Sample records for cambridge depersonalization scale

  1. [Screening for depersonalization-derealization with two items of the cambridge depersonalization scale].

    PubMed

    Michal, Matthias; Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Tschan, Regine; Edinger, Jens; Lichy, Marcel; Knebel, A; Tuin, Inka; Beutel, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    Depersonalization (DP) and derealization (DR) are considered to be highly underdiagnosed. Therefore the development of screening instruments is important. From the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) two items were extracted discriminating best patients with clinical significant DP from patients without DP. These two Items were assembled to a short version of the CDS. This short version (CDS-2) was tested in a sample of 38 patients with clinical significant DP-DR and 49 patients without or only mild DP-DR. Scores were compared against clinical diagnoses based on a structured interview (gold standard). The CDS-2 was able to differentiate patients with clinical significant DP well from other groups (cut-off of CDS-2>or=3, sensitivity=78.9%, specifity=85.7%) and also showed high reliability (Cronbachs alpha=0.92). Therefore the CDS-2 can be considered as a useful tool for screening and identification of DP-DR. PMID:19544244

  2. Psychometric properties of the Cambridge depersonalization scale in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Aponte-Soto, Michell R; Vélez-Pastrana, María; Martínez-Taboas, Alfonso; González, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Depersonalization experiences have been studied in the United States and Europe, but there is a dearth of investigations with Latino populations. In the current study we examined the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) in 300 adult individuals from the community and compared the results with those reported previously with non-Latino clinical populations. Discrepant findings have been reported with respect to the factor structure of the CDS. We performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on the CDS items and compared our results with published analyses on other populations. Results revealed that the psychometric properties of the CDS, such as reliability, seem adequate, although the factor structure of the CDS seems to be inconsistent across studies. We selected a 4-factor solution that was most parsimonious and best fit our data. Furthermore, we obtained a moderate, statistically significant relationship (r = .64, p = .001) between the CDS and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. Our results, utilizing a nonclinical sample of Puerto Rican adults, suggest that depersonalization experiences can be reliably measured in a Latino and Spanish-speaking population. PMID:24283777

  3. De-constructing depersonalization: further evidence for symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Kozin, David Stephen; Segal, Karina; Lerch, Brenna; Dujour, Roxanne; Giesbrecht, Timo

    2008-01-15

    Depersonalization disorder is defined in the DSM-IV-TR using a single symptom criterion, which does not do justice to the phenomenological complexity of the disorder. In 394 affected adults, the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale yielded five factors (numbing, unreality of self, perceptual alterations, unreality of surroundings, and temporal disintegration), put forth as symptom criteria for a better diagnosis of depersonalization disorder. PMID:17959254

  4. Somatoform dissociation in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Smith, Rebecca J; Knutelska, Margaret; Smith, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    Along with psychoform dissociation, somatoform dissociation has been put forth as a core aspect of dissociative states, possibly as reliable as psychoform dissociation in the screening for dissociative disorders. The goal of this study was to investigate the prominence and correlates of somatoform dissociation in one of the major Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) dissociative disorders, depersonalization disorder (DPD). A total of 54 adults with DPD and 47 healthy control participants free of lifetime Axis I and II disorders were administered the 20-item Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ) as well as the Dissociative Experiences Scale, the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form. Somatoform dissociation scores were statistically significantly, but clinically only modestly, elevated in the DPD as compared to the healthy control group. SDQ items significantly elevated in the DPD group were mostly perceptual in nature. Depersonalization scores were significantly correlated with somatoform dissociation in the DPD group, whereas absorption and amnesia scores were not. With respect to childhood interpersonal trauma, although emotional abuse was significantly associated with depersonalization severity, none of the 5 categories of trauma were significantly associated with somatoform dissociation in the DPD group. In conclusion, somatoform dissociation is modest in DPD, and the SDQ is a weak instrument for the screening of dissociation in this disorder, detecting only one third of the sample when using the traditional SDQ cutoff score of 30. PMID:19042782

  5. A placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of lamotrigine in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; Phillips, Mary L; Ivin, Glynis; Krystal, John; David, Anthony S

    2003-03-01

    There is evidence to support the view that glutamate hyperactivity might be relevant to the neurobiology of depersonalization. We tested the efficacy of lamotrigine, which reduces glutamate release, as a treatment for patients with depersonalization disorder. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was used to evaluate 12 weeks of treatment of lamotrigine. Subjects comprised nine patients with DSM-IV depersonalization disorder. Changes on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale and the Present State Examination depersonalization/derealization items were compared across the two cross-over periods. Lamotrigine was not significantly superior to placebo. None of the nine patients was deemed a responder to the lamotrigine arm of the cross-over. Lamotrigine does not seem to be useful as a sole medication in the treatment of depersonalization disorder. PMID:12680746

  6. Depersonalization/derealization during acute social stress in social phobia.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Juergen; Braeuer, David; Crawcour, Stephen; Klumbies, Elisabeth; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed at investigating how frequently and intensely depersonalization/derealization symptoms occur during a stressful performance situation in social phobia patients vs. healthy controls, as well as testing hypotheses about the psychological predictors and consequences of such symptoms. N=54 patients with social phobia and N=34 control participants without mental disorders were examined prior to, during, and after a standardized social performance situation (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST). An adapted version of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale was applied along with measures of social anxiety, depression, personality, participants' subjective appraisal, safety behaviours, and post-event processing. Depersonalization symptoms were more frequent in social phobia patients (92%) than in controls (52%). Specifically in patients, they were highly positively correlated with safety behaviours and post-event-processing, even after controlling for social anxiety. The role of depersonalization/derealization in the maintenance of social anxiety should be more thoroughly recognized and explored. PMID:23434546

  7. Depersonalization as a mediator in the relationship between self-focused attention and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Perona-Garcelán, Salvador; Carrascoso-López, Francisco; García-Montes, José M; Vallina-Fernández, Oscar; Pérez-Álvarez, Marino; Ductor-Recuerda, María Jesús; Salas-Azcona, Rosario; Cuevas-Yust, Carlos; Gómez-Gómez, María Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the potentially mediating role of certain dissociative factors, such as depersonalization, between self-focused attention and auditory hallucinations. A total of 59 patients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorder completed a self-focused attention scale ( M. F. Scheier & C. S. Carver, 1985 ), the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (M. Sierra & G. E. Berrios, 2000), and the hallucination and delusion items on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (S. R. Kay, L. A. Opler, & J. P. Lindenmayer, 1988). The results showed that self-focused attention correlated positively with auditory hallucinations, with delusions, and with depersonalization. It was also demonstrated that depersonalization has a mediating role between self-focused attention and auditory hallucinations but not delusions. In the discussion, the importance of dissociative processes in understanding the formation and maintenance of auditory hallucinations is suggested. PMID:21967180

  8. Depersonalization disorder and anxiety: a special relationship?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; Medford, Nick; Wyatt, Geddes; David, Anthony S

    2012-05-15

    A significant association between anxiety and depersonalization has been found in healthy controls and psychiatric patients irrespective of underlying conditions. Although patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD) often have a history of severe anxiety symptoms, clinical observations suggest that the relation between anxiety and depersonalization is complex and poorly understood. Using relevant rating scales, levels of anxiety and depersonalization were assessed in 291 consecutive DPD cases. 'High' and 'low' depersonalization groups, were compared according to anxiety severity. Correlation and multivariate regression analyses were also used to assessed the contribution of anxiety to the phenomenology and natural course of depersonalization. A low but significant association between depersonalization and anxiety (as measured by Beck's Anxiety Inventory) was only apparent in those patients with low intensity depersonalization, but not in those with severe depersonalization. Levels of anxiety did not seem to make specific contributions to the clinical features of depersonalization itself, although DPD patients with high anxiety seem characterised by additional non-specific perceptual symptoms. The presence of a 'statistical dissociation' between depersonalization and anxiety adds further evidence in favour of depersonalization disorder being an independent condition and suggests that its association with anxiety has been overemphasized. PMID:22414660

  9. The detection and measurement of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Guralnik, O; Gross, S; Stein, D J; Schmeidler, J; Hollander, E

    1998-09-01

    Depersonalization disorder comprises one of the four major dissociative disorders and yet remains poorly studied. There are no reports describing the application of dissociation scales to this population. Our goal was to investigate the applicability of four such scales to depersonalization disorder and to establish screening criteria for the disorder. Two general dissociation scales and two depersonalization scales were administered to 50 subjects with DSM-III-R depersonalization disorder and 20 healthy control subjects. The depersonalization disorder group scored significantly higher than the normal control group in all scales and subscales. Factor analysis of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) yielded three factors as proposed previously, absorption, amnesia, and depersonalization/derealization. A DES cutoff score of 12, markedly lower than those previously proposed for the screening of other dissociative disorders, is required for the sensitive detection of depersonalization disorder. Alternatively, the DES pathological dissociation taxon (DES-taxon) score recently generated in the literature appears more sensitive to the detection of depersonalization disorder and is better recommended for screening purposes. The other three scales were fairly strongly correlated to the DES, suggesting that they may measure similar but not identical concepts, and cutoff scores are proposed for these scales also. General implications for the screening and quantification of depersonalization pathology are discussed. PMID:9741559

  10. Types of Depersonalization and their Relation to Severity of Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, John R.; Bovasso, Gregory

    Depersonalization and the correct identification of the symptoms of depersonalization remain a source of controversy in psychiatry. For this study, 232 university students (75 percent women) answered questions on the Differential Personality Inventory. Five types of depersonalization experiences, based on earlier scales, were then used to cluster…

  11. Temporal disintegration in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Hwu, Ruth; Knutelska, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Distortions of the experience of time are central to some types of dissociative experiences. In this study, we investigated the relationship between a self-report measure of temporal disintegration and symptoms of dissociation in depersonalization disorder (DPD). Fifty-two DPD and thirty non-clinical control participants were administered the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES) and Temporal Integration Inventory (TII). The DPD group had significantly higher TII scores than the control group. Within the DPD group, there was a significant positive correlation between DES total score and TII total score, and between TII-time distinction subscale score and TII-agency subscale score. In the DPD group, TII scores were not associated with age of onset or duration of illness. Of the three dissociative domains of absorption, amnesia, and depersonalization/derealization, only absorption was a significant predictor of TII total and subscale scores by stepwise linear regression analyses. We conclude that the experience of temporal disintegration in DPD is not directly related to the core symptoms of depersonalization/derealization, but exists when the depersonalized experience involves more prominent absorption. PMID:17409052

  12. Cognitive functioning in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Orna; Giesbrecht, Timo; Knutelska, Margaret; Sirroff, Beth; Simeon, Daphne

    2007-12-01

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is a dissociative disorder characterized by a subjective sense of unreality and detachment, and has been associated with deficits in perception and short-term memory. In this study, 21 DPD and 17 healthy comparison participants free of psychiatric disorders were administered a comprehensive neuropsychologic battery. The groups did not differ in full-scale, verbal, and performance IQ (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), in working memory (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test), or in selective attention (Digit Span with Distracters). The DPD group performed significantly worse on immediate visual and verbal recall (Wechsler Memory Scale, Revised), but not on delayed recall. Dissociation severity was significantly correlated with processing slowness and distractibility. We conclude that DPD is associated with cognitive disruptions in early perceptual and attentional processes. PMID:18091191

  13. Depersonalization disorder: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is a chronic and distressing condition with a prevalence in the general population between 0.8 and 2%. Several neurobiological studies in the last decade have shown that patients have suppressed limbic activation to emotional stimuli. Such findings are in line with a model which suggests that the condition is generated by an anxiety-triggered, 'hard-wired' inhibitory response to threat. Such a mechanism would ensure the preservation of adaptive behavior, during situations normally associated with overwhelming and potentially disorganizing anxiety. In DPD, such a response would become chronic and dysfunctional. Depersonalization remains a condition for which no definitive treatment exists, and for which conventional medications, such as antidepressants or antipsychotics, have been found to be of little value. Fortunately, a few promising lines of pharmacological treatment have emerged in recent years, although more rigorous studies are needed. For example, a number of studies suggest that opioid receptor antagonists such as naltrexone and naloxone are useful in at least a subgroup of patients. In spite of initial expectations, the use of lamotrigine as a sole medication has not been found useful. However, open-label trials suggest that its use as an add-on treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is beneficial in a substantial number of patients. Similarly, the use of clonazepam, particularly in conjunction with SSRI antidepressants, appears to be beneficial in patients with high levels of background anxiety. In line with the stress-related model of depersonalization, those neurotransmitter systems of relevance to depersonalization are known to play important inhibitory roles in the regulation of the stress response. PMID:18088198

  14. Independence of Depersonalization-Derealization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleiss, Joseph L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article presents data on a measure of depersonalization and derealization which are germane to the hypothesized independence of this syndrome from diagnosis and other factors of psychopathology. (Author)

  15. Depersonalization in patients with persecutory delusions.

    PubMed

    Cernis, Emma; Dunn, Graham; Startup, Helen; Kingdon, David; Wingham, Gail; Pugh, Katherine; Cordwell, Jacinta; Mander, Helen; Freeman, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Delusions are, in part, attempts to explain confusing anomalous experience. Depersonalization, a key subset of anomalous experience, has been little studied in relation to persecutory delusions. The aims of this study were to assess the presence of depersonalization in patients with persecutory delusions and to examine associations with levels of paranoia and worry. Fifty patients with a current persecutory delusion completed measures of depersonalization, psychotic symptoms, and worry. Depersonalization experiences were common: 30 patients (60%) each reported at least 10 different depersonalization symptoms occurring often. A greater number of depersonalization experiences were associated with higher levels of paranoia and worry. The positive association of worry and paranoia became nonsignificant when controlling for depersonalization. Overall, depersonalization may be common in patients with persecutory delusions and is associated with the severity of paranoia. The results are consistent with the view that worry may cause depersonalization experiences that contribute to the occurrence of paranoid thoughts. PMID:25198701

  16. The Cambridge CFD grid for large-scale distributed CFD applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaobo Yang; Mark Hayes; Karl W. Jenkins; Stewart Cant

    2005-01-01

    The Cambridge CFD (computational fluid dynamics) Grid is a distributed problem-solving environment for large-scale CFD applications set up between the Cambridge eScience Centre and the CFD Laboratory in the Engineering Department at the University of Cambridge. A Web portal, the Cambridge CFD Web Portal (CamCFDWP) has been developed to provide transparent integration of CFD applications to non-computer scientist end users.

  17. Desipramine: a possible treatment for depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Noyes, R; Kuperman, S; Olson, S B

    1987-12-01

    Primary depersonalization disorder is believed to be resistant to treatment. However, we report the successful treatment of a case with desipramine and suggest that, because there is a link between depersonalization and anxiety disorders, tricyclic antidepressants may prove effective for depersonalization. PMID:3435887

  18. Aripiprazole in depersonalization disorder comorbid with major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder: 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Uguz, Faruk; Sahingoz, Mine

    2014-01-01

    Depersonalization is a frequent symptom in depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but sometimes, it may be severe and concurrently diagnosed as a disorder. The treatment of depersonalization disorder both alone and comorbid with other psychiatric disorders is as yet unclear. This report presents the successful treatment with aripiprazole of concurrent depersonalization disorder in 3 patients with depression or OCD. The psychiatric disorders were diagnosed through structured clinical interviews. Assessments were by means of Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Aripiprazole may be a beneficial psychotropic drug in the treatment of depersonalization disorder comorbid with OCD or depression, which is an important problem in clinical practice. PMID:24992087

  19. Basal norepinephrine in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Guralnik, Orna; Knutelska, Margaret; Yehuda, Rachel; Schmeidler, James

    2003-11-01

    In contrast to the noradrenergic dysregulation described in PTSD, little is known regarding noradrenergic function in dissociative disorders. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate basal norepinephrine in depersonalization disorder (DPD). Nine subjects with DSM-IV DPD, without lifetime PTSD, were compared to nine healthy comparison (HC) subjects. Norepinephrine was measured via 24-h urine collection and three serial plasma determinations. Groups did not differ significantly in plasma norepinephrine levels. Compared to the HC group, the DPD group demonstrated significantly higher urinary norepinephrine, only prior to covarying for anxiety. The DPD group also demonstrated a highly significant inverse correlation between urinary norepinephrine and depersonalization severity (r=-0.88). Norepinephrine and cortisol levels (reported in a prior study) were not intercorrelated. We concluded that although dissociation accompanied by anxiety was associated with heightened noradrenergic tone, there was a marked basal norepinephrine decline with increasing severity of dissociation. The findings are in concordance with the few reports on autonomic blunting in dissociation and merit further investigation. PMID:14572626

  20. Depersonalization disorder: thinking without feeling.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M L; Medford, N; Senior, C; Bullmore, E T; Suckling, J; Brammer, M J; Andrew, C; Sierra, M; Williams, S C; David, A S

    2001-12-30

    Patients with depersonalization disorder (DP) experience a detachment from their own senses and surrounding events, as if they were outside observers. A particularly common symptom is emotional detachment from the surroundings. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compared neural responses to emotionally salient stimuli in DP patients, and in psychiatric and healthy control subjects. Six patients with DP, 10 with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and six volunteers were scanned whilst viewing standardized pictures of aversive and neutral scenes, matched for visual complexity. Pictures were then rated for emotional content. Both control groups rated aversive pictures as much more emotive, and demonstrated in response to these scenes significantly greater activation in regions important for disgust perception, the insula and occipito-temporal cortex, than DP patients (covarying for age, years of education and total extent of brain activation). In DP patients, aversive scenes activated the right ventral prefrontal cortex. The insula was activated only by neutral scenes in this group. Our findings indicate that a core phenomenon of depersonalization--absent subjective experience of emotion--is associated with reduced neural responses in emotion-sensitive regions, and increased responses in regions associated with emotion regulation. PMID:11756013

  1. Methylphenidate in depersonalization disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Foguet, Q; Alvárez, M J; Castells, E; Arrufat, F

    2011-01-01

    The symptom of depersonalization is frequently associated with other mental disorders, physiological effects of substances or medical diseases. However, it is rare that, as in the case presented, the experiences of depersonalization form an isolated entity, a primary depersonalization disorder. Among the many psychoactive drugs studied, none of them has been shown to be the treatment of choice. Among those with which the best results are obtained are opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone and naltrexone), the combination of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with lamotrigine and clorimipramine. Although with virtually no evidence, we are presenting a case that responded spectacularly to methylphenidate. PMID:21274825

  2. Depersonalization disorder and self-injurious behavior.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Stein, D J; Hollander, E

    1995-01-01

    Depersonalization is a subjective sense of unreality regarding various aspects of the self, experienced as disconnectedness from one's own body, mentations, feelings, or actions. When episodes of depersonalization are recurrent or persistent and lead to distress or dysfunction, the diagnosis of depersonalization disorder is made. Certain similarities in phenomenology, comorbidity, neurochemistry, and treatment response suggest a relationship to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum. However, depersonalization is a very poorly studied condition, and any conclusions must be viewed tentatively. Self-injurious behaviors are defined as intentionally self-inflicted bodily injuries without lethal intent. Basic categories are briefly described. Subsequently, the phenomenology and biology of both impulsive and compulsive self-injurious behaviors, and their relationship to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum, are discussed. PMID:7713864

  3. Depersonalization disorder: a functional neuroanatomical perspective.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary L; Sierra, Mauricio

    2003-09-01

    Clinical reports of depersonalization suggest that attenuated emotional experience is a central feature of the condition. Patients typically complain of emotional numbness and some patients ascribe their feelings of unreality to a lack of affective "colouring" in things perceived. Recent neuroimaging and psychophysiological studies support these assumptions as they show both attenuated autonomic responses in depersonalization, and decreased activity within neural regions important for the generation of affective responses to emotive stimuli. Furthermore, findings from neuroimaging studies indicate increased prefrontal cortical activity in depersonalised patients, particularly within regions associated with contextualization and appraisal of emotionally-salient information rather than mood induction per se. Taken together, these finding suggest that symptoms of depersonalization, and in particular emotional numbing, may be related to a reversal of normal patterns of autonomic and neural response to emotive stimuli. PMID:13129809

  4. Preliminary physiological evidence for impaired emotion regulation in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Monde, Kai-Mosadi; Ketay, Sarah; Giesbrecht, Timo; Braun, Ashley; Simeon, Daphne

    2013-09-30

    Depersonalization disorder is associated with emotional responding deficits. Ability to regulate emotion was measured by heart rate, skin conductance, and subjective responses to pictures. Compared to controls, depersonalized participants were better able to suppress, but not enhance, emotions irrespective of valence (heart rate). Emotion regulation in depersonalization merits further study. PMID:23507419

  5. Cannabis-induced depersonalization disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Franziska; Kupferschmid, Stephan; Simon, Andor E

    2012-01-01

    We present a case series of 6 patients who developed persistent depersonalization disorder in adolescence after consuming cannabis. In 2 of these cases, the illness course was severely disabling. Within the growing body of literature that investigates the effects of cannabis use on mental health, the association between cannabis and depersonalization disorder is widely neglected. We review the clinical characteristics of this disorder and summarize the neurobiological evidence relating it to cannabis use. This case series extends awareness about the potentially detrimental effect of cannabis use in young individuals beyond its well-documented relationship with psychosis and other psychological sequelae. PMID:22378193

  6. The psychotherapeutic treatment of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Torch, E M

    1987-01-01

    A psychotherapeutic approach to the treatment of depersonalization disorder is presented. The treatment process enables the patient to drop dissociation as a defense against overly vigorous scrutiny of a "self," which is felt to be inadequate when compared to highly demanding standards set by parents. When feelings of worthlessness and helplessness are "transferred" back to original sources of childhood trauma, the patient is then taught how to handle conflict without needing to dissociate from the stress as overpowering and literally depersonalizing the threat. PMID:3428875

  7. Autonomic response in the perception of disgust and happiness in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; Senior, Carl; Phillips, Mary L; David, Anthony S

    2006-12-01

    Patients with depersonalization disorder have shown attenuated responses to emotional unpleasant stimuli, hence supporting the view that depersonalization is characterised by a selective inhibition on the processing of unpleasant emotions. It was the purpose of this study to establish if autonomic responses to facial emotional expressions also show the same blunting effect. The skin conductance responses (SCRs) of 16 patients with chronic DSM-IV depersonalization disorder, 15 normal controls and 15 clinical controls with DSM-IV anxiety disorders were recorded in response to facial expressions of happiness and disgust. Patients with anxiety disorders were found to have greater autonomic responses than patients with depersonalization, in spite of the fact that both groups had similarly high levels of subjective anxiety as measured by anxiety scales. SCR to happy faces did not vary across groups. The findings of this study provide further support to the idea that patients with depersonalization have a selective impairment in the processing of threatening or unpleasant emotional stimuli. PMID:17074399

  8. Examination of the pathological dissociation taxon in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Knutelska, Margaret; Nelson, Dorothy; Guralnik, Orna; Schmeidler, James

    2003-11-01

    In recent years, the pathologic dissociation taxon developed by Waller, Putnam, and Carlson (Psychological Methods 1:300-321, 1996) from a Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) sample has been increasingly used in studies of dissociation in general. However, the taxon's convergence with dissociative diagnoses other than DID, as well as the taxon's central premise that pathologic dissociation is a categorical rather than a dimensional construct, remain areas of exploration. This report examines the applicability of the pathologic dissociation taxon to Depersonalization Disorder (DPD). The Dissociative Experiences Scale was administered to 100 consecutively recruited DPD subjects diagnosed by semistructured clinical interview and by the SCID-D. Taxon membership probability was calculated using the recommended SAS scoring program. Approximately 2/3 of subjects (N = 64) had a very high probability (>.80) of belonging to the taxon, while 1/3 of subjects had a very low probability (<.10) of belonging to the taxon. A taxon cutoff score of 13 yielded an 81% sensitivity in detecting the presence of DPD. The modest convergence between taxonic membership and clinical dissociative disorder diagnosis suggests that the taxon may have important limitations in its use, at least when applied to DPD in its current form. As previously, we continue to recommend a low taxon cutoff score (13) for the sensitive detection of depersonalization disorder. The inference that pathologic dissociation is a unitary and categorical entity is also discussed. PMID:14614341

  9. Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where "a person feels that he or she has changed in some way or is somehow unreal." Derealization when "the same beliefs are held about one's surroundings." Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder fits users of Second Life who adopt "in-world" avatars and in effect, enact multiple distinct identities or personalities (known as alter egos or alters). Select questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization (SCI-DER)8 will be discussed as they might apply to the user's experience in Second Life. Finally I would like to consider the hypothesis that rather than a pathological disorder, dissociation is a normal response to the "artificial reality" of Second Life.

