jeff Mello suggest that schools need to hire academic administrators with significantly developed management skills. The author responds to this recommendation with two concerns. First, many of the causes of the…

  16. Creating High-Quality Health Care Workplaces. A Background Paper for Canadian Policy Research Networks' National Roundtable (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, October 29, 2001). CPRN Work Network Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehoorn, Mieke; Lowe, Graham S.; Rondeau, Kent V.; Schellenberg, Grant; Wagar, Terry H.

    Insights from a variety of research streams were synthesized to identify the key ingredients of a high-quality work environment in Canada's health care sector and ways of achieving high-quality workplaces in the sector. The following sets of interacting factors were considered: (1) the work environment and the human resource practices that shape…

  17. Enriching Arizona's Knowledge Economy: Creating the Research Connections, Attention, and Talent Arizona Needs to Compete. Proposition 301 Investments at Arizona State University, FY 2002-FY 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernon, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This report presents results tracked by the CAT Measures, a 21st century assessment tool for enabling policymakers to monitor "en route" performance of their public investments in science and technology research. Developed by Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University, the CAT Measures analyze growth supporting three pillars…

  18. Using Community-based Participatory Research to Adapt keepin’ it REAL: Creating a Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade “keepin’ it REAL” prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step adaptation model, emphasized a collaborative approach, both transformative and empowering. Essential adaptation elements were the Risk-to-Resiliency Continuum; the teaching of a wide range of skills including risk assessment, decision making, and resistance strategies; and, maintaining the theoretical grounding of Narrative Theory, Communication Competence, and Focus Theory of Norms. This paper describes how CBPR methodology can be conducted successfully while focusing on sustained theoretical grounding and effective research practices in a school-based setting. PMID:21057596

  19. Creating Research Experiences in Ocean Science for Two Year College (2YC) Students Using Resources Available through the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    One of the best and simple ways to increase enthusiasm for ocean sciences is by getting 2YC students connected with data and tools available through IODP. IODP is one of the world's largest international marine research programs that is dedicated to advancing understanding of Earth's processes through scientific drilling of the ocean floor. Few of the activities proposed here can be easily integrated into any 2YC geoscience class. These include, live video conferencing with JOIDES Resolution Ocean Drilling research vessel which provides a unique opportunity for the students to ask questions from the shipboard scientists and learn about their research as well as their experience onboard. In class, students will be introduced to search and use data available through scientific drilling to answer scientific questions. Furthermore, organizing field trips to the IODP Gulf Coast repository will provide hands on experience to describe and analyze cores from the ocean floor. These simple additions to the curriculum will provide wide range of unique experiences to the students at 2YC which will encourage them to pursue advanced studies in ocean sciences and/or careers in scientific ocean drilling.

  20. Preparing teachers to create a mainstream science classroom conducive to the needs of English-language learners: A feminist action research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Gayle; Mast, Colette; Ehlers, Nancy; Franklin, Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    A feminist action research team, which consisted of a science educator, an English-language learner (ELL) educator, a first-year science teacher, and a graduate assistant, set a goal to work together to explore the process a beginning teacher goes through to establish a classroom conducive to the needs of middle-level ELL learners. The guiding questions of the study were answered by gathering a wealth of data over the course of 5 months and taken from the classroom, planning sessions, and researchers and students. These data were collected by observations, semistructured interviews, and written document reviews. The progressive analysis ultimately revealed that: (a) successful strategies a beginning teacher must utilize for teaching middle-level ELL children in a mainstream classroom involve complex structural considerations that are not part of the teacher's preparation; (b) learning increases for all children, but there are differences in learning achievement between ELL and non-ELL children; and (c) student and peer feedback proved to be an effective means of enhancing the growth of a beginning teacher seeking to increase her skills in teaching ELL learners. The experiences and findings from this project have implications for teacher preparation programs committed to preparing educators to teach science to all children.

  1. Can the Neighborhood Built Environment Make a Difference in Children's Development? Building the Research Agenda to Create Evidence for Place-Based Children's Policy.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Karen; Badland, Hannah; Kvalsvig, Amanda; O'Connor, Meredith; Christian, Hayley; Woolcock, Geoffrey; Giles-Corti, Billie; Goldfeld, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Healthy child development is determined by a combination of physical, social, family, individual, and environmental factors. Thus far, the majority of child development research has focused on the influence of individual, family, and school environments and has largely ignored the neighborhood context despite the increasing policy interest. Yet given that neighborhoods are the locations where children spend large periods of time outside of home and school, it is plausible the physical design of neighborhoods (built environment), including access to local amenities, can affect child development. The relatively few studies exploring this relationship support associations between child development and neighborhood destinations, green spaces, interaction with nature, traffic exposure, and housing density. These studies emphasize the need to more deeply understand how child development outcomes might be influenced by the neighborhood built environment. Pursuing this research space is well aligned with the current global movements on livable and child-friendly cities. It has direct public policy impact by informing planning policies across a range of sectors (urban design and planning, transport, public health, and pediatrics) to implement place-based interventions and initiatives that target children's health and development at the community level. We argue for the importance of exploring the effect of the neighborhood built environment on child development as a crucial first step toward informing urban design principles to help reduce developmental vulnerability in children and to set optimal child development trajectories early. PMID:26432681

  2. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and his or her JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for more than 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. The American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) contracts with NASA and manages program recruitment. Over the past several years, we have made attempts to increase the diversity of the participants in the NFFP Program. A great deal of attention has been given to candidates from minority-serving institutions. There were approximately 100 applicants for the 34 positions in 2002. JPL was the first-choice location for more than half of them. Faculty from 16 minority-serving institutions participated as well as four women. The summer began with an orientation meeting that included introduction of key program personnel, and introduction of the fellows to each other. During this welcome, the fellows were briefed on their obligations to the program and to their JPL colleagues. They were also given a short historical perspective on JPL and its relationship to Caltech and NASA. All fellows received a package, which included information on administrative procedures, roster of fellows, seminar program, housing questionnaire, directions to JPL, maps of

  3. State Synergies and Disease Surveillance: Creating an Electronic Health Data Communication Model for Cancer Reporting and Comparative Effectiveness Research in Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Reams, Christopher; Powell, Mallory; Edwards, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This case study describes the collaboration between a state public health department, a major research university, and a health extension service funded as part of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to establish an interoperable health information system for disease surveillance through electronic reporting of systemic therapy data from numerous oncology practices in Kentucky. The experience of the Kentucky cancer surveillance system can help local and state entities achieve greater effectiveness in designing communication efforts to increase usage of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchanges (HIEs), help eligible clinicians meet these new standards in patient care, and conduct disease surveillance in a learning health system. Innovation: We document and assess the statewide efforts of early health information technology (HIT) adopters in Kentucky to facilitate the nation’s first electronic transmission of a clinical document architecture (CDA) from a physician office to a state cancer surveillance registry in November 2012. Successful transmission of the CDA not only represented a landmark for technology innovators, informaticists, and clinicians, but it also set in motion a new communication mechanism by which state and federal agencies can capture and trade vital cancer statistics in a way that is safe, secure, and timely. The corresponding impact this has on cancer surveillance and comparative effective research is immense. With guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Kentucky Cancer Registry (KCR), the Kentucky Health Information Exchange (KHIE), and the Kentucky Regional Extension Center (KREC) have moved one step further in transforming the interoperable health environment for improved disease surveillance. Credibility: This case study describes the efforts of established and reputable agencies, including the KCR, the state department of health

  4. Shaking up the future of Hispanic students in rural southwest Arizona: A collaborative research/teaching effort creating a bridge between students and the geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, M. F.; Croxen, F.; Garrett, M.

    2002-12-01

    Arizona Western College, Yuma, Arizona, serves the largely Hispanic population of rural southwestern Arizona. The majority of our students are first-generation college students who frequently lack strong educational role models. We are constructing a geoscience education program for recruiting and mentoring Hispanic and Native American students from Yuma and La Paz counties, Arizona. This program will be structured around faculty-mentored, undergraduate research on the seismicity and related geologic phenomenon of the Salton Trough of southeastern California and northern Mexico. Yuma-area students are well-suited for this program, because they have strong footholds in the cultures and languages of the region. Our chief goal is to provide educational opportunities in geoscience for historically underrepresented minorities of southern Arizona and California. Ultimately, this should lead to leadership roles in the geoscience for Hispanics in the largely Hispanic communities of the desert southwest. Importantly, this geoscience education program has the support and collaboration of science educators from across the educational spectrum in southern Arizona and California, and northern Mexico.

  5. Creating the Evidence through Comparative Effectiveness Research for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice by Deploying a National Intervention Network and a National Data Repository

    PubMed Central

    Pechacek, Judith; Cerra, Frank; Brandt, Barbara; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Delaney, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is currently a resurgence of interest in interprofessional education and collaborative practice (IPECP) and its potential to positively impact health outcomes at both the patient level and population level, healthcare delivery, and health professions education. This resurgence of interest led to the creation of the National Center on Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and Education in October 2012. Methods: This paper describes three intertwined knowledge generation strategies of the National Center on Interprofessional Practice and Education: (1) the development of a Nexus Incubator Network, (2) the undertaking of comparative effectiveness research, and (3) the creation of a National Center Data Repository. Results: As these strategies are implemented over time they will result in the production of empirically grounded knowledge regarding the direction and scope of the impact, if any, of IPECP on well-defined health and healthcare outcomes including the possible improvement of the patient experience of care. Conclusions: Among the motivating factors for the National Center and the three strategies adopted and addressed herein is the need for rigorously produced, scientifically sound evidence regarding IPECP and whether or not it has the capacity to positively affect the patient experience of care, the health of populations, and the per capita cost of healthcare. PMID:27417753

  6. Bedside–to-Bench Translational Research for Chronic Heart Failure: Creating an Agenda for Clients Who Do Not Meet Trial Enrollment Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, P; Thomas, M

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition usually without cure. Significant developments, particularly those addressing pathophysiology, mainly started at the bench. This approach has seen many clinical observations initially explored at the bench, subsequently being trialed at the bedside, and eventually translated into clinical practice. This evidence, however, has several limitations, importantly the generalizability or external validity. We now acknowledge that clinical management of CHF is more complicated than merely translating bench-to-bedside evidence in a linear fashion. This review aims to help explore this evolving area from an Australian perspective. We describe the continuation of research once core evidence is established and describe how clinician–scientist collaboration with a bedside-to-bench view can help enhance evidence translation and generalizability. We describe why an extension of the available evidence or generating new evidence is occasionally needed to address the increasingly diverse cohort of patients. Finally, we explore some of the tools used by basic scientists and clinicians to develop evidence and describe the ones we feel may be most beneficial. PMID:26309418

  7. Broad scope method for creating humanized animal models for animal health and disease research through antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Korry J; Cox, James E; Rompato, Giovanni; Benninghoff, Abby D; Ward, Robert E; Broadbent, Jeff; Lefevre, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, mouse humanization studies have used human fecal transfer to germ-free animals. This practice requires gnotobiotic facilities and is restricted to gnotobiotic mouse lines, which limits humanized mouse research. We have developed a generalizable method to humanize non germ-free mice using antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer. The method involves depleting resident intestinal microbiota with broad-spectrum antibiotics, introducing human microbiota from frozen fecal samples by weekly gavage, and maintaining mice in HEPA-filtered microisolator cages. Pyrosequencing cecal microbiota 16S rRNA genes showed that recipient mice adopt a humanized microbiota profile analogous to their human donors, and distinct from mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) or untreated control mice. In the humanized mice, 75% of the sequence mass was observed in their respective human donor and conversely, 68% of the donor sequence mass was recovered in the recipient mice. Principal component analyses of GC- and HPLC-separated cecal metabolites were performed to determine effects of transplanted microbiota on the metabolome. Cecal metabolite profiles of mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) and control mice were dissimilar from each other and from humanized mice. Metabolite profiles for mice humanized from different donor samples clustered near each other, yet were sufficiently distinct that separate clusters were apparent for each donor. Also, cecal concentrations of 57 metabolites were significantly different between humanization treatments. These data demonstrate that our protocol can be used to humanize non germ-free mice and is sufficiently robust to generate metabolomic differences between mice humanized from different human donors. PMID:24637796

  8. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-05

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  9. Creating an Interactive Globe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kurt D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a hands-on geography activity that is designed to teach longitude and latitude to fifth-grade students. Children create a scale model of the earth from a 300 gram weather balloon. This activity incorporates geography, mathematics, science, art, and homework. Provides information for obtaining materials. (KO)

  10. How Banks Create Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Lyndi

    This teaching module explains how the U.S. banking system uses excess reserves to create money in the form of new deposits for borrowers. The module is part of a computer-animated series of four-to-five-minute modules illustrating standard concepts in high school economics. Although the module is designed to accompany the video program, it may be…

  11. Creating Quality Media Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1982-01-01

    Innovation, imagination, and student creativity are key ingredients in creating quality media materials for the small school. Student-produced media materials, slides without a camera, personalized slide programs and copy work, self-made task cards, self-made overhead transparencies, graphic materials, and utilization of the mass media are some of…

  12. Creating a Reference Toolbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane

    1997-01-01

    To help students understand that references are tools used to locate specific information, one librarian has her third-grade students create their own reference toolboxes as she introduces dictionaries, atlases, encyclopedias, and thesauri. Presents a lesson plan to introduce print and nonprint thesauri to third and fourth graders and includes a…

  13. Creating Photo Illustrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2003-01-01

    Explains the uses of photo illustrations. Notes that the key to developing a successful photo illustration is collaborative planning. Outlines the following guidelines for photo illustrations: never set up a photograph to mimic reality; create only abstractions with photo illustrations; clearly label photo illustrations; and never play photo…

  14. Creating Happy Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Denise Jarrett

    2001-01-01

    Some teachers are building and sharing their wisdom and know-how through lesson study, in the process creating memorable learning experiences for students and for each other. This paper describes how lesson study can transform teaching and how schools are implementing lesson study. A sidebar presents questions to consider in lesson study. (SM)

  15. Creating dedicated bioenergy crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy is one of the current mechanisms of producing renewable energy to reduce our use of nonrenewable fossil fuels and to reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Humans have been using bioenergy since we first learned to create and control fire - burning manure, peat, and wood to cook food...

  16. Create a Critter Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchey, Elizabeth K.; Nestlerode, Janet A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents methods for creating appropriate ways of collecting live specimens to use for firsthand observation in the classroom. Suggests ecological questions for students to address using these devices. This project is ideal for schools that have access to piers or bridges on a coastal body of water. (NB)

  17. Creating a Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazimirski, J.; And Others

    The second in a series of programmed books, "Creating a Market" is published by the International Labour Office as a manual for persons studying marketing. This manual was designed to meet the needs of the labor organization's technical cooperation programs and is primarily concerned with consumer goods industries. Using a fill-in-the-blanks and…

  18. Looking, Writing, Creating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzive, Bonnie

    1997-01-01

    Describes how a middle school language arts teacher makes analyzing and creating visual art a partner to reading and writing in her classroom. Describes a project on art and Vietnam which shows how background information can add to and influence interpretation. Describes a unit on Greek mythology and Greek vases which leads to a related visual…

  19. Creating an Interactive PDF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    There are many ways to begin a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat. The easiest and most popular way is to create the document in another application (such as Microsoft Word) and then use the Adobe Acrobat software to convert it to a PDF. In this article, the author describes how he used Acrobat's many tools in his project--an interactive…

  20. Creating a Classroom Makerspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Luz

    2014-01-01

    What is a makerspace? Makerspaces are community-operated physical spaces where people (makers) create do-it-yourself projects together. These membership spaces serve as community labs where people learn together and collaborate on projects. Makerspaces often have tools and equipment like 3-D printers, laser cutters, and soldering irons.…

  1. Creating a Virtual Gymnasium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorentino, Leah H.; Castelli, Darla

    2005-01-01

    Physical educators struggle with the challenges of assessing student performance, providing feedback about motor skills, and creating opportunities for all students to engage in game-play on a daily basis. The integration of technology in the gymnasium can address some of these challenges by improving teacher efficiency and increasing student…

  2. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  3. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  4. Create Your State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Kris; Melvin, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Students are often encouraged to work together with their classmates, sometimes with other classes, occasionally with kids at other schools, but rarely with kids across the country. In this article the authors describe the Create Your State project, a collaborative nationwide project inspired by the Texas Chair Project wherein the artist, Damien…

  5. Creating Quality Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    This booklet presents information on how total quality management can be applied to school systems to create educational improvement. Total quality management offers education a systemic approach and a new set of assessment tools. Chapter 1 provides a definition and historical overview of total quality management. Chapter 2 views the school…

  6. Educating Managers to Create Healthy Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This article provides management educators with a comprehensive, research-based set of concepts they can use to enrich students' understanding of how to create healthy workplaces. To assist with that endeavor, learning objectives related to creating healthy workplaces are provided. Work environment stressors are discussed along with human and…

  7. Creating Civil Societies: The University's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daxner, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The president emeritus of Carl von Ossietzky University in Germany describes a research project examining the university's role in creating a democratic citizenship, prompted by the European Union's need to create societies in which citizens can participate actively in determining their own future. (EV)

  8. Enhanced Research to Create More Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal, K.

    2004-03-01

    Mr. Doc Hastings, U.S. Congressman from the state of Washington is interviewed regarding various topics related to the nuclear energy picture in the US. Topics include the level of public support for nuclear energy, differences between the roles for state and federal governments, job creation, clean-up briefings, a Yucca Mountain status, a hydrogen-nuclear status, the role of nuclear energy in Kyoto protocol compliance, and the market for power plants.

