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1

Depersonalization in patients with persecutory delusions.  

PubMed

Delusions are, in part, attempts to explain confusing anomalous experience. Depersonalization, a key subset of anomalous experience, has been little studied in relation to persecutory delusions. The aims of this study were to assess the presence of depersonalization in patients with persecutory delusions and to examine associations with levels of paranoia and worry. Fifty patients with a current persecutory delusion completed measures of depersonalization, psychotic symptoms, and worry. Depersonalization experiences were common: 30 patients (60%) each reported at least 10 different depersonalization symptoms occurring often. A greater number of depersonalization experiences were associated with higher levels of paranoia and worry. The positive association of worry and paranoia became nonsignificant when controlling for depersonalization. Overall, depersonalization may be common in patients with persecutory delusions and is associated with the severity of paranoia. The results are consistent with the view that worry may cause depersonalization experiences that contribute to the occurrence of paranoid thoughts. PMID:25198701

Cernis, Emma; Dunn, Graham; Startup, Helen; Kingdon, David; Wingham, Gail; Pugh, Katherine; Cordwell, Jacinta; Mander, Helen; Freeman, Daniel

2014-10-01

2

Testing a Neurobiological Model of Depersonalization Disorder Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation?  

PubMed Central

Background Depersonalization disorder (DPD) includes changes in subjective experiencing of self, encompassing emotional numbing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pointed to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) inhibition of insula as a neurocognitive correlate of the disorder. Objective We hypothesized that inhibition to right VLPFC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased arousal and reduced symptoms. Methods Patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD (N = 17) and controls (N = 20) were randomized to receive one session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC or temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). 1Hz rTMS was guided using neuronavigation and delivered for 15 min. Co-primary outcomes were: (a) maximum skin conductance capacity, and (b) reduction in depersonalization symptoms (Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale (CDS) [state version]). Secondary outcomes included spontaneous fluctuations (SFs) and event-related skin conductance responses. Results In patients with DPD, rTMS to VLPFC led to increased electrodermal capacity, namely maximum skin conductance deflections. Patients but not controls also showed increased SFs post rTMS. Patients who had either VLPFC or TPJ rTMS showed a similar significant reduction in symptoms. Event-related electrodermal activity did not change. Conclusions A single session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC (but not TPJ) significantly increased physiological arousal capacity supporting our model regarding the relevance of increased VLPFC activity to emotional numbing in DPD. rTMS to both sites led to reduced depersonalization scores but since this was independent of physiological arousal, this may be a non-specific effect. TMS is a potential therapeutic option for DPD; modulation of VLPFC, if replicated, is a plausible mechanism. PMID:24439959

Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rothwell, John C.; David, Anthony S.

2014-01-01

3

Effect of naloxone therapy on depersonalization: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the hypothesis of the role for the opioid system in the pathogenesis of depersonalization, the effect of naloxone (an opioid receptor blocker) on the symptoms and corticosteroids secretion was studied in patients with depersonalization syndrome. Fourteen depersonalization patients were treated with naloxone: 11 patients received single doses (1.6 or 4 mg i.v.) and three others received multiple infusions,

Yuri L. Nuller; Marina G. Morozova; Olga N. Kushnir; Nikita Hamper

2001-01-01

4

Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where \\

Gregory P. Garvey

2010-01-01

5

Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where "a person feels that he or she has changed in some way or is somehow unreal." Derealization when "the same beliefs are held about one's surroundings." Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder fits users of Second Life who adopt "in-world" avatars and in effect, enact multiple distinct identities or personalities (known as alter egos or alters). Select questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization (SCI-DER)8 will be discussed as they might apply to the user's experience in Second Life. Finally I would like to consider the hypothesis that rather than a pathological disorder, dissociation is a normal response to the "artificial reality" of Second Life.

Garvey, Gregory P.

2010-01-01

6

[Anxiety, depression, stress in "depersonalization" and "derealization"].  

PubMed

We quote the terms "depersonalization" and "derealization" though meaningless in an absolute sens, and feel it is suitable to define them as: "The diminishing of the feeling of significance experiences (vivencia) of the ego and of the reality". Theme of the communication: twofold: Remember a frequent omission--with important exceptions--is a lack of focus on the terrible pathos which acquires a certain intensity this syndrome. I have working in this direction since 1960 and specifically since 1988 with a total of 3.592 patients affective and obsessive-compulsive, from which I selected 242, with "depersonalization" and "derealization" syndromes. 60 of them clinically severe. As assessed by the clinical phenomenological method. The observation time varied from three months and aigth and half years. "Under the auspices of egodistonia with a correct judgement of reality" in following areas: Environmentally (speak of "symptom of Tantalus"...). In the diminishing of sense of body. The patient involuntary memory. In the area of thought. In the area of the perception of time. Independent of those other stress situation which are known to a accompany the appearance of the syndrome of the "depersonalization" and "derealization" we think that this may produce at times symptoms of post-traumatic stress.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7887208

Sánchez de las Matas Dávila, J

1994-01-01

7

The Role of Childhood Interpersonal Trauma in Depersonalization Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In contrast to trauma's rela- tionship with the other dissociative disor- ders, the relationship of trauma to deper- sonalization disorder is unknown. The purpose of this study was to systemati- cally investigate the role of childhood in- terpersonal trauma in depersonalization disorder. Method: Forty-nine subjects with DSM-IV depersonalization disorder and 26 healthy comparison subjects who were free of life-

Daphne Simeon; Orna Guralnik; D. James Schmeidler; D. Beth Sirof; M. A. Margaret Knutelska

2001-01-01

8

Effect of naloxone therapy on depersonalization: a pilot study.  

PubMed

To test the hypothesis of the role for the opioid system in the pathogenesis of depersonalization, the effect of naloxone (an opioid receptor blocker) on the symptoms and corticosteroids secretion was studied in patients with depersonalization syndrome. Fourteen depersonalization patients were treated with naloxone: 11 patients received single doses (1.6 or 4 mg i.v.) and three others received multiple infusions, with the maximal dosage being 10 mg, and the effect of naloxone on symptom severity was determined. In eight patients, the cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone content in the blood plasma was determined prior to and after the 4 mg naloxone infusion. A reversed-phase microcolumn high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection was applied for assessment of glucocorticoids. In three of 14 patients, depersonalization symptoms disappeared entirely and seven patients showed a marked improvement. The therapeutic effect of naloxone provides evidence for the role of the endogenous opioid system in the pathogenesis of depersonalization. PMID:11448093

Nuller, Y L; Morozova, M G; Kushnir, O N; Hamper, N

2001-06-01

9

Interoceptive Cue Exposure for Depersonalization: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder relies heavily on interoceptive exposure. Specifically, therapists induce physical symptoms associated with panic in order to produce habituation to those sensations. Many common symptoms of panic are easily induced, such as increased heart rate and dizziness. However, depersonalization is a…

McKay, Dean; Moretz, Melanie W.

2008-01-01

10

A Preliminary Evaluation of Repeated Exposure for Depersonalization and Derealization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dissociative symptoms including depersonalization and derealization are commonly experienced by individuals suffering from panic disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have been published investigating the specific treatment of these symptoms in individuals diagnosed with panic disorder or PTSD, despite evidence that the…

Weiner, Elliot; McKay, Dean

2013-01-01

11

Interoceptive–reflective regions differentiate alexithymia traits in depersonalization disorder  

PubMed Central

It is unclear to what degree depersonalization disorder (DPD) and alexithymia share abnormal brain mechanisms of emotional dysregulation. We compared cerebral processing of facial expressions of emotion in individuals with DPD to normal controls (NC). We presented happy and sad emotion expressions in increasing intensities from neutral (0%) through mild (50%) to intense (100%) to DPD and non-referred NC subjects in an implicit event-related fMRI design, and correlated respective brain activations with responses on the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and its three subscales F1-F3. The TAS-20 predicts clinical diagnosis of DPD with a unique variance proportion of 38%. Differential regression analysis was utilized to ascertain brain regions for each alexithymia subscale. Differential regions of total alexithymia severity for happy emotion were the globus pallidus externus; for identifying feelings (TAS-20 F1 subscale), the right anterior insula; for description of feelings (F2), the right dorsal mid-anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); and for externally oriented cognitive style (F3), the left paracingulate gyrus (BA 32). For sad emotion, the differential region for the total TAS-20 score was the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); for TAS-20 F1, the left inferior anterior insula; for TAS-20 F2, the right PCC (BA 31); and for TAS-20 F3, the right orbital gyrus (BA 10). Supporting our hypotheses, the ascertained brain regions for TAS-20 subscales subserve interoception, monitoring and reflection of internal states and emotion. The presented analyses provide evidence that alexithymia plays a substantial role in emotional dysregulation in DPD, presumably based on restrictions in interoception. PMID:23932225

Lemche, Erwin; Brammer, Michael J.; David, Anthony S.; Surguladze, Simon A.; Phillips, Mary L.; Sierra, Mauricio; Williams, Steven C.R.; Giampietro, Vincent P.

2013-01-01

12

Construct Validity of Three Depersonalization Measures in Trauma-Exposed College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depersonalization is a type of dissociation characterized by feelings of unreality and detachment from one's sense of self. Despite a history rich in clinical description, the construct of depersonalization has proven difficult to define and measure. Available measures vary substantially in content, and all have relatively limited psychometric support. In this study the content validity, internal consistency, and convergent and

Christy A. Blevins; Frank W. Weathers; Elizabeth A. Mason

2012-01-01

13

STRESS AND TRAUMA: Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder  

PubMed Central

Depersonalization/derealization disorder is characterized by depersonalization often co-occurring with derealization in the absence of significant psychosis, memory, or identity disturbance. Depersonalization/derealization is categorized as one of the dissociative disorders, which also includes dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Although these disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, many persons with psychiatric illness who have experienced trauma report symptoms consistent with dissociative disorders. There are limited scientific data on prevalence of depersonalization/derealization disorder specifically. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological and epidemiological information regarding diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders in general, and illustrates common presenting histories of persons with derealization/depersonalization disorder utilizing composite cases. The clinical vignettes focus on recommended psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy interventions as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan for these individuals. PMID:25337444

Snyder, Malynda; Marie Gillig, Paulette

2014-01-01

14

STRESS AND TRAUMA: Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.  

PubMed

Depersonalization/derealization disorder is characterized by depersonalization often co-occurring with derealization in the absence of significant psychosis, memory, or identity disturbance. Depersonalization/derealization is categorized as one of the dissociative disorders, which also includes dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Although these disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, many persons with psychiatric illness who have experienced trauma report symptoms consistent with dissociative disorders. There are limited scientific data on prevalence of depersonalization/derealization disorder specifically. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological and epidemiological information regarding diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders in general, and illustrates common presenting histories of persons with derealization/depersonalization disorder utilizing composite cases. The clinical vignettes focus on recommended psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy interventions as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan for these individuals. PMID:25337444

Gentile, Julie P; Snyder, Malynda; Marie Gillig, Paulette

2014-07-01

15

Altered orientation of spatial attention in depersonalization disorder.  

PubMed

Difficulties with concentration are frequent complaints of patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). Standard neuropsychological tests suggested alterations of the attentional and perceptual systems. To investigate this, the well-validated Spatial Cueing paradigm was used with two different tasks, consisting either in the detection or in the discrimination of visual stimuli. At the start of each trial a cue indicated either the correct (valid) or the incorrect (invalid) position of the upcoming stimulus or was uninformative (neutral). Only under the condition of increased task difficulty (discrimination task) differences between DPD patients and controls were observed. DPD patients showed a smaller total attention directing effect (RT in valid vs. invalid trials) compared to healthy controls only in the discrimination condition. RT costs (i.e., prolonged RT in neutral vs. invalid trials) mainly accounted for this difference. These results indicate that DPD is associated with altered attentional mechanisms, especially with a stronger responsiveness to unexpected events. From an evolutionary perspective this may be advantageous in a dangerous environment, in daily life it may be experienced as high distractibility. PMID:24594203

Adler, Julia; Beutel, Manfred E; Knebel, Achim; Berti, Stefan; Unterrainer, Josef; Michal, Matthias

2014-05-15

16

Depersonalization or Cynicism, Efficacy or Inefficacy: What Are the Dimensions of Teacher Burnout?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article seeks to contribute to the ongoing debate on the dimensionality of the burnout syndrome. Specifically, its aims are: (1) to investigate the role of efficacy beliefs using negatively worded inefficacy items instead of positive ones and (2) to establish whether depersonalization and cynicism can be considered two different dimensions of…

Simbula, Silvia; Guglielmi, Dina

2010-01-01

17

Symptom Profiles in Depersonalization and Anxiety Disorders: An Analysis of the Beck Anxiety Inventory.  

PubMed

Background: Depersonalization disorder (DPD) entails distressing alterations in self-experiencing. However, it has long been recognized that depersonalisation symptoms occur in other disorders, particularly anxiety and panic. One strand of research proposes that depersonalization phenomenology arises through altered autonomic arousal in response to stress. Sampling and Methods: We sought to examine profiles of anxiety symptoms through a secondary data analysis of individual items and factor subscales on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), comparing two relatively large patient samples with DPD or with a variety of anxiety conditions, respectively. The DPD sample (n = 106) had a lower overall BAI score than the combined anxiety disorders group (n = 525). Results: After controlling for this as well as for potential confounders such as age and gender, the DPD group presented significantly lower scores on the panic subscale, marginally lower scores on the autonomic subscale and significantly higher scores on the neurophysiological subscale of the BAI. Conclusions: These differences imply similarities between the cognitive components of DPD and anxiety disorders while physiological experiences diverge. The findings encourage future research looking at direct physiological measures and longitudinal designs to confirm the mechanisms underlying different clinical manifestations of anxiety. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25401973

Nestler, Steffen; Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; David, Anthony S

2014-11-12

18

Cambridge Cosmology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created at the University of Cambridge, is meant for the introductory astronomy student who is seeking to understand cosmology issues. There is extensive information on the Big Bang theory, galaxies and clusters, relic radiation, cosmic strings et al, and inflation. There are several helpful movies and animations disperses throughout the website.

2009-10-13

19

Cambridge Cosmology: Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explores the topic of galaxies. It discusses statistics and parts of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, as well as other classes of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, lenticular, and irregular). Galaxy clusters and large-scale structures such as superclusters and voids are explored in terms of their characteristics and origin. Also discussed is the fact that the Universe is comprised mainly of dark matter.

Paul Shellard

20

Grey matter alterations in patients with depersonalization disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study  

PubMed Central

Background To our knowledge, no whole brain investigation of morphological aberrations in dissociative disorder is available to date. Previous region-of-interest studies focused exclusively on amygdalar, hippocampal and parahippocampal grey matter volumes and did not include patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). We therefore carried out an explorative whole brain study on structural brain aberrations in patients with DPD. Methods We acquired whole brain, structural MRI data for patients with DPD and healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry was carried out to test for group differences, and correlations with symptom severity scores were computed for grey matter volume. Results Our study included 25 patients with DPD and 23 controls. Patients exhibited volume reductions in the right caudate, right thalamus and right cuneus as well as volume increases in the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right somatosensory region that are not a direct function of anxiety or depression symptoms. Limitations To ensure ecological validity, we included patients with comorbid disorders and patients taking psychotropic medication. Conclusion The results of this first whole brain investigation of grey matter volume in patients with a dissociative disorder indentified structural alterations in regions subserving the emergence of conscious perception. It remains unknown if these alterations are best understood as risk factors for or results of the disorder. PMID:25285875

Daniels, Judith K.; Gaebler, Michael; Lamke, Jan-Peter; Walter, Henrik

2015-01-01

21

Cambridge Relativity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Cambridge's Relativity site provides users with a glimpse at the major issues within theoretical physics and cosmology. Sections cover such diverse issues as black holes, the big bang, cosmic strings, and quantum gravity. Written in a style accessible to the non-scientist and with useful illustrations, the sections describe currently accepted theories, their possible consequences for the fate or origin of the universe, and their limitations. Users may also be interested in a link to Stephen Hawking's Web site and an introduction to COSMOS, the supercomputer on which many cosmological models are tested. The site also links to a collection of Quicktime movies modeling such things as black hole formation and the interactions and behaviors of cosmic strings.

1996-01-01

22

Cambridge Books Online http://ebooks.cambridge.org  

E-print Network

Cambridge Books Online http://ebooks.cambridge.org Space and Time in Perception and Action Edited 2010. Downloaded from Cambridge Books Online by IP 128.32.245.208 on Tue Nov 15 21:08:22 GMT 2011. http

Whitney, David

23

Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2  

E-print Network

Last 5. Relevancy Title Author Print Publication Year #12; 10 Online Publication Date 6. Hide #12; 1 Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2 Cambridge Books Online ...............3 ....................................5

Wu, Yih-Min

24

The Effects of Being Spurned and Self-Esteem on Depersonalization and Coping Preferences in Kindergarten Teachers: The Case of Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary objective of this study was to examine, based on a model of spurned helpers' reactions: (a) the degrees to which kindergarten teachers in Hong Kong, China, experienced recurrent rejections of their offers of help (being spurned) by peer teachers; (b) whether being spurned by peers would induce depersonalization; (c) the ways teachers…

Cheuk, Wai Hing; Wong, Kwok Sai; Rosen, Sidney

2011-01-01

25

Cambridge Cosmology: Black Holes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Cambridge Cosmology site introduces the concept of black holes, explaining their properties and presenting observational evidence for their existence. Also covered are black hole formation, and determination of weight, size, and distance.

John Stewart

26

Neighborhood design for Cambridge  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the problem of modest high-density low-rise housing design for a site in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It considers first the general changes in housing demand and the housing industry which have made it ...

Reynolds, Margaret (Margaret Philpott Ray), 1953-

1981-01-01

27

CambridgeSoft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CambridgeSoft provides a variety for software for chemical structure drawing and visualization, including the popular ChemDraw and Chem3D programs. Chem3D Ultra includes computational chemistry capability.

28

Cambridge Cosmology: Relic Radiation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic background radiation present in our Universe. Also covered are topics such as the present temperature of the Universe as taken by the COBE satellite, fluctuations seen at the 'edge' of the Universe, and possible causes of these fluctuations.

Shellard, Paul

29

The Depersonalization of Sex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Love is frequently interpreted in a reductionistic way as a mere sublimation of sexual drives and instincts which man shares with all the other animals. Such an interpretation blocks a true understanding of all the various human phenomena. (Author)

Frankl, Viktor E.

1977-01-01

30

Cambridge Cosmology: Cosmic Strings and Other Defects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic strings and other defects in our Universe. It begins with phase transitions in the early Universe, and how cosmic strings and other defects formed early on. Cosmic string evolution and dynamics are discussed while looking at high-resolution numerical cosmic string simulations. Also covered are possible explanations for the origin of large-scale structures (such as galaxies) and texture models of these structures.

Shellard, Paul; Martins, Carlos; Sornborger, Andrew

31

Cambridge Cosmology: Quantum Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explains the concepts of quantum gravity and quantum cosmology, and how they are useful in understanding space and the space-time continuum. This includes the M-theory, formerly known as the string theory, and the Holographic Principle, in order to explain phenomena such as black holes and the first one-hundredth of a second of the Big Bang.

Hertog, Thomas; Herdeiro, Carlos; Chamblin, H.; Ashbourn, J.; Reall, Harvey

32

How do you feel when you can't feel your body? Interoception, functional connectivity and emotional processing in depersonalization-derealization disorder.  

PubMed

Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DD) typically manifests as a disruption of body self-awareness. Interoception -defined as the cognitive processing of body signals- has been extensively considered as a key processing for body self-awareness. In consequence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are systematic differences in interoception between a patient with DD and controls that might explain the disembodiment symptoms suffered in this disease. To assess interoception, we utilized a heartbeat detection task and measures of functional connectivity derived from fMRI networks in interoceptive/exteroceptivo/mind-wandering states. Additionally, we evaluated empathic abilities to test the association between interoception and emotional experience. The results showed patient's impaired performance in the heartbeat detection task when compared to controls. Furthermore, regarding functional connectivity, we found a lower global brain connectivity of the patient relative to controls only in the interoceptive state. He also presented a particular pattern of impairments in affective empathy. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental research that assesses the relationship between interoception and DD combining behavioral and neurobiological measures. Our results suggest that altered neural mechanisms and cognitive processes regarding body signaling might be engaged in DD phenomenology. Moreover, our study contributes experimental data to the comprehension of brain-body interactions and the emergence of self-awareness and emotional feelings. PMID:24967634

Sedeño, Lucas; Couto, Blas; Melloni, Margherita; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Yoris, Adrián; Baez, Sandra; Esteves, Sol; Velásquez, Marcela; Barttfeld, Pablo; Sigman, Mariano; Kichic, Rafael; Chialvo, Dante; Manes, Facundo; Bekinschtein, Tristan A; Ibanez, Agustin

2014-01-01

33

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6...

2011-07-01

34

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6...

2013-07-01

35

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6...

2012-07-01

36

CAPREx Programme Information Cambridge in Africa  

E-print Network

Cambridge-Africa Research Fund by the Alborada Trust, as well as additional funding from the Isaac Newton of New York, The Alborada Trust and the Isaac Newton Trust to support our CAPREx and Cambridge in Africa

Steiner, Ullrich

37

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117...Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m....

2010-07-01

38

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117...Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m....

2014-07-01

39

76 FR 13665 - Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action Total Staffing, Cambridge, OH...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Administration [TA-W-74,605] Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...applicable to workers of Cambridge Tool & Die, Cambridge, Ohio. The workers are engaged...Cambridge, Ohio location of Cambridge Tool & Die Corporation. The Department has...

2011-03-14

40

The Cambridge in Africa Programme Cambridge-Africa Alborada Research Fund Call For Applications  

E-print Network

The Cambridge in Africa Programme Cambridge-Africa Alborada Research Fund ­ Call For Applications activities, named the Cambridge in Africa (CiA) Programme. This Programme currently works in partnership) and THRiVE (Training Health Researchers into Vocational Excellence in East Africa), both sponsored

Travis, Adrian

41

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY WEST ROAD CAMBRIDGE UNITED KINGDOM CB3 9DR  

E-print Network

, subscription or donation, in the Voyager library management system · Searching online bibliographic databasesCAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY WEST ROAD CAMBRIDGE UNITED KINGDOM CB3 9DR Telephone +44 (0) 1223 333000 Fax +44 (0) 1223 333160 www.lib.cam.ac.uk CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY SENIOR LIBRARY ASSISTANT (GRADE 5

Talbot, James P.

42

University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy Modelling of Microstructural and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, between May 2007 and August 2007. Except where acknowledgements

Cambridge, University of

43

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY PART I HANDBOOK 2011/2012 Department of Archaeology and Anthropology Pembroke Street Cambridge CB2 3QY 01223 762846/7 http://www.archanth.cam.ac.uk/ #12;2 Contents Page INTRODUCTION TO PART I ­ ARCHAEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 THE PART I COURSE STRUCTURE

Travis, Adrian

44

Page 1 of 7 University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 7 University of Cambridge Freedom of Information Act 2000 Publication Scheme: Guide in Part II of the Freedom of Information Act 2000; (iii) where it is archived, out-of-date, or otherwise at cost price from the Cambridge University Press Bookshop (http

Keeler, James

45

Revision Planned for the Cambridge Latin Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes a discussion on the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) held during the 1980 ACL Institute at the University of New Hampshire by CLC users and Cambridge University Press representatives. Emphasizes suggestions by users on grammar instruction strategies better suited to American students' needs. (MES)

Sebesta, Judith Lynn

1980-01-01

46

Chapter 6.25 Cambridge Fiji F200 Plasma ALD  

E-print Network

on the tool. 3.0 Applicable Documents 4.0 Definitions & Process Terminology 4.1 Plasma 4.1.1 ICP coilChapter 6.25 Cambridge Fiji F200 Plasma ALD (cambridge) (586) 1.0 Equipment Purpose 1.1 The Cambridge system uses reactive chemistry to generate thin films one atomic layer at a time. The Cambridge

Healy, Kevin Edward

47

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http by saying `well, it could be 10, or it could be 1, or it could be 0.1, . . . ' Scale variables

MacKay, David J.C.

48

Behavioral and Brain Sciences http://journals.cambridge.org/BBS  

E-print Network

Behavioral and Brain Sciences http://journals.cambridge.org/BBS Additional services for Behavioral doi:10.1017/S0140525X1200012X Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/BBS

Nottingham, University of

49

6. Photocopy of lithograph (from Cambridge Historical Commission) Ebenezer Tappan ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Photocopy of lithograph (from Cambridge Historical Commission) Ebenezer Tappan and Lodowick H. Bradford, lithographers ca. 1850 EAST FRONT - Middlesex County Superior Court Building, Third, Otis & Thorndike Streets, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

50

Cambridge University Students'Union Media Pack 2013/2014  

E-print Network

for exam periods) Online Advertising with The Cambridge Student Banner advertising is available year round to be held at Kelsey Kerridge Sports Centre in Cambridge ­ stall space for local and national business

Travis, Adrian

51

Cambridge University Students'Union Media Pack 2013/2014  

E-print Network

(save for exam periods) Online Advertising with The Cambridge Student Banner advertising is available annual student fair to be held at Kelsey Kerridge Sports Centre in Cambridge ­ stall space for local

Talbot, James P.

52

76 FR 12729 - Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0038; FRL-8861-1] Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data...the submitter, will be transferred to Cambridge Environmental Inc. in accordance with...h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2). Cambridge Environmental Inc. has been...

2011-03-08

53

Searching the Cambridge Structural Database for polymorphs.  

PubMed

In order to identify all pairs of polymorphs in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), a method was devised to automatically compare two crystal structures. The comparison is based on simulated powder diffraction patterns, but with special provisions to deal with differences in unit-cell volumes caused by temperature or pressure. Among the 325,000 crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database, 35,000 pairs of crystal structures of the same chemical compound were identified and compared. A total of 7300 pairs of polymorphs were identified, of which 154 previously were unknown. PMID:16186651

van de Streek, Jacco; Motherwell, Sam

2005-10-01

54

47 September 2014 Robinson College, Cambridge, UK  

E-print Network

4­7 September 2014 Robinson College, Cambridge, UK Programme & Abstracts Typeset by Portland Press Speaker Abstracts 1 Poster Abstracts 14 Author Index 66 #12;ii Welcome ©2014 Biochemical Society, London to Robinson College for the Focused Meeting entitled `The Dynamic Cell'. Stephen Royle, Jeremy Carlton, Ulrike

55

NEWNHAM COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE CB3 9DF  

E-print Network

Should Not Study Law at University." Debate, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Law: http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/press (1993) Should the law recognise a right to die? Q4) Does law create freedom or is freedom the absence

Lasenby, Joan

56

The Cambridge University Library Management Research Unit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description of the Unit which has been set up at Cambridge University with an OSTI grant and whose work is to study methods leading to increased effectiveness and efficiency in academic libraries. Attention is focussed on practical investigations making use of O & M and related techniques. (Author)

Plumb, Philip W.

1971-01-01

57

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Faculty of Mathematics  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Faculty of Mathematics MATHEMATICS FOR THE NATURAL SCIENCES WORKBOOK Mathematics is an essential tool for all scientists. In the first year of the Natural Sciences Tripos, there are three mathematics courses: Mathematics (courses A or B); Quantitative Biology; and Elementary

Lasenby, Joan

58

Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

Schaffhauser, Dian

2009-01-01

59

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2010), Page 1 of 10. Copyright INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2010.  

E-print Network

) music, where rhythm and melody scales are different from the ones used in Western music. We obtained. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2010. doi:10.1017/S1355617710000494 1 INTRODUCTION Music perception (Johansson, 2006). One of the early efforts for an information processing model describing music perception

60

Scales  

SciTech Connect

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

Murray Gibson

2007-04-27

61

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2010-07-01

62

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2011-07-01

63

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2013-07-01

64

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2014-07-01

65

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2012-07-01

66

Cambridge Elementary students enjoy gift of computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Children at Cambridge Elementary School, Cocoa, Fla., eagerly unwrap computer equipment donated by Kennedy Space Center. Cambridge is one of 13 Brevard County schools receiving 81 excess contractor computers thanks to an innovative educational outreach project spearheaded by the Nasa k-12 Education Services Office at ksc. Behind the children is Jim Thurston, a school volunteer and retired employee of USBI, who shared in the project. The Astronaut Memorial Foundation, a strategic partner in the effort, and several schools in rural Florida and Georgia also received refurbished computers as part of the year-long project. Ksc employees put in about 3,300 volunteer hours to transform old, excess computers into upgraded, usable units. A total of $90,000 in upgraded computer equipment is being donated.

1999-01-01

67

City of Cambridge: CityViewer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is the best way to experience the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts? You could read a history of Harvard University, take a walking tour, or perhaps browse a topical website. But why not look at the Cambridge CityViewer for edification? This unique tool "allows the public to view, query, mark up, and print custom maps using only a web browser." Notedly, the viewer works best with Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox. Visitors can check out ten different topical overlays, including those dealing with city parks, construction projects, land parcels, sewers, zoning, and traffic. There are many ways to get started, such as performing a simple search, an advanced search, or even just by typing in a street name and number. For anyone with an interest in urban history, planning, and land use, this site is a rare treat.