  10. Cognitive-affective neuroscience of depersonalization.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Simeon, Daphne

    2009-09-01

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is characterized by a subjective sense of detachment from one's own being and a sense of unreality. An examination of the psychobiology of depersonalization symptoms may be useful in understanding the cognitive-affective neuroscience of embodiment. DPD may be mediated by neurocircuitry and neurotransmitters involved in the integration of sensory processing and of the body schema, and in the mediation of emotional experience and the identification of feelings. For example, DPD has been found to involve autonomic blunting, deactivation of sub-cortical structures, and disturbances in molecular systems in such circuitry. An evolutionary perspective suggests that attenuation of emotional responses, mediated by deactivation of limbic structures, may sometimes be advantageous in response to inescapable stress. PMID:19890227

  11. Validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER).

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco; Pini, Stefano; Calugi, Simona; Preve, Matteo; Masini, Matteo; Giovannini, Ilaria; Conversano, Ciro; Rucci, Paola; Cassano, Giovanni B

    2008-10-01

    This study evaluates the validity and reliability of a new instrument developed to assess symptoms of depresonalization: the Structured Clinical Interview for the Depersonalization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER). The instrument is based on a spectrum model that emphasizes soft-signs, sub-threshold syndromes as well as clinical and subsyndromal manifestations. Items of the interview include, in addition to DSM-IV criteria for depersonalization, a number of features derived from clinical experience and from a review of phenomenological descriptions. Study participants included 258 consecutive patients with mood and anxiety disorders, 16.7% bipolar I disorder, 18.6% bipolar II disorder, 32.9% major depression, 22.1% panic disorder, 4.7% obsessive compulsive disorder, and 1.5% generalized anxiety disorder; 2.7% patients were also diagnosed with depersonalization disorder. A comparison group of 42 unselected controls was enrolled at the same site. The SCI-DER showed excellent reliability and good concurrent validity with the Dissociative Experiences Scale. It significantly discriminated subjects with any diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders from controls and subjects with depersonalization disorder from controls. The hypothesized structure of the instrument was confirmed empirically. PMID:19183789

  12. An open trial of naltrexone in the treatment of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Knutelska, Margaret

    2005-06-01

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) remains one of the few disorders in modern psychiatry for which no treatments are established that are even partially effective, whether pharmacological or psychotherapeutic. Depersonalization disorder is a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition dissociative disorder characterized by a pervasive subjective sense of unreality and detachment with intact reality testing. Two recent controlled medication trials, one with lamotrigine and one with fluoxetine, failed to show efficacy. There is some evidence for dysregulation of endogenous opioid systems in depersonalization, and a few studies have suggested that opioid antagonists may have efficacy in the treatment of dissociation and depersonalization symptoms. In this prospective open treatment trial, 14 subjects were recruited and treated with naltrexone for 6 weeks to a maximum dose of 100 mg/d (first 7 subjects) or 10 weeks to a maximum dose of 250 mg/d (next 7 subjects). Mean naltrexone dose was 120 mg/d. There was an average 30% reduction of symptoms with treatment, as measured by 3 validated dissociation scales. Three patients were very much improved, and 1 patient was much improved with naltrexone treatment. These findings are potentially promising in a highly treatment-refractory disorder for which no treatment guidelines exist and warrant a randomized controlled trial. PMID:15876908

  13. ECEM (Eye Closure, Eye Movements): application to depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Harriet, E Hollander

    2009-10-01

    Eye Closure, Eye Movements (ECEM) is a hypnotically-based approach to treatment that incorporates eye movements adapted from the Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) protocol in conjunction with hypnosis for the treatment of depersonalization disorder. Depersonalization Disorder has been differentiated from post-traumatic stress disorders and has recently been conceptualized as a subtype of panic disorder (Baker et al., 2003; David, Phillips, Medford, & Sierra, 2004; Segui et. al., 2000). During ECEM, while remaining in a hypnotic state, clients self-generated six to seven trials of eye movements to reduce anticipatory anxiety associated with depersonalization disorder. Eye movements were also used to process triggers that elicited breath holding, often followed by episodes of depersonalization. Hypnotic suggestions were used to reverse core symptoms of depersonalization, subjectively described as "feeling unreal" (Simeon et al., 1997). PMID:19862896

  14. A survey on worries of pregnant women - testing the German version of the Cambridge Worry Scale

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is a transition period in a woman's life characterized by increased worries and anxiety. The Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) was developed to assess the content and extent of maternal worries in pregnancy. It has been increasingly used in studies over recent years. However, a German version has not yet been developed and validated. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the extent and content of worries in pregnancy on a sample of women in Germany using a translated and adapted version of the Cambridge Worry Scale, and (2) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the German version. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study and enrolled 344 pregnant women in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Women filled out structured questionnaires that contained the CWS, the Spielberger-State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI), as well as questions on their obstetric history. Antenatal records were also analyzed. Results The CWS was well understood and easy to fill in. The major worries referred to the process of giving birth (CWS mean value 2.26) and the possibility that something might be wrong with the baby (1.99), followed by coping with the new baby (1.57), going to hospital (1.29) and the possibility of going into labour too early (1.28). The internal consistency of the scale (0.80) was satisfactory, and we found a four-factor structure, similar to previous studies. Tests of convergent validity showed that the German CWS represents a different construct compared with state and trait anxiety but has the desired overlap. Conclusions The German CWS has satisfactory psychometric properties. It represents a valuable tool for use in scientific studies and is likely to be useful also to clinicians. PMID:20038294

  15. Left hemispheric activation in depersonalization disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hollander, E; Carrasco, J L; Mullen, L S; Trungold, S; DeCaria, C M; Towey, J

    1992-06-01

    Depersonalization disorder is classified in DSM-III-R (APA 1987) as a dissociative disorder characterized by altered perception or experience of the self. To date, there are no known reports of the neurobiological features of this disorder. We report clinical and biological correlates in a patient with depersonalization disorder previously unresponsive to a variety of anticonvulsant, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and tricyclic antidepressant trials, but for whom fluoxetine partially reduced depersonalization symptoms, but not associated anxiety and depression. Neurophysiological, neuroanatomical and neuropsychological findings revealed left hemispheric frontal-temporal activation and decreased left caudate perfusion. These findings suggest a similarity to the neuropsychiatric data reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. PMID:1525279

  16. Depersonalization disorder may be related to glutamate receptor activation imbalance.

    PubMed

    Pikwer, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Low-dose ketamine administration mimics, both clinically and on gross neuroimaging, depersonalization disorder. The perceptual effects of ketamine may be due to secondary stimulation of glutamate release and lamotrigine, possibly by inhibited glutamate release, may reduce some of ketamine's so-called dissociative effects. However, lamotrigine does not seem to be useful in the treatment of depersonalization disorder. Glutamate release in prefrontal cortex is increased by subanaesthetic doses of ketamine, resulting in increased inhibition, possibly via intercalated GABAerg cells, of projections from amygdala, affecting structures critically involved in depersonalization. I speculate that, in depersonalization disorder, the increased glutamate activity in prefrontal cortex is due to intrinsic imbalance, resulting in long-term potentiation, at the postsynaptic glutamate receptors on the GABAerg interneurons while the same receptor abnormality at the synapses on the intercalated GABAerg cells of the amygdala result in long-term depression in the case of either normal or high glutamate release. PMID:21742442

  17. Syntax-Based Word Ordering Incorporating a Large-Scale Language University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    us- ing an N-gram language model only. Both meth- ods apply heuristic search. Zhang and Clark de of Cambridge Computer Laboratory yz360@cam.ac.uk Graeme Blackwood University of Cambridge Engineering and Clark, 2011). By using CCG and learn- ing guided search, Zhang and Clark re- ported the highest scores

  18. Depersonalization in Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders, First-Degree Relatives and Normal Controls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Torres; Lucía Inchausti; Maialen Aristegui; Berta Ibañez; Luis Diez; Aranzazu Fernandez-Rivas; Sonia Bustamante; Karim Haidar; Maier Rodríguez-Zabaleta; Argiñe Mingo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depersonalization occurs in healthy individuals and across a broad range of psychiatric patients. Data on depersonalization in persons linked to patients through genetics, environment or education are scarce. Due to their higher risk of developing psychosis, first-degree healthy relatives might show differences with the general population. This study examines depersonalization in patients with schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, their

  19. Interoceptive-reflective regions differentiate alexithymia traits in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Lemche, Erwin; Brammer, Michael J; David, Anthony S; Surguladze, Simon A; Phillips, Mary L; Sierra, Mauricio; Williams, Steven C R; Giampietro, Vincent P

    2013-10-30

    It is unclear to what degree depersonalization disorder (DPD) and alexithymia share abnormal brain mechanisms of emotional dysregulation. We compared cerebral processing of facial expressions of emotion in individuals with DPD to normal controls (NC). We presented happy and sad emotion expressions in increasing intensities from neutral (0%) through mild (50%) to intense (100%) to DPD and non-referred NC subjects in an implicit event-related fMRI design, and correlated respective brain activations with responses on the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and its three subscales F1-F3. The TAS-20 predicts clinical diagnosis of DPD with a unique variance proportion of 38%. Differential regression analysis was utilized to ascertain brain regions for each alexithymia subscale. Differential regions of total alexithymia severity for happy emotion were the globus pallidus externus; for identifying feelings (TAS-20 F1 subscale), the right anterior insula; for description of feelings (F2), the right dorsal mid-anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); and for externally oriented cognitive style (F3), the left paracingulate gyrus (BA 32). For sad emotion, the differential region for the total TAS-20 score was the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); for TAS-20 F1, the left inferior anterior insula; for TAS-20 F2, the right PCC (BA 31); and for TAS-20 F3, the right orbital gyrus (BA 10). Supporting our hypotheses, the ascertained brain regions for TAS-20 subscales subserve interoception, monitoring and reflection of internal states and emotion. The presented analyses provide evidence that alexithymia plays a substantial role in emotional dysregulation in DPD, presumably based on restrictions in interoception. PMID:23932225

  20. Interoceptive–reflective regions differentiate alexithymia traits in depersonalization disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lemche, Erwin; Brammer, Michael J.; David, Anthony S.; Surguladze, Simon A.; Phillips, Mary L.; Sierra, Mauricio; Williams, Steven C.R.; Giampietro, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear to what degree depersonalization disorder (DPD) and alexithymia share abnormal brain mechanisms of emotional dysregulation. We compared cerebral processing of facial expressions of emotion in individuals with DPD to normal controls (NC). We presented happy and sad emotion expressions in increasing intensities from neutral (0%) through mild (50%) to intense (100%) to DPD and non-referred NC subjects in an implicit event-related fMRI design, and correlated respective brain activations with responses on the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and its three subscales F1-F3. The TAS-20 predicts clinical diagnosis of DPD with a unique variance proportion of 38%. Differential regression analysis was utilized to ascertain brain regions for each alexithymia subscale. Differential regions of total alexithymia severity for happy emotion were the globus pallidus externus; for identifying feelings (TAS-20 F1 subscale), the right anterior insula; for description of feelings (F2), the right dorsal mid-anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); and for externally oriented cognitive style (F3), the left paracingulate gyrus (BA 32). For sad emotion, the differential region for the total TAS-20 score was the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24); for TAS-20 F1, the left inferior anterior insula; for TAS-20 F2, the right PCC (BA 31); and for TAS-20 F3, the right orbital gyrus (BA 10). Supporting our hypotheses, the ascertained brain regions for TAS-20 subscales subserve interoception, monitoring and reflection of internal states and emotion. The presented analyses provide evidence that alexithymia plays a substantial role in emotional dysregulation in DPD, presumably based on restrictions in interoception. PMID:23932225

  1. A preliminary evaluation of repeated exposure for depersonalization and derealization.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Elliot; McKay, Dean

    2013-03-01

    Dissociative symptoms including depersonalization and derealization are commonly experienced by individuals suffering from panic disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have been published investigating the specific treatment of these symptoms in individuals diagnosed with panic disorder or PTSD, despite evidence that the subset of individuals with panic disorder who experience depersonalization and derealization report more panic attacks as well as greater panic severity and functional impairment. Furthermore, it has been shown that these symptoms can impede treatment and recovery in PTSD. Finally, recent research has shown that interoceptive exposure generally enhances the efficacy of treatment outcome for PTSD and PTSD with comorbid panic. This study investigated the use of a novel interoceptive exposure technique for treatment of depersonalization and derealization in individuals with high anxiety sensitivity and/or symptoms of PTSD. Results indicated significant reductions on six of seven items as well as total score on an outcome measure of depersonalization and derealization. Thus, this technique appears to hold promise for utilization as a form of interoceptive exposure in the treatment of these symptoms. PMID:23118274

  2. Interoceptive Cue Exposure for Depersonalization: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Dean; Moretz, Melanie W.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder relies heavily on interoceptive exposure. Specifically, therapists induce physical symptoms associated with panic in order to produce habituation to those sensations. Many common symptoms of panic are easily induced, such as increased heart rate and dizziness. However, depersonalization is a…

  3. A Preliminary Evaluation of Repeated Exposure for Depersonalization and Derealization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Elliot; McKay, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms including depersonalization and derealization are commonly experienced by individuals suffering from panic disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have been published investigating the specific treatment of these symptoms in individuals diagnosed with panic disorder or PTSD, despite evidence that the…

  4. Depersonalization: a selective impairment of self-awareness.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; David, Anthony S

    2011-03-01

    Depersonalization is characterised by a profound disruption of self-awareness mainly characterised by feelings of disembodiment and subjective emotional numbing. It has been proposed that depersonalization is caused by a fronto-limbic (particularly anterior insula) suppressive mechanism--presumably mediated via attention--which manifests subjectively as emotional numbing, and disables the process by which perception and cognition normally become emotionally coloured, giving rise to a subjective feeling of 'unreality'. Our functional neuroimaging and psychophysiological studies support the above model and indicate that, compared with normal and clinical controls, DPD patients show increased prefrontal activation as well as reduced activation in insula/limbic-related areas to aversive, arousing emotional stimuli. Although a putative inhibitory mechanism on emotional processing might account for the emotional numbing and characteristic perceptual detachment, it is likely, as suggested by some studies, that parietal mechanisms underpin feelings of disembodiment and lack of agency feelings. PMID:21087873

  5. STRESS AND TRAUMA: Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Julie P; Snyder, Malynda; Marie Gillig, Paulette

    2014-07-01

    Depersonalization/derealization disorder is characterized by depersonalization often co-occurring with derealization in the absence of significant psychosis, memory, or identity disturbance. Depersonalization/derealization is categorized as one of the dissociative disorders, which also includes dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Although these disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, many persons with psychiatric illness who have experienced trauma report symptoms consistent with dissociative disorders. There are limited scientific data on prevalence of depersonalization/derealization disorder specifically. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological and epidemiological information regarding diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders in general, and illustrates common presenting histories of persons with derealization/depersonalization disorder utilizing composite cases. The clinical vignettes focus on recommended psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy interventions as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan for these individuals. PMID:25337444

  6. STRESS AND TRAUMA: Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Malynda; Marie Gillig, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Depersonalization/derealization disorder is characterized by depersonalization often co-occurring with derealization in the absence of significant psychosis, memory, or identity disturbance. Depersonalization/derealization is categorized as one of the dissociative disorders, which also includes dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Although these disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, many persons with psychiatric illness who have experienced trauma report symptoms consistent with dissociative disorders. There are limited scientific data on prevalence of depersonalization/derealization disorder specifically. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological and epidemiological information regarding diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders in general, and illustrates common presenting histories of persons with derealization/depersonalization disorder utilizing composite cases. The clinical vignettes focus on recommended psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy interventions as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan for these individuals. PMID:25337444

  7. Science Center Cambridge Common

    E-print Network

    Johnston Gate Science Center Fire HQ Cambridge LAW SCHOOL Cambridge Common HARVARD YARD HA HAMMOND STREETLibrary Center Holyoke Science Center Widener Fire HQ Cambridge LAW SCHOOL Cambridge Common HARVARD BROADW AY PRESCOTTS QUINCYSTREET EVERETT STREET STREET MASSACHUSETTSAVENUE CAMBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTSAVENUE

  8. Psychophysiological investigations in depersonalization disorder and effects of electrodermal biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; Sierra, Mauricio; David, Anthony S

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies investigating depersonalization disorder (DPD) report a lower baseline skin conductance level (SCL) and attenuated skin conductance response (SCR) to emotive stimuli. We hypothesized that increasing physiological arousal levels via electrodermal biofeedback may ameliorate disembodiment and emotional numbing symptomatology. Real-time versus sham biofeedback yielded a significant SCL increase after just 3 real-time biofeedback sessions in healthy volunteers. Subsequently, a randomized controlled biofeedback trial was administered with DPD patients. Findings were not replicated as SCL tended to fall, curiously more substantially in the real-time condition, concomitant with increased low- and high-frequency heart rate variability. To further investigate abnormal autonomic regulation in DPD, we compared basal autonomic activity between patients and healthy volunteers and found the former to be significantly more labile, indexed by greater nonspecific SCRs and higher resting SCLs. Rather than low sympathetic arousal, DPD might be better characterized by abnormal autonomic regulation affecting emotional and physiological responsivity. PMID:22545565

  9. Altered orientation of spatial attention in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Adler, Julia; Beutel, Manfred E; Knebel, Achim; Berti, Stefan; Unterrainer, Josef; Michal, Matthias

    2014-05-15

    Difficulties with concentration are frequent complaints of patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). Standard neuropsychological tests suggested alterations of the attentional and perceptual systems. To investigate this, the well-validated Spatial Cueing paradigm was used with two different tasks, consisting either in the detection or in the discrimination of visual stimuli. At the start of each trial a cue indicated either the correct (valid) or the incorrect (invalid) position of the upcoming stimulus or was uninformative (neutral). Only under the condition of increased task difficulty (discrimination task) differences between DPD patients and controls were observed. DPD patients showed a smaller total attention directing effect (RT in valid vs. invalid trials) compared to healthy controls only in the discrimination condition. RT costs (i.e., prolonged RT in neutral vs. invalid trials) mainly accounted for this difference. These results indicate that DPD is associated with altered attentional mechanisms, especially with a stronger responsiveness to unexpected events. From an evolutionary perspective this may be advantageous in a dangerous environment, in daily life it may be experienced as high distractibility. PMID:24594203

  10. Implicit self-esteem in borderline personality and depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Alexis N; Berlin, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Self-perception is disrupted in people with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and depersonalization disorder (DPD), fluctuating with sudden shifts in affect in BPD and experienced as detached in DPD. Measures of implicit self-esteem (ISE), free from conscious control and presentation biases, may highlight how such disruptions of self-concept differentially affect these two populations on an unconscious level. We examined ISE using the Implicit Association Test, along with measures of emotion, behavior, and temperament, in BPD (n?=?18), DPD (n?=?18), and healthy control (n?=?35) participants. DPD participants had significantly higher ISE and were more harm avoidant than BPD and control participants, while BPD participants had more "frontal" behaviors and impulsivity and less self-directedness and cooperativeness than DPD and control participants. Thus, while BPD and DPD commonly overlap in terms of dissociative symptoms and emotional irregularities, differences in self-esteem, behavior, and temperament can help identify where they diverge in terms of their cognition, behavior, and ultimately underlying neurobiology. PMID:22493585

  11. Implicit Self-Esteem in Borderline Personality and Depersonalization Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Alexis N.; Berlin, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-perception is disrupted in people with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and depersonalization disorder (DPD), fluctuating with sudden shifts in affect in BPD and experienced as detached in DPD. Measures of implicit self-esteem (ISE), free from conscious control and presentation biases, may highlight how such disruptions of self-concept differentially affect these two populations on an unconscious level. We examined ISE using the Implicit Association Test, along with measures of emotion, behavior, and temperament, in BPD (n?=?18), DPD (n?=?18), and healthy control (n?=?35) participants. DPD participants had significantly higher ISE and were more harm avoidant than BPD and control participants, while BPD participants had more “frontal” behaviors and impulsivity and less self-directedness and cooperativeness than DPD and control participants. Thus, while BPD and DPD commonly overlap in terms of dissociative symptoms and emotional irregularities, differences in self-esteem, behavior, and temperament can help identify where they diverge in terms of their cognition, behavior, and ultimately underlying neurobiology. PMID:22493585

  12. Emotional memory in depersonalization disorder: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Medford, Nicholas; Brierley, Barbara; Brammer, Michael; Bullmore, Edward T; David, Anthony S; Phillips, Mary L

    2006-12-01

    This study examines emotional memory effects in primary depersonalization disorder (DPD). A core complaint of DPD sufferers is the dulling of emotional responses, and previous work has shown that, in response to aversive stimuli, DPD patients do not show activation of brain regions involved in normal emotional processing. We hypothesized that DPD sufferers would not show the normal emotional enhancement of memory, and that they would not show activation of brain regions concerned with emotional processing during encoding and recognition of emotional verbal material. Using fMRI, 10 DPD patients were compared with an age-matched healthy control group while performing a test of emotional verbal memory, comprising one encoding and two recognition memory tasks. DPD patients showed significantly enhanced recognition for overtly emotive words, but did not show enhancement of memory for neutral words encoded in an emotive context. In addition, patients did not show activation of emotional processing areas during encoding, and exhibited no substantial difference in their neural responses to emotional and neutral material in the encoding and emotional word recognition tasks. This study provides further evidence that patients with DPD do not process emotionally salient material in the same way as healthy controls, in accordance with their subjective descriptions of reduced or absent emotional responses. PMID:17085021

  13. Conditional reasoning in Asperger's syndrome and depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Emma Jane; Dumigan, Rachael; Schoenberg, Poppy; Mauricio, Sierra; Murphy, Declan G; David, Anthony S

    2012-09-01

    Conditional reasoning premises can be systematically manipulated to elicit specific response patterns. This is useful for investigating the reasoning style of people who report clinical symptoms. We administered a standardized conditional reasoning task to 16 participants with a diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome (AS), 16 participants with a diagnosis of depersonalization disorder (DPD), and 32 intelligence-quotient-matched controls. Premises were manipulated for a) context, with some being embedded within extra statements, and b) content, neutral or emotional. Both the AS and DPD participants were less likely to incorporate exceptions to the given premises than the controls, indicating difficulties with mental flexibility, although this effect was less marked in the DPD group. It seems the AS participants were also less influenced than the controls by statements that highlight possible alternative consequences. However, this effect was less robust than that observed with statements detailing exceptions, suggesting it may be because of general problems with executive function rather than difficulties in processing contextual information. We did not observe the expected difference between the DPD participants and the controls when reasoning with emotional premises. Overall, these data suggest that the DPD and AS participants have distinct reasoning styles, which may be of use for interventions based on cognitive change. PMID:22922241

  14. Skin conductance and memory fragmentation after exposure to an emotional film clip in depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Merckelbach, Harald; van Oorsouw, Kim; Simeon, Daphne

    2010-05-30

    It is often assumed that when confronted with an emotional event, patients with DPD inhibit information processing. It is also thought that this fosters memory fragmentation. This hypothesis has not been tested in chronic depersonalization. The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal pattern of autonomic responding to emotional material in depersonalization disorder, along with concomitant deficits in subjective and objective memory formation (i.e., difficulties to form a coherent narrative consisting of an ordered sequence of events). Participants with depersonalization disorder (n=14) and healthy control participants (n=14) viewed an emotional video clip while their skin conductance (SC) levels were measured. Peritraumatic dissociation was measured before and after the clip, and memory performance was measured 35 min after viewing. Compared to controls, depersonalized participants exhibited a distinctly different temporal pattern of autonomic responding, characterized by an earlier peak and subsequent flattening of SCLs. Maximum SCLs did not differ between the two groups. Moreover, unlike the control group, depersonalized participants showed no SC recovery after clip offset. In terms of memory performance, patients exhibited objective memory fragmentation, which they also reported subjectively. However, they did not differ from controls in free recall performance. Apparently, emotional responding in DPD is characterized by a shortened latency to peak with subsequent flattening and is accompanied by memory fragmentation in the light of otherwise unremarkable memory functioning. PMID:20381160

  15. Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yih-Min

    ( Cambridge Journals Online Cambridge Books Online Login ) #12; 5 (4) Login 2. 3. (1) Top Accessed #12; 1 Cambridge University Press .......2 Cambridge Books Online ...............2 Cambridge Books Online ...............3 ....................................5

  16. Striking Discrepancy of Anomalous Body Experiences with Normal Interoceptive Accuracy in Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Matthias; Reuchlein, Bettina; Adler, Julia; Reiner, Iris; Beutel, Manfred E.; Vögele, Claus; Schächinger, Hartmut; Schulz, André

    2014-01-01

    Background Disembodiment is a core feature of depersonalization disorder (DPD). Given the narratives of DPD patients about their disembodiment and emotional numbing and neurobiological findings of an inhibition of insular activity, DPD may be considered as a mental disorder with specific impairments of interoceptive awareness and body perception. Methods We investigated cardioceptive accuracy (CA) of DPD patients (n?=?24) as compared to healthy controls (n?=?26) with two different heartbeat detection tasks (“Schandry heartbeat counting task” and “Whitehead heartbeat discrimination task”). Self-rated clearness of body perception was measured by questionnaire. Results Contrary to our hypothesis, DPD patients performed similarly to healthy controls on the two different heartbeat detection tasks, and they had equal scores regarding their self-rated clearness of body perception. There was no correlation of the severity of “anomalous body experiences” and depersonalization with measures of interoceptive accuracy. Only among healthy controls CA in the Schandry task was positively correlated with self-rated clearness of body perception. Depersonalization was unrelated to severity of depression or anxiety, while depression and anxiety were highly correlated. Anxiety and depression did not modify the associations of depersonalization with interoceptive accuracy. Conclusions Our main findings highlight a striking discrepancy of normal interoception with overwhelming experiences of disembodiment in DPD. This may reflect difficulties of DPD patients to integrate their visceral and bodily perceptions into a sense of their selves. This problem may be considered an important target for psychotherapeutic treatment approaches. PMID:24587061

  17. Temporo-parietal junction stimulation in the treatment of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Antonio; Simeon, Daphne; Urban, Nina; Bulow, Peter; Allart, Anouk; Lisanby, Sarah

    2011-03-30

    This is the first clinical trial of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in depersonalization disorder (DPD). After 3weeks of right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) rTMS, 6/12 patients responded. Five responders received 3 more weeks of right TPJ rTMS showing 68% DPD symptoms improvement. Right TPJ rTMS was safe and effective. PMID:20837362

  18. Face processing in depersonalization: an fMRI study of the unfamiliar self.

    PubMed

    Ketay, Sarah; Hamilton, Holly K; Haas, Brian W; Simeon, Daphne

    2014-04-30

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is characterized by a core sense of unfamiliarity. Nine DPD participants and 10 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing self and unfamiliar faces. Compared with control subjects, the DPD group exhibited significantly greater activation in several brain regions in response to self vs. stranger faces. Implications are discussed. PMID:24582597

  19. Microwave background interferometry in Cambridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Jones

    1991-01-01

    A new instrument, the Ryle Telescope, has been developed in Cambridge which has a high temperature sensitivity and the ability to integrate for several hundred hours on the same field. It will be used to study the CMB on angular scales of a few arcmin, with particular emphasis on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. A second instrument to study the CMB on

  20. Depersonalization Disorder: Disconnection of Cognitive Evaluation from Autonomic Responses to Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Matthias; Koechel, Ansgar; Canterino, Marco; Adler, Julia; Reiner, Iris; Vossel, Gerhard; Beutel, Manfred E.; Gamer, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD) typically complain about emotional detachment. Previous studies found reduced autonomic responsiveness to emotional stimuli for DPD patients as compared to patients with anxiety disorders. We aimed to investigate autonomic responsiveness to emotional auditory stimuli of DPD patients as compared to patient controls. Furthermore, we examined the modulatory effect of mindful breathing on these responses as well as on depersonalization intensity. Methods 22 DPD patients and 15 patient controls balanced for severity of depression and anxiety, age, sex and education, were compared regarding 1) electrodermal and heart rate data during a resting period, and 2) autonomic responses and cognitive appraisal of standardized acoustic affective stimuli in two conditions (normal listening and mindful breathing). Results DPD patients rated the emotional sounds as significantly more neutral as compared to patient controls and standardized norm ratings. At the same time, however, they responded more strongly to acoustic emotional stimuli and their electrodermal response pattern was more modulated by valence and arousal as compared to patient controls. Mindful breathing reduced severity of depersonalization in DPD patients and increased the arousal modulation of electrodermal responses in the whole sample. Finally, DPD patients showed an increased electrodermal lability in the rest period as compared to patient controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that the cognitive evaluation of emotional sounds in DPD patients is disconnected from their autonomic responses to those emotional stimuli. The increased electrodermal lability in DPD may reflect increased introversion and cognitive control of emotional impulses. The findings have important psychotherapeutic implications. PMID:24058547

  1. Alexithymia, absorption, and cognitive failures in depersonalization disorder: a comparison to posttraumatic stress disorder and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Giesbrecht, Timo; Knutelska, Margaret; Smith, Rebecca Jo; Smith, Lisa M

    2009-07-01

    Alexithymia, absorption, and cognitive failures are traits that have been implicated in dissociative psychopathology. Forty-six participants with depersonalization disorder (DPD), 21 with posttraumatic stress disorder, and 35 healthy controls completed measures of dissociation, alexithymia, absorption, cognitive failures, and childhood trauma. The DPD and posttraumatic stress disorder groups had significantly and comparably elevated absorption and cognitive failures scores. Only the DPD group had significantly elevated alexithymia scores, specifically in "difficulty identifying feelings." Regression analyses revealed that "alexithymia-difficulty identifying feelings" was predictive of both DPD diagnosis and depersonalization scores. In contrast, amnesia scores were predicted by childhood trauma and absorption. In conclusion, the link between depersonalization and alexithymia appeared to be specific rather than broadly related to early trauma or to trauma-spectrum psychopathology. PMID:19597356

  2. University of Cambridge Sport

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    University of Cambridge Sport A N N U A L R E V I E W 2 0 0 5 ­ 2 0 0 6 #12;I am delighted the University. Cambridge is proud of its scholar sportsmen and women whose excellence in the sporting arena so Vice-Chancellor SteveForrestInsightVisual #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE SPORT ANNUAL REVIEW 2005 ­ 2006

  3. HARVARD YARD Cambridge St.

    E-print Network

    A B C D 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 A B C D HARVARD YARD Cambridge St. Cambridge St. PeabodySt. Broadway PrescottSt. PrescottSt. QuincySt. FeltonSt. WareSt. Harvard St. Rem ington St. Arrow St. LindenSt. Holyoke HOUSEELIOT HOUSE KIRKLAND HOUSE HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE COMMON CABOT

  4. Distinctiveness and overlap of depersonalization with anxiety and depression in a community sample: results from the Gutenberg Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Michal, Matthias; Wiltink, Jörg; Till, Yvonne; Wild, Philipp S; Blettner, Maria; Beutel, Manfred E

    2011-07-30

    Depersonalization disorder is considered to be a common clinical phenomenon and disorder with an enormous gap between prevalence and detection partly due to the common interpretation of depersonalization (DP) being a negligible variant of anxiety and depression. Therefore, we sought to analyze (1) the prevalence rate of DP in a large community sample (n=5000) according to a recently developed ultra brief two-item depersonalization screener; (2) the associations with depression, anxiety, physical and mental health status; and 93) whether DP contributes independently to the health status beyond anxiety and depression. The prevalence of clinically significant DP was 0.8% (n=41), and 8.5% (n=427) endorsed at least one symptom of DP. DP was independently associated with impairment of mental and physical health status as well as with a medical history of any depressive or anxiety disorder. Despite the consistent association of DP with anxiety and depression, the shared variances were small, and DP was clearly separated from symptoms of anxiety and depression in the principal component analysis. Therefore, we conclude that the implementation of depersonalization screening might be recommended. PMID:21122925

  5. Emotional memory and perception of emotional faces in patients suffering from depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Barbara; Sierra, Mauricio; Medford, Nick; Hunter, Elaine; Baker, Dawn; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; David, Anthony S

    2007-08-01

    Previous work has shown that patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD) have reduced physiological responses to emotional stimuli, which may be related to subjective emotional numbing. This study investigated two aspects of affective processing in 13 patients with DPD according to the DSM-IV criteria and healthy controls: the perception of emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) and memory for emotional stimuli. Results revealed a specific lack of sensitivity to facial expression of anger in patients, but normal enhancement of memory for peripheral aspects of arousing emotional material. The results are consistent with altered processing of threat-related stimuli but intact consolidation processes, at least when the stimuli involved are potently arousing. PMID:17705944

  6. Cambridge Cosmology: Black Holes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Stewart

    This Cambridge Cosmology site introduces the concept of black holes, explaining their properties and presenting observational evidence for their existence. Also covered are black hole formation, and determination of weight, size, and distance.

