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1

The Cambridge CFD Grid for Large Scale Distributed CFD Applications  

E-print Network

The Cambridge CFD (computational fluid dynamics) Grid is a distributed problem solving environment for large-scale CFD applications set up between the Cambridge eScience Centre and the CFD Lab in the Engineering Department at the University...

Yang, Xiaobo; Hayes, Mark; Jenkins, K; Cant, Stewart R

2005-01-01

2

Depersonalization after marijuana smoking.  

PubMed

Depersonalization and other behavioral and physiological indices were monitored before and after the administration of high- and low-potency marijuana cigarettes and a placebo cigarette in 35 physically and mentally healthy normal volunteers. The cigarettes were administered under double-blind conditions during three visits to the laboratory separated by a minimum of 1 week. Marijuana smoking, but not placebo smoking, was associated with significant depersonalization that was maximal 30 min after smoking the high-potency cigarettes. Other behavioral changes induced by marijuana included disintegration of time sense, sensation of "high," increased state anxiety, tension, anger, and confusion. Respiration, pulse rate, and systolic blood pressure also increased after marijuana smoking. Multiple regression identified temporal disintegration as the most significant predictor of depersonalization. PMID:8490070

Mathew, R J; Wilson, W H; Humphreys, D; Lowe, J V; Weithe, K E

1993-03-15

3

Cognitive functioning in depersonalization disorder.  

PubMed

Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is a dissociative disorder characterized by a subjective sense of unreality and detachment, and has been associated with deficits in perception and short-term memory. In this study, 21 DPD and 17 healthy comparison participants free of psychiatric disorders were administered a comprehensive neuropsychologic battery. The groups did not differ in full-scale, verbal, and performance IQ (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), in working memory (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test), or in selective attention (Digit Span with Distracters). The DPD group performed significantly worse on immediate visual and verbal recall (Wechsler Memory Scale, Revised), but not on delayed recall. Dissociation severity was significantly correlated with processing slowness and distractibility. We conclude that DPD is associated with cognitive disruptions in early perceptual and attentional processes. PMID:18091191

Guralnik, Orna; Giesbrecht, Timo; Knutelska, Margaret; Sirroff, Beth; Simeon, Daphne

2007-12-01

4

Testing a Neurobiological Model of Depersonalization Disorder Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation?  

PubMed Central

Background Depersonalization disorder (DPD) includes changes in subjective experiencing of self, encompassing emotional numbing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pointed to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) inhibition of insula as a neurocognitive correlate of the disorder. Objective We hypothesized that inhibition to right VLPFC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased arousal and reduced symptoms. Methods Patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD (N = 17) and controls (N = 20) were randomized to receive one session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC or temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). 1Hz rTMS was guided using neuronavigation and delivered for 15 min. Co-primary outcomes were: (a) maximum skin conductance capacity, and (b) reduction in depersonalization symptoms (Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale (CDS) [state version]). Secondary outcomes included spontaneous fluctuations (SFs) and event-related skin conductance responses. Results In patients with DPD, rTMS to VLPFC led to increased electrodermal capacity, namely maximum skin conductance deflections. Patients but not controls also showed increased SFs post rTMS. Patients who had either VLPFC or TPJ rTMS showed a similar significant reduction in symptoms. Event-related electrodermal activity did not change. Conclusions A single session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC (but not TPJ) significantly increased physiological arousal capacity supporting our model regarding the relevance of increased VLPFC activity to emotional numbing in DPD. rTMS to both sites led to reduced depersonalization scores but since this was independent of physiological arousal, this may be a non-specific effect. TMS is a potential therapeutic option for DPD; modulation of VLPFC, if replicated, is a plausible mechanism. PMID:24439959

Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rothwell, John C.; David, Anthony S.

2014-01-01

5

Aripiprazole in depersonalization disorder comorbid with major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder: 3 cases.  

PubMed

Depersonalization is a frequent symptom in depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but sometimes, it may be severe and concurrently diagnosed as a disorder. The treatment of depersonalization disorder both alone and comorbid with other psychiatric disorders is as yet unclear. This report presents the successful treatment with aripiprazole of concurrent depersonalization disorder in 3 patients with depression or OCD. The psychiatric disorders were diagnosed through structured clinical interviews. Assessments were by means of Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Aripiprazole may be a beneficial psychotropic drug in the treatment of depersonalization disorder comorbid with OCD or depression, which is an important problem in clinical practice. PMID:24992087

Uguz, Faruk; Sahingoz, Mine

2014-01-01

6

Depersonalization: A Valid Dimension of Burnout?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major underlying assumption in burnout research is that burnout is a phenomenon to be found primarily in the human services professions. The focus of this study is the effect this assumption has had on conventional definitions of burnout. The generalizability of the concept of depersonalization, frequently cited as a part of burnout, is tested in a nonhuman services occupation.

Anna-Maria Garden

1987-01-01

7

The Role of Childhood Interpersonal Trauma in Depersonalization Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In contrast to trauma's rela- tionship with the other dissociative disor- ders, the relationship of trauma to deper- sonalization disorder is unknown. The purpose of this study was to systemati- cally investigate the role of childhood in- terpersonal trauma in depersonalization disorder. Method: Forty-nine subjects with DSM-IV depersonalization disorder and 26 healthy comparison subjects who were free of life-

Daphne Simeon; Orna Guralnik; D. James Schmeidler; D. Beth Sirof; M. A. Margaret Knutelska

2001-01-01

8

ECEM (Eye Closure, Eye Movements): application to depersonalization disorder.  

PubMed

Eye Closure, Eye Movements (ECEM) is a hypnotically-based approach to treatment that incorporates eye movements adapted from the Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) protocol in conjunction with hypnosis for the treatment of depersonalization disorder. Depersonalization Disorder has been differentiated from post-traumatic stress disorders and has recently been conceptualized as a subtype of panic disorder (Baker et al., 2003; David, Phillips, Medford, & Sierra, 2004; Segui et. al., 2000). During ECEM, while remaining in a hypnotic state, clients self-generated six to seven trials of eye movements to reduce anticipatory anxiety associated with depersonalization disorder. Eye movements were also used to process triggers that elicited breath holding, often followed by episodes of depersonalization. Hypnotic suggestions were used to reverse core symptoms of depersonalization, subjectively described as "feeling unreal" (Simeon et al., 1997). PMID:19862896

Harriet, E Hollander

2009-10-01

9

Anxiety Changes Depersonalization and Derealization Symptoms in Vestibular Patients  

PubMed Central

Background. Depersonalization and derealization are common symptoms reported in the general population. Objective. The aim of the present study was to establish the relationship between anxiety and depersonalization and derealization symptoms in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Methods. Twenty-four vestibular patients with anxiety and 18 vestibular patients without anxiety were examined for depersonalization and derealization symptoms. They were also compared to healthy controls. Results. The results revealed that anxiety consistently changes depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. They are more frequent, more severe, and qualitatively different in vestibular patients with anxiety than in those without anxiety. Conclusion. Anxiety has an effect on depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. The various hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of this effect were discussed. PMID:24803735

Kolev, Ognyan I.; Georgieva-Zhostova, Spaska O.; Berthoz, Alain

2014-01-01

10

Interoceptive Cue Exposure for Depersonalization: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder relies heavily on interoceptive exposure. Specifically, therapists induce physical symptoms associated with panic in order to produce habituation to those sensations. Many common symptoms of panic are easily induced, such as increased heart rate and dizziness. However, depersonalization is a…

McKay, Dean; Moretz, Melanie W.

2008-01-01

11

Depersonalization in Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders, First-Degree Relatives and Normal Controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Depersonalization occurs in healthy individuals and across a broad range of psychiatric patients. Data on depersonalization in persons linked to patients through genetics, environment or education are scarce. Due to their higher risk of developing psychosis, first-degree healthy relatives might show differences with the general population. This study examines depersonalization in patients with schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, their

Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Torres; Lucía Inchausti; Maialen Aristegui; Berta Ibañez; Luis Diez; Aranzazu Fernandez-Rivas; Sonia Bustamante; Karim Haidar; Maier Rodríguez-Zabaleta; Argiñe Mingo

2010-01-01

12

Syntax-Based Word Ordering Incorporating a Large-Scale Language University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

of words. The word ordering problem can also include word choice, where only a subset of the input words ordering and word choice. The use of syntax models makes their search problems harder than word permutationSyntax-Based Word Ordering Incorporating a Large-Scale Language Model Yue Zhang University

Koehn, Philipp

13

Cambridge Cosmology: Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explores the topic of galaxies. It discusses statistics and parts of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, as well as other classes of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, lenticular, and irregular). Galaxy clusters and large-scale structures such as superclusters and voids are explored in terms of their characteristics and origin. Also discussed is the fact that the Universe is comprised mainly of dark matter.

Shellard, Paul; Wu, Jiun-Huei

14

Early elements of the corporate form: depersonalization of business in ancient Rome  

Microsoft Academic Search

A crucial step in economic development is the depersonalization of business, which enables an enterprise to operate as a separate entity from its owners and managers. Until the emergence of a de iure depersonalization of business in the 19th century, business activities were eminently personal, with managing partners bearing unlimited liability. Roman law even restricted agency. Yet, the Roman legal

B. Abatino; G. Dari-Mattiacci; E. Perotti

2009-01-01

15

STRESS AND TRAUMA: Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder  

PubMed Central

Depersonalization/derealization disorder is characterized by depersonalization often co-occurring with derealization in the absence of significant psychosis, memory, or identity disturbance. Depersonalization/derealization is categorized as one of the dissociative disorders, which also includes dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Although these disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, many persons with psychiatric illness who have experienced trauma report symptoms consistent with dissociative disorders. There are limited scientific data on prevalence of depersonalization/derealization disorder specifically. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological and epidemiological information regarding diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders in general, and illustrates common presenting histories of persons with derealization/depersonalization disorder utilizing composite cases. The clinical vignettes focus on recommended psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy interventions as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan for these individuals. PMID:25337444

Snyder, Malynda; Marie Gillig, Paulette

2014-01-01

16

Conditional reasoning in Asperger's syndrome and depersonalization disorder.  

PubMed

Conditional reasoning premises can be systematically manipulated to elicit specific response patterns. This is useful for investigating the reasoning style of people who report clinical symptoms. We administered a standardized conditional reasoning task to 16 participants with a diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome (AS), 16 participants with a diagnosis of depersonalization disorder (DPD), and 32 intelligence-quotient-matched controls. Premises were manipulated for a) context, with some being embedded within extra statements, and b) content, neutral or emotional. Both the AS and DPD participants were less likely to incorporate exceptions to the given premises than the controls, indicating difficulties with mental flexibility, although this effect was less marked in the DPD group. It seems the AS participants were also less influenced than the controls by statements that highlight possible alternative consequences. However, this effect was less robust than that observed with statements detailing exceptions, suggesting it may be because of general problems with executive function rather than difficulties in processing contextual information. We did not observe the expected difference between the DPD participants and the controls when reasoning with emotional premises. Overall, these data suggest that the DPD and AS participants have distinct reasoning styles, which may be of use for interventions based on cognitive change. PMID:22922241

Lawrence, Emma Jane; Dumigan, Rachael; Schoenberg, Poppy; Mauricio, Sierra; Murphy, Declan G; David, Anthony S

2012-09-01

17

Altered orientation of spatial attention in depersonalization disorder.  

PubMed

Difficulties with concentration are frequent complaints of patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). Standard neuropsychological tests suggested alterations of the attentional and perceptual systems. To investigate this, the well-validated Spatial Cueing paradigm was used with two different tasks, consisting either in the detection or in the discrimination of visual stimuli. At the start of each trial a cue indicated either the correct (valid) or the incorrect (invalid) position of the upcoming stimulus or was uninformative (neutral). Only under the condition of increased task difficulty (discrimination task) differences between DPD patients and controls were observed. DPD patients showed a smaller total attention directing effect (RT in valid vs. invalid trials) compared to healthy controls only in the discrimination condition. RT costs (i.e., prolonged RT in neutral vs. invalid trials) mainly accounted for this difference. These results indicate that DPD is associated with altered attentional mechanisms, especially with a stronger responsiveness to unexpected events. From an evolutionary perspective this may be advantageous in a dangerous environment, in daily life it may be experienced as high distractibility. PMID:24594203

Adler, Julia; Beutel, Manfred E; Knebel, Achim; Berti, Stefan; Unterrainer, Josef; Michal, Matthias

2014-05-15

18

Implicit Self-Esteem in Borderline Personality and Depersonalization Disorder  

PubMed Central

Self-perception is disrupted in people with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and depersonalization disorder (DPD), fluctuating with sudden shifts in affect in BPD and experienced as detached in DPD. Measures of implicit self-esteem (ISE), free from conscious control and presentation biases, may highlight how such disruptions of self-concept differentially affect these two populations on an unconscious level. We examined ISE using the Implicit Association Test, along with measures of emotion, behavior, and temperament, in BPD (n?=?18), DPD (n?=?18), and healthy control (n?=?35) participants. DPD participants had significantly higher ISE and were more harm avoidant than BPD and control participants, while BPD participants had more “frontal” behaviors and impulsivity and less self-directedness and cooperativeness than DPD and control participants. Thus, while BPD and DPD commonly overlap in terms of dissociative symptoms and emotional irregularities, differences in self-esteem, behavior, and temperament can help identify where they diverge in terms of their cognition, behavior, and ultimately underlying neurobiology. PMID:22493585

Hedrick, Alexis N.; Berlin, Heather A.

2012-01-01

19

Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2  

E-print Network

Last 5. Relevancy Title Author Print Publication Year #12; 10 Online Publication Date 6. Hide #12; 1 Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2 Cambridge Books Online ...............3 ....................................5

Wu, Yih-Min

20

About Cambridge University Press.........................2 About Cambridge Books Online .............................2  

E-print Network

Books Online .............................2 Homepage...................................................................10 Search Result........................................................12 Book Landing of the largest academic publishers globally. About Cambridge Books Online Cambridge Books Online offers

Wu, Yih-Min

21

Cambridge guarantees most students  

E-print Network

Rankings. 1 WelcometoCambridgewww.cam.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/ 700+ Cambridge has over 700 student clubs're probably already aware that Cambridge is one of the best universities in the world in terms of its academic, and personal tuition and support to develop your academic interests. Engaging with academics at the forefront

Keeler, James

22

Early Cambridge radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radio astronomy started in Cambridge immediately after the hostilities of the World War II have ceased. Martin Ryle was the inspiring leader of a small group that started to develop interferometry techniques at the Cavendish Laboratory. From this development came the numerous Cambridge radio source surveys culminating in the Nobel prize awarded to Martin Ryle for invention of aperture synthesis.

F. G. Smith

2007-01-01

23

@ Cambridge Department of Chemistry University of Cambridge biennial report 2012  

E-print Network

and government. We are fortunate to attract some of the brightest and the best students ­ both nationallyChemistry @ Cambridge Department of Chemistry University of Cambridge biennial report 2012 #12, Colchester Published by the Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2

Travis, Adrian

24

Neighborhood design for Cambridge  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the problem of modest high-density low-rise housing design for a site in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It considers first the general changes in housing demand and the housing industry which have made it ...

Reynolds, Margaret (Margaret Philpott Ray), 1953-

1981-01-01

25

Early Cambridge radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio astronomy started in Cambridge immediately after the hostilities of the World War II have ceased. Martin Ryle was the inspiring leader of a small group that started to develop interferometry techniques at the Cavendish Laboratory. From this development came the numerous Cambridge radio source surveys culminating in the Nobel prize awarded to Martin Ryle for invention of aperture synthesis. The history of this early development is the subject of the present paper.

Smith, F. G.

2007-06-01

26

Quantum Computing Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing Peter Shor M.I.T. Cambridge, MA 1 #12;What is the difference between a computer (physical) device can perform efficiently. (Various theoretical computer scientists, 1960's). If quantum computers can be built, this would imply this "folk thesis" is not true. 14 #12;Misconceptions about Quantum

Fominov, Yakov

27

University of Cambridge Sport  

E-print Network

to welcome you to this compendium of sporting activity and achievements during the last academic year across and achievements of Cambridge students in the sporting arena during the last academic year were significant in many areas. Academic excellence was matched by some outstanding performances and the same hunger for pre

Travis, Adrian

28

Cambridge Cosmology: Relic Radiation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic background radiation present in our Universe. Also covered are topics such as the present temperature of the Universe as taken by the COBE satellite, fluctuations seen at the 'edge' of the Universe, and possible causes of these fluctuations.

Shellard, Paul

29

Prevalence and childhood antecedents of Depersonalization Syndrome in a UK Birth Cohort  

PubMed Central

Purpose Depersonalization syndrome is characterised by a sense of unreality about the self (depersonalization: DP) and/or the outside world (derealization: DR). Prevalence estimates vary widely. Little is known about childhood antecedents of the disorder although emotional abuse is thought to play a role. Methods Longitudinal data from 3275 participants of a UK population based birth cohort (the MRC National Survey of Health and Development) were used to: i) assess the prevalence of DP syndrome at age 36, measured by the Present State Examination (PSE); and ii) examine the effects of a range of socio-demographic, childhood adversity and emotional responses as potential risk factors for DP. Results Thirty three survey members were classified with DP, yielding a prevalence of 0.95% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.56 to 1.34). There were no associations with socioeconomic status, parental death or divorce; self reported accidents, childhood depression, tendency to daydream or reactions to criticism. However, teacher-estimated childhood anxiety was a strong independent predictor of adult depersonalization, and there were strong cross-sectional relationships between DP and anxiety and depression caseness. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first study assessing nationwide prevalence of the DP syndrome and uses longitudinal data to explore childhood risk factors for adult DP. The prevalence of adult DP was slightly lower than reported by other surveys. The study found that childhood anxiety was the only significant predictor of the adult DP syndrome, supporting the view that depersonalisation disorder forms part of the spectrum of responses to anxiety. PMID:21181112

Lee, William E.; Kwok, Charlie H. T.; Hunter, Elaine C. M.; Richards, Marcus; David, Anthony S.

2012-01-01

30

Cambridge Cosmology: Quantum Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explains the concepts of quantum gravity and quantum cosmology, and how they are useful in understanding space and the space-time continuum. This includes the M-theory, formerly known as the string theory, and the Holographic Principle, in order to explain phenomena such as black holes and the first one-hundredth of a second of the Big Bang.

Hertog, Thomas; Herdeiro, Carlos; Chamblin, H.; Ashbourn, J.; Reall, Harvey

31

Cambridge Cosmology: Cosmic Strings and Other Defects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic strings and other defects in our Universe. It begins with phase transitions in the early Universe, and how cosmic strings and other defects formed early on. Cosmic string evolution and dynamics are discussed while looking at high-resolution numerical cosmic string simulations. Also covered are possible explanations for the origin of large-scale structures (such as galaxies) and texture models of these structures.

Shellard, Paul; Martins, Carlos; Sornborger, Andrew

32

Culture of Cambridge  

E-print Network

live in outside Cambridge, I meet many more people I know and it feels much more like a village. A nod, a wave of the hat, a smile, a quick chat, an agreement to meet for longer, all these occur several times a day. I was told by an almost blind... , carvings and the deposited debris of five generations of my family’s travels around the world I know this in miniature. As I try to sort out my own childhood collections of coins, stamps, dinky toys, toy soldiers, animal teeth, chocolate wrappers, I feel a...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

33

Cambridge Dictionaries Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Explicitly designed for the International or second-language speaker, this site allows users to search -- but not browse -- Cambridge's Dictionary of American English, International Dictionary of English, International Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs, and International Dictionary of Idioms. Entries have value-added, second-language instructional items such as the identification of "false friends" (i.e., false cognates), simple codes that "demonstrate all the important grammatical patterns of a word," and a limited defining vocabulary that minimizes the need for students to look up the definition of a definition. Both the phrasal verb dictionary and the dictionary of idioms will be helpful to ESL students as the search engine returns a number of similarly worded entries to a student's possibly imprecise query. Note: users cannot search all four volumes at once, and we found the International Dictionary more helpful than the Dictionary of American English for basic definitions and breadth of coverage.

34

FURTHER PARTICULARS The University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

's leading Universities, with an outstanding reputation for academic achievement and research. CambridgeFURTHER PARTICULARS The University of Cambridge The University of Cambridge is one of the world Research Institute, and the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies. The Department is directly

35

Health-related quality of life in the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort (CC75C): development of a dementia-specific scale and descriptive analyses  

PubMed Central

Background The assessment of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) is important in people with dementia as it could influence their care and support plan. Many studies on dementia do not specifically set out to measure dementia-specific HRQL but do include related items. The aim of this study is to explore the distribution of HRQL by functional and socio-demographic variables in a population-based setting. Methods Domains of DEMQOL’s conceptual framework were mapped in the Cambridge City over 75’s Cohort (CC75C) Study. HRQL was estimated in 110 participants aged 80+ years with a confirmed diagnosis of dementia with mild/moderate severity. Acceptability (missing values and normality of the total score), internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha), convergent, discriminant and known group differences validity (Spearman correlations, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests) were assessed. The distribution of HRQL by socio-demographic and functional descriptors was explored. Results The HRQL score ranged from 0 to 16 and showed an internal consistency Alpha of 0.74. Validity of the instrument was found to be acceptable. Men had higher HRQL than women. Marital status had a greater effect on HRQL for men than it did for women. The HRQL of those with good self-reported health was higher than those with fair/poor self-reported health. HRQL was not associated with dementia severity. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first study to examine the distribution of dementia-specific HRQL in a population sample of the very old. We have mapped an existing conceptual framework of dementia specific HRQL onto an existing study and demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Findings in this study suggest that whereas there is big emphasis in dementia severity, characteristics such as gender should be taken into account when assessing and implementing programmes to improve HRQL. PMID:24512291

2014-01-01

36

COMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE  

E-print Network

different layers, like operating system and applications, or computer and network. The Laboratory's research. Thus we are researching across the spectrum from hardware compilation to biological modellingCOMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Leaders in Computing Research and Teaching William

Haddadi, Hamed

37

The Cambridge Experimentation Review Board  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reproduced is the report made by a citizens' group in Cambridge, Massachusetts and presented to the city council that outlines safety regulations for the conduct of recombinant DNA research at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (CS)

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1977

1977-01-01

38

DSpace@Cambridge Implementation Project website  

E-print Network

are already actively contributing, or have agreed to provide, material are: • Archaeology • Cambridge University Library • CamRAD (Cambridge Rock Art Database) • CARET (Centre for Applied Research in Education Technology) • Chemistry - Unilever Centre... for Molecular Informatics • CRASSH (Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities) • CUMIS (Cambridge University Moving Image Studio) • Economics - Dept of Applied Economics • Fitzwilliam Museum • Music • Pathology • Philosophy • Dept...

Morgan, Peter; Massiou, Anna

2003-01-01

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CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY DesignedandprintedbyUniversityPrintingServices,UniversityPress,Cambridge.www.cambridge.org/ups  

E-print Network

for all library staff in the University, it was decided that, in its Cambridge manifestation, the Voyager project ever undertaken in the libraries of the University. That the system went live in July 2002, within of hard work undertaken over a period of more than a year by the Project Team. Ms Killiard, Mr Sendall, Ms

Steiner, Ullrich

40

UNIVERSITYOF Cambridge Working  

E-print Network

% of the 1990 levels by 2050. With an increase in future fossil fuel use, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS, carbon sequestration, storage reservoir processes. JEL Classification O13 Q40 Q41 Q42 Q48 Q51 Q54 Q55 Q58, uncertainty of CCS deployment, the risks of long-term CO2 storage, public communication and scale. Research

Cambridge, University of

41

Further Physics: Cambridge Modular Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This slender text was written to support the teaching of A- and AS-level physics modules within the Cambridge Modular Science scheme. Its usefulness will not be confined to those courses. The topics addressed are circular motion, gravity, simple harmonic motion, waves, electrostatics, capacitors and d.c. and a.c. circuits. The book lends itself well for use as a student reference. It

Jon Scaife

1997-01-01

42

The History of a Cambridge Landscape Jill Sinclair  

E-print Network

Fresh Pond The History of a Cambridge Landscape Jill Sinclair The MIT Press Cambridge-in-Publication Data Sinclair, Jill, 1961- Fresh Pond : the history of a Cambridge landscape / Jill Sinclair. p. cm Pond (Middlesex County, Mass.)--History. 2. Cambridge (Mass.) --History. 3. Landscape--Massachusetts--Cambridge--History

43

76 FR 13665 - Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action Total Staffing, Cambridge, OH...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration [TA-W-74,605] Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...applicable to workers of Cambridge Tool & Die, Cambridge, Ohio. The workers are engaged...Cambridge, Ohio location of Cambridge Tool & Die Corporation. The Department has...

2011-03-14

44

University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy Modelling of Microstructural and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, between May 2007 and August 2007. Except where acknowledgements

Cambridge, University of

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY PART I HANDBOOK 2012/2013 Department of Archaeology and Anthropology Pembroke Street Cambridge CB2 3QY 01223 335454 http://www.archanth.cam.ac.uk/ #12;#12;Contents Page INTRODUCTION TO PART I ­ ARCHAEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 1 THE PART I COURSE STRUCTURE 3

Talbot, James P.

46

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY PART I HANDBOOK 2009/2010 Faculty of Archaeology and Anthropology Pembroke Street Cambridge CB2 3QY 01223 762846/7 http://www.archanth.cam.ac.uk/ #12;Contents Page INTRODUCTION TO PART I ­ ARCHAEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 THE PART I COURSE STRUCTURE 5

Travis, Adrian

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY PART I HANDBOOK 2011/2012 Department of Archaeology and Anthropology Pembroke Street Cambridge CB2 3QY 01223 762846/7 http://www.archanth.cam.ac.uk/ #12;2 Contents Page INTRODUCTION TO PART I ­ ARCHAEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 THE PART I COURSE STRUCTURE

Travis, Adrian

48

Cambridge University: Digital Image Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over the course of the past eight centuries, Cambridge University has come into the possession of more than a few important documents. Their online digital image collection may be seen as an important first stop for anyone interested in perusing some of these remarkable materials. These documents include The Portsmouth and Macclesfield Collection, which contains the writings and ideas of Sir Isaac Newton, and the sketchbooks of Conrad Martens, who accompanied Charles Darwin on board the Beagle. That is far from all, however, as visitors can also browse the pages of the 13th century illuminated volume, "The Life of King Edward the Confessor". All in all, it is a lovely collection and one that scholars with any interest in English history will want to examine and recommend to their colleagues and students.

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FURTHER PARTICULARS The University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

(including gender reassignment), marital or parental status, race, ethnic or national origin, colour at the University, living in Cambridge and details of current vacancies. Attachment: CHRIS/PD33 Part 2 ­ Role Descri

50

ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 1 Tracking of a Joint Path for the Walking of an  

E-print Network

ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 1 Tracking of a Joint,version1-26Feb2013 Author manuscript, published in "Robotica 22 (2004) 15-28" #12;ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 2 parameter: the arc length Ã?. A time scaling control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

Rosenberg, Alexander (1983), The Structure of Biological Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  

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Rosenberg, Alexander (1983), The Structure of Biological Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University in History and Philosophy of Science 32A: 407­452. Schlesinger, George N. (1987), ``Accommodation and Pre in Evolutionary Biology,'' Erkenntnis 17: 291­306. Worrall, John (1978), ``The Ways in Which the Methodology

Fitelson, Branden

52

To be published in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (in press) Cambridge University Press 2003  

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1 To be published in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (in press) © Cambridge University Press 2003.) To give and to give not: The behavioral ecology of human food transfers Michael Gurven Department introduces a framework for better understanding variation in sharing behavior across small-scale traditional

Cosmides, Leda

53

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/  

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by the Cambridge Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk) and to take a leading part in planning. With the launch of the Cambridge Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk) in 2011, many thousands more

Steiner, Ullrich

54

The Rate of Creep Deformation St Edmund's College, Cambridge  

E-print Network

Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ A dissertation submitted. Bhadeshia and Dr T. Sourmail in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

Cambridge, University of

55

The Depersonalization of Sex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Love is frequently interpreted in a reductionistic way as a mere sublimation of sexual drives and instincts which man shares with all the other animals. Such an interpretation blocks a true understanding of all the various human phenomena. (Author)

Frankl, Viktor E.