68

The automated photographic measuring facility at Cambridge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and performance of the automated photographic measuring facility at Cambridge is described. It consists of a precision laser scanning microdensitometer connected to a series of computers that process the data on-line. Plates up to 350 mm square can be measured. The microdensitometer samples the plate to 12 bit accuracy at a speed of 230,000 samples/second. The positional accuracy is better than a micron. Other features include platen rotation and automatic focus.

Kibblewhite, E. J.; Bridgeland, M. T.; Bunclark, P. S.; Irwin, M.

1984-01-01

69

Cambridge Companions Online ISBN Author Title Pub Year Sub Collection Sub Category  

E-print Network

9780521440370 Myerson The Cambridge Companion to Henry David Thoreau 1995 Literature & Classics American literature 9780521495844 Freedman The Cambridge Companion to Henry James 1998 Literature & Classics American

Wu, Yih-Min

70

77 FR 3118 - Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel, Cambridge, MD  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-1164] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge...establishing a temporary security zone. An environmental analysis checklist and a categorical exclusion determination are available...165.T05-1164 Security Zone; Choptank River and...

2012-01-23

71

Use of the Cambridge Structural Database in Study of Single and Partial Double C-X  

E-print Network

Use of the Cambridge Structural Database in Study of Single and Partial Double C-X (X=C,N,O) Bonds What is the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD)? Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), University of Cambridge, UK http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/ -a database containing structural information (atomic

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

72

The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

Pippard, Brian

73

Cambridge Physics: Past, Present and Future  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Opened in 1874, the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge is one of the oldest teaching laboratories in England. Researchers at the Laboratory have made key findings regarding the electron, positive rays, and the nucleus. This interactive site was created by staff members at the Cavendish (with the collaboration of the physics department) in order to educate the public about their work and history. First-time visitors should scroll over the boxes on the homepage to learn more about some of their key discoveries as a way of becoming familiarized with their work. Moving on, the "Past, Present, Future" area provides a virtual tour of the Cavendish Laboratory, along with biographies of the key figures who've worked at the Laboratory since the 19th century.

74

University of Cambridge : Mathematics Enrichment (nrich)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

University of Cambridge offers this website, Mathematics Enrichment (nrich), with problems, games and articles on mathematics for students ages 5 to 19. The problems are organized by Tiers (1 to 3) and follow the UK education system, but a guide for international educators is given in the Help section. Each problem includes a question, related resources, pictures or diagrams, a form for students to submit their solution, hints for students having difficulty, and notes for parents and teachers. The website is updated monthly and offers a weekly problem. This months theme is the mathematics of making journeys, with the path of the Olympic Torch as an intriguing lead-in to the topic. Registered users can pose questions and post messages in the discussion forum, both of which are also viewable by non-registered viewers. Registration is simple and does not cost anything.

2007-12-12

75

University of Cambridge: Mathematics Enrichment (nrich)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

University of Cambridge offers this website, Mathematics Enrichment (nrich), with problems, games and articles on mathematics for students ages 5 to 19. The problems are organized by Tiers (1 to 3) and follow the UK education system, but a guide for international educators is given in the Help section. Each problem includes a question, related resources, pictures or diagrams, a form for students to submit their solution, hints for students having difficulty, and notes for parents and teachers. The website is updated monthly and offers a weekly problem. This months' theme is "the mathematics of making journeys," with the path of the Olympic Torch as an intriguing lead-in to the topic. Registered users can pose questions and post messages in the discussion forum, both of which are also viewable by non-registered viewers. Registration is simple and does not cost anything.

76

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might revolve around the sun? How did Christopher Columbus abuse his knowledge of a lunar eclipse predicted by an astronomical almanac? Packed with anecdotes and intriguing detail, this book describes how we observed the sky and interpreted what we saw at different periods of history; how this influenced our beliefs and mythology; and how great astronomers contributed to what we now know. The result is a lively and highly visual history of astronomy - a compelling read for specialists and non-specialists alike.

Hoskin, Michael

77

Popular Music http://journals.cambridge.org/PMU  

E-print Network

, pp. 57­8) The moveable feast of Carnival, which falls in February or March, marks the culmi- nation0261143011000031 209 #12;http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 29 Aug 2012 IP address: 134.219.64.158 feast

Sheldon, Nathan D.

78

Cambridge in transition : regulating parking in a growing city  

E-print Network

Parking is regulated today by cities to achieve a variety of goals including traffic reduction, air quality improvement, urban densification, and climate change mitigation. In the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts, parking ...

Ferrentino, Cara Elizabeth

2013-01-01

79

Cambridge Grand Junction transit implementation : alternatives, scheduling, cost, and performance  

E-print Network

The Grand Junction railroad lies at the heart of East Cambridge adjacent to the Kendall Square business district and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus. Over the last one hundred years the railroad has gone ...

Iglesias Cuervo, Jesus

2012-01-01

80

The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR): A Measure of Health-Related Quality of Life and Quality of Life for Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: No outcome measures specific to pulmonary hypertension (PH) currently exist. The aim of the study was to develop health-related\\u000a quality of life (symptoms and functioning) scales and a quality of life scale that would allow comprehensive, accurate and\\u000a valid patient-reported outcome assessment in clinical studies. Methods: The content of the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) was derived from

S. P. McKenna; N. Doughty; D. M. Meads; L. C. Doward; J. Pepke-Zaba

2006-01-01

81

The CAMbridge Emission Line Surveyor (CAMELS)  

E-print Network

The CAMbridge Emission Line Surveyor (CAMELS) is a pathfinder program to demonstrate on-chip spectrometry at millimetre wavelengths. CAMELS will observe at frequencies from 103-114.7 GHz, providing 512 channels with a spectral resolution of R = 3000. In this paper we describe the science goals of CAMELS, the current system level design for the instrument and the work we are doing on the detailed designs of the individual components. In addition, we will discuss our efforts to understand the impact that the design and calibration of the filter bank on astronomical performance. The shape of the filter channels, the degree of overlap and the nature of the noise all effect how well the parameters of a spectral line can be recovered. We have developed a new and rigorous method for analysing performance, based on the concept of Fisher information. This can in be turn coupled to a detailed model of the science case, allowing design trade-offs to be properly investigated.

Thomas, C N; Maiolino, R; Goldie, D J; Acedo, E de Lera; Wagg, J; Blundell, R; Paine, S; Zeng, L

2014-01-01

82

78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code...CFR), this is notice that on July 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810,...

2013-08-26

83

Enquist et al. largely sidestep our main findings, namely the whole-plant scaling of  

E-print Network

-specific scaling relations in terms of both photosynthesis and respiration being propor- tional to tissue nitrogen Press, Cambridge, 1986). 10. Ryan, M. G. Ecol.Appl. 1, 157­167 (1991). 11. Wright, I. J. etal. Nature

84

77 FR 64143 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab By Notice dated June 18, 2012, and...June 26, 2012, 77 FR 38086, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts...determined that the registration of Cambridge Isotope Lab to manufacture the listed basic...

2012-10-18

85

Meeting of the Radio Astronomy group, Cambridge, 2001 May 19  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A meeting of the Radio Astronomy group was held at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge on Saturday 2001 May 19. The meeting was to have been held at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cambridge, but due to foot and mouth restrictions the venue had to be changed. The last meeting of the Radio Astronomy Section had been held at MRAO in 1968. After informal conversations as the astronomers assembled lectures were given by university research staff on the latest developments in professional radio astronomy.

Brown, G.

2001-10-01

86

Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

of Philosophy in Micro- and Nanotechnology Enterprise 1 Awarding body University of Cambridge 2 Teaching in Micro- and Nanotechnology Enterprise 5 Programme Title Master of Philosophy in Micro- and Nanotechnology- and Nanotechnology Enterprise is to teach the fundamental science underlying micro- and nanotechnology and to enable

de Gispert, Adrià

87

Page 1 of 5 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

(5*), Classics, Ancient History, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies (5*) 9. The core teaching staff: The University of Cambridge and the Colleges 3. Final Award: Bachelor of Arts 4. Subject: Modern and Medieval; · in certain cases, film and the visual arts in those cultural contexts. (b) to provide high calibre students

de Gispert, Adrià

88

World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR  

E-print Network

World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR Additional services for World Trade Review here Climate and trade policies: from mutual destruction to mutual support PATRICK A. MESSERLIN World Trade Review / Volume 11 / Issue 01 / January 2012, pp 53 - 80 DOI: 10.1017/S1474745611000395, Published

Boyer, Edmond

89

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here, John R. Lister and M. Grae Worster Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 700 / June 2012, pp 63 76 DOI

Worster, M. Grae

90

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here. Paoletti and Harry L. Swinney Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 706 / September 2012, pp 571 583 DOI: 10

Texas at Austin. University of

91

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here. Pegler and M. Grae Worster Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 696 / April 2012, pp 152 174 DOI: 10

Worster, M. Grae

92

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here and E. I. Parau Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 688 / December 2011, pp 528 550 DOI: 10.1017/jfm

Parau, Emilian I.

93

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here. Woodhouse and Raymond E. Goldstein Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 705 / August 2012, pp 165 175 DOI

Goldstein, Raymond E.

94

www.bluesci.co.uk The Cambridge University  

E-print Network

will become dependent on brain-enhancing drugs to function 14 Regulars On the Cover 3 News 4 Reviews 5 History . Smart Drugs Needham . Thought Experiments . Risk FOCUS Higher, Faster, Stronger ISSN1748 recommendations for performing CPR Contents 1 Cambridge University science magazine Easter 2012 Issue 24 Contents

Cambridge, University of

95

Page 1 of 5 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

, natural for courses to develop and change over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw Statement(s) Economics, Town and Country Planning, Law, Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences in several adjoining Victorian buildings on Silver Street in central Cambridge. Some lecture rooms

de Gispert, Adrià

96

Page 1 of 5 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

, natural for courses to develop and change over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw Cambridge. Some lecture rooms are in the recently refurbished Laundress Lane Seminar rooms, and some teaching takes place in the Mill Lane Lecture rooms in three dedicated, fully-equipped (Powerpoint included

de Gispert, Adrià

97

The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY  

E-print Network

The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY Additional services for The China Quarterly here Lowincome Housing in Chinese Cities: Policies and Practices Youqin Huang The China Quarterly (2012). Lowincome Housing in Chinese Cities: Policies and Practices. The China Quarterly, 212, pp

Huang, Youqin

98

The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY  

E-print Network

The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY Additional services for The China Quarterly and Boston: Brill, 2012. vii + 394 pp., 133.00 $182.00. ISBN 9789004218444 Benjamin A. Elman The China this article: Benjamin A. Elman (2012). The China Quarterly, 212, pp 11451148 doi:10.1017/ S0305741012001440

Elman, Benjamin

99

COTTAGE FARM COMBINED SEWER DETENTION AND CHLORINATION STATION, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cottage Farm Detention and Chlorination Station was placed in operation by the Metropolitan District Commission on April 29, 1971. The station, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, diverts and treats combined sewage flows from the Charles River Valley sewer system (15,600 acr...

100

The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

Armstrong, Michael

2010-01-01

101

THE METAL-NON-METAL TRANSITION Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge  

E-print Network

oxide, the material which in 1937 first made us realise that the Bloch-Wilson theory of metalsTHE METAL-NON-METAL TRANSITION N. F. MOTT Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge RBsumB. -La transition mktal-non metal discutke dans cet article est celle qui apparait comme une condquence de l'knergie de

Boyer, Edmond

102

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment  

E-print Network

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Project Team: Cy Chan, Pamela Silva, Chao Zhang Wind Resource Assessment Environmental Impact Community Impact Financial Analysis Turbine Evaluation Set For the full report, please visit: http

103

The Cambridge University Large Vocabulary Arabic Speech Recognition System  

E-print Network

Project Global Autonomous Language Exploitation (GALE) DARPA founded research program (Thanks to DARPA!) (http://www.darpa.mil/ipto/programs/gale/gale.asp) Frank Diehl University of Cambridge #12;Introduction Language Exploitation (GALE) DARPA founded research program (Thanks to DARPA!) (http://www.darpa

de Gispert, Adrià

104

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

OF CRIMINOLOGY Programme Specification: MPhil in Criminology Awarding institution University of Cambridge or fail, no grade or numerical mark is given) Programme title Criminology UCAS code N/A QAA subject-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in Criminology; Students

de Gispert, Adrià

105

[Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Studies 9-13.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These materials are a part of a series of studies sponsored by the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics which reflects the ideas of CCSM regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-12. Feasibility Studies 9-13 contain a wide range of topics. The following are the titles and brief descriptions of these studies. Number…

Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

106

Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

, natural for courses to develop and change over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend this programme specification at any time. Programme Specification: Bachelor of Theology: The Cambridge Theological Federation (CTF). 3) Final Award: Bachelor of Theology for Ministry (B.Th.) 4) Subject

de Gispert, Adrià

107

Cambridge Colleges' Online Reports for Supervisions Manual for College Offices  

E-print Network

-College payments 49 1 #12;1 Introduction 1.1 CamCORS CamCORS, Cambridge Colleges' Online Reports for Supervisions, is a system that allows supervision reports to be read, written, and processed online. Supervisors are asked is intended for use with the Colleges' existing payment systems. In order to use CamCORS, you will need

de Gispert, Adrià

108

MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge  

E-print Network

. The C. elegans IgSF proteins can be classi®ed into ®ve broad categories: muscle proteins, protein models; cell adhesion molecules; cell surface receptors; muscle proteins ############ With completion Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QH, UK The predicted proteins of the genome

Teichmann, Sarah

109

DSpace@Cambridge: implementing long-term digital preservation  

E-print Network

Case studies 5.1 Horse Paleopathology data One of the collections in DSpace@Cambridge con- tains horse paleopathology data. 4 These are re- search findings from excavations in China in 2004, and consist of images of horse bones and associated...

De Mulder, Tom

2005-10-04

110

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Terms of use : Click here Evidence of very long meandering features in the logarithmic region long meandering features in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers N. HUTCHINS AND IVAN://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022112006003946 How to cite this article: N. HUTCHINS and IVAN MARUSIC (2007). Evidence of very long meandering

Marusic, Ivan

111

Embedding Sustainable Development at Cambridge University Engineering Department  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose--The paper seeks to examine the latest stage in a process of change aimed at introducing concepts of sustainable development into the activities of the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, UK. Design/methodology/approach--The rationale behind defining the skills which future engineers require is discussed and vehicles for…

Fenner, Richard A.; Ainger, Charles M.; Cruickshank, Heather J.; Guthrie, Peter M.

2005-01-01

112

Cambridge University Library -Social and Political Sciences (SPS) Library, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RQ  

E-print Network

Cambridge University Library - Social and Political Sciences (SPS) Library, Free School Lane Assistant to deliver high quality library services. You will need excellent interpersonal skills and good IT skills. You should enjoy working as part of a team, as well as being confident and capable

Cambridge, University of

113

Ian Hacking. Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? Cam-bridge University Press, Cambridge, 2014 xv + 290 pp.  

E-print Network

Ian Hacking. Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? Cam- bridge University Press, Cambridge that delivers a certain experience of un- derstanding, Hacking argues, surprisingly, that neither notion, and while Hacking challenges us to imagine that the role of proof in mathematics could have been different

Avigad, Jeremy

114

A review of "The Cambridge Companion to Newton." by I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith, eds.  

E-print Network

REVIEWS 135 were subject, the ways rulers influenced medicine, and how royal practitioners shaped and reacted to changing political fortunes. I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith, eds. The Cambridge Compan- ion to Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge... of methodological unity belonging to the wide range of disciplines he dealt with. The philosophical theory of absolute space-time is the one which most made Newton a milestone in the history of philosophy. That vision underwent its final crisis during...

Alessandro Giostra

2003-01-01

115

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: king these assumptions explicit, perhaps by using the book asthe basis for a large-scale computational grammar, very likely one in the tradition ofPullum's earlier work (Gazdar et al. 1985). Such a project, although very worthwhile,would probably be too long-term for most of us, so we now turn to other ways inwhich the availability of the grammar may enhance the

Rodney Huddleston; Geoffrey K. Pullum

2002-01-01

116

Cambridge Cosmology: The Hot Big Bang Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website introduces the Big Bang Model (also known as the standard cosmology) and the fact that it successfully explains many details about the formation of the Universe. It also touches upon issues not explainable through standard cosmology. A brief history of observational cosmology in the 20th century is given as a reference, followed by a brief history of our Universe as told through standard cosmology as well as particle and quantum cosmology. This site goes through the four 'pillars' of the Hot Big Bang Model: expansion of the Universe after a violent explosion, origin of the cosmic background radiation, nucleosynthesis of the light elements, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structures in the Universe.

Shellard, Paul

117

DARWIN COLLEGE SOCIETY DARWIN COLLEGE SILVER STREET CAMBRIDGE CB3 9EU  

E-print Network

DARWIN COLLEGE SOCIETY DARWIN COLLEGE · SILVER STREET · CAMBRIDGE · CB3 9EU Porters' Lodge (01223 3 The Darwin College Society has started an exciting new initiative designed to enable our current students and the Medical Research Council, Dept of Genetics & Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge). Integration

Travis, Adrian

118

77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code...Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on May 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810,...

2012-06-26

119

Measures of Systemic Risk Cambridge 2014 1 Measures of Systemic Risk  

E-print Network

Measures of Systemic Risk ­ Cambridge 2014 1 Measures of Systemic Risk Stefan Weber Leibniz & Birgit Rudloff. Stefan Weber ­ Leibniz Universit¨at Hannover #12;Measures of Systemic Risk ­ Cambridge 2014 2 Motivation · Various financial crises have highlighted the paramount importance of systemic risk

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

120

Investigating the Impact of Cambridge International Assessments on U.S. Stakeholders: Student and Teacher Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the continuing program to study the impact of its international assessments, the University of Cambridge International Examinations ("Cambridge") has undertaken a series of studies investigating the impact on a range of US stakeholders. This paper reports on research designed to respond to a series of washback and impact questions…

Shaw, Stuart

2011-01-01

121

Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

2010-01-01

122

The Stiffness of Tensegrity Structures Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge,  

E-print Network

The Stiffness of Tensegrity Structures S.D. Guest Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK July 9, 2010 Abstract The stiffness of tensegrity, and the reorientation of forces as already stressed members are rotated. For any particular tensegrity, both sources

Guest, Simon

123

Developing Rating Scales for CASE: Theoretical Concerns and Analyses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of the Cambridge Assessment of Spoken English (CASE) is reviewed, with particular reference to the trialling and validation of the rating scales. The objectives of the test are to assess an individual's ability to produce and process spoken English; demonstrate the ability to communicate in English through the use of grammatical,…

Milanovic, Michael; And Others

124

Investigating the Site of Newton's Laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge  

E-print Network

background Newton the laboratory chemist Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a man of the most extraordinarily diverse interests — a member of that tiny band of scholars such as da Vinci and Goethe who were active and creative in a wide variety of fields. He... Investigating the site of Newton’s laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge P.E. Spargo* IT IS NOT GENERALLY KNOWN THAT OVER THE course of some thirty years, Isaac Newton carried out around four hundred chemical experiments in a private laboratory...

Spargo, P E

125

The Cambridge Structural Database in retrospect and prospect.  

PubMed

The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) was established in 1965 to record numerical, chemical and bibliographic data relating to published organic and metal-organic crystal structures. The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now stores data for nearly 700,000 structures and is a comprehensive and fully retrospective historical archive of small-molecule crystallography. Nearly 40,000 new structures are added each year. As X-ray crystallography celebrates its centenary as a subject, and the CCDC approaches its own 50th year, this article traces the origins of the CCDC as a publicly funded organization and its onward development into a self-financing charitable institution. Principally, however, we describe the growth of the CSD and its extensive associated software system, and summarize its impact and value as a basis for research in structural chemistry, materials science and the life sciences, including drug discovery and drug development. Finally, the article considers the CCDC's funding model in relation to open access and open data paradigms. PMID:24382699

Groom, Colin R; Allen, Frank H

2014-01-13

126

Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education.  

PubMed

The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal-organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout. PMID:20877495

Battle, Gary M; Ferrence, Gregory M; Allen, Frank H

2010-10-01

127

A Large-Scale Evaluation of Acoustic and Subjective Music Similarity Measures Adam Berenzweig  

E-print Network

A Large-Scale Evaluation of Acoustic and Subjective Music Similarity Measures Adam Berenzweig Lab being the most reliable overall. (3) Our methodology for large- scale cross-site music similarity@ee.columbia.edu Brian Whitman Music Mind & Machine Group MIT Media Lab Cambridge MA U.S.A. bwhitman

Ellis, Dan

128

Online edition (c) 2009 Cambridge UP DRAFT! April 1, 2009 Cambridge University Press. Feedback welcome. 443  

E-print Network

the student project scale to substan- tial research projects. We begin (Section 20.1.1) by listing desiderata of this chapter is the component shown in Figure 19.7 as web crawler; it is sometimes referred to as a spider.WEB CRAWLER SPIDER The goal of this chapter is not to describe how to build the crawler for a full

Pratt, Vaughan

129

Research applications of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD).  

PubMed

Crystal structure data are of fundamental importance in a wide spectrum of scientific activities. This tutorial review summarises the principal application areas, so far, for the data from more than 300,000 crystal structures of small organic and metal-organic compounds that are stored in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Direct use of the accumulated data is valuable in establishing standard molecular dimensions, determining conformational preferences and in the study of intermolecular interactions, all of which are crucial in structural chemistry and rational drug design. More recently, information derived from the CSD has been used to construct two dynamic libraries of structural knowledge: Mogul, which stores intramolecular information, and IsoStar, which stores information about intermolecular interactions. These electronic libraries provide information "at the touch of a button". In their turn, the libraries also serve as sources of structural knowledge for applications software that address specific problems in small-molecule and biological chemistry. PMID:15480471

Allen, Frank H; Taylor, Robin

2004-10-20

130

University of Cambridge: Economics, Networks and Security Seminar Series  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A biweekly seminar series on Economics, Networks, and Security is being held at the University of Cambridge during fall 2003. This website maintains abstracts of the speakers' presentations and research papers about their topics of discussion. Of the five seminars scheduled, papers for three have been posted online and the remaining two will likely be available in the near future. The first paper outlines the concept of trusted computing and discusses the implications for public policy. The second paper is based on economical aspects of intellectual property, but a less technical resource is also given and is titled Digital Goods in the New Economy. Lastly, the facets of e-commerce and its relation to security is the basis for the third paper. [CL

131

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS  

E-print Network

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS Additional services for British Journal of Political Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Gill British Journal of Political Science / Volume 43 / Issue 02 / April 2013, pp 425

Gill, Jeff

132

A hotel economic feasibility study : Monsignor O'Brien Highway, Cambridge, Massachusetts  

E-print Network

A hotel economic feasibility study was carried out for an assemblage of four (4) parcels located on Monsignor O'Brien Highway in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The primary objective of this economic feasibility study was to ...

Rogers, Mark P. (Mark Paul)

2007-01-01

133

The study of the communication patterns of Boston-Cambridge regional biotech firms to universities  

E-print Network

This paper analyzes data from a study which focused on understanding the informal scientific communication network among Biotechnology firms in the Boston-Cambridge Biotech area. A previous study (Allen, et. al., 2009) ...

Hashmi, Nada

2008-01-01

134

Mass Programmed Agents for Simulating Human Strategies in Large Scale Systems  

E-print Network

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 USA sarned@eecs.harvard repre- senting self-interested behaviors. This allows the system to scale-up and test the influence of changing different system parameters. The main steps we use are: · Define the simulated environment

Kraus, Sarit

135

Individual Rationality and Participation in Large Scale, Multi-hospital Kidney Exchange  

E-print Network

Individual Rationality and Participation in Large Scale, Multi-hospital Kidney Exchange [Extended Harvard University Cambridge, MA aroth@hbs.edu ABSTRACT As multi-hospital kidney exchange clearinghouses ABSTRACT When kidney exchange was just beginning, most exchanges were conducted in single hospitals

Sandholm, Tuomas W.

136

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. About Chapter 12://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http

MacKay, David J.C.

137

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See soldier in the line, say the number `one' to the soldier behind you. 2. If you are the rearmost soldier

MacKay, David J.C.

138

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See of the world record for some quantity x, say earthquake magnitude, or longjump distances jumped at world

MacKay, David J.C.

139

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http 1', I will usually simply say that it is `true'. I 2.1 Probabilities and ensembles An ensemble X not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http

MacKay, David J.C.

140

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http (electrical, say) channel with inputs and outputs that are continuous in time. We put in x(t), and out comes y

MacKay, David J.C.

141

The contribution of media analysis to the evaluation of environmental interventions: the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study  

E-print Network

to encourage people who would not nor- mally use buses to shift to the busway. “We are looking to appeal to people who are normally using their BMW to go into CambridgeCambridge Evening News, April 17, 2009 In practice, some of the positive features...

Kesten, Joanna; Cohn, Simon; Ogilvie, David

2014-05-21

142

Integrating Mass Scale Spectroscopic Processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper briefly presents the challenges in implementing the data driven pipelines which will support the delivery of science data products from three major new spectroscopic , namely the Gaia-ESO survey, the WEAVE multi-object spectrograph for the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope, and the 4MOST multi-object spectrograph for the ESO VISTA telescope. We note the design solutions being implemented at the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit where an integrated approach in the delivery of a scalable data pipeline is being adopted. The design of the processing system is strongly science driven, which ensures that the analysis system delivers high quality data products to the science survey teams on the shortest possible time-scales, thereby allowing rapid scientific validation and exploitation of the data.

Walton, N. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Koposov, S.; Lewis, J. R.; Gonzales-Solarez, E.

2014-05-01

143

Proceedings of the 13th Workshop on Dynamical Phenomena at Surfaces (Cambridge, UK, July 2008)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The papers collected here arise from the Workshop on Dynamical Phenomena at Surfaces, held in Cambridge, UK, in July 2008. The meeting has grown from the, SURPHON workshops [1], which traditionally had an emphasis on surface lattice dynamics. Over time the range of scientific interest has broadened and the recent meeting covered a wide range of topics including diffusion of

W Allison; G Alexandrowicz; J Ellis; H Hedgeland; A P Jardine

2009-01-01

144

Genetic Influences on Cognitive Function Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The genetic relationship between intelligence and components of cognition remains controversial. Conflicting results may be a function of the limited number of methods used in experimental evaluation. The current study is the first to use CANTAB (The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). This is a battery of validated computerised…

Singer, Jamie J.; MacGregor, Alex J.; Cherkas, Lynn F.; Spector, Tim D.

2006-01-01

145

The Journal of Agricultural Science http://journals.cambridge.org/AGS  

E-print Network

The Journal of Agricultural Science http://journals.cambridge.org/AGS Additional services for The Journal of Agricultural Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints The Journal of Agricultural Science / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 12 DOI: 10.1017/S

146

Downloaded: 22 Oct 2008journals.cambridge.org Clonal diversity within infections and the virulence  

E-print Network

Downloaded: 22 Oct 2008journals.cambridge.org Clonal diversity within infections and the virulence predict that genetic diversity of microparasite infections will influence the level of costs suffered infections of P. mexicanum made up of 1, 2, 3, or >3 clones (scored using 3 microsatellite loci) to observe

Schall, Joseph J.

147

Searching the Cambridge Structural Database for the 'best' representative of each unique polymorph.  

PubMed

A computer program has been written that removes suspicious crystal structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and clusters the remaining crystal structures as polymorphs or redeterminations. For every set of redeterminations, one crystal structure is selected to be the best representative of that polymorph. The results, 243,355 well determined crystal structures grouped by unique polymorph, are presented and analysed. PMID:16840806

van de Streek, Jacco

2006-08-01

148

Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 University of Cambridge Department Green, Malcolm Longair, Julia Riley, Martin Krause #12;Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 Feedback and Triggering in Galaxy Evolution · We currently have

Steiner, Ullrich

149

A symmetry-extended mobility rule Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

A symmetry-extended mobility rule S.D. Guest Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK June 9, 2003 Abstract A symmetry-extended mobility rule for mechanical and strengthened by an equation that predicts symmetries, as well as numbers, of mobilities and states of self

Guest, Simon

150

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS  

E-print Network

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS Additional services for British Journal of Political Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial and FLORENCE HAEGEL British Journal of Political Science / Volume 37 / Issue 01 / January 2007, pp 1 - 22 DOI

Boyer, Edmond

151

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed  

E-print Network

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed JJB Gill1 DAR Davies2 of Domestic Animals; Toulouse-Auzeville, 10-13 July 1990) sheep / chimerism / XX/XY / infertility-type external genitalia. Apart from this animal, all the ultimately infertile females showed no sign

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Natural Language Engineering 1 (1): 132. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1998 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

Natural Language Engineering 1 (1): 1­32. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1998 Cambridge University readability. First, for determining content and structure (docu- ment planning), we did not explicitly model readability, but rather followed a pragmatic approach of repeatedly revising content and structure following

Reiter, Ehud

153

Natural Language Engineering 1 (1): 000000. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1998 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

Natural Language Engineering 1 (1): 000­000. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1998 Cambridge University Press 1 Using the Crowd for Readability Prediction Orph´ee De Clercq 1,3 V´eronique Hoste 1,2 Bart experts for a machine learning approach to automatic readability prediction. In order to do so, we

De Cock, Martine

154

The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

2013-01-01

155

Bibliography Anderson, J.R. (1983). Architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard  

E-print Network

1 Bibliography Anderson, J.R. (1983). Architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University) "Situated cognition and the role of multi-agent models in explaining language structure." In D. Kudenko, E perspectives. New York: Walter de Gruyter. Brown, J., A. Collins, and P. Duguid. "Situated cognition

Maryland at College Park, University of

156

US ISSN 0006-9698 CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 17 OCTOBER 2011 NUMBER 526  

E-print Network

US ISSN 0006-9698 CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 17 OCTOBER 2011 NUMBER 526 A NEW CRYPTIC SPECIES OF SALAMANDER, GENUS OEDIPINA (CAUDATA: PLETHODONTIDAE), FROM PREMONTANE ELEVATIONS IN NORTHERN NICARAGUA elevations of three isolated mountains in northern Nicaragua. The new cryptic species differs in molecular

Wake, David B.