  7. Neighborhood design for Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, Margaret (Margaret Philpott Ray), 1953-

    1981-01-01

    This thesis examines the problem of modest high-density low-rise housing design for a site in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It considers first the general changes in housing demand and the housing industry which have made it ...

  8. CambridgeSoft

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    CambridgeSoft provides a variety for software for chemical structure drawing and visualization, including the popular ChemDraw and Chem3D programs. Chem3D Ultra includes computational chemistry capability.

  9. The Cambridge Multimedia Document Retrieval (MDR) Project

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Laboratory, University of Cambridge William Gates Building, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD The Cambridge Multimedia Document Retrieval (MDR) project at Cambridge from 1997-2000, with selected illustr* *ations. The focus is primarily

  10. Prevalence, correlates, and predictors of depersonalization experiences in the German general population.

    PubMed

    Michal, Matthias; Wiltink, Jörg; Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Tuin, Inka; Lichy, Marcel; Brähler, Elmar; Beutel, Manfred E

    2009-07-01

    The survey aimed to investigate the prevalence of depersonalization (DP) experiences, its sociodemographic characteristics and its associations with medical conditions, illness behavior, and potential etiologic factors. A representative face-to-face household survey was conducted. The sample consists of n = 1,287 participants aged 14 to 90 years. Sociodemographic variables, medical conditions, current mental disorders, health care utilization, and childhood adversities were assessed. A total of 1.9% participants scored in the range of clinically significant DP (DP-C) and 9.7% reported at least some impairment through DP (DP-I). DP-C/DP-I were strongly associated with depression and anxiety. After adjustment for depression and anxiety, DP-C and DP-I were independently associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic pulmonary disease, severe pain, and childhood adversities. We conclude that DP is common, it can not be reduced to a negligible variant of depression or anxiety and that more awareness about DP with respect to detection and research is urgently required. PMID:19597357

  11. Grey matter alterations in patients with depersonalization disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Judith K.; Gaebler, Michael; Lamke, Jan-Peter; Walter, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no whole brain investigation of morphological aberrations in dissociative disorder is available to date. Previous region-of-interest studies focused exclusively on amygdalar, hippocampal and parahippocampal grey matter volumes and did not include patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). We therefore carried out an explorative whole brain study on structural brain aberrations in patients with DPD. Methods We acquired whole brain, structural MRI data for patients with DPD and healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry was carried out to test for group differences, and correlations with symptom severity scores were computed for grey matter volume. Results Our study included 25 patients with DPD and 23 controls. Patients exhibited volume reductions in the right caudate, right thalamus and right cuneus as well as volume increases in the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right somatosensory region that are not a direct function of anxiety or depression symptoms. Limitations To ensure ecological validity, we included patients with comorbid disorders and patients taking psychotropic medication. Conclusion The results of this first whole brain investigation of grey matter volume in patients with a dissociative disorder indentified structural alterations in regions subserving the emergence of conscious perception. It remains unknown if these alterations are best understood as risk factors for or results of the disorder. PMID:25285875

  12. Cambridge Cosmology: Cosmic Strings and Other Defects

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Shellard

    This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic strings and other defects in our Universe. It begins with phase transitions in the early Universe, and how cosmic strings and other defects formed early on. Cosmic string evolution and dynamics are discussed while looking at high-resolution numerical cosmic string simulations. Also covered are possible explanations for the origin of large-scale structures (such as galaxies) and texture models of these structures.

  13. The Cambridge Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirion, Wil

    The Cambridge Star Atlas covers the entire sky, both northern and southern latitudes, in an attractive format that is suitable for beginners and experienced astronomical observers. There is a series of monthly sky charts, followed by an atlas of the whole sky, arranged in 20 overlapping charts. Each chart shows stars down to magnitude 6.5, together with about 900 non-stellar objects, such as clusters and galaxies, which can be seen with binoculars or a small telescope. There is a comprehensive map of the Moon's surface, showing craters and other named features. Wil Tirion is the world's foremost artist and designer of astronomical maps. For this edition he has devised improved versions of the monthly charts and added all-sky charts, and the text has been completely revised. In this improved and expanded format, The Cambridge Star Atlas is an ideal reference atlas for sky watchers everywhere.

  14. Creativity in Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan; Macfarlane, Alan

    2013-08-07

    . If we start with poetry, it is not often recognized that perhaps three quarters of the greatest pre-twentieth century poets writing in the English language spent some time at Cambridge. They include Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, John... individuals. There are economists (Malthus, Marshall, Keynes), historians (Macaulay, Maitland, Trevelyan), philosophers (Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein), literary critics (Quiller Couch, Empson, Richards) anthropologists (Maine, Frazer, Rivers). It was a...

  15. Later developments at Cambridge: Titan, CAP, and the Cambridge Ring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROGER M. NEEDHAM

    1992-01-01

    The research developments at the Cambridge University Mathematical Laboratory after the completion of the EDSAC 2 project and up to M.V. Wilkes' retirement from his chair in 1980 are outlined. In particular, the Titan system, which supported high-performance multiprogrammed computing, the CAP capability-based computer, and the Cambridge Ring, a digital communication ring, projects are described

  16. University of Cambridge SPORTS CENTRE

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    2013 University of Cambridge SPORTS CENTRE: BUILDING USER GUIDEMadingley Road, Cambridge University West Campus, CB3 0ES #12;SPORTS CENTRE: BUILDING USER GUIDE [Type text] Page 2 #12;SPORTS CENTRE: Architect, Structural Engineer, M&E, Landscaping: Main Contractor: Quantity Surveying: #12;SPORTS CENTRE

  17. Microsoft Research Ltd. Cambridge, UK

    E-print Network

    Winn, John

    Gates Tom Minka Microsoft Research Ltd. Cambridge, UK John Winn Microsoft Research Ltd. Cambridge, UK Abstract Gates are a new notation for representing mixture models and context a containment structure. Gates capture this containment structure graphically, al- lowing both the independences

  18. Virtual Cambridge - first proof

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2015-06-30

    this to those who have not experienced an Oxbridge College. Colleges increasingly feel strange in our mobile and fragmented world. Yet for a Japanese who has experienced the family firm or large industrial corporation, the ie-like organizations of Japan gives a... there is arguably one of the most beautiful walks in the world along the ‘Backs’. Cambridge is indeed a very beautiful city and one way to see its many Colleges and stately buildings is from a high place. You might go up St Mary’s Church tower, but as a Fellow...

  19. Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical http://journals.cambridge.org/PSP

    E-print Network

    Klein, John R.

    Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PSP Permissions : Click here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/PSP, IP address: 141.217.20.120 on 01

  20. About Cambridge University Press.........................2 About Cambridge Books Online .............................2

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yih-Min

    users, meaning anyone who wants to may access the resource 24 hours a day. With online access to unique Books Online .............................2 Homepage is to further the University's objective of advancing knowledge, education, learning, and research. Cambridge

  1. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6...

  2. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6...

  3. DSpace@Cambridge Implementation Project website

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Peter; Massiou, Anna

    2003-01-01

    are already actively contributing, or have agreed to provide, material are: • Archaeology • Cambridge University Library • CamRAD (Cambridge Rock Art Database) • CARET (Centre for Applied Research in Education Technology) • Chemistry - Unilever Centre... are already actively contributing, or have agreed to provide, material are: • Archaeology • Cambridge University Library • CamRAD (Cambridge Rock Art Database) • CARET (Centre for Applied Research in Education Technology) • Chemistry - Unilever Centre...

  4. University of Cambridge Intellectual Property Rights

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    ) dated 7 September 2006. By said Adjudication it was determined that Cambridge Enterprise Ltd (CE) had of the Legal Services Office, University of Cambridge. 3. For the reasons set out below, the Tribunal has come of notification of the research results from a University staff member, Cambridge Enterprise shall consider

  5. What does Cambridge Enterprise do?

    E-print Network

    Keeler, James

    is advancing solar and wind power, developing new therapies for disease and removing barriers to personalised and Cambridge Enterprise Venture Partners, and offers business planning, mentoring, and other related programmes of prototypes in order to find the best commercial partners. Over the past three years, income from licensing

  6. DARWIN COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE Editorial note

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    DARWIN COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE STATUTES Editorial note The first Statutes of Darwin College were made by the Nominative Trustees. The present CHARTER and STATUTES for Darwin College were approved by Her Majesty constituting a Body Politic and Corporate by the name and style of "The Master and Fellows of Darwin College

  7. 76 FR 12729 - Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...FRL-8861-1] Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental...be transferred to Cambridge Environmental Inc. in accordance with 40 CFR 2.307(h...308(i)(2). Cambridge Environmental Inc. has been awarded a contract to...

  8. ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 1 Tracking of a Joint Path for the Walking of an

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 1 Tracking of a Joint,version1-26Feb2013 Author manuscript, published in "Robotica 22 (2004) 15-28" #12;ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN ROBOTICA PUBLISHED BY CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 2 parameter: the arc length ×. A time scaling control

  9. University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy Modelling of Microstructural and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, between May 2007 and August 2007. Except where acknowledgements

  10. Cambridge University Students' Union Old Examination Hall

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    Cambridge University Students' Union Old Examination Hall Free School Lane Cambridge CB2 3RF Tel, not all of whom learn best this way, and we know this because students have told us. The AS level exams with us about current A levels'. Our question in response to this is: which universities have said

  11. The Cambridge Multimedia Document Retrieval (MDR) Summary of experiments

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    , University of Cambridge William Gates Building, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, England July 2001The Cambridge Multimedia Document Retrieval (MDR) Project : Summary of experiments K. Sparck Jones) project at Cambridge from 1997-2000, with selected illustrations. The focus is primarily on retrieval

  12. Service in Cambridge ROLE MODELS FOR TOMORROW

    E-print Network

    Reuter, Martin

    Service in Cambridge ROLE MODELS FOR TOMORROW Ruben Alonzo ('11, Course 14) Young minority men who.E.A.D.) to empower at-risk teens to stay in school and pursue higher education. With a PSC Coop Grant, Ruben

  13. 25-26 June 2012, Cambridge, UK

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Michael (Oxford) · Angela McLean (Oxford) · Andrew Phillips (Microsoft Research Cambridge) · Andrew Sewell) · Mark Coles (York) · Deborah Dunn-Walters (King's College London) · Grant Lythe (Leeds) · Andrew Mc

  14. In The Cambridge Companion to Darwin, eds. J. Hodge and G. Radick (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 92-115

    E-print Network

    Richards, Robert J.

    1 In The Cambridge Companion to Darwin, eds. J. Hodge and G. Radick (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 92-115 Darwin on Mind, Morals, and Emotions Robert J. Richards From the beginning of his theorizing about species, Darwin had human beings in view. In the initial pages of his

  15. The Cambridge companion to Bertrand Russell, edited by Nicholas Griffin, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK and New York, US, xvii + 550 pp.--

    E-print Network

    Koellner, Peter

    The Cambridge companion to Bertrand Russell, edited by Nicholas Griffin, Cambridge University Press. Bertrand Russell's logicism. Pp. 171­201. Michael Beaney. Russell and Frege. Pp. 128­170. Gregory Landini­309. The above papers have been selected from The Cambridge companion to Bertrand Russell as those likely

  16. A Geologic Time Scale 2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felix M. Gradstein; James G. Ogg; Alan G. Smith

    2005-01-01

    A successor to A Geologic Time Scale 1989 (Cambridge, 1990), this volume introduces the theory and methodology behind the construction of the new time scale, before presenting the scale itself in extensive detail. An international team of over forty stratigraphic experts develops the most up-to-date international stratigraphic framework for the Precambrian and Phanerozoic eras. A large wallchart summarizing the time

  17. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    by the Cambridge Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk) and to take a leading part in planning. With the launch of the Cambridge Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk) in 2011, many thousands more

  18. Polar Record http://journals.cambridge.org/POL

    E-print Network

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Polar Record http://journals.cambridge.org/POL Additional services for Polar Record: Email alerts April 2012 Link to this article: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0032247412000198 How to cite here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/POL, IP address: 134.219.64.158 on 29 Aug 2012 #12

  19. How do you feel when you can't feel your body? Interoception, functional connectivity and emotional processing in depersonalization-derealization disorder.

    PubMed

    Sedeño, Lucas; Couto, Blas; Melloni, Margherita; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Yoris, Adrián; Baez, Sandra; Esteves, Sol; Velásquez, Marcela; Barttfeld, Pablo; Sigman, Mariano; Kichic, Rafael; Chialvo, Dante; Manes, Facundo; Bekinschtein, Tristan A; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DD) typically manifests as a disruption of body self-awareness. Interoception -defined as the cognitive processing of body signals- has been extensively considered as a key processing for body self-awareness. In consequence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are systematic differences in interoception between a patient with DD and controls that might explain the disembodiment symptoms suffered in this disease. To assess interoception, we utilized a heartbeat detection task and measures of functional connectivity derived from fMRI networks in interoceptive/exteroceptivo/mind-wandering states. Additionally, we evaluated empathic abilities to test the association between interoception and emotional experience. The results showed patient's impaired performance in the heartbeat detection task when compared to controls. Furthermore, regarding functional connectivity, we found a lower global brain connectivity of the patient relative to controls only in the interoceptive state. He also presented a particular pattern of impairments in affective empathy. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental research that assesses the relationship between interoception and DD combining behavioral and neurobiological measures. Our results suggest that altered neural mechanisms and cognitive processes regarding body signaling might be engaged in DD phenomenology. Moreover, our study contributes experimental data to the comprehension of brain-body interactions and the emergence of self-awareness and emotional feelings. PMID:24967634

  20. 77 FR 3118 - Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel, Cambridge, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina in Cambridge, Maryland during...Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina's Breakwater Pavilion, in...Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina's Breakwater Pavilion,...

  1. Reflections on Cambridge: Reflections on Isaac Newton, discovery and Cambridge - with apple tree

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Reflections about the life and effects of Isaac Newton in Cambridge, filmed outside Trinity College, with the descendant of his apple tree behind (and the rooms where he lived and worked). Filmed by Xu Bei in 2009....

  2. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  3. Parasitology http://journals.cambridge.org/PAR

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Parasitology http://journals.cambridge.org/PAR Additional services for Parasitology: Email alerts Parasitology / Volume 139 / Special Issue 09 / August 2012, pp 1168 1177 DOI: 10.1017/S0031182012000443 brucei cytoskeleton: advances and opportunities. Parasitology, 139, pp 11681177 doi:10.1017/S

  4. Parasitology http://journals.cambridge.org/PAR

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Parasitology http://journals.cambridge.org/PAR Additional services for Parasitology: Email alerts. BELTRAN, R. POULIN and C. LAGRUE Parasitology / FirstView Article / October 2012, pp 1 9 DOI: 10.1017/S parvum (Trematoda) life history strategy, size and egg production. Parasitology, Available on CJO doi:10

  5. The Cambridge University Library Management Research Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Philip W.

    1971-01-01

    A description of the Unit which has been set up at Cambridge University with an OSTI grant and whose work is to study methods leading to increased effectiveness and efficiency in academic libraries. Attention is focussed on practical investigations making use of O & M and related techniques. (Author)

  6. Microsoft Cambridge at TREC 2002: Filtering Track

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen E. Robertson; Steve Walker; Hugo Zaragoza; Ralf Herbrich

    2002-01-01

    SW alker † 1 Summary Apart from a short description of our Query Track contri- bution, this report is concerned with the Adaptive Filter- ing track only. There is a separate report in this volume (1)on the Microsoft Research Cambridge participation in QA track. A number of runs were submitted for the Adaptive Fil- tering track, on all tasks (adaptive

  7. Microsoft Cambridge at TREC9: Filtering Track

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen E. Robertson; Steve Walker

    2000-01-01

    1 Summary Apart from a short description of our Query Track contri- bution, this report is concerned with the Adaptive Filter- ing track only. There is a separate report in this volume (1) on the Microsoft Research Cambridge participation in QA track. A number of runs were submitted for the Adaptive Fil- tering track, on all tasks (adaptive filtering, batch

  8. DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE \\\\Fserv\\health_and_safety\\Safety Handbook & Forms\\Web_versions\\Induction_checklist.doc HSIC ­ Sept 09 Health and Safety Induction Checklist Please locate and digest health & safety information provided in the induction pack and the Department website

  9. HARVARD LAW SCHOOL CAMBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 02138

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    HARVARD LAW SCHOOL CAMBRIDGE · MASSACHUSETTS · 02138 2012-13 Student Writing Prize Submission prize with a copy of your paper and a cover sheet to writingprizes@law.harvard.edu. Your submission: _______________________________________________________________________ Contact Julie Barton, Director of Special Academic Programs, at jbarton@law.harvard.edu with questions

  10. Bayesian Nonparametric Models Peter Orbanz, Cambridge University

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    , clustering, latent variable modeling, sequential modeling, image segmentation, source separation and grammarBayesian Nonparametric Models Peter Orbanz, Cambridge University Yee Whye Teh, University College. Definition A Bayesian nonparametric model is a Bayesian model on an infinite-dimensional parameter space

  11. Cambridge Pilot School. First Year Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Wendy L.; Mulhauser, Fritz

    The Pilot School described in this document is a joint venture of the Cambridge public schools and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, to experiment with decentralized alternatives to the usual pattern of secondary education. The first section is a chronology of the school's history and operations during the first year; the second describes…

  12. The Fitzwilliam Museum University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Zeki, Semir

    The Fitzwilliam Museum University of Cambridge REGULATIONS Welcome to the Fitzwilliam Museum Department. · Behave in any way which may be a nuisance or cause offence to others. · Offer tips to any also reserves the right to refuse admission. In an emergency the Museum doors and gates may be closed

  13. Please return this completed form to The Cambridge Foundation, 1 Quayside, Bridge Street, Cambridge CB5 8AB Do not send this form to your bank, return it directly to the Cambridge Foundation

    E-print Network

    Please return this completed form to The Cambridge Foundation, 1 Quayside, Bridge Street, Cambridge CB5 8AB Do not send this form to your bank, return it directly to the Cambridge Foundation The Cambridge Foundation Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences Please insert name and address below

  14. Cambridge Elementary students enjoy gift of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Children at Cambridge Elementary School, Cocoa, Fla., eagerly unwrap computer equipment donated by Kennedy Space Center. Cambridge is one of 13 Brevard County schools receiving 81 excess contractor computers thanks to an innovative educational outreach project spearheaded by the Nasa k-12 Education Services Office at ksc. Behind the children is Jim Thurston, a school volunteer and retired employee of USBI, who shared in the project. The Astronaut Memorial Foundation, a strategic partner in the effort, and several schools in rural Florida and Georgia also received refurbished computers as part of the year-long project. Ksc employees put in about 3,300 volunteer hours to transform old, excess computers into upgraded, usable units. A total of $90,000 in upgraded computer equipment is being donated.

  15. University of Cambridge Lady Mitchell Hall

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    week prior to the event. Bookings are non-refundable if cancelled less than a week prior to the event://www.visitcambridge.org/VisitCambridge/Home.aspx http://www.cam.ac.uk/museums/ http://www.cam.ac.uk/colleges/addresses.html #12;Travelling by car or Grand Arcade. The most convenient Park and Ride sites for the venue are: Madingley Road: You should ask

  16. Scaling and biomechanics of surface attachment in climbing animals

    E-print Network

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Scaling and biomechanics of surface attachment in climbing animals David Labonte & Walter Federle Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge Attachment devices are essential adaptations for climbing animals, and valuable models for synthetic...

  17. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore,

    E-print Network

    Muehlenbein, Michael

    bases for human male reproductive functions. We begin with a discussion of the various aspects of male cussion and research on human male reproduction, both the proximate mechanisms involved in addition agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge

  18. Latest Results from the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope

    E-print Network

    Young, John

    Latest Results from the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope C.A.Haniff 1 , J.E.Baldwin a brief report and discuss progress at the Cam­ bridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope, in particular of synthesis imaging with a separated­element in­ terferometer (Baldwin et al. 1996), our team in Cambridge has

  19. Understanding Cambridge from the Inside Out

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2015-07-09

    Japanese who has experienced the family firm or large industrial corporation, the ie-like organizations of Japan gives a sense of what I mean. The place of work is also a place of social meaning, there is often life-time assurance, those who work together... buildings is from a high place. You might go up St Mary’s Church tower, but as a Fellow of King’s I can take you onto the roof of the famous Chapel of King’s College, from which you can look in all directions across the river, lawns and buildings. Cambridge...

  20. Press release: 18 September 2014 Curating Cambridge: our city, our stories, our stuff

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Press release: 18 September 2014 Curating Cambridge: our city, our stories, our stuff 20 October will open for Curating Cambridge: our city, our stories, our stuff, a five week festival of fun the Cambridge Festival of Ideas website. If pub quizzes are your thing don't miss Things of Cambridge: A Pub

  1. Harvard University -Houghton Library / Harvard University. Harvard Library bulletin. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Library. Harvard University -Houghton Library / Harvard University. Harvard Library bulletin. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Li

    E-print Network

    Richards, Robert J.

    Harvard University - Houghton Library / Harvard University. Harvard Library bulletin. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Library. #12;Harvard University - Houghton Library / Harvard University. Harvard Library bulletin. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Library. #12;Harvard University - Houghton

  2. Response to the Witty Review, May 2013 University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    in the global economy. Greater Cambridge is competing with city-regions like San Francisco, Boston and Bangalore number of high quality jobs, each of which generates several-fold more in the service and supply chain

  3. PHILIP CLAUDE CAPLAN 165 Erie Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    generator for adaptive simulations. · Data structures & algorithms for rapid/efficient CFD development: Anisotropic quadrilateral mesh generation for high-order numerical simulations Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA element methods (classical, hybridized and embedded variants) · Developed an anisotropic unstructured mesh

  4. University of Cambridge Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences

    E-print Network

    University of Cambridge Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences Further Particulars: Catering Assistant (28 hours per week) Background The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences outside caterers with in-house arrangements. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20

  5. Cambridge Grand Junction transit implementation : alternatives, scheduling, cost, and performance

    E-print Network

    Iglesias Cuervo, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    The Grand Junction railroad lies at the heart of East Cambridge adjacent to the Kendall Square business district and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus. Over the last one hundred years the railroad has gone ...

  6. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL

    E-print Network

    Osterhout, Lee

    Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL Additional services for Bilingualism: Language and Cognition: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: ERP evidence DARREN TANNER, JUDITH MCLAUGHLIN, JULIA HERSCHENSOHN and LEE OSTERHOUT Bilingualism

  7. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL

    E-print Network

    Osterhout, Lee

    Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL Additional services for Bilingualism: Language and Cognition: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints comprehension DARREN TANNER, KAYO INOUE and LEE OSTERHOUT Bilingualism: Language and Cognition / Volume 17

  8. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL

    E-print Network

    Osterhout, Lee

    Bilingualism: Language and Cognition http://journals.cambridge.org/BIL Additional services for Bilingualism: Language and Cognition: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints comprehension DARREN TANNER, KAYO INOUE and LEE OSTERHOUT Bilingualism: Language and Cognition / First

  9. Relationship between childhood trauma, mindfulness, and dissociation in subjects with and without hallucination proneness.

    PubMed

    Perona-Garcelán, Salvador; García-Montes, José M; Rodríguez-Testal, Juan Francisco; López-Jiménez, Ana Ma; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; Ductor-Recuerda, María Jesús; Benítez-Hernández, María del Mar; Arias-Velarde, Ma Ángeles; Gómez-Gómez, María Teresa; Pérez-Álvarez, Marino

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between childhood traumas, mindfulness, and dissociation (more specifically, absorption and depersonalization) in healthy subjects with and without hallucination proneness. A sample of 318 subjects was given the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised (R. P. Bentall & P. Slade, 1985). From this sample, 2 groups were formed: one with high and the other with low hallucination proneness. Furthermore, all participants were given the Tellegen Absorption Scale (A. Tellegen & G. Atkinson, 1974), the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (M. Sierra & G. E. Berrios, 2000), the Southampton Mindfulness Questionnaire (P. D. J. Chadwick et al., 2008), and the Trauma Questionnaire (J. R. E. Davidson, D. Hughes, & D. G. Blazer, 1990). The results showed that in the group with high hallucination proneness, there were significantly more subjects with traumatic experiences than in the group with low predisposition, although no significant difference in the mean number of traumatic experiences undergone in childhood was found between the 2 groups, although there was a trend toward significance. A correlation analysis showed a significant negative association between mindfulness on the one hand and absorption and depersonalization on the other. A positive relationship was also found between childhood traumas and absorption and depersonalization. Finally, multiple mediation analysis showed that the absorption and depersonalization variables acted as mediators between childhood traumas and hallucination proneness. We discuss the importance of the relationship between the variables studied and hallucination proneness and suggest some approaches for their treatment. PMID:24377971

  10. 40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.205 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  11. Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PEM

    E-print Network

    Kalisch, Henrik

    Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PEM Additional 711729 doi:10.1017/S0013091512000065 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/PEM

  12. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  13. The CAMbridge Emission Line Surveyor (CAMELS)

    E-print Network

    Thomas, C N; Maiolino, R; Goldie, D J; Acedo, E de Lera; Wagg, J; Blundell, R; Paine, S; Zeng, L

    2014-01-01

    The CAMbridge Emission Line Surveyor (CAMELS) is a pathfinder program to demonstrate on-chip spectrometry at millimetre wavelengths. CAMELS will observe at frequencies from 103-114.7 GHz, providing 512 channels with a spectral resolution of R = 3000. In this paper we describe the science goals of CAMELS, the current system level design for the instrument and the work we are doing on the detailed designs of the individual components. In addition, we will discuss our efforts to understand the impact that the design and calibration of the filter bank on astronomical performance. The shape of the filter channels, the degree of overlap and the nature of the noise all effect how well the parameters of a spectral line can be recovered. We have developed a new and rigorous method for analysing performance, based on the concept of Fisher information. This can in be turn coupled to a detailed model of the science case, allowing design trade-offs to be properly investigated.