1977-01-01

56

Language Support for Lightweight Transactions University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD tim.harris@cl.cam.ac.uk Keir Fraser University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD keir.fraser@cl.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT

Harris, Timothy

57

77 FR 3118 - Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel, Cambridge, MD  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2011-1164] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel...Coast Guard is establishing a temporary security zone encompassing certain waters of...

2012-01-23

58

About Cambridge Hall Cambridge is located on the All Saints Campus in the centre of Manchester  

E-print Network

Telephone Internet point/socket Under bed storage Carpet Mirror Shaver light Wall light Bed side light and 7 pm at the Wardens' Office, accessible through Cambridge Hall North reception. There are no Car

59

Reflections on Cambridge: Reflections on Isaac Newton, discovery and Cambridge - with apple tree  

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Reflections about the life and effects of Isaac Newton in Cambridge, filmed outside Trinity College, with the descendant of his apple tree behind (and the rooms where he lived and worked). Filmed by Xu Bei in 2009....

Macfarlane, Alan

60

University of Cambridge Sport Sports Yearbook 2010  

E-print Network

Cruising Club 43 Cycling Club 47 Eton Fives Club 50 Fencing Club 53 Gliding Club 56 Golf Club 58 Gymnastics of the high levels of participation and achievement in sport of Cambridge University students. The opportunity for students to build on sporting success at school,or to take up and compete in a new sport

Travis, Adrian

61

Cambridge University science magazine Michaelmas 2010  

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University science magazine from Tutankhamun . Modern Art . Scurvy Henry Cavendish . Out of Body Experiences.bluesci.co.uk The Cambridge University science magazine from Tutankhamun . Modern Art . Scurvy Henry Cavendish . Out of Body-6920 9771748692000 19> ISSN 1748-6920 9771748692000 19> Tutankhamun Henry Cavendish GeneTherapy -The beginnings, Gene

Cambridge, University of

62

NEWNHAM COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE CB3 9DF  

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and write about women in literature, history, society and culture, while developing their independent study and writing skills. Through exposure to the type of work they might be expected to do at Cambridge, we hope women's history and educational excellence are, of course, central! This Prize may be of particular

Lasenby, Joan

63

ELECTRONS IN GLASS (*) Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England  

E-print Network

surprising. An electron in a perfect crystalline lattice was supposed to move much like an electron in free states below an energy gap were occupied, so that the number of electrons moving in one direction619 ELECTRONS IN GLASS (*) N. F. MOTT Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England Abstract. 2014

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE  

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DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE \\\\Fserv\\health_and_safety\\Safety Handbook & Forms\\Web_versions\\Induction_checklist.doc HSIC ­ Sept 09 Health and Safety Induction Checklist Please locate and digest health & safety information provided in the induction pack and the Department website

Cambridge, University of

65

The Cambridge University Library Management Research Unit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description of the Unit which has been set up at Cambridge University with an OSTI grant and whose work is to study methods leading to increased effectiveness and efficiency in academic libraries. Attention is focussed on practical investigations making use of O & M and related techniques. (Author)

Plumb, Philip W.

1971-01-01

66

University of Cambridge Sport Sports Yearbook 2012  

E-print Network

. The world knows Cambridge for its sporting history as well as its academic prowess,and we measure our 9 Association Football Club (Men's) 10 Association Football Club (Women's) 12 Athletic Club 13 League 83 Rugby Union Football Club 84 Women's Rugby Union Football Club 86 Ski & Snowboard Club 87 Small

Travis, Adrian

67

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy  

E-print Network

in September 2009 Philosophy at Cambridge page 3 May 2009 An Oxford Lad at Cambridge Sidney A. Josephs I came up to Trinity in 1957, on a Cambridge Bursary for Adult students, to read Moral Sciences (Neither moral nor scientific!). I was 24 years old and had... of Cambridge, London and, subsequently, Oxford Universities. The wheel had turned full circle and my debt had been repaid. Sidney A. (Joe) Josephs (1933–2008) read Moral Sciences at Trinity 1957–1960. Philosophy at Cambridge page 4 May 2009 appreciation...

Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

68

City of Cambridge: CityViewer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is the best way to experience the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts? You could read a history of Harvard University, take a walking tour, or perhaps browse a topical website. But why not look at the Cambridge CityViewer for edification? This unique tool "allows the public to view, query, mark up, and print custom maps using only a web browser." Notedly, the viewer works best with Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox. Visitors can check out ten different topical overlays, including those dealing with city parks, construction projects, land parcels, sewers, zoning, and traffic. There are many ways to get started, such as performing a simple search, an advanced search, or even just by typing in a street name and number. For anyone with an interest in urban history, planning, and land use, this site is a rare treat.

69

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore,  

E-print Network

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York www but with particular emphasis on host-parasite coevolution and its consequences for the evolution of antibiotic resistance and pathogen virulence. Finally, the evolutionary histories of several key pathogens are discussed

Muehlenbein, Michael

70

Cambridge Companions Online ISBN Author Title Pub Year Sub Collection Sub Category  

E-print Network

9780521440370 Myerson The Cambridge Companion to Henry David Thoreau 1995 Literature & Classics American literature 9780521495844 Freedman The Cambridge Companion to Henry James 1998 Literature & Classics American

Wu, Yih-Min

71

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

the accuracy of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation

de Gispert, Adrià

72

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

the accuracy of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however Studies Tripos 1. Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3

de Gispert, Adrià

73

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

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the accuracy of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however University of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation Details n/a 4. Name

de Gispert, Adrià

74

Mathematical Structures in Computer http://journals.cambridge.org/MSC  

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reprints: Click here Terms of use : Click here Applications and extensions of Alloy: past, present, Germany Email: taghdiri@ira.uka.de § Google, Cambridge, MA., U.S.A. Email: gdennis@alum.mit.edu ¶ Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA., U.S.A. Email: jnear

Tomkins, Andrew

75

How Do You Feel when You Can't Feel Your Body? Interoception, Functional Connectivity and Emotional Processing in Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder  

PubMed Central

Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DD) typically manifests as a disruption of body self-awareness. Interoception ?defined as the cognitive processing of body signals? has been extensively considered as a key processing for body self-awareness. In consequence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are systematic differences in interoception between a patient with DD and controls that might explain the disembodiment symptoms suffered in this disease. To assess interoception, we utilized a heartbeat detection task and measures of functional connectivity derived from fMRI networks in interoceptive/exteroceptivo/mind-wandering states. Additionally, we evaluated empathic abilities to test the association between interoception and emotional experience. The results showed patient's impaired performance in the heartbeat detection task when compared to controls. Furthermore, regarding functional connectivity, we found a lower global brain connectivity of the patient relative to controls only in the interoceptive state. He also presented a particular pattern of impairments in affective empathy. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental research that assesses the relationship between interoception and DD combining behavioral and neurobiological measures. Our results suggest that altered neural mechanisms and cognitive processes regarding body signaling might be engaged in DD phenomenology. Moreover, our study contributes experimental data to the comprehension of brain-body interactions and the emergence of self-awareness and emotional feelings. PMID:24967634

Sedeno, Lucas; Couto, Blas; Melloni, Margherita; Canales-Johnson, Andres; Yoris, Adrian; Baez, Sandra; Esteves, Sol; Velasquez, Marcela; Barttfeld, Pablo; Sigman, Mariano; Kichic, Rafael; Chialvo, Dante; Manes, Facundo; Bekinschtein, Tristan A.; Ibanez, Agustin

2014-01-01

76

The newsletter of the CAMBRIDGE QUATERNARY ISSUE 36 LENT 2007  

E-print Network

entitled `The History of Quaternary Glaciations'. The work is also available online via ScienceDirect. #12 enjoys sport, especially floorball (which is played in Cambridge!) and ice hockey. Seminar Dates QDG

de Gispert, Adrià

77

Cambridge in transition : regulating parking in a growing city  

E-print Network

Parking is regulated today by cities to achieve a variety of goals including traffic reduction, air quality improvement, urban densification, and climate change mitigation. In the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts, parking ...

Ferrentino, Cara Elizabeth

2013-01-01

78

Psychological Medicine http://journals.cambridge.org/PSM  

E-print Network

disorder: impairments that are more similar than different. Psychological Medicine, Available on CJO 2013Psychological Medicine http://journals.cambridge.org/PSM Additional services for Psychological : Click here Cognition in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder: impairments that are more similar

79

EDUCATION Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 2012  

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EDUCATION Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA and Computer Science (EECS) Thesis: Web Page Enhancement on Desktop and Mobile development for mobile devices (Android and iOS). · Worked on the integration test

80

Response to the Witty Review, May 2013 University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

is also one of building excellence in sectors where the UK can still leverage competitive advantage that is nationally relevant, but it focuses primarily on the Greater Cambridge region and on the actual and potential

Talbot, James P.

81

Pioneering research from the University of Cambridge The machine  

E-print Network

Solar power 34 ­ 35 Sarah Franklin 18 ­ 19 Microscopic crystals 20 ­ 21 Venice's Lagoon 22 ­ 23 of Cambridge's Office of External Affairs and Communications. 2 3 OFF ON TRAI N CAR PAR TY RESTAURANT OUTDOOR

Talbot, James P.

82

University of Cambridge Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences Further Particulars: Catering Assistant (28 hours per week) Background The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences outside caterers with in-house arrangements. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20

83

Cambridge Grand Junction transit implementation : alternatives, scheduling, cost, and performance  

E-print Network

The Grand Junction railroad lies at the heart of East Cambridge adjacent to the Kendall Square business district and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus. Over the last one hundred years the railroad has gone ...

Iglesias Cuervo, Jesus

2012-01-01

84

Bibliography Jean Bertoin. Lvy Processes, volume 121 of Cambridge Tracts in Mathematics.  

E-print Network

Bibliography Jean Bertoin. Lévy Processes, volume 121 of Cambridge Tracts in Mathematics. Cambridge of Pitman Res. Notes Math. Ser., pages 111­120. Longman Sci. Tech., Harlow, 1986. John Hawkes. Potential

Khoshnevisan, Davar

85

Bibliography Anderson, J.R. (1983). Architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard  

E-print Network

). The social life of information. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Buffler, A., Saalih, S., Lubben and Computer Representations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. #12;2 Coelho, S. M., and Séré, M. (1998 & Technological Education, 16(1), 79-97. Collins, A. and Ferguson, W. (1993). "Epistemic forms and epistemic games

Maryland at College Park, University of

86

Clare College, Cambridge THE IMMIGRATION, ASYLUM AND NATIONALITY ACT 2006  

E-print Network

Clare College, Cambridge THE IMMIGRATION, ASYLUM AND NATIONALITY ACT 2006 It is a criminal offence with the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006, the College is required to check the working status of all or indicating permanent residence issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to a national

Dixon, Peter

87

University of Cambridge Sport Annual Review 2007 -2008  

E-print Network

Club 111 Table Tennis Club 116 Trampoline Club 117 Volleyball Club 119 Talented Athletes Scholarship Athletics Club 17 Badminton Club 20 Basketball Club 22 Women's Basketball Club 25 Boat Club 26 Women's Boat strength in depth in Cambridge sport,with a surprising level of participation and competition at College

Travis, Adrian

88

COTTAGE FARM COMBINED SEWER DETENTION AND CHLORINATION STATION, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cottage Farm Detention and Chlorination Station was placed in operation by the Metropolitan District Commission on April 29, 1971. The station, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, diverts and treats combined sewage flows from the Charles River Valley sewer system (15,600 acr...

89

A Global Personal Energy Meter University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

world's energy meter' while Encraft2 offers a carbon footprint calculator that takes into consid in monitoring energy consumption. 1 http://www.amee.cc 2 http://www.encraft.co.uk #12;2 Potential benefitsA Global Personal Energy Meter Simon Hay University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Abstract

Cambridge, University of

90

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

the accuracy of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however and Religious Studies Tripos 1) Awarding Institution: The University of Cambridge 2) Teaching Institutions

de Gispert, Adrià

91

Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

which provide individual teaching through written work and feedback thereon. Throughout students Formative assessment is provided through the supervision system where feedback is given in oral and written: The University of Cambridge and the Colleges. 3) Final Award: Postgraduate Diploma in Theology and Religious

de Gispert, Adrià

92

Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-print Network

in the Colleges which provide individual teaching through written work and feedback thereon. Throughout students Formative assessment is provided through the supervision system where feedback is giv: The University of Cambridge and the Colleges. 3) Final Award: Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) 4) Subject: Theology

de Gispert, Adrià

93

Further Particulars: Library and Information Assistant The University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

, schools and other institutions plus a central administration. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national and international visitor of Cambridge so that it is available to the wider community on the web. Location Isaac Newton Institute

Travis, Adrian

94

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Paoletti and Harry L. Swinney Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 706 / September 2012, pp 571 583 DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2012.284, Published online: 13 July 2012 Link to this article: http://journals

Texas at Austin. University of

95

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Pegler and M. Grae Worster Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 696 / April 2012, pp 152 174 DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2012.21, Published online: 09 March 2012 Link to this article: http://journals

Worster, M. Grae

96

Science in Cambridge Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments  

E-print Network

TIME LIFE & MATTER Science in Cambridge Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments Department Local Styles Politics in the Heavens Theory Embodied in Instrument Design 7 Optical Instruments 8 of the History of Science #12;Since 1672 Harvard University has been acquir- ing scientific instruments

Canales, Jimena

97

The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY  

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The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY Additional services for The China Quarterly and Boston: Brill, 2012. vii + 394 pp., 133.00 $182.00. ISBN 9789004218444 Benjamin A. Elman The China this article: Benjamin A. Elman (2012). The China Quarterly, 212, pp 11451148 doi:10.1017/ S0305741012001440

Elman, Benjamin

98

The Cambridge-Lesley Literacy Project: Theory, Practice and Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lesley College and the public schools in Cambridge, Massachusetts collaborated in a project using the natural learning model from Don Holdaway's "The Foundations of Literacy" to improve literacy education in grades K-6. The first two phases of natural learning (desire to learn a skill and attempting the new skill with a proficient person) were…

Snow, Mary B.; And Others

99

Using AI to Enable Knowledge Management Peterhouse College Cambridge  

E-print Network

Using AI to Enable Knowledge Management ES 99 Peterhouse College Cambridge Monday 13th December by the participants. Alun Preece, University of Aberdeen, AI for Knowledge Management: Walk, Don't Runq Gary Iain to Support Knowledge Management? q Graeme West, Strathclyde University, Using AI to Enable Knowledge

Watson, Ian

100

www.cambridge.org/us/9780521194280 Molecular Machines in  

E-print Network

www.cambridge.org/us/9780521194280 Molecular Machines in Biology Workshop of the Cell Joachim Frank Columbia University, New York About the Book The concept of molecular machines in biology has transformed, translation, protein folding, and protein degradation, are all carried out by molecular machines. This volume

Grishok, Alla

101

The Growth of Economic Studies at Cambridge: 1776-1860.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the resistance toward establishing an economics curriculum at Cambridge University from 1776 to 1860. Complex reasons include inertia, low intellectual standards, fear of being considered partisan, and avoidance of change during good times. The eventual introduction of economics was achieved only when wholesale reforms were enacted within…

Rashid, Salim

1980-01-01

102

Cambridge University science magazine www.bluesci.co.uk  

E-print Network

.bluesci.org · Grapefruit · Dr Hypothesis · · Probiotics · Quantum Computers · Chocolate Why do we love it? Astrobiology in association withCambridge's Science Magazine produced by Face Recognition Mind-reading computers and brain produced by Mining the Moon An unexpected fuel source The Large Hadron Collider Europe's £5 billion

Cambridge, University of

103

Dr Liz Hide University of Cambridge Museums Officer  

E-print Network

Museum, Castle Hill www.folkmuseum.org.uk · Cambridge Museum of Technology www) http://www.museumsassociation.org/professional- development/ · SHARE Museums east has a resource bank.sharemuseumseast.org Reading · Museum Basics (Ambrose & Paine, 2006) ­ A comprehensive introduction to all aspects of museum

Cambridge, University of

104

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-print Network

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / Volume 24 / Issue 04 / July 2006, pp 429 - 431 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574705002420, Published online positioning method for a humanoid robot. Robotica, 24, pp 429-431 doi:10.1017/S0263574705002420 Request

Hu, Huosheng

105

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-print Network

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 8 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574711000774, Published online: 25 on taskoriented workspace. Robotica, Available on CJO 2011 doi:10.1017/S0263574711000774 Request Permissions

Kim, Jongwon

106

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-print Network

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click. Goldberg Robotica / Volume 13 / Issue 06 / November 1995, pp 565 573 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574700018646 algorithms for automatic planning by robots in stochastic environments. Robotica,13, pp 565573 doi:10.1017/S

Goldberg, Ken

107

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-print Network

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click predictive controller for robots to follow a virtual leader Dongbing Gu and Huosheng Hu Robotica / Volume 27. Robotica, 27, pp 905-913 doi:10.1017/S0263574708005316 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from

Hu, Huosheng

108

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-print Network

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Vicente Matellán Robotica / Volume 26 / Issue 06 / November 2008, pp 817 - 830 DOI: 10.1017/S (2008). A hybrid approach to fast and accurate localization for legged robots. Robotica, 26, pp 817

Hu, Huosheng

109

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences University of Cambridge Appointment of Deputy Director: Further particulars The Institute The Newton Institute is a national and international visitor the supervision of a Management Committee, see http://www.newton.ac.uk/mancom.html. The Institute has

110

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment  

E-print Network

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects 4 / 25 2.5 / 25 Rated Wind Speed (m/s) 13 10 14.5 ~15 12 The above turbines were chosen to provide, several recent studies examining birds and wind turbines have observed that most birds usually avoid

111

Gregory Jefferis MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.  

E-print Network

Gregory Jefferis MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK. Title: From Smell to Behaviour in the Fly Abstract Our goal is to understand how smell turns into behaviour. The sensory neurons that detect as flies smell different odours. One focus has been processing of sex pheromones that trigger different

Gruen, Sonja

112

Embedding Sustainable Development at Cambridge University Engineering Department  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose--The paper seeks to examine the latest stage in a process of change aimed at introducing concepts of sustainable development into the activities of the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, UK. Design/methodology/approach--The rationale behind defining the skills which future engineers require is discussed and vehicles for…

Fenner, Richard A.; Ainger, Charles M.; Cruickshank, Heather J.; Guthrie, Peter M.

2005-01-01

113

8 Story Street, 5th Floor Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138  

E-print Network

8 Story Street, 5th Floor Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 Tel: 617.496.9348 Fax: 617.496.9350 coache@gse.harvard.edu www.coache.org The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education EXECUTIVE SUMMARY-grained picture of specific policies and practices as well as comparisons by gender, race, and academic areas

Dasgupta, Dipankar

114

World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR  

E-print Network

World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR Additional services for World Trade Review here Climate and trade policies: from mutual destruction to mutual support PATRICK A. MESSERLIN World Trade Review / Volume 11 / Issue 01 / January 2012, pp 53 - 80 DOI: 10.1017/S1474745611000395, Published

Boyer, Edmond

115

Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM  

E-print Network

for fluids that are more shear-thinning. In cases where the layer is subject to a constraining surface on n, with rapid finite-time algebraic decay in shear-thickening cases, large-time exponential decayJournal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal

Worster, M. Grae

116

www.bluesci.co.uk The Cambridge University  

E-print Network

will become dependent on brain-enhancing drugs to function 14 Regulars On the Cover 3 News 4 Reviews 5 History . Smart Drugs Needham . Thought Experiments . Risk FOCUS Higher, Faster, Stronger ISSN1748 recommendations for performing CPR Contents 1 Cambridge University science magazine Easter 2012 Issue 24 Contents

Cambridge, University of

117

Behavioral and Brain Sciences (1999), 22:700-701 Cambridge University Press Copyright 1999 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

Behavioral and Brain Sciences (1999), 22:700-701 Cambridge University Press Copyright © 1999 and neuronal behavior in a neural field model of the superior colliculus Thomas P. Trappenberg a1 and Raymond M. Klein a2 a1 Riken Brain Science Institute, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa

Trappenberg, Thomas

118

Undergraduate-postgraduate astronomy in Cambridge - a student's perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes the astronomical scene at Cambridge University from the point of view of a one-time graduate there: I'm now a first-year postgraduate. I progressed from an interest in Maths and Physics at sixth-form level to a degree in Physics and Theoretical Physics, a postgraduate Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics course (Part III) and now to the Institute of Astronomy.

Williams, Robin

1991-01-01

119

Cambridge Cosmology: The Hot Big Bang Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website introduces the Big Bang Model (also known as the standard cosmology) and the fact that it successfully explains many details about the formation of the Universe. It also touches upon issues not explainable through standard cosmology. A brief history of observational cosmology in the 20th century is given as a reference, followed by a brief history of our Universe as told through standard cosmology as well as particle and quantum cosmology. This site goes through the four 'pillars' of the Hot Big Bang Model: expansion of the Universe after a violent explosion, origin of the cosmic background radiation, nucleosynthesis of the light elements, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structures in the Universe.

Shellard, Paul

120

CIRSI: the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are currently building a panoramic wide field near infrared imaging camera based on 4 Rockwell Hawaii HgCdTe 10242 detectors. The survey instrument will operate in the J and H bands and will be as scientifically versatile and as easy to use as a large format CCD camera. It is expected to be ready for astronomical use by late 1997. It will be particularly well-suited for surveys of star-forming regions, low mass stars, distant galaxies, clusters and QSOs. The camera will be commissioned at the prime focus of the 2.5 m Isaac Newton telescope, where the image scale is 0.45'/pixel, giving an effective field of view of 14.6 by 14.6 arc minutes. The field of view of this camera with 0.15' pixels is 5.1 by 5.1 arc minutes and is thus approximately 60 times larger than the current near-infrared imager on Keck (NIRC). When combined with a 4.0 m class telescope, the combination is approximately 10 times as powerful as the Keck 10.0 m, when the apertures are taken into account. The options for upgrading the camera into a wide field spectroscopic survey instrument are currently being investigated.

Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; McMahon, R. G.; Parry, Ian R.; Piche, F.; Ellis, Richard S.

1997-03-01

121

Flow Field Results of the Cambridge Stratified Swirl Burner Using Laser Doppler Anemometer  

E-print Network

Flow Field Results of the Cambridge Stratified Swirl Burner Using Laser Doppler Anemometer Technical Report CUED/A-TURBO/TR.134 R. Zhou*, M.S. Sweeney, S. Hochgreb Cambridge Combustion... Research Centre Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge *rz242@cam.ac.uk Abstract A series of flow fields generated by a turbulent methane/air stratified swirl burner are investigated using laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) to obtain...

Zhou, Ruigang; Sweeney, Mark; Hochgreb, Simone

2012-06-08

122

A review of "The Cambridge Companion to Newton." by I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith, eds.  

E-print Network

REVIEWS 135 were subject, the ways rulers influenced medicine, and how royal practitioners shaped and reacted to changing political fortunes. I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith, eds. The Cambridge Compan- ion to Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge... University Press, 2002. xiv + 514pp. ?15.95 paper/? 45.00 hard. Review BY ALESSANDRO GIOSTRA, ACCADEMIA GEORGICA, TREIA. ?The goal of this volume is to provide an introduction to Newton?s work, enabling readers to gain more rapid access...

Alessandro Giostra

2003-01-01

123

Scales  

ScienceCinema

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08

124

P?~P; Cambridge journal of undergraduate philosophy  

E-print Network

wi thout on tological gaps (we can call it nature) then we lose that freedom: even our perceptions, desires and beliefs are caused by something else. Bu t do not worry, because reality is bigger than our models of it. And what is the relationship... of the problem itself, (cf. Whi tehead 's consciousness of the importance of history in "Process and Reality", (Cambridge 1929». "I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in!' Boswell's Johnson April...

Anderson, Janet; Susijn, Laura

125

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy  

E-print Network

of the Angles. (These fine stories appeared in the 14th century as part of our historic rivalry with Oxford.) Rather it is clear that it came into being in the first decade of the 13th century. And so the University will shortly be gathering itself to celebrate... , alternating manic intellectual excitement & abysmal depression.’ Geuss supplemented his Philosophy at Cambridge page 8 May 2005 continued from page 1 consumer product, and complaints procedures for individuals can’t secure public goods. This doesn’t show...

126

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jan 2012 IP address: 193.157.195.253 Geol. Mag. 129 (5), 1992, pp. 533-542. Copyright 1992 Cambridge University Press. Printed in Great Britain 533  

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http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jan 2012 IP address: 193.157.195.253 Geol. Mag. 129 (5), 1992, pp. 533-542. Copyright © 1992 Cambridge University Press. Printed in Great Britain 533 Palaeozoic

Torsvik, Trond Helge

127

Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

2010-01-01

128

Second International Symposium on Engineering Systems MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 15-17, 2009  

E-print Network

Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1AG, UK DJ Hamilton Department of Physics of Planned Behavior. Both sets of simulations reveal lessons of possible benefit to policy-makers concerned of applied complexity science, taking methodological inspiration from lattice model computer simulation

Aickelin, Uwe

129

University of Cambridge Equality & Diversity Information Report 2011-12 Equality & Diversity Information  

E-print Network

.2.7 Representation on senior University committees by gender ........................... 19 1.2.8 Equal Pay ReviewsUniversity of Cambridge Equality & Diversity Information Report 2011-12 1 Equality & Diversity Information Report 2011-12 January 2013 #12;University of Cambridge Equality & Diversity Information Report

Travis, Adrian

130

The Stiffness of Tensegrity Structures Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge,  

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The Stiffness of Tensegrity Structures S.D. Guest Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK July 9, 2010 Abstract The stiffness of tensegrity, and the reorientation of forces as already stressed members are rotated. For any particular tensegrity, both sources

Guest, Simon

131

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy, and  

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Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy FOR THE FUTURE Low cost and resilience in the face of uncertainty Thursday 11 March 2010 at the Isaac Newton) of the University of Cambridge 1.30 pm Tea, coffee and biscuits available at the Isaac Newton Institute 2.25 pm

132

Success in the US: Are Cambridge International Assessments Good Preparation for University Study?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the research being conducted by University of Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate for continued studies in colleges and universities. The primary purpose of the research is to highlight…

Shaw, Stuart; Bailey, Clare

2011-01-01

133

Take a seat... Development Office, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, CB2 1TJ  

E-print Network

Take a seat... Take a seat... Development Office, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, CB2 1TJ www.trinhall.cam.ac.uk fundraising@trinhall.cam.ac.uk Tel: 01223 766345 Fax: 01223 765157 Trinity Hall Cambridge registered charity that it will not be possible for an individual to always sit on their chair when they dine in hall. The donor will not own

Lasenby, Joan

134

Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education1  

PubMed Central

The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal–organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout. PMID:20877495

Battle, Gary M.; Ferrence, Gregory M.; Allen, Frank H.