  9. Methodologies in creating skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    The creation of skin substitutes has significantly decreased morbidity and mortality of skin wounds. Although there are still a number of disadvantages of currently available skin substitutes, there has been a significant decline in research advances over the past several years in improving these skin substitutes. Clinically most skin substitutes used are acellular and do not use growth factors to assist wound healing, key areas of potential in this field of research. This article discusses the five necessary attributes of an ideal skin substitute. It comprehensively discusses the three major basic components of currently available skin substitutes: scaffold materials, growth factors, and cells, comparing and contrasting what has been used so far. It then examines a variety of techniques in how to incorporate these basic components together to act as a guide for further research in the field to create cellular skin substitutes with better clinical results. PMID:27154041

  10. Creating and Disseminating Knowledge for Educational Reform: Policy Management of the National Institute of Education's Regional Educational Laboratories and National Research and Development Centers. A Report to the National Council on Educational Research. [Executive Summary and Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Leadership Development, Los Angeles, CA.

    Drawing on interviews, documents, and eight studies, this policy research study offers information and recommendations in order to fulfill the responsibility of the National Council on Educational Research to establish general policies for, and review the conduct of, the National Institute of Education (NIE). Questions guiding this study are: the…

  11. Creating Geoscience Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskop, J.; Buskop, W.

    2013-12-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization recognizes 21 World Heritage in the United States, ten of which have astounding geological features: Wrangell St. Elias National Park, Olympic National Park, Mesa Verde National Park, Chaco Canyon, Glacier National Park, Carlsbad National Park, Mammoth Cave, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and Everglades National Park. Created by a student frustrated with fellow students addicted to smart phones with an extreme lack of interest in the geosciences, one student visited each World Heritage site in the United States and created one e-book chapter per park. Each chapter was created with original photographs, and a geological discovery hunt to encourage teen involvement in preserving remarkable geological sites. Each chapter describes at least one way young adults can get involved with the geosciences, such a cave geology, glaciology, hydrology, and volcanology. The e-book describes one park per chapter, each chapter providing a geological discovery hunt, information on how to get involved with conservation of the parks, geological maps of the parks, parallels between archaeological and geological sites, and how to talk to a ranger. The young author is approaching UNESCO to publish the work as a free e-book to encourage involvement in UNESCO sites and to prove that the geosciences are fun.

  12. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  13. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  14. Creating healthy camp experiences.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward A; Tothy, Alison S

    2011-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has created recommendations for health appraisal and preparation of young people before participation in day or resident camps and to guide health and safety practices for children at camp. These recommendations are intended for parents, primary health care providers, and camp administration and health center staff. Although camps have diverse environments, there are general guidelines that apply to all situations and specific recommendations that are appropriate under special conditions. This policy statement has been reviewed and is supported by the American Camp Association. PMID:21444589

  15. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  16. Creating sustainable performance.

    PubMed

    Spreitzer, Gretchen; Porath, Christine

    2012-01-01

    What makes for sustainable individual and organizational performance? Employees who are thriving-not just satisfied and productive but also engaged in creating the future. The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization, and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers. Thriving has two components: vitality, or the sense of being alive and excited, and learning, or the growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment. Four mechanisms, none of which requires heroic effort or major resources, create the conditions for thriving: providing decision-making discretion, sharing information about the organization and its strategy, minimizing incivility, and offering performance feedback. Organizations such as Alaska Airlines, Zingerman's, Quicken Loans, and Caiman Consulting have found that helping people grow and remain energized at work is valiant on its own merits-but it can also boost performance in a sustainable way. PMID:22299508

  17. Entanglement Created by Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, Abdullah F.; Ficek, Zbigniew

    2011-10-27

    A technique for entangling closely separated atoms by the process of dissipative spontaneous emission is presented. The system considered is composed of two non-identical two-level atoms separated at the quarter wavelength of a driven standing wave laser field. At this atomic distance, only one of the atoms can be addressed by the laser field. In addition, we arrange the atomic dipole moments to be oriented relative to the inter-atomic axis such that the dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms is zero at this specific distance. It is shown that an entanglement can be created between the atoms on demand by tuning the Rabi frequency of the driving field to the difference between the atomic transition frequencies. The amount of the entanglement created depends on the ratio between the damping rates of the atoms, but is independent of the frequency difference between the atoms. We also find that the transient buildup of an entanglement between the atoms may differ dramatically for different initial atomic conditions.

  18. Creating Community through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Deborah E.; Travick-Jackson, Cecelia

    2006-01-01

    This research studies a doctoral program that includes a cohort component. Candidates engage in active learning and in the skill of mentoring. Research on peer mentoring has shown to support graduate students as they progress in their study (Luna & Cullen, 1998). Analysis of the data found themes relating to mentoring and community: candidates…

  19. How to Create Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    1984-01-01

    Describes a second year, high school biology course in which students learn how to do independent investigations. Focuses on the research methodology used by the students (including Campbell and Stanley designs) and instructional strategies. (JN)

  20. Creating the living brand.

    PubMed

    Bendapudi, Neeli; Bendapudi, Venkat

    2005-05-01

    It's easy to conclude from the literature and the lore that top-notch customer service is the province of a few luxury companies and that any retailer outside that rarefied atmosphere is condemned to offer mediocre service at best. But even companies that position themselves for the mass market can provide outstanding customer-employee interactions and profit from them, if they train employees to reflect the brand's core values. The authors studied the convenience store industry in depth and focused on two that have developed a devoted following: QuikTrip (QT) and Wawa. Turnover rates at QT and Wawa are 14% and 22% respectively, much lower than the typical rate in retail. The authors found six principles that both firms embrace to create a strong culture of customer service. Know what you're looking for: A focus on candidates' intrinsic traits allows the companies to hire people who will naturally bring the right qualities to the job. Make the most of talent: In mass-market retail, talent is generally viewed as a commodity, but that outlook becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. Create pride in the brand: Service quality depends directly on employees' attachment to the brand. Build community: Wawa and QT have made concerted efforts to build customer loyalty through a sense of community. Share the business context: Employees need a clear understanding of how their company operates and how it defines success. Satisfy the soul: To win an employee's passionate engagement, a company must meet his or her needs for security, esteem, and justice. PMID:15929408

  1. Creating Unique Research Experiences for two-year College faculty And Students (URECAS): An integrated research and transfer program for two-year college students in the Earth and space sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, P. M.; Adamec, B.

    2012-12-01

    Nationwide, approximately 17% of all two-year colleges offer geoscience degrees, and the two-year college population is growing rapidly. Although 33% of two-year college students are members of underrepresented minorities, this group earned only 12% of geoscience associate's degrees in 2008. Thus, engaging with two-year colleges represents both a potential rich source of diversity for the field and an area where much work remains to be done. Through the National Science Foundation's Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences Program, we conducted a workshop at the American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Headquarters in Washington DC in July, 2012. This workshop gathered over fifty participants including two-year college Earth and space science faculty who conduct research with their students, as some of their four-year college partners, members of other scientific organizations, and federal employees working to support Earth and space science education. Our workshop provided the opportunity for two-year college faculty to increase their awareness of existing and successful research programs in the Earth and space sciences, and helped to identify relevant challenges to participation for both students and faculty. Additionally, faculty from four-year Earth and space science programs who have successfully transitioned two-year college students into their programs sparked a discussion of the issues and barriers involved in that process. Outcomes from this workshop include dissemination of best practices for doing student-faculty research in Earth and space sciences at two-year colleges, at nearby four-year campuses, and national summer research programs. Our workshop built on previous efforts to coalesce a community of practice made up of two-year college faculty who conduct research in the Earth and space sciences with their students and those who are interested in partnering with or supporting them. Finally, the planning workshop helped to define the path

  2. An interpretivist teacher research study of how connections to a high school classroom experience are created among students, parents, and the teacher through the use of a teacher's website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Henry C.

    The purpose of this interpretivist, teacher research study was to describe and explain how connections to a high school classroom are created among students, parents, and the teacher through the use of my website. The questions that guided the study are: (1) How does the use of a website affect the connection between students and the classroom experience? (2) How does the use of a website affect the connection between students and their teacher? (3) How does the use of a website affect the connection between parents and their students' classroom experience? The study was centered on the framework of currere which is a process that uses the past and future to bracket an experience before synthesizing the parts together to understand the overall meaning. Data were gathered through student reflections, student autobiographies, and student and parent questionnaires. Student autobiographies collected at the beginning and end of the year served as the regressive and progressive steps of currere, which bracketed weekly student reflections. The effects of the website on the classroom experience were revealed when I synthesized the student data with the information I had collected from parents, and from my own journal. The data were then presented in the form of narratives from the interpreted views of the students, parents, and the teacher. The study found that personal relationships are important and essential to creating an environment where the teacher can adapt to the changing needs of students and parents. The website provided a vehicle for the transfer of real time information between all the parties involved in the classroom experience. The website sped up the processes that led to a belonging classroom, a community of learners. An unexpected finding was the stakeholders were empowered to use the website to shape the development of the classroom experience throughout the school year.

  3. Creating new market space.

    PubMed

    Kim, W C; Mauborgne, R

    1999-01-01

    Most companies focus on matching and beating their rivals. As a result, their strategies tend to take on similar dimensions. What ensues is head-to-head competition based largely on incremental improvements in cost, quality, or both. The authors have studied how innovative companies break free from the competitive pack by staking out fundamentally new market space--that is, by creating products or services for which there are no direct competitors. This path to value innovation requires a different competitive mind-set and a systematic way of looking for opportunities. Instead of looking within the conventional boundaries that define how an industry competes, managers can look methodically across them. By so doing, they can find unoccupied territory that represents real value innovation. Rather than looking at competitors within their own industry, for example, managers can ask why customers make the trade-off between substitute products or services. Home Depot, for example, looked across the substitutes serving home improvement needs. Intuit looked across the substitutes available to individuals managing their personal finances. In both cases, powerful insights were derived from looking at familiar data from a new perspective. Similar insights can be gleaned by looking across strategic groups within an industry; across buyer groups; across complementary product and service offerings; across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry; and even across time. To help readers explore new market space systematically, the authors developed a tool, the value curve, that can be used to represent visually a range of value propositions. PMID:10345394

  4. Creating alternatives in science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Traditional scientist training at the PhD level does not prepare students to be competitive in biotechnology or other non-academic science careers. Some universities have developed biotechnology-relevant doctoral programmes, but most have not. Forming a life science career club makes a statement to university administrators that it is time to rework the curriculum to include biotechnology-relevant training. A career club can supplement traditional PhD training by introducing students to available career choices, help them develop a personal network and teach the business skills that they will need to be competitive in science outside of academia. This paper is an instructional guide designed to help students create a science career club at their own university. These suggestions are based on the experience gained in establishing such a club for the Graduate School at the University of Colorado Denver. We describe the activities that can be offered, the job descriptions for the offices required and potential challenges. With determination, a creative spirit, and the guidance of this paper, students should be able to greatly increase awareness of science career options, and begin building the skills necessary to become competitive in non-academic science. PMID:20161069

  5. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Joseph H.; Seebode, Linda C.

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  6. Creating Sample Plans

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  7. Self Creating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Bruce

    2001-04-01

    Cosmology has deduced that our existence began 15 billion years ago but that does not constitute a true story. When compared against infinity, the true question one must as is, ‘why did creation begin now (a mere 15 billion give or take years ago) and not at some infinite point before? What could keep the one common original source static for an infinity, and then spring forth into existence?’ Also, accelerators are actually creating atmospheres much like that within quasars, black holes and stars. This destructive/creative environment is not that of original creation, it is of that which occurs in a later stage of cosmic evolution. Knowing that it is only a matter of movement or change, understanding what is moving is the key. Regardless of how much power is used to alter the character of a particle’s matter, it does not make its essence go away, nor does it make the understanding of original essence clearer. To find the true answer of what occurred, one must look back in time and think carefully over the process of elimination to find the original creation of matter, albeit different than that of the later processes. Matter and the physical laws formed themselves in an absolute infinity of blackness prior to light and no Big Bang scenario was necessary.

  8. Creating a Marketing Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevier, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    A guide to developing a college marketing plan defines key marketing terms, outlines the development of a plan (including institutional analysis, market research, strategy formation and execution, and program evaluation), and provides a list of important principles with which to operate a program. (MSE)

  9. Creating a Collaborative Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Fisher, Alice; Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly; Lunenburg, Fred; Creighton, Ted; Czaja, Marion; Merchant, Jimmy; Christianson, Judy

    More and more research is focusing on the importance of a healthy work environment and its impact on workers' well-being and productivity. A culture of collaboration has been shown to have an important impact on school-reform efforts and is recognized by several authors as an effective platform for progress within an organization. A collaborative…

  10. SIRTF Cycle-1 Research Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Bicay, M. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the fourth and final element in NASA's family of Great Observatories, was successfully launched into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit on August 25, 2003. The SIRTF Science Center (SSC) at Caltech is now soliciting Cycle-1 research proposals from the worldwide scientific community. Proposals must be submitted electronically to the SSC by February 14, 2004. A preliminary version of the Cycle-1 Call for Proposals (CP) was issued by the SSC in November 2002. A CP Update and supporting technical documentation, which incorporates the on-orbit performance of the observatory, were released in December 2003. Investigations may be proposed for new SIRTF observations, through the General Observer (GO) program, or for archival research. About 3700 hours of observing time is being offered for the Cycle-1 GO Program, in small (less than 50 hours) and medium (50 to 200 hours) categories. More than \\15 million in NASA data analysis support is available to qualified GO investigators. For GO proposals, a detailed list of proposed observations, generated by the SIRTF Planning Observations Tool, must accompany the research proposal. The Archival Research (AR) Program in Cycle-1 is limited to the analysis of data from the First-Look Survey, a 100-hour program to be executed by the SSC at the start of the science mission. Up to \\750,000 in NASA data analysis support is available to qualified AR investigators. All documents supporting the Cycle-1 solicitation are available online in the Proposal Kit section of the SSC public Web site (http://sirtf.caltech.edu/SSC/). Questions pertaining to the Cycle-1 CP should be sent electronically to the SSC HelpDesk at sirtf@ipac.caltech.edu. SIRTF is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  11. Creating a Toilet Training Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Creating a Toilet Training Plan Page Content Article Body These are the tools ... will need to create your own toilet-training plan and implement it at the best time for ...

  12. Creating engaging experiences for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    McClusky, John F

    2008-01-01

    The traditional model of rehabilitation center design based on usability and function falls short of addressing the aspirations of those who use them. To better serve the motivational needs of both patients and therapists, we need to reconsider the gymnasium-inspired designs of current rehabilitation centers. Designers Patricia Moore and David Guynes have drawn inspiration from the everyday to create more engaging rehabilitation experiences with their Easy Street, Independence Square, Rehab 1-2-3, Our Town, and WorkSyms rehabilitation environments. Their designs simulate real-life situations to motivate patients by helping them connect their therapy to the life in which they aspire to return. Utilizing an empathic research process, Moore and Guynes build a deeper understanding of both patients' and therapists' values and apply that understanding to designs that are more directly connected to patients' aspirational goals while still meeting their functional rehabilitation needs. This same research-based design approach is utilized in all of their design work that has included, most recently, the design of the Phoenix Valley Transit Authority's Metro Light Rail Train. The train and stations have won awards for accessibility and will begin public operation in late 2008. PMID:18430671

  13. How Research Space Is Created in a Diverse Research World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Diane D.