  14. 40 University of Cambridge Annual Report 2010 Reports and Financial Statements

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Assessment and Cambridge University Press and their subsidiary companies and joint ventures, the Gates of knowledge, education, and learning worldwide. The Gates Cambridge Trust and the Associated Trusts the University appoints the majority of the trustees of each Trust. The purposes of the Gates Cambridge Trust

  15. Efficient Stochastic LASF codes for MIMO-OFDM University of Cambridge, Digital Technology Group.

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Technology Group. William Gates Building, JJ Thompson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 OFD, UK Email: eem27@cam. William Gates Building, JJ Thompson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 OFD, UK Email: ijw24@cam.ac.uk II. SYSTEM MODELEfficient Stochastic LASF codes for MIMO-OFDM Systems Evan Mella University of Cambridge, Digital

  16. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    William Gates Building Cambridge CB3 0FD Tel: +44 1223 763585 Email: jan.samols@cl.cam.ac.uk Website: httpThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing://www.camring.ucam.org The Ring is the newsletter of Cambridge Computer Lab Ring, the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory

  17. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    classes of triad resonance have been Email address for correspondence: reza.alam@berkeley.edu #12;268 M MohammadReza Alam Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 691 / January 2012, pp 267 278 DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2011://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022112011004733 How to cite this article: MohammadReza Alam (2012). A new triad resonance between copropagating

  18. The Rate of Creep Deformation St Edmund's College, Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    of Cambridge. The research described herein was conducted under the supervision of Professor H. K. D. H Acknowledgement I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Professor H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia for his guidance and Yokota Tomuyuki. It was an enormous pleasure to work with them. Thanks also to my friends

  19. The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

    E-print Network

    Franklin, James

    in mechanics, both celestial and terrestriaL Elasticity and fluid dynamics became mathematically tractableThe Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy Volume II EDITED BY KNUD HAAKONSSEN and collecting statistics to compute its power, J People volunteered to become more l1umerate;.l even those who

  20. Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment

    E-print Network

    Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects 4 / 25 2.5 / 25 Rated Wind Speed (m/s) 13 10 14.5 ~15 12 The above turbines were chosen to provide, several recent studies examining birds and wind turbines have observed that most birds usually avoid

  1. Seed Science Research http://journals.cambridge.org/SSR

    E-print Network

    Abella, Scott R.

    Seed Science Research http://journals.cambridge.org/SSR Additional services for Seed Science : Click here Soil seed banks in a mature coniferous forest landscape: dominance of native perennials and low spatial variability Scott R. Abella and Judith D. Springer Seed Science Research / Volume 22

  2. The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY

    E-print Network

    Elman, Benjamin

    The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY Additional services for The China Quarterly and Boston: Brill, 2012. vii + 394 pp., 133.00 $182.00. ISBN 9789004218444 Benjamin A. Elman The China this article: Benjamin A. Elman (2012). The China Quarterly, 212, pp 11451148 doi:10.1017/ S0305741012001440

  3. The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY

    E-print Network

    Huang, Youqin

    The China Quarterly http://journals.cambridge.org/CQY Additional services for The China Quarterly here Lowincome Housing in Chinese Cities: Policies and Practices Youqin Huang The China Quarterly (2012). Lowincome Housing in Chinese Cities: Policies and Practices. The China Quarterly, 212, pp

  4. Network Science http://journals.cambridge.org/NWS

    E-print Network

    Gill, Jeff

    Network Science http://journals.cambridge.org/NWS Additional services for Network Science R. FREEMAN Network Science / Volume 1 / Issue 01 / April 2013, pp 68 - 94 DOI: 10 priors for updating covert networks. Network Science, 1, pp 68-94 doi:10.1017/nws.2012

  5. The Cambridge University Large Vocabulary Arabic Speech Recognition System

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    Project Global Autonomous Language Exploitation (GALE) DARPA founded research program (Thanks to DARPA!) (http://www.darpa.mil/ipto/programs/gale/gale.asp) Frank Diehl University of Cambridge #12;Introduction Language Exploitation (GALE) DARPA founded research program (Thanks to DARPA!) (http://www.darpa

  6. Further Particulars: Library and Information Assistant The University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    , schools and other institutions plus a central administration. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national and international visitor of Cambridge so that it is available to the wider community on the web. Location Isaac Newton Institute

  7. Clare College, Cambridge "WE BELIEVE IN ONE LORD, JESUS CHRIST"

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Clare College, Cambridge "WE BELIEVE IN ONE LORD, JESUS CHRIST" Chapel ServiCeS lent term 2012 #12 Believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ..." Sermons on Sunday evenings this term will focus on the second article of the Creeds (Apostles' and Nicene), "We believe in Jesus Christ". Preachers have been invited

  8. The Cambridge-Lesley Literacy Project: Theory, Practice and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Mary B.; And Others

    Lesley College and the public schools in Cambridge, Massachusetts collaborated in a project using the natural learning model from Don Holdaway's "The Foundations of Literacy" to improve literacy education in grades K-6. The first two phases of natural learning (desire to learn a skill and attempting the new skill with a proficient person) were…

  9. COTTAGE FARM COMBINED SEWER DETENTION AND CHLORINATION STATION, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cottage Farm Detention and Chlorination Station was placed in operation by the Metropolitan District Commission on April 29, 1971. The station, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, diverts and treats combined sewage flows from the Charles River Valley sewer system (15,600 acr...

  10. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Y. Ahmet ekerciolu Robotica / FirstView Article / October 2014, pp 1 - 13 DOI: 10.1017/S formation control of networked mobile robots in environments with obstacles. Robotica, Available on CJO 2014

  11. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Ken

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click. Goldberg Robotica / Volume 13 / Issue 06 / November 1995, pp 565 573 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574700018646 algorithms for automatic planning by robots in stochastic environments. Robotica,13, pp 565573 doi:10.1017/S

  12. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Hu, Huosheng

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Vicente Matellán Robotica / Volume 26 / Issue 06 / November 2008, pp 817 - 830 DOI: 10.1017/S (2008). A hybrid approach to fast and accurate localization for legged robots. Robotica, 26, pp 817

  13. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Hu, Huosheng

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click predictive controller for robots to follow a virtual leader Dongbing Gu and Huosheng Hu Robotica / Volume 27. Robotica, 27, pp 905-913 doi:10.1017/S0263574708005316 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from

  14. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jongwon

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 8 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574711000774, Published online: 25 on taskoriented workspace. Robotica, Available on CJO 2011 doi:10.1017/S0263574711000774 Request Permissions

  15. http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica

    E-print Network

    Hu, Huosheng

    Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / Volume 24 / Issue 04 / July 2006, pp 429 - 431 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574705002420, Published online positioning method for a humanoid robot. Robotica, 24, pp 429-431 doi:10.1017/S0263574705002420 Request

  16. Genetical Research http://journals.cambridge.org/GRH

    E-print Network

    Halligan, Daniel

    Genetical Research http://journals.cambridge.org/GRH Additional services for Genetical Research balance Peter D. Keightley Genetical Research / Volume 58 / Issue 02 / October 1991, pp 139 144 DOI: 10 at quantitative trait loci in mutationselection balance. Genetical Research, 58, pp 139144 doi:10.1017/S

  17. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Terms of use : Click here On the acoustic levitation stability behaviour of spherical and ellipsoidal://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022112012003503 How to cite this article: D. Foresti, M. Nabavi and D. Poulikakos On the acoustic levitation Press 2012 1 doi:10.1017/jfm.2012.350 On the acoustic levitation stability behaviour of spherical

  18. www.newn.cam.ac.uk Newnham College | Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Eugenia

    in the Easter Term). Students usually stay up for a week or so either side. Tripos A Cambridge word for course placements, and all sorts of other help. Newnham in America A group of ex-students who especially support people, and offer all sorts of information and advice. But unlike in a hotel, they do not carry your bags

  19. PEMBROKE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE SAFETY AND SECURITY POLICY AND PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    1 PEMBROKE COLLEGE · CAMBRIDGE SAFETY AND SECURITY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Introduction Pembroke before they go down each term. Security of Buildings and Rooms The main College gates are closed at around 20.00. The smaller wicket gate remains open until 22.00 in term and out of term. Access

  20. World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    World Trade Review http://journals.cambridge.org/WTR Additional services for World Trade Review here Climate and trade policies: from mutual destruction to mutual support PATRICK A. MESSERLIN World Trade Review / Volume 11 / Issue 01 / January 2012, pp 53 - 80 DOI: 10.1017/S1474745611000395, Published

  1. Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB

    E-print Network

    Liska, Richard

    Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB Additional services for Laser, J. Limpouch, R. Liska and P. Váchal Laser and Particle Beams / Volume 30 / Issue 03 / September 2012 of annularlaserbeamdriven plasma jets from massive planar targets. Laser and Particle Beams,30, pp 445457 doi:10.1017/S

  2. Cambridge is the UK's capital of cycling hop

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Theatre hosts a varied programme of drama, dance, music, comedy and pantomime, as well as many shows prior life, Cambridge Junction presents a varied programme, including live music, club nights, theatre, dance.cam.ac.uk Admission charges apply Come and see plants from all over the world in one great garden, including arid

  3. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine http://journals.cambridge.org/PDM

    E-print Network

    Kirsh, David

    Prehospital and Disaster Medicine http://journals.cambridge.org/PDM Additional services for Prehospital and Disaster Medicine: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints of Patient Documentation by Emergency Field Responders during a Disaster MassCasualty Exercise Theodore C

  4. Ian Hacking. Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? Cam-bridge University Press, Cambridge, 2014 xv + 290 pp.

    E-print Network

    Avigad, Jeremy

    Ian Hacking. Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? Cam- bridge University Press, Cambridge that delivers a certain experience of un- derstanding, Hacking argues, surprisingly, that neither notion, and while Hacking challenges us to imagine that the role of proof in mathematics could have been different

  5. 236 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 [3] R. Ho, K. W. Mai, and M. A. Horowitz, "The future of wires," Proc.

    E-print Network

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    236 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 and J. Poulton, Digital Systems Engineering. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997. [9] T. Papaefthymiou, "Practical repeater insertion for low power: What repeater library do we need?," in Proc. DAC

  6. The Foundations of Causal Decision Theory, by James Joyce, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999, Pp. xii + 268. H/b 45.00.

    E-print Network

    Fitelson, Branden

    The Foundations of Causal Decision Theory, by James Joyce, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press to students and researchers with interests in these issues. Joyce begins with an entertaining but trenchant Savage's theory). Within just a few brief chapters, Joyce has the reader well prepared for a thorough

  7. Causality: Models, Reasoning, and Inference. By JUDEA PEARL. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 2000. xi 1 384 pp. d25.00.

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Causality: Models, Reasoning, and Inference. By JUDEA PEARL. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 2000. xi 1 384 pp. d25.00. Few would disagree with Pearl that causal knowledge is often more useful such a framework. Pearl centres his work around structural models, which are systems of structural relations

  8. ANISH KAPOOR: ENGINEERING ART Neil A. Dodgson, University of Cambridge, 15 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, UK CB3 0FD

    E-print Network

    Dodgson, Neil

    1 ANISH KAPOOR: ENGINEERING ART Neil A. Dodgson, University of Cambridge, 15 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, UK CB3 0FD nad10@cam.ac.uk Anish Kapoor has become well-known for his enormous architectural installations and his

  9. R. Schneider, Convex Bodies The BrunnMinkowsk Theory. Second expanded edition. Ency-clopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 151, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge,

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Rolf

    R. Schneider, Convex Bodies ­ The Brunn­Minkowsk Theory. Second expanded edition. Ency- clopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 151, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, xxii+736 pp, 2014. ERRATA p. 136 bodies and bisectors in Minkowski spaces. Adv. Geom. 14 (2014), 427­445. [162] Barthe, F., B¨or¨oczky, K

  10. To appear in Immunity to Error Through Misidentification: New Essays, edited by S. Prosser and F. Recanati, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Recanati, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Bodily immunity to error* Frédérique de Vignemont CNRS a similar account of self-ascription of the physical properties of one's own body1 (e.g. body size, weight for their very helpful comments. 1 By one's body, I shall assume one's body as defined in biology, and I shall

  11. University of Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics

    E-print Network

    simulation of supersonic disk-gap-band parachute Figure 2 : Photo Credit: Animal Flight Group, Dept such as membranes and shell · modelling and analysis of large-scale structural membranes, such as parachutes such complexities are needed in order to produce high-fidelity predictions for aerodynamic and structural design

  12. A review of "Reformation and Religious Identity in Cambridge, 1590-1644" by David Hoyle

    E-print Network

    Gregory, Brad S.

    2008-01-01

    history of the Dutch and their struggle for independence. David Hoyle. Reformation and Religious Identity in Cambridge, 1590-1644. The History of the University of Cambridge: Texts and Studies, 6. Woodbridge: Boydell Press and Cambridge University... a deeply anti-Roman ?prevailing consensus? (69) among Reformed Protestant theologians of various stripes from the 1590s through the 1610s, centered around concerns such as predestination, election, assurance, and perseverance. Theologians...

  13. Chapter 6.25 Cambridge Fiji F200 Plasma ALD

    E-print Network

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    and hold them stable during the process. 4.3 Gas delivery 4.3.1 MFC : Mass Flow Controller ­ used(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) 4.5.2 Reactant gas: The Cambridge can source Ar, H2, N2, and O2 into the plasma chamber. The Ar MFC Processes, Gases, Process Notes 7.1 Programming Commands 7.1.1 MFC 7.1.1.1 Turns on MFC for that gas

  14. A review of "The Cambridge Companion to Writing of the English Revolution." by N. H. Keeble, ed. 

    E-print Network

    Jason Peacey

    2003-01-01

    . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. xxii + 296 pp. + 7 illus. $59.95/$21.95. Review by JASON PEACEY, HISTORY OF PARLIAMENT TRUST. This collection of fifteen short essays by leading scholars of seventeenth-century literature introduces...

  15. Cambridge Cosmology: The Hot Big Bang Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Shellard

    This website introduces the Big Bang Model (also known as the standard cosmology) and the fact that it successfully explains many details about the formation of the Universe. It also touches upon issues not explainable through standard cosmology. A brief history of observational cosmology in the 20th century is given as a reference, followed by a brief history of our Universe as told through standard cosmology as well as particle and quantum cosmology. This site goes through the four 'pillars' of the Hot Big Bang Model: expansion of the Universe after a violent explosion, origin of the cosmic background radiation, nucleosynthesis of the light elements, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structures in the Universe.

  16. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Issue XIV January 2007 William Gates Building Cambridge CB3 0FD Tel: +44 1223 763585 Email: janThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing's Annual Dinner on March 19th 2007. The event will be held in Queens' Old Hall, one of Cambridge's most

  17. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    William Gates Building Cambridge CB3 0FD Tel: +44 1223 763585 Email: jan.samols@cl.cam.ac.uk Website: httpThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing: Chris Morgan (JE01) Ring News Membership Subscriptions Cambridge Computer Lab Ring has now been approved

  18. The journal of The Cambridge CompuTer lab ring Issue XXI --May 2009 --20 www.camring.ucam.org

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    : William Gates Building, Cambridge CB3 0FD Published three times a year. Copy deadline for the SeptemberRingThe The journal of The Cambridge CompuTer lab ring Issue XXI -- May 2009 -- £20 www ObjectSecuirty -- Zeus Don's diary 15 Jon Crowcroft Computer Laboratory news 16 #12;2 ©The Cambridge

  19. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    September 2006 William Gates Building Cambridge CB3 0FD Tel: +44 1223 763585 Email: jan of Red Gate Software Ltd., a Cambridge software tools company, contacted me to ask if I would likeThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing

  20. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Completing) #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 Are any

  1. Publications in Nonrefereed Journals 1990 Imaging Xray Astronomy (editor M. Elvis) [Cambridge: CUP].

    E-print Network

    Elvis, Martin

    Publications in Non­refereed Journals BOOKS 1990 Imaging X­ray Astronomy (editor M. Elvis) [Cambridge: CUP]. 1995 The AXAF ``Science Instrument Notebook'', Rev 2.0 (ed. M. Elvis), AXAF Science Center TD­401. 1999 Quasar Physics (A. Lawrence and M. Elvis) [Cambridge: CUP], in preparation. DIGITAL

  2. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy, and

    E-print Network

    Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy FOR THE FUTURE Low cost and resilience in the face of uncertainty Thursday 11 March 2010 at the Isaac Newton) of the University of Cambridge 1.30 pm Tea, coffee and biscuits available at the Isaac Newton Institute 2.25 pm

  3. University of Cambridge ... for women who expect to lead the way

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    .murrayedwards.cam.ac.uk MURRAY EDWARDS COLLEGE founded as New Hall University of Cambridge Gateway Gap Year Scholarships In 1954 Gateway Gap Year Scholarships for very able young women with the energy and potential to prepare themselves more fully for Cambridge. Gateway Gap Year Scholarships I To enable students to extend

  4. Issue I September 1 2002 The RingThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Lab Ring Office, William Gates Building, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FD. The benefits1 Issue I September 1 2002 The RingThe Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association William Gates Building Opens By Professor Ian Leslie The 1st of May saw

  5. ICT AND PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH THE PARADOX RESOLVED? Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    in the absolute and relative productivity performance of firms, sectors and countries. This effect is pervasive of Cambridge Trumpington Street Cambridge CB2 1AG alan.hughes@cbr.cam.ac.uk Michael S. Scott Morton Jay W there is clear evidence of the conditions that seem to be required before the payoff from ICT can be realised

  6. Divine Discourse: Philosophical Reflections on the Claim that God Speaks. Nicholas Wolterstorff, Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1995. x + 326 pp.

    E-print Network

    Himma, Kenneth Einar

    Divine Discourse: Philosophical Reflections on the Claim that God Speaks. Nicholas Wolterstorff, Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1995. x + 326 pp. Kenneth Einar Himma University of Washington Regardless of whether one agrees... interpretation, religious epistemol- ogy, theology and philosophical hermeneutics. At the intersection of these fields lies a claim Wolterstorff sees as fundamental to Ju­ daism, Christianity and Islam (p. 8): the claim that God speaks. More specifically...

  7. Investigating the Site of Newton's Laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Spargo, P E

    background Newton the laboratory chemist Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a man of the most extraordinarily diverse interests — a member of that tiny band of scholars such as da Vinci and Goethe who were active and creative in a wide variety of fields. He... Investigating the site of Newton’s laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge P.E. Spargo* IT IS NOT GENERALLY KNOWN THAT OVER THE course of some thirty years, Isaac Newton carried out around four hundred chemical experiments in a private laboratory...

  8. Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy

    E-print Network

    @cam.ac.uk 1 For more interesting details see A Concise History of the University of Cambridge by Elisabeth Leedham-Green (CUP 1996). The Faculty gratefully acknowledges support for this newsletter from 3M library security systems. In 1963 I anticipated... an original and successful film. As William Goldman famously put it “Nobody knows anything”. Well I certainly wouldn’t argue with that. Amanda Boyle is a film producer and director Nobody Knows Anything: Philosophy, Film and Me Amanda Boyle (St. John’s) from...

  9. Item response theory analyses of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Wilmer, Jeremy; Herzmann, Grit; McGugin, Rankin Williams; Fiset, Daniel; Van Gulick, Ana E; Ryan, Kaitlin F; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). First, we assessed the dimensionality of the test with a bifactor exploratory factor analysis (EFA). This EFA analysis revealed a general factor and 3 specific factors clustered by targets of CFMT. However, the 3 specific factors appeared to be minor factors that can be ignored. Second, we fit a unidimensional item response model. This item response model showed that the CFMT items could discriminate individuals at different ability levels and covered a wide range of the ability continuum. We found the CFMT to be particularly precise for a wide range of ability levels. Third, we implemented item response theory (IRT) differential item functioning (DIF) analyses for each gender group and 2 age groups (age ? 20 vs. age > 21). This DIF analysis suggested little evidence of consequential differential functioning on the CFMT for these groups, supporting the use of the test to compare older to younger, or male to female, individuals. Fourth, we tested for a gender difference on the latent facial recognition ability with an explanatory item response model. We found a significant but small gender difference on the latent ability for face recognition, which was higher for women than men by 0.184, at age mean 23.2, controlling for linear and quadratic age effects. Finally, we discuss the practical considerations of the use of total scores versus IRT scale scores in applications of the CFMT. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25642930

  10. Psychometric properties of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (A-DES) in Japanese adolescents from a community sample.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Takahiro; Hamada, Shoko; Kaida, Ako; Gotow, Kazufumi; Murase, Satomi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (A-DES) applied to Japanese adolescents in school. A large sample of normal adolescents (N = 2,272) aged 11 to 18 years completed the A-DES, and the factor structure, frequency, and differences by gender and age were examined. The scores of Japanese adolescents were comparable to the results of similarly aged adolescents in the United States, England, and Turkey but much higher than those recorded in The Netherlands, Finland, and Sweden. In particular, adolescents aged 11 to 12 seemed to have more dissociative experiences than older adolescents. Out of 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-factor structures that exploratory factor analyses regarded as competing models, confirmatory factor analyses seemed to support a 3-factor structure: depersonalization, disintegration of conscious control, and amnesia. The future implications of these results for clinicians and professionals who assess dissociative tendency in adolescents are described. PMID:20603766

  11. University of Cambridge: Economics, Networks and Security Seminar Series

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A biweekly seminar series on Economics, Networks, and Security is being held at the University of Cambridge during fall 2003. This website maintains abstracts of the speakers' presentations and research papers about their topics of discussion. Of the five seminars scheduled, papers for three have been posted online and the remaining two will likely be available in the near future. The first paper outlines the concept of trusted computing and discusses the implications for public policy. The second paper is based on economical aspects of intellectual property, but a less technical resource is also given and is titled Digital Goods in the New Economy. Lastly, the facets of e-commerce and its relation to security is the basis for the third paper. [CL

  12. British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS

    E-print Network

    Gill, Jeff

    British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS Additional services for British Journal of Political Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Gill British Journal of Political Science / Volume 43 / Issue 02 / April 2013, pp 425

  13. See things differently as the people behind museums and collections in Cambridge share their favourite objects,

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    , and they also had lots of bugs." MelanieWorgan, Learning Officer The Barbarini Faun -- Museum of Classical,CambridgeMuseumofTechnology "... one of the furnace doors is opened...releasing a burst of heat and light." John Connett, Steam

  14. See things differently as the people behind museums and collections in Cambridge share their favourite objects,

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    , and they also had lots of bugs." MelanieWorgan, Learning Officer The Barberini Faun -- Museum of Classical,CambridgeMuseumofTechnology "... one of the furnace doors is opened...releasing a burst of heat and light." John Connett, Steam

  15. Studying Psychology at Cambridge Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (C800 BA/PBS)

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    to Computer Science Modern Societies Social Anthropology Cognitive Neuroscience Psychology & Social Issues and Cognitive Psychology plus two optional papers. Experimental Psychology, a research project, plus oneStudying Psychology at Cambridge Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (C800 BA

  16. Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy, Issue 12

    E-print Network

    Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

    2015-05-08

    Harlan (left) presenting Chris Cowie with a clock Philosophy at Cambridge page 7 May 2015 Philosophical ethics often focuses on the negative, on ‘thou shalt not’. It focuses on issues like abortion, euthanasia, or killing in war, in an attempt...

  17. The study of the communication patterns of Boston-Cambridge regional biotech firms to universities

    E-print Network

    Hashmi, Nada

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes data from a study which focused on understanding the informal scientific communication network among Biotechnology firms in the Boston-Cambridge Biotech area. A previous study (Allen, et. al., 2009) ...

  18. A hotel economic feasibility study : Monsignor O'Brien Highway, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    E-print Network

    Rogers, Mark P. (Mark Paul)

    2007-01-01

    A hotel economic feasibility study was carried out for an assemblage of four (4) parcels located on Monsignor O'Brien Highway in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The primary objective of this economic feasibility study was to ...

  19. COSMO 20132-6 Sept 2013, Cambridge, UK Plenary Speakers CMS Collaboration

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    COSMO 20132-6 Sept 2013, Cambridge, UK Plenary Speakers CMS Collaboration Planck Collaboration Cli, J Ellis, K Enqvist, J Frieman, E Gates, R Gregory, F Halzen, S Hawking, M Hindmarsh, S Katsanevas, J

  20. COSMO 20132-6 Sept 2013, Cambridge, UK Plenary Speakers CMS Collaboration

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    COSMO 20132-6 Sept 2013, Cambridge, UK Plenary Speakers CMS Collaboration Planck Collaboration Cli Frieman, E Gates, R Gregory, F Halzen, S Hawking, M Hindmarsh, S Katsanevas, J Kim, L Knox, R Kolb, J

  1. The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE MapQuant: Open-source software for large-scale

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    involved the quantification of excised 2-D protein gel spots [1, 5], current methods employ chromatoRESEARCH ARTICLE MapQuant: Open-source software for large-scale protein quantification Kyriacos C and Genomics, Cambridge, MA, USA Whole-cell protein quantification using MS has proven to be a challenging task

  3. Phase diagram for Anderson disorder: Beyond single-parameter scaling Nigel Goldenfeld

    E-print Network

    Haydock, Roger

    Phase diagram for Anderson disorder: Beyond single-parameter scaling Nigel Goldenfeld Department, Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom Roger Haydock Department of Physics and Materials Science Institute, 1274 in a disordered potential is transformed analytically and exactly to a basis of random extended states leading

  4. Herring, S. C. (In press, 2008). Digital media. In P. Hogan (Ed.), The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the Language Sciences. Cambridge University Press.