2010-01-01

135

Cambridge-MIT Exchange (CME) Junior Year Abroad at the University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

POTENTIAL 1 2 3 4 MOTIVATION AND ENTHUSIASM FOR ACADEMIC STUDIES 1 2 3 4 ADAPTABILITY AND MATURITY 1 2 3 4 a student's academic record to date, their academic potential and personal maturity. It would be helpful if you could rate the applicant on the following scales and add any comments you believe would help

Polz, Martin

136

University of Cambridge: Economics, Networks and Security Seminar Series  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A biweekly seminar series on Economics, Networks, and Security is being held at the University of Cambridge during fall 2003. This website maintains abstracts of the speakers' presentations and research papers about their topics of discussion. Of the five seminars scheduled, papers for three have been posted online and the remaining two will likely be available in the near future. The first paper outlines the concept of trusted computing and discusses the implications for public policy. The second paper is based on economical aspects of intellectual property, but a less technical resource is also given and is titled Digital Goods in the New Economy. Lastly, the facets of e-commerce and its relation to security is the basis for the third paper. [CL

137

The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

1994-01-01

138

University of Cambridge Museums Connecting you to the wonders of our world  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge Museums Connecting you to the wonders of our world Museum of Archaeology how scientific instruments are important to us all. 8 Museum of Zoology Downing Street CB2 3EJ www.museum.zoo

Steiner, Ullrich

139

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. 1-171, Cambridge MA 02139  

E-print Network

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. 1-171, Cambridge MA 02139 David of Engineering Systems at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research currently focuses on developing

Levit, Anna

140

Studying Psychology at Cambridge Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (C800 BA/PBS)  

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to Computer Science Modern Societies Social Anthropology Cognitive Neuroscience Psychology & Social Issues and Cognitive Psychology plus two optional papers. Experimental Psychology, a research project, plus oneStudying Psychology at Cambridge Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (C800 BA

Steiner, Ullrich

141

Local Restaurants -Cambridge Cuisine Type Description Location by Neighborhood/Area  

E-print Network

in small production wine + beer, handcrafted local cheese and homemade provisions MIT - Mass. Ave Square, Cambridge The Blue Room One Kendall Square 617-494-9034 http://www.theblueroom.net/ Mediterranean

de Weck, Olivier L.

142

Economic impact of M.I.T. on Cambridge and Metropolitan Boston  

E-print Network

This thesis investigated the economic impact of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on its host city, Cambridge, and upon the Boston Metropolitan Area. The primary purpose was to develop sufficient information about ...

Finberg, Irving William

1964-01-01

143

A hotel economic feasibility study : Monsignor O'Brien Highway, Cambridge, Massachusetts  

E-print Network

A hotel economic feasibility study was carried out for an assemblage of four (4) parcels located on Monsignor O'Brien Highway in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The primary objective of this economic feasibility study was to ...

Rogers, Mark P. (Mark Paul)

2007-01-01

144

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy, Issue 10  

E-print Network

to Mrs Margrit Edwards in December 2012 after 25 years with the University, 16 of these as Principal Secretary in the Faculty. Mrs Lesley Lancaster retired in April 2013 from her role as Graduate Secretary after 22 years. They have both played... forthcoming book publication “Ludwig Wittgenstein Dictating Philosophy: to Francis Skinner”. Philosophy at Cambridge page 8 May 2013 Elizabeth Anscombe Emily Thomas on one of the Cambridge greats Elizabeth Anscombe (1919–2001) was one of the most...

Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

145

Cambridge Cognitive Examination: performance of healthy elderly Brazilians with low education levels Cambridge Cognitive Examination: desempenho de idosos brasileiros saudáveis com baixa escolaridade  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to estimate the quartile dis- tribution on the cognitive assessment of normal elderly with low education as measured by the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG). A sample of 292 elderly (> 65 years of age), screened for dementia and depression, were assessed us- ing the CAMCOG. The CAMCOG scores of normal subjects (n = 206) were stratified according

Henriques Moreira; Roberto Alves Lourenço; Claudia Soares; Eliasz Engelhardt; Jerson Laks

2009-01-01

146

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 23 Feb 2010 IP address: 82.21.57.233 Robotica (2005) volume 23, pp. 123129. 2005 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

) volume 23, pp. 123­129. © 2005 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0263574704000529 Printed that is limited to applications with a priori known trajectory movements. The P2Arm developed by ActivMedia) convention and methodology are used in this section to derive its kinematics. The coordinate frame

Hu, Huosheng

147

Development and Current Status of the “Cambridge” Loudness Models  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness—the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids. PMID:25315375

Moore, Brian C. J.

2014-01-01

148

Gray, W. D. (2008). Cognitive modeling for cognitive engineering. In R. Sun (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of computational psychology (pp. 565-588). New York: Cambridge University Press. Page 1  

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handbook of computational psychology (pp. 565-588). New York: Cambridge University Press. Page 1 CognitiveGray, W. D. (2008). Cognitive modeling for cognitive engineering. In R. Sun (Ed.), The Cambridge Modeling for Cognitive Engineering Wayne D. Gray 1 Introduction Cognitive engineering is the application

Gray, Wayne

149

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On­screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted + # . (18.11) The probability that the next symbol is symbol w is Fw F + # . (18.12) Figure 18.6 shows Zipf Press 2003. On­screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You

MacKay, David J.C.

150

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 23 Jul 2009 IP address: 131.111.16.227 J . Fluid Me&. (1980), vol. 101,part 2, pp. 403-421  

E-print Network

&. (1980), vol. 101,part 2, pp. 403-421 Printed in Great Britain. 403 Heat transfer to a slowly moving and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW (Received 26 March 1980) Using

Hinch, John

151

J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 658, pp. 409437. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112010001801  

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, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 01238, USA 2 Departments of Chemical Engineering and Mathematics: general fluid mechanics, micro-/nanofluid dynamics, Stokesian dynamics 1. Introduction With recentJ. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 658, pp. 409­437. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S

Bazant, Martin Z.

152

1The University of Cambridge Athena SWAN Bronze renewal submission November 2012 Athena SWAN Bronze University award renewal application  

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1The University of Cambridge Athena SWAN Bronze renewal submission November 2012 Athena SWAN Bronze and Humanities, Humanities and Social Sciences). The Department of Physics currently holds a Silver Athena SWAN Research Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute #12;2The University of Cambridge Athena SWAN

Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

153

Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 WHEN PLASTICITY?  

E-print Network

Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July: concrete, plasticity, cracking, flow, size effect, fibre reinforcement 1 BACKGROUND The need for adequate ductility in practical concrete structures is widely recognised, to cope with various circumstances

Burgoyne, Chris

154

J. Child Lang. 26 (1999), 217260. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1999 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

of change; (5) Brain development; (6) Interactions, all the way down, and (7) Rethinking 217 #12;CHILDJ. Child Lang. 26 (1999), 217­260. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1999 Cambridge University Press processes are best characterized as fluid interactions embodied in a highly plastic brain, and that the best

155

BOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge  

E-print Network

systems for use on planet Earth are then covered. Chapter 18 concerns lightning protection techniquesBOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge University Press, incredibly useful ­ schol- arly compendium of all that is known about lightning, its causes, and the many

Florida, University of

156

University of Cambridge scholarships awarded to learners in Pakistan and India  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge scholarships awarded to learners in Pakistan and India 24 April 2012 We in India and Pakistan who have received an offer of a place at the University. The scholarships were for students in India - Miss Payoshaa Shah (Prabhavati Padamshi Soni International Junior College, Mumbai) has

Travis, Adrian

157

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PNS  

E-print Network

: Click here Terms of use : Click here Taste, olfactory and food texture reward processing in the brain://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0029665112000821 How to cite this article: Edmund T. Rolls (2012). Taste, olfactory and food texture reward and food texture reward processing in the brain and the control of appetite Edmund T. Rolls Department

Rolls, Edmund T.

158

Ian Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, xvii + 302 pp.  

E-print Network

Ian Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, and as an introduction to statistical inference and decision theory, it is even better. Hacking writes very clearly and engagingly throughout. A good supply of well-chosen exercises appear at the end of each chapter, and Hacking

Fitelson, Branden

159

Psychological Medicine, 2000, 30, 345357. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2000 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

Psychological Medicine, 2000, 30, 345�357. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2000 Cambridge to understanding thought disorder in schizophrenia G. R. KUPERBERG," P. K. MCGUIRE AND A. S. DAVID From the Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College School of Medicine

Kuperberg, Gina

160

SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NIO AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON" TO  

E-print Network

1 SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NI�O AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON Science, V. 17, pp. 97-112. #12;2 OPENING QUOTE � Sir Gilbert Walker (1925) -- "It is a natural or amplitude." #12;3 OUTLINE (1) Background (2) Sir Gilbert Walker (3) Yule-Walker Equations (4) Reaction

Katz, Richard

161

Anderson, J. (1983). The architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University.  

E-print Network

of primitive culture. Journal of American Fork- Lore, 17, 243-254. Boas, F. (1911). The mind of primitive man processes. In K. W. Spence and J. T. Spence (Eds.), The psychology of learning and motivation: Advances of Educational Research, 64(1), 1-35. Cole, M. (1996). Cultural psychology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University

Sandifer, Cody

162

An adaptation of the Cambridge Colour Test for use with animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, molecular biological techniques have presented new opportunities for addressing questions concerning the neural mechanisms involved in color coding, thereby rousing renewed interest in animal color vision testing. We have modified a computer-based assessment tool, the Cambridge Colour Test, to make it suitable for use with animals. Here, the validity and reliability of the testing method were evaluated using squirrel

KATHERINE MANCUSO; MAUREEN NEITZ; JAY NEITZ

2006-01-01

163

British Journal of Music Education http://journals.cambridge.org/BME  

E-print Network

British Journal of Music Education http://journals.cambridge.org/BME Additional services for British Journal of Music Education: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints music lessons Dan Stowell and Simon Dixon British Journal of Music Education / FirstView Article

Dixon, Simon

164

The Journal of Agricultural Science http://journals.cambridge.org/AGS  

E-print Network

The Journal of Agricultural Science http://journals.cambridge.org/AGS Additional services for The Journal of Agricultural Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints The Journal of Agricultural Science / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 12 DOI: 10.1017/S

165

Provisional Approaches to Goals for School Mathematics; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 37.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-6. In view of the experiences of other curriculum groups and of the general discussions since 1963, the present report initiates the next step in evolving the "Goals".…

Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

166

Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in  

E-print Network

PA Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in 1943, and blew it up Dambusters raid recreated to reveal mystery of the bouncing bombs By Jerome Taylor Monday, 2 May 2011 It has gone down in history as one of the world's most daring bombing raids � a feat

Talbot, James P.

167

The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

2013-01-01

168

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed  

E-print Network

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed JJB Gill1 DAR Davies2 of Domestic Animals; Toulouse-Auzeville, 10-13 July 1990) sheep / chimerism / XX/XY / infertility-type external genitalia. Apart from this animal, all the ultimately infertile females showed no sign

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

What To Look for in ESL Admission Tests: Cambridge Certificate Exams, IELTS, and TOEFL.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Familiarizes test users with issues to consider when employing assessments for screening and admission purposes. Examines the purpose, content, and scoring methods of three English-as-a-Second-Language admissions tests--the Cambridge certificate exams, International English Language Teaching System, and Test of English as a Foreign…

Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline; Turner, Carolyn E.

2000-01-01

170

Downloaded: 14 Nov 2008journals.cambridge.org How will public and animal health interventions drive  

E-print Network

Downloaded: 14 Nov 2008journals.cambridge.org How will public and animal health interventions drive, such as chemotherapy and vaccination, alter parasite survival and repro- duction, the main selective pressures shaping models of long-lasting interventions, such as vaccination, and regularly repeated short interventions

Read, Andrew

171

University of Cambridge, Materials Science & Metallurgy H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Other Techniques  

E-print Network

University of Cambridge, Materials Science & Metallurgy H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Other Techniques Thermogravimetry Thermogravimetry (TG) is a technique by which the weight of a substance, in an environment heated recording system. The assembly has to be capable of continuously registering any weight changes in the test

Cambridge, University of

172

Cambridge Safari How many animals can you find lurking in the buildings of  

E-print Network

the map inside to guide you to zoology in the architecture, and send us pictures of the animals that you pictures of animals in the buildings of Cambridge through Facebook and Twitter, #cambridgesafari www.facebook.com/Zoology of Zoology The Museum of Zoology is currently closed for major refurbishment supported by the Heritage

Steiner, Ullrich

173

Multi-Modal Courtship in the Peacock Spider, Maratus volans (O.P.-Cambridge, 1874)  

E-print Network

Multi-Modal Courtship in the Peacock Spider, Maratus volans (O.P.-Cambridge, 1874) Madeline B, Maratus volans, has one of the most elaborate courtship displays in arthropods. Using regular and high- speed video segments captured in the lab, we provide detailed descriptions of complete male courtship

Elias, Damian Octavio

174

Further Particulars: Programme and Visitor Secretary (Reception) The University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

, faculties, schools and other institutions plus a central administration. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national and international for various committees. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge

Travis, Adrian

175

The Cambridge Continuum from CIE--A Positive Alternative for U.S. Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Registrars and admissions officers across the U.S. will have noticed a gradual but definite increase in students bearing qualifications from CIE--University of Cambridge International Examinations. Most already recognize the Advanced Level (A Level) and Ordinary Level (O Level) qualifications; many are less familiar with IGCSE (International…

Eason, Tom; Reach, Sherry; Sismey, Val

2004-01-01

176

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, UK Phylogenetics: New data, new Phylogenetic challenges  

E-print Network

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, UK Phylogenetics: New data, new molecular evolution. The workshop is taking place at the Isaac Newton Institute, where the highly Phylogenetic challenges Follow-up Meeting 20 ­ 24 JUNE 2011 in association with the Newton Institute programme

Warnow,Tandy

177

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS  

E-print Network

British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS Additional services for British Journal of Political Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial and FLORENCE HAEGEL British Journal of Political Science / Volume 37 / Issue 01 / January 2007, pp 1 - 22 DOI

Boyer, Edmond

178

Ideology, Class and Rationality: A Critique of Cambridge International Examinations' "Thinking Skills" Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article undertakes a critique of the aims and objectives of "Thinking Skills", one of the most widely and internationally used curricula in the teaching of thinking, offered by the University of Cambridge International Examinations. By engaging in a critical discourse analysis of how political and class biases are (re-)produced in the forms…

Lim, Leonel

2012-01-01

179

The Fault Line between Keynes and the Cambridge Keynesians: A Review Essay  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay reviews Michael Ambrosi's important but neglected book on the formative period of Keynesian economics. The book traces the evolution of a Cambridge macroeconomic tradition running from Marshall and Pigou to Keynes, and interprets The General Theory as a response to Pigou's analysis of unemployment. Ambrosi also argues that Keynes's disciples, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor and Joan Robinson, were,

M. G. Hayes

2010-01-01

180

Some Cambridge reactions to The General Theory: David Champernowne and Joan Robinson on full employment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay analyses early reactions put forward by Cambridge economists David Champernowne and Joan Robinson to J. M. Keynes's treatment of the labour market in The General Theory. Champernowne's and Robinson's critical reactions represented attempts to fill the gap of the determinants of changes in money-wages, which they both identified as a weak spot in the argument of the book.

Mauro Boianovsky

2005-01-01

181

For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI  

E-print Network

For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI intelligence (AI) in the context of its history and core themes. After a concise preamble introducing by a succinct introduction to the major research areas within AI. The chapter will continue with a description

Memphis, University of

182

Athena SWAN Bronze department award application Name of university: University Of Cambridge  

E-print Network

Athena SWAN Bronze department award application Name of university: University Of Cambridge1@cam.ac.uk Telephone: +44 (0)1223 337865 Departmental website address: www.maths.cam.ac.uk Athena, sizes and compositions. The definition of a `department' for SWAN purposes can be found on the Athena

Mottram, Nigel

183

n the summer of 2009, a team of Cam-bridge University undergraduates  

E-print Network

violaceum were likewise modified to yield green and purple. The students' technicolor creations, dubbed "E. chromi" in reference to the organisms' scientific name, won the Cambridge team the grand prize at that year's International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) compe- tition, in which high

184

www.cambridge.org/us/american-history American Labor and Economic  

E-print Network

resistance of marginalized and underrepresented groups (women, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. As economists, pol- iticians, union leaders, and advocates for African-American and Mexican-American workerswww.cambridge.org/us/american-history American Labor and Economic Citizenship New Capitalism from

Tsien, Roger Y.

185

Poster presented at the 11th Cambridge Workshop on  

E-print Network

horizontally averaged quantities: the natural logarithm of the mean gas pres­ sure and the logarithm calculations of time­dependent compressible convection, the dynamics, spatial scales, and thermal structure of the convection zone. Stars with radiatively dominated weak convection have a larger proportionality factor

Freytag, Bernd

186

The Cambridge Forum for Sustainability and the Environment Members: Biographies  

E-print Network

in controlling epidemics. Keywords · spread of genetically modified crops · control of antibiotic and pesticide of disease and other organisms using a combination of experimentation and modelling. His group's current-borne, micro-organisms at a range of spatial scales and as model experimental microcosms of larger

Edinburgh, University of

187

18. Van der Voo, R. Paleomagnetism of the Atlantic, Tethys and Iapetus Oceans (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993).  

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, 315­379 (1994). 20. Baumgartner, P. O. Age and genesis of Tethyan Jurassic Radiolarites. Eclog. Geol. Helv. 80, 831­879 (1987). 21. Bartolini, A., Baumgartner, P. O. & Guex, J. Middle and Late Jurassic ............................................................................................................................................................................. During the last glacial period, large millennial-scale temperature oscillations--the `Dansgaard

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

188

The Science of Pain World of the Nanoputians For He's a Jolly Old (Cambridge) Fellow Designer Babies  

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· Designer Babies · Issue 1 Michaelmas 2004 A New Science Magazine for Cambridge in association with. Designed for users, the Libra range combines new ideas with proven technology to offer outstanding

Cambridge, University of

189

Nonlinear Radiating Instability of a Barotropic Eastern Boundary Current Massachusetts Institute of Technology/WHOI Joint Program, Cambridge, Massachusetts  

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Nonlinear Radiating Instability of a Barotropic Eastern Boundary Current JINBO WANG Massachusetts Institute of Technology/WHOI Joint Program, Cambridge, Massachusetts MICHAEL A. SPALL Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts GLENN R. FLIERL AND PAOLA MALANOTTE-RIZZOLI Massachusetts

190

Convective cell formation in a levitated dipole Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139  

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, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 D. T. Garnier Columbia University, New in the Levitated Dipole Experiment LDX , which is being built jointly by Columbia University and Massachusetts

Garnier, Darren T.

191

Stability of a plasma confined in a dipole field Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139  

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Stability of a plasma confined in a dipole field J. Kesner Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received 3 March 1998; accepted 9 July 1998 Plasma

192

Impact of communications between firms on innovation and new product development : the case of the Cambridge/Boston biotech cluster  

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The paper reports the results of a study of innovations and new product development in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Boston/Cambridge cluster. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that more ...

Kolosov, Dmitry, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01

193

Finite size effects in cluster-cluster aggregation Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 OHE, U.K.  

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, Cambridge CB3 OHE, U.K. and R. Jullien Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 this formula, we consider the « Sutherland's ghost » model, which has been pro- posed to represent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA  

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Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA light years) Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS Image CXC operated for NASA by the Smithsonian Astrophysical

195

Tuesday mornings at the University Centre You will receive a warm welcome in the University Centre on Mill Lane, Cambridge  

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coffee and juice � Book lending library with books about Cambridge, English history and culture plus followed by a College tour and coffee with Professor Rugg. 10.30 am, Magdalene College Porters'Lodge. Free

196

Tuesday mornings at the University Centre You will receive a warm welcome in the University Centre on Mill Lane, Cambridge  

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coffee and juice · Book lending library with books about Cambridge, English history and culture plus'Lodge. Free B Thursday 15 May How a small drapery store became today's John Lewis: coffee, croissants

197

The Impact of Damming the Ord River on the Fine Sediment Budget in Cambridge Gulf, Northwestern Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

WOLANSKI, E.; SPAGNOL, S., and WILLIAMS, D., 2004. The impact of damming the Ord River on the fine sediment budget in Cambridge Gulf, northwestern Australia. Journal of Coastal Research, 20(3), 801-807. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Cambridge Gulf is a turbid embayment about 50 km long, with a mean water depth of about 12 m. The spring tidal range

E. Wolanski; S. Spagnol; D. Williams

2004-01-01

198

Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week, Bartleby.com (last reviewed in the December 10, 1999 Scout Report) announced the online publication of all eighteen volumes of the classic Cambridge History of English and American Literature. This excellent free resource "comprises the largest public reference work of literary criticism and history on the Internet." Originally published in 1907-1921, the volumes include 303 chapters and more than 11,000 pages, edited and written by a worldwide panel of 171 leading scholars and thinkers of the early twentieth century. The online version features over 5,600 files, searchable by keyword and browseable by volume, chapter, and section. The electronic Cambridge History also includes chapter and bibliography indexes. Although a bit dated in parts, these eighteen volumes are a valuable, and now easily accessible, research tool for secondary and university students.

199

PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

2013-02-01

200

Healthy Living Cambridge Kids: A Community-based Participatory Effort to Promote Healthy Weight and Fitness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community-based healthy weight intervention on child weight and fitness. Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have monitored BMI and fitness annually since 2000. Annual increases of overweight and obesity from 2000 (37.0%) to 2004 (39.1%), triggered a multidisciplinary team of researchers, educators, health care, and public health professionals to mobilize

Virginia R. Chomitz; Robert J. McGowan; Josefine M. Wendel; Sandra A. Williams; Howard J. Cabral; Stacey E. King; Dawn B. Olcott; Maryann Cappello; Susan Breen; Karen A. Hacker

2010-01-01

201

PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet  

PubMed Central

Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined 18FDG PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment. PMID:24339455

Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C; Carpenter, T Adrian

2013-01-01

202

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy, Issue 11  

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focused on all three areas. Prof. Matt Kramer, from the Cambridge Law Faculty, discussed the consequences of Thomson’s distinction between infringements and violations of rights when we consider cases of desperation. Prof. Jennifer Hornsby from Birkbeck... award; and Dr Michael Blome-Tillmann is an EC Marie Curie Research Fellow for 2 years. Student Prizes Ali Boyle (Peterhouse) was awarded the Matthew Buncombe prize for best overall achievement in the MPhil. The Craig Taylor prize for best performance...

Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

2014-05-13

203

A spiritual leader? Cambridge zoology, mountaineering and the death of F.M. Balfour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frank Balfour was regarded by his colleagues as one of the greatest biologists of his day and Charles Darwin’s successor, yet the young aristocrat died in a climbing accident before his thirty-first birthday. Reactions to his death reveal much about the image of science and scientists in late-Victorian Britain. In this paper I examine the development of the Cambridge school

Helen Blackman

2004-01-01

204

Street Versus Rooftop Level Concentrations of Fine Particles in a Cambridge Street Canyon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dispersion of particles, as evidenced by changes in their number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs), in urban\\u000a street canyons, is still not well understood. This study compares measurements by a fast-response particle spectrometer (DMS500)\\u000a of the PNDs and the PNCs (5–1000 nm, sampled at 1 Hz) at street and rooftop levels in a Cambridge UK street canyon, and examines\\u000a mixing, physical and

Prashant Kumar; Paul S. Fennell; Allan N. Hayhurst; Rex E. Britter

2009-01-01

205

Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

Dupree, Andrea K.

1998-01-01

206

Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge  

PubMed Central

Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education. PMID:24899813

Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

2014-01-01

207

nature biotechnology volume 29 number 2 FebruArY 2011 149 1Society of Fellows, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. 2Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. 3Wyss  

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, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. 2Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. 3Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. 4Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Church, George M.

208

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

E-print Network

, medical students undertake a programme of patient contact (PfP), and vets engage in practical animal this programme specification at any time. MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE TRIPOS 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation Details General Medical Council

de Gispert, Adrià

209

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

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of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation

de Gispert, Adrià

210

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

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of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation Details n/a 4. Name of Final

de Gispert, Adrià

211

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

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of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses of Cambridge 2. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation Details None 4. Name of Final

de Gispert, Adrià

212

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 14 Jul 2009 IP address: 131.111.16.227 J. Fluid Mech. (1995), uol. 282, pp. 373403  

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of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, The University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW, such as colloidal and macromolecular systems which have internal degrees of freedom describing changes simulations of Brownian motion are currently being used to study a wide range of phenomena in colloidal

Hinch, John

213

19/03/2013 15:01BBC News -Zoe Cambridge's emotional talking head Page 1 of 3http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21827924  

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between Cam- bridge University's Engineering Department and the Toshiba Research Laboratory. Her genesis visual data - which have been a strength of Cambridge and the Toshiba lab in particular. It has been led of Cambridge and the Toshiba laboratory on the Science Park. Professor Cipolla says Zoe is "the interface

Cipolla, Roberto

214

Characterization of the genus Hernandarioides F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 (Opiliones, Gonyleptidae, Ampycinae).  

PubMed

Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge (1905) described the monotypic genus Hernandarioides based on the species Hernandarioides plana F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905, from Bugaba, Panama. The etymology of the generic name was inspired by the pre-existing Hernandaria Sørensen, 1884, because of the obliteration of the scutal grooves (which in this case is a convergence between the two unrelated groups Ampycinae and Hernandariinae). The species description was based only on the female holotype. Modern taxonomic descriptions of laniatorean harvestmen are most commonly based upon male holotypes because females lack many diagnostic characters. The holotype, deposited in the Natural History Museum, London, is brittle and does not bring much meaningful information about the species. Hernandarioides was not originally included in any subfamily of Gonyleptidae, and was included by Roewer (1913: 464) in the Hernandariinae. Goodnight & Goodnight (1942: 18) described in Prostygninae the monotypic genus Kaluga along with the species Kaluga elongata Goodnight & Goodnight, 1942, from Casita Alta, a locality very close to Bugaba, providing uninformative illustrative material. A little later, Goodnight & Goodnight (1947: 15) synonymized Kaluga with Hernandarioides and Kaluga elongata with Hernandarioides plana. Kury (2003: 105) proposed the unjustified emendation Hernandarioides planus. Finally Kury & Alonso-Zarazaga (2011: 53) transferred the genus to the Ampycinae and explained that the grammatical gender of Hernandarioides is feminine, reestablishing the original inflection Hernandarioides plana.  PMID:25081774

Kury, Adriano B; Quintero, Diomedes A

2014-01-01

215

Setting up a discipline: conflicting agendas of the Cambridge History of Science Committee, 1936-1950.  

PubMed

Traditionally the domain of scientists, the history of science became an independent field of inquiry in the twentieth century and mostly after the Second World War. This process of emancipation was accompanied by a historiographical departure from previous, 'scientistic' practices, a transformation often attributed to influences from sociology, philosophy and history. Similarly, the liberal humanists who controlled the Cambridge History of Science Committee after 1945 emphasized that their contribution lay in the special expertise they, as trained historians, brought to the venture. However, the scientists who had founded the Committee in the 1930s had already advocated a sophisticated contextual approach: innovation in the history of science thus clearly came also from within the ranks of scientists who practiced in the field. Moreover, unlike their scientist predecessors on the Cambridge Committee, the liberal humanists supported a positivistic protocol that has since been criticized for its failure to properly contextualize early modern science. Lastly, while celebrating the rise of modern science as an international achievement, the liberal humanists also emphasized the peculiar Englishness of the phenomenon, In this respect, too, their outlook had much in common with the practices from which they attempted to distance their project. PMID:11640235

Mayer, A K

2000-12-01

216

Cambridge Cosmology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is meant for the introductory astronomy student who is seeking to understand cosmology issues. There is extensive information on the Big Bang theory, galaxies and clusters, relic radiation, cosmic strings et al, and inflation. There are several helpful movies and animations disperses throughout the website.

2007-01-24

217

Individual Rationality and Participation in Large Scale, Multi-hospital Kidney Exchange  

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Individual Rationality and Participation in Large Scale, Multi-hospital Kidney Exchange [Extended Harvard University Cambridge, MA aroth@hbs.edu ABSTRACT As multi-hospital kidney exchange clearinghouses ABSTRACT When kidney exchange was just beginning, most exchanges were conducted in single hospitals

Sandholm, Tuomas W.

218

Hopkins, C. D. (1999). Signal evolution in electric communication. In The Design of Animal Communication, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press.  

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Communication, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12;Hopkins, C. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12;Hopkins, C. D

Hopkins, Carl D.