    2009-01-01

    About a decade ago it was suggested (Belcher, 1997) that increasing diversity among professional academics writing in English, i.e., the growing presence of women and those (both men and women) from outside the Anglophone "inner circle" (Kachru, 1992), was exerting mounting pressure on established academia for greater tolerance of non-traditional,…

  14. Photocatalytic Solutions Create Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    A Stennis Space Center researcher investigating the effectiveness of photocatalytic materials for keeping the Center's buildings free of grime turned to a solution created by PURETi Inc. of New York City. Testing proved successful, and NASA and the company now share a Dual Use Technology partnership. PURETi's coatings keep surfaces clean and purify surrounding air, eliminating pollution, odors, and microbes.

  15. Creating the Total Quality Effective School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    This book shows how Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) theory for organizational management can be integrated with the effective-schools literature. Part 1 compares the 14 principles of TQM with the tenets of effective-schools research. The second part develops a blueprint for creating the total quality effective school. The conceptual…

  16. Instruction: Does It Mean Creating Intelligence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brethower, Dale

    1990-01-01

    Argues that the mission of the university is to create intelligence. Defines intelligence, discusses research on cognitive processes of learning, and discusses obstacles to using the demonstrate-label-coach-mastery strategy emphasizing the value of the clinical approach used to teach seven specific skills. Presents a classroom illustration of this…

  17. Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

  18. The Leadership Assignment: Creating Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    This book provides change-motivated leaders with an understanding of the change process and the tools to drive change. Eight change principles guide change agents in creating and sustaining change: prepare to lead change; knowledge is power; create empowering mental models; overcome resistance to change; lead change; accelerate the change process;…

  19. India creates social marketing organization.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    India, in a major policy shift toward reversible birth controls methods, will form a new organization to promote private sector contraceptive sales. The government, through a recently signed agreement with the Agency for International Development (AID), plans to establish a private nonprofit Contraceptive Marketing Organization (CMO) in fiscal year 1984. This momentous move marks a full circle return to a 1969 proposal by AID and Ford Foundation consultants. Funded at about $500 million over a 7 year period, the CMO will function as a semi-autonomous entity run by a board of governors representing government and such public and public sectors as health, communications, management, manufacturing, marketing, advertising, and market research. According to the agreement called the India Family Planning Communications and Marketing Plan, the CMO's activities will cover procurement and distribution of condoms, oral contraceptives (OCs), and other yet to be determined contraceptive methods. Of the $500 million in funds, the government of India has pledged 2/3, AID roughly $50 million in grants and loans, with the balance expected from such sources as the UN Fund for Population Activities. The CMO's goal is a marked increase in contraceptive use by married couples of reproductive age from the current 6% rate to 20% by 1990. As of 1982, India has 122 million such couples, with 1% purchasing commercial products, 2% buying Nirodh Marketing Program condoms and 3% relying on free government contraceptives. Besides creating the CMO, the India/AID pact outlines intensified public sector family planning promotions and activities. Some Indian health experts believe the government's decision to expand social marketing's role rests with a significant decade long decline in the popularity of such permanent birth control measures as vasectomy and tubal ligation. PMID:12313308

  20. Summer Student Research Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Carol (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, over 150 undergraduate students and first-year graduate students participated in a variety of research programs coordinated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Education Office in conjunction with the Caltech Student- Faculty Programs Office. The programs give students the opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of an experienced mentor for a 10-week period. Students gain valuable experience while contributing to the ongoing goals of JPL. Students are required to submit progress reports and an abstract, and to give an oral presentation of their projects to an audience of JPL staff and other students. This set of abstracts provides brief descriptions of the projects that were conducted by these students and their mentors. A schedule of student talks is also included.

  1. The Caltech airborne submillimeter SIS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Carlstrom, J.; Miller, D.; Ugras, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have constructed a sensitive submillimeter receiver for the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) which at present operates in the 500-750 GHz band. The DSB receiver noise temperature is about 5 h nu/k(sub B) over the 500-700 GHz range. This receiver has been used to detect H2O(18)O, HCl, and CH in interstellar molecular clouds, and also to search for C(+) emission from the highly redshifted galaxy (z = 2.3) IRAS 10214.

  2. Light Matters (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Atwater, Harry (Director, Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI), California Institute of Technology); LMI Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Light Matters' was submitted by the Center for Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'striking photography and visual impact'. LMI, an EFRC directed by Harry Atwater at the California Institute of Technology is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: CalTech (lead), University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion is 'to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter to sculpt the flow of sunlight, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency.' Research topics are: catalysis (imines hydrocarbons), solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, photonic, solid state lighting, metamaterial, optics, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, photsynthesis, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, and matter by design.

  3. Creating and Exploring Simple Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Miles J.

    2007-01-01

    Students manipulate data algebraically, and statistically to create models applied to a falling ball. They also borrow tools from arithmetic progressions to examine the relationship between the velocity and the distance the ball falls. (Contains 2 tables and 5 figures.)

  4. NITARP: Measuring The Effectiveness of an Authentic Research Experience in Secondary Astronomy Education Through Concept Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, Elin; Rebull, Luisa M.; Black, David V.; Gibbs, John; Larsen, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    For secondary students to make use of astronomical data in a school setting, they previously needed access to large telescopes, expensive equipment and difficult-to-use software. This has improved as online data archives have become available; however, difficulties remain, including searching and downloading the data and translating it into formats that high school students can readily analyze. To address these issues, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) selects teams consisting of teachers and students from several schools. Each year, new teams of educators attend an introductory workshop at the winter AAS conference where they select a research project that will use the archived data. Throughout the spring, educators engage in weekly teleconferences, write proposals, and begin working with their students. The teams meet at Caltech in the summer to learn how to access and analyze the IPAC data and continue to work throughout the fall. Through this experience, participants learn how to search, download, translate, and analyze authentic astronomical data. They learn the nature of scientific communication through developing and presenting their findings alongside practicing astronomers at the following winter AAS. In order to measure how successful the 2014 NITARP summer visit was in teaching participating high school students the terminology and processes necessary to analyze IPAC data, students were asked to create concept maps showing the main and subsidiary ideas and concepts related to their research. They then synthesized their group webs into a master web. When additional terms and concepts were presented, the students were able to integrate them into the master web, showing that they understood the relationship of ideas, concepts, and processes needed for their research. Our companion poster, Gibbs et al., presents the scientific aspects of this project. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program

  5. "Dieu a cree la femelle, l'homme a fait la femme." En rekognoscering i dansk og undenlandsk konssprogsforskning ("God Created the Female, Man Created Woman." A Reconnaissance in Danish and Foreign Research on Sex Differences and Language). ROLIG papir 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennicke, Annette

    Research on sex differences and language includes the following (many titles are English translations): "Language--The Child, the Women, the Family"; "Woman and Man"; "In Society's Words"; "The Life of Words"; "Verbs and Women"; "Lines from a Ladies Luncheon"; "The History of the Danish Language"; "How Sex Roles Are Represented and Conserved in…

  6. Journaling: creating space for "I".

    PubMed

    Charles, Jennell P

    2010-01-01

    As nurses engaged in a caring profession, it is critical that we learn not only to care for others but also to care for ourselves. To care effectively for ourselves, we must create the space and time in which to do this. Journaling is one tool that scholars offer as a way to create this space. Although there is no clear consensus about the best techniques for journaling, there is evidence that journaling, as a reflective, meditative activity, can promote creativity, self-awareness, and personal development. PMID:21140872

  7. Creating a New Professional Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Reading and Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This position paper investigates the merits and potential benefits of creating a new, more comprehensive professional association for members of the learning assistance and developmental education profession. This was the task assigned to the College Reading and Learning Association/National Association for Developmental Education (CRLA/NADE)…

  8. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  9. Creating Frameworks for Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2007-01-01

    The task of creating organizational policies and systems that promote and support reflective teaching is multifaceted and seldom enumerated in early childhood professional literature. One of the best overviews the author has found comes from Carol Brunson Phillips and Sue Bredekamp (1998). The author opines that if the early childhood profession…

  10. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  11. Creating Presentations on ICT Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the creation of presentations on ICT classes. The first part highlights the most important steps when creating a presentation. The main idea is, that the computer presentation shouldn't consist only from the technological part, i.e. the editing of the presentation in a computer program. There are many steps before and after…

  12. Creating Space for Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As teachers struggle to balance the needs of their students with the requirements of commercial reading materials, educators need to consider how teachers will create space for children's literature in today's classrooms. In this article, 10 practical recommendations for incorporating children's literature in the reading instructional framework…

  13. Creating Time for Equity Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renée, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Iin urban communities across the nation, a broad range of partners have committed to reinventing educational time together to ensure equitable access to rich learning opportunities for all young people. Across the nation, education partners are using their creativity, commitment, and unique resources to create new school and system designs that…

  14. Creating a Global Perspective Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braskamp, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    The author has written this Guidebook to assist users interested in creating a campus that will be more global in its mission, programs, and people. His approach is to focus on the views and contributions of the people who are engaged in higher education. Thus it has a "person" emphasis rather than a structural or policy point of view. The author…

  15. Creating a Culture of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Phyllis H.

    1994-01-01

    In financially troubled times, the college or university must develop a culture of leadership. Leadership development programming can strengthen the institution by fostering a team approach to solving institutional problems, by increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of human resources, and by creating a pool of qualified professionals for…

  16. Schoolwide Behavior Support: Creating Urban Schools that Accommodate Diverse Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Robert; Hawken, Leanne; Green, Judith

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the challenges that urban special education administrators face in serving students with frequent behavior problems. New strategies for creating supportive environments are shared, including creating a positive school climate, increasing capacity to initiate and maintain research-validated practices, and implementing programs…

  17. Verbal and Behavioral Cues: Creating an Autonomy-Supportive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young-Jones, Adena; Cara, Kelly Copeland; Levesque-Bristol, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Teaching practices can create a range of autonomy-supportive or controlling learning environments. Research shows that autonomy-supportive techniques are more conducive to positive learning outcomes than controlling techniques. This study focused on simple verbal and behavioral cues that any teacher could use to create a positive learning…

  18. Self-Invented Notation Systems Created by Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pyng-Na

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated self-invented notation systems created by young children aged four to six. The researcher showed the children how to feel various pitches and rhythms through singing, eurhythmy, instrumental playing, rhymes and music appreciation. The children were then provided with opportunities to create music notations and…

  19. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1984-01-01

    This potpourri surveys research on various topics: neurologically based curricula, midafternoon slumps in student attention, accounting for contexts in research, feelings of powerlessness among students and teachers, further equity implications of computers in schools, misreporting of research findings, and accounting for media transfer in…

  20. Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160027.html Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal Weight, race, education and lifestyle all affect timing, duration of symptoms, research indicates To ...

  1. Old Advice for New Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I offer advice to new researchers on how to conduct a successful research project in educational psychology. I break the research task into three parts: creating a research question, creating a research methodology, and creating a dissemination plan. The criteria for creating a research question include personal interest,…

  2. Creating and Analyzing a Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Lauren; Stewart, Bailey; Peatross, Justin

    2006-10-01

    Most people have witnessed mirages such as the distant "puddles" that appear on a highway when the pavement is warmed by the Sun. The warmed surface heats the nearby air creating a temperature gradient with the cooler (and more dense) air above. The apparent displacement of distant objects occurs as light refracts through the different air densities. Rays of light from the sky that are originally directed toward the ground can be bent upward, appearing to a viewer as though coming from the ground. This effect is known as an inferior mirage; a superior mirage occurs when cooler air is underneath.1,2 In this paper, a mirage is created indoors using an electric hotplate and a saucepan filled with ice water.

  3. Creating small transcription activating RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James; Takahashi, Melissa K; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-03-01

    We expanded the mechanistic capability of small RNAs by creating an entirely synthetic mode of regulation: small transcription activating RNAs (STARs). Using two strategies, we engineered synthetic STAR regulators to disrupt the formation of an intrinsic transcription terminator placed upstream of a gene in Escherichia coli. This resulted in a group of four highly orthogonal STARs that had up to 94-fold activation. By systematically modifying sequence features of this group, we derived design principles for STAR function, which we then used to forward engineer a STAR that targets a terminator found in the Escherichia coli genome. Finally, we showed that STARs could be combined in tandem to create previously unattainable RNA-only transcriptional logic gates. STARs provide a new mechanism of regulation that will expand our ability to use small RNAs to construct synthetic gene networks that precisely control gene expression. PMID:25643173

  4. Creating advanced health informatics certification.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Cynthia S; Williamson, Jeffrey J; Steen, Elaine B; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    In 2005, AMIA leaders and members concluded that certification of advanced health informatics professionals would offer value to individual practitioners, organizations that hire them, and society at large. AMIA's work to create advanced informatics certification began by leading a successful effort to create the clinical informatics subspecialty for American Board of Medical Specialties board-certified physicians. Since 2012, AMIA has been working to establish advanced health informatics certification (AHIC) for all health informatics practitioners regardless of their primary discipline. In November 2015, AMIA completed the first of 3 key tasks required to establish AHIC, with the AMIA Board of Directors' endorsement of proposed eligibility requirements. This AMIA Board white paper describes efforts to establish AHIC, reports on the current status of AHIC components, and provides a context for the proposed AHIC eligibility requirements. PMID:27358327

  5. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  6. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen

    In May of 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences hosted a conference on ways to improve the scientific quality of educational research. In medicine, thanks to work 40 years ago by 2 researchers, Howard Hyatt and Frederick Mosteller, the commitment of medical professionals to base their diagnoses and prescriptions on clinical trials in…

  7. Creating Cross-disciplinary Courses

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Elaine R.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its focus on the biological underpinnings of action and behavior, neuroscience intersects with many fields of human endeavor. Some of these cross-disciplinary intersections have been long standing, while others, such as neurotheology or neuroeconomics, are more recently formed fields. Many undergraduate institutions have sought to include cross-disciplinary courses in their curriculum because this style of pedagogy is often seen as applicable to real world problems. However, it can be difficult for faculty with specialized training within their discipline to expand beyond their own fields to offer cross-disciplinary courses. I have been creating a series of multi- or cross-disciplinary courses and have found some strategies that have helped me successfully teach these classes. I will discuss general strategies and tools in developing these types of courses including: 1) creating mixed experience classrooms of students and contributing faculty 2) finding the right tools that will allow you to teach to a mixed population without prerequisites 3) examining the topic using multiple disciplinary perspectives 4) feeding off student experience and interest 5) assessing the impact of these courses on student outcomes and your neuroscience program. This last tool in particular is important in establishing the validity of this type of teaching for neuroscience students and the general student population. PMID:23494491

  8. Creating your own leadership brand.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised. PMID:12424994

  9. Creating your own leadership brand.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised. PMID:12382542

  10. Creating Family/School Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Barry, Ed.

    The papers in this volume, commissioned by RMC Research Corporation for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, were adapted to reflect the input of participants at a national conference in Washington, DC in June 1992 on middle grades parent and community involvement. Part I reviews the literature in five chapters that focus on the…

  11. Creating Asynchronous Online Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    This research project examined how to develop and sustain online, asynchronous learning communities in continuous intake, distance education environments for learners in grades 7 through 10. The study is an action research project that is based upon in-depth, qualitative data. Interviews were conducted with distance education teachers,…

  12. Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  13. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  14. Creating an environment for learning.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-03-16

    This article, the third in a series of 11, provides guidance to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence that meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice (SSLAP). The importance of developing a high quality practice placement is discussed in relation to the fifth domain of the SSLAP, 'creating an environment for learning'. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements of this domain. PMID:26982867

  15. Creating breakthroughs at 3M.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, E; Thomke, S; Sonnack, M

    1999-01-01

    Most senior managers want their product development teams to create break-throughs--new products that will allow their companies to grow rapidly and maintain high margins. But more often they get incremental improvements to existing products. That's partly because companies must compete in the short term. Searching for breakthroughs is expensive and time consuming; line extensions can help the bottom line immediately. In addition, developers simply don't know how to achieve breakthroughs, and there is usually no system in place to guide them. By the mid-1990s, the lack of such a system was a problem even for an innovative company like 3M. Then a project team in 3M's Medical-Surgical Markets Division became acquainted with a method for developing breakthrough products: the lead user process. The process is based on the fact that many commercially important products are initially thought of and even prototyped by "lead users"--companies, organizations, or individuals that are well ahead of market trends. Their needs are so far beyond those of the average user that lead users create innovations on their own that may later contribute to commercially attractive breakthroughs. The lead user process transforms the job of inventing breakthroughs into a systematic task of identifying lead users and learning from them. The authors explain the process and how the 3M project team successfully navigated through it. In the end, the team proposed three major new product lines and a change in the division's strategy that has led to the development of breakthrough products. And now several more divisions are using the process to break away from incrementalism. PMID:10621267