    E-print Network

    Herring, Susan

    of several text-based applications: instant messaging, weblogs (blogs), and text messaging on mobile phones modality of language alongside speech and writing. Text-based CMC, by far the most common manifestation of the Language Sciences. Cambridge University Press. DIGITAL MEDIA Digital media are those media whose means

  5. How to market events to the general public in the Cambridge area The University produces a What's On highlight poster and e-bulletin for the general

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    , for example, Local Secrets, Visit Cambridge and Cambridge Online. It is a good idea to have an online presence use Facebook, Twitter etc. You can also request that the Communications team put a story about your

  6. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 18 Jun 2009 IP address: 132.239.1.231 J. Fluid Mech. (2009), vol. 626, pp. 307332. c 2009 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Krstic, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 18 Jun 2009 IP address: 132.239.1.231 J. Fluid Mech://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 18 Jun 2009 IP address: 132.239.1.231 308 J. Cochran and M. Krstic trajectory as it defines in the United Kingdom 307 Motion planning and trajectory tracking for three-dimensional Poiseuille flow JENNIE

  7. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 23 Feb 2012 IP address: 146.50.144.83 Math. Struct. in Comp. Science (2011), vol. 21, pp. 383416. c Cambridge University Press 2011

    E-print Network

    Venema, Yde

    2011-01-01

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 23 Feb 2012 IP address: 146.50.144.83 Math. Struct of Yde Venema was made possible by VICI grant 639.073.501 of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) #12;http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 23 Feb 2012 IP address: 146.50.144.83 M. B

  8. Parallel and Distributed Computing Systems (PDCS) 2007, Cambridge, MA21 Nov 2007 1 The Impact of Error in User-Provided

    E-print Network

    Jones, William Michael

    Parallel and Distributed Computing Systems (PDCS) 2007, Cambridge, MA21 Nov 2007 1 The Impact://www.parl.clemson.edu/beosim #12;Parallel and Distributed Computing Systems (PDCS) 2007, Cambridge, MA21 Nov 2007 2 Multi-site Co-allocation #12;Parallel and Distributed Computing Systems (PDCS) 2007, Cambridge, MA21 Nov 2007 3 Scheduling w

  9. Math. Struct. in Comp. Science (2007), vol. 17, pp. 819837. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S096012950700607X Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01

    and probabilistic event structures SAMY ABBES University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, William Gates BuildingMath. Struct. in Comp. Science (2007), vol. 17, pp. 819­837. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi, 15 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD U.K. Received 28 December 2004; revised 14 December 2006

  10. Date: 16/12/13 Review Date: 16/12/14 Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 16/12/13 Review Date: 16/12/14 Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 Control measures

  11. Date: 12/01/12 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 12/01/12 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM of Carcinogens etc) #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

  12. Date:09-01-2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date:09-01-2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 Are any

  13. Date: 20/02/2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 20/02/2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM, mouth #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

  14. Cambridge Primary Review Trust is a not-for-profit company incorporated at Companies House and supported by Pearson Company No 8322650 www.primaryreview.org.uk

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    13/01 CPRT Cambridge Primary Review Trust is a not-for-profit company incorporated at Companies schools. Cambridge Primary Review Trust (CPRT), a not-for-profit company, exists to build on the work Cambridge Primary Review Trust is a not-for-profit company incorporated at Companies House and supported

  15. "Cambridge-Allston Connection by Bike, Rail, Trolley or Cable Car" 10/30/2005 Oliver Knill

    E-print Network

    Knill, Oliver

    "Cambridge-Allston Connection by Bike, Rail, Trolley or Cable Car" 10/30/2005 Oliver Knill One the Cambridge and the Alston Harvard campus is insufficient. Connectivity by car or buses is no solution monorail train from the Science Center to Allston along JFK. 4) Create a cable car transportation between

  16. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Research Corporate Technology Group, Santa Clara, California. Ring Issue XII May 2006 William Gates Building Cambridge CB3 0FD Tel: +44 1223 763585 Email: jan.samols@cl.cam.ac.uk Website: http

  17. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Completing are the hazards and risks?): HCL and HNO3 are corrosive and toxic, can cause chemical burns to skins, eyes, mucous

  18. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Completing, corrosive, irritant, readily absorbed through skin Exposure Route i.e. skin, eyes #12;Chemical Hazard Risk

  19. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Completing Code of Practice on the Safe Use of Carcinogens etc) #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C

  20. Development and Current Status of the “Cambridge” Loudness Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness—the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids. PMID:25315375

  1. Cambridge Structural Database as a tool for studies of general structural features of organic molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, Lyudmila N.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    1999-01-01

    The review surveys and generalises data on the use of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for studying and revealing general structural features of organic molecular crystals. It is demonstrated that software and facilities of the CSD allow one to test the applicability of a number of known concepts of organic crystal chemistry (the principle of close packing, the frequency of occurrence of space groups, the preferred formation of centrosymmetrical molecular crystals, etc.) on the basis of abundant statistical data. Examples of the use of the Cambridge Structural Database in engineering of molecular crystals and in the systematic search for compounds with specified properties are given. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  2. University of Cambridge ... for women who expect to lead the way

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    . Clear information 2. Help to manage your own finances I `Managing your money' advice sessions I Access to online student budget tools/information 3. Funding opportunities for: I Financial difficulties - Access Cambridge are settled (with employment or further study) within 6 months Most graduates earn £20

  3. Programming the EDSAC: Early Programming Activity at the University of Cambridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Campbell-kelly

    1998-01-01

    The EDSAC computer was completed at Cambridge University, England, in May 1949. By early 1950, a programming system had been set up, and the EDSAC began to attract a number of regular users. The article describes the development of the programming system between the first operation of the machine in May 1949 and the end of that year. Subsequent programming

  4. Programming the EDSAC: Early Programming Activity at the University of Cambridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Campbell-Kelly

    1980-01-01

    The EDSAC computer was completed at Cambridge University, England, in May 1949. By early 1950 a programming system had been set up and the EDSAC began to attract a number of regular users. This article describes the development of the programming system between the first operation of the machine in May 1949 and the end of that year. Subsequent programming

  5. James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability—II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. FULLER

    1982-01-01

    Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extract reproduced in this paper consists of a draft of the first half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Historical notes are added on the development of stability theory before Maxwell's essay.

  6. James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: Extracts relating to control and stability, 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. Fuller

    1981-01-01

    Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extract reproduced in Part II consists of a draft of the first half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Historical notes are added on the development of stability theory before Maxwell's essay.

  7. James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability-I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. FULLER

    1982-01-01

    Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. Extracts are reproduced dealing with (i) a speed governor designed by Maxwell at the age of fifteen, and (ii) the stability of fluid motion (1855).

  8. James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge manuscripts: extracts relating to control and stability—III

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. FULLER

    1983-01-01

    Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extracts reproduced in Part III consist mainly of a draft of the second half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the motion of Saturn's rings. Here Maxwell investigates the stability of a fluid ring rotating round a centre

  9. Kirsh to appear in Cognitive Life of Things, Cambridge Press Explaining Artifact Evolution

    E-print Network

    Kirsh, David

    how artifacts preserve and bias cognition across generations ­ those aspects of practiceKirsh to appear in Cognitive Life of Things, Cambridge Press 1 Explaining Artifact Evolution David Kirsh Dept of Cognitive Science, UCSD kirsh@ucsd.edu Introduction: Interpreting an Artifact's Cognitive

  10. SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA

    E-print Network

    Strickland, Stevie

    SILK { a playful blend of Scheme and Java Kenneth R. Anderson, BBN Technologies, Cambridge, MA) interpreter in Java [after [6] p. 176]. Abstract SILK (Scheme in about 50 K) is a compact Scheme imple- mented Scheme in Java, but its access to Java was awkward. The current version has altered SILK's syntax

  11. www.cambridge.org/us/american-history American Labor and Economic

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    www.cambridge.org/us/american-history American Labor and Economic Citizenship New Capitalism from as a time when Herbert Hoover and his allies worked to significantly reform economic policy. In Ameri- can Labor and Economic Citizenship, Mark Hendrickson both augments and amends this view by studying

  12. Multiple Directorships in Cambridge Hi-tech Cluster Implications for policy and research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shailendra Vyakarnam

    This paper explores the significance of individuals and their particular assets of experience and networks, as the key influence to the growth process of the high technology cluster in Cambridge. There is substantial evidence that serial entrepreneurs may develop a high level of social capital and play an important role in shaping the formation of clusters in which they operate.

  13. Provisional Approaches to Goals for School Mathematics; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-6. In view of the experiences of other curriculum groups and of the general discussions since 1963, the present report initiates the next step in evolving the "Goals".…

  14. British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/JPS Additional services for British Journal of Political Science: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial and FLORENCE HAEGEL British Journal of Political Science / Volume 37 / Issue 01 / January 2007, pp 1 - 22 DOI

  15. Position: Senior Postdoctoral Associate Position Location: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

    E-print Network

    Barton, Paul I.

    of Technology, Cambridge, MA Project title: Isolation of Human Monoclonal Antibodies for HIV Protection to isolate natural human monoclonal antibodies with broad and potent HIV neutralizing activity and develop are to 1) isolate broadly neutralizing antibodies from plasma cells from a large group of patients

  16. SU Detection for RT03f at Cambridge University Marcus Tomalin, Sue Tranter, Phil Woodland

    E-print Network

    Hain, Thomas

    FILE TEST DATA DECODER PFM ALIGNMENT AND WORD SEQUENCE STT Figure 1: SU­Detection System Cambridge: backchannel SU boundary . SU N: no SU boundary Steps in the PFM construction process: . Convert training data University The Prosodic Feature Model Training Data Num PFM Vecs Num Tree Nodes LDC train­simple­pilot 27

  17. SU Detection for RT-03f at Cambridge University Marcus Tomalin, Sue Tranter, Phil Woodland

    E-print Network

    Hain, Thomas

    FILE TEST DATA DECODER PFM ALIGNMENT AND WORD SEQUENCE STT Figure 1: SU-Detection System Cambridge boundary · SU N: no SU boundary Steps in the PFM construction process: · Convert training data into word The Prosodic Feature Model Training Data Num PFM Vecs Num Tree Nodes LDC train-simple-pilot 27,825 N/A LDC

  18. Ian Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, xvii + 302 pp.

    E-print Network

    Fitelson, Branden

    probability ideas." Hacking also asserts (14) that prob- ability is a "fundamental tool for inductive logicIan Hacking. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic. Cambridge University Press 2000, and as an introduction to statistical inference and decision theory, it is even better. Hacking writes very clearly

  19. 19 September 2005 Page 1 of 3 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    DIPLOMA in the CONSERVATION OF EASEL PAINTINGS 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching. Programme Title Conservation of Easel Paintings 6. UCAS Code n/a 7. Benchmark Statement(s) History of Art, Architecture and Design 8. Qualifications Framework Level H 9a. Date of Revision 19 September 2005 9b. Last

  20. Further Particulars: Programme and Visitor Secretary (Reception) The University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    , faculties, schools and other institutions plus a central administration. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national and international for various committees. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge

  1. Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    PA Engineers from Cambridge University built a replica of a German dam the RAF bombed in 1943 the Möhne and Edersee dams in May 1943. The feat is the culmination of a two-year attempt by engineers of using bouncing bombs to jump over the heavy torpedo nets protecting Nazi Germany's dams. But his notes

  2. At the origin of the industrial district: Alfred Marshall and the Cambridge school

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiorenza Belussi; Katia Caldari

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the origin and evolution of the concept of the industrial district. The idea of industrial district is quite widespread in modern industrial economics and in business studies, with a variety of meanings and typologies. Indeed the real original conceptualisation dates back to Alfred Marshall and the economists of the so-called Cambridge school. Quite often the concept of

  3. Edward Noble Kramer was born April 17, 1908 in Cambridge, Wisconsin

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Edward Noble Kramer was born April 17, 1908 in Cambridge, Wisconsin but grew up in the small town of Oregon, Wisconsin, just south of Madison where his parents ran a printing business and published of Wisconsin, Madison, and after one year as instructor in Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin

  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Facilities 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, Massachusetts

    E-print Network

    Leiserson, Charles E.

    cooling mode of operation. The new equipment has now been in place for a complete winter and worked veryMassachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Facilities 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge chilled water at 42o f utilizing mechanical cooling. The following wet bulb conditions are the control

  5. University of Cambridge, Materials Science & Metallurgy H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Other Techniques

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    University of Cambridge, Materials Science & Metallurgy H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Other Techniques in a variety of imposed environments to yield information on the reduction of metal ores. In organic chemistry the technique has been widely used to study the degradation of polymers and to investigate the pyrolysis

  6. HARVARD-YENCHING 2 Divinity Avenue | Cambridge, MA 02138 | U.S.A.

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yih-Min

    HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE 2 Divinity Avenue | Cambridge, MA 02138 | U.S.A. Tel: 617.495.3369 | Fax: 617.495.7798 Email: programs@harvard-yenching.org Visiting Fellows Program 2011-2012 Application Form-2 Faculty member(s) at Harvard University and/or any other major university in the United States with whom

  7. HARVARD-YENCHING 2 Divinity Avenue | Cambridge, MA 02138 | U.S.A.

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yih-Min

    HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE 2 Divinity Avenue | Cambridge, MA 02138 | U.S.A. Tel: 617.495.3369 | Fax: 617.495.7798 Email: programs@harvard-yenching.org Visiting Scholars Program 2011-2012 Application Form-2 Faculty member(s) at Harvard University and/or any other major university in the United States with whom

  8. Name Title Affiliations H K D H Bhadeshia Professor The University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Institute for Materials Science 8Toshihiro TSUCHIYAMA Professor Kyushu University 9 Shinichi TERASHIMA DrName Title Affiliations H K D H Bhadeshia Professor The University of Cambridge 1 Kazutoshi ICHIKAWA Dr NIPPON STEEL CORPORATION 2 Osamu UMEZAWA Professor Yokohama National University 3 Toshihiko

  9. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PNS

    E-print Network

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    Proceedings of the Nutrition Society http://journals.cambridge.org/PNS Additional services for Proceedings of the Nutrition Society: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints and the control of appetite Edmund T. Rolls Proceedings of the Nutrition Society / Volume 71 / Issue 04 / November

  10. Genetic Influences on Cognitive Function Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Jamie J.; MacGregor, Alex J.; Cherkas, Lynn F.; Spector, Tim D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic relationship between intelligence and components of cognition remains controversial. Conflicting results may be a function of the limited number of methods used in experimental evaluation. The current study is the first to use CANTAB (The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). This is a battery of validated computerised…

  11. Press release: 5 November 2014 Curating Cambridge: our city, our stories, our stuff

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    . Go on a journey of discovery with the people behind the Cambridge Sculpture Trail app and find and the Museum of Zoology ­ bring you a night of entertainment with their very own game shows, Just a Minnow and Q-Ice at The Big Game Night on 21 November. Watch as contestants battle it out for museum domination

  12. Callisto: Co-Scheduling Parallel Runtime Systems Oracle Labs, Cambridge, UK

    E-print Network

    Harris, Timothy

    Callisto: Co-Scheduling Parallel Runtime Systems Tim Harris Oracle Labs, Cambridge, UK timothy. This paper introduces Callisto, a resource management layer for parallel runtime systems. We describe Callisto and the implementation of two Callisto-enabled runtime systems--one for OpenMP, and another

  13. Book Review A. Darwiche, Modeling and Reasoning with Bayesian Networks, Cambridge, 2009

    E-print Network

    Xiang, Yang

    Book Review A. Darwiche, Modeling and Reasoning with Bayesian Networks, Cambridge, 2009 Yang Xiang and Reasoning with Bayesian Networks by Adnan Darwiche is an excellent example of this trend. The book provides The field of probabilistic reasoning with Bayesian networks has experienced fruitful advancement in the last

  14. J. Child Lang. 25 (1998), 443484. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    1998-01-01

    , 1997), implying that a consensus has been reached within linguistic theory. For child languageJ. Child Lang. 25 (1998), 443­484. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press a l 443 #12;Construction grammar and its implications for child language research ELIZABETH BATES

  15. Cambridge Safari How many animals can you find lurking in the buildings of

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    the map inside to guide you to zoology in the architecture, and send us pictures of the animals that you pictures of animals in the buildings of Cambridge through Facebook and Twitter, #cambridgesafari www.facebook.com/Zoology of Zoology The Museum of Zoology is currently closed for major refurbishment supported by the Heritage

  16. A Comparison of the Abilities Measured by the Cambridge and Educational Testing Service EFL Test Batteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Lyle F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The abilities measured by the First Certificate of English (FCE) administered by the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate are compared with the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) administered by the Educational Testing Service. The analyses suggest that the FCE and TOEFL appear to measure the same common aspect of language…

  17. University of Cambridge, 3D Ultrasound Research Sequential 3D Diagnostic Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    University of Cambridge, 3D Ultrasound Research Sequential 3D Diagnostic Ultrasound using the Stradx System Andrew Gee, Richard Prager & Graham Treece June 2001 Sequential 3D Diagnostic Ultrasound using the Stradx System 1 Sequential freehand 3D ultrasound Sequential Conventional Conventional

  18. Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 University of Cambridge Department Green, Malcolm Longair, Julia Riley, Martin Krause #12;Paul Alexander Third Cavendish-KAIST Symposium Cavendish-KAIST Symposium September 2006 Feedback and Triggering in Galaxy Evolution · We currently have

  19. DARWIN COLLEGE SOCIETY DARWIN COLLEGE SILVER STREET CAMBRIDGE CB3 9EU

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    DARWIN COLLEGE SOCIETY DARWIN COLLEGE · SILVER STREET · CAMBRIDGE · CB3 9EU Porters' Lodge (01223 3)35660 Darwin College Career Network Life Sciences event, 11th June 2010 Biographies of participating Alumni The Darwin College Society has started an exciting new initiative designed to enable our current students

  20. A symmetry-extended mobility rule Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Guest, Simon

    A symmetry-extended mobility rule S.D. Guest Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK June 9, 2003 Abstract A symmetry-extended mobility rule for mechanical and strengthened by an equation that predicts symmetries, as well as numbers, of mobilities and states of self

  1. BOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    systems for use on planet Earth are then covered. Chapter 18 concerns lightning protection techniquesBOOK REVIEW V.A.Rakov and M.A.Uman, Lightning: Physics and Effects, Cambridge University Press, incredibly useful ­ schol- arly compendium of all that is known about lightning, its causes, and the many

  2. For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI

    E-print Network

    Memphis, University of

    For The Cambridge Handbook to Artificial Intelligence History, motivations and core themes of AI intelligence (AI) in the context of its history and core themes. After a concise preamble introducing by a succinct introduction to the major research areas within AI. The chapter will continue with a description

  3. Proceedings of the 13th Workshop on Dynamical Phenomena at Surfaces (Cambridge, UK, July 2008)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Allison; G Alexandrowicz; J Ellis; H Hedgeland; A P Jardine

    2009-01-01

    The papers collected here arise from the Workshop on Dynamical Phenomena at Surfaces, held in Cambridge, UK, in July 2008. The meeting has grown from the, SURPHON workshops [1], which traditionally had an emphasis on surface lattice dynamics. Over time the range of scientific interest has broadened and the recent meeting covered a wide range of topics including diffusion of

  4. University of Cambridge The Government White Paper: Students at the Heart of the System

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    1 University of Cambridge The Government White Paper: Students at the Heart of the System Response's governing body, the Regent House. The Council has also encouraged individual members of the University in Discussion about the Government's recent policies for Higher Education can be read at: http

  5. Athena SWAN Bronze department award application Name of university: University Of Cambridge

    E-print Network

    Mottram, Nigel

    , sizes and compositions. The definition of a `department' for SWAN purposes can be found on the Athena At the end of each section state the number of words used. Click here for additional guidance on completing for Analysis CCBI Cambridge Computational Biology Institute DAMTP Department of Applied Mathematics

  6. J. Child Psychol. Psychiat. Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 411425. 1998 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Logan, Gordon D.

    J. Child Psychol. Psychiat. Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 411­425. 1998 Cambridge University Press ' 1998 Association for Child Psychology and Psychiatry Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved 0021-9630\\98 $15, the suggestion was examined that anxiety disorders are associated with abnormally high levels of response

  7. Adaptation of the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) into French-Canadian and English-Canadian

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, Donna; Duval, Karine; Martel, Simon; Granton, John; Lefebvre, Marie-Claude; Meads, David M; Twiss, James; McKenna, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) is the first disease-specific instrument for assessing patient-reported symptoms, functioning and quality of life (QoL) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). OBJECTIVES: To create and validate French-Canadian (FC) and English-Canadian (EC) language versions of the CAMPHOR. METHODS: A translation panel (for the FC version) and lay panels (for both versions) were convened to adapt the questionnaires (dual-panel methodology). Subsequently, these new questionnaires were field-tested in 15 FC PAH and 15 EC PAH patients. Finally, in a postal validation study, the new language versions of the CAMPHOR underwent psychometric evaluation in 41 FC and 52 EC PAH patients to test for reliability and validity. RESULTS: The FC and EC field-test interview participants found the questionnaires relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete. Psychometric analyses showed that the FC and EC adaptations were successful. High test-retest coefficients for the scales after controlling for change in respondent’s QoL (FC: 0.92 to 0.96; EC: 0.85 to 0.99) indicated a high degree of reliability. The FC and EC CAMPHOR scales had good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficients 0.90 to 0.92 and 0.88 to 0.92, respectively). Predicted correlations with the Nottingham Health Profile provided evidence of the construct validity of the FC and EC scales. The FC and EC adaptations also showed known groups validity. CONCLUSIONS: The FC and EC adaptations of the CAMPHOR have been shown to be reliable and valid for measures of health-related QoL and QoL in PAH, and thus can be recommended for use in clinical studies and routine practice in PAH. PMID:18354747

  8. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jun 2009 IP address: 130.89.86.81 J. Fluid Mech. (2009), vol. 630, pp. 179189. c 2009 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2009-01-01

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jun 2009 IP address: 130.89.86.81 J. Fluid Mech. (2009.calzavarini@ens-lyon.fr #12;http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 24 Jun 2009 IP address: 130.89.86.81 180 E. Calzavarini tracks in turbulent flows (La Porta et al. 2001; Mordant et al. 2001; Berg 2006; Xu et al. 2006; Volk et

  9. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 30 Aug 2012 IP address: 134.219.64.158 Modern Asian Studies 45, 1 (2011) pp. 131157. C Cambridge University Press 2010

    E-print Network

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 30 Aug 2012 IP address: 134.219.64.158 Modern Asian://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 30 Aug 2012 IP address: 134.219.64.158 132 M A R K U S D A E C H S E L affected the `everyday for what a military regime could do in a country with a dismal track record of state efficiency.1

  10. TRINITY HALL TRINITY LANE CAMBRIDGE CB2 1TJ conference@trinhall.cam.ac.uk 01223 764444

    E-print Network

    Lasenby, Joan

    Shallots and Sauce Vierge VEGETARIAN Spinach & Butternut Squash Risotto with Rocket and Root Vegetable & Caramelized Shallot Wellington, Basil Dressing #12;TRINITY HALL TRINITY LANE CAMBRIDGE CB2 1TJ conference

  11. Impact of communications between firms on innovation and new product development : the case of the Cambridge/Boston biotech cluster

    E-print Network

    Kolosov, Dmitry, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a study of innovations and new product development in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Boston/Cambridge cluster. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that more ...

  12. J. Fluid Mech. (1999), vol. 398, pp. 271297. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Dintrans, Boris

    1999-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (1999), vol. 398, pp. 271­297. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge University Press 271 Gravito-inertial waves in a rotating stratified sphere or spherical shell By B. DINTRANS

  13. J. Fluid Mech. (1999), vol. 390, pp. 271295. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Dauxois, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (1999), vol. 390, pp. 271­295. Printed in the United Kingdom c 1999 Cambridge University Press 271 Near-critical reflection of internal waves By THIE R R Y DAUXOIS AND W. R. YOUNG Scripps

  14. Whose parking space is it? : managing residential parking in the context of urban growth : case study of Cambridge, MA

    E-print Network

    Chang, Winnie C

    2014-01-01

    In the context of urban growth, how can a city approach residential parking issues? Cambridge, MA is experiencing rapid growth in real estate development and investment, shifts in demographics and travel behavior. How do ...

  15. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Galactic Halo: An enormous halo of hot gas (in blue) around

  16. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Sagittarius A*: The Milky Way's supermassive black hole, about

  17. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu NGC 6240: A pair of colliding spiral galaxies about 330 million

  18. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu NGC 1232: A collision between galaxies about 60 million light

  19. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The remains of a stellar explosion

  20. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Perseus Cluster and Virgo Cluster: Two galaxy clusters about 250

  1. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu M101: Four images of galaxies that have been made using data

  2. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The debris from a supernova observed

  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu SN 1006: A supernova remnant whose progenitor explosion was seen

  4. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Sagittarius A*: The supermassive black hole about 26,000 light

  5. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu W49B: A supernova remnant that is located about 26,000 light

  6. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Puppis A: A supernova remnant located about 7,000 light years

  7. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

    E-print Network

    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Chandra X-ray 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Observatory Center http://chandra.harvard.edu Centaurus A: An active galaxy about 12 million light years from

  8. "Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    "Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M" and "atmospherics". ­p. 494, right column, 3rd paragraph, 3rd line from top: replace "Aircraft" with "Airborne". ­p

  9. LOW-RANK VARIANCE ESTIMATION IN LARGE-SCALE GMRF MODELS Dmitry M. Malioutov, Jason K. Johnson, and Alan S. Willsky

    E-print Network

    Willsky, Alan S.

    LOW-RANK VARIANCE ESTIMATION IN LARGE-SCALE GMRF MODELS Dmitry M. Malioutov, Jason K. Johnson 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT We consider the problem of variance be obtained efficiently for sparse GMRFs of very large size, computing the variances is a chal- lenging

  10. Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Zoback, Mark D.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its enormous cost, large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing CO2 emissions associated with coal-based electrical power generation and other industrial sources of CO2 [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2005) IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Prepared by Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eds Metz B, et al. (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge, UK); Szulczewski ML, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:5185–5189]. We argue here that there is a high probability that earthquakes will be triggered by injection of large volumes of CO2 into the brittle rocks commonly found in continental interiors. Because even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes threaten the seal integrity of CO2 repositories, in this context, large-scale CCS is a risky, and likely unsuccessful, strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:22711814

  11. Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zoback, Mark D; Gorelick, Steven M

    2012-06-26

    Despite its enormous cost, large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing CO(2) emissions associated with coal-based electrical power generation and other industrial sources of CO(2) [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2005) IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Prepared by Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eds Metz B, et al. (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge, UK); Szulczewski ML, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:5185-5189]. We argue here that there is a high probability that earthquakes will be triggered by injection of large volumes of CO(2) into the brittle rocks commonly found in continental interiors. Because even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes threaten the seal integrity of CO(2) repositories, in this context, large-scale CCS is a risky, and likely unsuccessful, strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:22711814

  12. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye

    1993-10-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation range is found to be dominated by relatively nonlocal interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg [Z. Phys. 124, 628 (1948)], Obukhov [Isv. Geogr. Geophys. Ser. 13, 58 (1949)] and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley [The First Course of Turbulence (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1972)]. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an ``ideal'' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments [A. S. Monin and A. M. Yaglom, Statistical Fluid Mechanics (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1975), Vol. 2].

  13. 18. Van der Voo, R. Paleomagnetism of the Atlantic, Tethys and Iapetus Oceans (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993).