219

Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

Mohr, Peter

220

Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 APPLICATION OF PLASTICITY THEORY TO REINFORCED  

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Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 11 APPLICATION OF PLASTICITY THEORY TO REINFORCED CONCRETE DEEP BEAMS Ashraf ASHOUR 1 Keun-and-tie, mechanism, capacity. 1 INTRODUCTION Reinforced concrete deep beams are fairly common structural elements

Burgoyne, Chris

221

Least-squares migration using complex wavelets Mark Miller* and Nick Kingsbury, Cambridge University; Richard Hobbs, Durham University  

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of definition of this term for a complex wavelet basis. Least-squares migration using complex wavelets LSMLeast-squares migration using complex wavelets Mark Miller* and Nick Kingsbury, Cambridge involving non- stationary data. In this paper, a complex wavelet based least-squares migration (LSM) method

Kingsbury, Nick

222

"Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman  

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.P., and Prokhorov, E.N. 2003. Lightning and Lightning Protection, 330 p., Moscow: Znak. Loeb, L.B. 2004. The Kinetic"Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman Additions to Appendix: Books on lightning and related subjects (Rev. May 2006) Dibner, B. 1976

Florida, University of

223

Two new spider species of the genus Chrysso O. P.-Cambridge, 1882 (Araneae, Theridiidae) in Hainan Island, China  

PubMed Central

Abstract Two new spider species of the genus Chrysso O. P.-Cambridge, 1882 are reported from Hainan Island, China, Chrysso bifurcasp. n. (male, female) and Chrysso bicuspidatasp. n. (male, female). Chrysso bimaculata Yoshida, 1998is recorded from China for the first time. PMID:22639529

Zhang, Bao-Shi; Zhang, Feng

2012-01-01

224

Meteorites, Ice, and Antarctica. William A. Cassidy. A personal account. Cambridge University Press, 2003, 349 p., US $25 (ISBN  

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Meteorites, Ice, and Antarctica. William A. Cassidy. A personal account. Cambridge University Press heard a talk at a scientific meeting about meteorites that a team of Japanese glaci- ologists had found in Antarctica in 1969. He knew that meteorites were rare, yet the glaciologists had found nine meteorites

225

Ada Numerica (1998), pp. 1-49 Cambridge University Press, 1998 Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo  

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Ada Numerica (1998), pp. 1-49 © Cambridge University Press, 1998 Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo-mail: caiflisch@math.ucla.edu Monte Carlo is one of the most versatile and widely used numerical methods. Its convergence rate, O(N~1 ^2 ), is independent of dimension, which shows Monte Carlo to be very robust but also

Li, Tiejun

226

J Fluid Mech (IYYh), rol 324. p p 55-82 Copyright 0 1996 Cambridge Universit! Press  

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J Fluid Mech (IYYh), rol 324. p p 55-82 Copyright 0 1996 Cambridge Universit! Press 55 Hydraulic the jump. The energy loss in the jump is proportional to the third power of the jump amplitude, which is similar to classical two-dimensional hydraulic jumps in non-rotating fluids. Jump properties are discussed

227

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this  

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of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses. Teaching Institution University of Cambridge 3. Accreditation Details None 4. Name of Final Award Bachelor

de Gispert, Adrià

228

J. Plasma Physics: page 1 of 6. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/S0022377814000270  

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J. Plasma Physics: page 1 of 6. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/S0022377814000270 1 Preliminary characteristics of magnetic field and plasma performance in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment 2014) The Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) device is a newly constructed research instrument

Merlino, Robert L.

229

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this  

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. All Linguistics Tripos students take core courses in `Linguistic Theory' and in `Language History this programme specification at any time. LINGUISTICS TRIPOS 1 Awarding body University of Cambridge 2 Teaching Programme Title Linguistics Tripos 6 UCAS Code n/a 7 Benchmark Statement Linguistics 8 Qualifications

de Gispert, Adrià

230

SOIL MIX REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY (PROJECT SMiRT) In October 2007, Cambridge University launched the largest Technology Strategy  

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SOIL MIX REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY (PROJECT SMiRT) OVERVIEW In October 2007, Cambridge University. Project SMiRT (Soil Mix Remediation Technology) is a £1.24M project led by the contractor Bachy Soletanche launched the largest Technology Strategy Board funded project on Contaminated Land Remediation Technologies

Travis, Adrian

231

PROF. MICHAEL PHILIP SHORT 203 Pemberton St. #2, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA +1-617-347-7763  

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EDUCATION Ph.D., Nuclear Science & Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, MA August 2010 "A Functionally Graded and future nuclear reactors · Material & microstructure design of new alloys · Experimental material design research experience in nuclear materials science and engineering · Especially skilled at experimental

Chen, Sow-Hsin

232

Protein Science (1997), 6: 246-248. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 1997 The Protein Society  

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; structural variability; World Wide Web 1 of 5 1/30/00 8:08 PM Protein Science 6(1):246-248. Library constructed a library of protein family cores, accessible over the World Wide Web at httpProtein Science (1997), 6: 246- 248. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright

Gerstein, Mark

233

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1 Athena SWAN Silver department award application  

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Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1: ZOOLOGY Date of application: 29 November 2013 Date of university Bronze Athena SWAN award: May 2013 of words used. Click here for additional guidance on completing the template. #12;Department of Zoology

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Protein Science (1995), 4:1217-1232. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1995 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1995), 4:1217-1232. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1995 The Protein Society Building proteins from C, coordinates using the dihedral probability grid be applied to many problems in peptide and protein modeling. Here we present the DPG-MC method and apply

Goddard III, William A.

235

Tuesday mornings at the University Centre You will receive a warm welcome in the University Centre on Mill Lane, Cambridge  

E-print Network

coffee and juice · Book lending library with books about Cambridge, English history and culture plus Saturday 8 March Tour ofTrinity College followed by coffee withThe Master and his partner. 10 am January Coffee in the Provost's Lodge, followed by visit to the College Archives. 10.40 am, King's College

Lasenby, Joan

236

J. Plasma Physics (2009), vol. 75, part 5, pp. 709711. c 2009 Cambridge University Press Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

J. Plasma Physics (2009), vol. 75, part 5, pp. 709­711. c 2009 Cambridge University Press Printed in the United Kingdom 709 B O O K R E V I E W Elementary Physics of Complex Plasmas, Lecture Notes on Physics0022377809990225 The treatise Elementary Physics of Complex Plasmas was written primarily for researchers

Merlino, Robert L.

237

COMMERCIALIZING A DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY BASED UPON UNIVERSITY IP THROUGH OPEN INNOVATION: A CASE STUDY OF CAMBRIDGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the use of a university spin-out firm to bring a potentially disruptive technology to market. The focus for discussion is how a spin-out can build a technology ecosystem of providers of complementary resources to enable partner organizations to build competence in a novel and potentially disruptive technology. The paper uses the illustrative case of Cambridge Display Technology

TIM MINSHALL; STUART SELDON; DAVID PROBERT

2007-01-01

238

M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

Blazer, Christie

2011-01-01

239

What if I have a disability? The University of Cambridge welcomes applications from disabled students or those with a  

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to provide a suitable learning environment for disabled students. The University's Disability Resource Centre, and resources to disabled students. As well as giving support and advice to those studying at Cambridge and we can also put you in touch with other disabled students who are studying here. For advice about

Steiner, Ullrich

240

More Effective ABE Instruction for Institutionalized Adult Alcoholics and Addicts through the Cambridge Kentucky GED Video Series. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Cambridge/Kentucky Educational Television General Educational Development (GED) Video Series as a tool for providing adult basic education (ABE) instruction to institutionalized drug addicts and alcoholics at Eagleville Hospital in Eagleville, Pennsylvania. After the integration of the…

Mellon, Thomas A.

241

In: Brewer, W, Pantelis C and Castle D (eds) Smell and the Brain. Cambridge University Press 7 __________________________________________________  

E-print Network

In: Brewer, W, Pantelis C and Castle D (eds) Smell and the Brain. Cambridge University Press 7. It was not a scent that made things smell better, not some sachet, some toiletry. It was something completely new of scents, odours, smells or #12;aromas as mnemonic cues that can revive, refresh, retrieve and recreate

Park, Sohee

242

Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 GENERALISED COLLAPSE ANALYSIS OF CONCRETE BRIDGES  

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, 2007 193 GENERALISED COLLAPSE ANALYSIS OF CONCRETE BRIDGES Campbell MIDDLETON Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Keywords: yield-line, collapse, failure, concrete, slab, bridges. 1 INTRODUCTION A new technique for evaluating the ultimate strength of reinforced concrete bridges has been developed

Burgoyne, Chris

243

Collagen structure deciphered CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--For the first time, an MIT researcher's atom-by-atom study of the  

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Collagen structure deciphered CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--For the first time, an MIT researcher's atom-by-atom study of the deformation and fracture of collagen explains Nature's design of its most abundant protein material. It is due to the basis of the collagen structure that leads to its high strength and ability

Buehler, Markus J.

244

"Cambridge-Allston Connection by Bike, Rail, Trolley or Cable Car" 10/30/2005 Oliver Knill  

E-print Network

and poison the air. Health Traffic noise and exhaust produce stress and health problems. Crossing. Streets around Harvard square are congested. Additional streets or bridges will attract traffic and worsen Cambridge and Allston. 5) Form a traffic-free river area between Harvard campus and the Charles river. (We

Knill, Oliver

245

Biofilms (2004) 1, 239263 C 2005 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1479050505001596 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Biofilms (2004) 1, 239­263 C 2005 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1479050505001596 Printed A B S T R A C T The study of bacterial colonies is a crucial step towards understanding biofilms. We on biocomplexity in general and biofilms in particular. This review is aimed at researchers from different

Jacob, Eshel Ben

246

Cambridge College Guide 29th November 2011 Document owned by the Chair of the Graduate Tutors Committee.  

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Committee. Cambridge Colleges ­ a guide for graduate students Index 1. Introduction 2. Pastoral support practice. Colleges promote and sustain these values through the care they offer to their students that graduate students enjoy in College. Using such facilities and participating in your College's graduate

Talbot, James P.

247

Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

1983-07-01

248

Reginald Crundall Punnett: First Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912  

PubMed Central

R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett’s career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of “partial coupling” in the sweet pea (later “linkage”) and to the diagram known as Punnett’s square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described. PMID:22964834

Edwards, A. W. F.

2012-01-01

249

Agricultural accidents: A study of 132 patients seen at addenbrooke's hospital, Cambridge, in 12 months  

PubMed Central

In a 12-month study 132 patients injured in agricultural accidents were treated at the Accident Service of Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Agricultural machinery and implements were concerned in 50% of the accidents and animals in 10%. The state of immunity against tetanus of these patients was found to be extremely low, only 9% being fully immunized, and 56% having never received a course of prophylactic adsorbed tetanus toxoid. While prevention is obviously the only real solution to accidents of any nature, legislation is not enough to achieve this, and the final responsibility lies with the farmworker to ensure that all safety precautions are followed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5388731

Cooper, D. K. C.

1969-01-01

250

Healthy Living Cambridge Kids: a community-based participatory effort to promote healthy weight and fitness.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community-based healthy weight intervention on child weight and fitness. Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have monitored BMI and fitness annually since 2000. Annual increases of overweight and obesity from 2000 (37.0%) to 2004 (39.1%), triggered a multidisciplinary team of researchers, educators, health care, and public health professionals to mobilize environmental and policy interventions. Guided by the social-ecological model and community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, the team developed and implemented Healthy Living Cambridge Kids (HLCK), a multicomponent intervention targeting community, school, family, and individuals. The intervention included city policies and community awareness campaigns; physical education (PE) enhancements, food service reforms, farm-to-school-to-home programs; and family outreach and "BMI and fitness reports". Baseline (2004) to follow-up (2007) evaluation design assessed change in children's weight and fitness status. A cohort of 1,858 K-5th grade children participated: 37.3% black, 14.0% Hispanic, 37.1% white, 10.2% Asian, 1.7% other race; 43.3% were lower income. BMI z-score (0.67-0.63 P < 0.001) and proportion obese (20.2-18.0% P < 0.05) decreased, and mean number of fitness tests (0-5) passed increased (3.7-3.9 P < 0.001). Whereas black and Hispanic children were more likely to be obese at baseline (27.0 and 28.5%, respectively) compared with white (12.6%) and Asian (14.3%) children, obesity among all race/ethnicity groups declined. Concurrent with a 3-year community intervention, modest improvements in obesity and fitness were observed among CPS children from baseline to follow-up. The CBPR approach facilitated sustaining policies and program elements postintervention in this diverse community. PMID:20107461

Chomitz, Virginia R; McGowan, Robert J; Wendel, Josefine M; Williams, Sandra A; Cabral, Howard J; King, Stacey E; Olcott, Dawn B; Cappello, Maryann; Breen, Susan; Hacker, Karen A

2010-02-01

251

Normal Range of Cambridge Low Contrast Test; a Population Based Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the range of contrast sensitivity (CS) and its determinants in a normal population, Mashhad, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional population based study, 4,453 individuals were invited of whom 3,132 persons agreed to participate (response rate, 70.4%). CS data from 2,449 eligible individuals were analyzed. CS was determined using the Cambridge low contrast square-wave grating test, and its associations with age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) refractive error, were analyzed. Results Mean age of the participants was 29.1±17.3 (range, 4-89) years and 66.4% were female. Mean CS was 239.6±233.3 and 234.6±228.6 cps in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean binocular CS was 310.9±249.0 cps. Multiple linear regression showed that CS was inversely correlated with older age (?=-1.1, P<0.001), female gender (?=-40.1, P<0.001), poorer BCVA (?=-165.4, P<0.001), and severity of myopia (?=-10.2, P<0.001). Conclusion The normal range of Cambridge low-contrast grating test reported herein may serve as a reference for the general population in Iran. Our findings can be used for both research and clinical applications, particularly for evaluations of the outcomes of refractive surgery. In the current study, CS was lower in older subjects, myopic individuals and patients with lower BCVA. PMID:24982735

Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Heravian, Javad; Abdolahinia, Tahereh; Norouzi Rad, Reza; Asgari, Soheila; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

2014-01-01

252

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted + . (18.11) The probability that the next symbol is symbol w is Fw F + . (18.12) Figure 18.6 shows Zipf Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You

MacKay, David J.C.

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Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.  

E-print Network

Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. Exercise 18.1.[2] Estimate the capacity of word-English, in bits per character. [Hint: think of word Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http

MacKay, David J.C.

254

Genet. Res., Camb. (1999), 74, pp. 291302. With 3 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1999 Cambridge University Press 291 Epistatic and environmental interactions for quantitative  

E-print Network

environmental and epistatic interactions influence the inheritance and evolution of quantitative traits a major advance in understanding the inheritance of quantitative traits (Tanksley, 1993). Nevertheless Cambridge University Press 291 Epistatic and environmental interactions for quantitative trait loci involved

Doebley, John

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Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 9 13, 2013.  

E-print Network

Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 9 ­ 13, 2013 International CDIO Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University School

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0)1223 335999 email: reception@newton.ac.uk  

E-print Network

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0:00-19:00 A free public event at the Isaac Newton Institute To request free tickets to this event please contact

257

Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599609. 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0263574704000396 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599­609. © 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S, and manufacturability consideration. Part II on real machine design will follow in the next issue of Robotica. KEYWORDS

Kim, Jongwon

258

Geol. Mag. 140 (2), 2003, pp. 173203. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 173 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756802007070 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 140 (2), 2003, pp. 173­203. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 173 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756802007070 Printed in the United Kingdom Carbonate platform evolution and conodont stratigraphy during

Calner, Mikael

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http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jan 2012 IP address: 193.157.195.253 Geol. Mag. 125 (/), 1988, pp. 63-82. Printed in Great Britain  

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http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jan 2012 IP address: 193.157.195.253 Geol. Mag. 125 (/), 1988, pp. 63-82. Printed in Great Britain 63 Multiphase magnetic overprints in the Moine Thrust Zone T

Torsvik, Trond Helge

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Geol. Mag. 142 (1), 2005, pp. 5780. c 2005 Cambridge University Press 57 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756804000366 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 142 (1), 2005, pp. 57­80. c 2005 Cambridge University Press 57 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756804000366 Printed in the United Kingdom Cambrian biostratigraphy of the Tal Group, Lesser Himalaya, India

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Geol. Mag. 140 (3), 2003, pp. 343355. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 343 DOI: 10.1017/S001675680300757X Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 140 (3), 2003, pp. 343­355. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 343 DOI: 10.1017/S001675680300757X Printed in the United Kingdom Palaeomagnetic evolution of the C¸ ankiri Basin (central Anatolia

Utrecht, Universiteit

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Geol. Mag. 140 (4), 2003, pp. 397420. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 397 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756803007830 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 140 (4), 2003, pp. 397­420. c 2003 Cambridge University Press 397 DOI: 10.1017/S0016756803007830 Printed in the United Kingdom Changes in organic matter production and accumulation as a mechanism

Kah, Linda

263

Geol. Mag. 143 (1), 2006, pp. 105114. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 105 doi:10.1017/S0016756805001408 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 143 (1), 2006, pp. 105­114. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 105 doi:10.1017/S0016756805001408 Printed in the United Kingdom Temporal variations of the trace fossil Zoophycos in a 425 ka long

Löwemark, Ludvig

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Geol. Mag. 143 (6), 2006, pp. 887903. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 887 doi:10.1017/S0016756806002512 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Geol. Mag. 143 (6), 2006, pp. 887­903. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 887 doi:10.1017/S0016756806002512 Printed in the United Kingdom Short-lived mafic magmatism at 560­570 Ma in the northern Norwegian

Torsvik, Trond Helge

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Geol. Mag. 142 (5), 2005, pp. 583604. c 2005 Cambridge University Press 583 doi:10.1017/S0016756805000890 Printed in the United Kingdom  

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Geol. Mag. 142 (5), 2005, pp. 583­604. c 2005 Cambridge University Press 583 doi:10.1017/S0016756805000890 Printed in the United Kingdom Geomorphic evolution of a storm-dominated carbonate ramp (c. 549 Ma

Grotzinger, John P.

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Geol. Mag. 143 (5), 2006, pp. 657678. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 657 doi:10.1017/S0016756806002469 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Geol. Mag. 143 (5), 2006, pp. 657­678. c 2006 Cambridge University Press 657 doi:10.1017/S0016756806002469 Printed in the United Kingdom First record of the Hirnantian (Upper Ordovician) 13C excursion

Saltzman, Matthew R.

267

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETYHELD ON MONDAY 29TH APRIL 2013 AT THE EMMANUEL CHURCH HALL, CAMBRIDGE ROAD, SOUTHPORT.  

E-print Network

AT THE EMMANUEL CHURCH HALL, CAMBRIDGE ROAD, SOUTHPORT. Commencing at 7.45 pm. 1. Apologies for absence: Mike every week to open up the room and then act as expert projectionist and general assistant to visiting

Harris, Timothy

268

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure  

E-print Network

activity from surveillance data for * Correspondence: david.ogilvie@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk 1Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK Full list of author... such as the UK where many people live too far from their workplace to walk or cycle the entire journey. Several studies have shown that using public transport can involve a substantial daily quantity of walking and that commuters who use public transport tend...

Ogilvie, David; Griffin, Simon J; Jones, Andy; Mackett, Roger; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna R; Jones, Natalia; Cohn, Simon; Yang, Lin; Chapman, Cheryl

2010-11-16

269

A Robust Method of Measuring Other-Race and Other-Ethnicity Effects: The Cambridge Face Memory Test Format  

PubMed Central

Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

2012-01-01

270

Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m{sup 2} steady-state, 1 GW/m{sup 2} in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (10{sup 18} neutrons/m{sup 2} s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

2011-06-01

271

Face recognition performance of individuals with Asperger syndrome on the Cambridge Face Memory Test.  

PubMed

Although face recognition deficits in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome (AS), are widely acknowledged, the empirical evidence is mixed. This in part reflects the failure to use standardized and psychometrically sound tests. We contrasted standardized face recognition scores on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) for 34 individuals with AS with those for 42, IQ-matched non-ASD individuals, and age-standardized scores from a large Australian cohort. We also examined the influence of IQ, autistic traits, and negative affect on face recognition performance. Overall, participants with AS performed significantly worse on the CFMT than the non-ASD participants and when evaluated against standardized test norms. However, while 24% of participants with AS presented with severe face recognition impairment (>2 SDs below the mean), many individuals performed at or above the typical level for their age: 53% scored within +/- 1 SD of the mean and 9% demonstrated superior performance (>1 SD above the mean). Regression analysis provided no evidence that IQ, autistic traits, or negative affect significantly influenced face recognition: diagnostic group membership was the only significant predictor of face recognition performance. In sum, face recognition performance in ASD is on a continuum, but with average levels significantly below non-ASD levels of performance. PMID:22162360

Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn

2011-12-01

272

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Dorchester County, Maryland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Maryland, penetrated 3,299 feet of unconsolidated Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments and bottomed in quartz-monzonite gneiss. The well was drilled to provide data for a study of the aquifer system of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Twenty-one core samples were collected. Six sand zones were tested for aquifer properties and sampled for ground-water chemistry. Point-water heads were measured at seven depths. Environmental heads (which ranged from - 18.33 to + 44.16 feet relative to sea level)indicate an upward component of flow. A temperature log showed a maximum temperature of 41.9 degrees Celsius and a mean temperature gradient of 0.00838 degrees Celsius per foot. The water analyses delineated the freshwater-saltwater transition zone between 2,650 and 3,100 feet. The ground water changes progressively downward from a sodium bicarbonate to a sodium chloride character. Clays in the analyzed core samples belong to the montmorillonite and kaolinite groups, and mean cation exchange capacity ranged from 8.3 to 38.9 milliequivalents per 100 grams. Vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities measured in cores ranged from 1.5 x 10 6 to 1.3 feet per day and from 7.3 x 10 -6 to 1.3 feet per day, respectively, but the most permeable sands were not cored. Porosity was 1.5 percent in the quartz monzonite bedrock and ranged from 22.4 to 41 percent in the overlying sediments. Transmissivities from aquifer tests ranged from 25 to 850 feet squared per day; horizontal hydraulic conductivities ranged from.2.5 to 85 feet squared per day, and intrinsic permeabilities ranged from 0.8 to 23 micrometers squared. Fossils identified in core samples include palynomorphs, dinoflagellates, and foraminifers.

Trapp, Henry, Jr.; Knobel, Leroy L.; Meisler, Harold; Leahy, P. Patrick

1984-01-01

273

Voyager 2 Fine-Scale Velocity Oscillations at 48 AU K. I. Paularena, J. W. Belcher, J. D. Richardson, G. S. Gordon, Jr., and A. J.  

E-print Network

Voyager 2 Fine-Scale Velocity Oscillations at 48 AU K. I. Paularena, J. W. Belcher, J. D of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Voyager 2 solar wind speeds show unusual variations beginning on day;eld data from Voyager 2. 1 #12;Introduction In March of 1996, the Voyager 2 spacecraft was located

Richardson, John

274

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual mean specific conductance for water year 2005 which was 737 uS/cm. However, the annual mean specific conductance at Stony Brook near Route 20 in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) station 01104460), on the principal tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir, and at USGS station 01104475 on a smaller tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir were about 15 and 13 percent lower, respectively, than the previous annual mean specific conductances of 538 and 284 uS/cm, respectively for water year 2005. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir decreased from 553 uS/cm in the 2005 water year to 514 uS/cm in the 2006 water year. Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during water year 2006. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 4 days. Composite samples, consisting of as many as 100 subsamples, were collected by automatic samplers during storms. Concentrations of most dissolved constituents were generally lower in samples of stormwater than in samples collected during base flow; however, the average concentration of total phosphorus in samples of stormwater were from 160 to 1,109 percent greater than the average concentration in water samples collected during base-flow conditions. Concentrations of total nitrogen in water samples collected during base-flow conditions and composite samples of stormwater at USGS stations 01104415, 01104460, and 01104475 were similar, but mean concentrations of total nitrogen in samples of stormwater differed by about 0.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) from those in water samples collected during base-flow conditions at U.S. Geological Survey stations 01104433 and 01104455. In six water samples, measurements of pH were lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) national recommended freshwater quality criteria and the USEPA secondary drinking water-standa

Smith, Kirk P.

2008-01-01

275

Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

Despite its enormous cost, large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing CO(2) emissions associated with coal-based electrical power generation and other industrial sources of CO(2) [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2005) IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Prepared by Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eds Metz B, et al. (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge, UK); Szulczewski ML, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:5185-5189]. We argue here that there is a high probability that earthquakes will be triggered by injection of large volumes of CO(2) into the brittle rocks commonly found in continental interiors. Because even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes threaten the seal integrity of CO(2) repositories, in this context, large-scale CCS is a risky, and likely unsuccessful, strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:22711814

Zoback, Mark D; Gorelick, Steven M

2012-06-26

276

MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

1993-01-01

277

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104455) were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir increased from 514 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) in the 2004 water year to 553 ?S/cm for the 2005 water year. Water samples were collected from four tributaries during base-flow and stormflow conditions in December 2004, and July, August, and September 2005 and analyzed for suspended sediment, 6 major dissolved ions, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, 8 total metals, 18 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 61 pesticides and metabolites, and Escherichia coli bacteria. Concentrations for most dissolved constituents in samples of stormwater were generally lower than the concentrations observed in samples collected during base flow; however, concentrations of total phosphorus, PAHs, suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals were substantially greater in stormwater samples. Concentrations of dissolved chloride and total recoverable manganese in water samples collected during base-flow conditions from three tributaries exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking water standards of 250 and 0.05 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Concentrations of total recoverable manganese exceeded the secondary drinking water standard in samples of stormwater from each tributary. Concentrations of total recoverable iron in water samples exceeded the (USEPA) secondary drinking water standard of 0.3 mg/L periodically in water samples collected at (USEPA) stations 01104415, 01104455, and 01104475, and consistently in all water samples collected at USGS station 01104433. Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in water samples collected during base flow ranged from 4 to 1,400 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (col/100mL). Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in composite samples of stormwater ranged between 1,700 to 43,000 c

Smith, Kirk P.

2007-01-01

278

Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: A mixed-methods analysis  

PubMed Central

Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009–2010). Even in Britain's leading ‘cycling city’, cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a ‘park-and-ride’ site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could ‘afford’ to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio-economic range. This suggests the importance of combining individual-level ‘healthy travel’ interventions with measures aimed at creating travel environments in which all social groups can pursue healthy and satisfying lives. PMID:22465380

Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R.; Ogilvie, David

2012-01-01

279

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 07 Dec 2009 IP address: 144.173.5.196 New Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax genotypes from  

E-print Network

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 07 Dec 2009 IP address: 144.173.5.196 New Trypanosoma Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK 2 Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen (KIT) Biomedical), which discriminates species by size polymorphisms in multiple regions of the ribosomal RNA locus. FFLB

Tyler, Charles

280

Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8…

Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

2010-01-01

281

Behavior and Philosophy, 32, 197-229 (2004). 2004 Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies IS THE OPERANT CONTINGENCY ENOUGH FOR A SCIENCE OF  

E-print Network

IS THE OPERANT CONTINGENCY ENOUGH FOR A SCIENCE OF PURPOSIVE BEHAVIOR? William Timberlake Department of the operant contingency to serve as the basis of a science of purposive behavior. Such a question might seemBehavior and Philosophy, 32, 197-229 (2004). © 2004 Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies 197

Timberlake, William D.

282

The role of Cambridge Women's Aid in assisting victims of domestic violence to reassemble their lives: an evaluation of the refuge service  

E-print Network

The role of Cambridge Women's Aid in assisting victims of domestic violence to reassemble of accommodation for women escaping domestic violence to go to seek help, support, information and protection. 2. What do women regard as the psychological impact of domestic violence on them, and does

Steiner, Ullrich

283

Genet. Res., Camb. (1999), 74, pp. 255264. With 4 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1999 Cambridge University Press 255 Estimating genetic correlations in natural populations  

E-print Network

Cambridge University Press 255 Estimating genetic correlations in natural populations MICHAEL LYNCH of populations in natural settings. Here, non-invasive methods that allow the estimation of genetic correlations and domesticated populations. Estimation of quantitative-genetic parameters is a demanding enterprise even

Lynch, Michael

284

From T.H. Lee, The Design of CMOS Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits A Nonlinear History of Radio 1998 Cambridge University Press Page 1 of 34  

E-print Network

From T.H. Lee, The Design of CMOS Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits A Nonlinear History of Radio ©1998 Cambridge University Press Page 1 of 34 A Nonlinear History of Radio 1.0 Introduction Integrated history of radio touches briefly on just some of the main stories, and provides pointers to the literature

Lee, Thomas H.