  16. Philanthropy's new agenda: creating value.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E; Kramer, M R

    1999-01-01

    During the past two decades, the number of charitable foundations in the United States has doubled while the value of their assets has increased more than 1,100%. As new wealth continues to pour into foundations, the authors take a timely look at the field and conclude that radical change is needed. First, they explain why. Compared with direct giving, foundations are strongly favored through tax preferences whose value increases in rising stock markets. As a nation, then, we make a substantial investment in foundation philanthropy that goes well beyond the original gifts of private donors. We should therefore expect foundations to achieve a social impact disproportionate to their spending. If foundations serve merely as passive conduits for giving, then they not only fall far short of their potential but also fail to meet an important societal obligation. Drawing on Porter's work on competition and strategy, the authors then present a framework for thinking systematically about how foundations create value and how the various approaches to value creation can be deployed within the context of an overarching strategy. Although many foundations talk about "strategic" giving, much current practice is at odds with strategy. Among the common problems, foundations scatter their funding too broadly, they overlook the value-creating potential of longer and closer working relationships with grantees, and they pay insufficient attention to the ultimate results of the work they fund. This article lays out a blueprint for change, challenging foundation leaders to spearhead the evolution of philanthropy from private acts of conscience into a professional field. PMID:10662001

  17. Create a Pint-Sized Photo Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathright, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Explains a project, which involves creating a book using digital images. Notes that teachers can create books with samples of their work. Provides other suggestions for using this project, such as teaching scanning, creating a photo portfolio as a semester exam project, or creating introduction pieces for yearbook or newspaper staffers. (PM)

  18. ASDSO updates bibliography, creates support database

    SciTech Connect

    Spragens, L. )

    1993-04-01

    The Association of State Dam Safety Officials has updated its Bibliography of Dam Safety Practices, originally published in 1990 with assistance from the US Committee on Large Dams. The new document lists publications addressing dam safety issues and includes 20 subject headings. The Federal Emergency Management Agency underwrote the update, which includes information about journal articles on dam safety, conference presentations, and new books and manuals. The publication also contains information about obtaining copies of the documents. The bibliography features a new section on use of geosynthetics in dam safety, compiled by Greg Hammer, of ASDSO's Technical Committee. Dam break analysis, emergency action planning, instrumentation, inspections, overtopping of dams, rehabilitation of dams, risk analysis, and seismic behavior are also included. In conjunction with the release of the updated bibliography, ASDSO is creating a computer database for its members that contains information from the bibliography. ASDSO also is in the process of adding information to the database about current research in dam safety. When the database becomes available later this year, members will be able to search for information on research in a specific subject area. Users also will be able to search for research groups, individuals, and universities to obtain an overview of who is conducting research in dam safety. Additionally, the database will allow the user to search for subject matter experts when looking for conference speakers and writers with specific specialties.

  19. Governing Bodies That Consider Joining or Creating Federations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a research study exploring what motivates governing bodies to consider joining or creating a federation, their experiences of the process and the barriers faced. The research methodology involved semi-structured telephone interviews, face-to-face interviews and analysis of relevant documentation. The varied…

  20. Creating experimental color harmony map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaret, Christel; Urban, Fabrice; Lepinel, Josselin

    2014-02-01

    Starting in the 17th century with Newton, color harmony is a topic that did not reach a consensus on definition, representation or modeling so far. Previous work highlighted specific characteristics for color harmony on com- bination of color doublets or triplets by means of a human rating on a harmony scale. However, there were no investigation involving complex stimuli or pointing out how harmony is spatially located within a picture. The modeling of such concept as well as a reliable ground-truth would be of high value for the community, since the applications are wide and concern several communities: from psychology to computer graphics. We propose a protocol for creating color harmony maps from a controlled experiment. Through an eye-tracking protocol, we focus on the identification of disharmonious colors in pictures. The experiment was composed of a free viewing pass in order to let the observer be familiar with the content before a second pass where we asked "to search for the most disharmonious areas in the picture". Twenty-seven observers participated to the experiments that was composed of a total of 30 different stimuli. The high inter-observer agreement as well as a cross-validation confirm the validity of the proposed ground-truth.

  1. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture. PMID:19910709

  2. Creating healthy and just bioregions.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Keith; Leiter, Robert Allen

    2016-03-01

    Dramatic changes taking place locally, regionally, globally, demand that we rethink strategies to improve public health, especially in disadvantaged communities where the cumulative impacts of toxicant exposure and other environmental and social stressors are most damaging. The emergent field of Sustainability Science, including a new bioregionalism for the 21st Century, is giving rise to promising place-based (territorially rooted) approaches. Embedded in this bioregional approach is an integrated planning framework (IPF) that enables people to map and develop plans and strategies that cut across various scales (e.g. from regional to citywide to neighborhood scale) and various topical areas (e.g. urban land use planning, water resource planning, food systems planning and "green infrastructure" planning) with the specific intent of reducing the impacts of toxicants to public health and the natural environment. This paper describes a case of bioregionally inspired integrated planning in San Diego, California (USA). The paper highlights food-water-energy linkages and the importance of "rooted" community-university partnerships and knowledge-action collaboratives in creating healthy and just bioregions. PMID:26812849

  3. Creating a urine black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, Randy; Pan, Zhao; Meritt, Andrew; Belden, Jesse; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    Since the mid-nineteenth century, both enlisted and fashion-conscious owners of khaki trousers have been plagued by undesired speckle patterns resulting from splash-back while urinating. In recent years, industrial designers and hygiene-driven entrepreneurs have sought to limit this splashing by creating urinal inserts, with the effectiveness of their inventions varying drastically. From this large assortment of inserts, designs consisting of macroscopic pillar arrays seem to be the most effective splash suppressers. Interestingly this design partially mimics the geometry of the water capturing moss Syntrichia caninervis, which exhibits a notable ability to suppress splash and quickly absorb water from impacting rain droplets. With this natural splash suppressor in mind, we search for the ideal urine black hole by performing experiments of simulated urine streams (water droplet streams) impacting macroscopic pillar arrays with varying parameters including pillar height and spacing, draining and material properties. We propose improved urinal insert designs based on our experimental data in hopes of reducing potential embarrassment inherent in wearing khakis.

  4. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  5. Adolescents and HIV: creating partnerships.

    PubMed

    Tierney, S

    1998-05-01

    Despite the President's directive on youth and HIV in 1997 to focus the nation's attention on adolescents and the battle against AIDS, prevention programs continue to be ineffective. The number of seropositive youth, ages 13 to 24 years old, is unclear due to inconsistent definitions of age ranges and inadequate access to testing. Youth have not sought testing for many reasons, including failing to perceive their vulnerability to HIV, confidentiality concerns, and not realizing the effectiveness of early treatment. Adolescents are creating independence, establishing relationships, and learning about drugs and alcohol. Young gay and bisexual men, drug-using youth, and youth of color are at high risk of HIV transmission. Identifying the population involved in risk-taking behavior and eliminating the behavior is an ineffective strategy for adolescent HIV prevention programs. Complicating the issue further, the goals and expectations of adolescents differ from the adults who design and deliver prevention programs. HIV education and prevention efforts need to address solutions to hopelessness, isolation, and violence, rather than focusing on the negative effects risky behaviors will have in the future. Effective programs combine a youth/adult partnership to take advantage of the strengths of each individual. Strategies for implementing prevention programs that address the specific needs of adolescents are suggested. PMID:11365416

  6. Creating a "Virtual" Magnet School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Burton E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a "virtual" magnet school in Massachusetts for high school math and science that uses telecommunications to link students, universities, and corporate advisors. University and corporate roles are discussed, a summer institute is described, and sample research activities are included. (LRW)

  7. Creating School-Business Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy. Bureau of Student, Community and Adult Services.

    The six chapters in this publication describe the scope of school/business partnership activity in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Following the first chapter's introductory remarks, chapter 2 outlines methodology for the research project. Surveys were sent to superintendents of schools and to various businesses thought likely to be involved in…

  8. Creating Sister Cities: An Exchange Across Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. T.; Cabezon, S. A.; Hardy, E.; Harrison, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this project creates a cultural and educational exchange program between communities in South and North America, linking San Pedro de Atacama in Chile and Magdalena, New Mexico in the United States. Both communities have similar demographics, are in relatively undeveloped regions of high-elevation desert, and are located near major international radio astronomy research facilities. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is just 40 km east of San Pedro; the Very Large Array (VLA) is just 40 km west of Magdalena. In February 2007, the Mayor of San Pedro and two teachers visited Magdalena for two weeks; in July 2007 three teachers from Magdalena will visit San Pedro. These visits enable the communities to lay the foundation for a permanent, unique partnership. The teachers are sharing expertise and teaching methodologies for physics and astronomy. In addition to creating science education opportunities, this project offers students linguistic and cultural connections. The town of San Pedro, Chile, hosts nearly 100,000 tourists per year, and English language skills are highly valued by local students. Through exchanges enabled by email and distance conferencing, San Pedro and Magdalena students will improve English and Spanish language skills while teaching each other about science and their respective cultures. This poster describes the AUI/NRAO Sister Cities program, including the challenges of cross-cultural communication and the rewards of interpersonal exchanges between continents and cultures.

  9. Creating a Regional Healthcare Network: People First.

    PubMed

    Michel-Verkerke, Margreet B

    2016-01-01

    Care organizations in the Dutch region Apeldoorn want to collaborate more in order to improve the care provision to elderly and psychiatric patients living independently. In order to support the collaboration they intend to create a regional digital healthcare network. The research was focused on the relevance of a regional healthcare network for care providers. Eleven semi-structured interviews based on the USE IT-model, were conducted with care providers and staff members. Results show that care providers need to tune their activities for this target group and create an agreement on integrated care. The relevance of a digital communication and collaboration platform is high. The regional healthcare network should support the collaboration between care providers by: 1. Offering a communication platform to replace the time consuming communication by telephone; 2. Making patient information available for patient and care provider at patients' homes; 3. Giving insight in who is giving what care to whom; and 4. Giving access to knowledge about the target group: elderly and psychiatric patients living independently. PMID:27577356

  10. FoilSim: Basic Aerodynamics Software Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth A.

    1999-01-01

    FoilSim is interactive software that simulates the airflow around various shapes of airfoils. The graphical user interface, which looks more like a video game than a learning tool, captures and holds the students interest. The software is a product of NASA Lewis Research Center s Learning Technologies Project, an educational outreach initiative within the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP).This airfoil view panel is a simulated view of a wing being tested in a wind tunnel. As students create new wing shapes by moving slider controls that change parameters, the software calculates their lift. FoilSim also displays plots of pressure or airspeed above and below the airfoil surface.

  11. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    PubMed

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation. PMID:27296877

  12. The Art of Gymnastics: Creating Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovegno, Inez

    1988-01-01

    Offering students opportunities for creating movement sequences in gymnastics allows them to understand the essence of gymnastics, have creative experiences, and learn about themselves. The process of creating sequences is described. (MT)

  13. The "Communication Commando Model" Creates a Research Culture of Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, John C.

    2008-01-01

    A major dilemma faced by undergraduates is the enormous intellectual distance between standard short exercises (essays or exams) in traditional class work and more thorough, literature rich, meticulously analyzed, often empirically tested, issue-oriented work of scholars. Over the past 15 years, the author designed a "communication commando model"…

  14. Improving Collaborative Teacher Education Research: Creating Tighter Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Mary T.; Griffin, Cynthia; Leko, Melinda Marie; Stephens, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Although collaborative teacher education programs have grown in number over the past two decades, we still do not understand the ways in which these programs, or the practices in those programs, improve the preparation of inclusive teachers. At a time when teacher education's viability is being questioned, it is problematic that little information…

  15. Creating Research-Based Videos that Can Affect Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    To engage recipients of Extension science-based video programming involves understanding what behaviors and decisions the recipients may be considering that can be affected by the programming. Such understanding may be developed through interviews, focus groups, and surveys, which should provide guidance for elements of the style and content of…

  16. Onyx-Advanced Aeropropulsion Simulation Framework Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a new software environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation systems. Its purpose is to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by creating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system (refs. 1 and 2). Through a university grant as part of that effort, researchers at the University of Toledo have developed Onyx, an extensible Java-based (Sun Micro-systems, Inc.), objectoriented simulation framework, to investigate how advanced software design techniques can be successfully applied to aeropropulsion system simulation (refs. 3 and 4). The design of Onyx's architecture enables users to customize and extend the framework to add new functionality or adapt simulation behavior as required. It exploits object-oriented technologies, such as design patterns, domain frameworks, and software components, to develop a modular system in which users can dynamically replace components with others having different functionality.

  17. Creating a therapeutic milieu in retirement communities.

    PubMed

    Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2011-01-01

    Elderly persons' relocation to retirement communities is a stressful event that requires person-milieu adjustment. Research has shown differences in relocation adjustment for elders residing in different retirement communities. A secondary analysis used findings from a study of relocated elders in order to determine whether certain therapeutic factors were lacking in retirement communities where elders had difficulty in adjusting. Study participants were 104 elders who relocated to six retirement communities in Northeast Ohio. This study analyzed qualitative data from the researchers' observations and field notes and narratives obtained from the elders who participated in the original study. The analysis focused on data that described the environmental characteristics of retirement communities where elders reported less successful adjustment. These environmental characteristics were evaluated for consistency with the characteristics of Shives' therapeutic milieu. Most retirement communities in the study did not fulfill all eight dimensions of a therapeutic milieu as defined by Shives. For example, individualized treatment programs were lacking in most of the retirement communities and the activities offered were not based on individual assessment and did not contribute to personal growth. The findings point to the need to create a more therapeutic milieu in retirement communities in order to facilitate successful readjustment for relocated elders. PMID:21574846

  18. [Creating an integrated nursing curriculum].

    PubMed

    Romano, R A; Papa, L M; Lopes, G T

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, Brazilian society has gone through great changes into political, ideological and economical fields. These changes left their strings into society, specially in population health. The nurse formation based on the Law n(o) 5540/68 and on the Statement n(o) 163/72, no more meets population demands. Since 1992, the Nursing Faculty of UERJ-FEUerj intensifies the reflection movement upon teaching-learning process searching for transforming its own reality. The making of this project presents two complementary and important reasons: FEUerj docents and discents' desire in elaborating a curriculum which searches for nurses' formation that articulates teaching-work-community, theory and practice, based on a Critical Theory of Education, on the line of PROBLEMATIZATION, and the accomplishment of Statement n(o) 314/94 from the CFE and from the Letter of Order MEC n(o) 1171/15/dez/94. From debating, the professional profile has been defined from the social environment where the profession is performed and the alumnate's characteristics; area determination or group of attributions, according to professional praxis adequation, concept hierachization, processes, etc., which in the process of 'classification and syntheses' of knowledge results into a netlike chained and related tree. In the first phase of the curriculum study, it has diagnosed as principal condition, the actual curriculum 'DECONTEXTUALIZATION' and the 'US' to be faced to lead it to an end the Curriculum Reformulation Proposal. The Process of Pedagogical Abilitation for professors, workshops, researches on the desirable and present profile, seminars, performance, abilities and principles systematization, identification of areas which compose the integrated curriculum, subjects localization into areas and articulation between professional subjects and other activities, has been implemented. Based on this work on the problematized pedagogy first step, an instrument 'Research on the

  19. Creating A Light Curve Using Gathered Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Joseph; Stolarz, S. A.; DePorto, R. W.; Shake, W. J.; Piper, M.; Linder, T. R.; Holmes, R.; Conwell, J.

    2012-01-01

    Our group of students with the support of educators and astronomers carried out a program to do astrometric and photometric analysis on the asteroid 2000 SO1 with the objective of obtaining a more in depth analysis of this asteroid and publishing light curve data describing the period of the asteroid. We chose our target asteroid using the minor planet center database, choosing an object that would have an acceptable Right Ascension, Declination, magnitude, and air mass for the ARO (Astronomical Research Observatory)-30 inch telescope operated by the SKYNET program. Our journey began with using Astrometrica for the IASC/WISE Program to identify and find new asteroids in the sky and add data to the Minor Planet Center Database. We then used MPO (Minor Planet Observatory) Canopus to form a light curve and conduct a fourier analysis on an example asteroid to familiarize ourselves with the program and used the program again to conduct fourier analysis on asteroid 2000 SO1. The educational goal in mind was to (a) learn the process of collecting and analyzing data using Astrometrica, MPO Canopus, the Minor Planet Center, and SKYNET and (b) create a poster to display the steps used in the process of surveying taken images and the production of a light curve. We collected 300 images a night, while discarding all the corrupted images, until we had enough data to accurately represent the object.Our work was successful due to resources from; Eastern Illinois University's Physics Department, the Astronomical Research Observatory, the University of Chicago's Yerkes Observatory, the SKYNET network, NASA's IASC/WISE (International Astronomical Search Collaboration/ Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer), NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) and Lincoln-Way North High School.