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , 315­379 (1994). 20. Baumgartner, P. O. Age and genesis of Tethyan Jurassic Radiolarites. Eclog. Geol. Helv. 80, 831­879 (1987). 21. Bartolini, A., Baumgartner, P. O. & Guex, J. Middle and Late Jurassic ............................................................................................................................................................................. During the last glacial period, large millennial-scale temperature oscillations--the `Dansgaard

  14. Change in cardio-protective medication and health related quality of life after diagnosis of screen-detected diabetes: results from the ADDITION-Cambridge cohort

    E-print Network

    Black, J. A.; Long, G. H.; Sharp, S. J.; Kuznetsov, L.; Boothby, C. E.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    2015-04-23

    of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, United Kingdom Word count: 3643/5000 Address for correspondence: Dr Rebecca Simmons, MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Box 285, Cambridge Biomedical Campus... associated with glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis of the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort. Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract. (2014). 104, 281–7 10. Echouffo-Tcheugui, J. B., Simmons, R. K., Williams, K. M., et al...

  15. The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative Model of Clinical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Ogur; David Hirsh; Edward Krupat; David Bor

    2007-01-01

    The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (HMS-CIC) is a redesign of the principal clinical year to foster students' learning from close and continuous contact with cohorts of patients in the disciplines of internal medicine, neurology, obstetrics- gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. With year-long mentoring, students follow their patients through major venues of care. Surgery and radiology also are taught longitudinally, grounded

  16. Heidegger's Crisis: Philosophy and Politics in Nazi Germany (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1993) by Hans Sluga.

    E-print Network

    Kerckhove, Lee

    Heidegger's Crisis: Philosophy and Politics in Nazi Germany (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1993) by Hans Sluga. Reviewed by Lee Kerckhove Loyola University Chicago The current debate over Heidegger's Nazism began with the appearance... the rectorship, Heidegger continued his collaboration with the regime by secretly denouncing colleagues and students. 3 He remained a dues paying member of the Nazi party until the end of the war and in 1953 published a modified version of a lecture...

  17. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

  18. A spiritual leader? Cambridge zoology, mountaineering and the death of F.M. Balfour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Blackman

    2004-01-01

    Frank Balfour was regarded by his colleagues as one of the greatest biologists of his day and Charles Darwin’s successor, yet the young aristocrat died in a climbing accident before his thirty-first birthday. Reactions to his death reveal much about the image of science and scientists in late-Victorian Britain. In this paper I examine the development of the Cambridge school

  19. Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    1998-01-01

    This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

  20. If you have any questions, please contact Cambridge in America at (212) 984-0960, e-mail mail@cantab.org, or visit the website www.cantab.org, where you can make your gift online.

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    If you have any questions, please contact Cambridge in America at (212) 984-0960, e-mail mail__________________________________________ Matric Year __________________ Address__________________________________________ Date__________________ My employer will match my gift ­ I will send the forms to Cambridge in America

  1. Hopkins, C. D. (1999). Signal evolution in electric communication. In The Design of Animal Communication, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press.

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, Carl D.

    1999-01-01

    Communication, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12, eds. M. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12;Hopkins, C. D. Hauser and M. Konishi), pp. 461-491. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press. #12;Hopkins, C. D

  2. CTSRDDr Peter G. Neumann (SRI) and Dr Robert N. M. Watson (Cambridge) Jonathan Anderson, Ross Anderson, David Chisnall, Nirav Dave, Brooks Davis, Rance DeLong, Khilan Gudka, Steven Hand, Asif Khan, Myron King, Ben Laurie,

    E-print Network

    Neumann, Peter G.

    . Moore, Alan Mujumdar, Steven J. Murdoch, Robert Norton, Philip Paeps, Michael Roe, John Rushby, Hassen N. M. Watson Dr Michael Roe Dr Hassen Saidi Mr Rance DeLong Mr Jonathan Woodruff Mr Stacey Son, Michael Roe (Cambridge), Robert Watson (Cambridge), Howie Shrobe (DARPA), Steven Murdoch (Cambridge), Sam

  3. F:\\EVENTS\\Open Days\\Talks & Workshops\\CAMBRIDGE INTERVIEWS.doc rev 26.6.13 NEWNHAM COLLEGE OPEN DAY

    E-print Network

    Lasenby, Joan

    DAY CAMBRIDGE INTERVIEWS Interviews are an important part of the Cambridge application procedure; 85 and other people who have influenced you, books you have read, places you have visited, television university, but DO tell us what makes the course particularly suitable for you. DO NOT simply list your

  4. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 11 Sep 2012 IP address: 129.2.19.102 Legal Theory, 17 (2011), 133.

    E-print Network

    Horty, John F.

    2011-01-01

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 11 Sep 2012 IP address: 129.2.19.102 Legal Theory, 17 into the text. 1 #12;http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 11 Sep 2012 IP address: 129.2.19.102 2 JOHN F in this paper is to describe a new framework within which we can begin to address this problem. I concentrate

  5. Proceedings of 1998 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, pages 294-294, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 16-21, 1998.

    E-print Network

    , Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 16-21, 1998. ISIT 1998, Cambridge, MA, USA, August 16 August 21 Low- ated by an all-one-polynomial. The proposed canon- ical basis multiplier requires m2 , 1 XOR gates and m2 AND gates. We also extend this canonical basis multiplier to obtain a new bit-parallel normal

  6. Date: 25 Mar 2014 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 25 Mar 2014 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM of solution will be prepared. Risks associated with the procedure (What are the hazards and risks?): Sodium

  7. Date: 21 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 21 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM in distilled water 100 ml Liquid Corrosive, irritant Skin, eyes, ingestion, inhalation #12;Chemical Hazard Risk

  8. Date: 25 Mar 2014 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 25 Mar 2014 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Lab coat Yes Glove box / isolator No Chemical apron No #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD

  9. Date: 20/02/2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Date: 20/02/2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C © University of Cambridge Revised July 2004 UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE CHEMICAL HAZARD RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Code of Practice on the Safe Use of Carcinogens etc) #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C

  10. A biological survey of a Cambridge suburb: assortative marriage for IQ and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Mascie-Taylor, C G; Gibson, J B

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of a study, carried out in a Cambridge suburb, which measured the similarity in IQ and some personality traits between spouses. In both sexes mean IQ scores tended to diminish from social class I to V. Lower IQ scores were associated with higher levels of extraversion, neuroticism and inconsistency. Assortative marriage was found for IQ components, Total IQ, extraversion-introversion and inconsistency scores. Both geographical and social stratification were shown to affect the degree of assortative marriage. PMID:434762

  11. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  12. Scaling Cubes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-23

    In this activity, learners explore scale by using building cubes to see how changing the length, width, and height of a three-dimensional object affects its surface area and its volume. Learners build bigger and bigger cubes to understand these scaling relationships.

  13. Scale Models

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, covers the general concept of scale by demonstrating factors of ten. The activity "facilitates the introduction and reinforcement of the metric scale and paves the way to the discussion of lengths that are smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye." The lesson also introduces the idea of using different tools to address different length scales which is fundamental to learning about nanotechnology. Future activities could introduce atoms and cell structure as well as recent advancements in technology. A Teacher Preparation Guide is included.

  14. Characterization of the genus Hernandarioides F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 (Opiliones, Gonyleptidae, Ampycinae).

    PubMed

    Kury, Adriano B; Quintero, Diomedes A

    2014-01-01

    Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge (1905) described the monotypic genus Hernandarioides based on the species Hernandarioides plana F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1905, from Bugaba, Panama. The etymology of the generic name was inspired by the pre-existing Hernandaria Sørensen, 1884, because of the obliteration of the scutal grooves (which in this case is a convergence between the two unrelated groups Ampycinae and Hernandariinae). The species description was based only on the female holotype. Modern taxonomic descriptions of laniatorean harvestmen are most commonly based upon male holotypes because females lack many diagnostic characters. The holotype, deposited in the Natural History Museum, London, is brittle and does not bring much meaningful information about the species. Hernandarioides was not originally included in any subfamily of Gonyleptidae, and was included by Roewer (1913: 464) in the Hernandariinae. Goodnight & Goodnight (1942: 18) described in Prostygninae the monotypic genus Kaluga along with the species Kaluga elongata Goodnight & Goodnight, 1942, from Casita Alta, a locality very close to Bugaba, providing uninformative illustrative material. A little later, Goodnight & Goodnight (1947: 15) synonymized Kaluga with Hernandarioides and Kaluga elongata with Hernandarioides plana. Kury (2003: 105) proposed the unjustified emendation Hernandarioides planus. Finally Kury & Alonso-Zarazaga (2011: 53) transferred the genus to the Ampycinae and explained that the grammatical gender of Hernandarioides is feminine, reestablishing the original inflection Hernandarioides plana.  PMID:25081774

  15. Building America Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency. Efficient operation of the heating system faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68 degrees F) than day (73 degrees F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  16. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L.; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-01-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances. PMID:24954981

  17. Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. Onscreen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.

    E-print Network

    MacKay, David J.C.

    . http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam distributions are a lot like Gaussian distributions, except that whereas the Gaussian goes from -# to #, gamma for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links. 320 24 --- Exact

  18. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Peter

    This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

  19. Scales Reader

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This interactive Flash applet, suitable for whiteboard display, challenges learners to read metric weighing scales in four different ranges. The scales read 0-5 kilograms in wholes or halves, 0-500 grams, 0-1000 g, and 0-5 kg in decimal tenths. The student requests a weight, places a cursor, enters a reading, and checks the answer to receive a score.

  20. Multidimensional Scaling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Drennan

    \\u000a Multidimensional scaling is perhaps in concept the simplest and most intuitive of the various approaches to multivariate analysis,\\u000a and this can rightly be regarded as a major advantage. It is difficult to misunderstand the principles upon which it is based.\\u000a A multidimensional scaling takes as its starting point a matrix of similarity (or dissimilarity) scores between cases like\\u000a the one

  1. A Journal of Opinion and Research 79 JOHN F. KENNEDY STREET CAMBRIDGE, MA 02138 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    E-print Network

    they leaned toward the Republican Party, with the rest saying they did not lean in either direction. But 56 reported CAMBRIDGE, MA ­ Both Republicans and Democrats can take comfort in the latest findings about Democratic than lean Republican, but the views of independents on educational issues appear closer to those

  2. 350 PIERS Proceedings, Cambridge, USA, July 58, 2010 Optimizing Windows Security Features to Block Malware and Hack

    E-print Network

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    350 PIERS Proceedings, Cambridge, USA, July 5­8, 2010 Optimizing Windows Security Features to Block, iPods, and USB phones. Malware that exploits Windows Autoplay features to replicate via USB drives package in form of ready-to-deploy scripts which helps optimize Windows security feature

  3. J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 644, pp. 533. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112009992205

    E-print Network

    Bush, John W.M.

    2010-01-01

    of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA (Received 24 May 2008; revised 9 Engineering and Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30318, USA Email address stroke (Bush & Hu 2006). The form and function of the surface layer (or `integument') of water

  4. Towards the 1980s: Papers Presented at the BACIE Annual Conference at Trinity College, Cambridge, September 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Association for Commercial and Industrial Education, London (England).

    The annual conference of the British Association for Commercial and Industrial Education (BACIE), held at Trinity College, Cambridge, England, in September 1968, was devoted to educational objectives for England for the 1980's. The three speeches presented were, "The Objectives of Society" (Sir Herbert Butterfield), "Industry in the 1980's (G.A.H.…

  5. University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    of Easel Paintings 1) Awarding Institution: The University of Cambridge 2) Teaching Institutions: The Hamilton Kerr Institute. 3) Final Award: Diploma 4) Subject: Conservation of Easel Paintings 5) UCAS Code Benchmarking Group: History of Art, Architecture and Design 12) Date of production: 19 September 2005 13

  6. THE JOURNAL OF THE CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LAB RING Issue XVI --September 2007 --20 www.camring.ucam.org

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    to emanate from the bar, alarms were ringing and the fire brigade was called.The London Ringlet Bar carriedRingThe THE JOURNAL OF THE CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LAB RING Issue XVI -- September 2007 -- £20 www.camring.ucam.org Richard Muirhead 5 Founder ofTideway Systems Igor Drokov 7 Founder of Cronto Ring news 2 Ring events

  7. Journal of Tropical Ecology (2011) 27:8391. Copyright Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0266467410000623

    E-print Network

    2011-01-01

    assemblages in two common tree species in primary lowland forest of New Guinea were explored using direct of ant assemblages living in the canopy of two locally widespread tree species in lowland rain forestJournal of Tropical Ecology (2011) 27:83­91. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10

  8. Teaching Economics at Cambridge at the Turn of the Century: Alfred Marshall as Lecturer in Political Economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Groenewegen

    1990-01-01

    An examination of several aspects of Alfred Marshall's economics teaching at Cambridge is the subject matter of this paper, with special reference to assessing the impact on his teaching style of the publication of his Principles in 1890. Lecture style and content are examined first, drawing heavily on reminiscences from former students Benians, Chapman, Fay, Layton, Keynes, Marshall, McGregor, and

  9. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, vol. 17 (2007) pp. 81107 doi:10.1017/S0957423907000379 2007 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01

    Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, vol. 17 (2007) pp. 81­107 doi:10.1017/S0957423907000379 2007 Cambridge University Press L'ALGEvBRE ARABE DANS LES TEXTES HEuBRAI}QUES (II). DANS L'ITALIE DES XVe ET XVIe SIEvCLES, SOURCES ARABES ET SOURCES VERNACULAIRES1 TONY LEu VY Nous savons encore assez mal ce que les

  10. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2011), 17, 654662. Copyright E INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2011.

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    in women than in men. (JINS, 2011, 17, 654­662) Keywords: Gender differences, Alzheimer's disease (AD., 1984). Some evidence suggests that men and women may be affected differently by AD (Azad, Al Bugami. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2011. doi:10.1017/S1355617711000452 Women have Farther to Fall

  11. The Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): A new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood

    E-print Network

    Duchaine, Bradley C.

    )). Yet many of the existing standardized face recognition tests for adults (e.g. the Benton FacialThe Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): A new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood Abigail Croydon a , Hannah Pimperton b , Louise Ewing c,d , Brad C. Duchaine e

  12. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2010), 16, 15. Copyright INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2010.

    E-print Network

    Smith, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    , University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada 4School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UnitedJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2010), 16, 1­5. Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2010. doi:10.1017/S1355617709991172 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

  13. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 RECENT APPLICATIONS OF PLASTICITY THEORY TO CONCRETE

    E-print Network

    Burgoyne, Chris

    concrete structures · Shear assessment of bridge decks containing inadequately-anchored reinforcementMorley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 127 RECENT APPLICATIONS OF PLASTICITY THEORY TO CONCRETE SHEAR PROBLEMS Tim IBELL 1 Steve DENTON 2

  14. Directions to Jefferson Physical Laboratory From I-90 (Massachusetts Turnpike): Get off at Cambridge (exit 18). Turn left immediately

    E-print Network

    Directions to Jefferson Physical Laboratory By car From I-90 (Massachusetts Turnpike): Get off at Cambridge (exit 18). Turn left immediately onto Soldiers Field Road (west). Take Harvard Square exit, bear right across Anderson Bridge, and drive straight into Harvard Square. You'll pass Out of Town News

  15. The Knowledge Engineering Review, Vol. 28:3, 249271. & Cambridge University Press, 2013 doi:10.1017/S0269888913000234

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    @lirmm.fr Abstract This paper presents a graph-based knowledge representation and reasoning language. This language knowledge constructs of this language, elementary graph-based reasoning mechanisms, as well as the graphThe Knowledge Engineering Review, Vol. 28:3, 249­271. & Cambridge University Press, 2013 doi:10

  16. Rowland Institute at Harvard, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

    E-print Network

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA A morphometrics-based phylogeny of the temperate ­ morphometrics ­ character independence ­ Cyphophthalmi ­ Pettalidae ­ character coding ­ homology analysis and, in some cases, return to morphometrics. For example, Pelser et al.Õs (2004) first combined

  17. J. Plasma Physics (2009), vol. 75, part 5, pp. 709711. c 2009 Cambridge University Press Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    J. Plasma Physics (2009), vol. 75, part 5, pp. 709­711. c 2009 Cambridge University Press Printed in the United Kingdom 709 B O O K R E V I E W Elementary Physics of Complex Plasmas, Lecture Notes on Physics0022377809990225 The treatise Elementary Physics of Complex Plasmas was written primarily for researchers

  18. J. Plasma Physics: page 1 of 6. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/S0022377814000270

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    J. Plasma Physics: page 1 of 6. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/S0022377814000270 1 Preliminary characteristics of magnetic field and plasma performance in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment 2014) The Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) device is a newly constructed research instrument

  19. Detection of Visual Memory and Learning Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arjun Sahgal; Barbara J. Sahakian; Trevor W. Robbins; Catherine J. Wray; Stephen Lloyd; Julia H. Cook; Ian G. McKeith; Jennifer C. A. Disley; Sarah Eagger; Stephen Boddington; James A. Edwardson

    1991-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by marked cognitive and especially mnemonic decline. Microcomputer controlled tests offer a powerful method for assessing these impairments, since precise control over stimulus presentation and responding can be achieved. The recently described CANTAB© (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery) procedure includes a number of visual tasks which can help to pinpoint these deficiencies with accuracy. Using

  20. Journal of Tropical Ecology (2010) 26:473480. Copyright Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0266467410000337

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2010-01-01

    Journal of Tropical Ecology (2010) 26:473­480. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0266467410000337 Seed predation and defleshing in the agouti-dispersed palm Astrocaryum and Conservation Ecology, University of Groningen, PO Box 14, NL-9750 AA Haren, the Netherlands Smithsonian

  1. University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    policy-makers and real cases in areas such as: aviation, communications and IT, transport, energy etc of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification this programme specification at any time. MPHIL in TECHNOLOGY POLICY 1 Awarding body University of Cambridge 2

  2. Source-Water Protection and Water-Quality Investigations in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Supply System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Norton, Chip; MacDonald, Timothy W.D.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction The Cambridge Water Department (CWD) supplies about 15 million gallons of water each day to more than 95,000 customers in the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most of this water is obtained from a system of reservoirs located in Cambridge and in parts of five other suburban-Boston communities. The drainage basin that contributes water to these reservoirs includes several potential sources of drinking-water contaminants, including major highways, secondary roads, areas of commercial and industrial development, and suburban residential tracts. The CWD is implementing a comprehensive Source-Water Protection Plan to ensure that the highest quality water is delivered to the treatment plant. A key element of this plan is a program that combines systematic monitoring of the drainage basin with detailed investigations of the effects of nonpoint-source contaminants, such as highway-deicing chemicals, nutrients, oxygen-demanding organic compounds, bacteria, and trace metals arising from stormwater runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the CWD and the Massachusetts Highway Department (MassHighway) to develop a better understanding of the sources, transport, and fate of many of these contaminants. This Fact Sheet describes source-water protection and water-quality investigations currently underway in the Cambridge drinking-water supply system. The investigations are designed to complement a national effort by the USGS to provide water suppliers and regulatory agencies with information on the vulnerability of water supplies and the movement and fate of source-water contaminants.

  3. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1 Athena SWAN Silver department award application

    E-print Network

    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Athena SWAN Silver Award Submission November 2013 1: ZOOLOGY Date of application: 29 November 2013 Date of university Bronze Athena SWAN award: May 2013 of words used. Click here for additional guidance on completing the template. #12;Department of Zoology

  4. A review of "Milton’s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres 1625-1632." by John K. Hale

    E-print Network

    Hill, Eugene D.

    2007-01-01

    he writes of it splendidly, with sure confi- dence and affection. John K. Hale. Milton?s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres 1625-1632. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. xii + 305 pp. $32.00. Review by EUGENE...

  5. Review van het boek "subsystems of Second Order Arithmetic (second edition)" door Stephen G. Simpson. Cambridge University Press, 2009.

    E-print Network

    van Oosten, Jaap

    Review van het boek "subsystems of Second Order Arithmetic (second edition)" door Stephen G. Simpson. Cambridge University Press, 2009. De eerste editie van dit boek verscheen in 1999, maar werd niet in correcties van typefoutjes en bijwerking van de bibliografie. De grondgedachte van dit boek is de volgende

  6. "Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    .P., and Prokhorov, E.N. 2003. Lightning and Lightning Protection, 330 p., Moscow: Znak. Loeb, L.B. 2004. The Kinetic"Lightning: Physics and Effects", Cambridge University Press, 687 p., 2003, V.A. Rakov and M.A. Uman Additions to Appendix: Books on lightning and related subjects (Rev. May 2006) Dibner, B. 1976

  7. Copyright Cambridge University Press 2003. On-screen viewing permitted. Printing not permitted. http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/ for links.

    E-print Network

    MacKay, David J.C.

    . http://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam distributions are a lot like Gaussian distributions, except that whereas the Gaussian goes from - to , gamma://www.cambridge.org/0521642981 You can buy this book for 30 pounds or $50. See http://www.inference.phy.cam

  8. Scaling Rules!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkinson, Dan; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Scaling is a fundamental issue in any spatially or temporally hierarchical system. Defining domains and identifying the boundaries of the hierarchical levels may be a challenging task. Hierarchical systems may be broadly classified to two categories: compartmental and continuous ones. Examples of compartmental systems include: governments, companies, computerized networks, biological taxonomy and others. In such systems the compartments, and hence the various levels and their constituents are easily delineated. In contrast, in continuous systems, such as geomorphological, ecological or climatological ones, detecting the boundaries of the various levels may be difficult. We propose that in continuous hierarchical systems a transition from one functional scale to another is associated with increased system variance. Crossing from a domain of one scale to the domain of another is associated with a transition or substitution of the dominant drivers operating in the system. Accordingly we suggest that crossing this boundary is characterized by increased variance, or a "variance leap", which stabilizes, until crossing to the next domain or hierarchy level. To assess this we compiled sediment yield data from studies conducted at various spatial scales and from different environments. The studies were partitioned to ones conducted in undisturbed environments, and those conducted in disturbed environments, specifically by wildfires. The studies were conducted in plots as small as 1 m2, and watersheds larger than 555000 ha. Regressing sediment yield against plot size, and incrementally calculating the variance in the systems, enabled us to detect domains where variance values were exceedingly high. We propose that at these domains scale-crossing occurs, and the systems transition from one hierarchical level to another. Moreover, the degree of the "variance leaps" characterizes the degree of connectivity among the scales.

  9. Scaling Away

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NCTM/Illuminations

    2009-02-12

    In this lesson, "students will measure the dimensions of a common object, multiply each dimension by a scale factor, and examine a model using the multiplied dimensions. Students will then compare the surface area and volume of the original object and the enlarged model." (From NCTM's Illuminations)

  10. Scaling satan.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K M; Huff, J L

    2001-05-01

    The influence on social behavior of beliefs in Satan and the nature of evil has received little empirical study. Elaine Pagels (1995) in her book, The Origin of Satan, argued that Christians' intolerance toward others is due to their belief in an active Satan. In this study, more than 200 college undergraduates completed the Manitoba Prejudice Scale and the Attitudes Toward Homosexuals Scale (B. Altemeyer, 1988), as well as the Belief in an Active Satan Scale, developed by the authors. The Belief in an Active Satan Scale demonstrated good internal consistency and temporal stability. Correlational analyses revealed that for the female participants, belief in an active Satan was directly related to intolerance toward lesbians and gay men and intolerance toward ethnic minorities. For the male participants, belief in an active Satan was directly related to intolerance toward lesbians and gay men but was not significantly related to intolerance toward ethnic minorities. Results of this research showed that it is possible to meaningfully measure belief in an active Satan and that such beliefs may encourage intolerance toward others. PMID:11577971

  11. Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

    1983-07-01

    Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

  12. Healthy Living Cambridge Kids: a community-based participatory effort to promote healthy weight and fitness.

    PubMed

    Chomitz, Virginia R; McGowan, Robert J; Wendel, Josefine M; Williams, Sandra A; Cabral, Howard J; King, Stacey E; Olcott, Dawn B; Cappello, Maryann; Breen, Susan; Hacker, Karen A

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community-based healthy weight intervention on child weight and fitness. Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have monitored BMI and fitness annually since 2000. Annual increases of overweight and obesity from 2000 (37.0%) to 2004 (39.1%), triggered a multidisciplinary team of researchers, educators, health care, and public health professionals to mobilize environmental and policy interventions. Guided by the social-ecological model and community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, the team developed and implemented Healthy Living Cambridge Kids (HLCK), a multicomponent intervention targeting community, school, family, and individuals. The intervention included city policies and community awareness campaigns; physical education (PE) enhancements, food service reforms, farm-to-school-to-home programs; and family outreach and "BMI and fitness reports". Baseline (2004) to follow-up (2007) evaluation design assessed change in children's weight and fitness status. A cohort of 1,858 K-5th grade children participated: 37.3% black, 14.0% Hispanic, 37.1% white, 10.2% Asian, 1.7% other race; 43.3% were lower income. BMI z-score (0.67-0.63 P < 0.001) and proportion obese (20.2-18.0% P < 0.05) decreased, and mean number of fitness tests (0-5) passed increased (3.7-3.9 P < 0.001). Whereas black and Hispanic children were more likely to be obese at baseline (27.0 and 28.5%, respectively) compared with white (12.6%) and Asian (14.3%) children, obesity among all race/ethnicity groups declined. Concurrent with a 3-year community intervention, modest improvements in obesity and fitness were observed among CPS children from baseline to follow-up. The CBPR approach facilitated sustaining policies and program elements postintervention in this diverse community. PMID:20107461

  13. The long-term impact of urbanisation on aquatic plants: Cambridge and the River Cam.

    PubMed

    Preston, C D; Sheail, J; Armitage, P; Davy-Bowker, J

    2003-10-01

    Historical and contemporary records have been used to assess the impact of urbanisation on the aquatic plants of the River Cam and its narrow floodplain in Cambridge. Of the 62 native aquatic plant species which have been recorded in the study area since 1660, 40 (65%) were still present in the period 1985-1999 whereas 22 (35%) are apparently extinct. There is a striking relationship between the fate of species and their trophic requirements, with species of less eutrophic habitats having suffered disproportionately. Historical records demonstrate that the River Cam became grossly polluted by sewage from Cambridge in the 19th century, but the chemical and biological quality of the river improved from 1897 onwards. However, the majority of the species recorded from the river and nearby ditches persisted until after maximum incidence of sewage pollution, which may even have stimulated the growth of 'weed' in the river. Losses of aquatic plant species from two riparian commons, Coe Fen (35%) and Sheep's Green (50%), have been particularly great. The level of these and other areas of low-lying common land by the river has been systematically raised by the controlled tipping of waste in hollows, followed by levelling and resowing. The main effects of urbanisation on the flora therefore arose from the transformation of riparian pastures into suburban open spaces. Commons which are used purely for amenity purposes have lost almost all their aquatic plant species. Those which are still grazed retain more, and continuance of grazing is probably essential if a varied aquatic flora is to be maintained. The interpretation of botanical records in terms of recorded management history is likely to throw further light on the processes of urbanisation, although the number of sites with a sufficiently detailed botanical record may be limited. PMID:14499527

  14. http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 16 Dec 2008 IP address: 128.118.145.89 Of mice and men: asymmetric interactions between

    E-print Network

    http://journals.cambridge.org Downloaded: 16 Dec 2008 IP address: 128.118.145.89 Of mice and men the coexistence of the two pathogens, with or without vaccination. We then track the dynamics of the system

  15. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0)1223 335999 email: reception@newton.ac.uk

    E-print Network

    Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH tel: +44 (0:00-19:00 A free public event at the Isaac Newton Institute To request free tickets to this event please contact

  16. J. Fluid Mech. (2008), vol. 603, pp. 271304. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112008001109 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Barkley, Dwight

    2008-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (2008), vol. 603, pp. 271­304. c 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112008001109 Printed in the United Kingdom 271 Convective instability and transient growth in flow over

  17. J. Fluid Mech. (2004), vol. 514, pp. 271280. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112004000291 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2004-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (2004), vol. 514, pp. 271­280. c 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112004000291 Printed in the United Kingdom 271 On the coherent drag-reducing and turbulence-enhancing behaviour

  18. J. Fluid Mech. (2003), vol. 482, pp. 271290. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112003004117 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (2003), vol. 482, pp. 271­290. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112003004117 Printed in the United Kingdom 271 The added mass of an expanding bubble By C. D. OHL, A. TIJINK

  19. Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599609. 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0263574704000396 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jongwon

    2004-01-01

    Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599­609. © 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S, and manufacturability consideration. Part II on real machine design will follow in the next issue of Robotica. KEYWORDS

  20. Scale Models

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners explore the relative sizes and distances of objects in the solar system. Without being informed of the expected product, learners will make a Play-doh model of the Earth-Moon system, scaled to size and distance. The facilitator reveals the true identity of the system at the conclusion of the activity. During the construction phase, learners try to guess what members of the solar system their model represents. Each group receives different amounts of Play-doh, with each group assigned a color (red, blue, yellow, white). At the end, groups set up their models and inspect the models of other groups. They report patterns of scale that they notice; as the amount of Play-doh increases, for example, so do the size and distance of the model. This resource guide includes background information about the Earth to Moon ratio and solar eclipses.