285

J. Fluid Mech. (2003), vol. 479, pp. 191197. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112002003634 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

flows of incompressible fluids as well as potential flows in the acoustic approximation derived hereJ. Fluid Mech. (2003), vol. 479, pp. 191­197. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, MN 55455, USA joseph@aem.umn.edu (Received 6 September

Joseph, Daniel D.

286

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2010-01-01

287

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

E-print Network

: October 2004 Page 1 of 5 #12;13) Educational aims of the programme The Music Tripos is intended to deepen this programme specification at any time. MUSIC TRIPOS 1) Awarding Institution: The University of Cambridge 2, Bachelor of Music 4) Subject: The Music Tripos is taught over three years in Part IA (1st year), Part IB (2

de Gispert, Adrià

288

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

E-print Network

space in an adjacent Victorian house. Page 1 of 5 #12;Educational aims of the programme The Music Tripos this programme specification at any time. MUSIC TRIPOS 1 Awarding body University of Cambridge 2 Teaching, Bachelor of Music 5 Programme Title Music Tripos 6 UCAS Code W300 BA/M 7 Benchmark Statement Music 8

de Gispert, Adrià

289

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme  

E-print Network

this programme specification at any time. MUSIC TRIPOS 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching, Bachelor of Music 5. Programme Title Music Tripos 6. UCAS Code W300 BA/M 7. Benchmark Statement(s) Music 8. Qualifications Framework Level H 9a. Date of Revision March 2008 9b. Last Reviewed March 2008 Subject The Music

de Gispert, Adrià

290

Abdel-Hamid, Tarek (1984) The Dynamics of Software Development Project Management: An Integrative System Dynamics Perspective. Doctoral thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge,  

E-print Network

) The Power of Product Integrity. Managing Product Life Cycles From Start to Finish. Harvard Business Review, and Management in the World Auto Industry. Harvard Business School Press. Cambridge, MA. Clark, Kim B. and Wheelwright, Steven (1993) Managing New Product and Process Development. Harvard Business School Press

Ford, David N.

291

Modern Intellectual History, 1, 3 (2004), pp. 427438 C 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S1479244304000241 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Modern Intellectual History, 1, 3 (2004), pp. 427­438 C 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10, 2002) Robert Richards, The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe With The Romantic Conception of Life, Robert Richards brings to culmination a series of works on the roots

Richards, Robert J.

292

J. Child Lang. 30 (2003), 117-143. @ 2003 Cambridge University Press DOl: 10.1017/S0305000902005457 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

J. Child Lang. 30 (2003), 117-143. @ 2003 Cambridge University Press DOl: 10.1017/S0305000902005457 adult input remains obscure. Twenty-nine children aged 2; 6 to 3; 2, divided into three treatment groups trained. Very little input, if concentrated but varied, and presented so that the child attends

Chase, Sheila

293

Law R, Dieckmann U & Metz JAJ (2000). Introduction. In: The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity, eds. Dieckmann U, Law R & Metz JAJ, pp. 16. Cambridge  

E-print Network

Law R, Dieckmann U & Metz JAJ (2000). Introduction. In: The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity, eds. Dieckmann U, Law R & Metz JAJ, pp. 1­6. Cambridge University Press. c.J. Metz Species form different kinds of patches; these patches form a mosaic and together constitute

Dieckmann, Ulf

294

Metz JAJ, Dieckmann U & Law R (2000). Epilogue. In: The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity, eds. Dieckmann U, Law R & Metz JAJ, pp. 513516. Cambridge  

E-print Network

Metz JAJ, Dieckmann U & Law R (2000). Epilogue. In: The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity, eds. Dieckmann U, Law R & Metz JAJ, pp. 513­516. Cambridge University Press. c International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis 24 Epilogue Johan A.J. Metz, Ulf Dieckmann, and Richard Law

Dieckmann, Ulf

295

MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Tel: (617) 253-1324 Fax: (617) 258-9360  

E-print Network

MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Tel: (617) 253-1324 Fax: (617) 258-9360 Release for Pharmacy Patient Prescription Profile Please fill Medical Record Number or MIT ID Number 2 I authorize the MIT Medical Department to release pharmacy

Polz, Martin

296

Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during the study period. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 3 days. Composite sampl

Smith, Kirk P.

2011-01-01

297

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 21 Jul 2009 IP address: 131.111.16.227 3. Fluid Mech. (1993),vol. 256, pp. 343401  

E-print Network

between fluctuating colloidal particles: oscillatory and stochastic motions By E. J. HINCH' AND LUDWIG C. NITSCHE2 'Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, The University of Cambridge, Silver motion in colloidal systems,nonlinear- ities due to motion of the boundaries and to inertia throughout

Hinch, John

298

Protein Science (1994), 3:2419-2427. CambridgeUniversity Press. Printed in the USA Copyright 0 1994 The Protein Society  

E-print Network

Protein Science (1994), 3:2419-2427. CambridgeUniversity Press. Printed in the USA Copyright 0 1994 The Protein Society Disulfide crosslinks to probe the structure and flexibility of a designed four-helix bundle protein LYNNE REGAN, ARLENE ROCKWELL,'ZELDA WASSERMAN,' AND WILLIAM DEGRADO' The Experimental

Mochrie, Simon

299

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0)1223 335999 email: reception@newton.ac.uk  

E-print Network

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0 David Berman Wednesday 14 March 2012 18:30-19:30 A free public event at the Isaac Newton Institute)1223 335999 email: reception@newton.ac.uk String theory is at the cutting edge of theoretical physics. Its

300

Organised Sound 8(3): 331339 2003 Cambridge University Press. Printed in the United Kingdom. DOI: 10.1017/S1355771803000311 Book reviews  

E-print Network

Organised Sound 8(3): 331­339 © 2003 Cambridge University Press. Printed in the United Kingdom. DOI: 10.1017/S1355771803000311 Book reviews Eduardo Reck Miranda, Computer Sound Design, 2nd edition. Music Technology Series, Focal Press, Oxford, 2002. 263 pp. With CD-ROM, ISBN 0-240-51693-1 This volume

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

301

Robotica (1994) volume 12, pp 421-430. 1994 Cambridge University Press Inverse kinematics of six-degree of freedom "general"  

E-print Network

Robotica (1994) volume 12, pp 421-430. © 1994 Cambridge University Press Inverse kinematics of six. Bidaud Laboratoire de Robotique de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Tour 66, 2eme etage, 4 Place to the inverse kinematics problem of the GMF Arc Mate welding manipulator. In spite of its geometry

Mavroidis, Constantinos

302

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2011-01-01

303

3768 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 54, NO. 8, AUGUST 2008 [1] R. G. Gallager, Low Density Parity Check Codes. Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

, "Design of capacity ap- proaching irregular low-density parity-check codes," IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, vol low-density parity check codes," Electron. Notes Theoret. Comput. Sci., vol. 74, 2003. [5] N. Wiberg. Gallager, Low Density Parity Check Codes. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1963. [2] T. J. Richardson and R

No, Jong-Seon

304

Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 72, pp. 135147. With 6 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 135 Dynamics of recombination modifiers caused by cyclical  

E-print Network

Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 72, pp. 135­147. With 6 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 135 Dynamics of recombination modifiers caused by cyclical selection: Interaction: the fixed recombination rate was replaced by a polymorphic recombination modifier. The modifier

Kirzhner Valery

305

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 28 Dec 2010 IP address: 129.2.19.102 Legal Theory, 10 (2004), 1931. Printed in the United States of America  

E-print Network

(2004), 19­31. Printed in the United States of America Published by Cambridge University Press 0361 courts place a high value on similar treatment of similar cases, and on the predictability of judicial constraint by rules; a constrained court must apply the rules of precedent cases in reaching current

Horty, John F.

306

J. Fluid Mech. (2012), vol. 691, pp. 165177. c Cambridge University Press 2011 165 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.466  

E-print Network

with shear-thinning or shear-thickening flow, as well as yield-stress fluids such as the Bingham or HerschelJ. Fluid Mech. (2012), vol. 691, pp. 165­177. c Cambridge University Press 2011 165 doi:10.1017/jfm deformation state. We test the theory for soft catenaries made of a Maxwell fluid and an elastic yield

Mahadevan, L.

307

J. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 686, pp. 525. c Cambridge University Press 2011 5 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.272  

E-print Network

of flowing behaviours (e.g. shear thinning, shear thickening and thixotropy) depending on the microstructureJ. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 686, pp. 5­25. c Cambridge University Press 2011 5 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011 are measured in dense suspensions of neutrally buoyant non-Brownian spheres dispersed in a Newtonian fluid

Pouliquen, Olivier

308

Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test–Australian  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error,

Elinor McKone; Ashleigh Hall; Madeleine Pidcock; Romina Palermo; Ross B. Wilkinson; Davide Rivolta; Galit Yovel; Joshua M. Davis; Kirsty B. OConnor

2011-01-01

309

Genet. Res., Camb. (2000), 75, pp. 7581. With 3 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2000 Cambridge University Press 75 Inbreeding depression due to mildly deleterious mutations in  

E-print Network

on the inbreeding depression caused by mildly deleterious alleles. Since our interest is in part motivated by plant Cambridge University Press 75 Inbreeding depression due to mildly deleterious mutations in finite We studied the effects of population size on the inbreeding depression and genetic load caused

Bataillon, Thomas

310

Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components of cognition. Previous studies document the role of frontal cortex in performance of two CANTAB subtests:

Sally Ozonoff; Ian Cook; Hilary Coon; Geraldine Dawson; Robert M. Joseph; Ami Klin; William M. McMahon; Nancy Minshew; Jeffrey A. Munson; Bruce F. Pennington; Sally J. Rogers; M. Anne Spence; Helen Tager-Flusberg; Fred R. Volkmar; Debora Wrathall

2004-01-01

311

Biofilms (2005) 2, 177181 C 2005 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1479050505001948 First published online 8 December 2005 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Biofilms (2005) 2, 177­181 C 2005 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1479050505001948 First Violet assays for measurement of biofilm formation by Enterococcus S. L. Broschat1 *, D. R. Call2 , E. A. Kuhn2 and F. J. Loge3 A B S T R A C T In previous work, we described a protocol for measuring biofilm

Broschat, Shira Lynn

312

SHERR, B. F., E. B. SHERR, AND T. BERMAN. 1983. STEIN, J. R. [ED.]. 1973. Handbook of phycological Grazing, growth, and ammonium excretion rates methods. Cambridge.  

E-print Network

of phycological Grazing, growth, and ammonium excretion rates methods. Cambridge. of a heterotrophic bacterial demand. Also, spatial disequilib- rium is driven by accumulation of organic matter in cold, deep of LDOC would then become available throughout the water column during winter mixing. Strayer (1988

313

J. Fluid Mech. (2006), vol. 556, pp. 283308. c 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112006009633 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Microfluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 2 Universit and in revised form 25 September 2005) By adding minute concentrations of a high-molecular-weight polymer, liquid jets or bridges collapsing under the action of surface tension develop a characteristic shape

314

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Background Modifying transport infrastructure to support active travel (walking and cycling) could help to increase population levels of physical activity. However, there is limited evidence for the effects of interventions in this field, and to the best of our knowledge no study has convincingly demonstrated an increase in physical activity directly attributable to this type of intervention. We have therefore taken the opportunity presented by a 'natural experiment' in Cambridgeshire, UK to establish a quasi-experimental study of the effects of a major transport infrastructural intervention on travel behaviour, physical activity and related wider health impacts. Design and methods The Commuting and Health in Cambridge study comprises three main elements: a cohort study of adults who travel to work in Cambridge, using repeated postal questionnaires and basic objective measurement of physical activity using accelerometers; in-depth quantitative studies of physical activity energy expenditure, travel and movement patterns and estimated carbon emissions using household travel diaries, combined heart rate and movement sensors and global positioning system (GPS) receivers; and a longitudinal qualitative interview study to elucidate participants' attitudes, experiences and practices and to understand how environmental and social factors interact to influence travel behaviour, for whom and in what circumstances. The impacts of a specific intervention - the opening of the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway - and of other changes in the physical environment will be examined using a controlled quasi-experimental design within the overall cohort dataset. Discussion Addressing the unresolved research and policy questions in this area is not straightforward. The challenges include those of effectively combining different disciplinary perspectives on the research problems, developing common methodological ground in measurement and evaluation, implementing robust quantitative measurement of travel and physical activity behaviour in an unpredictable 'natural experiment' setting, defining exposure to the intervention, defining controls, and conceptualising an appropriate longitudinal analytical strategy. PMID:21080928

2010-01-01

315

CNBH, Physiology Department, Cambridge University www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/cnbh  

E-print Network

using a larger database of speech sounds and show that performance increases compared with vowel sounds the scale between sequences of utterances. Stimuli are speech syllables resynthesised by STRAIGHT [Kawahara information in speech sounds and resynthesises the same utterance over a range of VTL and GPR values. Speech

Ives, D. Timothy

316

Combinatorics, Probability and Computing (2008) 17, 711726. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0963548308009188 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

Combinatorics, Probability and Computing (2008) 17, 711­726. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi of the Erdos­R´enyi Giant Component RUSSELL LYONS1 , RON PELED2 and ODED SCHRAMM3 1 Department of Mathematics in the giant component of the random graph G(n, c/n) (c > 1) grows like exp{m(f(c) + o(1))} as n , where m

Lyons, Russell

317

Bjorken scaling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bjorken Scaling refers to an important simplifying feature-scaling-of a large class of dimensionless physical quantities in elementary particles; it strongly suggests that experimentally observed strongly interacting particles (hadrons) behave as collections of point-like constituents when probed at high energies. A property of hadrons probed in high-energy scattering experiments is said to scale when it is determined not by the absolute energy of an experiment but by dimensionless kinematic quantities, such as a scattering angle or the ratio of the energy to a momentum transfer. Because increasing energy implies potentially improved spatial resolution, scaling implies independence of the absolute resolution scale, and hence effectively point-like substructure. Scaling behavior was first proposed by James Bjorken in 1968 for the structure functions of deep inelastic scattering of electrons on nucleons. This idea, along with the contemporaneous concept of partons proposed by Feynman, and the experimental discovery of (approximate) scaling behavior, together inspired the idea of asymptotic freedom, and the formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) - the modern fundamental theory of strong interactions. Bjorken scaling is, however, not exact; deviations from strict scaling is required in quantum field theory. The QCD theory can predict the detailed form of violations of the scaling behavior of the relevant physical quantities through the distinctive quantum effect of dimensional transmutation. These predictions have been fully confirmed by modern high energy experiments. This theory provides a firm foundation for the intuitive QCD parton picture of elementary particles.

Tung, Wu-Ki

2009-03-01

318

Scale It!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When building a dollhouse or a model of a car or a cell, close attention to the details is crucial to making it look accurate and realistic. A consistent scaling factor for all details in the model is critical. In this activity, students explore scaling t

Taylor, Amy R.; Jones, M. G.; Falvo, Michael R.

2009-04-01

319

Scaling Cubes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore scale by using building cubes to see how changing the length, width, and height of a three-dimensional object affects its surface area and its volume. Learners build bigger and bigger cubes to understand these scaling relationships.

Exploratorium

2010-01-01

320

EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic and particle spectrum, from what is expected to be common sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as well as neutrinos, have created great excitement, lively discussions and have given birth to collaborations for joint analyses and observations. A special thank you to our non-gravitational wave presenters and participants for making the time to join us. We hope this will be the beginning of a long tradition for this workshop. In this workshop we also introduced the student prize for the best poster. Twenty student posters participated in this competition. Pinkesh Patel of Caltech was the prize winner on a 'Resampling Technique to Calculate the F-statistic', co-authored with X Siemens and R Dupuis. We are grateful to the MIT Kavli Institute for providing the financial support for the cash prize that accompanied this. We would like to thank the local and international organizing committees for putting together a great scientific program, all the conference presenters and participants and finally the CQG editorial staff for making this conference proceeding volume happen.

Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

2008-09-01

321

Scale Models  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, covers the general concept of scale by demonstrating factors of ten. The activity "facilitates the introduction and reinforcement of the metric scale and paves the way to the discussion of lengths that are smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye." The lesson also introduces the idea of using different tools to address different length scales which is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology. Future activities could introduce atoms and cell structure as well as recent advancements in technology. A Teacher Preparation Guide is included.

2014-09-05

322

A Preliminary Validity Study of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery for the Assessment of Executive Function in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective Although the executive function subtests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) have been used to assess cognitive function in diverse psychiatric illnesses, few studies have verified the validity of this battery for Korean psychiatric patients. Therefore, this preliminary study evaluated the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients by comparing it with subtests of the Computerized Neuropsychological Test (CNT). Methods Three subtests of the CANTAB and three subtests of the CNT were administered to 36 patients diagnosed with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Subtests of the CANTAB included the Intra/Extra-Dimensional Set Shift (IED), Stockings of Cambridge (SOC), and Spatial Working Memory (SWM). Differences between groups on each subtest as well as correlations between the subtests of the CANTAB and the CNT were assessed. Results The schizophrenia group performed significantly more poorly on the IED and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) compared with the bipolar disorder group. Additionally, correlation analyses revealed a significant correlation between the IED and the WCST; a positive correlation between the SOC and the Trail Making Test, Part B and the Stroop test; and a significant correlation between the SWM and the Stroop test. Conclusion This study verified the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients and suggests that the subtests of this battery would be useful and appropriate for assessing deficits in executive function in Korean clinical settings.

Kim, Hee Sun; An, Yong Min; Kwon, Jun Soo

2014-01-01

323

Scaling Relationships  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This classroom ready resourse is good for teaching scaling of size in relationship to semiconductor components. It describes the role of modeling and simulation, including example pictures to help students understand the material. The document contains two pages and may be downloaded in PowerPoint file format.

2013-07-30

324

Scale Factor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It seems commonsense that when the dimensions of an object are doubled, the area is doubled as well. You can use this applet to investigate this misconception. Students can see how changes in the scale factor influence the ratio of perimeters and the ratio of areas between two figures.

Illuminations, Nctm

2000-01-01

325

Scaling Away  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, "students will measure the dimensions of a common object, multiply each dimension by a scale factor, and examine a model using the multiplied dimensions. Students will then compare the surface area and volume of the original object and the enlarged model." (From NCTM's Illuminations)

Nctm/illuminations

2009-02-12

326

Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as much as 96 percent of total solids resided within 9 feet of the curb. Median accumulation rates of street solids and median washoff of street solids after rainstorms on multifamily and commercial land-use streets were also similar at about 33 and 22 pounds per curb-mile per day, and 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Results indicate that solids on the streets tested in Cambridge, Mass., can recover to pre-rainstorm yields within 1 to 3 days after washoff. The finer grain-size fractions tended to be more readily washed from the roadway surfaces during rainstorms. Street solids in the coarsest grain-size fraction on multifamily streets indicated an average net increase following rainstorms and are likely attributed to debris run-on from trees, lawns, and other plantings commonly found in residential areas. In seven experiments between May and December 2010, the median removal efficiency of solids from street surfaces following a single pass by a regenerative-air street cleaner was about 82 percent on study sites in the multifamily land-use streets and about 78 percent on the commercial land-use streets. Median street-solid removal efficiency increased with increasing grain size. This type of regenerative-air street cleaner left a median residual street-solid load on the street surface of about 100 pounds per curb-mile. Median concentrations of organic carbon and total phosphorus (P) on multifamily streets were about 35 and 29 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. The median total mass of organic carbon and total P in street solids on multifamily streets was 68 and 75 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. More than 87 percent of the mass of total P was determined to be in solids greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter for both land-use types. The median total accumulation rate for total P on multifamily streets was about 5 times greater than on commercial streets. Total P accumulation in the medium grain-size fraction was nearly the same for streets within both land-use types at 0.004 p

Sorenson, Jason R.

2013-01-01

327

Education in Cambridge  

E-print Network

of the major lecture series I have given. For the first year students I have lectured on kinship and marriage, on an introduction to anthropology, on political and economic anthropology, war, famine and disease, long term transformations in civilizations... are a few examples: ‘broadband’ in China, whitening of the face in Japan, family structures in Singapore, religion in Sarawak, social change in Vietnam, identity in Malaysia, shamanism in Nepal, hunter-gatherers in India, development in South America...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

328

HARVARD YARD Cambridge St.  

E-print Network

HOUSE RADCLIFFE QUADRANGLE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN DIVINITY IN BLUE. Adams Art Space, 10 Linden Street........................................................................................... C4 Adams House, 26 Plympton Street

329

PhD student, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK MEng student, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK  

E-print Network

(i.e.drophammerorvibro-piling)induce vibrations and settlement in a zone close to the pile, and cause noise and dust pollution. Damage to existing the vibration, hammering and noise pollution associatedwithdynamicinstallationmethods.Table 1.1 compares the noise created duringinstallation of steel sheet piles using dynamic and press-in methods. The press

Bolton, Malcolm

330

Creativity in Cambridge  

E-print Network

etc) in a largely non-technological subject, I have found it unnecessary to fight for or justify my eccentricities. It is a great spur as well as a pleasure to be esteemed in whatever one attempts to do, on the assumption that though it may look... of single-minded dogged pursuit of incredibly complex solutions is the work of Fred Sanger, who not once but twice did the amazingly arduous and long task of sequencing (by hand) first insulin and then a phage. The concentration of James Frazer...

Macfarlane, Alan; Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

331

Charm of Cambridge  

E-print Network

evening at a country inn, and then something odd, or outré as another master of this genre, Edgar Allen Poe, would put it, occurs. A doll’s house or picture comes alive, a tree seems to be infected with malignant things, and a room number 13...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

332

Fellowship in Cambridge  

E-print Network

feature of all these total institutions is that different parts of life occur within one physical space – sleeping, eating, drinking, sport, prayer and thought. The walls, literal or virtual, are there to form a strong boundary between ‘the outside... it much more than a club. The central feature of a club is that it has one overriding and usually quite specific goal. It is set up to join people together who want to play chess, football, cricket, row, sing, run, fly, debate or whatever it is...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

333

Customs of Cambridge  

E-print Network

it as a hypocritical, indirect and odious form of speech. It cannot be mastered, in fact, without getting to know the place, the people, the history and the culture fairly well. Once mastered, it is the salt which savours many an interaction. It also binds... to become so involved in one’s thoughts, happiness or misery, that one forgets the common courtesies. They become covered over by rush, self-regard, and laziness. But my grandfather’s advice when I was about eight was that however shy, apprehensive or tired...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07

334

Cambridge International Science Publishing  

E-print Network

. In such an environment, a scientist or engineer will formulate a mathematical model, approximate its solution using Methods in Sciences and Engineering vol. 2, no. 3, 2, pp. 1--3 ISSN 1472--7978 The Cost/Reliability Trade to scientific computing and where scientists and en­ gineers formulate their mathematical models and investigate

Toronto, University of

335

Nuclear scales  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01

336

Scale invariability  

E-print Network

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". Thus the derived equation is that of levitation. Reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators, where permanent energy decay of all oscillation forbids constancy of known "physical constants". This hyperresonator concept explains the magnetism (as every forced oscillator feature), as well as the gravitation (as forward propagation of mechanical vibrations along the aether i.e. throughout the vacuum structure). To test my claim I propose a Space mission to collect on site measurements of eigenperiods of the Sun, its planets, and their satellites. The levitation equitation enables propulsionless Space travel via gravity sailing: Space vehicle hull ought to be engineered so as to automatically adjust its grave mode, to the vehicle instant gravitational surroundings, akin to trout up swimming.

M. Omerbashich

2008-01-06

337

Shuttle Astronauts Visit NASA's X-Ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge to Coordinate Plans for Launch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-- June 25, 1998 Eileen Collins, the first U.S. woman commanderof a Space Shuttle mission and her fellow astronauts for NASA s STS-93 mission toured the Operations Control Center (OCC) for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) today. AXAF is scheduled for launch on January 26, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. They met with the staff of the OCC and discussed how the status of the observatory will be monitored while in the shuttle bay and during deployment. "We are honored to have this historic shuttle crew visit us and familiarize themselves with the OCC," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the AXAF Science Center, which operates the OCC for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory through a contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "It is appropriate that a pathbreaking shuttle mission will deploy the premier X-ray observatory of this century." AXAF is the third of NASA s Great Observatories along with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. It will observe in greater detail than ever before the hot, violent regions of the universe that cannot be seen with optical telescopes. Exploding stars, black holes and vast clouds of gas in galaxy clusters are among the fascinating objects that AXAF is designed to study. The satellite is currently in the final stages of testing at TRW Space and Electronics Group,the prime contractor, in Redondo Beach, California. In late August it will be flown aboard a specially-outfitted Air Force C-5 aircraft to Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be integrated with a Boeing booster and then installed in the Shuttle bay. The shuttle crew that will take AXAF into space includes Collins (Col., USAF), Jeffrey Ashby (Cmdr., USN), pilot; Steven Hawley, Ph.D., mission specialist; Catherine Cady Coleman, Ph.D. (Major, USAF), mission specialist; and Michel Tognini (Col., French Air Force), mission specialist. While visiting the OCC the crew learned how critical data (temperatures, voltages, etc.,) will be monitored while AXAF is in the bay of the shuttle. This information will be relayed to the shuttle from the OCC via Johnson Space Center. The condition of the satellite during launch and the first few orbits will determine if it can be sent on its way. Unlike the Hubble Space telescope, AXAF will not be serviceable after it is in orbit. When the satellite has been released into space from the shuttle bay, a built in propulsion system will boost it into a large elliptical orbit around Earth. The nearest the observatory will come to Earth is 6,200 miles and its furthest point will be more than a third of the way to the moon. This means that the telescope will have approximately 52 hours of observing time each orbit. AXAF images will show fifty times more detail than any previous X-ray telescope. The revolutionary telescope combines the ability to make sharp images while measuring precisely the energies of X-rays coming from cosmic sources. The impact AXAF will have on X-ray astronomy can be compared to the difference between a fuzzy black and white and a sharp color picture.

1998-06-01

338

Maximum likelihood estimation of optimal scaling factors for expression array normalization  

E-print Network

for Computer Science 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 bMIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 cWhitehead Institute for Biomedical Research Nine Cambridge Center as well as in the manufacture of the array itself, and may differ depending on the array technology being

Gifford, David K.

339

http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 11 Apr 2014 IP address: 129.82.80.156 Antarctic Science 26(2), 153162 (2014) & Antarctic Science Ltd 2013 doi:10.1017/S095410201300045X  

E-print Network

structure to Antarctic soil ecosystems by changing the physical conditions in the soil environment withinhttp://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 11 Apr 2014 IP address: 129.82.80.156 Antarctic Science 26(2), 153�162 (2014) & Antarctic Science Ltd 2013 doi:10.1017/S095410201300045X Water track

Wall, Diana

340

Genet. Res., Camb. (2001), 77, pp. 107116. With 2 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2001 Cambridge University Press 107 Quantitative trait locus mapping of fitness-related traits in  

E-print Network

number, body size and early fecundity) in a panel of 98 Oregon-Ri2b3 recombinant inbred lines (RILs Cambridge University Press 107 Quantitative trait locus mapping of fitness-related traits in Drosophila mapped using a composite interval mapping procedure. QTL for female reproductive success were located

Mackay, Trudy F.C.

341

New Trends in Astronomy Teaching, edited by L. Gouguenheim, D. McNally, & J. R. Percy (Cambridge University Press), 1998. Pp. 352, 25.5 x 18 cm. Price  

E-print Network

New Trends in Astronomy Teaching, edited by L. Gouguenheim, D. McNally, & J. R. Percy (Cambridge). In their preface to this Colloquium volume on the teaching of astronomy, the editors indicate that eight years have of astronomy teaching (as well as many other aspects of life). John R. Percy, in his opening lecture

342

8/12/08 9:38 AMLife in a bubble ( CAMBRIDGE Mass. --Hundreds of insec...) Page 1 of 2http://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-news-1/Life-in-a-bubble-4270-1/  

E-print Network

Medicine Dictionary Biology Navigation Medical Navigation M life bubble Post Your Comments: (View All8/12/08 9:38 AMLife in a bubble ( CAMBRIDGE Mass. -- Hundreds of insec...) Page 1 of 2http://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-news-1/Life-in-a-bubble-4270-1/ Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine

Flynn, Morris R.