  20. Creating relevant science through urban planning and gardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Dana

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a community-based science project that was coproduced with urban teenagers and to elaborate on my understanding of what it means to create a practicing culture of science learning. This understanding will be positioned in relation to various educationally relevant discourses and research on urban science education, concluding with an exploration of these questions: In what ways did an urban planning and community gardening project help to create a learning environment in which science was relevant? To whom was science relevant and toward what ends? It is argued that in a practicing culture of science learning, science was relevant because (a) it was created from participants' concerns, interests, and experiences inside and outside science, (b) it was an ongoing process of researching and then enacting ideas, and (c) it was situated within the broader community.

  1. Creating an Adult Learning Culture through Practice Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Colin; McCormack, Brendan

    2000-01-01

    An action research project sought to create a learning culture in a hospital. Adult learning principles and facilitation of learning at and from work were emphasized. Although the hospital's top-down management eventually ended the project, active staff participation in learning was begun. (SK)

  2. Creating and Sustaining Learning Communities: Early Lessons from Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlstetter, Priscilla; Griffin, Noelle C.

    There has been a rapid increase over the past 5 years in both the number of charter schools in the United States and the enthusiasm for the concept. Most research about charter schools has not addressed how charter schools create and sustain high-quality learning communities. This paper presents findings of a study that investigated how learning…

  3. Creating Practice Ready, Well and Professional Law Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Anneka

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing movement to create successful, ethical, well-rounded and practice ready legal professionals both in terms of their content knowledge and their mental well-being. As a Legal Teaching "profession" it is incumbent on us to answer this call in a responsive, creative, integrated, well researched and evaluated manner. This…

  4. Strategies for Creating a Caring Learning Climate in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-student interactions are at the core of the teaching-learning process. There is research evidence showing that a teacher's caring behavior is strongly related to students' attitudes and engagement in physical education (PE). This article discusses practical strategies that PE teachers can employ to create a caring learning environment,…

  5. Creating a Positive School Climate at the Junior High Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Vincent F.

    One of the seven correlates of an effective school, as identified by the Effective Schools Research, is a positive school climate: a positive attitude on the part of the entire staff and student body exhibited through overt behavior that creates a warm, orderly learning environment. Development of such an environment depends upon: (1) strong…

  6. Learning through Intermediate Problems in Creating Cognitive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miwa, Kazuhisa; Morita, Junya; Nakaike, Ryuichi; Terai, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive modelling is one of the representative research methods in cognitive science. It is believed that creating cognitive models promotes learners' meta-cognitive activities such as self-monitoring and reflecting on their own cognitive processing. Preceding studies have confirmed that such meta-cognitive activities actually promote…

  7. What Kind of Learning Environment Do Newly Qualified Teachers Create?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyman, Tarja; Kaikkonen, Pauli

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of recent studies, language teaching has educational, cultural, and social objectives. The purpose of this study was firstly to investigate whether the new objectives of foreign language learning and teaching are put into effect, and secondly to examine what kind of learning environments teachers create. The main research data…

  8. Creating Teacher Incentives for School Excellence and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett; Eckert, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring that all students in America's public schools are taught by good teachers is an educational and moral imperative. Teacher incentive proposals are rarely grounded on what high-quality research indicates are the kinds of teacher incentives that lead to school excellence and equity. Few of the current approaches to creating teacher…

  9. Creating a Context of Care in the Online Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This essay addresses the affective and social components on online teaching, components that have been neglected in much research on distance learning. The essay offers accessible and practical advice for online teachers to create a "context of care" in their classrooms, thus minimizing student anxiety and maximizing student learning.

  10. A Tool for Creating Healthier Workplaces: The Conducivity Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The conducivity process, a methodology for creating healthier workplaces by promoting conducive production, is illustrated through the use of the "conducivity game" developed in the NordNet Project in Sweden, which was an action research project to test a job redesign methodology. The project combined the "conducivity" hypotheses about a…

  11. Creating Communities: Working with Refugee Students in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roxas, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    This article critically examines the reality of building community in public schools and specifically identifies the obstacles faced by teachers who try to create community with refugee students. The research in the article focuses on Ms. Patricia Engler, a teacher in a newcomer center for refugee students located in an urban setting. Engler…

  12. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Martinelli, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Ricci Pacifici, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2013-12-01

    YRM logo The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been a rapidly growing event for the last few years. Together with other initiatives which have emerged in several research areas, the young researcher meeting marks the awareness and the desire of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in scientific progress. Devoted to the discussion and the interchange of new developments and ideas in physics, the meeting is primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in an informal atmosphere. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. Born in Rome in 2009, after three editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2013 was held in Trieste. Propelled by the past success, the fourth meeting was a two-day conference on 3-4June. It was sponsored by the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA - and the University of Padova, thus acquiring an even further international drive. In this volume, we collect some of the contributions that were presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, biophysics and medical physics. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Matteo Martinelli (mmartin@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di

  13. Creating presentation graphics with MS-DOS computer technology.

    PubMed

    Van Hoozer, H; Warner, S; Felton, G

    1989-01-01

    This article describes how The University of Iowa College of Nursing Instructional Design Services uses MS-DOS computer technology to create presentation graphics to support nursing education, research, scholarly productivity, and service. Hardware and software are described and examples are presented to illustrate the use of software to create alphanumeric, schematic, and freeform pictures. The authors stress that the use of computer-aided design and production does not eliminate the use of traditional principles of visual design, but rather necessitates their application. PMID:2752333

  14. The Use of Plasma Vortexes in Creating Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Alexander; Alexander Leith Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been created in a variety of ways such as arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Each of these techniques has been proven to produce carbon nanotubes in small quantities in a lab setting. This is the problem that we have been addressing. Over the course of 16 months, we have been working on a new method of carbon nanotube production that is based around fluid dynamics and plasma. We have created the basic components to test this new way to produce carbon nanotubes. This research will ideally provide a new avenue for carbon nanotube production. Worked with Dr. Randal Tagg of the University of Colorado Denver.

  15. Energy cost of creating quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bhattacharya, Samyadeb; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We consider physical situations where the resource theories of coherence and thermodynamics play competing roles. In particular, we study the creation of quantum coherence using unitary operations with limited thermodynamic resources. We find the maximal coherence that can be created under unitary operations starting from a thermal state and find explicitly the unitary transformation that creates the maximal coherence. Since coherence is created by unitary operations starting from a thermal state, it requires some amount of energy. This motivates us to explore the trade-off between the amount of coherence that can be created and the energy cost of the unitary process. We also find the maximal achievable coherence under the constraint on the available energy. Additionally, we compare the maximal coherence and the maximal total correlation that can be created under unitary transformations with the same available energy at our disposal. We find that when maximal coherence is created with limited energy, the total correlation created in the process is upper bounded by the maximal coherence, and vice versa. For two-qubit systems we show that no unitary transformation exists that creates the maximal coherence and maximal total correlation simultaneously with a limited energy cost.

  16. Learning Course Content by Creating a Wiki

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Kathryn I.; Felvegi, Emese

    2009-01-01

    In this article, students' perceptions of the benefits and the challenges of creating a wiki for a language arts methods class are explored through their online reflections and interview transcripts. The students' own words describe their experiences about learning course content while collaborating to create a course wiki. Reflecting on the…

  17. Process to create simulated lunar agglutinate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Robert J. (Inventor); Gustafson, Marty A. (Inventor); White, Brant C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of creating simulated agglutinate particles by applying a heat source sufficient to partially melt a raw material is provided. The raw material is preferably any lunar soil simulant, crushed mineral, mixture of crushed minerals, or similar material, and the heat source creates localized heating of the raw material.

  18. Creating "Third Spaces": Promoting Learning through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm offers us a definition of "third spaces" as "more democratic and dialogic spaces than a classroom, as well as a metaphor for a space in which new, hybrid, and challenging discourses and real-world knowledge and applications are created." With helpful background and examples, he urges us to create such spaces for our students, adamant that…

  19. Create a Positive Environment | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Family, friends, coworkers, and others who you interact with can affect how you feel about yourself. This includes how you feel about your body. One of the keys to creating a more positive body image is to create a more positive environment for yourself by focusing on:

  20. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  1. Learning by Doing: Creating Engaging Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Liz; Glass, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a Learning-by-Doing Instructional model to create an innovative language course. The authors describe the structure of the course, the instructional strategies implemented, and the Learning Management System tools used to create an engaging learning experience.

  2. Using Technology to Create Safer Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Arthur J.; Martinez, Kenneth

    1995-01-01

    Although classes to create student self-esteem and antigang programs are gaining in popularity, most school districts have not used available technology to help create safer campuses. Increased availability of telephones and two-way radios would enhance school security, along with incorporation of newer technologies such as computers, digitized…

  3. Creating Digital Video in Your School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Creating digital videos provides students with practice in critical 21st century communication skills, as the video production involves critical thinking, general observation, and analysis and perspective-making skills. Producing video helps students appreciate literature and other expressions of information and students creating digital video…

  4. Creating a global observatory for health R&D.

    PubMed

    Terry, Robert F; Salm, José F; Nannei, Claudia; Dye, Christopher

    2014-09-12

    A global map of health R&D activity would improve the coordination of research and help to match limited resources with public health priorities, such as combating antimicrobial resistance. The challenges of R&D mapping are large because there are few standards for research classification and governance and limited capacity to report on R&D data, especially in low-income countries. Nevertheless, based on developments in semantic classification, and with better reporting of funded research though the Internet, it is now becoming feasible to create a global observatory for health R&D. PMID:25214621

  5. Utilization of geothermal effluents to create waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczynski, V.W.; Wert, M.A.; LaBar, D.J.

    1981-10-01

    A generic research study was performed to determine the feasibility of using spent geothermal fluids to create waterfowl wetlands. Aspects studied included water quality, biology, ecology, toxicology, ground-water hydrology, geology and soils, wastewater treatment, economic, socioeconomic, and legal constraints. Results indicate that some geothermal effluents can be used directly with no treatment to create waterfowl wetlands. Many geothermal effluents can be used to create wetlands with relatively minimal pretreatment; this category is economically more attractive than injection. The wetlands themselves will effectively further cleanse the effluents for possible cascading resource use (such as irrigation water or surface water enhancement). Finally, some effluents require extensive pretreatment before wetland use. Economics in the latter category favor injection.

  6. IBES: a tool for creating instructions based on event segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Katharina; Petersen, Nils; Huff, Markus; Ghose, Tandra

    2013-01-01

    Receiving informative, well-structured, and well-designed instructions supports performance and memory in assembly tasks. We describe IBES, a tool with which users can quickly and easily create multimedia, step-by-step instructions by segmenting a video of a task into segments. In a validation study we demonstrate that the step-by-step structure of the visual instructions created by the tool corresponds to the natural event boundaries, which are assessed by event segmentation and are known to play an important role in memory processes. In one part of the study, 20 participants created instructions based on videos of two different scenarios by using the proposed tool. In the other part of the study, 10 and 12 participants respectively segmented videos of the same scenarios yielding event boundaries for coarse and fine events. We found that the visual steps chosen by the participants for creating the instruction manual had corresponding events in the event segmentation. The number of instructional steps was a compromise between the number of fine and coarse events. Our interpretation of results is that the tool picks up on natural human event perception processes of segmenting an ongoing activity into events and enables the convenient transfer into meaningful multimedia instructions for assembly tasks. We discuss the practical application of IBES, for example, creating manuals for differing expertise levels, and give suggestions for research on user-oriented instructional design based on this tool. PMID:24454296

  7. Employee satisfaction: creating a positive work force.

    PubMed

    Wright, M

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1990s, El Camino Hospital (ECH) streamlined its operations in order to remain competitive. In 1992, the hospital's District Board voted to turn the hospital's management over to a nonprofit company and it became an integrated delivery system (IDS). Hospital employees continued to suffer as their work and work schedules changed in ongoing efforts by the new administration to streamline. Finally, in early 1997, the IDS, Camino Healthcare, was dissolved. The director of radiology and radiation oncology services became aware of increasing employee problems, from high turnover rates and increased absenteeism, to morale and productivity issues. Employees also worried about job redesign, re-engineering and a lack of clear direction and expectations from department leadership. The director of the department created a task force to respond to the needs of staff members. With so much anger directed at department leadership, supervisory staff were not included in the task force. The task force worked first to identify rumors and innuendos and followed with a plan to resolve such issues. The second step was to agree to focus on issues that they could change and to let go of those they couldn't. They selected five priority issues or concerns. The group met weekly and made progress by replacing negative talk and attitudes with positive ones. Meanwhile, the director researched employee satisfaction issues so she would be prepared to discuss such issues and concerns with employees. She focused on a common theme, of having a personal mission or goal for one's self. She encouraged staff members to be aware of their own behavior when communicating with others. Although several informal surveys proved there was still much work to be done, there was positive response--a light at the end of the long tunnel. PMID:10180224

  8. The Impact of and Lessons Learned from NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Nitarp Team

    2014-07-01

    NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, gets teachers involved in authentic astronomical research. We partner small groups of educators with a professional astronomer mentor for a year-long original research project. The teams echo the entire research process, from writing a proposal, to doing the research, to presenting the results at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The program runs from January through January. Applications are available annually in May and are due in September. The educators' experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other programs we know of that get real astronomy data into the classroom in three ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters in science sessions at an American Astronomical Society meeting alongside other researchers' work (participants are not given a “free pass” because they are educators or students). Third, the “product” is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project and their experiences to fit in their classroom environment. NITARP changes the way teachers think about science and scientists. More information is available online at http://nitarp.ipac.caltech.edu/.

  9. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  10. Creating a VAPEPS database: A VAPEPS tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, George

    1989-01-01

    A procedural method is outlined for creating a Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) Database. The method of presentation employs flowcharts of sequential VAPEPS Commands used to create a VAPEPS Database. The commands are accompanied by explanatory text to the right of the command in order to minimize the need for repetitive reference to the VAPEPS user's manual. The method is demonstrated by examples of varying complexity. It is assumed that the reader has acquired a basic knowledge of the VAPEPS software program.

  11. ISO 55000: Creating an asset management system.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Chris; Main, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the October 2014 issue of HEJ, Keith Hamer, group vice-president, Asset Management & Engineering at Sodexo, and marketing director at Asset Wisdom, Kevin Main, argued that the new ISO 55000 standards present facilities managers with an opportunity to create 'a joined-up, whole lifecycle approach' to managing and delivering value from assets. In this article, Kevin Main and Chris Bradley, who runs various asset management projects, examine the process of creating an asset management system. PMID:26268021

  12. Create three distinct career paths for innovators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gina Colarelli; Corbett, Andrew; Pierantozzi, Ron

    2009-12-01

    Large companies say they Create Three Distinct want to be Career Paths for Innovators innovative, but they fundamentally mismanage their talent. Expecting innovators to grow along with their projects-from discovery to incubation to acceleration--sets them up to fail. Most people excel at one of the phases, not all three. By allowing innovation employees to develop career paths suited to their strengths, companies will create a sustainable innovation function. PMID:19968059

  13. Creating Math Videos: Comparing Platforms and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasian, Reza O.; Sieben, John T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a short tutorial on creating mini-videos using two platforms--PCs and tablets such as iPads--and software packages that work with these devices. Specifically, we describe the step-by-step process of creating and editing videos using a Wacom Intuos pen-tablet plus Camtasia software on a PC platform and using the software…

  14. Creating Shareable Decision Support Services: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Marilyn D.; Maviglia, Saverio M.; Ramelson, Harley Z.; Schaeffer, Molly; Rocha, Beatriz H.; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Middleton, Blackford; Goldberg, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Creating shareable decision support services is a complex task requiring effort from multiple interdisciplinary role players with a wide variety of experience and expertise. The CDS Consortium research project has developed such a service, defining a multi-layer representation of knowledge and building upon an architectural service design created at Partners Health Care, and is demonstrating its use in both a local and an external institutional setting. The process was iterative, and we encountered unexpected requirements based on decisions made at various points. We report in this paper on challenges we faced while pursuing this research: knowledge representation and modeling, data interchange and standards adoption, the process of getting agreement on content, logistics of integrating into a system that already has multiple CDS interventions, legal issues around privacy and access, inter-team communication and organization. PMID:21347049

  15. Talkoot: software tool to create collaboratories for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Movva, Sunil; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Conover, Helen; Nair, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    Open science, where researchers share and publish every element of their research process in addition to the final results, can foster novel ways of collaboration among researchers and has the potential to spontaneously create new virtual research collaborations. Based on scientific interest, these new virtual research collaborations can cut across traditional boundaries such as institutions and organizations. Advances in technology allow for software tools that can be used by different research groups and institutions to build and support virtual collaborations and infuse open science. This paper describes Talkoot, a software toolkit designed and developed by the authors to provide Earth Science researchers a ready-to-use knowledge management environment and an online platform for collaboration. Talkoot allows Earth Science researchers a means to systematically gather, tag and share their data, analysis workflows and research notes. These Talkoot features are designed to foster rapid knowledge sharing within a virtual community. Talkoot can be utilized by small to medium sized groups and research centers, as well as large enterprises such a national laboratories and federal agencies.