157

Computational problems in magnetic resonance imaging Tuomo Valkonen, University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

pathologies. Figure: Illustration of the DTI process. Left-to-right: 1. DWI images, 2. colour-coded tensors, 3 (Uni-Graz), and F. Knoll (TU Graz). Diffusion tensor imaging [7, 8] Diffusion-weighted MRI measuresComputational problems in magnetic resonance imaging Tuomo Valkonen, University of Cambridge Joint

Edinburgh, University of

158

James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability—II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extract reproduced in this paper consists of a draft of the first half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Historical notes are added on the development of stability theory before Maxwell's essay.

A. T. FULLER

1982-01-01

159

James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability-I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. Extracts are reproduced dealing with (i) a speed governor designed by Maxwell at the age of fifteen, and (ii) the stability of fluid motion (1855).

A. T. FULLER

1982-01-01

160

James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: Extracts relating to control and stability, 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extract reproduced in Part II consists of a draft of the first half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Historical notes are added on the development of stability theory before Maxwell's essay.

A. T. Fuller

1981-01-01

161

James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability—III  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extracts reproduced in Part III consist mainly of a draft of the second half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Here Maxwell investigates the stability of a fluid ring rotating round a centre

A. T. FULLER

1983-01-01

162

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PNS  

E-print Network

and the control of appetite Edmund T. Rolls Proceedings of the Nutrition Society / Volume 71 / Issue 04 / November://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0029665112000821 How to cite this article: Edmund T. Rolls (2012). Taste, olfactory and food texture reward and food texture reward processing in the brain and the control of appetite Edmund T. Rolls Department

Rolls, Edmund T.

163

Cambridge Safari How many animals can you find lurking in the buildings of  

E-print Network

the map inside to guide you to zoology in the architecture, and send us pictures of the animals that you pictures of animals in the buildings of Cambridge through Facebook and Twitter, #cambridgesafari www.facebook.com/Zoology of Zoology The Museum of Zoology is currently closed for major refurbishment supported by the Heritage

Steiner, Ullrich

164

Local Restaurants Cambridge Cuisine Type Description Location by Neighborhood/Area  

E-print Network

http://www.classicirish.com/ Irish classic Irish pub Central Square Asmara Ethiopian 739Local Restaurants Cambridge Cuisine Type Description Location by Neighborhood/Area 1369 Coffee://www.gardenatthecellar.com/ Gastropub "A gastropub is a British term for a public house, "pub", which specializes in high quality

de Weck, Olivier L.

165

Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

2005-01-01

166

Legacies, Policies and Prospects: One Year on from the Cambridge Primary Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the "Cambridge Primary Review." The "Review" has been supported from the beginning by Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, and this has given it the independence which is essential to its credibility. Its remit was to investigate, report and make recommendations on the condition and future of primary education in England. Its scope…

Alexander, Robin

2011-01-01

167

Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a…

Armstrong, Michael

2011-01-01

168

Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

2012-01-01

169

19 September 2005 Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

DIPLOMA in the CONSERVATION OF EASEL PAINTINGS 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching. Programme Title Conservation of Easel Paintings 6. UCAS Code n/a 7. Benchmark Statement(s) History of Art conservators/restorers and one conservation scientist. In addition conservators from UK and abroad, without

de Gispert, Adrià

170

Further Particulars: Programme and Visitor Secretary (Reception) The University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

, faculties, schools and other institutions plus a central administration. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national and international for various committees. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge

Travis, Adrian

171

Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in  

E-print Network

PA Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in 1943, and blew it up Dambusters raid recreated to reveal mystery of the bouncing bombs By Jerome Taylor Monday, 2 May 2011 It has gone down in history as one of the world's most daring bombing raids ­ a feat

Talbot, James P.

172

The Journal of Asian Studies http://journals.cambridge.org/JAS  

E-print Network

The Journal of Asian Studies http://journals.cambridge.org/JAS Additional services for The Journal Mekong Delta, 1757­1954 Shawn McHale The Journal of Asian Studies / Volume 72 / Issue 02 / May 2013, pp: The Signicance of the Lower Mekong Delta, 1757­1954. The Journal of Asian Studies, 72, pp 367-390 doi:10.1017/S

Schmitt, William R.

173

Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

2012-01-01

174

JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20101 Fusion Energy & ITER:Fusion Energy & ITER  

E-print Network

Energy without green house gashouse gas #12;JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20103 3 D + T + He ++ n U235 n n Neutrons Billions ITERITER startsstarts DEMODEMO decisiondecision:: Fusion impact? Energy without green internal components are water cooled; max: 10 MW/mAll internal components are water cooled; max: 10 MW/m22

175

SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA) interpreter in Java [after [6] p. 176]. Abstract SILK (Scheme in about 50 K) is a compact Scheme imple- mented Scheme in Java, but its access to Java was awkward. The current version has altered SILK's syntax

Strickland, Stevie

176

J. Brian Bird Born in Birmingham, England in 1923, Brian Bird was a student at Cambridge  

E-print Network

J. Brian Bird Born in Birmingham, England in 1923, Brian Bird was a student at Cambridge University Arctic and the other on the Natural Landscapes of Canada. Brian Bird also played a key role Bay and spent much of his time there enjoying vegetable gardening. Brian Bird passed away on August 20

Fabry, Frederic

177

BOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge  

E-print Network

systems for use on planet Earth are then covered. Chapter 18 concerns lightning protection techniquesBOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge University Press, incredibly useful ­ schol- arly compendium of all that is known about lightning, its causes, and the many

Florida, University of

178

For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI  

E-print Network

For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI for understanding and appreciating the subsequent chapters in this volume. Overview of Artificial Intelligence core themes The history of artificial intelligence may be best understood in the context of its core themes

Memphis, University of

179

Ian Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, xvii + 302 pp.  

E-print Network

Ian Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, and as an introduction to statistical inference and decision theory, it is even better. Hacking writes very clearly and engagingly throughout. A good supply of well-chosen exercises appear at the end of each chapter, and Hacking

Fitelson, Branden

180

CamGrid: Experiences in constructing a university-wide, Condor-based grid at the University of Cambridge  

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CamGrid: Experiences in constructing a university-wide, Condor-based grid at the University of Cambridge M Calleja1, B Beckles4, M Keegan3, M A Hayes2, A Parker2 and M T Dove1, 3 1. Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing... of Cambridge based on the Condor middleware [1]. Once the issues of stakeholder concerns (e.g. security policies) and technical problems (e.g. firewalls and private IP addresses) have been taken into account, a solution based on two separate Condor...

Calleja, Mark; Beckles, B; Keegan, M; Hayes, Mark; Parker, A; Dove, Martin T

2008-06-26

181

J. Functional Programming 9 (4): 355372, July 1999. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge University Press  

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J. Functional Programming 9 (4): 355­372, July 1999. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge's paper is a highly readable, elementary introduction to the algebra centred on the well-known function

Hutton, Graham

182

J. Fluid Mech. (1998), ol. 376, pp. 376378. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press  

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J. Fluid Mech. (1998), ol. 376, pp. 376­378. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge), and White (1994). The authors state that the textbook is very readable in its format, and there is no reason

Worster, M. Grae

183

TRINITY HALL TRINITY LANE CAMBRIDGE CB2 1TJ conference@trinhall.cam.ac.uk 01223 764444  

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Shallots and Sauce Vierge VEGETARIAN Spinach & Butternut Squash Risotto with Rocket and Root Vegetable & Caramelized Shallot Wellington, Basil Dressing #12;TRINITY HALL TRINITY LANE CAMBRIDGE CB2 1TJ conference

Lasenby, Joan

184

12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, May 8---10, 2006, Cambridge, Massachusetts PML absorbing boundary condition for nonlinear  

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12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, May 8---10, 2006, Cambridge, Massachusetts PML absorbing of Mathematics and Statistics, Senior member AIAA + Professor, School of Jet Propulsion, Senior member AIAA

Hu, Fang Q.

185

Impact of communications between firms on innovation and new product development : the case of the Cambridge/Boston biotech cluster  

E-print Network

The paper reports the results of a study of innovations and new product development in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Boston/Cambridge cluster. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that more ...

Kolosov, Dmitry, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01

186

The Science of Pain World of the Nanoputians For He's a Jolly Old (Cambridge) Fellow Designer Babies  

E-print Network

· Designer Babies · Issue 1 Michaelmas 2004 A New Science Magazine for Cambridge in association with. Designed for users, the Libra range combines new ideas with proven technology to offer outstanding

Cambridge, University of

187

Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week, Bartleby.com (last reviewed in the December 10, 1999 Scout Report) announced the online publication of all eighteen volumes of the classic Cambridge History of English and American Literature. This excellent free resource "comprises the largest public reference work of literary criticism and history on the Internet." Originally published in 1907-1921, the volumes include 303 chapters and more than 11,000 pages, edited and written by a worldwide panel of 171 leading scholars and thinkers of the early twentieth century. The online version features over 5,600 files, searchable by keyword and browseable by volume, chapter, and section. The electronic Cambridge History also includes chapter and bibliography indexes. Although a bit dated in parts, these eighteen volumes are a valuable, and now easily accessible, research tool for secondary and university students.

188

Innovations and Challenges in Renal Cancer: Summary Statement From the Third Cambridge Conference  

PubMed Central

The Third Cambridge Conference on Innovations and Challenges in Renal Cancer, a symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 27–28, 2008, and chaired by Michael B. Atkins, was convened to discuss the current state of knowledge in the field, critique new data, stimulate communication among those involved in basic and clinical research, and offer recommendations for further study. Four main topics were discussed: genetics and molecular biology of renal cell cancer, staging and prognosis, systemic therapy, and correlative science and biomarkers in stage IV disease. The conference format combined brief presentations with extended periods of discussion. The conclusions and recommendations are summarized in this paper and presented in more detail in the individual papers that follow. PMID:19402064

Atkins, Michael B.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Escudier, Bernard J.; Figlin, Robert A.; Hudes, Gary H.; Kaelin, William G.; Linehan, W. Marston; McDermott, David F.; Mier, James W.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Rini, Brian I.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Teh, Bin Tean; Wood, Christopher G.; Zurita, Amado J.; King, Laura

2009-01-01

189

18. Van der Voo, R. Paleomagnetism of the Atlantic, Tethys and Iapetus Oceans (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993).  

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, 315­379 (1994). 20. Baumgartner, P. O. Age and genesis of Tethyan Jurassic Radiolarites. Eclog. Geol. Helv. 80, 831­879 (1987). 21. Bartolini, A., Baumgartner, P. O. & Guex, J. Middle and Late Jurassic ............................................................................................................................................................................. During the last glacial period, large millennial-scale temperature oscillations--the `Dansgaard

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

190

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy, Issue 11  

E-print Network

College Lectureship in Philosophy for Fitzwilliam and Churchill Colleges. Dr Raphaël Ehrsam (Universite Paris 1 Sorbonne) was appointed to a temporary lectureship. Dr Craig French (University of Antwerp) was appointed to a 3-year Junior Research... differences to love and revolution of the world. Speakers from Cambridge have included graduate students such as Lorna Finlayson, Joanna Burch-Brown, Christine Tiefensee; and also Faculty members, such as Paulina Sliwa, Elselijn Kingma, Anna Alexandrova...

Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

2014-05-13

191

A spiritual leader? Cambridge zoology, mountaineering and the death of F.M. Balfour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frank Balfour was regarded by his colleagues as one of the greatest biologists of his day and Charles Darwin’s successor, yet the young aristocrat died in a climbing accident before his thirty-first birthday. Reactions to his death reveal much about the image of science and scientists in late-Victorian Britain. In this paper I examine the development of the Cambridge school

Helen Blackman

2004-01-01

192

Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

Dupree, Andrea K.

1998-01-01

193

Book Review: Aristotle's Ethics as First Philosophy Claudia Baracchi Cambridge University Press, 2008 ISBN 9780521866583  

E-print Network

Book Reviews Aristotle's Ethics as First Philosophy Claudia Baracchi Cambridge University Press, 2008 ISBN 9780521866583 Review by Douglas K. Fishel, University of Kansas Writing a book on Aristotle from a continental perspective with scant... begins her argument in Metaphysics A and in the Posterior Analytics. From the Metaphysics, Baracchi indicates that Aristotle believes that desire is the basis for the human quest for knowledge. That leads to the search for perceptual knowledge...

Fischel, Douglas R.

194

Street Versus Rooftop Level Concentrations of Fine Particles in a Cambridge Street Canyon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dispersion of particles, as evidenced by changes in their number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs), in urban\\u000a street canyons, is still not well understood. This study compares measurements by a fast-response particle spectrometer (DMS500)\\u000a of the PNDs and the PNCs (5–1000 nm, sampled at 1 Hz) at street and rooftop levels in a Cambridge UK street canyon, and examines\\u000a mixing, physical and

Prashant Kumar; Paul S. Fennell; Allan N. Hayhurst; Rex E. Britter

2009-01-01

195

PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

2013-02-01

196

Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge  

PubMed Central

Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education. PMID:24899813

Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

2014-01-01

197

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 14 Jul 2009 IP address: 131.111.16.227 J. Fluid Mech. (1995), uol. 282, pp. 373403  

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of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, The University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW, such as colloidal and macromolecular systems which have internal degrees of freedom describing changes simulations of Brownian motion are currently being used to study a wide range of phenomena in colloidal

Hinch, John

198

Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied…

Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

2014-01-01

199

Date: 14 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004  

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spaces) Clear and tidy workspace with no other chemical contamination. Disposal measures to be usedDate: 14 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM

Cambridge, University of

200

The conquest of vitalism or the eclipse of organicism? The 1930s Cambridge organizer project and the social network of mid-twentieth-century biology.  

PubMed

In the 1930s, two concepts excited the European biological community: the organizer phenomenon and organicism. This essay examines the history of and connection between these two phenomena in order to address the conventional 'rise-and-fall' narrative that historians have assigned to each. Scholars promoted the 'rise-and-fall' narrative in connection with a broader account of the devitalizing of biology through the twentieth century. I argue that while limited evidence exists for the 'fall of the organizer concept' by the 1950s, the organicism that often motivated the organizer work had no concomitant fall--even during the mid-century heyday of molecular biology. My argument is based on an examination of shifting social networks of life scientists from the 1920s to the 1970s, many of whom attended or corresponded with members of the Cambridge Theoretical Biology Club (1932-1938). I conclude that the status and cohesion of these social networks at the micro scale was at least as important as macro-scale conceptual factors in determining the relative persuasiveness of organicist philosophy. PMID:24941735

Peterson, Erik

2014-06-01

201

Building America Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency. Efficient operation of the heating system faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68 degrees F) than day (73 degrees F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

Not Available

2014-11-01

202

Characterization of the genus Hernandarioides F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 (Opiliones, Gonyleptidae, Ampycinae).  

PubMed

Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge (1905) described the monotypic genus Hernandarioides based on the species Hernandarioides plana F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905, from Bugaba, Panama. The etymology of the generic name was inspired by the pre-existing Hernandaria Sørensen, 1884, because of the obliteration of the scutal grooves (which in this case is a convergence between the two unrelated groups Ampycinae and Hernandariinae). The species description was based only on the female holotype. Modern taxonomic descriptions of laniatorean harvestmen are most commonly based upon male holotypes because females lack many diagnostic characters. The holotype, deposited in the Natural History Museum, London, is brittle and does not bring much meaningful information about the species. Hernandarioides was not originally included in any subfamily of Gonyleptidae, and was included by Roewer (1913: 464) in the Hernandariinae. Goodnight & Goodnight (1942: 18) described in Prostygninae the monotypic genus Kaluga along with the species Kaluga elongata Goodnight & Goodnight, 1942, from Casita Alta, a locality very close to Bugaba, providing uninformative illustrative material. A little later, Goodnight & Goodnight (1947: 15) synonymized Kaluga with Hernandarioides and Kaluga elongata with Hernandarioides plana. Kury (2003: 105) proposed the unjustified emendation Hernandarioides planus. Finally Kury & Alonso-Zarazaga (2011: 53) transferred the genus to the Ampycinae and explained that the grammatical gender of Hernandarioides is feminine, reestablishing the original inflection Hernandarioides plana.  PMID:25081774

Kury, Adriano B; Quintero, Diomedes A

2014-01-01

203

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

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. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 8 Dependent Random Variables buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 8

MacKay, David J.C.

204

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http the following questions, please ask your common sense what it thinks the answers are; we will then see how and commutes 60 miles to work. Whilst at work, he receives a phone­call from his neighbour saying that Fred

MacKay, David J.C.

205

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

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. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 38 Introduction to Neural of their face, say) is stored in a digital computer at an address. To retrieve the memory you need to know

MacKay, David J.C.

206

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

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. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 320 24 --- Exact # # # # . Here, the Jacobian is # # # # ## # ln # # # # # = #. prior that expresses ignorance about # by saying

MacKay, David J.C.

207

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http samples. For brevity, we will say `independent samples' when we mean `e#ectively independent samples'. I this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 388 30 --- E

MacKay, David J.C.

208

CAMBRIDGE, U.K., AND BARCELONA, SPAIN--As the horse-trading to select a site for the Inter-  

E-print Network

CAMBRIDGE, U.K., AND BARCELONA, SPAIN--As the horse-trading to select a site for the Inter studying four candidate sites, in Canada, Japan, France, and Spain. To boost its odds, the E.U. decided to put forward only one candidate--either Cadarache in France or Vandellòs in Spain--and asked David King

209

MICRO-BRANCHING AS AN INSTABILITY IN DYNAMIC FRACTURE To appear in the proceedings of the IUTAM conference (Cambridge, 1995)  

E-print Network

MICRO-BRANCHING AS AN INSTABILITY IN DYNAMIC FRACTURE To appear in the proceedings of the IUTAM conference (Cambridge, 1995) MICRO-BRANCHING AS AN INSTABILITY IN DYNAMIC FRACTURE J. FINEBERG, S. P. GROSS in brittle, amorphous PMMA indicate that the process of dynamic fracture is governed by a micro

Fineberg, Jay

210

Ada Numerica (1998), pp. 1-49 Cambridge University Press, 1998 Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo  

E-print Network

Ada Numerica (1998), pp. 1-49 © Cambridge University Press, 1998 Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo-mail: caiflisch@math.ucla.edu Monte Carlo is one of the most versatile and widely used numerical methods. Its convergence rate, O(N~1 ^2 ), is independent of dimension, which shows Monte Carlo to be very robust but also

Li, Tiejun

211

Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), syip@mit.edu  

E-print Network

CV SIDNEY YIP Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), syip@mit.edu Education B.S. (Mechanical Engineering, 1958), M.S. (Nuclear Engineering, 1959), and Ph.D. (Nuclear Engineering, 1962), all from the University of Michigan

Chen, Sow-Hsin

212

Protein Science (1994),3:2064-2072. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1994 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1994),3:2064-2072. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (IL-S),and human macrophage inflammatory protein-10 (hMlP-I/?),respectively, is presented

Clore, G. Marius

213

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this  

E-print Network

to develop and change over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend Planning, Law, Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences and Environmental Studies 8 Qualifications Framework Street in central Cambridge. Some lecture rooms are in the recently refurbished Laundress Lane Seminar

de Gispert, Adrià

214

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1 Athena SWAN Silver department award application  

E-print Network

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1: ZOOLOGY Date of application: 29 November 2013 Date of university Bronze Athena SWAN award: May 2013 of words used. Click here for additional guidance on completing the template. #12;Department of Zoology

215

J. Functional Programming 1 (1): 1--000, January 1993 c fl 1993 Cambridge University Press 1  

E-print Network

J. Functional Programming 1 (1): 1--000, January 1993 c fl 1993 Cambridge University Press 1 A Type and typechecked it, providing a partially machine checked proof. 1 Introduction In a higher­order functional and evaluate the body of the function. In block­structured languages the extent of a formal parameter

Hannan, John

216

In Computer Vision in Human-Machine Interaction, R. Cipolla and A. Pentland, eds. Cambridge University Press, in press.  

E-print Network

In Computer Vision in Human-Machine Interaction, R. Cipolla and A. Pentland, eds. Cambridge University Press, in press. A FRAMEWORK FOR GESTURE GENERATION AND INTERPRETATION Justine Cassell[1] MIT) "body movements which are used to convey some information from one person to another" are in fact

Cassell, Justine

217

Degrees of Influence: The Politics of Honorary Degrees in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, 1900-2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The universities of Oxford and Cambridge had developed different attitudes towards the award of honorary degrees through the early and middle decades of the twentieth century. Recently, both have adopted a similar cautious and apolitical stance. This essay describes the role of honorary degrees in the production and reproduction of their cultural…

Heffernan, Michael; Jons, Heike

2007-01-01

218

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this  

E-print Network

, Cambridge. The Institute has a conservation library, laboratories, studios and workshops. 11) QAA or panel; 2. historical painting techniques and materials; 3. science of materials, theory of conservation this programme specification at any time. Programme Specification: Postgraduate Diploma in the Conservation

de Gispert, Adrià

219

The Potential Impact of High-Speed Networking on Teaching and Learning: A Case Study from Cambridge University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report on the SuperJANET high-speed network included interviews conducted at Cambridge University (England) on the use of computers and audiovisual aids in university teaching and learning. Results indicated the emergence of two main uses of the technology: (1) as a means of communication between students and teachers, and (2) as a means of…

Aston, J.; Gienke, M.

1995-01-01

220

The 4th Congress of the International Astronomical Union held in Cambridge (Massachusets) on 2 september 1932  

Microsoft Academic Search

On I July 1932 the King of Romania recepted N. Donitch and charged him to represent Romania at the IAU Congress to be held in the USA. He traveled to USA in view of the observation of the solar eclipse on 31 August and participation to IAU congress held in Cambridge (Massachussets) on 2-9 september. During the Congress the astronomers

Nicolae Donici

1933-01-01

221

Source-Water Protection and Water-Quality Investigations in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Supply System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The Cambridge Water Department (CWD) supplies about 15 million gallons of water each day to more than 95,000 customers in the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most of this water is obtained from a system of reservoirs located in Cambridge and in parts of five other suburban-Boston communities. The drainage basin that contributes water to these reservoirs includes several potential sources of drinking-water contaminants, including major highways, secondary roads, areas of commercial and industrial development, and suburban residential tracts. The CWD is implementing a comprehensive Source-Water Protection Plan to ensure that the highest quality water is delivered to the treatment plant. A key element of this plan is a program that combines systematic monitoring of the drainage basin with detailed investigations of the effects of nonpoint-source contaminants, such as highway-deicing chemicals, nutrients, oxygen-demanding organic compounds, bacteria, and trace metals arising from stormwater runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the CWD and the Massachusetts Highway Department (MassHighway) to develop a better understanding of the sources, transport, and fate of many of these contaminants. This Fact Sheet describes source-water protection and water-quality investigations currently underway in the Cambridge drinking-water supply system. The investigations are designed to complement a national effort by the USGS to provide water suppliers and regulatory agencies with information on the vulnerability of water supplies and the movement and fate of source-water contaminants.

Waldron, Marcus C.; Norton, Chip; MacDonald, Timothy W.D.

1998-01-01

222

Journal of Tropical Ecology (2012) 28:531541. Cambridge University Press 2012 doi:10.1017/S0266467412000648  

E-print Network

, tropical rain forest INTRODUCTION Fruitcharacteristicsaffectthecompositionofassemblages of animals that eatJournal of Tropical Ecology (2012) 28:531­541. © Cambridge University Press 2012 doi:10.1017/S0266467412000648 Fruit removal by hornbills in a semi-evergreen forest of the Indian Eastern Himalaya Pia Sethi, ,1

Howe, Henry F.

223

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this  

E-print Network

this programme specification at any time. MPhil in Criminology Awarding institution University of Cambridge Criminology UCAS code N/A QAA subject benchmark Undergraduate Criminology only Date of revision April 2008 students to some of the most important theory and research in Criminology; Students should acquire

de Gispert, Adrià

224

`Reclaiming voices: A qualitative study investigating the efficacy of the Freedom Programme in Cambridge as a support group for female  

E-print Network

in Cambridge as a support group for female survivors of domestic abuse' One of the most common yet least investigated modes of intervention with women survivors of domestic abuse is group work, including support through sharing The FP helped to dispel false perceptions (women survivors of domestic abuse may have

Steiner, Ullrich

225

A review of "Milton’s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres 1625-1632." by John K. Hale  

E-print Network

he writes of it splendidly, with sure confi- dence and affection. John K. Hale. Milton?s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres 1625-1632. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. xii + 305 pp. $32.00. Review by EUGENE...

Hill, Eugene D.

2007-01-01

226

Protein Science (1995), 4:1217-1232. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1995 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1995), 4:1217-1232. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1995 The Protein Society Building proteins from C, coordinates using the dihedral probability grid be applied to many problems in peptide and protein modeling. Here we present the DPG-MC method and apply

Goddard III, William A.

227

"Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman  

E-print Network

.P., and Prokhorov, E.N. 2003. Lightning and Lightning Protection, 330 p., Moscow: Znak. Loeb, L.B. 2004. The Kinetic"Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman Additions to Appendix: Books on lightning and related subjects (Rev. May 2006) Dibner, B. 1976

Florida, University of

228

M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

Blazer, Christie

2011-01-01

229

Maslowian Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of the Maslowian Scale, a method of revealing a picture of one's needs and concerns based on Abraham Maslow's levels of self-actualization, is described. This paper also explains how the scale is supported by the theories of L. Kohlberg, C. Rogers, and T. Rusk. After a literature search, a list of statements was generated…

Falk, C.; And Others

230

SCALE ISSUES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

One of the many definitions for scale in Webster’s dictionary is a system of grouping or classifying in a series of steps or degrees according to a standard of relative size, amount, importance, perfection, etc. The jargon used to describe scales in earth science includes, for example, continuum, co...

231

Scale It!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When building a dollhouse or a model of a car or a cell, close attention to the details is crucial to making it look accurate and realistic. A consistent scaling factor for all details in the model is critical. In this activity, students explore scaling t

Amy R. Taylor

2009-04-01

232

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 8 Dependent Random Variables. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See

MacKay, David J.C.

233

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http these rules: 1. If you are the front soldier in the line, say the number `one' to the soldier behind you. 2

MacKay, David J.C.

234

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. About Chapter 12://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http

MacKay, David J.C.

235

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http this channel. Motivation in terms of a continuous-time channel Consider a physical (electrical, say) channel

MacKay, David J.C.

236

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See of their face, say) is stored in a digital computer at an address. To retrieve the memory you need to know

MacKay, David J.C.

237

Scale invariability  

E-print Network

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a forced mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance causes tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses, critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". I propose that reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators where permanent energy decay of all oscillation naturally forb...

Omerbashich, M

2008-01-01

238

Scales Reader  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet, suitable for whiteboard display, challenges learners to read metric weighing scales in four different ranges. The scales read 0-5 kilograms in wholes or halves, 0-500 grams, 0-1000 g, and 0-5 kg in decimal tenths. The student requests a weight, places a cursor, enters a reading, and checks the answer to receive a score.

2002-01-01

239

The long-term impact of urbanisation on aquatic plants: Cambridge and the River Cam.  