343

Compte-rendu du livre de Luis Fernando Angosto Ferrndez et Sabine Kradolfer (coord.), Everlasting Countdowns. Race, Ethnicity and National Censuses in Latin American States. Newcastle upon Tyne, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012. In  

E-print Network

Countdowns. Race, Ethnicity and National Censuses in Latin American States. Newcastle upon Tyne, Cambridge Kradolfer (coord.), Everlasting Countdowns. Race, Ethnicity and National Censuses in Latin American States Scholars Publishing, 2012. In Cahiers des Amériques Latines, No. 71, 2013, pp. 204-207. 1 Elisabeth Cunin

Boyer, Edmond

344

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 1223 335999 email: info@newton.ac.uk www.newton.ac.uk  

E-print Network

Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 1223 335999 email: info@newton.ac.uk www.newton.ac.uk The Isaac Newton Institute is a national facility at the Institute, each with about twenty participants. For more information see www.newton.ac.uk. 112 programmes

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

345

15/09/2008 14:58Cambridge University Engineering Department: News item Page 1 of 2http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/stories/2008/gesture_control/  

E-print Network

entertainment systems simply by waving their hand, thanks to technology developed by Toshiba's Cambridge the Toshiba experimental TV viewers are able to interact with the display system simply by gesturing Professor Roberto Cipolla , who with Dr Bjorn Stenger at Toshiba and Tom Woodley at the Department

Cipolla, Roberto

346

1 | University of Cambridge | www.cam.ac.uk/science-festival E: csf@admin.cam.ac.uk T: 01223 766766 Speakers can visit your school and have indicated their available  

E-print Network

) in the descriptions. To book, please email: csf@admin.cam.ac.uk, or call 01223 766766. Cambridge Science Festival 2014 different parts of the body and what they do, and compare the skulls of different animals from lizards to find clues about human and other animal lifestyles, eating habits, movement and survival. Sessions

Cambridge, University of

347

Genet. Res., Camb. (1997), 70, pp. 125133 With 4 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1997 Cambridge University Press 125 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X  

E-print Network

Cambridge University Press 125 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X chromosome in mice of the divergence between mouse lines selected for high and low body weight. Here, we describe a study undertaken of the X chromosome were found to be associated with large differences in body weight, and to account

Keightley, Peter

348

Genet. Res., Camb. (1997), 70, pp. 117124. With 3 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1997 Cambridge University Press 117 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X  

E-print Network

Cambridge University Press 117 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X chromosome in mice cases, or 17% and 20% of the 10 week body weight in males and females respectively. Dominance effects was detected, but a single X-linked QTL appears to explain almost the entire X-linked body weight effect. 1

Keightley, Peter

349

Effects of QCD radiation on inclusive variables for determining the scale of new physics at hadron colliders.  

E-print Network

at hadron colliders Andreas Papaefstathioua and Bryan Webbera,b aCavendish Laboratory, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, UK bTheory Group, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland E-mail:andreas@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk,webber@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk Abstract... : a global inclusive variable for determining the mass scale of new physics in events with missing energy at hadron colliders,” arXiv:0812.1042 [hep-ph]. [42] A. D. Martin, W. J. Stirling, R. S. Thorne and G. Watt, “Parton distributions for the LHC...

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Webber, Bryan R

350

Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62 milligrams per liter), and lowest in Fresh Pond (54 milligrams per liter). Bed sediments in Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Reservoirs were enriched in iron, manganese, and arsenic relative to those in the impounded lower Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Trophic state indices, calculated for each reservoir based on nutrient concentrations, water-column transparency, and phytoplankton abundances, indicated that the upper and middle basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir were moderately to highly productive and likely to produce algal blooms; the lower basin of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir were similar and intermediate in productivity, and Fresh Pond was relatively unproductive and unlikely to produce algal blooms. This pattern is likely due to sedimentation of organic and inorganic particles in the three basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and in Stony Brook Reservoir. Molar ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus ranged from 55 in Stony Brook Reservoir to 120 in Hobbs Brook Reservoir, indicating that phytoplankton algae in these water bodies may be phosphorus limited and therefore sensitive to small increases in phosphorus loading from the drainage basin. Nitrogen loads were found to be less important than phosphorus to the trophic condition of the reservoirs. Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook, the two principle streams draining the Cambridge drinking-water source area, differed in their relative contributions to many of the estimated constituent loads. The estimated load of fecal coliform bacteria was more than seven times larger for the mainly residential Stony Brook subbasin upstream from Kendal Green, Mass., than it was for the more commercial and industrial Hobbs Brook subbasin, though the drainage areas of the two subbasins differ only by about 20 percent. The State standard for fecal coliform bacteria in streams in the Cambridge drinking-water source area (20 colony forming units per 100 milliliters) was exceeded at all sampling stations. Estimated s

Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

2001-01-01

351

Multidimensional scaling  

PubMed Central

The concept of similarity, or a sense of "sameness" among things, is pivotal to theories in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Similarity, however, is a difficult thing to measure. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) is a tool by which researchers can obtain quantitative estimates of similarity among groups of items. More formally, MDS refers to a set of statistical techniques that are used to reduce the complexity of a data set, permitting visual appreciation of the underlying relational structures contained therein. The current paper provides an overview of MDS. We discuss key aspects of performing this technique, such as methods that can be used to collect similarity estimates, analytic techniques for treating proximity data, and various concerns regarding interpretation of the MDS output. MDS analyses of two novel data sets are also included, highlighting in step-by-step fashion how MDS is performed, and key issues that may arise during analysis. PMID:23359318

Papesh, Megan H.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

2012-01-01

352

Metabolic modeling of endosymbiont genome reduction on a temporal scale  

E-print Network

compared with that of E. coli, but it has retained ancestral genes for proteins involved in DNA replication, Rehovot, Israel, 3 Department of molecular genetics, Weizmann Institute of science, Rehovot, Israel, 4 and Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK and 6 The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv

Ruppin, Eytan

353

Protein Science (1994), 3:15-21. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1994The Protein Society  

E-print Network

in the helix and in the outer&strands (particularly &strand2) display a small degree of chemical exchange line a higher degree of mobility on thepicosecond time scale, as manifested by lower values of the overall order stabilityto both heat and urea denaturation, despite the absenceof any disulfide bridges (Gronenborn et al

Clore, G. Marius

354

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2011), 17, 654662. Copyright E INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2011.  

E-print Network

: Gender Differences Between Normal Elderly and Alzheimer's Disease in Verbal Memory Engender Better). The implications of gender effects on the assessment of memory impairments is not well known, but how men and women memory learning and recall using the Logical Memory (LM) subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale

Chapman, Robert M.

355

J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 655, pp. 419445. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112010000959  

E-print Network

, while at hypersonic speeds, due to considerable radiative cooling and internal heat transfer temperature L. DUAN, I. BEEKMAN AND M. P. MART ´IN Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Maryland5T1 to M5T5). The influence of wall cooling on Morkovin's scaling, Walz's equation, the standard

Martín, Pino

356

J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 652, pp. 241257. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112010000042  

E-print Network

understanding of fluid mechanics at increasingly smaller time and length scales. Conversely, experimental to advance knowledge in new areas of fluid mechanics such as high-frequency nanofluidics. Recent work on high-frequency oscillating flows (Karabacak, Yakhot & Present address: Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton

357

J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 663, pp. 100119. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S002211201000340X  

E-print Network

travelling waves promote turbulence even when the uncontrolled flow stays laminar. On the other hand' kinetic energy, thereby maintaining the laminar flow. In flows driven by a fixed pressure gradient equations with uncertainty has considerable ability to predict full-scale phenomena. Key words: flow control

Jovanovic, Mihailo

358

J. Fluid Mech. (2000), vol. 416, pp. 297314. Printed in the United Kingdom c 2000 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

a series of new laboratory experiments which investigate the motion of a turbulent gravity current through propagating through arrays of retarding mounds (J´ohannesson et al. 1996), large-scale dense gas flows through have been built. One system involves an array of retarding mounds designed to arrest the flow

Hogg, Andrew

359

Determination of the b quark mass at the MZ scale with the DELPHI detector at LEP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study of the normalized three-jet rate of b quark events with respect to light quarks events (light=??u,d,s) has been performed using the CAMBRIDGE and DURHAM jet algorithms. The data used were collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP on the Z peak from 1994 to 2000. The results are found to agree with theoretical predictions treating mass corrections at next-to-leading order. Measurements of the b quark mass have also been performed for both the b pole mass: Mb and the b running mass: mb(MZ). Data are found to be better described when using the running mass. The measurement yields: m_b(M_Z)=2.85±0.18 (text{stat}) ±0.13 (text{exp}) ±0.19 (text{had}) ±0.12 (text{theo}) text{GeV}/c^2.for the CAMBRIDGE algorithm. This result is the most precise measurement of the b mass derived from a high energy process. When compared to other b mass determinations by experiments at lower energy scales, this value agrees with the prediction of quantum chromodynamics for the energy evolution of the running mass. The mass measurement is equivalent to a test of the flavour independence of the strong coupling constant with an accuracy of 7 ‰.

DELPHI Collaboration

2006-06-01

360

~~ejsl~a~Rohani isatthe Dept ofZoology, University ofCambridge, Downirag Street. Cambridge. UK CR23EJ; Timothy Lewis and Daniel ~r~l~~~~rn are at the  

E-print Network

-vdu are called coupled m Ls)D-18. ness~3. ver ev~~~t~~~~ytimescales, spi- ral waves have been explicitly shown dynamic, large-scale pattern ~~r~at~o~. PIis important to avoid confusion by clarifying precisely what we mean (and more ~~~~~ta~t~y~ what we do nol by s~~~~o~~a~i~~~s schooling, swarming meet our present

Rohani, Pej

361

Frontiers is a lecture series in which distinguished academics are invited to speak about the frontiers of research and to place their own contributions in context. This lecture is funded by the Isaac Newton Institute Cambridge, the Wales Institute of Mat  

E-print Network

the frontiers of research and to place their own contributions in context. This lecture is funded by the Isaac Newton Institute Cambridge, the Wales Institute of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, and Oxford

362

Frontiers is a lecture series in which distinguished academics are invited to speak about the frontiers of research and to place their own contributions in context. This joint event is funded by the Isaac Newton Institute Cambridge as part of their 20th  

E-print Network

by the Isaac Newton Institute Cambridge as part of their 20th anniversary celebrations, the Wales Institute of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, and Oxford University Press. Frontiers Newton Institute 20th

363

Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Australian.  

PubMed

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error, CFMT assessment of memory only at short delays, and a face set whose ethnicity is matched to only some Caucasian groups. We develop the "CFMT-Australian" (CFMT-Aus), which complements the CFMT-original by using ethnicity better matched to a different European subpopulation. Results confirm reliability (.88) and validity (convergent, divergent using cars, inversion effects). We show that face ethnicity within a race has subtle but clear effects on face processing even in normal participants (includes cross-over interaction for face ethnicity by perceiver country of origin in distinctiveness ratings). We show that CFMT-Aus clarifies diagnosis of prosopagnosia in 6 previously ambiguous cases. In 3 cases, this appears due to the better ethnic match to prosopagnosics. We also show that face memory at short (<3-min), 20-min, and 24-hr delays taps overlapping processes in normal participants. There is some suggestion that a form of prosopagnosia may exist that is long delay only and/or reflects failure to benefit from face repetition. PMID:22122116

McKone, Elinor; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Palermo, Romina; Wilkinson, Ross B; Rivolta, Davide; Yovel, Galit; Davis, Joshua M; O'Connor, Kirsty B

2011-03-01

364

Decline of executive function in a clinical population: age, psychopathology, and test performance on the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB).  

PubMed

This study presents a cross-sectional examination of the age-related executive changes in a sample of adults with a history of psychiatric illness using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. A total of 406 patients, aged 18 to 72 years old, completed executive function tests of working memory, strategic planning, and set shifting. Using current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition criteria, patients were diagnosed with: (a) affective disorders (N = 153), (b) substance-related disorders (N = 112), (c) personality disorders (N = 82), or (d) pervasive developmental disorders (N = 59). Test performances were compared to those of 52 healthy adults. Similar rates of age-related executive decline were found for patients and healthy participants. However, as adults with a history of psychiatric illness started out with significantly lower baseline levels of executive functioning, they may require less time before reaching a critical threshold where functional deficits emerge. Limitations as well as implications for future research were discussed. PMID:25084845

Janssen, Gwenny; van Aken, Loes; De Mey, Hubert; Witteman, Cilia; Egger, Jos

2014-01-01

365

The case for the continuing use of the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) and the standardization of notation in human mitochondrial DNA studies.  

PubMed

Since the determination in 1981 of the sequence of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome, the Cambridge Reference Sequence (CRS), has been used as the reference sequence to annotate mtDNA in molecular anthropology, forensic science and medical genetics. The CRS was eventually upgraded to the revised version (rCRS) in 1999. This reference sequence is a convenient device for recording mtDNA variation, although it has often been misunderstood as a wild-type (WT) or consensus sequence by medical geneticists. Recently, there has been a proposal to replace the rCRS with the so-called Reconstructed Sapiens Reference Sequence (RSRS). Even if it had been estimated accurately, the RSRS would be a cumbersome substitute for the rCRS, as the new proposal fuses--and thus confuses--the two distinct concepts of ancestral lineage and reference point for human mtDNA. Instead, we prefer to maintain the rCRS and to report mtDNA profiles by employing the hitherto predominant circumfix style. Tree diagrams could display mutations by using either the profile notation (in conventional short forms where appropriate) or in a root-upwards way with two suffixes indicating ancestral and derived nucleotides. This would guard against misunderstandings about reporting mtDNA variation. It is therefore neither necessary nor sensible to change the present reference sequence, the rCRS, in any way. The proposed switch to RSRS would inevitably lead to notational chaos, mistakes and misinterpretations. PMID:24304692

Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Richards, Martin B; Yao, Yong-Gang; Logan, Ian

2014-02-01

366

Book review: Modern Plasma Physics, Vol. I: Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas, by Patrick H. Diamond, Sanae-I. Itoh and Kimitaka Itoh, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK), 2010, IX, 417 p., ISBN 978-0-521-86920-1 (Hardback)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If you want to learn not only the most fundamental things about the physics of turbulent plasmas but also the current state of the problem including the most recent results in theoretical and experimental investigations - and certainly many physicists and astrophysicists do - this series of three excellent monographs is just for you. The first volume "Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas" develops the kinetic theory of turbulence through a focus on quasi-particle models and dynamics. It discusses the concepts and theoretical methods for describing weak and strong fluid and phase space turbulence in plasma systems far from equilibrium. The core material includes fluctuation theory, self-similar cascades and transport, mean field theory, resonance broadening and nonlinear wave-particle interaction, wave-wave interaction and wave turbulence, strong turbulence theory and renormalization. The book gives readers a deep understanding of the fields under consideration and builds a foundation for future applications to multi-scale processes of self-organization in tokamaks and other confined plasmas. In spite of a short pedagogical introduction, the book is addressed mainly to well prepared readers with a serious background in plasma physics, to researchers and advanced graduate students in nonlinear plasma physics, controlled fusions and related fields such as cosmic plasma physics

Somov, B. V.

367

Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

2012-03-01

368

Changes in diet, cardiovascular risk factors and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort  

PubMed Central

Aims To describe change in self-reported diet and plasma vitamin C, and to examine associations between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the year following diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent assessment of self-reported diet, plasma vitamin C, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk at 1 year, adjusting for change in physical activity and cardio-protective medication. Results Participants reported significant reductions in energy, fat and sodium intake, and increases in fruit, vegetable and fibre intake over 1 year. The reduction in energy was equivalent to an average-sized chocolate bar; the increase in fruit was equal to one plum per day. There was a small increase in plasma vitamin C levels. Increases in fruit intake and plasma vitamin C were associated with small reductions in anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. Increased vegetable intake was associated with an increase in BMI and waist circumference. Reductions in fat, energy and sodium intake were associated with reduction in HbA1c, waist circumference and total cholesterol/modelled cardiovascular disease risk, respectively. Conclusions Improvements in dietary behaviour in this screen-detected population were associated with small reductions in cardiovascular disease risk, independently of change in cardio-protective medication and physical activity. Dietary change may have a role to play in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk following diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:24102972

Savory, L A; Griffin, S J; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Simmons, R K

2014-01-01

369

Educational Scale-Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article explores the complexities of educational scale-making. "Educational scales" are defined as the spatial and temporal orders generated as pupils and teachers move and are moved through educational systems; scales are "envelopes of spacetime" into which certain schoolbased identities (and not others) can be folded. Scale is thus both an…

Nespor, Jan

2004-01-01

370

small-scale LARGE-SCALE  

E-print Network

BACTERIA: small-scale organism LARGE-SCALE CONSEQUENCES Water as a Resource Natural water systems are essential to the environment and to human activity. They supply us with drinking water, serve as a means accumulate in bodies of water and lead to eutrophication. Eutrohpication is the process of excess minerals

Wilhelm, Steven W.

371

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites  

E-print Network

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

Menascé, Daniel A.

372

2013 Cambridge Science Festival 2013 Cambridge Science Festival Index  

E-print Network

Physics Dr Claire Cockcroft Babraham Institute Dr Henry Gee Nature Lord Rees of Ludlow Astronomer Royal Professor Malcolm Longair Cavendish Laboratory Mr Tim Radford Journalist Professor Barbara Sahakian

Cambridge, University of

373

Effect of changing the amount and type of fat and carbohydrate on insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk: the RISCK (Reading, Imperial, Surrey, Cambridge, and Kings) trial1234  

PubMed Central

Background: Insulin sensitivity (Si) is improved by weight loss and exercise, but the effects of the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or carbohydrates of high glycemic index (HGI) or low glycemic index (LGI) are uncertain. Objective: We conducted a dietary intervention trial to study these effects in participants at risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Design: We conducted a 5-center, parallel design, randomized controlled trial [RISCK (Reading, Imperial, Surrey, Cambridge, and Kings)]. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in Si (measured by using an intravenous glucose tolerance test) and cardiovascular risk factors. Measurements were made after 4 wk of a high-SFA and HGI (HS/HGI) diet and after a 24-wk intervention with HS/HGI (reference), high-MUFA and HGI (HM/HGI), HM and LGI (HM/LGI), low-fat and HGI (LF/HGI), and LF and LGI (LF/LGI) diets. Results: We analyzed data for 548 of 720 participants who were randomly assigned to treatment. The median Si was 2.7 × 10?4 mL · ?U?1 · min?1 (interquartile range: 2.0, 4.2 × 10?4 mL · ?U?1 · min?1), and unadjusted mean percentage changes (95% CIs) after 24 wk treatment (P = 0.13) were as follows: for the HS/HGI group, ?4% (?12.7%, 5.3%); for the HM/HGI group, 2.1% (?5.8%, 10.7%); for the HM/LGI group, ?3.5% (?10.6%, 4.3%); for the LF/HGI group, ?8.6% (?15.4%, ?1.1%); and for the LF/LGI group, 9.9% (2.4%, 18.0%). Total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations decreased with SFA reduction. Decreases in TC and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were greater with LGI. Fat reduction lowered HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 and B concentrations. Conclusions: This study did not support the hypothesis that isoenergetic replacement of SFAs with MUFAs or carbohydrates has a favorable effect on Si. Lowering GI enhanced reductions in TC and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in subjects, with tentative evidence of improvements in Si in the LF-treatment group. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as ISRCTN29111298. PMID:20739418

Jebb, Susan A; Lovegrove, Julie A; Griffin, Bruce A; Frost, Gary S; Moore, Carmel S; Chatfield, Mark D; Bluck, Les J; Williams, Christine M; Sanders, Thomas AB

2010-01-01

374

Small Scale Organic Techniques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

1975-01-01

375

Robot calibration without scaling  

E-print Network

methods. Scaling is a common way of improving the condition number for a matrix. Researchers in other fields have developed specific methods of scaling matrices to improve the condition number. However, robotics researchers have not specifically addressed...

Ives, Thomas W.

2012-06-07

376

Weak scale supersymmetry  

SciTech Connect

An introduction to the ideas and current state of weak scale supersymmetry is given. It is shown that LEP data on Z decays has already excluded two of the most elegant models of weak scale supersymmetry. 14 refs.

Hall, L.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA) California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-11-12

377

Campus Map Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are given an outline map of the campus with no scale indicated. They are to work in small groups to determine the scale. Although rules and tape measures are provided, students are given no instruction on how to best determine the scale and are tasked with devising their own methodology. Students write their scales on the blackboard and we finish the class with a discussion of their various methodologies, sources of error, and why there is some variation among their results.

Todd, Carrie D.

378

Scale effects in transmissivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterogeneity accounts for several paradoxes in groundwater flow and solute transport. One of the most striking observations is the emergence of scale effects in transmissivity, that is, the increase in effective transmissivity (or hydraulic conductivity, for that matter) with increasing scale of observation. Traditional stochastic approaches, where transmissivity is treated as a multilog-normal random function, lead to a large-scale effective

Xavier Sánchez-Vila; Jesús Carrera; Jorge P. Girardi

1996-01-01

379

Thermal scale modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex system study data indicate that factors associated with multilayer insulation pose major problem in scale modeling, that numerical analysis aids correction for known compromises of scaling criteria, and that probable errors in scale modeling experiments fall within range predicted by statistical analysis.

Mac Gregor, R. K.

1971-01-01

380

ANNUAL REPORT University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

participation agenda, which was concentrated more upon access for able young students to full-time degree education staff and adult students ­ resulted in increased student numbers, and the expansion of continuing, the University's Council for Lifelong Learning began discussions on the development of a University policy

Steiner, Ullrich

381

Turing's Legacy Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

, Lenore Blum, Harry Buhrman, Ekaterina B. Fokina, Valentina Harizanov, Alexander Melnikov, Cameron E. Freer, Daniel M. Roy, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas C. Hales, Steven Homer, Alan L. Selman, Charles F View list of contributors... Hardback (ISBN-13: 9781107043480) c. £60.00 #12; Alan Turing

Harizanov, Valentina S.

382

Charles Fox Clare College, Cambridge  

E-print Network

composition process. The evolution and human composition aspects are integrated to increase the power of each Hierarchical Music Structures Tripos: Computer Science Part II Year: 2000 Word count: 11,297 Project OriginatorGenie, for semi-automated composition of meaningful and aesthetically pleasing music. This will be done by means

Barker, Jon

383

University of CambridgeUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Cambridge IARU Global Summer Programme  

E-print Network

Literature Intelligence 21 #12;LECTURES Ancient Empires/ History Science Roman luxury: the temptation literature, Home University literature, communicati on, neuro science, 3 2 1 U.C.Berkley Yale , history lecture 21:00 Library 24:30 Go to bed LECTURES Plenary/Evening Lectures Ancient Empires/ History Science

Miyashita, Yasushi

384

University of Cambridge: Science Festival  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Science Festival aims to provide the public with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of scientific interest and concern and to raise aspirations by encouraging young people to consider a career in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.Each year, the Festival welcomes over 30,000 visitors to over 250 events and receives extensive national and local media coverage. Over 170 event coordinators organise talks, interactive demonstrations, hands-on activities, film showings and debates with the assistance of around 1,000 staff and students from departments and organisations across the University and research institutions, charities and industry in the eastern region. In addition, over 150 people volunteer their time to act as stewards to ensure visitors have a safe and enjoyable Festival experience.

385

Cambridge World Oral Literature Project  

E-print Network

- sition are Mary and the newborn Christ child. Joseph on the bottom left is revealingly absent from the central group, emphasizing the fact that he was not the father. De- scribed as a widower with children from a previous marriage, Joseph is shown... , the cave and the earth each one set above the other in a continu- ous ascending ladder linking man to God and higher consciousness. Mt. Kailas is regarded as paradise in many Hindu sects, the spiritual centre of the world, whilst accord- ing...

Anon.

2009-11-26

386

Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge May August  

E-print Network

of botanical drawing in Paris had over 80 pupils, the majority of them women, several of whom became to Viking hack-silver and gold coins of the Civil War, the discovery of ancient treasure inspires great

Zeki, Semir

387

Oliver Williams University of Cambridge  

E-print Network

/Boosting validation Efficient Temporal fusion + sparsity #12;Questions? #12;Results: Cars Algorithm is not specific & Withdraw Pan Detect New Pos Big Change Lost Lost #12;1D example Tutorial: toy data 100 Training examples 12

Cipolla, Roberto

388

Cambridge Ideas - How Many Lightbulbs?  

E-print Network

the hot air, in which Prof Mackay has calculated the numbers involved for the alternatives to fossil fuels like coal, gas and oil. He debunks some myths about energy saving - unplugging our phone chargers, does not make any appreciable difference. After...

MacKay, David

2009-01-01

389

Optimal renormalization scales and commensurate scale relations  

SciTech Connect

Commensurate scale relations relate observables to observables and thus are independent of theoretical conventions, such as the choice of intermediate renormalization scheme. The physical quantities are related at commensurate scales which satisfy a transitivity rule which ensures that predictions are independent of the choice of an intermediate renormalization scheme. QCD can thus be tested in a new and precise way by checking that the observables track both in their relative normalization and in their commensurate scale dependence. For example, the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule at a given momentum transfer Q can be predicted from measurements of the e+e{sup {minus}} annihilation cross section at a corresponding commensurate energy scale {radical}s {proportional_to} Q, thus generalizing Crewther`s relation to non-conformal QCD. The coefficients that appear in this perturbative expansion take the form of a simple geometric series and thus have no renormalon divergent behavior. The authors also discuss scale-fixed relations between the threshold corrections to the heavy quark production cross section in e+e{sup {minus}} annihilation and the heavy quark coupling {alpha}{sub V} which is measurable in lattice gauge theory.

Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, H.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

1996-01-01

390

Maximum likelihood estimation of optimal scaling factors for expression array normalization  

E-print Network

Laboratory for Computer Science 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 b MIT Arti#12;cial Intelligence Laboratory 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 c Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research Nine technology being employed. Published research to date has not characterized the degree of variation

Gifford, David K.

391

Everyday scale errors.  

PubMed

Young children occasionally make scale errors- they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and researchers' informal accounts of these behaviors. However, scale errors have only been documented using laboratory procedures designed to promote their occurrence. To formally document the occurrence of scale errors in everyday settings, we posted a survey on the internet. Across two studies, participants reported many examples of everyday scale errors that are similar to those observed in our labs and were committed by children of the same age. These findings establish that scale errors occur in the course of children's daily lives, lending further support to the account that these behaviors stem from general aspects of visual processing. PMID:20121860

Ware, Elizabeth A; Uttal, David H; DeLoache, Judy S

2010-01-01

392

The positivity scale.  

PubMed

Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure positivity, defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of college participants. In Study 2, the unidimensionality of the P Scale was corroborated with confirmatory factor analysis in 2 independent samples (N? = 322; N? = 457). In Study 3, P Scale invariance across sexes and its relations with self-esteem, life satisfaction, optimism, positive negative affect, depression, and the Big Five provided further evidence of the internal and construct validity of the new measure in a large community sample (N = 3,589). In Study 4, test-retest reliability of the P Scale was found in a sample of college students (N = 262) who were readministered the scale after 5 weeks. In Study 5, measurement invariance and construct validity of P Scale were further supported across samples in different countries and cultures, including Italy (N = 689), the United States (N = 1,187), Japan (N = 281), and Spain (N = 302). Psychometric findings across diverse cultural context attest to the robustness of the P Scale and to positivity as a basic disposition. PMID:22250591

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

2012-09-01

393

In Press in: Boyd, I.A. (Ed) "Management of marine ecosystems: monitoring change in upper trophic levels" Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

at particular colonies. This work has highlighted the role that both broad-scale ocean climate variation that influence reproductive output at particular colonies have similar effects on survival or dispersal rates at specific colonies, are simil

Aberdeen, University of

394

INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

2010-01-01

395

Everyday Scale Errors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children occasionally make "scale errors"--they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and…

Ware, Elizabeth A.; Uttal, David H.; DeLoache, Judy S.