  16. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  17. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  18. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  19. [Create or copy... Which is the difference?].

    PubMed

    López P, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Creating and copying are two different processes; we must not confuse creativity with plagiarism. However, this distinction is problematic, because there is no possibility of creating from scratch, this implies that any creative act necessarily arises from accumulative experience, inevitably producing a continuity between old and new. Even so it is necessary to establish clearly the difference between creating and copying. It is not desirable that a matter of such importance remains in the nebula or that the relationship between creativity and ethics is kept unaware. There are many cases of plagiarism, but this cannot be a consolation. There is no gain when the existence of a plagiarism is ignored or concealed and less when it is unjustified. PMID:19399333

  20. Creating Quality Improvement Culture in Public Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Mahanna, Elizabeth; Joly, Brenda; Zelek, Michael; Riley, William; Verma, Pooja; Fisher, Jessica Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted case studies of 10 agencies that participated in early quality improvement efforts. Methods. The agencies participated in a project conducted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2007–2008). Case study participants included health directors and quality improvement team leaders and members. We implemented multiple qualitative analysis processes, including cross-case analysis and logic modeling. We categorized agencies according to the extent to which they had developed a quality improvement culture. Results. Agencies were conducting informal quality improvement projects (n = 4), conducting formal quality improvement projects (n = 3), or creating a quality improvement culture (n = 4). Agencies conducting formal quality improvement and creating a quality improvement culture had leadership support for quality improvement, participated in national quality improvement initiatives, had a greater number of staff trained in quality improvement and quality improvement teams that met regularly with decision-making authority. Agencies conducting informal quality improvement were likely to report that accreditation is the major driver for quality improvement work. Agencies creating a quality improvement culture were more likely to have a history of evidence-based decision-making and use quality improvement to address emerging issues. Conclusions. Our findings support previous research and add the roles of national public health accreditation and emerging issues as factors in agencies’ ability to create and sustain a quality improvement culture. PMID:24228680

  1. Creating Spin Switches and Junctions on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Eric; Stamp, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Inspired by the work of Hirjibehedin et al, (Science 317 1199) creating Heisenberg spin chains on an insulating surface, we examine geometries in which excitations down a spin chain are either blocked or transmitted depending on the state of a central junction, made from a spin dimer. The dimer state can be controlled by excitations down an additional chain, creating a spin switch. In addition to the technological applications of such a switch, the theoretical language developed has application to certain quantum computation schemes.

  2. Tools for creating and manipulating voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gary H; Capello, Kevin; Chiang, Albert; Cardenas-Mendez, Erick; Sabourin, Trevor

    2010-03-01

    The National Internal Radiation Assessment Section's Human Monitoring Laboratory (HML) has purchased and developed a number of in-house tools to create and edit voxel phantoms. This paper describes the methodology developed in the HML using those tools to prepare input files for Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms. Three examples are given. The in-house tools described in this paper, and the phantoms that have been created using them, are all publically available upon request from the corresponding author. PMID:20147794

  3. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  4. Congress Creates Super Federal Library Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steere, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    In a rare show of bipartisanship, the Senate passed the controversial Federal Library Agency Act (FLAA) on a nearly unanimous voice vote, sending it to President Obama for his expected signature. The House had passed it in February with a two-thirds majority. The FLAA creates a new mandate by combining federal library functions scattered…

  5. Position Paper: Creating a New Professional Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendale, David; Barrow, Hilda; Carpenter, Kathy; Hodges, Russ; McGrath, Jane; Newell, Pat; Norton, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This position paper investigates the merits and potential benefits of creating a new, more comprehensive professional association for members of the learning assistance and developmental education profession. This task was assigned to the College Reading and Learning Association/National Association for Developmental Education (CRLA/NADE) Working…

  6. The Magic Moment: Creating Color Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartges, Dan

    2009-01-01

    If there is a truly magic moment in art class, it must be when a student--of any age--attains a working knowledge of color's core principles. At that point, she or he becomes able to consistently create color harmony in any painting, regardless of the subject matter. From then on, that student gains greater confidence, can paint better pictures…

  7. Will Education Reform Create More Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which is intended to close the achievement gap by improving schools, may be largely ineffective due to several of its questionable assumptions (e.g, school attendance is valued by and valuable to all individuals, and education creates opportunities). Suggests that simply providing the poor…

  8. Creating Music Environments in Early Childhood Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Elayne

    1999-01-01

    Describes how teachers and caregivers can create music environments in early childhood settings that connect to other areas of development. Discusses how music environments can accommodate free-choice participation, describes the caregiver's role, and suggests music activities. Includes definitions of musical concepts for young children, also tips…

  9. Creating Teams Increases Extension Educator Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker-Scott, Linda; Daniels, Catherine H.; Martini, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Garden Team at Washington State University is a transdisciplinary group of faculty, staff, and students with expertise in applied plant and soil sciences and an interest in Extension education. The team's primary mission is to create current, relevant, and peer-reviewed materials as Extension publications for home gardeners. The average yearly…

  10. Creating the "History through Deaf Eyes" Documentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hott, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines how a documentary film about the history of deafness in the United States, inspired by the exhibition "History through Deaf Eyes," is going to be created. "History through Deaf Eyes" will have a dual focus. Part of its subject is deafness from the inside: the personal experiences of deaf people (and hearing…

  11. Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2012-01-01

    There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

  12. Green Energy Technologies Create Green Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced energy technologies that can help address climate change and reduce U.S. dependence on oil. As these new technologies are launched into commercial use, they create new jobs for American workers.

  13. A Model for an Object Created

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeok-Je

    2006-04-01

    Before going into the model treated here, it is need to know the nature of energy. Energy itself is active and constantly move. This fact results in the phenomenon of energy spread. The phenomenon of energy spread is under the law of energy conservation. For confining energy, additional energy is required. Suppose there were gathered energies for some reason. Creation of some objects is the result of the gathered energy and energy spread. In the case where a new object is more stable, after some fluctuation, energy from the object goes away so that a new object remains behind. For this, the enegy, E, larger than the sum of energy barrier, Eb, and the difference between the energy state of the object and initial energy state, dE, is required. E > Eb+dE Thus, a new object is created. It is an irreversible process. Adaptation is a sort of creation with no energy barrier. In the case where there is no energy source near the object, the created object is relatively inactive one. This is matter. To reduce the increased energy state due to gravitation, matters gather. In the case where there is an energy source near matters, a new object can be created around or within the matters. The created object will be active. This is life.

  14. Designing and Creating Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeen, George R.

    Designed to encourage the use of a defined methodology and careful planning in creating computer-assisted instructional programs, this paper describes the instructional design process, compares computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and programmed instruction (PI), and discusses pragmatic concerns in computer programming. Topics addressed include:…

  15. Creating Inclusive Schools for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a former principal at Falk Elementary School in Madison, Wisconsin, describes his school's shift as it sought to create an inclusive school for all students and establish an authentic sense of belonging. Nationwide, schools and districts from Concord, New Hampshire, to Whittier, California, and from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to…

  16. Extending the "Knowledge Advantage": Creating Learning Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maqsood, Tayyab; Walker, Derek; Finegan, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a synergy between the approaches of knowledge management in a learning organisation and supply chain management so that learning chains can be created in order to unleash innovation and creativity by managing knowledge in supply chains. Design/methodology/approach: Through extensive literature…

  17. Creating Competence: Perspectives and Practices in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    Creating competence has become a major issue in organizations. Various authors contend that competency management has the potential of integrating organizational strategy, human-resource instruments, and human-resource development; that competency development can lead to performance improvement; and that it can help Human Resource Development…

  18. Leveraging Resources to Create Comprehensive Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boisvert, Pamela K.

    2007-01-01

    The Colleges of Worcester Consortium has created a broad array of statewide, higher education access services over several decades by leveraging federal, state, local, and foundation resources. The consortium comprises thirteen diverse colleges and universities in central Massachusetts and is a nonprofit regional association of these institutions:…

  19. An Integrated System for Creating Educational Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Ellis

    1988-01-01

    Describes the development of ScriptWriter, a computer program designed at the University of Southern California to help create software for computer assisted instruction. Topics discussed include the graphics editor; text editor; font editor; a programming language called IQ; its use with interactive video and speech; and current applications.…

  20. Creating a Total Object of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klie, Evelyn Busch

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a workshop that accompanied the author's exhibit, "A Sense of Place: Paintings by Evelyn Busch Klie." Explains that students created a watercolor painting and a clay frame or base with details in it. Includes a list of art materials and learning objectives. (CMK)

  1. Creating a National Skills Corporation. Policy Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Rob

    To address the skills shortages stemming from the transition to a more technological and skills-intensive economy, Congress established a program whereby funds from H-1B visa fees would provide seed funds for private companies, labor, and government to join together in creating training alliances focused on skills in short supply. Unfortunately,…

  2. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  3. Creating a Successful Facility Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, William; Staskiewicz, Carolyn

    2001-01-01

    Presents the steps necessary for creating a successful facility master plan, including the purpose and use of a steering committee and the need for a comprehensive database that includes a community/school profile. Explains community involvement in plan development, and outlines the steps necessary for preparing a final facility plan for…

  4. System and method for creating expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Peter M. (Inventor); Luczak, Edward C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method provides for the creation of a highly graphical expert system without the need for programming in code. An expert system is created by initially building a data interface, defining appropriate Mission, User-Defined, Inferred, and externally-generated GenSAA (EGG) data variables whose data values will be updated and input into the expert system. Next, rules of the expert system are created by building appropriate conditions of the rules which must be satisfied and then by building appropriate actions of rules which are to be executed upon corresponding conditions being satisfied. Finally, an appropriate user interface is built which can be highly graphical in nature and which can include appropriate message display and/or modification of display characteristics of a graphical display object, to visually alert a user of the expert system of varying data values, upon conditions of a created rule being satisfied. The data interface building, rule building, and user interface building are done in an efficient manner and can be created without the need for programming in code.

  5. Creating a Career: Field Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training Research and Development Station, Prince Albert (Saskatchewan).

    This booklet has been prepared to guide the implementation, operation, and evaluation of the field tests of the Creating a Career program. This field test guide describes the preparation needed for a field test, (acquiring materials, choosing the instructor, registration, scheduling the field test, preparing the classroom, orientation of other…

  6. Creating "Technology Intensive" Courses through Faculty Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, Ariana; Fulford, Catherine P.

    The College of Education at the University of Hawaii has already begun to create an infrastructure to systematically infuse technology into its curriculum through a new designation of "Technology Intensive" courses. The primary goal of this project was to prepare future teachers to integrate technology into instruction through systematic…

  7. Games and Students: Creating Innovative Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jason Stratton

    2011-01-01

    To create professionals for the future, who will be innovative and internationally competitive, we need to change the learning environment. The current traditional delivery systems of education do not develop the necessary interpersonal, analytical and creative skills to deal with the new knowledge economy. Baer (2005), in calling for a new model…

  8. Creating a District Plan for Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Kathleen; Adams, Helen R.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses how to create a district plan for managing computer technology in schools from the perspectives of a district administrator and a media director. Topics addressed include equity in access and instruction; distance education consortiums; planning committee membership; goals and effective planning; staff support; adoption strategies;…

  9. Inspiring Students to Create the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Cynthia; Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    An exemplary program based at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay greatly increases the odds that at-risk youngsters will not only graduate from high school, but will go on to higher education. The program is also a model of university/community collaboration. ["Inspiring Students to Create the Future" was written with Timothy U. Kaufman, Linda…

  10. Creating competitive weapons from information systems.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, C; MacMillan, I C

    1984-01-01

    As the pace of competition intensifies in the 1980s, information systems will emerge as critical new weapons in the battle to gain an advantage over competitors. The authors show how a business can use modern information technologies to create a competitive edge by adding value to present products and services. PMID:10269062

  11. Creating an Internal Content Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennema, Greg

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an internal content management system that they have created at Calvin College. It is a hybrid of CMS and intranet that organizes Web site content and a variety of internal tools to help librarians complete their daily tasks. Hobbes is a Web-based tool that uses Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts written…

  12. Creating New Identities in Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Hannah Rose; Bernasconi, Claudia; MacDonald, Nora M.

    2007-01-01

    An international education opportunity has been created for design students at West Virginia University. This experience is unique because it takes an interdisciplinary approach to design that exposes students to the idea of a larger design methodology common to design professions. Students take core courses with students from a variety of design…

  13. Creating Smart-er Cities: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The following offers an overview of what it means for cities to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) Cities. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…

  14. Mental Mapping: A Lesson that Creates Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comenetz, Joshua

    2005-01-01

    Mental image and place-preference maps of college students in Florida were created through a two-part lesson. The patterns revealed by these maps were linked to students' life experiences, census data on migration and income, and similar studies conducted in other states. Students prefer states with established migration links to Florida and…

  15. Creating healthy futures. 2000 NOVA Award winners.

    PubMed

    Larson, L

    2000-05-01

    Winners of this year's NOVA awards, sponsored by the American Hospital Association and H&HN magazine, all share a broad definition of health. These five stars of community benefit also understand that a community and a health care organization share responsibility for what creates health, and that collaborative efforts are the only way to sustain innovative programs. PMID:11785219

  16. Spoken Word Processing Creates a Lexical Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Alexandra A.; Tamminen, Jakke; Quinlan, Philip T.; Gaskell, M. Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report 3 experiments that examined whether presentation of a spoken word creates an attentional bottleneck associated with lexical processing in the absence of a response to that word. A spoken word and a visual stimulus were presented in quick succession, but only the visual stimulus demanded a response. Response times to the visual stimulus…

  17. Leadership for Creating Community within Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Zelema M.

    Community college leaders are responsible for creating an institutional climate that is supportive, nurturing, collaborative, integrative, empowering, and inclusive. In providing leadership, it is important to remember that collective wisdom can take a college much farther than operating according to one person's ideal. In managing a multifaceted…

  18. Creating 21st Century Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Phan P.; Locke, John; Nair, Prakash; Bunting, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    What is involved in creating learning environments for the 21st century? How can school facilities serve as tools for teaching and meet the needs of students in the future? What components are required to design effective schools, and how does architecture relate to the purposes of schooling? These are some of the questions addressed at the…

  19. Web Pages Created Via SCID Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stammen, Ronald M.

    This paper describes the use of a management process, Systematic Curriculum and Instructional Development (SCID), for developing online multimedia modules. The project, "Collaboratively Creating Multimedia Modules for Teachers and Professors," was funded by the USWEST Foundation. The curriculum development process involved teams of experts in…

  20. Creating Innovative Student Projects with App Smashing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The potential for using various apps to improve student learning is tremendous. Yet, despite the iPad's possibilities, apps are often limited in their functionality. No one has created that magical, one-size-fits-all app that accomplishes all of the tasks that you had in mind. Luckily, there is an answer to this common problem: app smashing.…

  1. Multimedia Madness: Creating with a Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodley, Barb; Bremer, Janet

    2004-01-01

    High school students working in a project-driven environment create "projects with a purpose" that give younger students technology-based activities to help them practice skills in reading, math, spelling and science. An elective semester-long course using the Macromedia suite of programs with the objective of learning the software skills of…

  2. Creating and Implementing a Culture of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Phyllis H.; McDade, Sharon A.

    1996-01-01

    Colleges and universities should place less emphasis on the leadership of one or a few individual administrators and concentrate on creating a culture of leadership that will empower all members of the institution. The human resource development program at Boston College (Massachusetts) exemplifies the dynamic possibilities of leadership…

  3. Leadership: creating a cuiture of caring.

    PubMed

    DePaola, Dominick P

    2004-01-01

    Leadership is characterized in terms of accomplishing mutual goals for the organization, its employees, and its community through vision and creating a community of caring. The examples of Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines, Walt Disney, and Dean Arthur A. Dugoni of the University of the Pacific are used to illustrate how this style of leadership plays out in specific accomplishments. PMID:15948494

  4. Creating, Invigorating, and Sustaining Effective Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan; Miller, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Teams can boost creativity, morale, and communication, but they can also unleash disharmony, create tension, and waste time. To maximize teaming benefits, administrators must share authority, cultivate teacher leadership, train all team members, use situational leadership, model effective team leader behaviors, provide incentives, support each…

  5. Creating and Sustaining the Constructivist Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Bruce A.; Page, Marilyn L.