PubMed

Historical and contemporary records have been used to assess the impact of urbanisation on the aquatic plants of the River Cam and its narrow floodplain in Cambridge. Of the 62 native aquatic plant species which have been recorded in the study area since 1660, 40 (65%) were still present in the period 1985-1999 whereas 22 (35%) are apparently extinct. There is a striking relationship between the fate of species and their trophic requirements, with species of less eutrophic habitats having suffered disproportionately. Historical records demonstrate that the River Cam became grossly polluted by sewage from Cambridge in the 19th century, but the chemical and biological quality of the river improved from 1897 onwards. However, the majority of the species recorded from the river and nearby ditches persisted until after maximum incidence of sewage pollution, which may even have stimulated the growth of 'weed' in the river. Losses of aquatic plant species from two riparian commons, Coe Fen (35%) and Sheep's Green (50%), have been particularly great. The level of these and other areas of low-lying common land by the river has been systematically raised by the controlled tipping of waste in hollows, followed by levelling and resowing. The main effects of urbanisation on the flora therefore arose from the transformation of riparian pastures into suburban open spaces. Commons which are used purely for amenity purposes have lost almost all their aquatic plant species. Those which are still grazed retain more, and continuance of grazing is probably essential if a varied aquatic flora is to be maintained. The interpretation of botanical records in terms of recorded management history is likely to throw further light on the processes of urbanisation, although the number of sites with a sufficiently detailed botanical record may be limited. PMID:14499527

Preston, C D; Sheail, J; Armitage, P; Davy-Bowker, J

2003-10-01

240

Normal Range of Cambridge Low Contrast Test; a Population Based Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the range of contrast sensitivity (CS) and its determinants in a normal population, Mashhad, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional population based study, 4,453 individuals were invited of whom 3,132 persons agreed to participate (response rate, 70.4%). CS data from 2,449 eligible individuals were analyzed. CS was determined using the Cambridge low contrast square-wave grating test, and its associations with age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) refractive error, were analyzed. Results Mean age of the participants was 29.1±17.3 (range, 4-89) years and 66.4% were female. Mean CS was 239.6±233.3 and 234.6±228.6 cps in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean binocular CS was 310.9±249.0 cps. Multiple linear regression showed that CS was inversely correlated with older age (?=-1.1, P<0.001), female gender (?=-40.1, P<0.001), poorer BCVA (?=-165.4, P<0.001), and severity of myopia (?=-10.2, P<0.001). Conclusion The normal range of Cambridge low-contrast grating test reported herein may serve as a reference for the general population in Iran. Our findings can be used for both research and clinical applications, particularly for evaluations of the outcomes of refractive surgery. In the current study, CS was lower in older subjects, myopic individuals and patients with lower BCVA. PMID:24982735

Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Heravian, Javad; Abdolahinia, Tahereh; Norouzi Rad, Reza; Asgari, Soheila; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

2014-01-01

241

12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, May 8--10, 2006, Cambridge, Massachusetts PML absorbing boundary condition for non-linear  

E-print Network

12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, May 8--10, 2006, Cambridge, Massachusetts PML absorbing of Mathematics and Statistics, Senior member AIAA Professor, School of Jet Propulsion, Senior member AIAA

Hu, Fang Q.

242

J. Fluid Mech. (2004), vol. 505, pp. 365377. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112004008602 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

J. Fluid Mech. (2004), vol. 505, pp. 365­377. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112004008602 Printed in the United Kingdom 365 The dissipation approximation and viscous potential flow By D. D

Joseph, Daniel D.

243

J. Fluid Mech. (2002), vol. 462, pp. 365382. c 2002 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112002008704 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

J. Fluid Mech. (2002), vol. 462, pp. 365­382. c 2002 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112002008704 Printed in the United Kingdom 365 Magnetorotational instability of dissipative Couette flow By J E

Ji, Hantao

244

J. Fluid Mech. (2008), vol. 601, pp. 365379. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112008000608 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

J. Fluid Mech. (2008), vol. 601, pp. 365­379. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112008000608 Printed in the United Kingdom 365 A physically motivated approach for filtering acoustic waves

245

The ADDITION-Cambridge trial protocol - a cluster randomised controlled trial of screening for type 2 diabetes and intensive treatment for screen-detected patients  

E-print Network

General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, UK Email: Justin B Echouffo-Tcheugui - basile.echouffo-tcheugui@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk; Rebecca K Simmons - rebecca... diabetes and intensive multifactorial treatment in people with screen- detected diabetes in English general practice. The following research questions are posed:  Feasibility of screening: What uptake and yield are achievable in a primary care...

Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Simmons, Rebecca K; Williams, Kate M; Barling, Roslyn S; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

2009-05-12

246

Scaling Away  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, "students will measure the dimensions of a common object, multiply each dimension by a scale factor, and examine a model using the multiplied dimensions. Students will then compare the surface area and volume of the original object and the enlarged model." (From NCTM's Illuminations)

Nctm/illuminations

2009-02-12

247

Scale invariability  

Microsoft Academic Search

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales.

2008-01-01

248

A Robust Method of Measuring Other-Race and Other-Ethnicity Effects: The Cambridge Face Memory Test Format  

PubMed Central

Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

2012-01-01

249

Scale Models  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore the relative sizes and distances of objects in the solar system. Without being informed of the expected product, learners will make a Play-doh model of the Earth-Moon system, scaled to size and distance. The facilitator reveals the true identity of the system at the conclusion of the activity. During the construction phase, learners try to guess what members of the solar system their model represents. Each group receives different amounts of Play-doh, with each group assigned a color (red, blue, yellow, white). At the end, groups set up their models and inspect the models of other groups. They report patterns of scale that they notice; as the amount of Play-doh increases, for example, so do the size and distance of the model. This resource guide includes background information about the Earth to Moon ratio and solar eclipses.

McDonald Observatory

2011-01-01

250

Nuclear scales  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01

251

Scale invariability  

E-print Network

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". Thus the derived equation is that of levitation. Reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators, where permanent energy decay of all oscillation forbids constancy of known "physical constants". This hyperresonator concept explains the magnetism (as every forced oscillator feature), as well as the gravitation (as forward propagation of mechanical vibrations along the aether i.e. throughout the vacuum structure). To test my claim I propose a Space mission to collect on site measurements of eigenperiods of the Sun, its planets, and their satellites. The levitation equitation enables propulsionless Space travel via gravity sailing: Space vehicle hull ought to be engineered so as to automatically adjust its grave mode, to the vehicle instant gravitational surroundings, akin to trout up swimming.

M. Omerbashich

2008-01-06

252

Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m{sup 2} steady-state, 1 GW/m{sup 2} in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (10{sup 18} neutrons/m{sup 2} s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

2011-06-01

253

Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. Methods: Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or ceiling effects. The construct validity was investigated using exploratory factor analysis. Intra-rater reliability was measured in an interval of 3 months, inter-rater reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: The score distribution of the items showed no ceiling or floor effects. Four of the five factors extracted from the factor analysis represented important constructs of doctor-patient communication The ratings for the first and second round of assessing the videos correlated at 0.75 (p < 0.0001). Intraclass correlation coefficients for each item ranged were moderate and ranged from 0.05 to 0.57. Conclusions: Reasonable score distributions of most items without ceiling or floor effects as well as a good test-retest reliability and construct validity recommend the C-CG as an instrument for assessing communication skills in undergraduate medical students. Some deficiencies in inter-rater reliability are a clear indication that raters need a thorough instruction before using the C-CG. PMID:25480988

Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

2014-01-01

254

Scaled Composites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On April 18, 2003, an historic event in space travel was marked by the unveiling of the first private manned spacecraft and launch platform (called SpaceShipOne and White Knight, respectively). Already constructed and in the test flight stage of its development, the project was hidden from the public in order to reveal a finished product rather than just schematics. Scaled Composites, the private company that developed the spacecraft, gives data sheets and photos on its homepage. A detailed list of frequently asked questions addresses many issues regarding the project and its implications.

255

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual mean specific conductance for water year 2005 which was 737 uS/cm. However, the annual mean specific conductance at Stony Brook near Route 20 in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) station 01104460), on the principal tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir, and at USGS station 01104475 on a smaller tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir were about 15 and 13 percent lower, respectively, than the previous annual mean specific conductances of 538 and 284 uS/cm, respectively for water year 2005. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir decreased from 553 uS/cm in the 2005 water year to 514 uS/cm in the 2006 water year. Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during water year 2006. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 4 days. Composite samples, consisting of as many as 100 subsamples, were collected by automatic samplers during storms. Concentrations of most dissolved constituents were generally lower in samples of stormwater than in samples collected during base flow; however, the average concentration of total phosphorus in samples of stormwater were from 160 to 1,109 percent greater than the average concentration in water samples collected during base-flow conditions. Concentrations of total nitrogen in water samples collected during base-flow conditions and composite samples of stormwater at USGS stations 01104415, 01104460, and 01104475 were similar, but mean concentrations of total nitrogen in samples of stormwater differed by about 0.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) from those in water samples collected during base-flow conditions at U.S. Geological Survey stations 01104433 and 01104455. In six water samples, measurements of pH were lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) national recommended freshwater quality criteria and the USEPA secondary drinking water-standa

Smith, Kirk P.

2008-01-01

256

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Dorchester County, Maryland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Maryland, penetrated 3,299 feet of unconsolidated Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments and bottomed in quartz-monzonite gneiss. The well was drilled to provide data for a study of the aquifer system of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Twenty-one core samples were collected. Six sand zones were tested for aquifer properties and sampled for ground-water chemistry. Point-water heads were measured at seven depths. Environmental heads (which ranged from - 18.33 to + 44.16 feet relative to sea level)indicate an upward component of flow. A temperature log showed a maximum temperature of 41.9 degrees Celsius and a mean temperature gradient of 0.00838 degrees Celsius per foot. The water analyses delineated the freshwater-saltwater transition zone between 2,650 and 3,100 feet. The ground water changes progressively downward from a sodium bicarbonate to a sodium chloride character. Clays in the analyzed core samples belong to the montmorillonite and kaolinite groups, and mean cation exchange capacity ranged from 8.3 to 38.9 milliequivalents per 100 grams. Vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities measured in cores ranged from 1.5 x 10 6 to 1.3 feet per day and from 7.3 x 10 -6 to 1.3 feet per day, respectively, but the most permeable sands were not cored. Porosity was 1.5 percent in the quartz monzonite bedrock and ranged from 22.4 to 41 percent in the overlying sediments. Transmissivities from aquifer tests ranged from 25 to 850 feet squared per day; horizontal hydraulic conductivities ranged from.2.5 to 85 feet squared per day, and intrinsic permeabilities ranged from 0.8 to 23 micrometers squared. Fossils identified in core samples include palynomorphs, dinoflagellates, and foraminifers.

Trapp, Henry, Jr.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Meisler, Harold; Leahy, P. Patrick

1984-01-01

257

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure  

E-print Network

activity from surveillance data for * Correspondence: david.ogilvie@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk 1Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK Full list of author... and the hospital (Figure 2, Figure 3). A new high-quality bidirectional off-road cycle route is also to be provided adjacent to the busway. The busway is central to the plans for the new town of Northstowe, which is planned to be built on a former military site...

Ogilvie, David; Griffin, Simon J; Jones, Andy; Mackett, Roger; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna R; Jones, Natalia; Cohn, Simon; Yang, Lin; Chapman, Cheryl

2010-11-16

258

MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

1993-01-01

259

Parametric Equivalence Scales and Scale Relativities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors respond to J. Banks and P. Johnson's (1994) comment on Coulter et al. (1992) drawing on a more general discussion of parametric equivalence scale and scale relativity issues and new empirical results. The authors show that criticisms of their earlier work are unfounded. When the McClements scale is properly characterized, the scale does indeed provide lower estimates of

Stephen P Jenkins; Frank A Cowell

1994-01-01

260

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104455) were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir increased from 514 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) in the 2004 water year to 553 ?S/cm for the 2005 water year. Water samples were collected from four tributaries during base-flow and stormflow conditions in December 2004, and July, August, and September 2005 and analyzed for suspended sediment, 6 major dissolved ions, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, 8 total metals, 18 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 61 pesticides and metabolites, and Escherichia coli bacteria. Concentrations for most dissolved constituents in samples of stormwater were generally lower than the concentrations observed in samples collected during base flow; however, concentrations of total phosphorus, PAHs, suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals were substantially greater in stormwater samples. Concentrations of dissolved chloride and total recoverable manganese in water samples collected during base-flow conditions from three tributaries exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking water standards of 250 and 0.05 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Concentrations of total recoverable manganese exceeded the secondary drinking water standard in samples of stormwater from each tributary. Concentrations of total recoverable iron in water samples exceeded the (USEPA) secondary drinking water standard of 0.3 mg/L periodically in water samples collected at (USEPA) stations 01104415, 01104455, and 01104475, and consistently in all water samples collected at USGS station 01104433. Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in water samples collected during base flow ranged from 4 to 1,400 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (col/100mL). Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in composite samples of stormwater ranged between 1,700 to 43,000 c

Smith, Kirk P.

2007-01-01

261

J. Fluid Mech. (2007), vol. 577, pp. 137159. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112007004624 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

process with particular emphasis on the formation, structure and propagation of internal boluses onshelfJ. Fluid Mech. (2007), vol. 577, pp. 137­159. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112007004624 Printed in the United Kingdom 137 On the formation and propagation of nonlinear internal boluses

262

Protein Science (1996). 5:614-626. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1996 TheProteinSociety  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1996). 5:614-626. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1996 has been difficult because the freeenergies of alternative conformationsof the complex have been. The method is compared to an alternative formulation that has also been applied recently to the same data set

Weng, Zhiping

263

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 21 Jul 2009 IP address: 131.111.16.227 3. Fluid Mech. (1993),vol. 256, pp. 343401  

E-print Network

between fluctuating colloidal particles: oscillatory and stochastic motions By E. J. HINCH' AND LUDWIG C. NITSCHE2 'Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, The University of Cambridge, Silver motion in colloidal systems,nonlinear- ities due to motion of the boundaries and to inertia throughout

Hinch, John

264

Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test–Australian  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error,

Elinor McKone; Ashleigh Hall; Madeleine Pidcock; Romina Palermo; Ross B. Wilkinson; Davide Rivolta; Galit Yovel; Joshua M. Davis; Kirsty B. OConnor

2011-01-01

265

MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Tel: (617) 253-1324 Fax: (617) 258-9360  

E-print Network

MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Tel: (617) 253-1324 Fax: (617) 258-9360 Release for Pharmacy Patient Prescription Profile Please fill Medical Record Number or MIT ID Number 2 I authorize the MIT Medical Department to release pharmacy

Polz, Martin

266

Protein Science (l997),6:2359-2364. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1997 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (l997),6:2359-2364. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 'Laboratory of Eukaryotic Gene Regulation, Building 6B, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health

Clore, G. Marius

267

The Promotion of "Civility" and the Quest for the Creation of a "City of Peace": The Beginnings of Trinity College, Dublin and of Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the founding of two universities, Trinity College Dublin and Harvard College, as instances of "transfer of knowledge" and were seen as ideal replicas of the original model, or Cambridge University. Reports that universities were tools of the "civilizing" process in Ireland and the Massachusetts Bay colony. (CMK)

Boran, Elizabethanne; Robinson-Hammerstein, Helga

1998-01-01

268

Behavior and Philosophy, 32, 197-229 (2004). 2004 Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies IS THE OPERANT CONTINGENCY ENOUGH FOR A SCIENCE OF  

E-print Network

ranging from lever pressing to verbal behavior. With the addition of more complex technologiesBehavior and Philosophy, 32, 197-229 (2004). © 2004 Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies 197 IS THE OPERANT CONTINGENCY ENOUGH FOR A SCIENCE OF PURPOSIVE BEHAVIOR? William Timberlake Department

Timberlake, William D.

269

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

E-print Network

to develop and change over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend and Country Planning, Law, Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences and Environmental Studies 8. Qualifications on Silver Street in central Cambridge. Some lecture rooms are in the recently refurbished Laundress Lane

de Gispert, Adrià

270

Robotica (2008) volume 26, pp. 513524. 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0263574708004207 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Robotica (2008) volume 26, pp. 513­524. © 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S an improved touch-based human-machine interface, superior to the more common 3-DOF devices. However, the more as a function of current and desired configurations of a rigid body. Similarly to other approaches, the desired

Zefran, MiloÂ?

271

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2011-01-01

272

Published in the Proc. of the Fifth Int. Conf. on Computer Vision (ICCV '95), Cambridge, MA, USA, June, 1995, 801--808. 801 Animat Vision  

E-print Network

, situated in physics­based virtual worlds as autonomous virtual robots possessing active perception systems to propose animat vision, a paradigm which prescribes the use of artificial animals as autonomous virtualPublished in the Proc. of the Fifth Int. Conf. on Computer Vision (ICCV '95), Cambridge, MA, USA

Terzopoulos, Demetri

273

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2010-01-01

274

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme specification.  

E-print Network

centre for clinical practice, medical education and biomedical research. Students also study at a number a common set of themes which allow integration of a wide range of medical subjects around core principles for Curriculum 2005 is as follows: The University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine aims to educate

de Gispert, Adrià

275

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 28 Feb 2013 IP address: 131.247.12.21 Stress nature investigation on heteroepitaxial 3CSiC film on  

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stress in 3C­SiC films for high performance micro-electro- mechanical-system (MEMS) devices. During to compressive.5 For a better understanding of the impact that the growth rate has on the residual stresshttp://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 28 Feb 2013 IP address: 131.247.12.21 Stress nature

Volinsky, Alex A.

276

Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during the study period. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 3 days. Composite sampl

Smith, Kirk P.

2011-01-01

277

Acta Numerica (2009), pp. 243275 c Cambridge University Press, 2009 doi: 10.1017/S0962492906410011 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Acta Numerica (2009), pp. 243­275 c Cambridge University Press, 2009 doi: 10.1017/S0962492906410011 or nearly linearly with the number of degrees of freedom required. These methods are typically iterative of freedom are currently based on the avail- ability of fast algorithms for matrix-vector multiplication

278

J. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 684, pp. 427440. c Cambridge University Press 2011 427 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.310  

E-print Network

J. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 684, pp. 427­440. c Cambridge University Press 2011 427 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.310 Number of degrees of freedom and energy spectrum of surface quasi-geostrophic turbulence of classical predictions. It is found that the system's number of degrees of freedom N, which is defined

Cambridge, University of

279

J. Fluid Mech. (2014), vol. 754, pp. 365414. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/jfm.2014.355  

E-print Network

J. Fluid Mech. (2014), vol. 754, pp. 365­414. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/jfm. Introduction Multiscale phenomena, such as turbulence, exhibit a large number of degrees of freedom of freedom through simplification of the used models, by keeping only those degrees of freedom

Noack, Bernd R.

280

JFP 13 (2): 261293, March 2003. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0956796802004501 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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JFP 13 (2): 261­293, March 2003. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0956796802004501 Printed in the United Kingdom 261 Setoids in type theory GILLES BARTHE, VENANZIO CAPRETTA INRIA Sophia-Antipolis, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France (e-mail: {Gilles.Barthe

Capretta, Venanzio

281

Math. Struct. in Comp. Science (2004), vol. 14, pp. 97141. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0960129503004122 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Math. Struct. in Comp. Science (2004), vol. 14, pp. 97­141. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI definitions G. BARTHE , M. J. FRADE , E. GI M ´ENEZ§ , L. P I NTO¶ and T. UUSTALU INRIA Sophia of a #12;G. Barthe, M. J. Frade, E. Gim´enez, L. Pinto and T. Uustalu 98 pattern-matching operator (case

Uustalu, Tarmo

282

An Embedding of the ACL2 Logic in HOL Michael J.C. Gordon, Cambridge University, mjcg@cl.cam.ac.uk  

E-print Network

An Embedding of the ACL2 Logic in HOL Michael J.C. Gordon, Cambridge University, mjcg an embedding of the ACL2 logic into higher- order logic. An implementation of this embedding allows ACL2, Security, Theory, Verification Keywords Verification, formal methods, logic, ACL2, HOL, HOL4, first

Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

283

Protein Science (1994), 3:2419-2427. CambridgeUniversity Press. Printed in the USA Copyright 0 1994 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1994), 3:2419-2427. CambridgeUniversity Press. Printed in the USA Copyright 0 1994 The Protein Society Disulfide crosslinks to probe the structure and flexibility of a designed four-helix bundle protein LYNNE REGAN, ARLENE ROCKWELL,'ZELDA WASSERMAN,' AND WILLIAM DEGRADO' The Experimental

Mochrie, Simon

284

Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components…

Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

2004-01-01

285

Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 71, pp. 155160. With 3 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 155 Genetic hitch-hiking in a subdivided population  

E-print Network

Cambridge University Press 155 Genetic hitch-hiking in a subdivided population MONTGOMERY SLATKIN of genetic hitch-hiking in a geographically subdivided population is analysed under the assumption of emigrants per generation (Nm) is less than one. The approximate analysis shows that hitch-hiking can result

Slatkin, Montgomery

286

The Newsletter of the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Research Unit, Cambridge University Library No. 68 October 2014 Cairo Genizah takes Paris by storm  

E-print Network

The Newsletter of the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Research Unit, Cambridge University Library No. 68. Cynthia Weber ($250), John S. Schechter ($100), Norman Shelson (£200), Catford & Bromley Synagogue (£170. #12;GENIZAH FRAGMENTS 2 www.lib.cam.ac.uk/Taylor-Schechter The last year has seen three new

Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

287

An Architecture for Combining Ways to Think Push Singh and Marvin Minsky, MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, MA, {push, minsky}@media.mit.edu  

E-print Network

way-to-think Reflective Reactive Deliberative Criticize this way-to-think Select a new way-to-thinkAn Architecture for Combining Ways to Think Push Singh and Marvin Minsky, MIT Media Lab, Cambridge human-like `common sense', the ability to think about ordinary things the way people can? In our view

288

Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: A mixed-methods analysis  

PubMed Central

Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009–2010). Even in Britain's leading ‘cycling city’, cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a ‘park-and-ride’ site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could ‘afford’ to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio-economic range. This suggests the importance of combining individual-level ‘healthy travel’ interventions with measures aimed at creating travel environments in which all social groups can pursue healthy and satisfying lives. PMID:22465380

Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R.; Ogilvie, David

2012-01-01

289

PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)  

E-print Network

PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A) 0-10 NUMERIC PAIN INTENSITY SCALE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 NO PAIN MODERATE WORST PAIN PAIN #12;PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A) FLACC PAIN SCALE The FLACC is a behavioral pain assessment scale for use in non-verbal patients unable to provide numeric reports of pain. SCORING Categories

Oliver, Douglas L.

290

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Background Modifying transport infrastructure to support active travel (walking and cycling) could help to increase population levels of physical activity. However, there is limited evidence for the effects of interventions in this field, and to the best of our knowledge no study has convincingly demonstrated an increase in physical activity directly attributable to this type of intervention. We have therefore taken the opportunity presented by a 'natural experiment' in Cambridgeshire, UK to establish a quasi-experimental study of the effects of a major transport infrastructural intervention on travel behaviour, physical activity and related wider health impacts. Design and methods The Commuting and Health in Cambridge study comprises three main elements: a cohort study of adults who travel to work in Cambridge, using repeated postal questionnaires and basic objective measurement of physical activity using accelerometers; in-depth quantitative studies of physical activity energy expenditure, travel and movement patterns and estimated carbon emissions using household travel diaries, combined heart rate and movement sensors and global positioning system (GPS) receivers; and a longitudinal qualitative interview study to elucidate participants' attitudes, experiences and practices and to understand how environmental and social factors interact to influence travel behaviour, for whom and in what circumstances. The impacts of a specific intervention - the opening of the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway - and of other changes in the physical environment will be examined using a controlled quasi-experimental design within the overall cohort dataset. Discussion Addressing the unresolved research and policy questions in this area is not straightforward. The challenges include those of effectively combining different disciplinary perspectives on the research problems, developing common methodological ground in measurement and evaluation, implementing robust quantitative measurement of travel and physical activity behaviour in an unpredictable 'natural experiment' setting, defining exposure to the intervention, defining controls, and conceptualising an appropriate longitudinal analytical strategy. PMID:21080928

2010-01-01

291

09/05/2012 09:01BBC News -Silicon Fen shows off its wares at Cambridge showcase Page 1 of 6http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-16093741  

E-print Network

his Harry Potter-esque magic to the crowd. Meerkats and Avatars His company Zappar is showing what its augmented reality software can do at a tech- nology event on the outskirts of Cambridge. Meerkats

Cipolla, Roberto

292

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http samples. For brevity, we will say `independent samples' when we mean `effectively independent samples for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 388 30 -- Efficient

MacKay, David J.C.

293

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http 1', I will usually simply say that it is `true'. 2.1 Probabilities and ensembles An ensemble X for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 2.1: Probabilities

MacKay, David J.C.

294

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http the following questions, please ask your common sense what it thinks the answers are; we will then see how and commutes 60 miles to work. Whilst at work, he receives a phone-call from his neighbour saying that Fred

MacKay, David J.C.

295

Fractionaly Integrated Flux model and Scaling Laws in Weather and Climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fractionaly Integrated Flux model (FIF) has been extensively used to model intermittent observables, like the velocity field, by defining them with the help of a fractional integration of a conservative (i.e. strictly scale invariant) flux, such as the turbulent energy flux. It indeed corresponds to a well-defined modelling that yields the observed scaling laws. Generalised Scale Invariance (GSI) enables FIF to deal with anisotropic fractional integrations and has been rather successful to define and model a unique regime of scaling anisotropic turbulence up to planetary scales. This turbulence has an effective dimension of 23/9=2.55... instead of the classical hypothesised 2D and 3D turbulent regimes, respectively for large and small spatial scales. It therefore theoretically eliminates a non plausible "dimension transition" between these two regimes and the resulting requirement of a turbulent energy "mesoscale gap", whose empirical evidence has been brought more and more into question. More recently, GSI-FIF was used to analyse climate, therefore at much larger time scales. Indeed, the 23/9-dimensional regime necessarily breaks up at the outer spatial scales. The corresponding transition range, which can be called "macroweather", seems to have many interesting properties, e.g. it rather corresponds to a fractional differentiation in time with a roughly flat frequency spectrum. Furthermore, this transition yields the possibility to have at much larger time scales scaling space-time climate fluctuations with a much stronger scaling anisotropy between time and space. Lovejoy, S. and D. Schertzer (2013). The Weather and Climate: Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades. Cambridge Press (in press). Schertzer, D. et al. (1997). Fractals 5(3): 427-471. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (2011). International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos 21(12): 3417-3456.

Schertzer, Daniel; Lovejoy, Shaun

2013-04-01

296

Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling  

E-print Network

Decomposition Frequency sectors: 2k k+1, (, ) 2-k/2 Hart F. Smith Cubic Scaling for Caustics(#) Spatial support: 2!k/2 2!k !",k(y!x) Hart F. Smith Cubic Scaling for Caustics and Tangential Reflections Reflections Hart F. Smith Department of Mathematics University of Washington, Seattle 2008 SIAM Conference

Smith, Hart F.

297

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites  

E-print Network

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

Menascé, Daniel A.

298

The ADDITION-Cambridge trial protocol: a cluster – randomised controlled trial of screening for type 2 diabetes and intensive treatment for screen-detected patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, the benefits of such a strategy remain uncertain. METHODS AND DESIGN: The ADDITION-Cambridge study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of (i) a stepwise screening strategy for type 2 diabetes;

Justin B Echouffo-Tcheugui; Rebecca K Simmons; Kate M Williams; Roslyn S Barling; A Toby Prevost; Ann Louise Kinmonth; Nicholas J Wareham; Simon J Griffin

2009-01-01

299

Robot calibration without scaling  

E-print Network

methods. Scaling is a common way of improving the condition number for a matrix. Researchers in other fields have developed specific methods of scaling matrices to improve the condition number. However, robotics researchers have not specifically addressed...

Ives, Thomas W.

2012-06-07

300

Small Scale Organic Techniques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

1975-01-01

301

Lesson 34: Logarithmic Scales  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces logarithmic scales as a means for plotting data that might otherwise be difficult plot due to their widely varying values. Instead of plotting the actual values, the values of their logs are plotted on a scale of powers of ten. A discussion follows that highlights an unfamiliar feature for students: equal intervals on the power of ten scale do not correspond to equal values. Various application problems about acidity and ph, decibels, and the Richter Scale follow.

2011-01-01

302

Scratching the scale labyrinth  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce a new approach to computer-aided microtonal improvisation by combining methods for (1) interactive scale navigation, (2) real-time manipulation of musical patterns and (3) dynamical timbre adaption in solidarity with the respective scales. On the basis of the theory of well-formed scales we offer a visualization of the underlying combinatorial ramifications in terms of a scale

Andrew J. Milne; Martin Carle; William A. Sethares; Thomas Noll; Simon Holland

2011-01-01

303

Scales and Scale-like Structures  

E-print Network

are several species of Madagascar plants covered in scale-like arrangements of thorns, on display at the California Academy of Sciences. From left to right ? Alluaudia montagnacii, Alluaudia ascendens, Alluaudia procera, Didierea madagascariensis. . 13 6 A... of Madagascar plants covered in scale-like arrange- ments of thorns, on display at the California Academy of Sciences. From left to right ? Alluaudia montagnacii, Alluaudia ascendens, Alluaudia procera, Didierea mada- gascariensis. Other plants form...

Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

2011-08-08

304

Civilian PTSD Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strong associations between civilian posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scales and measures of general psychological distress suggest that the scales are nonspecific to PTSD. Three common PTSD scales were administered to 122 undergraduates who had experienced an emotionally salient, nontraumatic event: a college examination. Results indicated…

Shapinsky, Alicia C.; Rapport, Lisa J.; Henderson, Melinda J.; Axelrod, Bradley N.

2005-01-01

305

The Positivity Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure "positivity," defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of college…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A.; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

2012-01-01

306

IMAGE Satellite Scale Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about scale model building. Learners will use mathematics to determine the scale model size, construct a pattern, and build a paper scale model of the IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) satellite, the first satellite mission to image the Earth's magnetosphere. This is the second activity in the Solar Storms and You: Exploring Satellite Design educator guide.