  1. Scale invariability

    E-print Network

    M. Omerbashich

    2010-02-09

    I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". Thus the derived equation is that of levitation. Reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators, where permanent energy decay of all oscillation forbids constancy of known "physical constants". This hyperresonator concept explains the magnetism (as every forced oscillator feature), as well as the gravitation (as forward propagation of mechanical vibrations along the aether i.e. throughout the vacuum structure). To test my claim I propose a Space mission to collect on site measurements of eigenperiods of the Sun, its planets, and their satellites. The levitation equitation enables propulsionless Space travel via gravity sailing: Space vehicle hull ought to be engineered so as to automatically adjust its grave mode, to the vehicle instant gravitational surroundings, akin to trout up swimming.

  2. J. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 674, pp. 227243. c Cambridge University Press 2011 doi:10.1017/S0022112011000103

    E-print Network

    Schulze, Tim

    2011-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (2011), vol. 674, pp. 227­243. c Cambridge University Press 2011 doi:10.1017/S convective instabilities, can be found in Worster (1997). Schulze & Worster (1999) and Schulze & Worster@math.utk.edu #12;228 N. R. Gewecke and T. P. Schulze Liquid z = H, T = TH Mush z = a(t) z = b(t) Solid z = 0

  3. Scaled Composites

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    On April 18, 2003, an historic event in space travel was marked by the unveiling of the first private manned spacecraft and launch platform (called SpaceShipOne and White Knight, respectively). Already constructed and in the test flight stage of its development, the project was hidden from the public in order to reveal a finished product rather than just schematics. Scaled Composites, the private company that developed the spacecraft, gives data sheets and photos on its homepage. A detailed list of frequently asked questions addresses many issues regarding the project and its implications.

  4. Scaling and allometry in the building geometries of Greater London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, M.; Carvalho, R.; Hudson-Smith, A.; Milton, R.; Smith, D.; Steadman, P.

    2008-06-01

    Many aggregate distributions of urban activities such as city sizes reveal scaling but hardly any work exists on the properties of spatial distributions within individual cities, notwithstanding considerable knowledge about their fractal structure. We redress this here by examining scaling relationships in a world city using data on the geometric properties of individual buildings. We first summarise how power laws can be used to approximate the size distributions of buildings, in analogy to city-size distributions which have been widely studied as rank-size and lognormal distributions following Zipf [ Human Behavior and the Principle of Least Effort (Addison-Wesley, Cambridge, 1949)] and Gibrat [ Les Inégalités Économiques (Librarie du Recueil Sirey, Paris, 1931)]. We then extend this analysis to allometric relationships between buildings in terms of their different geometric size properties. We present some preliminary analysis of building heights from the Emporis database which suggests very strong scaling in world cities. The data base for Greater London is then introduced from which we extract 3.6 million buildings whose scaling properties we explore. We examine key allometric relationships between these different properties illustrating how building shape changes according to size, and we extend this analysis to the classification of buildings according to land use types. We conclude with an analysis of two-point correlation functions of building geometries which supports our non-spatial analysis of scaling.

  5. Multidimensional scaling

    PubMed Central

    Papesh, Megan H.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of similarity, or a sense of "sameness" among things, is pivotal to theories in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Similarity, however, is a difficult thing to measure. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) is a tool by which researchers can obtain quantitative estimates of similarity among groups of items. More formally, MDS refers to a set of statistical techniques that are used to reduce the complexity of a data set, permitting visual appreciation of the underlying relational structures contained therein. The current paper provides an overview of MDS. We discuss key aspects of performing this technique, such as methods that can be used to collect similarity estimates, analytic techniques for treating proximity data, and various concerns regarding interpretation of the MDS output. MDS analyses of two novel data sets are also included, highlighting in step-by-step fashion how MDS is performed, and key issues that may arise during analysis. PMID:23359318

  6. Scales and Scale-like Structures 

    E-print Network

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2011-08-08

    The use of scales in protective armor dates back at least to the ancient Persians. Herodotus also makes mention of Persian scaled armor, describing colored tunics covered in iron fish scales [Laufer 1914] [Herodotus 1954], and Persian Elamite artwork...

  7. The Sense of the Body in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the basic foundations of the self lie in the brain systems that represent the body. Specific sensorimotor stimulation has been shown to alter the bodily self. However, little is known about how disconnection of the brain from the body affects the phenomenological sense of the body and the self. Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who exhibit massively reduced somatomotor processes below the lesion in the absence of brain damage are suitable for testing the influence of body signals on two important components of the self–the sense of disembodiment and body ownership. We recruited 30 SCI patients and 16 healthy participants, and evaluated the following parameters: (i) depersonalization symptoms, using the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS), and (ii) measures of body ownership, as quantified by the rubber hand illusion (RHI) paradigm. We found higher CDS scores in SCI patients, which show increased detachment from their body and internal bodily sensations and decreasing global body ownership with higher lesion level. The RHI paradigm reveals no alterations in the illusory ownership of the hand between SCI patients and controls. Yet, there was no typical proprioceptive drift in SCI patients with intact tactile sensation on the hand, which might be related to cortical reorganization in these patients. These results suggest that disconnection of somatomotor inputs to the brain due to spinal cord lesions resulted in a disturbed sense of an embodied self. Furthermore, plasticity-related cortical changes might influence the dynamics of the bodily self. PMID:23209824

  8. Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m{sup 2} steady-state, 1 GW/m{sup 2} in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (10{sup 18} neutrons/m{sup 2} s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. Methods: Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or ceiling effects. The construct validity was investigated using exploratory factor analysis. Intra-rater reliability was measured in an interval of 3 months, inter-rater reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: The score distribution of the items showed no ceiling or floor effects. Four of the five factors extracted from the factor analysis represented important constructs of doctor-patient communication The ratings for the first and second round of assessing the videos correlated at 0.75 (p < 0.0001). Intraclass correlation coefficients for each item ranged were moderate and ranged from 0.05 to 0.57. Conclusions: Reasonable score distributions of most items without ceiling or floor effects as well as a good test-retest reliability and construct validity recommend the C-CG as an instrument for assessing communication skills in undergraduate medical students. Some deficiencies in inter-rater reliability are a clear indication that raters need a thorough instruction before using the C-CG. PMID:25480988

  10. C A M B R I D G E U N I V E R S I T Y E N G I N E E R I N G D E P A R T M E N T CAMBRIDGE VEHICLE DYNAMICS

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK. http://www.cvdc.org/ D.C. October 2010 #12;CAMBRIDGE VEHICLE DYNAMICS CONSORTIUM ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Invitation to Industry EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Cambridge Vehicle Dynamics consortium is a collaboration between vehicle dynamics and suspension design, including the problems of vehicle safety, productivity, ride

  11. 11/10/2010 17:32Cambridge University Engineering Department: News item Page 1 of 2http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/stories/2010/RAE_fellowship/

    E-print Network

    Cipolla, Roberto

    11/10/2010 17:32Cambridge University Engineering Department: News item Page 1 of 2http://www.eng.camhttp://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/stories/2010/RAE_fellowship/ © Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge Information provided by web-editor do a lot more to foster the right climate

  12. 15/09/2008 14:58Cambridge University Engineering Department: News item Page 1 of 2http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/stories/2008/gesture_control/

    E-print Network

    Cipolla, Roberto

    of Engineering University of Cambridge > Engineering Department > News & Features Control your TV simply15/09/2008 14:58Cambridge University Engineering Department: News item Page 1 of 2http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/stories/2008/gesture_control/ A hand signal pauses the new TV How to use the TV's computer mouse Department

  13. Since 2001, the National Institutes of Health and Oxford and Cambridge Universities in the U.K. have partnered to create an exciting collaborative doctoral training program in biomedical research. The NIH

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    . The NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program enables students to obtain a doctoral degree from either the University of Oxford or Cambridge while taking advantage of research in laboratories at the NIH in Bethesda investigators at NIH and at one of the U.K. universities. Students begin their dissertation research in October

  14. A review of "Cambridge History of the Book in Britain." by John Barnard and Donald F. McKenzie, eds.

    E-print Network

    Randy Robertson

    2003-01-01

    clarity and intelli- gibility, however, the book?s necessary references to the history of literary controversies such as the Satan debate, the positions of particular critics such as Georgia Christopher, and the intricacies of post-1950?s Milton... scholarship as a whole limit the access of non-specialists. Unfortunately, The Satanic Epic should prepare for a brief shelf life at Barnes and Noble, and even less at Walmart. John Barnard and Donald F. McKenzie, eds. The Cambridge History of the Book...

  15. MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  16. The Scales of Sustainable Design in Developing Nations

    E-print Network

    Quinn, S.; Cho, S.

    of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, M.L. Parry, O.F. Canziani, J.P. Palutikof, P.J. van der Linden and C.E. Hanson, Eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK, 433-467. Source (L): World..., P.J. van der Linden and C.E. Hanson, Eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK, 433-467. doi:10.1029/2004JD005462, 2005 Google Earth Henninger, Sasch. Urban Climate and Air Pollution in Kigali, Rwanda. The Seventh International Conference...

  17. Rating scale analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Glencross

    2009-01-01

    In many research studies, respondents' beliefs and opinions about various concepts are often measured by means of five, six and seven point scales. The widely used five point scale is commonly known as a Likert scale (Likert, (1932) \\

  18. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  19. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key…

  20. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  1. University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    and mental disability in patients of all ages; have studied the diagnosis and management of a range of health problems by means of linked placements in primary and secondary care; know about the public health aspects this programme specification at any time. MB BChir Standard 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2. Teaching

  2. The Promotion of "Civility" and the Quest for the Creation of a "City of Peace": The Beginnings of Trinity College, Dublin and of Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boran, Elizabethanne; Robinson-Hammerstein, Helga

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the founding of two universities, Trinity College Dublin and Harvard College, as instances of "transfer of knowledge" and were seen as ideal replicas of the original model, or Cambridge University. Reports that universities were tools of the "civilizing" process in Ireland and the Massachusetts Bay colony. (CMK)

  3. In: The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks (2nd ed) edited by M.A. Arbib, MIT press, Cambridge (2002)

    E-print Network

    Destexhe, Alain

    2002-01-01

    , to the closed state of sleep. The early stage of quiescent sleep is associated with EEG spindle waves, which orchestrated and highly regulated. Experimental and modeling studies have shown how sleep rhythms emerge from, Cambridge (2002) pp. 1049­1053. SLEEP OSCILLATIONS Alain Destexhe Unit´e de Neurosciences Int´egratives et

  4. J. Fluid Mech. (2013), vol. 737, pp. 205231. c Cambridge University Press 2013 205 doi:10.1017/jfm.2013.559

    E-print Network

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2013-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (2013), vol. 737, pp. 205­231. c Cambridge University Press 2013 205 doi:10.1017/jfm/9 for A 1, and the corresponding perturbation takes the form of vertically propagating pulses of environmental and industrial processes (Nield & Bejan 2006), such as the extraction of geothermal energy

  5. Journal of Tropical Ecology (2006) 22:431440. Copyright 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0266467406003221 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Rey Benayas, José María

    2006-01-01

    : lupew@ecologia.edu.mx been carried out mainly in tropical lowland rain forests (G´omez-Pompa & VJournal of Tropical Ecology (2006) 22:431­440. Copyright © 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0266467406003221 Printed in the United Kingdom Distance effect from cloud forest fragments on plant

  6. 1 J. McDowell: Mind and World, Cambridge, Mass., 1996; H. Putnam: The Threefold Cord: Mind, Body, and World, New York 1999.

    E-print Network

    Hatfield, Gary

    1 J. McDowell: Mind and World, Cambridge, Mass., 1996; H. Putnam: The Threefold Cord: Mind, Body Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy, New York 2001, 393­413. Transparency of Mind: The Contributions classical positions as paradigms for de ning their own views, usually in contrast. In the philosophy of mind

  7. MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Tel: (617) 253-1324 Fax: (617) 258-9360

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    MIT Medical Department Pharmacy Building E23-197 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 Medical Record Number or MIT ID Number 2 I authorize the MIT Medical Department to release pharmacy records to: Name and Address 3 Reason for Disclosure: further medical care applying for insurance

  8. Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. (2009), 146, 177 c 2008 Cambridge Philosophical Society doi:10.1017/S0305004108001692 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Driver, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. (2009), 146, 177 c 2008 Cambridge Philosophical Society doi:10.1017/S0305004108001692 Printed in the United Kingdom First published online 14 July 2008 177 Surjectivity of the Taylor does not require G to be simply connected and, moreover, the proof of iso- metry in the degenerate case

  9. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components…

  10. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally Ozonoff; Ian Cook; Hilary Coon; Geraldine Dawson; Robert M. Joseph; Ami Klin; William M. McMahon; Nancy Minshew; Jeffrey A. Munson; Bruce F. Pennington; Sally J. Rogers; M. Anne Spence; Helen Tager-Flusberg; Fred R. Volkmar; Debora Wrathall

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components of cognition. Previous studies document the role of frontal cortex in performance of two CANTAB subtests:

  11. University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme

    E-print Network

    de Gispert, Adrià

    with, and to learn from, real policy-makers and real cases in areas such as: aviation, communications of the information contained in this programme specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification this programme specification at any time. MPHIL in TECHNOLOGY POLICY 1 Awarding Body University of Cambridge 2

  12. [Pell, 1993] Barney Pell. Strategy Generation and Evaluation for Meta Game Playing. PhD thesis, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1993.

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    [Pell, 1993] Barney Pell. Strategy Generation and Evaluation for Meta Game­ Playing. PhD thesis, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1993. Forthcoming. [Russell and Wefald, 1992] Stuart Russell and Eric Wefald. Do the Right Thing. MIT Press, 1992. [Sahlin, 1991] Dan Sahlin. An automatic partial

  13. Review van het boek "Proofs and Computations" door Helmut Schwichtenberg en Stanley S. Wainer. Cambridge University Press (Perspectives in Logic), 2012.

    E-print Network

    van Oosten, Jaap

    Review van het boek "Proofs and Computations" door Helmut Schwichtenberg en Stanley S. Wainer. Cambridge University Press (Perspectives in Logic), 2012. We zouden heel blij moeten zijn met dit boek. Hoewel er op het gebied van de Bewijstheorie aardig wat op de markt is, ken ik geen ander boek waarin

  14. Robotica (1994) volume 12, pp 421-430. 1994 Cambridge University Press Inverse kinematics of six-degree of freedom "general"

    E-print Network

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    1994-01-01

    Robotica (1994) volume 12, pp 421-430. © 1994 Cambridge University Press Inverse kinematics of six. Bidaud Laboratoire de Robotique de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Tour 66, 2eme etage, 4 Place to the inverse kinematics problem of the GMF Arc Mate welding manipulator. In spite of its geometry

  15. Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8…

  16. Acta Numerica (2006), pp. 385470 c Cambridge University Press, 2006 doi: 10.1017/S0962492906250013 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Higdon, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Acta Numerica (2006), pp. 385­470 c Cambridge University Press, 2006 doi: 10.1017/S0962492906250013 of Mathematics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4605, USA E-mail: higdon of fluid dynamics, as applied to a relatively thin layer of stratified fluid on a rotating globe

  17. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 6 (3), 2003, 181200 C 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S1366728903001123 181 On the autonomy of the

    E-print Network

    Caramazza, Alfonso

    Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 6 (3), 2003, 181­200 C 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10 of a bilingual ALBERT COSTA Universitat de Barcelona DAMIR KOVACIC Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi experiments highly-proficient bilinguals were asked to name two sets of pictures in their L2: a) pictures

  18. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 9 (2), 2006, 153166 C 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1366728906002501 153 Lexical access in bilingual

    E-print Network

    Caramazza, Alfonso

    Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 9 (2), 2006, 153­166 C 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S1366728906002501 153 Lexical access in bilingual speakers: What's the (hard) problem?* MATTHEW University Models of bilingual speech production generally assume that translation equivalent lexical nodes

  19. All are welcome to the public programme of study days at IOCS Cambridge.These study days offer a wonderful opportunity to get to

    E-print Network

    Lasenby, Joan

    . If you would like to come but are unable to pay the whole fee please get in touch with us. Community a wonderful opportunity to get to hear distinguished lecturers addressing a number of major themes related, Cambridge CB4 1ND, UK. For more information please visit our website at www.iocs.cam.ac.uk, write to us

  20. Scales and Scale-like Structures

    E-print Network

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2011-08-08

    . Identification of scale patterns is particularly useful for identification of poisonous and nonpoisonous snakes. Nonpoisonous snakes have two rows of scales on their belly, while poisonous snakes have a single row of scales along most of their underside... in snakes. 4. Birds Although there is still debate over the specific origin of class Aves, or birds, many paleontologists consider Archaeopteryx to be one of the first birds, as a transition from the reptilian dinosaurs during the Jurassic Period 150...

  1. Identifying Product Scaling Principles 

    E-print Network

    Perez, Angel 1986-

    2011-06-02

    -by-analogy and bioinspired design. Despite various scaling laws for specific systems, there are no global principles for scaling systems, for example from a biological nano scale to macro scale. This is likely one of the reasons that bioinspired design is difficult. Very...

  2. Scaling: An Items Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Ye; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    "Scaling" is the process of constructing a score scale that associates numbers or other ordered indicators with the performance of examinees. Scaling typically is conducted to aid users in interpreting test results. This module describes different types of raw scores and scale scores, illustrates how to incorporate various sources of information…

  3. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  4. Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites

    E-print Network

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

  5. Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modifying transport infrastructure to support active travel (walking and cycling) could help to increase population levels of physical activity. However, there is limited evidence for the effects of interventions in this field, and to the best of our knowledge no study has convincingly demonstrated an increase in physical activity directly attributable to this type of intervention. We have therefore taken the opportunity presented by a 'natural experiment' in Cambridgeshire, UK to establish a quasi-experimental study of the effects of a major transport infrastructural intervention on travel behaviour, physical activity and related wider health impacts. Design and methods The Commuting and Health in Cambridge study comprises three main elements: a cohort study of adults who travel to work in Cambridge, using repeated postal questionnaires and basic objective measurement of physical activity using accelerometers; in-depth quantitative studies of physical activity energy expenditure, travel and movement patterns and estimated carbon emissions using household travel diaries, combined heart rate and movement sensors and global positioning system (GPS) receivers; and a longitudinal qualitative interview study to elucidate participants' attitudes, experiences and practices and to understand how environmental and social factors interact to influence travel behaviour, for whom and in what circumstances. The impacts of a specific intervention - the opening of the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway - and of other changes in the physical environment will be examined using a controlled quasi-experimental design within the overall cohort dataset. Discussion Addressing the unresolved research and policy questions in this area is not straightforward. The challenges include those of effectively combining different disciplinary perspectives on the research problems, developing common methodological ground in measurement and evaluation, implementing robust quantitative measurement of travel and physical activity behaviour in an unpredictable 'natural experiment' setting, defining exposure to the intervention, defining controls, and conceptualising an appropriate longitudinal analytical strategy. PMID:21080928

  6. www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk | Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1RB | press@fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk | 01223 332 941 Alan Beeton (1880-1942), Reposing c. 1929

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Museum Silent Partners: Artist and Mannequin from Function to Fetish Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge | 14 to Fetish. Silent Partners is the first exhibition ever to uncover the evolution and widespread use

  7. Convergence and Two-Scale

    E-print Network

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    Two-Scale Convergence and Two-Scale Numerical Methods Emmanuel Frénod Two-Scale Convergence multi-échelles Ile de Porquerolles, June 2th - 8th, 2013 Two-Scale Convergence and Two-Scale Numerical Two-Scale Convergence and Two-Scale Numerical Methods #12;Two-Scale Convergence and Two

  8. A Sense of Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tretter, Thomas R.; Jones, M. Gail

    2003-01-01

    Points out the importance of an understanding of a sense of scale and presents an activity that uses distance or time as a measure. The activity illustrates for students what the universe would look like at various scales. (DDR)

  9. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  10. Grey Scale Display Slave

    E-print Network

    Beeler, Michael

    The programs SNAP and ZSLAVE are components of a new grey scale display system. The object is to produce photographs, from a computer display, which have grey scale resolution comparable to that of a the visual input devices ...

  11. Robot calibration without scaling 

    E-print Network

    Ives, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    methods. Scaling is a common way of improving the condition number for a matrix. Researchers in other fields have developed specific methods of scaling matrices to improve the condition number. However, robotics researchers have not specifically addressed...

  12. On Quantitative Rorschach Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of quantitative Rorschach scales are discussed: first, those based on the response categories of content, location, and the determinants, and second, global scales based on the subject's responses to all ten stimulus cards. (Author/JKS)

  13. The Scale of Things

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about size and scale. Learners will create and walk through a distance scale model of the size of the Solar System. This activity requires a straight line distance of approximately 295 meters (300 yards).

  14. Campus Map Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carrie Davis Todd

    Students are given an outline map of the campus with no scale indicated. They are to work in small groups to determine the scale. Although rules and tape measures are provided, students are given no instruction on how to best determine the scale and are tasked with devising their own methodology. Students write their scales on the blackboard and we finish the class with a discussion of their various methodologies, sources of error, and why there is some variation among their results.

  15. Lesson 34: Logarithmic Scales

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This lesson introduces logarithmic scales as a means for plotting data that might otherwise be difficult plot due to their widely varying values. Instead of plotting the actual values, the values of their logs are plotted on a scale of powers of ten. A discussion follows that highlights an unfamiliar feature for students: equal intervals on the power of ten scale do not correspond to equal values. Various application problems about acidity and ph, decibels, and the Richter Scale follow.

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage grading scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David S. Rosen; R. Loch MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    Numerous systems are reported for grading the clinical condition of patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The\\u000a literature was reviewed for articles pertaining to the grading of such patients, including publications on the Hunt and Hess\\u000a Scale, Fisher Scale, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), and World Federation of Neurological Surgeons Scale. This article reviews the\\u000a advantages and limitations of these scales as

  17. IMAGE Satellite Scale Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about scale model building. Learners will use mathematics to determine the scale model size, construct a pattern, and build a paper scale model of the IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) satellite, the first satellite mission to image the Earth's magnetosphere. This is the second activity in the Solar Storms and You: Exploring Satellite Design educator guide.

  18. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  19. Civilian PTSD Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapinsky, Alicia C.; Rapport, Lisa J.; Henderson, Melinda J.; Axelrod, Bradley N.

    2005-01-01

    Strong associations between civilian posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scales and measures of general psychological distress suggest that the scales are nonspecific to PTSD. Three common PTSD scales were administered to 122 undergraduates who had experienced an emotionally salient, nontraumatic event: a college examination. Results indicated…

  20. SCALED HE TESTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. B. Doll; V. Salmon

    1952-01-01

    Four high-explosive (HE) tests were conducted at the Nevada Proving ; Grounds in order to provide information for scaled predictions for shallow ; underground and surface nuclear tests. In general, the air blast scaled as ; predicted in both duration and amplitude. The sharp and highly damped ; oscillation acceleration due to air blast scaled as did air-blast pressure, but

  1. Temporal Scale Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Fagerström

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how to define a scale space suitable for temporal measurements. We argue that such a temporal scale space should possess the properties of: temporal causality, linearity, continuity, positivity, recursitivity as well as translational and scaling covariance. It is shown that these requirements imply a one parameter family of con- volution kernels. Furthermore it is shown

  2. The Positivity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A.; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

    2012-01-01

    Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure "positivity," defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of college…

  3. Spring Scale Engineering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    IEEE

    2014-05-22

    In this activity, learners explore how spring scales work and how they are used for non-exact weight measurement. Learners work in teams to develop their own working spring scale out of ordinary items. They test their scale, present their designs to the group, compare their designs with those of other teams, and reflect on the experience.

  4. Earth History databases and visualization - the TimeScale Creator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogg, James; Lugowski, Adam; Gradstein, Felix

    2010-05-01

    The "TimeScale Creator" team (www.tscreator.org) and the Subcommission on Stratigraphic Information (stratigraphy.science.purdue.edu) of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (www.stratigraphy.org) has worked with numerous geoscientists and geological surveys to prepare reference datasets for global and regional stratigraphy. All events are currently calibrated to Geologic Time Scale 2004 (Gradstein et al., 2004, Cambridge Univ. Press) and Concise Geologic Time Scale (Ogg et al., 2008, Cambridge Univ. Press); but the array of intercalibrations enable dynamic adjustment to future numerical age scales and interpolation methods. The main "global" database contains over 25,000 events/zones from paleontology, geomagnetics, sea-level and sequence stratigraphy, igneous provinces, bolide impacts, plus several stable isotope curves and image sets. Several regional datasets are provided in conjunction with geological surveys, with numerical ages interpolated using a similar flexible inter-calibration procedure. For example, a joint program with Geoscience Australia has compiled an extensive Australian regional biostratigraphy and a full array of basin lithologic columns with each formation linked to public lexicons of all Proterozoic through Phanerozoic basins - nearly 500 columns of over 9,000 data lines plus hot-curser links to oil-gas reference wells. Other datapacks include New Zealand biostratigraphy and basin transects (ca. 200 columns), Russian biostratigraphy, British Isles regional stratigraphy, Gulf of Mexico biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy, high-resolution Neogene stable isotope curves and ice-core data, human cultural episodes, and Circum-Arctic stratigraphy sets. The growing library of datasets is designed for viewing and chart-making in the free "TimeScale Creator" JAVA package. This visualization system produces a screen display of the user-selected time-span and the selected columns of geologic time scale information. The user can change the vertical-scale, column widths, fonts, colors, titles, ordering, range chart options and many other features. Mouse-activated pop-ups provide additional information on columns and events; including links to external Internet sites. The graphics can be saved as SVG (scalable vector graphics) or PDF files for direct import into Adobe Illustrator or other common drafting software. Users can load additional regional datapacks, and create and upload their own datasets. The "Pro" version has additional dataset-creation tools, output options and the ability to edit and re-save merged datasets. The databases and visualization package are envisioned as a convenient reference tool, chart-production assistant, and a window into the geologic history of our planet.