    This book addresses key issues that teachers raise about creating and sustaining constructivist classrooms, providing practical tips, techniques, and examples to allow step-by-step implementation of constructivism and ongoing evaluation of student progress. The book gives directions for use at any grade level and includes checklists to evaluate…

  6. Creating Critical Viewers: A Personal Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherow-O'Leary, Renee

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a personal reflection on the implementation of "Creating Critical Viewers," a national media literacy program sponsored by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS), an industry association, in 1995. The television industry's decision to develop a media literacy curriculum in the 1990s was a powerful…

  7. Razzle Dazzle: Creating Interactive Library Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combes, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Creating an interactive and engaging school library environment for your school community is an important prerequisite to establishing a creditable identity with teaching staff, which in turn, leads to opportunities to develop collaborative curriculum programs. The library and its personnel must be perceived as a hub for learning and part of the…

  8. Creating Spaces to Support Transgender Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Jenifer K.; Conover-Williams, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the opportunity to create spaces within the family, school, and community that specifically promote the well-being of transgender adolescents and young adults. When social contexts are supportive, transgender youth report significantly less risk. Supportive home and school environments have been linked to better outcomes…

  9. Creating and Maintaining a Desirable Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lori K.; Stoldt, G. Clayton; Comfort, P. Greg

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an 11-step organizational audit designed to help administrators in the sport and activity sector, as well as the traditional business sector, create a friendly, encouraging environment for all. The 11 steps are: empowerment; rewards; evaluation; mission statement; policy manuals; resources; communication; organizational structure;…

  10. Creating a Culture for Teachers' Professional Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Linda; Kragler, Sherry

    1999-01-01

    In the literature, discussions of staff development (as a top-down decision-making model) have shifted to teacher-centered professional growth. Components include teachers as learners, reflective decisionmakers, collaborators, and accountability experts. Creating a culture of learning and involving teachers in strategic decision making are…

  11. The Media Creates Us in Its Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Propaganda in all its forms is the culture of a mass society. The media transmits propaganda to form public opinion and recreate the human being. Reversing the Western ideal of a rational and free individual, the media creates a childish conformist ensconced in the peer group, who acts unconsciously.

  12. Strategies for Creating New Venture Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Tomas; Middleton, Karen Williams

    2015-01-01

    New ventures, being heavily subjected to liabilities of newness, are seen to engage in legitimacy strategies to overcome these liabilities. Building on an adapted theoretical framework of organizational legitimacy, self-reported weekly diaries of twelve entrepreneurs were analysed to identify strategies used by new ventures to create legitimacy.…

  13. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting in Rome 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Fabio; Cattani, Giordano; Mazzaferro, Luca; Migliaccio, Marina; Pietrobon, Davide; Ricci Pacifici, Daniel; Stellato, Francesco; Veneziani, Marcella

    2012-10-01

    Conference logo At its third edition, the Young Researcher Meeting in Rome (YRMR) proves to be a growing event in the Italian scientific panorama. The high-quality content of the abstracts submitted to the scientific committee resulted in an exciting conference, held, for the second time, at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' on 20 January 2012. A busy schedule covered a large variety of cutting-edge science topics: fundamental interactions, particle physics, cosmology, astrophysics, condensed matter and biomedical physics. The broad range of the subjects discussed is the distinctive feature of the YRMR, a meeting aimed at enhancing the synergy among complementary branches of science by stimulating a fruitful exchange between theoretical, experimental and computational physics. Promoting collaborations between PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers creates a solid scientific network with an open-minded approach to discovery. In this volume, we collect the contributions that have been presented both in the form of talks and of posters. YRMR Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Luca Mazzaferro (luca.mazzaferro@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Marina Migliaccio (migliaccio@ifca.unican.es) Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Edificio Juan Jorda, Avenida de los Castros, E-39005 Santander, Cantabria Spain Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov) Jet Propulsion Laboratory - California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive 169-237 91109 Pasadena, CA USA Daniel Ricci Pacifici

  14. Creating and Sharing: Teens' Information Practices in Digital Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Mary Ann; Bruce, Christine; Lupton, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In a connected world youth are participating in digital content creating communities. This paper introduces a description of teens' information practices in digital content creating and sharing communities. Method: The research design was a constructivist grounded theory methodology. Seventeen interviews with eleven teens were…

  15. Identification of Error Types in Preservice Teachers' Attempts to Create Fraction Story Problems for Specified Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Cheryl J.; Beaver, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if recognizable error types exist in the work of preservice teachers required to create story problems for specific fraction operations. Students were given a particular single-operation fraction expression and asked to do the calculation and then create a story problem that would require the use of…

  16. Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Elizabeth Popp

    2012-01-01

    American universities today serve as economic engines, performing the scientific research that will create new industries, drive economic growth, and keep the United States globally competitive. But only a few decades ago, these same universities self-consciously held themselves apart from the world of commerce. "Creating the Market University" is…

  17. Comparison of the Motivational Climates Created during Multi-Activity Instruction and Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Mitchum B.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that sport education (SE) may be a superior curriculum model to multi-activity (MA) teaching because its pedagogies and structures create a task-involving motivational climate. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the objective motivational climates teachers create within the MA and SE models.…

  18. The CAMPARE Program:A New Model Promoting Minority Participation in Astronomy Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Phillips, C. B.; Tieu, J.; Povich, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program represents a new and innovative kind of research program for undergraduates: one that can effectively carry out the goal of recruiting qualified minority and female students to participate in Astronomy and Planetary Science research opportunities, while mentoring them in a way to maximize the chance that these students will persist in obtaining their undergraduate degrees in STEM fields, and potentially go on to obtain their PhDs or pursue careers in those fields. The members of CAMPARE comprise a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and four major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech). Most undergraduate research programs focus on a single research institution. By having multiple institutions, we significantly broaden the opportunities for students, both in terms of breadth of research topics and geographical location.

  19. Creating science simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction. One aim of the NSF is to integrate these and other computational thinking concepts into the classroom. End-user programming tools offer a unique opportunity to accomplish this goal. An end-user programming tool that allows students with little or no prior experience the ability to create simulations based on phenomena they see in-class could be a first step towards meeting most, if not all, of the above computational thinking goals. This thesis describes the creation, implementation and initial testing of a programming tool, called the Simulation Creation Toolkit, with which users apply high-level agent interactions called Computational Thinking Patterns (CTPs) to create simulations. Employing Computational Thinking Patterns obviates lower behavior-level programming and allows users to directly create agent interactions in a simulation by making an analogy with real world phenomena they are trying to represent. Data collected from 21 sixth grade students with no prior programming experience and 45 seventh grade students with minimal programming experience indicates that this is an effective first step towards enabling students to create simulations in the classroom environment. Furthermore, an analogical reasoning study that looked at how users might apply patterns to create simulations from high- level descriptions with little guidance shows promising results. These initial results indicate that the high level strategy employed by the Simulation Creation Toolkit is a promising strategy towards incorporating Computational Thinking concepts in the classroom environment.

  20. Shoestring Digital Library: If Existing Digital Library Software Doesn't Suit Your Needs, Create Your Own

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Creating a digital library might seem like a task best left to a large research collection with a vast staff and generous budget. However, tools for successfully creating digital libraries are getting easier to use all the time. The explosion of people creating content for the web has led to the availability of many high-quality applications and…

  1. Online interactive tutorials for creating graphs with excel 2007 or 2010.

    PubMed

    Vanselow, Nicholas R; Bourret, Jason C

    2012-01-01

    Graphic display of clinical data is a useful tool for the behavior-analytic clinician. However, graphs can sometimes be difficult to create. We describe how to access and use an online interactive tutorial that teaches the user to create a variety of graphs often used by behavior analysts. Three tutorials are provided that cover the basics of Microsoft Excel 2007 or 2010, creating graphs for clinical purposes, and creating graphs for research purposes. The uses for this interactive tutorial and other similar programs are discussed. PMID:23326629

  2. Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as part of a Cleveland Institute of Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts thesis project in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

  3. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for the past 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. A travel allowance is paid to those fellows outside the 50-mile radius of JPL.

  4. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  5. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

    A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

    This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  6. Barriers to creating a secure MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.; Matt, B.J.; Davida, G.I.

    1997-08-01

    This paper explores some of the many issues in developing security enhanced MPI for embedded real-time systems supporting the Department of Defense`s Multi-level Security policy (DoD MLS) are presented along with the preliminary design for such an MPI variant. In addition some of the many issues that need to be addressed in creating security enhanced versions of MPI for other domains are discussed. 19 refs.

  7. Creating Web Sites for Web Surfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    If you build it, will they come? This is one of the fundamental questions anybody creating a Web site has to confront, whether you're a business person, a Web professional or a home user. One of the fundamental ways to ensure people do come, and return, is to make the content of your site as appealing and as accessible as possible. A new study by…

  8. Strong branding creates a competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    This article encompasses the basics of branding and how it relates to radiology organizations. It also provides tools to help develop your brand. To effectively use branding as a component of your marketing strategy, it is important to follow 3 basic principles: focus on where you excel, understand the existing markets, and be consistent. You do not need to be a large hospital, imaging center, or department to create a brand identity. PMID:17608294

  9. Creating false memories for visual scenes.

    PubMed

    Miller, M B; Gazzaniga, M S

    1998-06-01

    Creating false memories has become an important tool to investigate the processes underlying true memories. In the course of investigating the constructive and/or reconstructive processes underlying the formation of false memories, it has become clear that paradigms are needed that can create false memories reliably in a variety of laboratory settings. In particular, neuroimaging techniques present certain constraints in terms of subject response and timing of stimuli that a false memory paradigm needs to comply with. We have developed a picture paradigm which results in the false recognition of items of a scene which did not occur almost as often as the true recognition of items that did occur. It uses a single presentation of pictures with thematic, stereotypical scenes (e.g. a beach scene). Some of the exemplars from the scene were removed (e.g. a beach ball) and used as lures during an auditory recognition test. Subjects' performance on this paradigm was compared with their performance on the word paradigm reintroduced by Roediger and McDermott. The word paradigm has been useful in creating false memories in several neuroimaging studies because of the high frequency of false recognition for critical lures (words not presented but closely associated with lists of words that were presented) and the strong subjective sense of remembering accompanying these false recognitions. However, it has several limitations including small numbers of lures and a particular source confusion. The picture paradigm avoids these limitations and produces identical effects on normal subjects. PMID:9705061

  10. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  11. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics: Cosmic physics portion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Schindler, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Research in particle astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology is supported under NASA Grant NAGW-1919. A three-year proposal for continuation of support was submitted a year ago and put into effect 1 October 1992. This report is the combined progress report and continuation application called for under the Federal Demonstration Project. Gamma-ray Astrophysics at SRL is separately supported under NAGW-1919 and will be separately summarized and proposed. This report will document progress and plans for our particle spectroscopy activities and for related data analysis, calibration, and community service activities. A bibliography and a budget will be attached as appendices. The Caltech SRL research program includes a heavy emphasis on elemental and isotopic spectroscopy of energetic particles in the cosmic radiation; in solar, interplanetary, and anomalous 'cosmic' radiation; and in planetary magnetospheres as discussed.

  12. Current Status of the DPOSS Effort at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odewahn, S. C.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss the current status of a three-color survey of fields of the digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS). Eventually, the DPOSS catalogs will be released to the astronomical community. The final catalog will contain an estimated minimum of 50,000,000 (50 million) galaxies, and over 2,000,000,000 (2 billion) stars, down to the equivalent blue limiting magnitude of 22., and with star-galaxy classifications accurate to 90% or better down to the equivalent blue magnitude of 21. An important addition is a program to collect extensive CCD calibration data in the Gunn gri system with the Palomar 60". This represents a considerable advance over other, currently existing optical sky surveys based on large-format photographic plates. A great variety of scientific projects should become possible using this major data set, including the following: studies of galaxy clustering and of the large-scale structure in the low-redshift universe, as tests of structure formation models; galaxy counts at moderate depth, as a function of magnitudes, colors, and morphology, to be used in tests of galaxy evolution over the past few Gigayears; a search for high redshift (z > 4) quasars, and active galactic nuclei at lower redshifts; mass optical identifications of radio, IR, and x-ray sources; generation of objectively defined catalogs of clusters and groups of galaxies; a search for previously unknown sparse globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies; cataloging of low surface brightness galaxies; a search for objects with peculiar colors or variability; and many others. In particular, we review efforts to perform automatic galaxy classification using artificial neural network image classifiers. This powerful technique is used to map a multivariate photometric parameter space to the revised Hubble system of galaxy classification. We present a new morphological classification approach using Fourier image models to identify barred and ringed spiral systems.

  13. Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network: Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R.; Chen, S.; Crummey, J.; Hauksson, E.; Solanki, K.; Thomas, V. I.; Watkins, M.; Yip, R.; Yu, E.; Given, D.; Peats, R.; Schwarz, S.

    2010-12-01

    The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in Southern California and performs the following tasks: 1) Operates remote seismic stations and the central data processing systems in Pasadena; 2) Generates and reports real-time products including location, magnitude, ShakeMap, and others; 3) Responds to FEMA, CalEMA, media, and public inquiries about earthquakes; 4) Manages the production, archival, and distribution of waveforms, phase picks, and other data at the SCEDC; 5) Contributes to development and maintenance of the ANSS Quake Monitoring System (AQMS) software to add new features and improve robustness; 6) Supports the deployment of AQMS to other ANSS member regional seismic networks. The public regularly accesses the CISN, SCSN, and SCEDC web pages for up-to-date quake info and more than 230,000 users subscribe to the Electronic Notification System (ENS) which sends rapid notifications via email and cell phones. We distribute our products via Internet (EIDS), email, and paging, to USGS in Reston and Golden, FEMA, CalEMA, local governments, partner members, and other subscribers. We have developed CISN Display and provide ShakeCast for customers who require real-time earthquake information. The SCSN also exchanges waveform, phase pick, and amplitude data in real-time with several other partner networks, including Menlo Park, UCB, UNR, Anza network, the Tsunami Warning Centers, IRIS, and the NEIC. We operate a number of 24/7 on-call rotations to provide quick response to verify seismic events as well as addressing systems and telemetry issues. As part of our goals to improve quality, robustness, and coverage, some of our recent efforts include: 1) Converting the digital stations in the network to Q330 dataloggers; 2) Developing command and control capabilities such as automated mass re-centering; 3) Migration from serial to Ethernet communications; 4) Clustering of data acquisition servers for fail-over to improve data availability; 5) Use of power spectral density (PSDs) in PQLX and XMax for seismic data quality assurance; 6) Development of memory-based and disk-based waveform servers that acquire seismic data via multicast; 7) Updates to the alarm processing configuration of our real-time and post-processing systems; 8) Development of metrics for tracking overall system performance; 9) Tightening our computing and network environment to prevent security intrusions. Some of these efforts were under way before the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah Mw 7.2 earthquake sequence which allowed us to test the effectiveness of our improvements and motivated further enhancements. We found generally that the upgraded system handled the increased load but additional needs should be addressed for the system to weather an earthquake sequence within the network of similar or greater magnitude.

  14. Creating technical heritage object replicas in a virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, Olga; Shcherbinin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents innovative informatics methods for creating virtual technical heritage replicas, which are of significant scientific and practical importance not only to researchers but to the public in general. By performing 3D modeling and animation of aircrafts, spaceships, architectural-engineering buildings, and other technical objects, the process of learning is achieved while promoting the preservation of the replicas for future generations. Modern approaches based on the wide usage of computer technologies attract a greater number of young people to explore the history of science and technology and renew their interest in the field of mechanical engineering.