307

Deliberation on scale theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments have demonstrated a lognormal distribution for scale parameters of soil water characteristics. Based on the distribution theory of random variables in statistics, some scale parameters not of lognormal distribution are identified in this paper. Representative Elementary Length (REL) is proposed to evaluate dominant processes across land scale units affected by different precipitation inputs. The implication is explored by synergetic

LIU SUXIA; MO XINGGUO; LIU CHANGMING

1995-01-01

308

Thermal scale modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex system study data indicate that factors associated with multilayer insulation pose major problem in scale modeling, that numerical analysis aids correction for known compromises of scaling criteria, and that probable errors in scale modeling experiments fall within range predicted by statistical analysis.

Mac Gregor, R. K.

1971-01-01

309

Structured Rating Scales.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A rating scale can be expressed as a chain of dichotomous items. The relationship between the dichotomies depends on the manner in which the rating scale is presented to the test taker. Three models for ordered scales are discussed. In the success model, which represents growth, the lowest or easiest category is presented first. If the test taker…

Linacre, John Michael

310

Manual of Scaling Methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manual reviews the derivation of the similitude relationships believed to be important to ice accretion and examines ice-accretion data to evaluate their importance. Both size scaling and test-condition scaling methods employing the resulting similarity parameters are described, and experimental icing tests performed to evaluate scaling methods are reviewed with results. The material included applies primarily to unprotected, unswept geometries, but some discussion of how to approach other situations is included as well. The studies given here and scaling methods considered are applicable only to Appendix-C icing conditions. Nearly all of the experimental results presented have been obtained in sea-level tunnels. Recommendations are given regarding which scaling methods to use for both size scaling and test-condition scaling, and icing test results are described to support those recommendations. Facility limitations and size-scaling restrictions are discussed. Finally, appendices summarize the air, water and ice properties used in NASA scaling studies, give expressions for each of the similarity parameters used and provide sample calculations for the size-scaling and test-condition scaling methods advocated.

Bond, Thomas H. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, David N.

2004-01-01

311

Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

2012-03-01

312

Scaling functions and scaling exponents in turbulence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We extend the recent work of Sirovich, Smith, and Yakhot (unpublished) and obtain for structure functions of arbitrary order an expression that is uniformly valid for the dissipation as well as the inertial range of scales. We compare the expression with experimental data obtained in a moderate-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer and find good agreement. This enables a more definitive determination of the scaling exponents and intermittency corrections than has been possible in the past. The results are substantiated by several consistency checks.

Stolovitzky, G.; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Juneja, A.

1993-11-01

313

How scaling fluctuation analyses can transform our view of the climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There exist a bewildering diversity of proxy climate data including tree rings, ice cores, lake varves, boreholes, ice cores, pollen, foraminifera, corals and speleothems. Their quantitative use raises numerous questions of interpretation and calibration. Even in classical cases - such as the isotope signal in ice cores - the usual assumption of linear dependence on ambient temperature is only a first approximation. In other cases - such as speleothems - the isotope signals arise from multiple causes (which are not always understood) and this hinders their widespread use. We argue that traditional interpretations and calibrations - based on essentially deterministic comparisons between instrumental data, model outputs and proxies (albeit with the help of uncertainty analyses) - have been both overly ambitious while simultaneously underexploiting the data. The former since comparisons typically involve series at different temporal resolutions and from different geographical locations - one does not expect agreement in a deterministic sense, while with respect to climate models, one only expects statistical correspondences. The proxies are underexploited since comparisons are done at unique temporal and / or spatial resolutions whereas the fluctuations they describe provide information over wide ranges of scale. A convenient method of overcoming these difficulties is the use of fluctuation analysis systematically applied over the full range of available scales to determine the scaling proeprties. The new transformative element presented here, is to define fluctuations ?T in a series T(t) at scale ?t not by differences (?T(?t) = T(t+?t) - T(t)) but rather by the difference in the means over the first and second halves of the lag ?t . This seemingly minor change - technically from "poor man's" to "Haar" wavelets - turns out to make a huge difference since for example, it is adequate for analysing temperatures from seconds to hundreds of millions of years yet remaining simple to interpret [Lovejoy and Schertzer, 2012]. It has lead for example to the discovery of the new "macroweather" regime between weather (?t 30 yrs) in which fluctuations decrease rather than increase with scale [Lovejoy, 2013]. We illustrate the transformative power of combining such fluctuation analysis with scaling by giving numerous examples from instrumental data, multiproxies, ice core proxies, corals, speleothems and GCM outputs [Lovejoy and Schertzer, 2013]. References: Lovejoy, S. (2013), What is climate?, EOS, 94, (1), 1 January, p1-2. Lovejoy, S., and D. Schertzer (2012), Haar wavelets, fluctuations and structure functions: convenient choices for geophysics, Nonlinear Proc. Geophys. , 19, 1-14 doi: 10.5194/npg-19-1-2012. Lovejoy, S., and D. Schertzer (2013), The Weather and Climate: Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades, 480 pp., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Lovejoy, Shaun; Schertzer, Daniel

2013-04-01

314

Multi scale experimental study of concrete rheology: from water scale to gravel scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

? RILEM 2006 Abstract Rheometric tests are carried out on cement based suspensions. Four scales are defined for this study: the sat- urating fluid scale, the cement paste scale, the mortar scale and finally the concrete scale. Each scale is considered as a suspension defined by its maximum granular class size. Each scale is obtained by adding a higher granular

Z. Toutou; N. Roussel

2005-01-01

315

Scaling in the Universe  

E-print Network

The aim of this review article is to give a comprehensive description of the scaling properties detected for the distribution of cosmic structures. Due to the great variety of statistical methods to describe the large-scale structure of the Universe, I will mainly concentrate on those methods which reveal remarkable regularities and scaling in the structure of the Universe. Although in most cases I prefer not to enter into the technical aspects of how implementing such methods, more details will be furnishes about the description of galaxy clustering in terms of fractal concepts. Despite recent claims for a Universe, which behaves like a fractal at arbitrarily large scales, I will show that the fractal language can be usefully employed to disprove this picture. The emerging scenario is that of a Universe, which behaves like a self-similar structure at small scales, where fractality is dynamically generated by non-linear gravitational clustering, while preserving large-scale homogeneity. Nevertheless, even at scales $\\magcir 10\\hm$, where gravity still acts linearly, the distribution of galaxy clusters shows remarkable scale-invariant features, which could give precise hints about the initial conditions for the evolution of the large-scale structure of the Universe.

Stefano Borgani

1994-04-22

316

Rationality in Action. By John Searle. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001. 303 pages, ISBN 0-262-19463-5. Hardback $35.00.  

E-print Network

to classical rationality. The first is the claim that rational actions are caused by beliefs and desires, in a way that amounts to causal necessitation. Next is that rationality is a matter of obeying rules (i.e., principles). Third, that rationality is a...106 AUSLEGUNG Rationality in Action. By John Searle. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001. 303 pages, ISBN 0-262-19463-5. Hardback $35.00. Curran F. Douglass University of Kansas John Searle's Rationality in Action (2001) is an important new book...

Douglass, Curran F.

317

Parkfield Aftershock Interoccurrence Scaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aftershock sequences present a unique opportunity to study the physics of earthquakes. Important questions concern the fundamental origin of three widely applicable scaling laws: 1) Gutenberg-Richter frequency- magnitude scaling, 2) Omori's law for aftershock decay rates, and 3) Båth's law for the difference between the magnitude of the largest aftershock and a main shock. The high resolution Parkfield seismic network

R. Shcherbakov; D. L. Turcotte; J. B. Rundle

2006-01-01

318

What Is Scale?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scale is one of the big ideas that cross the science domains. Whether one is talking about the weight of a blue whale, the size of a galaxy or a molecule, or the age of a mountain range, scale is an essential tool in understanding the universe in a scient

Taylor, Amy R.; Jones, M. G.; Falvo, Michael R.

2009-09-01

319

Mathematics Achievement Scale Score  

E-print Network

Saudi Arabia 410 Oman 385 Tunisia 359 Kuwait 342 Morocco 335 Yemen 248 Country Average Scale Score Sixth 438 Saudi Arabia 429 United Arab Emirates 428 Armenia 416 Qatar 394 Oman 377 Kuwait 347 Tunisia 346 Indonesia 386 Syrian Arab Republic 380 Morocco 371 Oman 366 Ghana 331 #12;Country Average Scale Score Ninth

Huang, Jianyu

320

Make a Scale Drawing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is designed to supplement a study of archaeology. The activity begins with an overview that explains how archaeologists create a scale model before starting a dig and how they use it throughout the excavation. Students create scale drawings of their desks and then check the mathematical accuracy of their peers' drawings.

321

Everyday Scale Errors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children occasionally make "scale errors"--they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and…

Ware, Elizabeth A.; Uttal, David H.; DeLoache, Judy S.

2010-01-01

322

Scales and erosion  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

There is a need to develop scale explicit understanding of erosion to overcome existing conceptual and methodological flaws in our modelling methods currently applied to understand the process of erosion, transport and deposition at the catchment scale. These models need to be based on a sound under...

323

Parallel Computing in SCALE  

SciTech Connect

The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement activities has been developed to provide an integrated framework for future methods development. Some of the major components of the SCALE parallel computing development plan are parallelization and multithreading of computationally intensive modules and redesign of the fundamental SCALE computational architecture.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01

324

Multi Scale Experimental Study of Concrete Rheology: From Water Scale to Gravel Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheometric tests are carried out on cement based suspensions. Four scales are defined for this study: the saturating fluid\\u000a scale, the cement paste scale, the mortar scale and finally the concrete scale. Each scale is considered as a suspension defined\\u000a by its maximum granular class size. Each scale is obtained by adding a higher granular size to the previous scale.

Z. Toutou; N. Roussel

2006-01-01

325

Allometric Scaling in Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The unity of life is expressed not only in the universal basis of inheritance and energetics at the molecular level, but also in the pervasive scaling of traits with body size at the whole-organism level. More than 75 years ago, Kleiber and Brody and Proctor independently showed that the metabolic rates, B, of mammals and birds scale as the three-quarter power of their mass, M. Subsequent studies showed that most biological rates and times scale as M-1/4 and M^1/4 respectively, and that these so called quarter-power scaling relations hold for a variety of organisms, from unicellular prokaryotes and eukaryotes to trees and mammals. The wide applicability of Kleiber's law, across the 22 orders of magnitude of body mass from minute bacteria to giant whales and sequoias, raises the hope that there is some simple general explanation that underlies the incredible diversity of form and function. We will present a general theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between metabolic rate, B, and body mass, M. We show how the pervasive quarter-power biological scaling relations arise naturally from optimal directed resource supply systems. This framework robustly predicts that: 1) whole organism power and resource supply rate, B, scale as M^3/4; 2) most other rates, such as heart rate and maximal population growth rate scale as M-1/4; 3) most biological times, such as blood circulation time and lifespan, scale as M^1/4; and 4) the average velocity of flow through the network, v, such as the speed of blood and oxygen delivery, scales as M^1/12. Our framework is valid even when there is no underlying network. Our theory is applicable to unicellular organisms as well as to large animals and plants. This work was carried out in collaboration with Amos Maritan along with Jim Brown, John Damuth, Melanie Moses, Andrea Rinaldo, and Geoff West.

Banavar, Jayanth

2009-03-01

326

On nature's scaling effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation afforded the opportunity to look back in the literature to discover scaling effects in nature that might be relevant to composites. Numerous examples were found in nature's approaches to wood, teeth, horns, leaves, eggs, feathers, etc. Nature transmits tensile forces rigidly with cohesive bonds, while dealing with compression forces usually through noncompressible hydraulics. The optimum design scaling approaches for aircraft were also reviewed for comparison with similitude laws. Finally, some historical evidence for the use of Weibull scaling in composites was reviewed.

Wilkins, Dick J.

1994-07-01

327

On nature's scaling effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation afforded the opportunity to look back in the literature to discover scaling effects in nature that might be relevant to composites. Numerous examples were found in nature's approaches to wood, teeth, horns, leaves, eggs, feathers, etc. Nature transmits tensile forces rigidly with cohesive bonds, while dealing with compression forces usually through noncompressible hydraulics. The optimum design scaling approaches for aircraft were also reviewed for comparison with similitude laws. Finally, some historical evidence for the use of Weibull scaling in composites was reviewed.

Wilkins, Dick J.

1994-01-01

328

Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.  

PubMed

As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions. PMID:24056361

Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

2013-10-01

329

GSA Geologic Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Geological Society of America (GSA) site contains a detailed geologic time scale as an educational resource. It may be downloaded to a larger size, and includes all Eras, Eons, Periods, Epochs and ages as well as magnetic polarity information.

1999-01-01

330

Scaling the Geologic Past  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes construction of a Geologic Time Scale on a 100 foot roll of paper and suggests activities concerning its use. Includes information about fossils and suggestions for conducting a fossil field trip with students. (BR)

Gerritts, Mary

1975-01-01

331

Large scale disease prediction  

E-print Network

The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

2008-01-01

332

Large scale dynamic systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

Doolin, B. F.

1975-01-01

333

A Mesozoic time scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an integrated geomagnetic polarity and stratigraphic time scale for the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods of the Mesozoic Era, with age estimates and uncertainty limits for stage boundaries. The time scale uses a suite of 324 radiometric dates, including high-resolution Ar-40\\/Ar-39 age estimates. This framework involves the observed ties between (1) radiometric dates, biozones, and stage boundaries, and

Felix M. Gradstein; Frits P. Agterberg; James G. Ogg; Jan Hardenbol; Paul van Veen; Jacques Thierry; Zehui Huang

1994-01-01

334

Interactive Geological Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This time scale allows students to select multiple time periods from a list and view them on a highlighted display. It shows the relationship between eon, era, period, sub-period, and epoch and also includes the date in mega-annum (Ma) or millions of years before present. The scale reflects the changes in the Cenozoic Era (Tertiary and Quaternary have been eliminated and the Neogene modified) in the most recent International Stratigraphic Charts.

335

Algebra Balance Scales - Negatives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides a virtual balance on which the student can represent (and then solve) simple linear equations with integer answers. Conceptually, positive weights (unit-blocks and x-boxes) push the pans of the scale downward. Negative values are represented by balloons which can be attached to the pans of the scale. The student can then manipulate the weights to solve the equation while simultaneously seeing a visual display of these effects on the equation.

University, Utah S.

2009-07-01

336

The Pet Attitude Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a It was the intention of the authors that this chapter be a resource of test and measures for the reader. The name of the Pet\\u000a Attitude Scale (PAS) (Templer, Salter, Dickey, Baldwin, & Veleber, 1981), apparently the first published scale that measures\\u000a human–animal bonding, reflects the fact that it was developed three decades ago. If it were constructed today, it

Donald I. Templer; Hiroko Arikawa

337

Simple Scales FS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet provides a virtual environment in which students can explore the concept of weight/mass. They place virtual teddy bears on a pan scale to determine their weights. The bears weigh from 1 to 4 units and can be placed on the scale individually or in groups. The activity lends itself to mental addition and subtraction with values less than or equal to ten.

Bunker, Dan

2004-01-01

338

Scaling the pyramids  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page features activities that compare the Great Pyramid to such modern structures as the Statue of Liberty and the Eiffel Tower. In the first activity, students use a template to construct a scale model of the Great Pyramid. They must find the scale heights for the tallest building in their neighborhood or for their height. In the remaining activity, students are given the dimensions for two other pyramids and challenged to create models. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Unit, Wgbh S.

1997-01-01

339

Scaling in stream communities.  

PubMed Central

Scaling relationships between population density (N) and body size (W), and of their underlying size distributions, can contribute to an understanding of how species use resources as a function of size. In an attempt to resolve the controversy over the form of scaling relationships, an extensive dataset, comprising 602 invertebrate species, was obtained from two geographically separate stream communities (Seebach in Austria and Mynach in Wales). We analysed the temporal consistency of the N-W relationship, which was subjected to ordinary least squares (OLS), bisector (OLS(BIS)) and quantile regressions, and species-size spectra with seasonally collated data. Slopes of seasonal OLS(BIS) regressions did not depart from -1 in either community, indicating a seasonally convergent scaling relationship, which is not energetically constrained. Species-size spectra may scale with habitat complexity, providing an alternative explanation for the observed body-size scaling. In contrast to the right-skewed species-size frequency distributions of single-species assemblages, the size spectra of these benthic communities exhibited 'central tendencies', reflecting their phyletic constitution. The shape of species body-mass spectra differed between the two communities, with a bimodal and seasonally convergent pattern in the Seebach community and a seasonally shifting unimodality in the Mynach community. The body-size spectra of large, mostly insect, species (greater than or equal to 1 mm) scaled to seasonal variations in habitat complexity (i.e. fractal D), suggesting that habitat structure constrains the community organization of stream benthos. PMID:12573074

Schmid, Peter E; Tokeshi, Mutsunori; Schmid-Araya, Jenny M

2002-01-01

340

Scaling, Universality, and Geomorphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theories of scaling apply wherever similarity exists across many scales. This similarity may be found in geometry and in dynamical processes. Universality arises when the qualitative character of a system is sufficient to quantitatively predict its essential features, such as the exponents that characterize scaling laws. Within geomorphology, two areas where the concepts of scaling and universality have found application are the geometry of river networks and the statistical structure of topography. We begin this review with a pedagogical presentation of scaling and universality. We then describe recent progress made in applying these ideas to networks and topography. This overview leads to a synthesis that attempts a classification of surface and network properties based on generic mechanisms and geometric constraints. We also briefly review how scaling and universality have been applied to related problems in sedimentology-specifically, the origin of stromatolites and the relation of the statistical properties of submarine-canyon topography to the size distribution of turbidite deposits. Throughout the review, our intention is to elucidate not only the problems that can be solved using these concepts, but also those that cannot.

Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Rothman, Daniel H.

341

Data-driven high-throughput prediction of the 3-D structure of small molecules: review and progress. A response to the letter by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.  

PubMed

A response is presented to sentiments expressed in "Data-Driven High-Throughput Prediction of the 3-D Structure of Small Molecules: Review and Progress. A Response from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre", recently published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, (1) which may give readers a misleading impression regarding significant impediments to scientific research posed by the CCDC. PMID:22107601

Baldi, Pierre

2011-12-27

342

The Polish Collection at the Alliance College Library in Cambridge Springs, PA: The Origins of the Collection in 1950, Its Rapid Development in the 1970's and the Introduction of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) in 1982.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay outlines the development, present condition, and future direction of the 20,000-volume Polish research collection at Alliance College, located in Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. Alliance College was founded in 1912 by the Polish National Alliance (PNA), a life insurance fraternal organization. In 1931 its entire library collection was…

Kozaczka, Stanley J.

343

Intelligent Behavior in Animals and Robots. By David McFarland & Thomas Bosser. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books (1993). Pp. xi + 308. Price $39.95 U.S.  

E-print Network

significant progress in the design and creation of robots, software `agents', and other artificially of traditional artificial intelligence (AI) created `brittle'systems with single areas of competence (e.g. chessREVIEW Intelligent Behavior in Animals and Robots. By David McFarland & Thomas Bosser. Cambridge

Todd, Peter M.

344

Methods and Skills for Research on Foreign Educational Systems. A Report on the NASFA/EAIE 1994 Seminars (Coral Gables, Florida, June 3-5 [and] Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, November 22-23). PIER World Education Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report presents results of two seminars, held in Miami (Florida) and Cambridge (England), in which representatives of two groups, The European Association for International Education and the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs: Association of International Educators, met for intensive discussion of the methods for and design of…

Aldrich-Langen, Caroline, Ed.

345

Laboratory for Integrated Science and Engineering (LISE), 11 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 Phone: (617) 384-7411 Fax: (617) 384-7302 www.cns.fas.harvard.edu  

E-print Network

Laboratory for Integrated Science and Engineering (LISE), 11 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138/10/2007 Center for Nanoscale Systems Laboratory for Integrated Science and Engineering (LISE) Iris Scan Access will follow any CNS and/or Harvard University policies, rules, safety procedures or other guidelines set forth

Heller, Eric

346

Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as much as 96 percent of total solids resided within 9 feet of the curb. Median accumulation rates of street solids and median washoff of street solids after rainstorms on multifamily and commercial land-use streets were also similar at about 33 and 22 pounds per curb-mile per day, and 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Results indicate that solids on the streets tested in Cambridge, Mass., can recover to pre-rainstorm yields within 1 to 3 days after washoff. The finer grain-size fractions tended to be more readily washed from the roadway surfaces during rainstorms. Street solids in the coarsest grain-size fraction on multifamily streets indicated an average net increase following rainstorms and are likely attributed to debris run-on from trees, lawns, and other plantings commonly found in residential areas. In seven experiments between May and December 2010, the median removal efficiency of solids from street surfaces following a single pass by a regenerative-air street cleaner was about 82 percent on study sites in the multifamily land-use streets and about 78 percent on the commercial land-use streets. Median street-solid removal efficiency increased with increasing grain size. This type of regenerative-air street cleaner left a median residual street-solid load on the street surface of about 100 pounds per curb-mile. Median concentrations of organic carbon and total phosphorus (P) on multifamily streets were about 35 and 29 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. The median total mass of organic carbon and total P in street solids on multifamily streets was 68 and 75 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. More than 87 percent of the mass of total P was determined to be in solids greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter for both land-use types. The median total accumulation rate for total P on multifamily streets was about 5 times greater than on commercial streets. Total P accumulation in the medium grain-size fraction was nearly the same for streets within both land-use types at 0.004 p

Sorenson, Jason R.

2013-01-01

347

Fire toxicity scaling  

SciTech Connect

The toxicity of the thermal-decomposition products from two flexible polyurethane foams (with and without a fire retardant) and a cotton upholstery fabric was evaluated by a series of small-scale and large-scale tests single mock-up upholstery chair tests during smoldering or flaming decomposition. In addition other fire property data such as rates of heat release, effective heats of combustion, specific gas species yields, and smoke obscuration were measured. The degree of toxicity observed during and following the flaming tests (both large-scale room burns and the NBS Toxicity Tests) could be explained by a 3-Gas Model which includes the combined toxicological effects of CO, CO/sub 2/, and HCN. Essentially, no animal deaths were noted during the thirty minute exposures to the non-flaming or smoldering combustion products produced in the NBS Toxicity Test Method or the large-scale room test. In the large-scale room tests, little toxicological difference was noted between decomposition products from the burn room and a second room 12 meters away.

Braun, E.; Levin, B.C.; Paabo, M.; Gurman, J.; Holt, T.

1987-02-01

348

Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

Dryer, M. (editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

1980-01-01

349

Pre-ovulatory follicular characteristics and ovulation rates in different breed crosses, carriers or non-carriers of the Booroola or Cambridge fecundity gene.  

PubMed

Terminal follicular dynamics and ovulation rates (OR) were compared in different local breeds after introducing fecundity genes of different origin. Crossbred ewes which were carriers (F+) or non-carriers (++) of Booroola (BFec) or Cambridge genes (CFec) were included: CambridgexCambridge (CC), CambridgexSuffolk (CS), CambridgexTexel (CT), BooroolaxTexel (BT) and BooroolaxGerman Mutton Merino (BGM). The numbers of small (diameter 2-3.5 mm), medium (diameter >3.5-5.0 mm) and large (diameter >5.0 mm) growing follicles, the maximum diameter before ovulation and the regression and artesia rates of ovarian follicles >/=2 mm in diameter were studied laparoscopically and repeatedly during the last 5 days of an induced oestrous cycle. The ORs were determined one cycle before and two cycles after the repeated laparoscopy. BFec and CFec significantly enhanced the OR of all crossbreeds. Carriers of BFec or CFec did not have significantly different ORs due to any crossbreeding effect. The same observation was made for non-carriers of both Fec gene types. Whatever the crossbreed, the number of small, medium and large growing follicles were similar between carriers and non-carriers in spite of a higher number of ovulating follicles in carriers of both Fec gene types. The diameter of ovulatory follicles did not differ among crossbreds, or between carriers and non-carriers except in the BT (5.2+/-0.2 vs. 6.5+/-0.8 mm, respectively) and CC (6.6+/-0.2 vs. 5.6+/-0.3 mm) ewes.The higher OR in the presence of the Booroola gene was associated with a low atresia rate of large follicles in all crossbreeds (BT: 52+/-8% (F+) vs. 61+/-7% (++); BGM: 51+/-6% vs. 75+/-5%). The high OR of the carriers of the CFec gene seemed to be associated with a lower number of large growing follicles with a lower (P<0.05) atresia rate as compared with Booroola crossbreeds. In conclusion, follicular features were similar between purebred Cambridge and its crossbred CS and CT. In ewes carrying the BFec or CFec gene, the reduction in follicular atresia seemed to be one of the main follicular features implicated in the higher OR. PMID:10967242

Mandiki, S N; Noël, B; Bister, J L; Peeters, R; Beerlandt, G; Decuypere, E; Visscher, A; Suess, R; Kaulfuss, K H; Paquay, R

2000-10-01

350

Generalized Scale Invariant Gravity  

E-print Network

We generalize the scale invariant gravity by allowing a negative kinetic energy term for the classical scalar field. This gives birth to a new scalar-tensor theory of gravity, in which the scalar field is in fact an auxiliary field. For a pure gravity theory without matter, the scale symmetric phase represents an equivalent class of gravity theories, which the Einstein gravity plus a cosmological constant belongs to under a special gauge choice. The one-loop quantum correction of the theory is calculated by using the Vilkovisky-DeWitt's method. We find that the scale symmetry is broken dynamically, and that the Einstein gravity is the ground state of the broken phase. We also briefly discuss the consequent cosmological implications. It is shown that the time-delay experiment restricts the present universe to be very close to the ground state.

Shih-Yuin Lin; Kin-Wang Ng

1997-08-20

351

Algebra Balance Scales  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online manipulative features a virtual balance scale. It offers students an experimental way to learn about solving linear equations involving negative or positive numbers. The applet presents an equation for the student to illustrate by balancing the scale using blue blocks for positive units and variables and red balloons for negative units and variables. The student then works with the arithmetic operations to solve the equation. A record of the steps taken by the student is shown on the screen and on the scale. The applet reinforces the idea that what is done to one side of an equation must be done to the other side to maintain balance. Instructions for using the applet, background information about solving equations, and teaching suggestions are included.

2003-01-01

352

Scaling a unitary matrix  

E-print Network

The iterative method of Sinkhorn allows, starting from an arbitrary real matrix with non-negative entries, to find a so-called 'scaled matrix' which is doubly stochastic, i.e. a matrix with all entries in the interval (0, 1) and with all line sums equal to 1. We conjecture that a similar procedure exists, which allows, starting from an arbitrary unitary matrix, to find a scaled matrix which is unitary and has all line sums equal to 1. The existence of such algorithm guarantees a powerful decomposition of an arbitrary quantum circuit.

Alexis De Vos; Stijn De Baerdemacker

2015-02-06

353

5.NBT Kipton's Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Kipton has a digital scale. He puts a marshmallow on the scale and it reads 7.2 grams. How much would you expect 10 marshmallows to weigh? Why? Kipton ...

2013-08-12

354

Customs of Cambridge  

E-print Network

. One Nobel Prize winner, Sydney Brenner, for example described how it was through almost ceaseless conversation with Francis Crick that they worked out the implications of the discovery of DNA. At meals, after meals, in endless meetings and teachings...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

355

Cambridge International Science Publishing  

E-print Network

-Step Runge­Kutta Methods of Stage-Order 3 and Order 6 J.H. Verner12 Department of Mathematics, PIMS, Simon and Verner obtain results for order 8 pairs that fail to show this designated order. Hairer and Wanner [3 grant A8147. #12;2 J.H. Verner 1 Introduction This article considers some explicit methods

Verner, Jim

356

Education in Cambridge  

E-print Network

of the major lecture series I have given. For the first year students I have lectured on kinship and marriage, on an introduction to anthropology, on political and economic anthropology, war, famine and disease, long term transformations in civilizations... ; By the eighteenth century those who had completed the first stage of their graduation were arranged in an order of merit. At the graduation ceremony a senior BA, sitting as a licensed fool on a three-legged stool or tripod, read out entertaining verses...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

357

Culture of Cambridge  

E-print Network

snuff boxes are ceremonially placed on the table, I feel part of some timeless world. In such moments, as in other special moments, all of the eight hundred years of rich history, all the intellect which has probed to the edge of the universe...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

358

Fractionating the unitary notion of dissociation: disembodied but not embodied dissociative experiences are associated with exocentric perspective-taking  

PubMed Central

It has been argued that hallucinations which appear to involve shifts in egocentric perspective (e.g., the out-of-body experience, OBE) reflect specific biases in exocentric perspective-taking processes. Via a newly devised perspective-taking task, we examined whether such biases in perspective-taking were present in relation to specific dissociative anomalous body experiences (ABE) – namely the OBE. Participants also completed the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS; Sierra and Berrios, 2000) which provided measures of additional embodied ABE (unreality of self) and measures of derealization (unreality of surroundings). There were no reliable differences in the level of ABE, emotional numbing, and anomalies in sensory recall reported between the OBE and control group as measured by the corresponding CDS subscales. In contrast, the OBE group did provide significantly elevated measures of derealization (“alienation from surroundings” CDS subscale) relative to the control group. At the same time we also found that the OBE group was significantly more efficient at completing all aspects of the perspective-taking task relative to controls. Collectively, the current findings support fractionating the typically unitary notion of dissociation by proposing a distinction between embodied dissociative experiences and disembodied dissociative experiences – with only the latter being associated with exocentric perspective-taking mechanisms. Our findings – obtained with an ecologically valid task and a homogeneous OBE group – also call for a re-evaluation of the relationship between OBEs and perspective-taking in terms of facilitated disembodied experiences. PMID:24198776

Braithwaite, Jason J.; James, Kelly; Dewe, Hayley; Medford, Nick; Takahashi, Chie; Kessler, Klaus

2013-01-01

359

Forced Choice Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This ipsative scale is composed of triads of statements concerning school tasks. The tasks are: write a story, write the alphabet, read a story, paint a picture, add numbers, subtract numbers, and write the numbers from 1 to 20. The triples are composed with each of the three arithmetic tasks combined with all possible pairs of the four…

Harvill, Leo M.