2010-01-01

396

Everyday scale errors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young children occasionally make scale errors - they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and researchers' informal

Elizabeth A. Ware; David H. Uttal; Judy S. DeLoache

2010-01-01

397

The Cosmic Distance Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of web-based exercises takes students on an interactive tour measuring cosmic distances. The exercises systematically steps out in scale from the familiar world of everyday objects to larger and larger astronomical scales, ultimately exploring the expansion rate of the universe. Links to other resources on the web are included.

Larson, Ana

2004-07-17

398

Short Hardiness Scale.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents a short, 15-item scale for measuring personality hardiness. Personality hardiness has been found to be a stress/health moderator in a wide range of studies. Still, there are problems with its measurement. The present 15-item scale has ...

P. T. Bartone

1995-01-01

399

Magnetron injection gun scaling  

SciTech Connect

Existing analytic design equations for magnetron injection guns (MIG's) are approximated to obtain a set of scaling laws. The constraints are chosen to examine the maximum peak power capabilities of MIG's. The scaling laws are compared with exact solutions of the design equations and are supported by MIG simulations.

Lawson, W.

1988-04-01

400

Ambivalent Racism Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of studies was conducted to develop and validate a scale to study racism in its newly adapted, ambivalent form. The scale was designed to measure the separate positively correlated hostile and benevolent components of racism. The first two studies, which involved 39 and 73 college students, established the questions that could be used for…

Blair, Jeremy

401

Premarital Attitude Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The thirty-one item questionnaire was developed to measure how prepared high school students are for marriage. The students are directed to read each statement and to select a response on a five point scale ranging from agreeing strongly to disagreeing strongly. The scale is scored to indicate three factors which are considered important for a…

Vancouver Board of School Trustees (British Columbia). Dept. of Planning and Evaluation.

402

Novel Reading Maturity Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to assess the maturity level of the novels which students read, the Novel Reading Maturity Scale (NRMS) is based on the notion that fiction of high quality is characterized by a number of themes or topics. The list of 22 topics in NRMS came from a survey of several guides on books for teenagers. To explore the reliability of the scale,…

Reich, Carol

403

What Is Scale?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scale is one of the big ideas that cross the science domains. Whether one is talking about the weight of a blue whale, the size of a galaxy or a molecule, or the age of a mountain range, scale is an essential tool in understanding the universe in a scient

Taylor, Amy R.; Jones, M. G.; Falvo, Michael R.

2009-09-01

404

Economies of scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working in groups of three, students analyze economies of scale. Each student constructs an individual short-run ATC curve, then the three students collaborate to determine if there are economies or diseconomies of scale and to create the long run ATC.

Maier, Mark

405

Parallel Computing in SCALE  

SciTech Connect

The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement activities has been developed to provide an integrated framework for future methods development. Some of the major components of the SCALE parallel computing development plan are parallelization and multithreading of computationally intensive modules and redesign of the fundamental SCALE computational architecture.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01

406

Interactions Between Synoptic-Scale Eddies and the Large-Scale Flow during the Life Cycles of Persistent Flow Anomalies.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through the entire life cycles of the PAs, the maxima in eddy activity (i.e. storm tracks) closely follow but are somewhat downstream of the regions of large-scale 700mb baroclinicity. The primary maxima are shifted well north of the climatological-mean storm track during the blocking cases (positive PAs) and well to the south during the zonal cases (negative PAs). Anomalous eddy activity is generally stronger at upper levels than at the surface. At least 6 days prior to the onset of positive PAs in both regions, significantly enhanced eddy activity appears well upstream of the point where the block subsequently forms, and spreads eastward in time reaching the key region by the time of onset. About a week prior to decay, the upstream eddy activity anomalies begin to weaken. Eddy activity is suppressed within the blocked region throughout the life cycle of the PA. Negative PAs are similar, but of opposite sign with the Pacific cases having the least anomalous eddy activity observed. During blocking, significant anomalous eddy anticyclonic forcing is found upstream (Atlantic cases) or near (Pacific cases) the block during all phases of the life cycles. The upper-level horizontal (barotropic) component is strongest during the mature phase suggesting that strong eddy vorticity forcing is playing a significant role in maintaining the block. The total eddy forcing is found to lead the development of both the positive and negative Atlantic cases by about five days suggesting that, in these cases, forcing by synoptic -scale eddies may also play an important role in the development of the flow anomalies. The results for the Atlantic positive cases are somewhat reminiscent of some sudden stratospheric warming events. For the Pacific cases, no clear temporal differences are found between the large-scale flow and the eddy forcings although the forcing patterns are broadly similar to the corresponding patterns during the Atlantic cases. Again, the Pacific negative cases appear to have the least amount of anomalous eddy feedbacks. The results suggest that a correct representation of the interactions between the eddies and the large-scale flow is important in order to correctly simulate the complete life cycles of persistent anomalies. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.) (Abstract shortened with permission of school.).

Neilley, Peter Paul

1990-03-01

407

Composite rating scales.  

PubMed

Rating scales are instruments that are very frequently used by clinicians to perform patient assessments. Typically, rating scales grade the attribute on an ordinal level of measurement, i.e., a rank ordering, meaning that the numbers assigned to the different ranks (item scores) do not represent 'real numbers' or 'physical magnitudes'. Single-item scales have some advantages, such as simplicity and low respondent burden, but they may also suffer from disadvantages, such as ambiguous score meanings and low responsiveness. Multi-item scales, in contrast, seem more adequate for assessment of complex constructs, allowing for detailed evaluation. Total scores representing the value of the construct may be quite precise and thus the responsiveness of the scale may be high. The most common strategy for obtaining the total score is the sum of the item scores, a strategy that constitutes one of the most important problems with these types of scales. A summative score of ordinal figures is not a 'real magnitude' and may have little sense. This paper is a review of the theoretical frameworks of the main theories used to develop rating scales (Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory). Bearing in mind that no alternative is perfect, additional research in this field and judicious decisions are called for. PMID:19732911

Martinez-Martin, Pablo

2010-02-15

408

Allometric Scaling in Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The unity of life is expressed not only in the universal basis of inheritance and energetics at the molecular level, but also in the pervasive scaling of traits with body size at the whole-organism level. More than 75 years ago, Kleiber and Brody and Proctor independently showed that the metabolic rates, B, of mammals and birds scale as the three-quarter power of their mass, M. Subsequent studies showed that most biological rates and times scale as M-1/4 and M^1/4 respectively, and that these so called quarter-power scaling relations hold for a variety of organisms, from unicellular prokaryotes and eukaryotes to trees and mammals. The wide applicability of Kleiber's law, across the 22 orders of magnitude of body mass from minute bacteria to giant whales and sequoias, raises the hope that there is some simple general explanation that underlies the incredible diversity of form and function. We will present a general theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between metabolic rate, B, and body mass, M. We show how the pervasive quarter-power biological scaling relations arise naturally from optimal directed resource supply systems. This framework robustly predicts that: 1) whole organism power and resource supply rate, B, scale as M^3/4; 2) most other rates, such as heart rate and maximal population growth rate scale as M-1/4; 3) most biological times, such as blood circulation time and lifespan, scale as M^1/4; and 4) the average velocity of flow through the network, v, such as the speed of blood and oxygen delivery, scales as M^1/12. Our framework is valid even when there is no underlying network. Our theory is applicable to unicellular organisms as well as to large animals and plants. This work was carried out in collaboration with Amos Maritan along with Jim Brown, John Damuth, Melanie Moses, Andrea Rinaldo, and Geoff West.

Banavar, Jayanth

2009-03-01

409

Scaling the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model is presented for the origin of the large scale structure of the universe and their Mass-Radius scaling law. The physics is conventional, orthodox, but it is used to fashion a highly unorthodox model of the origin of the galaxies, their groups, clusters, super-clusters, and great walls. The scaling law fits the observational results and the model offers new suggestions and predictions. These include a largest, a supreme, cosmic structure, and possible implications for the recently observed pressing cosmological anomalies.

Frankel, Norman E.

2014-04-01

410

Sulfate scale dissolution  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for removing barium sulfate scale. It comprises contacting the scale with an aqueous solution having a pH of about 8 to about 14 and consisting essentially of a chelating agent comprising a polyaminopolycarboxylic acid or salt of such an acid in a concentration of 0.1 to 1.0 M, and anions of a monocarboxylic acid selected form mercaptoacetic acid, hydroxyacetic acid, aminoacetic acid, or salicyclic acid in a concentration of 0.1 to 1.0 M and which is soluble in the solution under the selected pH conditions, to dissolve the scale.

Morris, R.L.; Paul, J.M.

1992-01-28

411

Large scale disease prediction  

E-print Network

The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

2008-01-01

412

Types of Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Across the different sciences one of the common challenges that researchers encounter is defining and measuring different variables. An essential part of that process is creating and using scales. In this investigation, students learn about a range of dif

Taylor, Amy R.; Jones, M. G.; Falvo, Michael R.

2009-04-01

413

Integration on time scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we study the process of Riemann and Lebesgue integration on time scales. The relationship of the Riemann and Lebesgue integrals is considered and a criterion for Riemann integrability is established.

Gusein Sh. Guseinov

2003-01-01

414

GSA Geologic Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Geological Society of America (GSA) site contains a detailed geologic time scale as an educational resource. It may be downloaded to a larger size, and includes all Eras, Eons, Periods, Epochs and ages as well as magnetic polarity information.

1999-01-01

415

Geological Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document describes how geologic time is approached in discussions of geologic topics. The uses of relative time and absolute time are compared, and a geologic time scale is provided to represent both concepts. References are provided.

416

Scaling Dark Energy  

E-print Network

We investigate the possibility of a dark energy component that is scaling with epochs. A phenomenological model is introduced whose energy density depends on the redshift in such a way that a smooth transition among the three dominant phases of the universe evolution (radiation era, matter domination, asymptotic de Sitter state) is achieved. We use the WMAP cosmic microwave background data and the luminosity distances of Type Ia Supernovae to test whether this data can provide a signal for scaling.

Salvatore Capozziello; Alessandro Melchiorri; Alice Schirone

2004-08-05

417

J. Fluid Mech. (2012), vol. 706, pp. 384412. c Cambridge University Press 2012 384 doi:10.1017/jfm.2012.260  

E-print Network

, atmospheric flows, moist convection 1. Introduction There is now quite an extensive body of research focused; Hendricks, Montgomery & Davis 2004). A recent review by Montgomery & Smith (2011) describes different by the interaction between deep cumulus clouds and a well-defined large-scale vortex. A tropical depression leads

Majda, Andrew J.

418

J. Fluid Mech. (2008), vol. 607, pp. 119139. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112008001882 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

of the system, rather than a consequence of a Hopf bifurcation of the deterministic system. The power spectrum of the magnetic field. Present address: LSGC CNRS ­ GROUPE ENSIC, BP 451, 54001 Nancy Cedex, France. Present of the oscillations is a consequence of the stochastic driving by the small-scale turbulent background fluctuations

Haller, Gary L.

419

Ferrire R, Dieckmann U & Couvet D (2004). Epilogue. In: Evolutionary Conservation Biology, eds. Ferrire R, Dieckmann U & Couvet D, pp. 356364. Cambridge University Press. c International  

E-print Network

and climate on a global scale (Hammond 1998; Western 2001). As a consequence, we must face the prospect of the catastrophic mass-extinction events of the past, the current biodiversity crisis has a unique feature a presumed capacity to mitigate its own deleterious impact, conservation action may be warranted (Novacek

Dieckmann, Ulf

420

J. Fluid Mech. (2014), vol. 746, pp. 214235. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/jfm.2014.133  

E-print Network

and to the external flow on a finite time scale, hysteresis is a prominent feature of the drop dynamics under opposing. This mechanism operates at zero Reynolds number, but is much enhanced by inertia. With the two forces opposing layer in hydrogen fuel cells. This is a porous medium through which air flows to the reaction site while

Feng, James J.

421

J. Fluid Mech. (2007), vol. 589, pp. 125145. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112007007872 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-print Network

­structure interactions ELISA FRANCO1 , DAVID N. PEKAREK2 , JIFENG PENG3 AND JOHN O. DABIRI3,4 1 Control and Dynamical scales. Examples include the #12;126 E. Franco, D. N. Pekarek, J. Peng and J. O. Dabiri 1 2 Figure 1

Dabiri, John O.

422

Full Scale Tunnel model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

1929-01-01

423

Multiple scale?dynamo  

PubMed Central

A scaling law approach is used to simulate the dynamo process of the Earth’s core. The model is made of embedded turbulent domains of increasing dimensions, until the largest whose size is comparable with the site of the core, pervaded by large-scale magnetic fields. Left-handed or right-handed cyclones appear at the lowest scale, the scale of the elementary domains of the hierarchical model, and disappear. These elementary domains then behave like electromotor generators with opposite polarities depending on whether they contain a left-handed or a right-handed cyclone. To transfer the behavior of the elementary domains to larger ones, a dynamic renormalization approach is used. A simple rule is adopted to determine whether a domain of scale l is a generator—and what its polarity is—in function of the state of the (l ? 1) domains it is made of. This mechanism is used as the main ingredient of a kinematic dynamo model, which displays polarity intervals, excursions, and reversals of the geomagnetic field. PMID:11038547

Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Allègre, Claude J.; Narteau, Clément

1997-01-01

424

Universities Scale Like Cities  

PubMed Central

Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the ‘gross university income’ in terms of total number of citations over ‘size’ in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities -the top-100 European universities- we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment. PMID:23544062

van Raan, Anthony F. J.

2013-01-01

425

Generalised Scale Invariant Theories  

E-print Network

We present the most general actions of a single scalar field and two scalar fields coupled to gravity, consistent with second order field equations in four dimensions, possessing local scale invariance. We apply two different methods to arrive at our results. One method, Ricci gauging, was known to the literature and we find this to produce the same result for the case of one scalar field as a more efficient method presented here. However, we also find our more efficient method to be much more general when we consider two scalar fields. Locally scale invariant actions are also presented for theories with more than two scalar fields coupled to gravity and we explain how one could construct the most general actions for any number of scalar fields. Our generalised scale invariant actions have obvious applications to early universe cosmology, and include, for example, the Bezrukov-Shaposhnikov action as a subset.

Antonio Padilla; David Stefanyszyn; Minas Tsoukalas

2013-12-03

426

Image Scale Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a booklet containing 11 problem sets and 9 "Extra for Experts" challenges. Learners use provided textual information to determine the scale (e.g., kilometers per millimeter) for images of the lunar surface, Mars, planets, stars and galaxies and then identify the smallest and largest features in the images according to their actual physical sizes. These problems involve measurement, dividing whole numbers, decimal mathematics, and scaling principles. Each set of problems is contained on one page. This booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

427

Scale Models and Diagrams  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a set of three, one-page problems about the scale of objects in images returned by spacecraft. Learners will measure scaled drawings using high-resolution images of the lunar and martian surfaces. Options are presented so that students may learn about the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission through a NASA press release or by viewing a NASA eClips video [4 min.]. This activity is part of the Space Math multi-media modules that integrate NASA press releases, NASA archival video, and mathematics problems targeted at specific math standards commonly encountered in middle school.

428

pH Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales. Investigate whether changing the volume or diluting with water affects the pH. Or you can design your own liquid!

Simulations, Phet I.; Adams, Wendy; Barbera, Jack; Langdon, Laurie; Loeblein, Patricia; Malley, Chris

2008-07-01

429

The creative achievement scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Creative Achievement Scale (CAS) was designed to measure the creative accomplishments of deceased individuals based on information extracted from biographical sources (e.g., published biographies). The CAS contains 11 items which pertain to personal attributes, product qualities, and sociocultural factors. Statistical analyses conducted on one small (n = 12) and one larger sample (n = 50) of subjects revealed the

Arnold M. Ludwig

1992-01-01

430

The Teacher Burnout Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 21-item Likert scale to measure teachers' burnout was developed. Factor analysis supported its validity and determined its four subscales: (1) Career Satisfaction; (2) Perceived Administrative Support; (3) Coping with Job-Related Stress; and (4) Attitudes towards Students. Additional analyses indicated good reliability and validity. (Items are…

Seidman, Steven A.; Zager, Joanne

1987-01-01

431

Sensor system scaling issues  

SciTech Connect

A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01

432

Scaling up Psycholinguistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation contains several projects, each addressing different questions with different techniques. In chapter 1, I argue that they are unified thematically by their goal of "scaling up psycholinguistics"; they are all aimed at analyzing large data-sets using tools that reveal patterns to propose and test mechanism-neutral hypotheses about…

Smith, Nathaniel J.

2011-01-01

433

Small scale membrane mechanics.  

PubMed

Large scale changes to lipid bilayer shapes are well represented by the Helfrich model. However, there are membrane processes that take place at smaller length scales that this model cannot address. In this work, we present a one-dimensional continuum model that captures the mechanics of the lipid bilayer membrane at the length scale of the lipids themselves. The model is developed using the Cosserat theory of surfaces with lipid orientation, or 'tilt', as the fundamental degree of freedom. The Helfrich model can be recovered as a special case when the curvatures are small and the lipid tilt is everywhere zero. We use the tilt model to study local membrane deformations in response to a protein inclusion. Parameter estimates and boundary conditions are obtained from a coarse-grained molecular model using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to capture the same phenomenon. The continuum model is able to reproduce the membrane bending, stretch and lipid tilt as seen in the DPD model. The lipid tilt angle relaxes to the bulk tilt angle within 5-6 nm from the protein inclusion. Importantly, for large tilt gradients induced by the proteins, the tilt energy contribution is larger than the bending energy contribution. Thus, the continuum model of tilt accurately captures behaviors at length scales shorter than the membrane thickness. PMID:24081650

Rangamani, Padmini; Benjamini, Ayelet; Agrawal, Ashutosh; Smit, Berend; Steigmann, David J; Oster, George

2014-08-01

434

CALIBRATION Galileo Scale Model  

E-print Network

see Jupiter and some of its 4 largest moons, just as Galileo Galilei did in Italy in 1610. While youPRINTING CALIBRATION Galileo Scale Model PARTS SHEET 1: The High-Gain Antenna PRINT ON TRANSPARENCY MATERIAL Galileo's High-Gain Antenna (HGA) was designed to unfold like an umbrella. It needed to be folded

435

Small-Scale Weather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The concepts covered so far that pertain to the Earth's weather will finally be applied in this chapter. A number of basic mechanisms that govern small-scale things such as cloud formation, rain, fog, dew point, and humidity, will be addressed.

Robertson, William C.

2005-01-01

436

Build an Interplanetary Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an activity in which students use a bathroom scale and a long board to see how their weight changes on other planets and the moon. Materials list, procedures, tables of planet radii, comparative values, and gravitational ratios are provided. (DDR)

Matthews, Catherine; And Others

1997-01-01

437

Scaling the Map  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Continuing the Asteroid Impact challenge, students learn how to determine map distances and areas using a map scale. They also get a better feel for how much an area represents on a map in relation to the sizes they are suggesting for their underground caverns.

Adventure Engineering

438

Bracken Basic Concept Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Bracken Basic Concept Scale, for use with preschool and primary-aged children, determines a child's school readiness and knowledge of English-language verbal concepts. The instrument measures 258 basic concepts in such categories as comparisons, time, quantity, and letter identification. This paper describes test administration, scoring and…

Naglieri, Jack A.; Bardos, Achilles N.

1990-01-01

439

Make a Balance / Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners create a kind of balance device using a wire coat hanger, some string, and paper cups. Learners use the balance to see how many jellybeans equals an apple, or create a scale and try to find the exact weight of something.

Minnesota, Science M.

1995-01-01

440

An Optimization Framework for Goal-Oriented, Model-Based Reduction of Large-Scale Systems  

E-print Network

, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA kwillcox@mit.edu B. Bader and B. van Bloemen Waanders are with Sandia National Lab- oratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA bwbader@sandia.gov, bartv@sandia.gov O. Ghattas is with the Institute

Ghattas, Omar

441

Evidence for the role of endosymbionts in regional-scale habitat partitioning by  

E-print Network

, and Peter R. Girguisa,1 a Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge Saint Denis de La Réunion, France; d Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole

Girguis, Peter R.

442

Cryo-Letters6, 2r-1\\(98r). P u b l i s h e db yC r y o -L e t t e r s ,7 , |/oottonWay,CambridgeCBI9L)(,U.l(.  

E-print Network

spherical stem galls on goldenrod (Solidago spp. ). The galls often extend above the snow, thus exposingWay,CambridgeCBI9L)(,U.l(. EFFEST OF TEMPERATUREAT]D DJRATICI{ OF EXPOSURECX.{TISSUE ICE FORT,IATION] IN TtiE GALL}i The goldenrod gaIl fly, Eurosta solidaginis (Fitch), has served as a nodel system for the study of naturally

Lee Jr., Richard E.

443

Scaling macroscopic aquatic locomotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inertial aquatic swimmers that use undulatory gaits range in length L from a few millimetres to 30 metres, across a wide array of biological taxa. Using elementary hydrodynamic arguments, we uncover a unifying mechanistic principle characterizing their locomotion by deriving a scaling relation that links swimming speed U to body kinematics (tail beat amplitude A and frequency ?) and fluid properties (kinematic viscosity ?). This principle can be simply couched as the power law Re ~ Sw?, where Re = UL/? >> 1 and Sw = ?AL/?, with ? = 4/3 for laminar flows, and ? = 1 for turbulent flows. Existing data from over 1,000 measurements on fish, amphibians, larvae, reptiles, mammals and birds, as well as direct numerical simulations are consistent with our scaling. We interpret our results as the consequence of the convergence of aquatic gaits to the performance limits imposed by hydrodynamics.

Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

2014-10-01

444

Chip Scale Atomic Magnetometers  

Microsoft Academic Search

An optically pumped magnetometer was drastically miniaturized, by taking advantage of MEMS techniques, producing the chip-scale atomic magnetometers (CSAM) physics package. The key component of the package is an alkali vapor cell. To probe the magnetic field experienced by the atoms, the injection current to the VCSEL was modulated at 3.4 GHz near half the hyperfine frequency of 87Rb. Lock-in

Peter D. D. Schwindt; B. J. Lindseth; S. Knappe; John Kitching; J. Moreland; L. Hollberg

2006-01-01

445

Toys and Scale Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Play is fun. With toys designed like real world objects – kitchen sinks, hot wheels, lawn mowers, baby dolls – children are\\u000a socialized through play. By playing with these toys, children exercise their imaginations, creativity, and intuition. So,\\u000a too, do adults exercise these mental muscles through play. Scale models are the toys that engineers and scientists use to\\u000a solve problems.

Richard I. Emori

446

Supergranulation Scale Connection Simulations  

E-print Network

Results of realistic simulations of solar surface convection on the scale of supergranules (96 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep) are presented. The simulations cover only 10% of the geometric depth of the solar convection zone, but half its pressure scale heights. They include the hydrogen, first and most of the second helium ionization zones. The horizontal velocity spectrum is a power law and the horizontal size of the dominant convective cells increases with increasing depth. Convection is driven by buoyancy work which is largest close to the surface, but significant over the entire domain. Close to the surface buoyancy driving is balanced by the divergence of the kinetic energy flux, but deeper down it is balanced by dissipation. The damping length of the turbulent kinetic energy is 4 pressure scale heights. The mass mixing length is 1.8 scale heights. Two thirds of the area is upflowing fluid except very close to the surface. The internal (ionization) energy flux is the largest contributor to the convective flux for temperatures less than 40,000 K and the thermal energy flux is the largest contributor at higher temperatures. This data set is useful for validating local helioseismic inversion methods. Sixteen hours of data are available as four hour averages, with two hour cadence, at steinr.msu.edu/~bob/96averages, as idl save files. The variables stored are the density, temperature, sound speed, and three velocity components. In addition, the three velocity components at 200 km above mean continuum optical depth unity are available at 30 sec. cadence.

R. F. Stein; A. Nordlund; D. Georgobiani; D. Benson; W. Schaffenberger

2008-11-04

447

Size, Scale and Models  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners take measurements and create charts to learn about the size of dinosaurs and their relative scale to humans. In addition, learners discover how scientists estimate the volume of dinosaurs by using a simple displacement procedure. Learners also examine how fossilized bones fit together when they make their own dinosaur skeleton. This activity is featured on pp.28-32 (part of a lesson that begins on p.19) of the "Dinosphere" unit of study for grades 3-5.

Crosslin, Rick; Fortney, Mary; Indianapolis, The C.

2004-01-01

448

Scaling an Atom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners make a scale model of an atom to see how big or how small an atom is compared to its nucleus. Learners will realize that most of matter is just empty space! Learners will calculate the diameter and radius of a pinhead and the distance between the radius and the electron cloud as well as other optional measurements listed in the "Etc." portion of the resource.

Muller, Eric

2002-01-01

449

Global Scale Solar Disturbances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combination of the STEREO and SDO missions have allowed for the first time imagery of the entire Sun. This coupled with the high cadence, broad thermal coverage, and the large dynamic range of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO has allowed discovery of impulsive solar disturbances that can significantly affect a hemisphere or more of the solar volume. Such events are often, but not always, associated with M and X class flares. GOES C and even B class flares are also associated with these large scale disturbances. Key to the recognition of the large scale disturbances was the creation of log difference movies. By taking the log of images before differencing events in the corona become much more evident. Because such events cover such a large portion of the solar volume their passage can effect the dynamics of the entire corona as it adjusts to and recovers from their passage. In some cases this may lead to a another flare or filament ejection, but in general direct causal evidence of 'sympathetic' behavior is lacking. However, evidence is accumulating these large scale events create an environment that encourages other solar instabilities to occur. Understanding the source of these events and how the energy that drives them is built up, stored, and suddenly released is critical to understanding the origins of space weather. Example events and comments of their relevance will be presented.

Title, A. M.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.

2013-12-01

450

Color quality scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The color rendering index (CRI) has been shown to have deficiencies when applied to white light-emitting-diode-based sources. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the restricted scope of the CRI unnecessarily penalizes some light sources with desirable color qualities. To solve the problems of the CRI and include other dimensions of color quality, the color quality scale (CQS) has been developed. Although the CQS uses many of elements of the CRI, there are a number of fundamental differences. Like the CRI, the CQS is a test-samples method that compares the appearance of a set of reflective samples when illuminated by the test lamp to their appearance under a reference illuminant. The CQS uses a larger set of reflective samples, all of high chroma, and combines the color differences of the samples with a root mean square. Additionally, the CQS does not penalize light sources for causing increases in the chroma of object colors but does penalize sources with smaller rendered color gamut areas. The scale of the CQS is converted to span 0-100, and the uniform object color space and chromatic adaptation transform used in the calculations are updated. Supplementary scales have also been developed for expert users.

Davis, Wendy; Ohno, Yoshi

2010-03-01

451

Scaling ecology across the continent  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial and Temporal Scaling in Continental-Scale Ecology Workshop; Boulder, Colorado, 11-12 June 2012 Understanding the functional response of ecosystems across multiple spatial and temporal scales is one of the fundamental challenges in ecology. More than 50 researchers attended a June workshop focused on scaling ecological data from local and regional scales to the continental scale hosted by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The workshop addressed key issues associated with the influence of scale on the interpretation of ecological variation, particularly in the context of continental-scale terrestrial ecology. These questions are particularly relevant to NEON, the first ecological observation platform designed to assess the natural and human causes and the biological consequences of environmental change at large scales.

Kampe, Thomas; Berukoff, Steve

2012-11-01

452

Challenging comparison of stroke scales  

PubMed Central

Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index (BI) are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales. PMID:24497865

Ghandehari, Kavian

2013-01-01

453

The Geologic Time Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains a large, easy to read, detailed geologic time scale for the Phanerozoic Eon (544 million years ago - Present). This is the period of time, also known as an eon, between the end of the Precambrian and today. The Phanerozoic begins with the start of the Cambrian period, 544 million years ago. It encompasses the period of abundant, complex life on Earth. The chart includes the Era, Period or System, and the Epoch or Series and features a brief description of each.