  15. The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE): A New Model for Promoting Minority Participation in Astronomy Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Phillips, C. B.; Tieu, J.; Prather, E. E.; Povich, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    The California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program represents a new and innovative kind of research program for undergraduates: one that can effectively carry out the goal of recruiting qualified minority and female students to participate in Astronomy and Planetary Science research opportunities, while mentoring them in a way to maximize the chance that these students will persist in obtaining their undergraduate degrees in STEM fields, and potentially go on to obtain their PhDs or pursue careers in those fields. The members of CAMPARE comprise a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and four major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech). Most undergraduate research programs focus on a single research institution. By having multiple institutions, we significantly broaden the opportunities for students, both in terms of breadth of research topics and geographical location. In its first three years, the CAMPARE program has had 20 undergraduates from two CSU campuses, both Hispanic Serving Institutions, take part in research and educational activities at four research institutions, the University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, and JPL/Caltech. Of the 20 participants, 9 are women and 11 are men, a much more even split than is typical in Astronomy research programs; 10 are Hispanic, 2 are African American, and 1 is part Native American, including 2 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants, an exceptionally high participation rate (65%) for students from underrepresented minority groups. Of the five participants who have graduated since the program began, two are in graduate programs in Physics or Astronomy, two are pursuing a K-12 teaching credential, and one has enlisted in the Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate

  16. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

  17. A global mechanism creating low atmospheric luminous cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitle Hauge, Bjørn; Petter Strand, Erling

    2014-05-01

    Red, white/yellow and blue balls of light have been observed in the low atmosphere over the Hessdalen valley , Norway, standing still and moving horizontally with random speed. Characteristics of these transient luminous phenomena in Hessdalen, and data from America, suggest that the process which creates these low atmospheric plasmas is a global mechanism, not only localized to the remote and desolated Hessdalen valley in Norway (62Deg.N - 11Deg.E). Transient luminous phenomena's has been observed in the low atmosphere over the Hessdalen valley for over 200 years. The first written documentation goes back to 1811 when the priest Jakob Tode Krogh wrote about it in his diary. Since 1982, inhabitants, tourists, journalists and scientists have done recurrent observations. E.P.Strand conducted the first scientific campaign in 1984, documenting over 50 observations in one month. 15 years later, Norwegian and Italian scientists installed the first permanent automated research base here. In 2010 French researchers joined this collaboration and installed two additional research bases. This transient luminous phenomenon, TLP, has been detected simultaneously on optical and radar devices, but electromagnetic radiation from this phenomenon has until now eluded detection. Smirnov (1994) and Zou(1994) was among the first scientist who used plasma physics trying to explain this phenomenon. Work done by Pavia & Taft (2010 and 2012) suggests that the TLP in Hessdalen probably is dusty or cold plasma, arranged as a cluster of Coulomb crystals. Optical spectrum data obtained by Strand (1984), Teodorani (2004) and Hauge (2007) showing a continuous optical spectrum support this hypothesis. Pictures of spiraling light rays obtained by Strand in 1984, and Hauge in 2004 and 2010 suggests that this plasma is moving in a strong magnetic field, and might be created by it. Radar reflections from the TLP in Hessdalen obtained by Strand in 1984 and Montebugnoli and Monari in 2007 points

  18. 10 ways to create shareholder value.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Alfred

    2006-09-01

    Executives have developed tunnel vision in their pursuit of shareholder value, focusing on short-term performance at the expense of investing in long-term growth. It's time to broaden that perspective and begin shaping business strategies in light of the competitive landscape, not the shareholder list. In this article, Alfred Rappaport offers ten basic principles to help executives create lasting shareholder value. For starters, companies should not manage earnings or provide earnings guidance; those that fail to embrace this first principle of shareholder value will almost certainly be unable to follow the rest. Additionally, leaders should make strategic decisions and acquisitions and carry assets that maximize expected value, even if near-term earnings are negatively affected as a result. During times when there are no credible value-creating opportunities to invest in the business, companies should avoid using excess cash to make investments that look good on the surface but might end up destroying value, such as ill-advised, overpriced acquisitions. It would be better to return the cash to shareholders in the form of dividends and buybacks. Rappaport also offers guidelines for establishing effective pay incentives at every level of management; emphasizes that senior executives need to lay their wealth on the line just as shareholders do; and urges companies to embrace full disclosure, an antidote to short-term earnings obsession that serves to lessen investor uncertainty, which could reduce the cost of capital and increase the share price. The author notes that a few types of companies--high-tech start-ups, for example, and severely capital-constrained organizations--cannot afford to ignore market pressures for short-term performance. Most companies with a sound, well-executed business model, however, could better realize their potential for creating shareholder value by adopting the ten principles. PMID:16967621

  19. Stigma creating stigma: a vicious circle

    PubMed Central

    Dinos, Sokratis

    2014-01-01

    Despite anti-stigma campaigns in the UK in recent years, the experiences of people with mental health problems indicate that stigma is still a major problem. The stigma of being a member of a socially excluded group, based on socioeconomic, personal or cultural/ethnic characteristics, should be considered alongside the stigma of mental illness. Membership of a stigmatised group (not based on mental illness) is often itself a risk factor for developing mental health problems. This article discusses the experiences of people from Black and minority ethnic and lesbian, gay and bisexual groups to explore how stigma can create more stigma. PMID:25237533

  20. Creating new interspecific hybrid and polyploid crops.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    Agricultural selection of desirable traits in domesticated plant and animal species mimics natural evolutionary selection for ability of species to survive, thrive, and reproduce in the wild. However, one evolutionary process is currently underutilised for human agricultural purposes: speciation through interspecific hybridisation and polyploid formation. Despite promising successes in creation of new hybrid and or polyploid species in many genera, few geneticists and breeders deliberately take advantage of polyploidy and interspecific hybridisation for crop improvement. We outline the possible benefits as well as potential problems and criticisms with this approach, and address how modern advances in technology and knowledge can help to create new crop species for agriculture. PMID:26164645

  1. CREATING A SERIOUS GAME FOR HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Clochesy, John M; Buchner, Marc; Hickman, Ronald L; Pinto, Melissa D; Znamenak, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic illnesses continues to increase as does the cost of such care. Teaching self-management skills is more effective than solely providing information and teaching technical skills at improving health outcomes. Serious games for health provide an opportunity to support learning and health-related behavior change using messages and experiences in an engaging and entertaining format. We developed eSMART-HD with the intention of improving interactions between patients with chronic disorders and their health care providers. This paper describes the factors that we considered when creating eSMART-HD, a serious game for health. PMID:26442360

  2. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  3. Creating semantic maps from laser terrestrial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Będkowski, J.; Majek, K.; Musialik, P.; Masłowski, A.; Adamek, A.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper creating semantic maps based on laser terrestrial data is shown. Semantic map is based on transformed geometric data (3D laser range finder) into the data with assigned labels. These labels can help in several applications such as navigation of mobile robot by finding traversable and not traversable regions. Computation of large 3D data sets requires high computational power, therefore we proposed the GPU based (Graphic Processing Unit) implementation to decrease the computational time. As a result we demonstrate the computed semantic map for mobile robot navigation.

  4. Creating an organizational climate for multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, J G

    1996-06-01

    Multiculturism is an ideal goal for our society, its organizations, and its institutions, involving a continuous process of education and change within organizations. Multiculturalism begins with diversity and requires various steps to achieve changes in attitudes, behaviors, and values. The leadership of organizations must not only commit to diversification, but they must participate in it and reward its efforts. Diversification should be managed by creating a climate of open participation, feedback, and control at the lower organizational levels. To micromanage the process of becoming diverse increases resistance and paranoia and counters educational efforts. PMID:10157003

  5. Creating Change and Staying Connected through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    In this column, a childbirth educator describes feeling overwhelmed and alone in her work. Collaboration is presented as a key agent to creating change, staying connected, and “keeping going.” The Cochrane Library, the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services, the ongoing collaboration of Lamaze International with the Maternity Center Association and DONA International, and birth networks are presented as examples of valuable collaborations. Childbirth educators benefit from these collaborative efforts by being able to access and use evidence-based information and to feel connected with like-minded colleagues. PMID:17273451

  6. Creating environments that foster academic integrity.

    PubMed

    Tippitt, Michelle Pixley; Ard, Nell; Kline, Juanita Reese; Tilghman, Joan; Chamberlain, Barbara; Meagher, P Gail

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies related to academic dishonesty within the nursing student population have been published; however, little has been written in the nursing literature regarding academic integrity and means of promoting this value. In addition to the many short-term solutions to prevent cheating and dissuade academic misconduct that are offered, solutions that promote long-term affective changes underlying the acquisition of academic integrity are needed. This article provides a context for discussions related to academic integrity, explores issues facing faculty when dealing with this challenge, and offers short-term and long-term strategies for creating environments that foster academic integrity. PMID:19753858

  7. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  8. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  9. Stigma creating stigma: a vicious circle.

    PubMed

    Dinos, Sokratis

    2014-08-01

    Despite anti-stigma campaigns in the UK in recent years, the experiences of people with mental health problems indicate that stigma is still a major problem. The stigma of being a member of a socially excluded group, based on socioeconomic, personal or cultural/ethnic characteristics, should be considered alongside the stigma of mental illness. Membership of a stigmatised group (not based on mental illness) is often itself a risk factor for developing mental health problems. This article discusses the experiences of people from Black and minority ethnic and lesbian, gay and bisexual groups to explore how stigma can create more stigma. PMID:25237533

  10. Use of created cattail ( Typha) wetlands in mitigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobberteen, Ross A.; Nickerson, Norton H.

    1991-11-01

    In order to balance pressures for land-use development with protection of wetland resources, artificial wetlands have been constructed in an effort to replace lost ecosystems. Despite its regulatory appeal and prominent role in current mitigation strategies, it is unclear whether or not created systems actually compensate for lost wetland resources. Mitigation predictions that rely on artificial wetlands must be analyzed critically in terms of their efficacy. Destruction of wetlands due to burial by coal fly ash at a municipal landfill in Danvers, Massachusetts, USA, provided an opportunity to compare resulting growth of created cattail ( Typha) marshes with natural wetland areas. Once the appropriate cattail species was identified for growth under disturbed landfill conditions, two types of artificial wetlands were constructed. The two systems differed in their hydrologic attributes: while one had a surface water flow characteristic of most cattail wetlands, the second system mimicked soil and water conditions found in naturally occurring floating cattail marshes. Comparison of plant growth measurements for two years from the artificial systems with published values for natural cattail marshes revealed similar structure and growth patterns. Experiments are now in progress to investigate the ability of created cattail marshes to remove and accumulate heavy metals from polluted landfill leachate. Research of the type reported here must be pursued aggressively in order to document the performance of artificial wetlands in terms of plant structure and wetland functions. Such research should allow us to start to evaluate whether artificial systems actually compensate for lost wetlands by performing similar functions and providing the concomitant public benefits.

  11. An approach to integrating and creating flexible software environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Kirstie L.

    1992-01-01

    Engineers and scientists are attempting to represent, analyze, and reason about increasingly complex systems. Many researchers have been developing new ways of creating increasingly open environments. In this research on VEHICLES, a conceptual design environment for space systems, an approach was developed, called 'wrapping', to flexibility and integration based on the collection and then processing of explicit qualitative descriptions of all the software resources in the environment. Currently, a simulation is available, VSIM, used to study both the types of wrapping descriptions and the processes necessary to use the metaknowledge to combine, select, adapt, and explain some of the software resources used in VEHICLES. What was learned about the types of knowledge necessary for the wrapping approach is described along with the implications of wrapping for several key software engineering issues.

  12. Our Lunar Destiny: Creating a Lunar Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    "Our Lunar Destiny: Creating a Lunar Economy" supports a vision of people moving freely and economically between the earth and the Moon in an expansive space and lunar economy. It makes the economic case for the creation of a lunar space economy and projects the business plan that will make the venture an economic success. In addition, this paper argues that this vision can be created and sustained only by private enterprise and the legal right of private property in space and on the Moon. Finally, this paper advocates the use of lunar land grants as the key to unleashing the needed capital and the economic power of private enterprise in the creation of a 21st century lunar space economy. It is clear that the history of our United States economic system proves the value of private property rights in the creation of any new economy. It also teaches us that the successful development of new frontiers-those that provide economic opportunity for freedom-loving people-are frontiers that encourage, respect and protect the possession of private property and the fruits of labor and industry. Any new 21st century space and lunar economy should therefore be founded on this same principle.

  13. Creating a biopower agenda through grassroots organizing

    SciTech Connect

    Hauter, W.

    1995-11-01

    Biomass electricity provides both opportunities for strengthening the rural economy and advancing environmental goals. However, while large scale biomass development can be done in a manner that both furthers economic development and helps prevent environmental degradation, its commercialization requires a complex coordination of activities between utilities and farmers. Inherent problems exist in creating parallel development of a resource base and technological advancements. In fact, an understanding of the anthropology of biopower is necessary in order to advance it on a large scale. The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) published a report on renewable electricity, released in March 1992, that has been used as a foundation for state-based work promoting renewables. In several Midwestern states, such as Nebraska, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, we have used classic grassroots organizing skills to educate the public and key constituencies about the benefits of biomass. Besides working directly with utilities to promote biomass development, we also have a legislative agenda that helps create a climate favorable to biopower. This paper will focus on the grassroots aspect of our campaigns. It will also include an overview of some anthropological work that the author has done in communities with farmers. The main tool for this has been focus groups. We have found that people can be organized around biomass issues and that a grassroots base furthers biomass development.

  14. Perceptual guidelines for creating rectangular treemaps.

    PubMed

    Kong, Nicholas; Heer, Jeffrey; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2010-01-01

    Treemaps are space-filling visualizations that make efficient use of limited display space to depict large amounts of hierarchical data. Creating perceptually effective treemaps requires carefully managing a number of design parameters including the aspect ratio and luminance of rectangles. Moreover, treemaps encode values using area, which has been found to be less accurate than judgments of other visual encodings, such as length. We conduct a series of controlled experiments aimed at producing a set of design guidelines for creating effective rectangular treemaps. We find no evidence that luminance affects area judgments, but observe that aspect ratio does have an effect. Specifically, we find that the accuracy of area comparisons suffers when the compared rectangles have extreme aspect ratios or when both are squares. Contrary to common assumptions, the optimal distribution of rectangle aspect ratios within a treemap should include non-squares, but should avoid extremes. We then compare treemaps with hierarchical bar chart displays to identify the data densities at which length-encoded bar charts become less effective than area-encoded treemaps. We report the transition points at which treemaps exhibit judgment accuracy on par with bar charts for both leaf and non-leaf tree nodes. We also find that even at relatively low data densities treemaps result in faster comparisons than bar charts. Based on these results, we present a set of guidelines for the effective use of treemaps and suggest alternate approaches for treemap layout. PMID:20975136

  15. Creating the best workplace on earth.

    PubMed

    Goffee, Rob; Jones, Gareth

    2013-05-01

    No organization can fulfill every hope and desire of its employees, so it helps to know which matter most to people. Goffee and Jones have identified the six most essential imperatives for creating an ideal work environment. Their insights come from surveys and interviews of hundreds of executives from all over the world. Few organizations embody all six attributes of the dream organization, many are difficult to achieve, and some even conflict with one another. But they nonetheless stand as an agenda for executives who wish to create the most productive, most rewarding workplace imaginable. Agenda 1. Let people be themselves. 2. Unleash the flow of information. 3. Magnify people's strengths. 4. Stand for more than shareholder value. 5. Show how the daily work makes sense. 6. Have rules people can believe in. This list contains no surprises, but implementing the elements is no easy task. Almost all of them require leaders to carefully balance competing interests and to reallocate their time and attention. Companies like Arup, LVMH, Waitrose, and even McDonald's are doing it to varying degrees. Your challenge is to match-and then to exceed-what they have managed to accomplish. PMID:23898736

  16. First Impressions: Creating Newsflashes with Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Posting a report on the web or sending out a press release used to be all that was needed to help get the word out about one's research findings. But times have changed. Today, effective dissemination depends on getting the right message to the right people at the right time in the right form. To break through the clutter, researchers need…

  17. Creating an Effective Online Instructor Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Edgecombe, Nikki; Stacey, Georgia West

    2013-01-01

    Student outcomes in online courses trail considerably behind those in face-to-face courses. In order to gain insight into why this might be, the Community College Research Center (CCRC) undertook a series of studies that examined 23 high-demand, entry-level online courses at two community colleges in one state. CCRC researchers observed the online…

  18. Understanding Those Who Create. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirto, Jane

    This book synthesizes research findings on creativity and talent development. Part 1, "Definitions and Processes of Creativity," discusses the definition of creativity, creativity and psychology, federal definitions of giftedness and creativity, psychological research on creativity, traditional theories of the creative, common descriptions of the…

  19. Education, Dialogue and Assessment: Creating Partnership for Improving Practice. Researching Professional Education. Research Reports Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Terry; And Others

    A study examined structures, processes, and practices of assessing competence in nursing and midwifery education programs in Britain. The methodology included documentation, interviews, and observations. Most interviewees were clear about the shortcomings of traditional assessment. In a satisfactory partnership, all the partners made a significant…

  20. Research and Resilience: Creating a Research Agenda for Supporting Military Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dorinda Silver; Mulrooney, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The decade of war since the attacks of 9-11 have meant lengthy and repeated combat deployment for millions of service members, many of whom are parents of very young children. In addition to the many challenges inherent to the deployment cycle, issues such as injury, combat stress, and the death of a service member parent are important realities…