360

Scaling of structural failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect,

Z. P. Bazant; Er-Ping Chen

1997-01-01

361

The Illness Attitude Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The Illness Attitude Scales (IAS) were developed by Robert Kellner as a clinimetric index for measuring hypochondriacal fears and beliefs (worry about illness, concerns about pain, health habits, hypochondriacal beliefs, thanatophobia, disease phobia, bodily preoccupations, treatment experience and effects of symptoms). The IAS have been extensively used in the past two decades, but there has been no comprehensive review

Laura Sirri; Silvana Grandi; Giovanni A. Fava

2008-01-01

362

Skill Scales Companion Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a reference document meant to accompany other National Skill Standards Board (NSSB) publications that describe the development of skill standards, including Built to Work: A Common Framework for Skill Standards. This companion guide provides the NSSB Complexity Rating Skill Scales. Chapter 1 explains briefly how this tool fits…

National Skill Standards Board (DOL/ETA), Washington, DC.

363

Sensor system scaling issues  

SciTech Connect

A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01

364

Rasch Scaling Program (RSP).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rasch Scaling Program (RSP) is a software package for applying the one-parameter logistic (Rasch) model to dichotomously scored item response data. RSP contains a thorough introduction to the Rasch model (1960, 1980) including explanations of the estimation methods and directions for running the program. (SLD)

Robin, Frederic; Xing, Dehui; Hambleton, Ronald K.

1999-01-01

365

pH Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales. Investigate whether changing the volume or diluting with water affects the pH. Or you can design your own liquid!

Simulations, Phet I.; Adams, Wendy; Barbera, Jack; Langdon, Laurie; Loeblein, Patricia; Malley, Chris

2008-07-01

366

Build an Interplanetary Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an activity in which students use a bathroom scale and a long board to see how their weight changes on other planets and the moon. Materials list, procedures, tables of planet radii, comparative values, and gravitational ratios are provided. (DDR)

Matthews, Catherine; And Others

1997-01-01

367

Scaling Down The Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A unit intended to teach children the size and scale of the Universe. Through hands-on manipulatives the students proceed in sequential stages to create four models, beginning with the Solar System and ending with the entire Universe. They also learn the distance of a light year.

Leger, Victor

2007-03-29

368

Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This table presents the modified Mercalli Intensity Scale (MMI), a measure of earthquake intensity based on shaking severity and observed effects of earthquakes. It includes MMI value, a description of shaking severity, and a summary and full description of damage effects. Each MMI value is accompanied by an illustration showing its expected effects.

369

CALIBRATION Galileo Scale Model  

E-print Network

see Jupiter and some of its 4 largest moons, just as Galileo Galilei did in Italy in 1610. While youPRINTING CALIBRATION Galileo Scale Model PARTS SHEET 1: The High-Gain Antenna PRINT ON TRANSPARENCY MATERIAL Galileo's High-Gain Antenna (HGA) was designed to unfold like an umbrella. It needed to be folded

370

Fundamentals of Zoological Scaling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following animal characteristics are considered to determine how properties and characteristics of various systems change with system size (scaling): skeletal weight, speed of running, height and range of jumping, food consumption, heart rate, lifetime, locomotive efficiency, frequency of wing-flapping, and maximum sizes of flying and hovering…

Lin, Herbert

1982-01-01

371

xi-scaling  

SciTech Connect

A class of purely kinematical corrections to xi-scaling is exposed. These corrections are inevitably present in any realistic hadron model with spin and gauge invariance and lead to phenomenologically important M/sub hadron//sup 2//Q/sup 2/ corrections to Nachtmann moments.

Gunion, J.F.

1980-04-01

372

Scale Factor X  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this game, students navigate a maze to get to a math challenge. The three challenges are: move blue and green "fuel cells" around to match the ratios in the given containers; measure shapes to determine the scale factors needed to make them match the given templates; determine how to place bases on a map based on clues involving proportions.

2010-01-01

373

ScaleNet  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Comprehensive database of information on scale insects (Homoptera: Coccoidea), an important pest of greenhouses and fruit trees. Topics include general information, economic importance, life histories, distribution, ecology and classification. Users can query the database for information like valid names, distributions, hosts, references, synonymy, and remarks for a particular taxon. The bibliography goes back to 1758. Last updated December 2006.

0000-00-00

374

Energetics Metabolic scaling relationships  

E-print Network

Energetics · Metabolic scaling relationships · Behavioral thermoregulation · Torpor and hibernation;Behavioral thermoregulation Nycticeius humeralis Evening bats Phyllostomus hastatus Greater spear-nosed bats from torpor can be expensive #12;Hibernation = long torpor Ground squirrel maintained at 4oC #12

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

375

Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Fourth Cambridge Radio Survey Catalogue (4C) (Pilkington, Gower, Scott and Wills 1965, 1967)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The machine readable catalogue contains survey data from the papers of Pilkington and Scott and Gower, Scott and Wills. These data result from a survey of radio sources between declinations -07 deg and +80 deg using the large Cambridge interferometer at 178 MHz. The computerized catalog contains for each source the 4C number, 1950 position, measured flux density, and accuracy class. For some sources miscellaneous brief comments such as cross identifications to the 3C catalog or remarks on contamination from nearby sources are given at the ends of the data records. A detailed description of the machine readable catalog as it is currently being distributed by the Astronomical Data Center is given to enable users to read and process the data.

Warren, W. H., Jr.

1983-01-01

376

Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62 milligrams per liter), and lowest in Fresh Pond (54 milligrams per liter). Bed sediments in Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Reservoirs were enriched in iron, manganese, and arsenic relative to those in the impounded lower Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Trophic state indices, calculated for each reservoir based on nutrient concentrations, water-column transparency, and phytoplankton abundances, indicated that the upper and middle basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir were moderately to highly productive and likely to produce algal blooms; the lower basin of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir were similar and intermediate in productivity, and Fresh Pond was relatively unproductive and unlikely to produce algal blooms. This pattern is likely due to sedimentation of organic and inorganic particles in the three basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and in Stony Brook Reservoir. Molar ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus ranged from 55 in Stony Brook Reservoir to 120 in Hobbs Brook Reservoir, indicating that phytoplankton algae in these water bodies may be phosphorus limited and therefore sensitive to small increases in phosphorus loading from the drainage basin. Nitrogen loads were found to be less important than phosphorus to the trophic condition of the reservoirs. Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook, the two principle streams draining the Cambridge drinking-water source area, differed in their relative contributions to many of the estimated constituent loads. The estimated load of fecal coliform bacteria was more than seven times larger for the mainly residential Stony Brook subbasin upstream from Kendal Green, Mass., than it was for the more commercial and industrial Hobbs Brook subbasin, though the drainage areas of the two subbasins differ only by about 20 percent. The State standard for fecal coliform bacteria in streams in the Cambridge drinking-water source area (20 colony forming units per 100 milliliters) was exceeded at all sampling stations. Estimated s

Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

2001-01-01

377

Why do Scale-Free Networks Emerge in Nature? From Gradient Networks to Transport Efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has recently been recognized [1,2,3] that a large number of complex networks are scale-free (having a power-law degree distribution). Examples include citation networks [4], the internet [5], the world-wide-web [6], cellular metabolic networks [7], protein interaction networks [8], the sex-web [9] and alliance networks in the U.S. biotechnology industry [10]. The existence of scale-free networks in such diverse systems suggests that there is a simple underlying common reason for their development. Here, we propose that scale-free networks emerge because they ensure efficient transport of some entity. We show that for flows generated by gradients of a scalar "potential'' distributed on a network, non scale-free networks, e.g., random graphs [11], will become maximally congested, while scale-free networks will ensure efficient transport in the large network size limit. [1] R. Albert and A.-L. Barabási, Rev.Mod.Phys. 74, 47 (2002). [2] M.E.J. Newman, SIAM Rev. 45, 167 (2003). [3] S.N. Dorogovtsev and J.F.F. Mendes, Evolution of Networks: From Biological Nets to the Internet and WWW, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, 2003. [4] S. Redner, Eur.Phys.J. B, 4, 131 (1998). [5] M. Faloutsos, P. Faloutsos and C. Faloutsos Comp.Comm.Rev. 29, 251 (1999). [6] R. Albert, H. Jeong, and A.L. Barabási, Nature 401, 130 (1999). [7] H. Jeong et.al. Nature 407, 651 (2000). [8] H. Jeong, S. Mason, A.-L. Barabási and Z. N. Oltvai, Nature 411, 41 (2001). [9] F. Liljeros et. al. Nature 411 907 (2000). [10] W. W. Powell, D. R. White, K. W. Koput and J. Owen-Smith Am.J.Soc. in press. [11] B. Bollobás, Random Graphs, Second Edition, Cambridge University Press (2001).

Toroczkai, Zoltan

2004-03-01

378

Extended scaling for ferromagnets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple systematic rule, inspired by high-temperature series expansion (HTSE) results, is proposed for optimizing the expression for thermodynamic observables of ferromagnets exhibiting critical behavior at Tc . This “extended scaling” scheme leads to a protocol for the choice of scaling variables, ?=(T-Tc)/T or (T2-Tc2)/T2 depending on the observable instead of (T-Tc)/Tc , and more importantly to temperature dependent noncritical prefactors for each observable. The rule corresponds to scaling of the leading term of the reduced susceptibility above Tc as ?c*(T)˜?-? in agreement with standard practice with scaling variable ? and for the leading term of the second-moment correlation length as ?c*(T)˜T-1/2?-? . For the specific heat in bipartite lattices, the rule gives Cc*(T)˜T-2[(T2-Tc2)/T2]-? . The latter two expressions are not standard. The scheme can allow for confluent and noncritical correction terms. A stringent test of the extended scaling is made through analyses of high-precision numerical and HTSE data, or real data, on the three-dimensional canonical Ising, XY , and Heisenberg ferromagnets. For the susceptibility ?(T) and the correlation length ?(T) of the three ferromagnets, their optimized expression, which consists of the leading terms [respectively, ?c*(T) and ?c*(T) ] and a quite limited number of confluent and noncritical correction terms, represents real data to surprisingly good approximations over the entire temperature range from Tc to infinity. The temperature dependent prefactors introduced are of crucial importance not only in fixing the optimized expression at relatively high temperatures but also in determining appropriately the small amplitude correction terms. For the specific heat of the Ising ferromagnet, Cc*(T) combined with two noncritical correction terms which are calculated with no free parameters once the correlation length critical parameters are known reproduces real data nicely also over the whole temperature range.

Campbell, I. A.; Hukushima, K.; Takayama, H.

2007-10-01

379

Logarithmic Scales: A Useful Example  

Microsoft Academic Search

Logarithmic intensity scales are widely encountered in astronomy (star magnitudes), acoustics (decibels), seismology (the Richter scale), and elsewhere. Yet students often have difficulty mastering the concept of logarithmic scales. With this note, I am calling attention to a case of the application of a logarithmic scale to something that is simple, transparent, and widely understood. The simplicity of the example

Albert A. Bartlett

2003-01-01

380

Measuring Growth with Vertical Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A vertical score scale is needed to measure growth across multiple tests in terms of absolute changes in magnitude. Since the warrant for subsequent growth interpretations depends upon the assumption that the scale has interval properties, the validation of a vertical scale would seem to require methods for distinguishing interval scales from…

Briggs, Derek C.

2013-01-01

381

Optimal scaling for ordered categories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the determination of optimal weights for points on scoring scales for subjective comparative experiments. A scoring scale with a specific number of points is considered, and it is assumed that verbal or other indications imply an order to the scale points. The optimal spacing for the scale points is obtained in the sense that treatment or

R. A. Bradley; S. K. Katti; Irma J. Coons

1962-01-01

382

Financial management: Development of scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is a contribution to the development of family resource management scales, specifically financial management scales. Principal axis factor analysis, with varimax rotation, is used to assess underlying relationships in 23 family resource management variables related to time and money resources. Reliability and content, construct, and criterion-related validity of the scales are assessed. Two scales that are reliable and

Vicki Schram Fitzsimmons; Tahira K. Hira; Jean W. Bauer; Jeanne L. Hafstrom

1993-01-01

383

Segregation beneath oxide scales  

SciTech Connect

Studies are reported and discussed on Auger analyses of the region beneath CrO{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, or NiO layers on their metal substrate. Small concentrations of S, C, and P were detected in areas which had been connected to the oxide layer, most probably due to segregation in defects, such as misfit dislocations, microvoids, grain boundaries, etc. For high oxygen pressures at the interface (Ni-NiO) P also can be enriched in the inner layer as phosphate. Sulfur starts to segregate to the free-metal surface as soon as the scale and metal separate, stabilizing voids and accelerating their growth to cavities or favoring the detachment of scale in the case of growth stresses. In this surface segregation S displaces C and P from the metal surface.

Grabke, H.J.; Kurbatov, G.; Schmutzler, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

1995-02-01

384

Large-Scale Weather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the previous chapter, we dealt with how the properties of air and water affected small-scale weather such as the formation of clouds, the formation of fog, and how comfortable you feel at different times of the year. In this chapter, we're going to go global, talking about major interactions between the Sun and Earth, the resulting effects on large air masses, and how these major interactions help us figure out what the weather's going to be tomorrow. As discussed earlier in the book, when science concepts are applied to the real world, things don't always work out exactly as expected. However, it is possible to get an overall picture of what's happening in large-scale weather.

Robertson, William C.

2005-01-01

385

Scaling Relations for Watersheds  

E-print Network

We study the morphology of watersheds in two and three dimensional systems subjected to different degrees of spatial correlations. The response of these objects to small, local perturbations is also investigated with extensive numerical simulations. We find the fractal dimension of the watersheds to generally decrease with the Hurst exponent, which quantifies the degree of spatial correlations. Moreover, in two dimensions, our results match the range of fractal dimensions $1.10 \\leq d_f \\leq 1.15$ observed for natural landscapes. We report that the watershed is strongly affected by local perturbations. For perturbed two and three dimensional systems, we observe a power-law scaling behavior for the distribution of areas (volumes) enclosed by the original and the displaced watershed, and for the distribution of distances between outlets. Finite-size effects are analyzed and the resulting scaling exponents are shown to depend significantly on the Hurst exponent. The intrinsic relation between watershed and invas...

Fehr, E; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

2011-01-01

386

Silica scale control  

SciTech Connect

Fouling by silica scaling remains one of the key problems to be solved in geothermal energy utilization. The EPRI, in their report on power plant water usage, has reported that, in 70% of power plants, water usage is limited by silica concentration. Silica deposit is caused as a result of its polymerization, coprecipitation with other minerals, precipitation with other multivalent ions, and biological activity in the water. Several of these processes may take place concurrently, making it difficult to predict equilibrium solubility. The solubility of amorphous silica is also dependent on many other factors such as, pH, temperature, particle size, particle hydration, and the presence of other ions, such as iron, aluminum, etc.. A hard silica scale is formed when calcium carbonate or other mineral precipitate provides a crystalline matrix in which silica can be entrapped.

Gill, J.S. [Calgon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1998-12-31

387

An elastica arm scale.  

PubMed

The concept of a 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free to slide in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measurement of load within a certain range of use. Finally, we show that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications for locomotion of serpents, plumbing and smart oil drilling. PMID:25197248

Bosi, F; Misseroni, D; Dal Corso, F; Bigoni, D

2014-09-01

388

Scaling macroscopic aquatic locomotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inertial aquatic swimmers that use undulatory gaits range in length L from a few millimetres to 30 metres, across a wide array of biological taxa. Using elementary hydrodynamic arguments, we uncover a unifying mechanistic principle characterizing their locomotion by deriving a scaling relation that links swimming speed U to body kinematics (tail beat amplitude A and frequency ?) and fluid properties (kinematic viscosity ?). This principle can be simply couched as the power law Re ~ Sw?, where Re = UL/? >> 1 and Sw = ?AL/?, with ? = 4/3 for laminar flows, and ? = 1 for turbulent flows. Existing data from over 1,000 measurements on fish, amphibians, larvae, reptiles, mammals and birds, as well as direct numerical simulations are consistent with our scaling. We interpret our results as the consequence of the convergence of aquatic gaits to the performance limits imposed by hydrodynamics.

Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

2014-10-01

389

Comparison of Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the Southwest Center for Microsystems Education features a learning module on scale: macro, micro and nano. The material is intended as a background for students learning about nanotechnology and microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS. A participant guide, instructor guide (both in PDF format) and a comprehensive powerpoint presentation are included. Classroom activities are included. Users are encouraged to register and log in in order to access the full content on the site.

2011-10-11

390

Size, Scale and Models  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners take measurements and create charts to learn about the size of dinosaurs and their relative scale to humans. In addition, learners discover how scientists estimate the volume of dinosaurs by using a simple displacement procedure. Learners also examine how fossilized bones fit together when they make their own dinosaur skeleton. This activity is featured on pp.28-32 (part of a lesson that begins on p.19) of the "Dinosphere" unit of study for grades 3-5.

Crosslin, Rick; Fortney, Mary; Indianapolis, The C.

2004-01-01

391

Regional-Scale Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter we emphasize that regional processes shape local diversity and that the realized diversity represents the\\u000a interplay of local and regional processes. Local diversity is predicted by the number of species in the regional species pool.\\u000a This species pool is a result of speciation, extinction and migration among regions. At smaller scales, environmental disturbance,\\u000a stochastic extinctions, productivity, predation,

Jonne Kotta; Jon D. Witman

392

Chip Scale Atomic Magnetometers  

Microsoft Academic Search

An optically pumped magnetometer was drastically miniaturized, by taking advantage of MEMS techniques, producing the chip-scale atomic magnetometers (CSAM) physics package. The key component of the package is an alkali vapor cell. To probe the magnetic field experienced by the atoms, the injection current to the VCSEL was modulated at 3.4 GHz near half the hyperfine frequency of 87Rb. Lock-in

Peter D. D. Schwindt; B. J. Lindseth; S. Knappe; John Kitching; J. Moreland; L. Hollberg

2006-01-01

393

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

SciTech Connect

Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01

394

Scaling an Atom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners make a scale model of an atom to see how big or how small an atom is compared to its nucleus. Learners will realize that most of matter is just empty space! Learners will calculate the diameter and radius of a pinhead and the distance between the radius and the electron cloud as well as other optional measurements listed in the "Etc." portion of the resource.

Muller, Eric

2002-01-01

395

Stability of a plasma confined in a dipole field Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139  

E-print Network

of low beta electrostatic modes in a magnetic dipole field is examined when the distribution function stable when the pressure profiles scale as p R 20/3 , similar to energetic particle pressure profiles, the pressure peak will occur at a distance from the ring surface and beyond the pressure peak the pressure must

396

J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 652, pp. 241257. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112010000042  

E-print Network

understanding of fluid mechanics at increasingly smaller time and length scales. Conversely, experimental to advance knowledge in new areas of fluid mechanics such as high-frequency nanofluidics. Recent work on high is beyond the reach of classical (Newtonian) fluid mechanics, which is only valid for 1. The viscoelastic

397

Comparing the theoretical versions of the Beaufort scale, the T-Scale and the Fujita scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

2005 is the bicentenary of the Beaufort Scale and its wind-speed codes: the marine version in 1805 and the land version later. In the 1920s when anemometers had come into general use, the Beaufort Scale was quantified by a formula based on experiment. In the early 1970s two tornado wind-speed scales were proposed: (1) an International T-Scale based on the Beaufort Scale; and (2) Fujita's damage scale developed for North America. The International Beaufort Scale and the T-Scale share a common root in having an integral theoretical relationship with an established scientific basis, whereas Fujita's Scale introduces criteria that make its intensities non-integral with Beaufort. Forces on the T-Scale, where T stands for Tornado force, span the range 0 to 10 which is highly useful world wide. The shorter range of Fujita's Scale (0 to 5) is acceptable for American use but less convenient elsewhere. To illustrate the simplicity of the decimal T-Scale, mean hurricane wind speed of Beaufort 12 is T2 on the T-Scale but F1.121 on the F-Scale; while a tornado wind speed of T9 (= B26) becomes F4.761. However, the three wind scales can be uni-fied by either making F-Scale numbers exactly half the magnitude of T-Scale numbers [i.e. F'half = T / 2 = (B / 4) - 4] or by doubling the numbers of this revised version to give integral equivalence with the T-Scale. The result is a decimal formula F'double = T = (B / 2) - 4 named the TF-Scale where TF stands for Tornado Force. This harmonious 10-digit scale has all the criteria needed for world-wide practical effectiveness.

Meaden, G. Terence; Kochev, S.; Kolendowicz, L.; Kosa-Kiss, A.; Marcinoniene, Izolda; Sioutas, Michalis; Tooming, Heino; Tyrrell, John

2007-02-01

398

The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance  

E-print Network

. * Corresponding author. Fax: +1-514-398-8434. E-mail address: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca (S. Lovejoy) #12;between the large and small scales which is not compa- tible with modern scaling analyses or theories (see Lovejoy

Lovejoy, Shaun

399

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.2 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.8 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Rich

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

400

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. There was also type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 17.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance duri

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

1997-01-01

401

Scale in education research: towards a multi-scale methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores some theoretical and methodological problems concerned with scale in education research through a critique of a recent mixed-method project. The project was framed by scale metaphors drawn from the physical and earth sciences and I consider how recent thinking around scale, for example, in ecosystems and human geography might offer helpful points and angles of view on

Andrew Noyes

2012-01-01

402

The Geologic Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains a large, easy to read, detailed geologic time scale for the Phanerozoic Eon (544 million years ago - Present). This is the period of time, also known as an eon, between the end of the Precambrian and today. The Phanerozoic begins with the start of the Cambrian period, 544 million years ago. It encompasses the period of abundant, complex life on Earth. The chart includes the Era, Period or System, and the Epoch or Series and features a brief description of each.

403

Homes scaling and BCS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is argued on the basis of the BCS theory that the zero-T penetration depth satisfies ?-2(0)??Tc (? is the normal state dc conductivity) not only in the extreme dirty limit ?0/??1, but in a broad range of scattering parameters down to ?0/?˜1 (?0 is the zero-T BCS coherence length and ? is the mean free path). Hence, the scaling ?-2(0)??Tc, suggested as a new universal property of superconductors [Dordevic, Basov, and Homes, Sci. Rep.10.1038/srep01713 3, 1713 (2013)], finds a natural explanation within the BCS theory.

Kogan, V. G.

2013-06-01

404

Graphing - Scaling a Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In science, students often start their graphs at an origin other than (0, 0). Also the scales are often very large or very small and variables, other than x and y, are used. The students will need to use breaks in the graph to accommodate the values. For example with the first problem they will want to start the vertical axis at 350, and the horizontal at 0.1000. In the answer key a graph created in Excel gives a general view of the data, however it is not possible to insert the necessary break to indicate that the intersection of the axis in not (0, 0).

2011-01-01

405

MULTIPLE SCALES FOR SUSTAINABLE RESULTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This session will highlight recent research that incorporates the use of multiple scales and innovative environmental accounting to better inform decisions that affect sustainability, resilience, and vulnerability at all scales. Effective decision-making involves assessment at mu...

406

Microburst modelling and scaling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A microburst can be modeled by releasing a volume of fluid that is slightly heavier than the ambient fluid, allowing it to fall onto a horizontal surface. Vorticity develops on the sides of this parcel as it descends and causes it to roll up into a turbulent vortex ring which impinges on the ground. Such a model exhibits many of the features of naturally occurring microbursts which are a hazard to aviation. In this paper this model is achieved experimentally by releasing a volume of salt water into fresh water from a cylindrical dispenser. When care is taken with the release the spreading rate of the surface outflow is measurable and quite repeatable despite the fact that the flow is turbulent. An elementary numerical approximation to this model, based on inviscid vortex dynamics, has also been developed. A scaling law is proposed which allows experiments with different fluid densities to be compared with each other and with the numerical results. More importantly the scaling law makes it possible to compare the model results with real microbursts.

Lundgren, T. S.; Yao, J.; Mansour, N. N.

1992-01-01

407

Spectral multidimensional scaling  

PubMed Central

An important tool in information analysis is dimensionality reduction. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down that play a significant role in recognition and classification tasks. The efficiency of dimension reduction tools is measured in terms of memory and computational complexity, which are usually a function of the number of the given data points. Sparse local operators that involve substantially less than quadratic complexity at one end, and faithful multiscale models with quadratic cost at the other end, make the design of dimension reduction procedure a delicate balance between modeling accuracy and efficiency. Here, we combine the benefits of both and propose a low-dimensional multiscale modeling of the data, at a modest computational cost. The idea is to project the classical multidimensional scaling problem into the data spectral domain extracted from its Laplace–Beltrami operator. There, embedding into a small dimensional Euclidean space is accomplished while optimizing for a small number of coefficients. We provide a theoretical support and demonstrate that working in the natural eigenspace of the data, one could reduce the process complexity while maintaining the model fidelity. As examples, we efficiently canonize nonrigid shapes by embedding their intrinsic metric into , a method often used for matching and classifying almost isometric articulated objects. Finally, we demonstrate the method by exposing the style in which handwritten digits appear in a large collection of images. We also visualize clustering of digits by treating images as feature points that we map to a plane. PMID:24108352

Aflalo, Yonathan; Kimmel, Ron

2013-01-01

408

Large scale collapse testing  

SciTech Connect

The design of deep water pipelines must consider external pressure loading which is applied to the line during construction or in service when the line is evacuated. A collapse failure can occur due to this external pressure alone or external pressure in combination with tension or bending loads which are imparted to the line during construction. Thus, there is an incentive for research to more accurately define the failure envelope for combined external pressure, bending, and tension for offshore pipelines. Previous work at the University of Texas at Austin concentrated on small scale testing and theoretical work. The purpose of the work in this project was to perform large scale tests to verify the previous work, and in particular to test a limited amount of seam welded Double Submerged Arc Welded (DSAW) pipe to compare with widely available seamless data. Deepwater gaslines normally are in the 16-24 in. size range where DSAW and ERW (electric resistance welded) are the only available manufacturing processes. ERW pipe was not studied in this project. Three main types of tests were performed by Stress Engineering Services, Inc. in this project. These were collapse only (16 in. pipe), collapse plus tension (6-5/8 in. pipe), and collapse plus bending (6-5/8 in. pipe). SES designed and had a multi purpose test vessel constructed to accommodate all three types of tests.

Fowler, J.R.; Hormberg, B.; Katsounas, A. (Stress Engineering Services, Inc., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-06-01

409

Scale and Powers of 10  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scale is a unifying concept in science. Whether one is considering the size and scope of the universe, an atom, or anything in-between, conceptual understanding of scale is a prerequisite to understanding. Other phenomena requiring knowledge of scale include geologic time, pH, and maps. Cognitively, most middle school students hold a concrete, incomplete conception of scale. Teachers can facilitate conceptual change to a more abstract conception with help from these resources.

University, Staff A.

2008-03-07

410

The Gains from Vertical Scaling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

2013-01-01

411

Studies with pain rating scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Good correlation has been shown between pain scores derived from 4 different rating scales. The correlation was maintained when presentation of the scales was separated by a series of questions and by physical examination. There is good evidence that the 4 scales are measuring the same underlying pain variable as they calibrate well. There is also evidence that an 11-point

W W Downie; P A Leatham; V M Rhind; V Wright; J A Branco; J A Anderson

1978-01-01

412

Ecological Resilience, Biodiversity, and Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe existing models of the relationship between species diversity and ecological function, and propose a conceptual model that relates species richness, ecological resilience, and scale. We suggest that species interact with scale-dependent sets of ecological structures and processes that determine functional opportunities. We propose that ecologi- cal resilience is generated by diverse, but overlap- ping, function within a scale

Garry Peterson; Craig R. Allen; C. S. Holling

1998-01-01

413

Scaling the atmospheric boundary layer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review scaling regimes of the idealized Atmospheric Boundary Layer. The main emphasis is given on recent findings for stable conditions. We present diagrams in which the scaling regimes are illustrated as a function of the major boundary-layer parameters. A discussion is given on the different properties of the scaling regimes in unstable and stable conditions.