454

New Scales for the Devereux Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five new scales for the Devereux Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale (DAB), measuring acting out behaviors, withdrawn\\/timid behaviors, psychotic behaviors, neurotic\\/dependent behaviors, and heterosexual interests, were developed using item-level factor analyses. These new scales were developed after two of the four higher order scales previously developed in a substance-abuse sample were not replicated in a psychiatric-inpatient and day-treatment sample. Internal consistency

Yossef S. Ben-Porath; Carolyn L. Williams; Craig Uchiyama

1989-01-01

455

Defining Macro-Scale Pressure From the Micro-Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Micro-scale models have proven to be powerful theoretical tools in groundwater flow and transport modelling. In addition to being useful in estimating traditional parameters, such as (relative) permeability and capillary pressure functions, micro-scale models have recently provided insight into complex multi-phase flow phenomena, such as the so-called dynamic capillary pressure, and are central in investigating theoretical developments in multi-phase flow modelling. To transfer the results of a micro-scale model to larger scales, a proper definition of macro-scale variables in terms of micro-scale quantities is crucial. One such variable is the pressure. Traditionally, macro-scale pressure of a given phase is defined in terms of the intrinsic phase average; i.e. the average of micro-scale pressure weighted by the volume of the phase. We show, by averaging of micro-scale momentum equations, that the macro-scale pressure in the Darcy equation is not necessarily the intrinsic phase average of its micro-scale equivalent. This will be the case if there are gradients of porosity or saturation in the system, and these gradients lead to non-negligible changes on the scale of the averaging volume. We have formulated a modified interpretation of macro-scale pressure. The implications of this modification for parameters on the macro-scale are significant, in particular for dynamic relative permeability and capillary pressure. We show that recent interpretations of dynamic capillary pressure can change significantly when this modified definition of macro-scale pressure is used. We also show, through simple example calculations, that inadmissible relative permeability values (e.g. values larger than 1) can result when using the standard average to define macro-scale phase pressures, but that no such problems arise with the new pressure definition. These results provide new insights into the definition and interpretation of average pressures, and also solve paradoxes that have been noted recently in the literature.

Nordbotten, J. M.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Dahle, H. K.; Celia, M. A.

2005-12-01

456

The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance  

E-print Network

The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance G.M. Lewisa, 1 20 August 1998 Abstract Scale invariance is rapidly becoming a new paradigm for geophysics. However, little attention has been paid to the anisotropy that is invariably present in geophysical ®elds

Lovejoy, Shaun

457

Scale Drift-Aware Large Scale Monocular SLAM Hauke Strasdat  

E-print Network

Scale Drift-Aware Large Scale Monocular SLAM Hauke Strasdat Department of Computing, Imperial visual SLAM systems have recently been presented which are capable of accurate, large-scale and real geometry via frames distributed over time. However, a classic issue with monocular visual SLAM is that due

Davison, Andrew

458

Microburst modelling and scaling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A microburst can be modeled by releasing a volume of fluid that is slightly heavier than the ambient fluid, allowing it to fall onto a horizontal surface. Vorticity develops on the sides of this parcel as it descends and causes it to roll up into a turbulent vortex ring which impinges on the ground. Such a model exhibits many of the features of naturally occurring microbursts which are a hazard to aviation. In this paper this model is achieved experimentally by releasing a volume of salt water into fresh water from a cylindrical dispenser. When care is taken with the release the spreading rate of the surface outflow is measurable and quite repeatable despite the fact that the flow is turbulent. An elementary numerical approximation to this model, based on inviscid vortex dynamics, has also been developed. A scaling law is proposed which allows experiments with different fluid densities to be compared with each other and with the numerical results. More importantly the scaling law makes it possible to compare the model results with real microbursts.

Lundgren, T. S.; Yao, J.; Mansour, N. N.

1992-01-01

459

Small scale sanitation technologies.  

PubMed

Small scale systems can improve the sustainability of sanitation systems as they more easily close the water and nutrient loops. They also provide alternate solutions to centrally managed large scale infrastructures. Appropriate sanitation provision can improve the lives of people with inadequate sanitation through health benefits, reuse products as well as reduce ecological impacts. In the literature there seems to be no compilation of a wide range of available onsite sanitation systems around the world that encompasses black and greywater treatment plus stand-alone dry and urine separation toilet systems. Seventy technologies have been identified and classified according to the different waste source streams. Sub-classification based on major treatment methods included aerobic digestion, composting and vermicomposting, anaerobic digestion, sand/soil/peat filtration and constructed wetlands. Potential users or suppliers of sanitation systems can choose from wide range of technologies available and examine the different treatment principles used in the technologies. Sanitation systems need to be selected according to the local social, economic and environmental conditions and should aim to be sustainable. PMID:16104403

Green, W; Ho, G

2005-01-01

460

Scaling in transportation networks.  

PubMed

Subway systems span most large cities, and railway networks most countries in the world. These networks are fundamental in the development of countries and their cities, and it is therefore crucial to understand their formation and evolution. However, if the topological properties of these networks are fairly well understood, how they relate to population and socio-economical properties remains an open question. We propose here a general coarse-grained approach, based on a cost-benefit analysis that accounts for the scaling properties of the main quantities characterizing these systems (the number of stations, the total length, and the ridership) with the substrate's population, area and wealth. More precisely, we show that the length, number of stations and ridership of subways and rail networks can be estimated knowing the area, population and wealth of the underlying region. These predictions are in good agreement with data gathered for about 140 subway systems and more than 50 railway networks in the world. We also show that train networks and subway systems can be described within the same framework, but with a fundamental difference: while the interstation distance seems to be constant and determined by the typical walking distance for subways, the interstation distance for railways scales with the number of stations. PMID:25029528

Louf, Rémi; Roth, Camille; Barthelemy, Marc

2014-01-01

461

Scaling in Transportation Networks  

PubMed Central

Subway systems span most large cities, and railway networks most countries in the world. These networks are fundamental in the development of countries and their cities, and it is therefore crucial to understand their formation and evolution. However, if the topological properties of these networks are fairly well understood, how they relate to population and socio-economical properties remains an open question. We propose here a general coarse-grained approach, based on a cost-benefit analysis that accounts for the scaling properties of the main quantities characterizing these systems (the number of stations, the total length, and the ridership) with the substrate's population, area and wealth. More precisely, we show that the length, number of stations and ridership of subways and rail networks can be estimated knowing the area, population and wealth of the underlying region. These predictions are in good agreement with data gathered for about subway systems and more than railway networks in the world. We also show that train networks and subway systems can be described within the same framework, but with a fundamental difference: while the interstation distance seems to be constant and determined by the typical walking distance for subways, the interstation distance for railways scales with the number of stations. PMID:25029528

Louf, Remi; Roth, Camille; Barthelemy, Marc

2014-01-01

462

Spectral multidimensional scaling  

PubMed Central

An important tool in information analysis is dimensionality reduction. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down that play a significant role in recognition and classification tasks. The efficiency of dimension reduction tools is measured in terms of memory and computational complexity, which are usually a function of the number of the given data points. Sparse local operators that involve substantially less than quadratic complexity at one end, and faithful multiscale models with quadratic cost at the other end, make the design of dimension reduction procedure a delicate balance between modeling accuracy and efficiency. Here, we combine the benefits of both and propose a low-dimensional multiscale modeling of the data, at a modest computational cost. The idea is to project the classical multidimensional scaling problem into the data spectral domain extracted from its Laplace–Beltrami operator. There, embedding into a small dimensional Euclidean space is accomplished while optimizing for a small number of coefficients. We provide a theoretical support and demonstrate that working in the natural eigenspace of the data, one could reduce the process complexity while maintaining the model fidelity. As examples, we efficiently canonize nonrigid shapes by embedding their intrinsic metric into , a method often used for matching and classifying almost isometric articulated objects. Finally, we demonstrate the method by exposing the style in which handwritten digits appear in a large collection of images. We also visualize clustering of digits by treating images as feature points that we map to a plane. PMID:24108352

Aflalo, Yonathan; Kimmel, Ron

2013-01-01

463

Spectral multidimensional scaling.  

PubMed

An important tool in information analysis is dimensionality reduction. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down that play a significant role in recognition and classification tasks. The efficiency of dimension reduction tools is measured in terms of memory and computational complexity, which are usually a function of the number of the given data points. Sparse local operators that involve substantially less than quadratic complexity at one end, and faithful multiscale models with quadratic cost at the other end, make the design of dimension reduction procedure a delicate balance between modeling accuracy and efficiency. Here, we combine the benefits of both and propose a low-dimensional multiscale modeling of the data, at a modest computational cost. The idea is to project the classical multidimensional scaling problem into the data spectral domain extracted from its Laplace-Beltrami operator. There, embedding into a small dimensional Euclidean space is accomplished while optimizing for a small number of coefficients. We provide a theoretical support and demonstrate that working in the natural eigenspace of the data, one could reduce the process complexity while maintaining the model fidelity. As examples, we efficiently canonize nonrigid shapes by embedding their intrinsic metric into , a method often used for matching and classifying almost isometric articulated objects. Finally, we demonstrate the method by exposing the style in which handwritten digits appear in a large collection of images. We also visualize clustering of digits by treating images as feature points that we map to a plane. PMID:24108352

Aflalo, Yonathan; Kimmel, Ron

2013-11-01

464

Scaling properties of geometric parallelization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a universal scaling law for all geometrically parallelized computer simulation algorithms. For algorithms with local interaction laws we calculate the scaling exponents for zero and infinite lattice size. The scaling is tested on local (cellular automata, Metropolis Ising) as well as cluster (Swendsen-Wang) algorithms. The practical aspects of the scaling properties lead to a simple recipe for finding the optimum number of processors to be used for the parallel simulation of a particular system.

Jakobs, A.; Gerling, R. W.

1992-01-01

465

Magnetic amelioration of scale formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Process industry remains sceptical of antiscale magnetic treatment (AMT) despite its long history. Manufacturer's claims concerning AMT comprise: (a) a reduction in the amount of scale formed, (b) production of a less tenacious scale due to a change in its crystal morphology, (c) removal of existing scale, and (d) a retention of the antiscaling properties of the treated water for

John S. Baker; Simon J. Judd

1996-01-01

466

Death Anxiety Scales: A Dialogue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents dialog among David Lester, author of first critical survey of death anxiety measures, developer of scales, and researcher about suicide and fear of death; Donald Templer, Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) creator; and journal editor. Lester and Templer discuss origins, uses, results, limitations, and future of death anxiety scales and research on…

Lester, David; Templer, Donald

1993-01-01

467

Scaling relations for galaxy clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use preliminary results of WINGS survey (Fasano et al.) to obtain determinations of optical scaling relations for galaxy clusters. Passing from one- to two- parameter scaling relations we pay particular attention to the Kormendy relation (KR) and to the Fundamental Plane (FP) of galaxy clusters, comparing them with scaling relations of elliptical galaxies.

Marmo, C.; Fasano, G.; Pignatelli, E.; Poggianti, B.; Bettoni, D.; Halliday, C.; Varela, J.; Moles, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Couch, W.; Dressler, A.

2004-07-01

468

Reliability of Value Orientation Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data originating from an interregional project concerned with patterns of living of dis advantaged families were examined with two purposes: 1) to estimate internal reliability of value orientation scales as a basis for further analysis, and 2) to consider differences in the selection of scale items for single states or for all states included in the study. Scales for four

Francille M. Firebaugh; C. R. Weaver; Richard D. Warren

1975-01-01

469

Scaling in transportation networks  

E-print Network

Subway systems span most large cities, and railway networks most countries in the world. These networks are fundamental in the development of countries and their cities, and it is therefore crucial to understand their formation and evolution. However, if the topological properties of these networks are fairly well understood, how they relate to population and socio-economical properties remains an open question. We propose here a general coarse-grained approach, based on a cost-benefit analysis that accounts for the scaling properties of the main quantities characterizing these systems (the number of stations, the total length, and the ridership) with the substrate's population, area and wealth. More precisely, we show that the length, number of stations and ridership of subways and rail networks can be estimated knowing the area, population and wealth of the underlying region. These predictions are in good agreement with data gathered for about $140$ subway systems and more than $50$ railway networks in the ...

Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

2014-01-01

470

In Brief: Scale model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here's one for Guinness or maybe Ripley: The Worlds's largest scale model of the solar system begins at a museum in Peoria, Ill., and extends geographically as far away as Ecuador and the South Pole. In the model, which was developed by the museum's deputy director Sheldon Schafer, 42 feet equal about 1 million miles. The Sun, which is 36-feet wide, is painted on the dome of the Lakeview Museum's planetarium in Peoria. Mercury, which is 1.5 inches across, can be found at a nearby store; Venus sits in a local bank lobby; Earth is lodged at a gas station; and Mars at a radio station. “The idea is that people will encounter a little bit of astronomy in the walks of their daily lives,” Schafer says.

471

In Brief: Scale model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here's one for Guinness or maybe Ripley: The Worlds's largest scale model of the solar system begins at a museum in Peoria, Ill., and extends geographically as far away as Ecuador and the South Pole. In the model, which was developed by the museum's deputy director Sheldon Schafer, 42 feet equal about 1 million miles. The Sun, which is 36-feet wide, is painted on the dome of the Lakeview Museum's planetarium in Peoria. Mercury, which is 1.5 inches across, can be found at a nearby store; Venus sits in a local bank lobby; Earth is lodged at a gas station; and Mars at a radio station. "The idea is that people will encounter a little bit of astronomy in the walks of their daily lives," Schafer says.

472

Small Scale Stenciling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, introduces students to "some of the challenges of making semiconductor chips and waveguides." These parts of electronic circuits will help students to understand the role of nanotechnology and nanofabrication processes and specifically the application of photolithography in computer chip manufacturing. In this lab, students will be "creating images using masks and ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light causes molecules in the coating of solar print paper to bind together and form a new compound." Stenciling is the same technique that photographers use and engineers to make computer chips, and students will be exploring this concept on a smaller scale. Included in this lab are: teacher preparation guide, student guide with answers, student guide with homework, and a student guide.

2014-09-02

473

Small Scale Sculpting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, introduces students to "some of the challenges of making semiconductor chips and waveguides." These parts of electronic circuits will help students to understand the role of nanotechnology and nanofabrication processes and specifically the application of etching in computer chip manufacturing. In this lab, students will learn about etching techniques and etch rates using chalk and vinegar. The process that they will be examining in the lab is similar to the way in which computer chips are created, but on a much larger scale and using different materials. Included in this lab are: teacher preparation guide, student guide with answers, and a student guide.

2014-09-01

474

Galactic-scale civilization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

Kuiper, T. B. H.

1980-01-01

475

Fractionating the unitary notion of dissociation: disembodied but not embodied dissociative experiences are associated with exocentric perspective-taking  

PubMed Central

It has been argued that hallucinations which appear to involve shifts in egocentric perspective (e.g., the out-of-body experience, OBE) reflect specific biases in exocentric perspective-taking processes. Via a newly devised perspective-taking task, we examined whether such biases in perspective-taking were present in relation to specific dissociative anomalous body experiences (ABE) – namely the OBE. Participants also completed the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS; Sierra and Berrios, 2000) which provided measures of additional embodied ABE (unreality of self) and measures of derealization (unreality of surroundings). There were no reliable differences in the level of ABE, emotional numbing, and anomalies in sensory recall reported between the OBE and control group as measured by the corresponding CDS subscales. In contrast, the OBE group did provide significantly elevated measures of derealization (“alienation from surroundings” CDS subscale) relative to the control group. At the same time we also found that the OBE group was significantly more efficient at completing all aspects of the perspective-taking task relative to controls. Collectively, the current findings support fractionating the typically unitary notion of dissociation by proposing a distinction between embodied dissociative experiences and disembodied dissociative experiences – with only the latter being associated with exocentric perspective-taking mechanisms. Our findings – obtained with an ecologically valid task and a homogeneous OBE group – also call for a re-evaluation of the relationship between OBEs and perspective-taking in terms of facilitated disembodied experiences. PMID:24198776

Braithwaite, Jason J.; James, Kelly; Dewe, Hayley; Medford, Nick; Takahashi, Chie; Kessler, Klaus

2013-01-01

476

Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale  

SciTech Connect

Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a

2011-04-15

477

Understanding Scale: Powers of Ten  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The classic film "Powers of Ten" is often employed to catalyze the building of more accurate conceptions of scale, yet its effectiveness is largely unknown. This study examines the impact of the film on students' concepts of size and scale. Twenty-two middle school students and six science teachers participated. Students completed pre- and post-intervention interviews and a Scale Card Sorting (SCS) task; all students observed the film "Powers of Ten." Experienced teachers' views on the efficacy of the film were assessed through a short written survey. Results showed that viewing the film had a positive influence on students' understandings of powers of ten and scale. Students reported that they had more difficulty with sizes outside of the human scale and found small scales more difficult to conceptualize than large scales. Students' concepts of relative size as well as their ability to accurately match metric sizes in scientific notation to metric scale increased from pre- to post-viewing of the film. Experienced teachers reported that the film was a highly effective tool. Teachers reported that the design of the film that allowed students to move slowly from the human scale to the large and small scales and then quickly back again was effective in laying the foundation for understanding the different scales.

Jones, M. Gail; Taylor, Amy; Minogue, James; Broadwell, Bethany; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Glenda

2007-04-01

478

Composite Health Plan Quality Scales  

PubMed Central

This study employs exploratory factor analysis and scale construction methods with commercial Health Plan Employers Data Information Set (HEDIS®) process of care and outcome measures from 1999 to uncover evidence for a unidimensional composite health maintenance organization (HMO) quality scale. Summated scales by categories of care are created and are then used in a factor analysis that has a single factor solution. The category of care scales were used to construct a summated composite scale which exhibits strong evidence of internal consistency (alpha= 0.90). External validity of the composite quality scale was checked by regressing the composite scale on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) survey results for 1999. PMID:17645158

Caldis, Todd

2007-01-01

479

SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING  

SciTech Connect

Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

G. CANAVAN

2001-02-01

480

Large scale traffic simulations  

SciTech Connect

Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Institute, NM (United States); Rickert, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

1997-04-01

481

Scaling of structural failure  

SciTech Connect

This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01

482

Galactic Distance Scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter begins with a discussion of the basic methods of determining astronomical distances, particularly, trigonometrical, statistical, and pulsational parallaxes. It then summarizes the current state of the calibration of various classes of pulsating variables (Classical Cepheids, type-II Cepheids, RR Lyraes, Miras, and ? Sct and SX Phe stars). Work on other distance indicators (e.g., the red giant clump and the tip of the red giant branch) is also summarized. The use of spectroscopic parallaxes and their application to supergiants and common stars as well as the methods of determining the distances to open and globular clusters are discussed. To illustrate and compare different distance indicators, their use in estimating the scale length of our Galaxy, and the distance to Galactic centre as well as the distances to the LMC, the Fornax dwarf spheroidal, and the spiral galaxy NGC4258 is discussed in some detail. An appendix summarizes some common bias problems that arise in the calibration and use of distance indicators.

Feast, Michael W.

483

Scale and Scaling in Ecological and Economic Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review various aspects of the notion of scale applied to natural systems, in particular complex adaptive systems. We argue\\u000a that scaling issues are not only crucial from the standpoint of basic science, but also in many applied issues, and discuss\\u000a tools for detecting and dealing with multiple scales, both spatial and temporal. We also suggest that the techniques of

Jérôme Chave; Simon Levin

484

Scaling laws for molecular communication  

E-print Network

In this paper, we investigate information-theoretic scaling laws, independent from communication strategies, for point-to-point molecular communication, where it sends/receives information-encoded molecules between nanomachines. Since the Shannon capacity for this is still an open problem, we first derive an asymptotic order in a single coordinate, i.e., i) scaling time with constant number of molecules $m$ and ii) scaling molecules with constant time $t$. For a single coordinate case, we show that the asymptotic scaling is logarithmic in either coordinate, i.e., $\\Theta(\\log t)$ and $\\Theta(\\log m)$, respectively. We also study asymptotic behavior of scaling in both time and molecules and show that, if molecules and time are proportional to each other, then the asymptotic scaling is linear, i.e., $\\Theta(t)=\\Theta(m)$.

Andrew W. Eckford; Chan-Byoung Chae

2014-04-01

485

Inflation from Broken Scale Invariance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We construct a model of inflation based on a low-energy effective theory of spontaneously broken global scale invariance. This provides a shift symmetry that protects the inflaton potential from quantum corrections. Since the underlying scale invariance is noncompact, arbitrarily large inflaton field displacements are readily allowed in the low-energy effective theory. A weak breaking of scale invariance by almost marginal operators provides a nontrivial inflaton minimum, which sets and stabilizes the final low-energy value of the Planck scale. The underlying scale invariance ensures that the slow-roll approximation remains valid over large inflaton displacements, and yields a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations, as required by the cosmic microwave background observations.

Csáki, Csaba; Kaloper, Nemanja; Serra, Javi; Terning, John

2014-10-01

486

Hemispherical Scale (Saissetia coffeae (Walker))  

Microsoft Academic Search

emispherical or helmet scale (Saissetia coffeae (Walker) (Homoptera: Coccidae)) is a yellow-brown to dark brown scale found on leaves, on small twigs, shoots, and fruits. The scale is shaped like a half-sphere, being very dome-shaped with the base varying from circular to elongated. It is between 1.5 and 3 millimeters (mm) long when mature. Up to 600 eggs are laid

Donald Nafus

487

SCALE AND HIERARCHY IN MACROEVOLUTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scale and hierarchy must be incorporated into any conceptual framework for the study of macroevolution, i.e. evolution above the species level. Expansion of temporal and spatial scales reveals evolutionary patterns and processes that are virtually inaccessible to, and unpredictable from, short-term, localized observations. These larger-scale phe- nomena range from evolutionary stasis at the species level and the mosaic assembly of

DAVID JABLONSKI

2007-01-01

488

Rating Scales in Psychotherapy Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Therapists can gain invaluable information by administering rating scales to clients throughout the therapy process. Indeed,\\u000a research has demonstrated therapists who utilize client feedback can improve their clients’ outcomes. We provide an overview\\u000a of the research of using rating scales in therapy. Next, we describe some practical considerations in the selection of rating\\u000a scales; specifically, we highlight the benefits and

Jesse Owen; Zac Imel

489

Development of a fatigue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract-A self-rating scale was developed to measure the severity of fatigue. Two-hundred and seventy-four new registrations on a general practice list completed a 14.item fatigue scale. In addition, 100 consecutive,attenders,to a general,practice,completed,the fatigue,scale and,the fatigue,item,of the revised,Clinical Interview,Schedule,(CIS-R). These,were,compared,by,the application,of Relative Operating,Characteristic,(ROC) analysis.,Tests,of,internal,consistency,and,principal,components analyses,were,performed,on both,sets of data. The scale was found to be both reliable and valid. There was a

TRUDIE CHALDER; G. BERELOWITZ; TERESA PAWLIKOWSKA; LOUISE WATTS; S. WESSELY; D. WRIGHT; E. P. WALLACE

1993-01-01

490

Electroweak scale neutrinos and Higgses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present two different models with electroweak scale right-handed neutrinos. One of the models is created under the constraint that any addition to the Standard Model must not introduce new higher scales. The model contains right-handed neutrinos with electroweak scale masses and a lepton number violating singlet scalar field. The scalar phenomenology is also presented. The second model is a triplet Higgs model where again the right-handed neutrinos have electroweak scale masses. In this case the model has a rich scalar phenomenology and in particular we present the analysis involving the doubly charged Higgs.

Aranda, Alfredo

2009-04-01

491

Scaling exponents estimation from time-scale energy distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown using some examples that the problem of estimating the evolution of scaling exponents characterizing locally a self-similar process can be efficiently handled within the general framework of time-scale energy distributions related to the wavelength transform. As is implicit from the structure of the estimators considered, the proposed methodology is dependent on the degree of nonstationarity of such

P. Goncalves; P. Flandrin

1992-01-01

492

Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1  

E-print Network

Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

Lovejoy, Shaun

493

Scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence  

E-print Network

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale -- the Alfven velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this...

Perez, J C; Boldyrev, S; Cattaneo, F

2014-01-01

494

Nonrelativistic scale anomaly, and composite operators with complex scaling dimensions  

SciTech Connect

Research Highlights: > Nonrelativistic scale anomaly leads to operators with complex scaling dimensions. > We study an operator O={psi}{psi} in quantum mechanics with 1/r{sup 2} potenial. > The propagator of the composite operator is analytically computed. - Abstract: It is demonstrated that a nonrelativistic quantum scale anomaly manifests itself in the appearance of composite operators with complex scaling dimensions. In particular, we study nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with an inverse square potential and consider a composite s-wave operator O={psi}{psi}. We analytically compute the scaling dimension of this operator and determine the propagator <0|TOO{sup +}|0>. The operator O represents an infinite tower of bound states with a geometric energy spectrum. Operators with higher angular momenta are briefly discussed.

Moroz, Sergej, E-mail: s.moroz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-05-15

495

Drift Scale THM Model  

SciTech Connect

This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a drift to transport any exposed radionuclides out of the drift to the groundwater below, and eventually to people within the accessible environment. Absent sufficient water, radionuclides cannot be transported and there would be no significant health effect on people, even if radioactive waste containers were damaged or corroded to such an extent that radionuclides were exposed to water.

J. Rutqvist

2004-10-07

496

Conceptions of scale and scaling: The expert-novice continuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science education reform recommendations include incorporation of big, overarching themes in K--12 science to reduce curricular fragmentation. One recommended unifying theme is scaling, but there appears to be a gap in the research literature on educators' knowledge of how students think about size and scale. This research investigated students' conceptions of size and scale across a continuum from 5th grade (n = 37), 7th grade (n = 71), 9th grade (n = 59), 12th grade academically gifted (n = 38), to experts (n = 10). Results showed that relative sizes of objects were more accurately conceptualized than absolute sizes for all groups. Objects that serve as size reference points were identified along with experiences that impact conceptions of scale. The size of a person was a major reference point for all groups. There were varying numbers of conceptually distinct size categories for each group, with the expert group possessing more distinct as well as more clearly defined categories, particularly at scales smaller than a person. Objects larger than a person were categorized into size groupings based on the nature of experiences with those sizes---visual or kinesthetic, wholistic or sequential. An asymmetry between conceptualizations of large and small scale was identified. At scales larger than a person, conceptualizations degraded uniformly as the size increased, but at small scale this degradation occurred in a discontinuous manner at the boundary where objects become invisible to the unaided eye. Experts mentally maneuvered across this discontinuity by conceptually jumping to a new scale world, using mathematics and various units of measurement to provide resilient links between microscopic and macroscopic worlds. This research concludes with implications for teachers, parents, and curriculum developers to help students make better use of scaling concepts as a broad, unifying theme to create coherence in the science curriculum.

Tretter, Thomas R.

497

The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

2004-01-01

498

Understanding Scale: Powers of Ten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classic film "Powers of Ten" is often employed to catalyze the building of more accurate conceptions of scale, yet its effectiveness is largely unknown. This study examines the impact of the film on students' concepts of size and scale. Twenty-two middle school students and six science teachers participated. Students completed pre- and…

Jones, M. Gail; Taylor, Amy; Minogue, James; Broadwell, Bethany; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Glenda

2007-01-01

499

The revised learning indicators scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The measurement of learning, particularly cognitive learning, has been problematic in instructional communication research. In an effort to address some of the methodological problems, Frymier, Shulman, and Houser (1996) developed a learning indicators scale. Several of the items in this scale involved communication behaviors. In this study it was hypothesized that students with a predisposition to avoid communication would score

Ann Bainbridge Frymier; Marian L. Houser

1999-01-01

500

Rating Scale Instruments and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines theoretical issues associated with measurement in the human sciences and ensuring data from rating scale instruments are measures. An argument is made that using raw scores from rating scale instruments for subsequent arithmetic operations and applying linear statistics is less preferable than using measures. These theoretical…

Cavanagh, Robert F.; Romanoski, Joseph T.

2006-01-01