A. A. M. Holtslag; F. T. M. Nieuwstadt

1986-01-01

414

Death Anxiety Scales: A Dialogue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents dialog among David Lester, author of first critical survey of death anxiety measures, developer of scales, and researcher about suicide and fear of death; Donald Templer, Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) creator; and journal editor. Lester and Templer discuss origins, uses, results, limitations, and future of death anxiety scales and research on…

Lester, David; Templer, Donald

1993-01-01

415

Earthquake impact scale  

USGS Publications Warehouse

With the advent of the USGS prompt assessment of global earthquakes for response (PAGER) system, which rapidly assesses earthquake impacts, U.S. and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels and response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake response, an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) is proposed on the basis of two complementary criteria. On the basis of the estimated cost of damage, one is most suitable for domestic events; the other, on the basis of estimated ranges of fatalities, is generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in developing countries. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and associated response levels, are quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response needed after an event through alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1,000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses reaching $1M, $100M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness predominate in countries in which local building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and these impacts lend to prioritization for international response. In contrast, financial and overall societal impacts often trigger the level of response in regions or countries in which prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and resulting fatalities. Any newly devised alert, whether economic- or casualty-based, should be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. Useful alerts should also be both specific (although allowably uncertain) and actionable. In this analysis, an attempt is made at both simple and intuitive color-coded alerting criteria; yet the necessary uncertainty measures by which one can gauge the likelihood for the alert to be over- or underestimated are preserved. The essence of the proposed impact scale and alerting is that actionable loss information is now available in the immediate aftermath of significant earthquakes worldwide on the basis of quantifiable loss estimates. Utilizing EIS, PAGER's rapid loss estimates can adequately recommend alert levels and suggest appropriate response protocols, despite the uncertainties; demanding or awaiting observations or loss estimates with a high level of accuracy may increase the losses. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.

2011-01-01

416

In Brief: Scale model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here's one for Guinness or maybe Ripley: The Worlds's largest scale model of the solar system begins at a museum in Peoria, Ill., and extends geographically as far away as Ecuador and the South Pole. In the model, which was developed by the museum's deputy director Sheldon Schafer, 42 feet equal about 1 million miles. The Sun, which is 36-feet wide, is painted on the dome of the Lakeview Museum's planetarium in Peoria. Mercury, which is 1.5 inches across, can be found at a nearby store; Venus sits in a local bank lobby; Earth is lodged at a gas station; and Mars at a radio station. "The idea is that people will encounter a little bit of astronomy in the walks of their daily lives," Schafer says.

417

In Brief: Scale model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here's one for Guinness or maybe Ripley: The Worlds's largest scale model of the solar system begins at a museum in Peoria, Ill., and extends geographically as far away as Ecuador and the South Pole. In the model, which was developed by the museum's deputy director Sheldon Schafer, 42 feet equal about 1 million miles. The Sun, which is 36-feet wide, is painted on the dome of the Lakeview Museum's planetarium in Peoria. Mercury, which is 1.5 inches across, can be found at a nearby store; Venus sits in a local bank lobby; Earth is lodged at a gas station; and Mars at a radio station. “The idea is that people will encounter a little bit of astronomy in the walks of their daily lives,” Schafer says.

418

Indian scales and inventories  

PubMed Central

This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

Venkatesan, S.

2010-01-01

419

Scale Invariant Cosmology II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmological problem is studied here starting from a metric with a variable scale factor for time and two different ones for space, noted R for ordinary space and S for the extra dimensions. Once R has been obtained from physical principles, one is left for S with a differential equation which can be solved through Lie group analysis and dynamical systems theory, and a frequent use of computer algebra has been made in the ensuing calculations. This leads to a good agreement with the recent observational results relating to distant supernovae. However, the solution obtained for S is particularly simple if spacetime has a dimension at least equal to ten, a result to be compared with those given by superstring or M theories.

Petit, Jean-Pierre; Midy, Pierre

420

Web Geologic Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of California-Berkeley Museum of Paleontology (last mentioned in the June 16, 1995 Scout Report) has recently updated its Web Geologic Time Scale, an online feature that helps users learn about the geologic timeline and explore related museum exhibits. The familiar geologic timeline appears on the main page of the Web site, with hypertext links for each division of time. Every page of the Web Geologic Time Machine site is liberally sprinkled with links to related UCMP Web pages; think of it as a portal to all online information available from the museum. Altogether, this Web site provides a well-organized and comprehensive resource for learning how the planet has changed over time, and would be a great addition to earth or life sciences classroom material for a broad range of grades.

1994-01-01

421

Large-scale cyclogenesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of several major cases of persistent negative height anomalies over the extratropical central North Pacific and eastern North Atlantic regions was investigated. These events were manifested at the surface by the development of large-scale cyclonic circulations and, at upper levels, by the formation of anomalously intense zonal jets. The data for the analyses were obtained from the twice-daily NMC final analyses of Northern Hemisphere sea-level pressure as well as geopotential heights, winds, and temperatures at all standard levels from 1000 mb to 100 mb for the fourteen winter seasons from years 1963-1964 through 1976-1977. The results indicate that, in many cases of cyclogenesis, baroclinic processes are likely to play an important role in the initial developments. At later stages, barotropic processes also provide significant contributions and play a role in the maintenance of the anomalies once they are established.

Dole, Randall M.; Black, Robert X.

1988-01-01

422

Scaled Entropy for Dynamical Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to characterize the complexity of a system with zero entropy we introduce the notions of scaled topological and metric entropies. We allow asymptotic rates of the general form determined by an arbitrary monotonically increasing "scaling" sequence . This covers the standard case of exponential scale corresponding to as well as the cases of zero and infinite entropy. We describe some basic properties of the scaled entropy including the inverse variational principle for the scaled metric entropy. Furthermore, we present some examples from symbolic and smooth dynamics that illustrate that systems with zero entropy may still exhibit various levels of complexity.

Zhao, Yun; Pesin, Yakov

2015-01-01

423

Comparing the theoretical versions of the Beaufort scale, the T-Scale and the Fujita scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

2005 is the bicentenary of the Beaufort Scale and its wind-speed codes: the marine version in 1805 and the land version later. In the 1920s when anemometers had come into general use, the Beaufort Scale was quantified by a formula based on experiment. In the early 1970s two tornado wind-speed scales were proposed: (1) an International T-Scale based on the

G. Terence Meaden; S. Kochev; L. Kolendowicz; A. Kosa-Kiss; Izolda Marcinoniene; Michalis Sioutas; Heino Tooming; John Tyrrell

2007-01-01

424

Understanding Scale: Powers of Ten  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The classic film "Powers of Ten" is often employed to catalyze the building of more accurate conceptions of scale, yet its effectiveness is largely unknown. This study examines the impact of the film on students' concepts of size and scale. Twenty-two middle school students and six science teachers participated. Students completed pre- and post-intervention interviews and a Scale Card Sorting (SCS) task; all students observed the film "Powers of Ten." Experienced teachers' views on the efficacy of the film were assessed through a short written survey. Results showed that viewing the film had a positive influence on students' understandings of powers of ten and scale. Students reported that they had more difficulty with sizes outside of the human scale and found small scales more difficult to conceptualize than large scales. Students' concepts of relative size as well as their ability to accurately match metric sizes in scientific notation to metric scale increased from pre- to post-viewing of the film. Experienced teachers reported that the film was a highly effective tool. Teachers reported that the design of the film that allowed students to move slowly from the human scale to the large and small scales and then quickly back again was effective in laying the foundation for understanding the different scales.

Jones, M. Gail; Taylor, Amy; Minogue, James; Broadwell, Bethany; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Glenda

2007-04-01

425

Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale  

SciTech Connect

Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a

2011-04-15

426

Scale and Scaling in Ecological and Economic Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review various aspects of the notion of scale applied to natural systems, in particular complex adaptive systems. We argue\\u000a that scaling issues are not only crucial from the standpoint of basic science, but also in many applied issues, and discuss\\u000a tools for detecting and dealing with multiple scales, both spatial and temporal. We also suggest that the techniques of

Jérôme Chave; Simon Levin

427

Will Lessons from Small-Scale Social Dilemmas Scale Up?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we ask whether the design principles that have been proposed as ways of solving small- and medium-sized dilemmas\\u000a related to use of resources are applicable at a larger scale. Obviously, these principles do not scale up automatically. On\\u000a the other hand, more hope exists regarding the feasibility of scaling up than is sometimes expressed in the literature

Michael McGinnis; Elinor Ostrom

428

Decline of executive function in a clinical population: age, psychopathology, and test performance on the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB).  

PubMed

This study presents a cross-sectional examination of the age-related executive changes in a sample of adults with a history of psychiatric illness using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. A total of 406 patients, aged 18 to 72 years old, completed executive function tests of working memory, strategic planning, and set shifting. Using current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition criteria, patients were diagnosed with: (a) affective disorders (N = 153), (b) substance-related disorders (N = 112), (c) personality disorders (N = 82), or (d) pervasive developmental disorders (N = 59). Test performances were compared to those of 52 healthy adults. Similar rates of age-related executive decline were found for patients and healthy participants. However, as adults with a history of psychiatric illness started out with significantly lower baseline levels of executive functioning, they may require less time before reaching a critical threshold where functional deficits emerge. Limitations as well as implications for future research were discussed. PMID:25084845

Janssen, Gwenny; van Aken, Loes; De Mey, Hubert; Witteman, Cilia; Egger, Jos

2014-01-01

429

Decision-making deficits in patients diagnosed with disordered gambling using the Cambridge Gambling task: the effects of substance use disorder comorbidity  

PubMed Central

Background Disordered gambling (DG) has often been associated with impaired decision-making abilities, suggesting a dysfunction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Aims To our knowledge, no previous study has accurately considered the effect of substance use disorder (SUD) comorbidity (including nicotine dependence) on decision-making impairments in DG. Methods and Materials We employed the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) to assess a big cohort of patients diagnosed with DG (N = 80) against matched healthy controls (HCs) (N = 108). The cohort included DG patients with nicotine and alcohol dependence, alcohol dependence only and 12 “pure” nonsmokers with only DG diagnosis. Results Pure nonsmoking, nicotine dependent as well as alcoholic DGs with current nicotine dependence, demonstrated a decision making profile, characterized by poor decision-making abilities and failure to make right choices (rational), closely resembling that of patients with vmPFC damage. Discussion This suggests that DGs with and without SUD comorbidity are equally affected in that domain of decision making abilities. Additionally, gambling diagnosis combined with alcohol and nicotine dependence involves a group of gambling patients with a relatively riskier decision making profile, showing that these patients apart from making irrational decisions take also more risks. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for SUD comorbidities with useful implications for future research and therapy. Limitations of the current investigation are discussed. PMID:25161815

Zois, Evangelos; Kortlang, Noreen; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Lemenager, Tagrid; Beutel, Martin; Mann, Karl; Fauth-Bühler, Mira

2014-01-01

430

Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Australian.  

PubMed

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error, CFMT assessment of memory only at short delays, and a face set whose ethnicity is matched to only some Caucasian groups. We develop the "CFMT-Australian" (CFMT-Aus), which complements the CFMT-original by using ethnicity better matched to a different European subpopulation. Results confirm reliability (.88) and validity (convergent, divergent using cars, inversion effects). We show that face ethnicity within a race has subtle but clear effects on face processing even in normal participants (includes cross-over interaction for face ethnicity by perceiver country of origin in distinctiveness ratings). We show that CFMT-Aus clarifies diagnosis of prosopagnosia in 6 previously ambiguous cases. In 3 cases, this appears due to the better ethnic match to prosopagnosics. We also show that face memory at short (<3-min), 20-min, and 24-hr delays taps overlapping processes in normal participants. There is some suggestion that a form of prosopagnosia may exist that is long delay only and/or reflects failure to benefit from face repetition. PMID:22122116

McKone, Elinor; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Palermo, Romina; Wilkinson, Ross B; Rivolta, Davide; Yovel, Galit; Davis, Joshua M; O'Connor, Kirsty B

2011-03-01

431

Tipping the scales.  

PubMed

In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters." PMID:12294553

1998-12-01

432

SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING  

SciTech Connect

Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

G. CANAVAN

2001-02-01

433

Scaling of structural failure  

SciTech Connect

This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01

434

Symposium on Combustion /International/, 16th, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., August 15-20, 1976, Proceedings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aspects of combustion technology in power systems are considered, taking into account a combustion in large boilers, the control of over-all thermal efficiency of combustion heating systems, a comparison of mathematical models of the radiative behavior of a large-scale experimental furnace, a concentric multiannular swirl burner, and the effects of water introduction on diesel engine combustion and emissions. Attention is also given to combustion and related processes in energy production from coal, spray and droplet combustion, soot formation and growth, the kinetics of elementary reactions, flame structure and chemistry, propellant ignition and combustion, fire and explosion research, mathematical modeling, high output combustion systems, turbulent flames and combustion, and ignition, optical, and electrical properties.

1977-01-01

435

Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

2014-12-01

436

Scale Interactions and Galaxy Evolution  

E-print Network

To understand galaxies and their evolution, it is necessary to describe how the different scales interact: how the microscopic physics, such as star formation, or the large scale physics, such as galaxy interactions may modify the galaxy global shapes. The purpose of this review is to point out some general or recent topics related to such scale interactions, both observational and theoretical, which are relevant in the present understanding of galaxies.

Daniel Pfenniger

2002-12-13

437

Optimal scaling of digital controllers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scaling the inputs and outputs of a digital controller is necessary to guarantee that these signals do not exceed the dynamic range of the analog-to-digital, and digital-to-analog converters. This paper gives two optimization problems that can be used to efficiently compute fully parametrized scaling matrices. An example that demonstrates the advantages of fully parametrized scaling over the more conventional diagonal

Daniel E. Viassolo; Mario A. Rotea

1997-01-01

438

AMathematical Model of Scale Perception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. A,hierarchical approach to scale formation in human,perception is applied to musical,scales. The model provides an adequate,mathematical description of the already known,scales and reveals some other new possibilities, in particular, a universal 19-tone musical system. Aformula,for the information difference between ,two probability distributions is employed ,to construct a numerical estimate of a contradiction between two compound,tones. The discordancefunction obtained in

L. V. Avdeev; P. B. Ivanov

1993-01-01

439

Discrete implementations of scale transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scale as a physical quantity is a recently developed concept. The scale transform can be viewed as a special case of the more general Mellin transform and its mathematical properties are very applicable in the analysis and interpretation of the signals subject to scale changes. A number of single-dimensional applications of scale concept have been made in speech analysis, processing of biological signals, machine vibration analysis and other areas. Recently, the scale transform was also applied in multi-dimensional signal processing and used for image filtering and denoising. Discrete implementation of the scale transform can be carried out using logarithmic sampling and the well-known fast Fourier transform. Nevertheless, in the case of the uniformly sampled signals, this implementation involves resampling. An algorithm not involving resampling of the uniformly sampled signals has been derived too. In this paper, a modification of the later algorithm for discrete implementation of the direct scale transform is presented. In addition, similar concept was used to improve a recently introduced discrete implementation of the inverse scale transform. Estimation of the absolute discretization errors showed that the modified algorithms have a desirable property of yielding a smaller region of possible error magnitudes. Experimental results are obtained using artificial signals as well as signals evoked from the temporomandibular joint. In addition, discrete implementations for the separable two-dimensional direct and inverse scale transforms are derived. Experiments with image restoration and scaling through two-dimensional scale domain using the novel implementation of the separable two-dimensional scale transform pair are presented.

Djurdjanovic, Dragan; Williams, William J.; Koh, Christopher K.

1999-11-01

440

Development of a fatigue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract-A self-rating scale was developed to measure the severity of fatigue. Two-hundred and seventy-four new registrations on a general practice list completed a 14.item fatigue scale. In addition, 100 consecutive,attenders,to a general,practice,completed,the fatigue,scale and,the fatigue,item,of the revised,Clinical Interview,Schedule,(CIS-R). These,were,compared,by,the application,of Relative Operating,Characteristic,(ROC) analysis.,Tests,of,internal,consistency,and,principal,components analyses,were,performed,on both,sets of data. The scale was found to be both reliable and valid. There was a

TRUDIE CHALDER; G. BERELOWITZ; TERESA PAWLIKOWSKA; LOUISE WATTS; S. WESSELY; D. WRIGHT; E. P. WALLACE

1993-01-01

441

Proportions - Scaling Up and Down  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Description:Students will investigate the use of linear scaling to enlarge or shrink a variety of objects. Students are lead through a series of hands on activities and then are asked to apply the concepts to some real world situations. Ensure that the students realize that if they scale an object in one direction by a given amount; they must scale the same amount in the other direction. By having the students do the activity in class they can 'see' that scaling in one direction may cause the other to over flow the allowable dimension or under fill it..

2011-01-01

442

Ethnic Differences in Burnout, Coping, and Intervention Acceptability Among Childcare Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined ethnic differences in burnout, coping strategies, and intervention acceptability in childcare professionals. Predictors of burnout also were examined. Participants were 131 (82 Caucasian-American (CA); 49 African-American (AA)) female childcare professionals. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced (COPE) Scale, and an intervention acceptability questionnaire. AA participants reported higher levels of depersonalization

Garret D. Evans; N. Elizabeth Bryant; JulieSarno Owens; Kelly Koukos

2004-01-01

443

Validating Large Scale Networks Using Temporary Local Scale Networks  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The USDA NRCS Soil Climate Analysis Network and NOAA Climate Reference Networks are nationwide meteorological and land surface data networks with soil moisture measurements in the top layers of soil. There is considerable interest in scaling these point measurements to larger scales for validating ...

444

Atmospheric complexity or scale by scale simplicity? S. Lovejoy,1  

E-print Network

Atmospheric complexity or scale by scale simplicity? S. Lovejoy,1 D. Schertzer,2,3 V. Allaire,1 T that weather can be accurately modeled as a cascade process. Citation: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, V. Allaire, T (sparse) networks and aircraft trajectories can themselves be fractal [Lovejoy et al., 1986, 2004; S

Long, Bernard

445

Geostatistical integration of linear coarse scale and fine scale data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building numerical models requires to integrate all available data. In the earth sciences, data typically come from different sources with different volume supports. Some are fine scale quasi-point support, such as well or core data; others are coarse scale data averaged over large block support, such as remote sensing and seismic travel time data. Both point and block support data

Yongshe Liu

2007-01-01

446

INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING BATCH SCALES. SERIES OF FIVE SCALES WITH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING BATCH SCALES. SERIES OF FIVE SCALES WITH SIX DIFFERENT MATERIALS. MIX SIFTED DOWN FROM SILOS ABOVE. INGREDIENTS: SAND, SODA ASH, DOLOMITE LIMESTONE, NEPHELINE SYENITE, SALT CAKE. - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Batch Plant, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

447

Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1  

E-print Network

Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

Lovejoy, Shaun

448

Drift Scale THM Model  

SciTech Connect

This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a drift to transport any exposed radionuclides out of the drift to the groundwater below, and eventually to people within the accessible environment. Absent sufficient water, radionuclides cannot be transported and there would be no significant health effect on people, even if radioactive waste containers were damaged or corroded to such an extent that radionuclides were exposed to water.

J. Rutqvist

2004-10-07

449

Scaling Properties of Aftershock Sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work the scaling properties of several aftershock sequences in California are studied using the framework of scaling analysis. The occurrence of aftershocks is an outcome of complex nonlinear threshold dynamics in the brittle part of the Earth's crust. This dynamics is a combined effect of different processes taking place in a highly heterogeneous media over a wide range

R. Shcherbakov; G. Yakovlev; D. L. Turcotte; J. B. Rundle

2005-01-01

450

Children's Scale Errors with Tools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children sometimes make "scale errors," attempting to interact with tiny object replicas as though they were full size. Here, we demonstrate that instrumental tools provide special insight into the origins of scale errors and, moreover, into the broader nature of children's purpose-guided reasoning and behavior with objects. In Study 1, 1.5- to…

Casler, Krista; Eshleman, Angelica; Greene, Kimberly; Terziyan, Treysi

2011-01-01

451

Spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central goal in ecology is to understand the spatial scaling of biodiversity. Patterns in the spatial distribu- tion of organisms provide important clues about the underlying mechanisms that structure ecological com- munities and are central to setting conservation priori- ties. Although microorganisms comprise much of Earth's biodiversity, little is known about their biodiver- sity scaling relationships relative to that

Jessica Green; Brendan J. M. Bohannan

2006-01-01

452

The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

2004-01-01

453

Scaling Theorems for Zero Crossings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We characterize some properties of the zero crossings of the Laplacian of signals¿in particular images¿filtered with linear filters, as a function of the scale of the filter (extending recent work by Witkin [16]). We prove that in any dimension the only filter that does not create generic zero crossings as the scale increases is the Gaussian. This result can be

Alan L. Yuille; Tomaso A. Poggio

1986-01-01

454

The Satisfaction With Life Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports the development and validation of a scale to measure global life satisfaction, the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS). Among the various components of subjective well-being, the SWLS is narrowly focused to assess global life satisfaction and does niot tap related constructs such as positive affect or loneliness. The SWLS is shown to have favorable psychometric properties, including

Ed Diener; ROBERT A. EMMONS; Randy Larsen; Sharon Griffin

1985-01-01

455

Involvement in Subject Learning Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Involvement in Subject Learning Scale (ISLS) was developed and validated as an educational outcome measure to be used in assessing higher education quality. The origins and development of the scale, its factor analysis, potential applications, limitations, and pilot use in France and Quebec (Canada) are described. The instrument is appended.…

Bujold, Neree; Saint-Pierre, Henri; Bhushan, Vidya

1997-01-01

456

Automatic scaling of digital ionograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new system has been devised to automatically scale digital ordinary-ray ionograms. The system has been developed for use at midlatitudes and has been trained on a full set of ionograms that are typical of the region. This paper describes the stages adopted in forming, recognizing, and scaling traces from the various ionospheric layers. Examples of the output available with

Matthew W. Fox; Craig Blundell

1989-01-01

457

A Scale of Mobbing Impacts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research was to develop the Mobbing Impacts Scale and to examine its validity and reliability analyses. The sample of study consisted of 509 teachers from Sakarya. In this study construct validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliabilities and item analysis of the scale were examined. As a result of factor analysis for…

Yaman, Erkan

2012-01-01

458

Specifying spectra for musical scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensory consonance and dissonance of musical intervals is dependent on the spectrum of the tones. The dissonance curve gives a measure of this perception over a range of intervals, and a musical scale is said to be related to a sound with a given spectrum if minima of the dissonance curve occur at the scale steps. While it is

William A. Setharesa

459

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Severity Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) severity scale has been developed to provide an ordinal staging system and a means of rapid functional assessment for patients with ALS. The scale allows an examiner to evaluate the symptoms of ALS numerically in four categories that describe speech, swallowing, lower extremity, and upper extremity abilities. These scores, combined with a vital capacity measured

Allen D. Hillel; Robert M. Miller; Kathryn Yorkston; Evelyn McDonald; Forbes H. Norris; Nancy Konikow

1989-01-01

460

Multi-scale Material Appearance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling and rendering the appearance of materials is important for a diverse range of applications of computer graphics - from automobile design to movies and cultural heritage. The appearance of materials varies considerably at different scales, posing significant challenges due to the sheer complexity of the data, as well the need to maintain inter-scale consistency constraints. This thesis presents a series of studies around the modeling, rendering and editing of multi-scale material appearance. To efficiently render material appearance at multiple scales, we develop an object-space precomputed adaptive sampling method, which precomputes a hierarchy of view-independent points that preserve multi-level appearance. To support bi-scale material appearance design, we propose a novel reflectance filtering algorithm, which rapidly computes the large-scale appearance from small-scale details, by exploiting the low-rank structures of Bidirectional Visible Normal Distribution Functions and pre-rotated Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions in the matrix formulation of the rendering algorithm. This approach can guide the physical realization of appearance, as well as the modeling of real-world materials using very sparse measurements. Finally, we present a bi-scale-inspired high-quality general representation for material appearance described by Bidirectional Texture Functions. Our representation is at once compact, easily editable, and amenable to efficient rendering.

Wu, Hongzhi

461

Rating scales for musician's dystonia  

PubMed Central

Musician's dystonia (MD) is a focal adult-onset dystonia most commonly involving the hand. It has much greater relative prevalence than non-musician’s focal hand dystonias, exhibits task specificity at the level of specific musical passages, and is a particularly difficult form of dystonia to treat. For most MD patients, the diagnosis confirms the end of their music performance careers. Research on treatments and pathophysiology is contingent upon measures of motor function abnormalities. In this review, we comprehensively survey the literature to identify the rating scales used in MD and the distribution of their use. We also summarize the extent to which the scales have been evaluated for their clinical utility, including reliability, validity, sensitivity, specificity to MD, and practicality for a clinical setting. Out of 135 publications, almost half (62) included no quantitative measures of motor function. The remaining 73 studies used a variety of choices from among 10 major rating scales. Most used subjective scales involving either patient or clinician ratings. Only 25% (18) of the studies used objective scales. None of the scales has been completely and rigorously evaluated for clinical utility. Whether studies involved treatments or pathophysiologic assays, there was a heterogeneous choice of rating scales used with no clear standard. As a result, the collective interpretive value of those studies is limited because the results are confounded by measurement effects. We suggest that the development and widespread adoption of a new clinically useful rating scale is critical for accelerating basic and clinical research in MD. PMID:23884039

Berque, Patrice; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart; Frucht, Steven J.

2013-01-01

462

Scaling of Fractured Rock Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fractured rocks exhibit a hierarchical structure which renders their attributes scale-dependent. Published data indicate a tendency for fracture length scales to be distributed according to a power law, average fracture aperture to be given by a power of the fracture length scale, and fracture density as well as log permeability to exhibit power-law scaling. We illustrate such scaling on log air permeabilities measured on a nominal support scale of 1-m along vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a 30×20×30 m3 block of unsaturated fractured tuff near Superior, Arizona. Log permeability sample structure functions of order q scale as powers ?(q) of separation scale (lag) over limited ranges of lags. A procedure known as extended self-similarity (ESS) extends power-law scaling to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave) functional relationship between ? and q. Whereas the literature associates such nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, our analysis shows that this behavior is consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to truncated (monofractal) fractional Brownian motion (tfBm). While the frequency distribution of the log permeability data appears to be Gaussian, those of increments corresponding to small lags exhibit heavy tails consistent with such sub-Gaussian fields. The same scaling theory allowed us to develop previously a consistent statistical relationship between fracture length, aperture, density and log permeability. In particular, for fractures having a given length scale L, variances of density and log permeability that exhibit power-law scaling grow as positive powers of L and decrease as negative powers of the smallest length scale sampled. For nominal parameters that are most representative of published values inferred from field data, the variance of fracture densities increases quadratically with L and that of log permeability increases as L3/2; for a given L the variance of log permeability is proportional to that of fracture density, the constant of proportionality being a (positive, zero or negative) power of L, and the standard deviation of log permeability is proportional to a positive power ? of the average aperture where 0

Neuman, S. P.; Guadagnini, A.; Riva, M.

2012-12-01

463

GUT Scale Fermion Mass Ratios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a series of recent works related to group theoretical factors from GUT symmetry breaking which lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton Yukawa couplings at the unification scale. New predictions for the GUT scale ratios y?/ys, y?/yb and yt/yb in particular are shown and compared to experimental data. For this comparison it is important to include possibly large supersymmetric threshold corrections. Due to this reason the structure of the fermion masses at the GUT scale depends on TeV scale physics and makes GUT scale physics testable at the LHC. We also discuss how this new predictions might lead to predictions for mixing angles by discussing the example of the recently measured last missing leptonic mixing angle ?13 making this new class of GUT models also testable in neutrino experiments.

Spinrath, Martin

2014-10-01

464

Important Scaling Parameters for Testing Model-Scale Helicopter Rotors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation into the effects of aerodynamic and aeroelastic scaling parameters on model scale helicopter rotors has been conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The effect of varying Reynolds number, blade Lock number, and structural elasticity on rotor performance has been studied and the performance results are discussed herein for two different rotor blade sets at two rotor advance ratios. One set of rotor blades were rigid and the other set of blades were dynamically scaled to be representative of a main rotor design for a utility class helicopter. The investigation was con-densities permits the acquisition of data for several Reynolds and Lock number combinations.

Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

1998-01-01

465

Water-quality conditions, and constituent loads and yields in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2005–07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of ongoing development in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply has the potential to be affected by a wide variety of contaminants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1997) through continuous monitoring and discrete sample collection and, since 2004, through systematic collection of streamwater samples during base-flow and stormflow conditions at five primary sampling stations in the drinking-water source area. Four primary sampling stations are on small tributaries in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins; the fifth primary sampling station is on the main stem of Stony Brook and drains about 93 percent of the Cambridge drinking-water source area. Water samples also were collected at six secondary sampling stations, including Fresh Pond Reservoir, the final storage reservoir for the raw water supply. Storm runoff and base-flow concentrations of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of streamflow and specific conductance for six monitoring stations, which include the five primary sampling stations. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. These data also were used to describe how streamwater quality is affected by various watershed characteristics and provide information to guide future watershed management. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), caffeine, and a suite of 59 polar pesticides. Values of physical properties and constituent concentrations varied widely, particularly in samples from tributaries. Median concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4 in samples collected in the Hobbs Brook Basin (39.8, 392, 207, and 21.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively) were higher than those for the Stony Brook Basin (17.8, 87.7, 49.7, and 14.7 mg/L, respectively). These differences in major ion concentrations are likely related to the low percentages of developed land and impervious area in the Stony Brook Basin. Concentrations of dissolved Cl and Na in samples, and those estimated from continuous records of specific conductance (particularly during base flow), often were greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking-water guideline for Cl (250 mg/L), the chronic aquatic-life guideline for Cl (230 mg/L), and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs drinking-water guideline for Na (20 mg/L). Mean annual flow-weighted concentrations of Ca, Cl, and Na were generally positively correlated with the area of roadway land use in the subbasins. Correlations between mean annual concentrations of Ca and SO4 in base flow and total roadway, total impervious, and commercial-industrial land uses were statistically significant. Concentrations of TN (range of 0.42 to 5.13 mg/L in all subbasins) and TP (range of 0.006 to 0.80 mg/L in all subbasins) in tributary samples did not differ substantially between the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. Concentrations of TN and TP in samples collected during water years 2004–07 exceeded proposed reference concentrations of 0.57 and 0.024 mg/L, in 94 and 56 percent of the samples, respectively. Correlations between annual flow-weighted concentrations of TN and percentages of recreational land use and water-body area were statistically significant; however, no significant relation was found between TP and available land-use information. The volume of streamflow affected water-quality conditions at the pri

Smith, Kirk P.

2013-01-01

466

Gelation on the microscopic scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Particle-tracking methods are used to study gelation in a colloidal suspension of Laponite clay particles. We track the motion of small fluorescent polystyrene spheres added to the suspension, and obtain the micron-scale viscous and elastic moduli of the material from their mean-squared displacement. The fluorescent spheres move subdiffusively due to the microstructure of the suspension, with the diffusive exponent decreasing from close to one at early times to near zero as the material gels. The particle-tracking data show that the system becomes more heterogeneous on the microscopic scale as gelation proceeds. We also determine the bulk-scale moduli using small-amplitude oscillatory shear rheometry. Both the macroscopic and microscopic moduli increase with time, and on both scales we observe a transition from a primarily viscous fluid to an elastic gel. We find that the gel point, determined as the time at which the viscous and elastic moduli are equal, is length-scale dependent—gelation occurs earlier on the bulk scale than on the microscopic scale.

Oppong, Felix K.; Coussot, P.; de Bruyn, John R.

2008-08-01

467

A scaling theory for linear systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A theory of scaling for rational (transfer) functions in terms of transformation groups is developed. Two different four-parameter scaling groups which play natural roles in studying linear systems are identified and the effect of scaling on Fisher information and related statistical measures in system identification are studied. The scalings considered include change of time scale, feedback, exponential scaling, magnitude scaling, etc. The scaling action of the groups studied is tied to the geometry of transfer functions in a rather strong way as becomes apparent in the examination of the invariants of scaling. As a result, the scaling process also provides new insight into the parameterization question for rational functions.

Brockett, R. W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

1980-01-01

468

Classical scale invariance, the electroweak scale, and vector dark matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model in which a dark, non-Abelian gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Higgs portal couplings between the dark and standard model sectors provide an origin for the Higgs mass squared parameter and, hence, the electroweak scale. We find that choices for model parameters exist in which the dark gauge multiplet is viable as dark matter.

Carone, Christopher D.; Ramos, Raymundo

2013-09-01

469

Cloud scaling from the meter to the basin scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth's atmospheric clouds display tremendous variety in form and scale. From fragmentary small cumulus elements to enormous sheets of clouds that swathe much of the midlatitude oceans, clouds are at once both ubiquitous and transitory. Spaceborne observing of clouds is allowing us to expand our appreciation of the horizontal scales of clouds. Here, I will present analyses showing remarkable scale invariance of cloud size distributions from both passive and active spaceborne remote sensing, and demonstrate how clouds of all sizes contribute signficiantly to the global cloud cover and energy balance. Cloud horizontal size distributions from near-global passive satellite data, from aircraft, and from a global high-resolution numerical weather prediction model, over the scale range 0.1-8000 km, are shown to be well-represented using a single power law relationship with an exponent of ? =1.66±0.04 from 0.1 to 1500~km or more. At scales longer than 1500~km there is a statistically significant scale break with fewer very large clouds than expected from the power law. Regionally, slight deviations from a power law slope of 2 in the cloud size distribution significantly affect which clouds are most important. Over the tropical trades and over most land areas, spaceborne lidar is used to show that small clouds (<1km) contribute most to cloud cover. Most clouds in these regions are shown to be optically thin or broken even at the resolution of the lidar (90 m), which calls into question the utility of cloud fractional coverage. Also remarkable is that the observed behavior is more or less consistent with a simple power law scaling of cloud optical depth. Suggestions will be offered for how to exploit the observed cloud scaling behavior for use in numerical models.

Wood, R.

2012-12-01

470

Estimating Plot Scale Impacts on Watershed Scale Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over recent decades, land and resource use as well as climate change have been implicated in reduced ecosystem services (ie: high quality water yield, biodiversity, agricultural and forest products). The prediction of ecosystem services expected under future land use decisions and changing climate conditions has become increasingly important. Complex policy and management decisions require the integration of physical, economic, and social data over several scales to assess effects on water resources and ecology. Field-based meteorology, hydrology, biology, soil physics, plant production, solute and sediment transport, economic, and social behavior data were measured in a catchment of South Korea. A variety of models (Erosion-3D, HBV-Light, VS2DH, Hydrus, PIXGRO, DNDC, and Hydrogeosphere) are being used to simulate plot and field scale measurements within the catchment. Results from each of the local-scale models provide identification of sensitive, local-scale parameters which are then used as inputs into a large-scale watershed model. The experimental field data throughout the catchment was integrated with the spatially-distributed SWAT2005 model. Typically, macroscopic homogeneity and average effective model parameters are assumed when upscaling local-scale heterogeneous measurements to the watershed. The approach of our study was that the range in local-scale model parameter results can be used to define the sensitivity and uncertainty in the large-scale watershed model. The field-based and modeling framework described is being used to develop scenarios to examine spatial and temporal changes in land use practices and climatic effects on water quantity, water quality, and sediment transport. Development of accurate modeling scenarios requires understanding the social relationship between individual and policy driven land management practices and the value of sustainable resources.

Shope, C. L.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Peiffer, S.; Huwe, B.

2010-12-01

471

Gravitation on large scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sample of dwarf and spiral galaxies with extended rotation curves is analysed, assuming that the fraction of dark matter is small. The objective of the paper is to prepare a framework for a theory, based on fundamental principles, that would give fits of the same quality as the phenomenology of dark halos. The following results are obtained: 1) The geodesics of massive systems with low density (Class I galaxies) can be described by the metric ds^2 = b^{-1}(r)dr^2 - b(r)dt^2 + r^2 dOmega^2 where b(r) = 1 - {2 over c^2}({{GM} over r} + gamma_f M^{1/2}) In this expression Gamma_f is a new fundamental constant which has been deduced from rotation curves of galaxies with circular velocity V_c^2 >= 2 {{GM} over r} for all r 2) The above metric is deduced from the conformal invariant metric ds^2 = B^{-1}(r)dr^2 - B(r)dt^2 + r^2 dOmega^2 where B(r) = 1 - {2 over c^2}({{GM} over r} + Gamma_f M^{1/2} + {1 over 3} {Gamma_f^2 over G}r) through a linear transform, u, of the linear special group SL(2, R) 3) The term {2 over c^2}Gamma_f M^{1/2} accounts for the difference between the observed rotation velocity and the Newtonian velocity. The term {2 over {3c^2}}{Gamma_f^2 over G}r is interpreted as a scale invariance between systems of different masses and sizes. 4) The metric B is a vacuum solution around a mass M deduced from the least action principle applied to the unique action I_a = -2 a int (-g)^{1/2} [R_{mu kappa}R^{ mu kappa} - 1/3(Ralphaalpha)^2] dx^4 built with the conformal Weyl tensor 5) For galaxies such that there is a radius, r_0, at which {{GM} over r_0} = Gamma M^{1/2} (Class II), the term Gamma M^{1/2} might be confined by the Newtonian potential yielding stationary solutions. 6) The analysed rotation curves of Class II galaxies are indeed well described with metrics of the form b(r) = 1 - {2 over c^2}({{GM} over r} + (n + 1) Gamma_0 M^{1/2}) where n is an integer and Gamma_0 = {1 over the square root of 3}Gamma_f 7) The effective potential is determined and found to be E(Gamma, r) = {Gamma^2 over G}r 8) A quantized model is deduced from a Schrodinger-type equation - {{D^2} {{d^2 Psi(r)} over {dr^2}}} = {[E - {{G M} over r}] Psi(r)} where D^2 is the product of the energy Gamma M^{1/2} by the square of the radius r where {{G M} over r} = {Gamma_f M^{1/2}}. The boundary conditions are given by Psi (0) = 0 and the effective potential 9) The data are in agreement with the hypothesis of quantization, but that hypothesis is not proved because, the mass-to-light ratio being a ''free'' variable, it is always possible to shift a Gamma-curve out of its best ''energy level''. However, if one moves a Gamma-fit from an ''energy level'' to the next, the fitting of the curve becomes clearly poorer. 10) The Newtonian mass-to-light ratios of Class I galaxies range from ~7 to ~75. The mass-to-light ratios of the same objects deduced from the Gamma-dynamics are reduced to 1.1 <= Mdyn/L <= 7.4. For Class II galaxies, the range of the Newtonian mass-to-light ratios of the sample is 10 <= M_{lum+dark}^N/L <= 40. It is reduced to 1.7 <= Mdyn/L <= 4.2 when using the quantized version of the Gamma-dynamics. It is approximately 3.5 M_odot/L_odot for Sb galaxies and 2 M_odot/L_odot for Sc galaxies. 11) None of the Gamma-fits are poorer than the models with dark halos of the reference articles. The Gamma-dynamics is sensitive to the integrated mass through the term Gamma M^{1/2}, and to the mass and density through the Newtonian term {G M} over r. This kind of coupling is particularly efficient in galaxies like NGC 1560 whose rotation curve shows conspicuous structure.

Giraud, E.

472

A new scale for measuring insomnia: the Bergen Insomnia Scale.  

PubMed

A new scale for the measurement of insomnia, the Bergen Insomnia Scale, was constructed on the basis of current formal and clinical diagnostic criteria for insomnia. There are six items, of which the first three pertain to sleep onset, maintenance, and early morning wakening insomnia, respectively. The last three items refer to not feeling adequately rested, experiencing daytime impairment, and being dissatisfied with current sleep. This scale was validated in three samples, 320 students, 2645 community persons, and 225 patients. Cronbach alphas in the three samples were .79, .87, and .80, respectively. The 2-wk. test-retest reliability for students was .77. In the student and the patient samples, a two-factor solution was found, nocturnal symptoms and daytime symptoms, but in the community sample, a one-factor solution was found. The Bergen Insomnia Scale discriminated well between the patient sample and the other two. In all three, values of convergent and discriminative validity in relation to other self-report measures were good, as well as in relation to polysomnographic data for patients. It is concluded that the Bergen Insomnia Scale has good psychometric properties. It is one of very few insomnia scales which provide normative data for comparisons and which has been validated against subjective as well as polysomnographic data. PMID:19235401

Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjorn; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Sivertsen, Børge; Hjørnevik, Mari; Morin, Charles M

2008-12-01

473

Space Math: Image Scale Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This booklet contains 11 problems and nine âExtra for Expertsâ challenges that require the student to determine the scale of an astronomical image involving the lunar surface, Mars, planets, stars and galaxies. With a millimeter ruler, students use provided textual information to determine the image scale (e.g. kilometers per millimeter) and then identify the smallest and largest features in the images according to their actual physical sizes. These problems involve measurement, dividing whole numbers, decimal mathematics, and scaling principles. (8.5 x11, 28 pages, 11 color images, PDF file)

Odenwald, Sten

2008-09-01

474

Scaling law in thermal phenomena  

E-print Network

In this paper the scaling law for the relaxation times in thermal phenomena is investigated. It is shown that dependent on the value of the parameter K=E/m(c\\alpha)^2,where E is the energy which is delivered to the system, m is the parton mass and \\alpha=1/137 for electromagnetic interaction and \\alpha=0.16 for strong interaction respectively, heat transport is diffusive, for K1. For the system with N partons the relaxation time is scaled as \\tau^N\\to N (\\hbar/(mc\\alpha)^2). Key words: Thermal phenomena, scaling

M. Kozlowski; J. Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-10-29

475

Logarithms and the Richter Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson involves using logarithms as used in the Richter Scale, which identifies the magnitude of earthquakes. The connection between basic exponential and logarithmic functions is emphasized. The activity includes assessment questions for students.

2011-01-25

476

Constructing cities, deconstructing scaling laws  

PubMed Central

Cities can be characterized and modelled through different urban measures. Consistency within these observables is crucial in order to advance towards a science of cities. Bettencourt et al. have proposed that many of these urban measures can be predicted through universal scaling laws. We develop a framework to consistently define cities, using commuting to work and population density thresholds, and construct thousands of realizations of systems of cities with different boundaries for England and Wales. These serve as a laboratory for the scaling analysis of a large set of urban indicators. The analysis shows that population size alone does not provide us enough information to describe or predict the state of a city as previously proposed, indicating that the expected scaling laws are not corroborated. We found that most urban indicators scale linearly with city size, regardless of the definition of the urban boundaries. However, when nonlinear correlations are present, the exponent fluctuates considerably. PMID:25411405

Arcaute, Elsa; Hatna, Erez; Ferguson, Peter; Youn, Hyejin; Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael

2015-01-01

477

Fluid dynamics: Swimming across scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The myriad creatures that inhabit the waters of our planet all swim using different mechanisms. Now, a simple relation links key physical observables of underwater locomotion, on scales ranging from millimetres to tens of metres.

Baumgart, Johannes; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

2014-10-01

478

Angles, scales and parametric renormalization  

E-print Network

We decompose renormalized Feynman rules according to the scale and angle dependence of amplitudes. We use parametric representations such that the resulting amplitudes can be studied in algebraic geometry.

Francis Brown; Dirk Kreimer

2011-12-06

479

Scale Length of Disk Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a part of a Euro-VO research initiative, we have undertaken a programme aimed at studying the scale length of 54909 Sa-Sd spiral galaxies from the SDSS DR6 catalogue. We have retrieved u, g, r, i, z-band images for all galaxies in order to derive the light profiles. We also calculate asymmetry parameters to select non-disturbed disks for which we will derive exponential disk scale lengths. As images in different bands probe different optical depths and stellar populations, it is likely that a derived scale length value should depend on waveband, and our goal is to use the scale length variations with band pass, inclination, galaxy type, redshift, and surface brightness, in order to better understand the nature of spiral galaxies.

Fathi, K.; Allen, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Peletier, R.

2009-07-01

480

Constructing cities, deconstructing scaling laws.  

PubMed

Cities can be characterized and modelled through different urban measures. Consistency within these observables is crucial in order to advance towards a science of cities. Bettencourt et al. have proposed that many of these urban measures can be predicted through universal scaling laws. We develop a framework to consistently define cities, using commuting to work and population density thresholds, and construct thousands of realizations of systems of cities with different boundaries for England and Wales. These serve as a laboratory for the scaling analysis of a large set of urban indicators. The analysis shows that population size alone does not provide us enough information to describe or predict the state of a city as previously proposed, indicating that the expected scaling laws are not corroborated. We found that most urban indicators scale linearly with city size, regardless of the definition of the urban boundaries. However, when nonlinear correlations are present, the exponent fluctuates considerably. PMID:25411405

Arcaute, Elsa; Hatna, Erez; Ferguson, Peter; Youn, Hyejin; Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael

2015-01-01

481

Scaling behavior of threshold epidemics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model for the spread of an infectious disease. In this stochastic process, there are two competing mechanism: infection and recovery. Susceptible individuals may contract the disease from infected individuals, while infected ones recover from the disease at a constant rate and are never infected again. Our focus is the behavior at the epidemic threshold where the rates of the infection and recovery processes balance. In the infinite population limit, we establish analytically scaling rules for the time-dependent distribution functions that characterize the sizes of the infected and the recovered sub-populations. Using heuristic arguments, we also obtain scaling laws for the size and duration of the epidemic outbreaks as a function of the total population. We perform numerical simulations to verify the scaling predictions and discuss the consequences of these scaling laws for near-threshold epidemic outbreaks.

Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

2012-05-01

482

Scaling analysis of transient heating  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This problem is a simple case designed to show the power of scaling analysis to estimate the behavior of variables of interest without doing a detailed analysis. Here, internal heat generation heats a square part and the student is asked to find the dependence of the maximum temperature on time. The use of a scaling analysis encourages the student to think about the physics of the problem more than just solving the differential equation.

Krane, Matthew J.

2008-10-14

483

Inflation in the scaling limit  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the stochastic dynamics of the/ital inflaton/ for a wide class of potentials leading either tochaotic or to power-law inflation.At late times the system enters a /ital scaling/ /ital regime/where macroscopic order sets in: the field distribution sharply peaksaround the classical slow-rollover configuration and curvature perturbationsoriginate with a non-Gaussian scale-invariant statistics.

Matarrese, S.; Ortolan, A.; Lucchin, F.

1989-07-15

484

Gray-Scale Atom Holography  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gray-scale photographic image of atoms has been generated by usinga computer-designed thin-film hologram. An ultra-cold neon atomic beamin the 1s3 state was transmitted through a thin-film binary hologram made of SiN4 and generated a pattern of atoms on amicro-channel plate detector. The designand the quality evaluation of the hologram for gray-scale picturesare discussed theoretically. The validity of the theoretical

Tetsuo Kishimoto; Jun'ichi Fujita; Satoru Mitake; Fujio Shimizu

1999-01-01

485

Scaling issues for biodiversity protection  

SciTech Connect

Environmental heterogeneity, in both space and time, has been important in the evolution and maintenance of biodiversity. Moreover, this heterogeneity is hierarchical in nature. Differences occur between biomes, between landscapes. Thus, hierarchical patterns of heterogeneity are a consequence of the the complexity within ecological communities, and the maintenance of biodiversity means the preservation of this complexity. Natural landscapes are dynamic systems that exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity. However, the exploitative nature of human activity tends to simplify landscapes (Krummel et al. 1987). The challenge of preserving biodiversity in managed landscapes is to incorporate natural levels of spatial and temporal heterogeneity into management schemes. The concept of scale has emerged as an important topic among ecologists that recognize the role of heterogeneity in natural ecosystems. Subjects related to scale such as grain (level of detail) and extent (size of area or duration of time) are frequently used to determine the appropriate interpretation of ecological data. Likewise, scale is important when applying ecological principles to biodiversity protection and conservation. The scale of a conservation endeavor affects the strategy involved, realistic goals, and probability of success. For instance, the spatial extent of a reserve system may be determined, for better or worse, by biogeography, distribution of surviving populations, political boundaries, or fiscal constraints. Our objectives are to: emphasize the importance of natural patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity, encourage a broader-scale perspective for conservation efforts, and illustrate the interaction between landscape-level heterogeneity and organism-based scales of resource utilization with a simulation experiment.

Pearson, S.M.; Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; O'Neill, R.V.

1992-01-01

486

Scaling issues for biodiversity protection  

SciTech Connect

Environmental heterogeneity, in both space and time, has been important in the evolution and maintenance of biodiversity. Moreover, this heterogeneity is hierarchical in nature. Differences occur between biomes, between landscapes. Thus, hierarchical patterns of heterogeneity are a consequence of the the complexity within ecological communities, and the maintenance of biodiversity means the preservation of this complexity. Natural landscapes are dynamic systems that exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity. However, the exploitative nature of human activity tends to simplify landscapes (Krummel et al. 1987). The challenge of preserving biodiversity in managed landscapes is to incorporate natural levels of spatial and temporal heterogeneity into management schemes. The concept of scale has emerged as an important topic among ecologists that recognize the role of heterogeneity in natural ecosystems. Subjects related to scale such as grain (level of detail) and extent (size of area or duration of time) are frequently used to determine the appropriate interpretation of ecological data. Likewise, scale is important when applying ecological principles to biodiversity protection and conservation. The scale of a conservation endeavor affects the strategy involved, realistic goals, and probability of success. For instance, the spatial extent of a reserve system may be determined, for better or worse, by biogeography, distribution of surviving populations, political boundaries, or fiscal constraints. Our objectives are to: emphasize the importance of natural patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity, encourage a broader-scale perspective for conservation efforts, and illustrate the interaction between landscape-level heterogeneity and organism-based scales of resource utilization with a simulation experiment.

Pearson, S.M.; Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; O`Neill, R.V.

1992-08-01

487

SETI and astrobiology: The Rio Scale and the London Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The public reaction to a discovery, the character of the corresponding risk communication, as well as the possible impact on science and society all depend on the character of the phenomenon discovered, on the method of discovery, on the distance to the phenomenon and, last but not least, on the reliability of the announcement itself. The Rio Scale - proposed together with Jill Tarter just a decade ago at an IAA symposium in Rio de Janeiro - attempts to quantify the relative importance of such a “low probability, high consequence event”, namely the announcement of an ETI discovery. After the publication of the book “The Eerie Silence” by Paul Davies it is necessary to control how the recently suggested possible “technosignatures” or “technomarkers” mentioned in this book could be evaluated by the Rio Scale. The new London Scale, proposed at the Royal Society meeting in January 2010, in London, is a similar attempt to quantify the impact of an announcement regarding the discovery of ET life on an analogous ordinal scale between zero and ten. Here again the new concept of a “shadow biosphere” raised in this book deserves a special attention since a “weird form of life” found on Earth would not necessarily have an extraterrestrial origin, nevertheless it might be an important discovery in itself. Several arguments are presented that methods, aims and targets of “search for ET life” and “search for ET intelligence” are recently converging. The new problem is raised whether a unification of these two scales is necessary as a consequence of the convergence of the two subjects. Finally, it is suggested that experts in social sciences should take the structure of the respective scales into consideration when investigating case by case the possible effects on the society of such discoveries.

Almár, Iván

2011-11-01

488

Galaxy clustering on large scales.  

PubMed Central

I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

Efstathiou, G

1993-01-01

489

Featured Invention: Laser Scaling Device  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In September 2003, NASA signed a nonexclusive license agreement with Armor Forensics, a subsidiary of Armor Holdings, Inc., for the laser scaling device under the Innovative Partnerships Program. Coupled with a measuring program, also developed by NASA, the unit provides crime scene investigators with the ability to shoot photographs at scale without having to physically enter the scene, analyzing details such as bloodspatter patterns and graffiti. This ability keeps the scene's components intact and pristine for the collection of information and evidence. The laser scaling device elegantly solved a pressing problem for NASA's shuttle operations team and also provided industry with a useful tool. For NASA, the laser scaling device is still used to measure divots or damage to the shuttle's external tank and other structures around the launchpad. When the invention also met similar needs within industry, the Innovative Partnerships Program provided information to Armor Forensics for licensing and marketing the laser scaling device. Jeff Kohler, technology transfer agent at Kennedy, added, "We also invited a representative from the FBI's special photography unit to Kennedy to meet with Armor Forensics and the innovator. Eventually the FBI ended up purchasing some units. Armor Forensics is also beginning to receive interest from DoD [Department of Defense] for use in military crime scene investigations overseas."

Dunn, Carol Anne

2008-01-01

490

Visions of Atomic Scale Tomography  

SciTech Connect

A microscope, by definition, provides structural and analytical information about objects that are too small to see with the unaided eye. From the very first microscope, efforts to improve its capabilities and push them to ever-finer length scales have been pursued. In this context, it would seem that the concept of an ultimate microscope would have received much attention by now; but has it really ever been defined? Human knowledge extends to structures on a scale much finer than atoms, so it might seem that a proton-scale microscope or a quark-scale microscope would be the ultimate. However, we argue that an atomic-scale microscope is the ultimate for the following reason: the smallest building block for either synthetic structures or natural structures is the atom. Indeed, humans and nature both engineer structures with atoms, not quarks. So far as we know, all building blocks (atoms) of a given type are identical; it is the assembly of the building blocks that makes a useful structure. Thus, would a microscope that determines the position and identity of every atom in a structure with high precision and for large volumes be the ultimate microscope? We argue, yes. In this article, we consider how it could be built, and we ponder the answer to the equally important follow-on questions: who would care if it is built, and what could be achieved with it?

Kelly, T. F. [Cameca Instruments; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Rajan, Krishna [Iowa State University; Ringer, S. P. [University of Sydney, Australia

2012-01-01

491

Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

1990-01-01

492

On Hellegouarch's definition of musical scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

We slightly modify Hellegouarch's axiomatic definition of a musical scale and give conditions for such scales to exist and to be uniquely defined. We also present an algorithm computing all elements of a scale.

Adrien Kassel; Christian Kassel

2010-01-01

493

Scaling properties in earthquake networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper proposes a network-based method for the assessment of earthquake relationships in space-time-magnitude patterns. It is shown that networks with minimum edge weight values in the middle to the upper range of the spectrum of the edge weight enjoy strong scaling properties, as opposed to networks with low values for the minimum edge weight, which exhibit weak or no such properties. The scaling behaviour along the spectrum of the weight values, in conjunction with the robustness regarding parameter variations, endorse the idea that a relationship exists between fundamental properties of seismicity and the scaling properties of the earthquake networks. Results of this method are further applied for the study of temporal changes in volcanic seismicity patterns.

Suteanu, Mirela

2014-05-01

494

Large Scale Dynamos in Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

Vishniac, Ethan T.

2015-01-01

495

Scales (ChemPages Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scales: this is a resource in the collection "ChemPages Laboratory Resources". Correctly reading a scale is a skill that is important to master. The Spectronic 20?, spectroscope, pipet, buret, graduated cylinder, and many other instruments and devices utlilize scales that must be read properly for successful laboratory work. The procedures outlined in this module should be followed for reading any scalar quantity in the laboratory. The ChemPages Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

496

IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

1999-01-01

497

Reconciling theories for metabolic scaling.  

PubMed

Metabolic theory specifies constraints on the metabolic organisation of individual organisms. These constraints have important implications for biological processes ranging from the scale of molecules all the way to the level of populations, communities and ecosystems, with their application to the latter emerging as the field of metabolic ecology. While ecologists continue to use individual metabolism to identify constraints in ecological processes, the topic of metabolic scaling remains controversial. Much of the current interest and controversy in metabolic theory relates to recent ideas about the role of supply networks in constraining energy supply to cells. We show that an alternative explanation for physicochemical constraints on individual metabolism, as formalised by dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory, can contribute to the theoretical underpinning of metabolic ecology, while increasing coherence between intra- and interspecific scaling relationships. In particular, we emphasise how the DEB theory considers constraints on the storage and use of assimilated nutrients and derive an equation for the scaling of metabolic rate for adult heterotrophs without relying on optimisation arguments or implying cellular nutrient supply limitation. Using realistic data on growth and reproduction from the literature, we parameterise the curve for respiration and compare the a priori prediction against a mammalian data set for respiration. Because the DEB theory mechanism for metabolic scaling is based on the universal process of acquiring and using pools of stored metabolites (a basal feature of life), it applies to all organisms irrespective of the nature of metabolic transport to cells. Although the DEB mechanism does not necessarily contradict insight from transport-based models, the mechanism offers an explanation for differences between the intra- and interspecific scaling of biological rates with mass, suggesting novel tests of the respective hypotheses. PMID:23668377

Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R; Nisbet, Roger M; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

2014-01-01

498

Angles, Scales and Parametric Renormalization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the structure of renormalized Feynman rules. Regarding them as maps from the Hopf algebra of Feynman graphs to {{C}} originating from the evaluation of graphs by Feynman rules, they are elements of a group {G=Spec_{Feyn}(H)} . We study the kinematics of scale and angle-dependence to decompose G into subgroups {G_{{1-s}}} and {G_{fin}} . Using parametric representations of Feynman integrals, renormalizability and the renormalization group underlying the scale dependence of Feynman amplitudes are derived and proven in the context of algebraic geometry.

Brown, Francis; Kreimer, Dirk

2013-09-01

499

Make a Human Scale Ladder  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this quick activity about size and scale (on page 2 of the PDF), each learner will be given an image of an object and communicate with other members of the group to arrange the objects they are holding in order of size (largest objects on one end and smallest on the other). Scale ladders help kids recognize the order of magnitude of some benchmark objects and correctly arrange them in order of size. This exercise also increases familiarity with the metric system, the universal language used by scientists, and some common prefixes such as "micro" and "nano." Also relates to linked video, DragonflyTV Nano: What's Nano?

2012-06-26

500

Scaling Properties of Universal Tetramers  

SciTech Connect

We evidence the existence of a universal correlation between the binding energies of successive four-boson bound states (tetramers), for large two-body scattering lengths (a), related to an additional scale not constrained by three-body Efimov physics. Relevant to ultracold atom experiments, the atom-trimer relaxation peaks for |a|{yields}{infinity} when the ratio between the tetramer and trimer energies is {approx_equal}4.6 and a new tetramer is formed. The new scale is also revealed for a<0 by the prediction of a correlation between the positions of two successive peaks in the four-atom recombination process.

Hadizadeh, M. R.; Yamashita, M. T. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

2011-09-23