  5. Manual of Scaling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This manual reviews the derivation of the similitude relationships believed to be important to ice accretion and examines ice-accretion data to evaluate their importance. Both size scaling and test-condition scaling methods employing the resulting similarity parameters are described, and experimental icing tests performed to evaluate scaling methods are reviewed with results. The material included applies primarily to unprotected, unswept geometries, but some discussion of how to approach other situations is included as well. The studies given here and scaling methods considered are applicable only to Appendix-C icing conditions. Nearly all of the experimental results presented have been obtained in sea-level tunnels. Recommendations are given regarding which scaling methods to use for both size scaling and test-condition scaling, and icing test results are described to support those recommendations. Facility limitations and size-scaling restrictions are discussed. Finally, appendices summarize the air, water and ice properties used in NASA scaling studies, give expressions for each of the similarity parameters used and provide sample calculations for the size-scaling and test-condition scaling methods advocated.

  6. Optimal renormalization scales and commensurate scale relations

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, H.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01

    Commensurate scale relations relate observables to observables and thus are independent of theoretical conventions, such as the choice of intermediate renormalization scheme. The physical quantities are related at commensurate scales which satisfy a transitivity rule which ensures that predictions are independent of the choice of an intermediate renormalization scheme. QCD can thus be tested in a new and precise way by checking that the observables track both in their relative normalization and in their commensurate scale dependence. For example, the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule at a given momentum transfer Q can be predicted from measurements of the e+e{sup {minus}} annihilation cross section at a corresponding commensurate energy scale {radical}s {proportional_to} Q, thus generalizing Crewther`s relation to non-conformal QCD. The coefficients that appear in this perturbative expansion take the form of a simple geometric series and thus have no renormalon divergent behavior. The authors also discuss scale-fixed relations between the threshold corrections to the heavy quark production cross section in e+e{sup {minus}} annihilation and the heavy quark coupling {alpha}{sub V} which is measurable in lattice gauge theory.

  7. Linear scale ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    van Reis, R; Goodrich, E M; Yson, C L; Frautschy, L N; Dzengeleski, S; Lutz, H

    1997-09-01

    Tangential flow filtration has traditionally been scaled up by maintaining constant the filtrate volume to membrane surface area ratio, membrane material and pore size, channel height, flow path geometry and retentate and filtrate pressures. Channel width and the number of channels have been increased to provide increased membrane area. Several other parameters, however, have not been maintained constant. A new comprehensive methodology for implementation of linear scale up and scale down of tangential flow filtration processes has been developed. Predictable scale up can only be achieved by maintaining fluid dynamic parameters which are independent of scale. Fluid dynamics are controlled by operating parameters (feed flow rate, retentate pressure, fed batch ratio and temperature), geometry (channel length, height, turbulence promoter and entrance/exit design), materials (membrane, turbulence promoter, and encapsulant compression), and system geometry (flow distribution). Cassette manufacturing procedures and tolerances also play a significant role in achieving scale independent performance. Extensive development work in the aforementioned areas has resulted in the successful implementation of linear scale up of ultrafiltration processes for recovery of human recombinant DNA derived pharmaceuticals. A 400-fold linear scale up has been achieved without intermediate pilot scale tests. Scale independent performance has a direct impact on process yield, protein quality and product economics and is therefore particularly important in the biotechnology industry. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 737-746, 1997. PMID:18636584

  8. Multi scale experimental study of concrete rheology: from water scale to gravel scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Toutou; N. Roussel

    2005-01-01

    ? RILEM 2006 Abstract Rheometric tests are carried out on cement based suspensions. Four scales are defined for this study: the sat- urating fluid scale, the cement paste scale, the mortar scale and finally the concrete scale. Each scale is considered as a suspension defined by its maximum granular class size. Each scale is obtained by adding a higher granular

  9. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  10. The positivity scale.

    PubMed

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

    2012-09-01

    Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure positivity, defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of college participants. In Study 2, the unidimensionality of the P Scale was corroborated with confirmatory factor analysis in 2 independent samples (N? = 322; N? = 457). In Study 3, P Scale invariance across sexes and its relations with self-esteem, life satisfaction, optimism, positive negative affect, depression, and the Big Five provided further evidence of the internal and construct validity of the new measure in a large community sample (N = 3,589). In Study 4, test-retest reliability of the P Scale was found in a sample of college students (N = 262) who were readministered the scale after 5 weeks. In Study 5, measurement invariance and construct validity of P Scale were further supported across samples in different countries and cultures, including Italy (N = 689), the United States (N = 1,187), Japan (N = 281), and Spain (N = 302). Psychometric findings across diverse cultural context attest to the robustness of the P Scale and to positivity as a basic disposition. PMID:22250591

  11. Size and Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Another good lesson plan from DiscoverySchool.com, the Size and Scale Web site gives teachers a well conceived and thorough activity on the physics of size and scale. Objectives of the lesson include: understanding the relative sizes of bodies in our solar system and the problem of making a scale model of the entire solar system (because the distances in space are so great that even a very small scale model would be too large to be practical). The site contains all the information needed to complete the lesson, as well as a printable version and related links.

  12. Scale Invariance without Scale Selection Iasonas Kokkinos

    E-print Network

    Yuille, Alan L.

    can then be guaranteed by estimating the Fourier Trans- form Modulus (FTM) of the formed signal as the FTM is translation invariant. We build our descriptors using phase, orientation and amplitude features and rotations into translations. Scale invariance is achieved by taking the Fourier Transform Modulus (FTM

  13. Anion Recognition by Pyrylium Cations and Thio-, Seleno- and Telluro- Analogues: A Combined Theoretical and Cambridge Structural Database Study.

    PubMed

    Quiñonero, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyrylium salts are a very important class of organic molecules containing a trivalent oxygen atom in a six-membered aromatic ring. In this manuscript, we report a theoretical study of pyrylium salts and their thio-, seleno- and telluro- analogues by means of DFT calculations. For this purpose, unsubstituted 2,4,6-trimethyl and 2,4,6-triphenyl cations and anions with different morphologies were chosen (Cl-, NO3- and BF4-). The complexes were characterized by means of natural bond orbital and "atoms-in-molecules" theories, and the physical nature of the interactions has been analyzed by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. Our results indicate the presence of anion-? interactions and chalcogen bonds based on both ?- and ?-hole interactions and the existence of very favorable ?-complexes, especially for unsubstituted cations. The electrostatic component is dominant in the interactions, although the induction contributions are important, particularly for chloride complexes. The geometrical features of the complexes have been compared with experimental data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. PMID:26114926

  14. Analog optical processing and computing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, October 25, 26, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Developments in optical signal processing are discussed, taking into account acousto-optic processors for passive surveillance, innovative and compact architectures for real-time two-dimensional correlation, scale-invariant Wigner distribution and ambiguity functions, an acousto-optic convolver for digital pulses, holography and four-wave mixing to see through the skin, the phase-conjugate of a Fourier hologram using four-wave mixing in BSO crystal, and a tunable, variable bandwidth, acousto-optic filter. Subjects related to pattern recognition are also explored, giving attention to optimal linear discriminant functions, orientation variability in generalized matched filters, an adaptive acousto-optic processor, an optical implementation of the synthetic discrimination function, and optimality considerations in modified matched spatial filters. A hybrid digital/integrated optical processor for on-line classification is considered along with white-light optical signal processing with a programmable magneto-optic device, and Lloyd's mirror as an optical processor.

  15. The Family Constellation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    The Family Constellation Scale (FC Scale) is an instrument that assesses perceived birth order in families. It can be used in counseling to help initiate conversations about various traits and assumptions that tend to characterize first-born, middle-born children, youngest-born, and only children. It provides both counselors and clients insights…

  16. Submicron scaling of HBTs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark J. W. Rodwell; Miguel Urteaga; Thomas Mathew; Dennis Scott; Dino Mensa; Q. Lee; James Guthrie; Y. Betser; Suzanne C. Martin; R. P. Smith; S. Jaganathan; Sundararajan Krishnan; Stephen I. Long; R. Pullela; Bipul Agarwal; Uddalak Bhattacharya; Lorene Samoska; Mattias Dahlstrom

    2001-01-01

    The variation of heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) bandwidth with scaling is reviewed. High bandwidths are obtained by thinning the base and collector layers, increasing emitter current density, decreasing emitter contact resistivity, and reducing the emitter and collector junction widths. In mesa HBTs, minimum dimensions required for the base contact impose a minimum width for the collector junction, frustrating device scaling.

  17. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  18. Everyday Scale Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Elizabeth A.; Uttal, David H.; DeLoache, Judy S.

    2010-01-01

    Young children occasionally make "scale errors"--they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and…

  19. Scales of climate impacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Clark

    1985-01-01

    Climates, ecosystems, and societies interact over a tremendous range of temporal and spatial scales. Scholarly work on climate impacts has tended to emphasize different questions, variables, and modes of explanation depending on the primary scale of interest. Much of the current debate on cause and effect, vulnerability, marginality, and the like stems from uncritical or unconscious efforts to transfer experience,

  20. Scaling up as Catachresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The metaphor of scaling up is the wrong one to use for describing and prescribing educational change. Many of the strategies being employed to achieve scaling up are counter-productive: they conceive of practitioners as delivery agents or consumers, rather than as co-constructors of change. An approach to educational innovation based on the…

  1. Thoughts on Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    This essay reflects on the challenges of thinking about scale--of making sense of phenomena such as continuous professional development (CPD) at the system level, while holding on to detail at the finer grain size(s) of implementation. The stimuli for my reflections are three diverse studies of attempts at scale--an attempt to use ideas related to…

  2. Economies of scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Maier

    Working in groups of three, students analyze economies of scale. Each student constructs an individual short-run ATC curve, then the three students collaborate to determine if there are economies or diseconomies of scale and to create the long run ATC.

  3. Multi Scale Experimental Study of Concrete Rheology: From Water Scale to Gravel Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Toutou; N. Roussel

    2006-01-01

    Rheometric tests are carried out on cement based suspensions. Four scales are defined for this study: the saturating fluid\\u000a scale, the cement paste scale, the mortar scale and finally the concrete scale. Each scale is considered as a suspension defined\\u000a by its maximum granular class size. Each scale is obtained by adding a higher granular size to the previous scale.

  4. CAMBRIDGE PRESENT As a Cambridge anthropology

    E-print Network

    at the social and environmental impact of logging on the community. I fell in love with Serjali in- volved in a long conflict with log- gers, who themselves are mostly Peruvians displaced from the highlands by economic necessity or civil unrest, or mestizos, of mixed race. Logging is very hard work

  5. Parallel Computing in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement activities has been developed to provide an integrated framework for future methods development. Some of the major components of the SCALE parallel computing development plan are parallelization and multithreading of computationally intensive modules and redesign of the fundamental SCALE computational architecture.

  6. Low-voltage field emitter arrays through aperture scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, David George

    Field-emission arrays (FEAs) are under consideration for a variety of electronic device applications. The reduction of device turn-on and operating voltages has been a topic of intense FEA research. The purpose of this work was to explore the reduction of FEA operating voltage through scaling the gate aperture and the tip radius, with the ultimate objective of integrating FEAs with CMOS technology. This work will also examine the suitability of ``classical'' electron emission theories when dimensions are scaled. We report the results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of the scaling of field emitter array (FEA) gate apertures to 100 nm and below. Electrostatic simulation indicates that by scaling the gate aperture, it is possible to fabricate devices that will support flat panel display applications at a gate voltage of 15 V. We demonstrated 100-nm-gate aperture molybdenum FEAs that turned on at gate voltages as low as 12 V and achieved a current density of 10 ?A/cm 2 at 17 V. It was possible to modulate the emission current density of the molybdenum devices by three orders of magnitude with a gate voltage swing of 5 V. The concept of device scaling was then applied to a silicon system where ultra small field emitters were fabricated, using oxidation sharpening, at a 200 nm period with gate apertures as small as 70 nm. We demonstrated 70-nm-gate aperture silicon FEAs that turned on at gate voltages as low as 10 V and achieved emission currents of 1 ?A at V g of 13 V which represents an array current density of approximately 10,000 ?A/cm2. Currents as high as 30 ?A were measured at Vg of 21 V. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the tips verified that the tip radii have a lognormal distribution with a mean radius of 4.5 nm. The measured tip radii are consistent with the electrical characterization of the devices. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  7. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2008-09-01

    It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic and particle spectrum, from what is expected to be common sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as well as neutrinos, have created great excitement, lively discussions and have given birth to collaborations for joint analyses and observations. A special thank you to our non-gravitational wave presenters and participants for making the time to join us. We hope this will be the beginning of a long tradition for this workshop. In this workshop we also introduced the student prize for the best poster. Twenty student posters participated in this competition. Pinkesh Patel of Caltech was the prize winner on a 'Resampling Technique to Calculate the F-statistic', co-authored with X Siemens and R Dupuis. We are grateful to the MIT Kavli Institute for providing the financial support for the cash prize that accompanied this. We would like to thank the local and international organizing committees for putting together a great scientific program, all the conference presenters and participants and finally the CQG editorial staff for making this conference proceeding volume happen.

  8. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  9. Geological Time Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document describes how geologic time is approached in discussions of geologic topics. The uses of relative time and absolute time are compared, and a geologic time scale is provided to represent both concepts. References are provided.

  10. GSA Geologic Time Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    This Geological Society of America (GSA) site contains a detailed geologic time scale as an educational resource. It may be downloaded to a larger size, and includes all Eras, Eons, Periods, Epochs and ages as well as magnetic polarity information.

  11. Scaling in sensitivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Doherty, P.F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Population matrix models allow sets of demographic parameters to be summarized by a single value 8, the finite rate of population increase. The consequences of change in individual demographic parameters are naturally measured by the corresponding changes in 8; sensitivity analyses compare demographic parameters on the basis of these changes. These comparisons are complicated by issues of scale. Elasticity analysis attempts to deal with issues of scale by comparing the effects of proportional changes in demographic parameters, but leads to inconsistencies in evaluating demographic rates. We discuss this and other problems of scaling in sensitivity analysis, and suggest a simple criterion for choosing appropriate scales. We apply our suggestions to data for the killer whale, Orcinus orca.

  12. Lifshitz scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2015-02-01

    We analyse scale anomalies in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the anomalies for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the anomaly structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale anomalies are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal anomalies. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal anomalies to Lifshitz scale anomalies with a dynamical exponent equal to one.

  13. A Mesozoic time scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felix M. Gradstein; Frits P. Agterberg; James G. Ogg; Jan Hardenbol; Paul van Veen; Jacques Thierry; Zehui Huang

    1994-01-01

    We present an integrated geomagnetic polarity and stratigraphic time scale for the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods of the Mesozoic Era, with age estimates and uncertainty limits for stage boundaries. The time scale uses a suite of 324 radiometric dates, including high-resolution Ar-40\\/Ar-39 age estimates. This framework involves the observed ties between (1) radiometric dates, biozones, and stage boundaries, and

  14. Simple Scales FS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dan Bunker

    2004-01-01

    This interactive Flash applet provides a virtual environment in which students can explore the concept of weight/mass. They place virtual teddy bears on a pan scale to determine their weights. The bears weigh from 1 to 4 units and can be placed on the scale individually or in groups. The activity lends itself to mental addition and subtraction with values less than or equal to ten.

  15. Algebra Balance Scales - Negatives

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Utah State University

    2009-07-01

    This site provides a virtual balance on which the student can represent (and then solve) simple linear equations with integer answers. Conceptually, positive weights (unit-blocks and x-boxes) push the pans of the scale downward. Negative values are represented by balloons which can be attached to the pans of the scale. The student can then manipulate the weights to solve the equation while simultaneously seeing a visual display of these effects on the equation.

  16. Interactive Geological Time Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This time scale allows students to select multiple time periods from a list and view them on a highlighted display. It shows the relationship between eon, era, period, sub-period, and epoch and also includes the date in mega-annum (Ma) or millions of years before present. The scale reflects the changes in the Cenozoic Era (Tertiary and Quaternary have been eliminated and the Neogene modified) in the most recent International Stratigraphic Charts.

  17. J. Fluid Mech. (2000), vol. 407, pp. 5784. Printed in the United Kingdom c 2000 Cambridge University Press

    E-print Network

    Tong, Penger

    2000-01-01

    applications in engineering for more efficient heat transfer. 1. Introduction The discovery of scaling laws with rough upper and lower surfaces. The measured heat transport in the rough cell is found to be increased to the large-scale circulation and the ordered rough surface creates a secondary flow (eddies) in the groove

  18. [Suicidal Risk Scale].

    PubMed

    Granier, E; Boulenger, J Ph

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of para-suicidal patients is one of the main tasks for the practitioner in an emergency unit. There are now any characteristics known as suicide risk factors, like drug or alcohol abuse, past history of suicides in the family, or psychiatric disorder. However though these characteristics are useful to define high-risk populations, they are not always relevant in personal assessment. The more relevant variables in this case are psychological. Unfortunately, there are very few assessment scales in this area, since scales are usually related to the prediction of suicide or para-suicide before the act. The only existing tool for assessment after the act is the Beck Suicidal Intent Scale (SIS, 1974), which assesses the wish to die. Therefore we propose a new scale for a global assessment of parasuicide: it is an eleven-items scale, divided in four sections. Each section assesses: (1) the parasuicide itself, with the wish to die, the way to die and precautions against intervention; (2) the patient himself, with the premeditation level, an affective disorder existing before the act, the means of future, and environment effect (in a sense of protection or risk); (3) the global impression after the psychiatric interview: the emotionalism level, and the trust in the patient attitude; (4) the patient history: alcohol or drug abuse, personal past-parasuicide. The scale construction was empirical, from clinical practice, but it encompasses the nine high-risk variables found by Motto and Bostrom (1990) in an analysis of prospective data from 3,005 psychiatric patients at risk for suicide, focusing on 38 persons who committed suicide within 60 days of evaluation. Our study has been conducted on a 77 sample of para-suicidal patients in the psychiatrist emergency unit of the Avignon Hospital. For each patient, the score from our scale was calculated by psychiatric nurses after their own interview, before psychiatric examination, about 12 or 24 hours after the entrance in the emergency unit. Then, patients were classified in four groups according to the psychiatrist decision and orientation: exit (n = 7), consultation (n = 34), hospitalization (n = 24), hospitalization under constraint (n = 12). These groups mean theoretically an increasing global gravity: it is possible for example to hospitalize a parasuicidal patient because he wants to die, even without depression. Or in an other case, if he has a very serious psychiatric disorder (for example affective or psychotic), with a low-lethality para-suicide. Moreover, for a 22 sub-sample patients, the score from Beck-SIS was also calculated. The scale scores comparison in the four groups were made by analysis of variance: there was a statistically significant difference between groups as whole and individually (p < 0.001). In the second analysis, we defined two subsamples: the first one contains the hospitalized patients (n = 36) and the second one, the non-hospitalized (n = 41) patients. Statistically, from the scale scores, it was possible to define a threshold above which all the patients were hospitalized, and an other one under which all patients were not hospitalized. Third, there was a good correlation between lethality scores in our scale (first section) and the Beck SIS scores (r = 0.91). In conclusion, our scale seems to be well correlated with global gravity meant by parasuicide, to assess correctly suicidal intent, and to provide reliable indicators for hospitalization. However, some aspects are still missing in this study: we did not compare any sub-score with other well-known scales, assessing depression or hopelessness. On the other hand, we couldn't obtain prospective data on all the patients after their parasuicide. The following steps will be to carry on with these studies, as well as with the replication of our results on larger samples. PMID:11963341

  19. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  20. Elders Health Empowerment Scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Empowerment refers to patient skills that allow them to become primary decision-makers in control of daily self-management of health problems. As important the concept as it is, particularly for elders with chronic diseases, few available instruments have been validated for use with Spanish speaking people. Objective: Translate and adapt the Health Empowerment Scale (HES) for a Spanish-speaking older adults sample and perform its psychometric validation. Methods: The HES was adapted based on the Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form. Where "diabetes" was mentioned in the original tool, it was replaced with "health" terms to cover all kinds of conditions that could affect health empowerment. Statistical and Psychometric Analyses were conducted on 648 urban-dwelling seniors. Results: The HES had an acceptable internal consistency with a Cronbach's ? of 0.89. The convergent validity was supported by significant Pearson's Coefficient correlations between the HES total and item scores and the General Self Efficacy Scale (r= 0.77), Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale (r= 0.69) and Making Decisions Empowerment Scale (r= 0.70). Construct validity was evaluated using item analysis, half-split test and corrected item to total correlation coefficients; with good internal consistency (?> 0.8). The content validity was supported by Scale and Item Content Validity Index of 0.98 and 1.0, respectively. Conclusions: HES had acceptable face validity and reliability coefficients; which added to its ease administration and users' unbiased comprehension, could set it as a suitable tool in evaluating elder's outpatient empowerment-based medical education programs. PMID:25767307

  1. Scale Models and Diagrams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a set of three, one-page problems about the scale of objects in images returned by spacecraft. Learners will measure scaled drawings using high-resolution images of the lunar and martian surfaces. Options are presented so that students may learn about the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission through a NASA press release or by viewing a NASA eClips video [4 min.]. This activity is part of the Space Math multi-media modules that integrate NASA press releases, NASA archival video, and mathematics problems targeted at specific math standards commonly encountered in middle school.

  2. Global Scale Impacts

    E-print Network

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  3. Scaling a unitary matrix

    E-print Network

    Alexis De Vos; Stijn De Baerdemacker

    2015-02-06

    The iterative method of Sinkhorn allows, starting from an arbitrary real matrix with non-negative entries, to find a so-called 'scaled matrix' which is doubly stochastic, i.e. a matrix with all entries in the interval (0, 1) and with all line sums equal to 1. We conjecture that a similar procedure exists, which allows, starting from an arbitrary unitary matrix, to find a scaled matrix which is unitary and has all line sums equal to 1. The existence of such algorithm guarantees a powerful decomposition of an arbitrary quantum circuit.

  4. Image Scale Math

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is a booklet containing 11 problem sets and 9 "Extra for Experts" challenges. Learners use provided textual information to determine the scale (e.g., kilometers per millimeter) for images of the lunar surface, Mars, planets, stars and galaxies and then identify the smallest and largest features in the images according to their actual physical sizes. These problems involve measurement, dividing whole numbers, decimal mathematics, and scaling principles. Each set of problems is contained on one page. This booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  5. 5.NBT Kipton's Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-08-12

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Kipton has a digital scale. He puts a marshmallow on the scale and it reads 7.2 grams. How much would you expect 10 marshmallows to weigh? Why? Kipton ...

  6. Make a Balance / Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners create a kind of balance device using a wire coat hanger, some string, and paper cups. Learners use the balance to see how many jellybeans equals an apple, or create a scale and try to find the exact weight of something.

  7. The Social Integration Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Susan M.; Straus, Murray A.

    The Social Integration Scale (SIS) is intended to facilitate empirical research on the applicability of control theory to many types of adult crime, including "street crime," white collar crime, and physical assaults on spouses. There are five subscales: (1) belief (belief in law and social control); (2) commitment (psychological investment in…

  8. Scaling School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the research on turning around low performing schools to summarize what we know, what we don't know, and what this means for scaling school turnaround efforts. "School turnaround" is defined here as quick, dramatic gains in academic achievement for persistently low performing schools. The article first considers the case set…

  9. A moment magnitude scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomac C. Hanks; Hiroo Kanamori

    1979-01-01

    The nearly conincident forms of the relations between seismic moment Mo and the magnitudes ML, Ms, and Mw imply a moment magnitude scale M=2\\/3 log Mo-10.7 which is uniformly valid for 3<~ML<~ 7, 5 <~Ms<~7 1\\/2 and Mw> 7 1\\/2.

  10. Characteristic Scales During Reionization

    E-print Network

    Steven R. Furlanetto; Matthew McQuinn; Lars Hernquist

    2005-11-23

    One of the key observables of the reionization era is the distribution of neutral and ionized gas. Recently, Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga, & Hernquist developed a simple analytic model to describe the growth of HII regions during this era. Here, we examine some of the fundamental simplifying assumptions behind this model and generalise it in several important ways. The model predicts that the ionized regions attain a well-defined characteristic size R_c that ranges from R_c~1 Mpc in the early phases to R_c>10 Mpc in the late phases. We show that R_c is determined primarily by the bias of the galaxies driving reionization; hence measurements of this scale constrain a fundamental property of the first galaxies. The variance around R_c, on the other hand, is determined primarily by the underlying matter power spectrum. We then show that increasing the ionizing efficiency of massive galaxies shifts R_c to significantly larger scales and decreases the importance of recombinations. These differences can be observed with forthcoming redshifted 21 cm surveys (increasing the brightness temperature fluctuations by up to a factor of two on large scales) and with measurements of small-scale anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. Finally, we show that stochastic fluctuations in the galaxy population only broaden the bubble size distribution significantly if massive galaxies are responsible for most of the ionizing photons. We argue that the key results of this model are robust to many of our uncertainties about the reionization process.

  11. Large Scale Deployment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahamadou Toure; Patricia Stolf; Daniel Hagimont; Laurent Broto

    2010-01-01

    Current computing platforms become more and more complex for users to use. To simplify configuration and deployment of applications on these infrastructures tools are necessary. Current deployment tools lack of maturity for large-scale deployment. For example a grid environment leads to a great diversity. Deploying an application on a grid from a single centralized machine is not adapt. So, decentralization

  12. Molecular-scale electronics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARK A. REED

    1999-01-01

    A review of nonequilibrium electronic transport in molecules and molecular-scale synthetic systems is given. Although the basic concepts and mechanisms for electronic conduction in polymers have been discussed for some time, recently developed experimental techniques provide systems for their validation. New fabrication techniques that create metallic contacts to a small number of conjugated organic molecules allow the study of the

  13. Allometric scaling of countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Yu, Tongkui

    2010-11-01

    As huge complex systems consisting of geographic regions, natural resources, people and economic entities, countries follow the allometric scaling law which is ubiquitous in ecological, and urban systems. We systematically investigated the allometric scaling relationships between a large number of macroscopic properties and geographic (area), demographic (population) and economic (GDP, gross domestic production) sizes of countries respectively. We found that most of the economic, trade, energy consumption, communication related properties have significant super-linear (the exponent is larger than 1) or nearly linear allometric scaling relations with the GDP. Meanwhile, the geographic (arable area, natural resources, etc.), demographic (labor force, military age population, etc.) and transportation-related properties (road length, airports) have significant and sub-linear (the exponent is smaller than 1) allometric scaling relations with area. Several differences of power law relations with respect to the population between countries and cities were pointed out. First, population increases sub-linearly with area in countries. Second, the GDP increases linearly in countries but not super-linearly as in cities. Finally, electricity or oil consumption per capita increases with population faster than cities.

  14. Scaling up Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation contains several projects, each addressing different questions with different techniques. In chapter 1, I argue that they are unified thematically by their goal of "scaling up psycholinguistics"; they are all aimed at analyzing large data-sets using tools that reveal patterns to propose and test mechanism-neutral hypotheses about…

  15. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  16. Scaling the Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adventure Engineering,

    Continuing the Asteroid Impact challenge, students learn how to determine map distances and areas using a map scale. They also get a better feel for how much an area represents on a map in relation to the sizes they are suggesting for their underground caverns.

  17. Scale Factor X

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    In this game, students navigate a maze to get to a math challenge. The three challenges are: move blue and green "fuel cells" around to match the ratios in the given containers; measure shapes to determine the scale factors needed to make them match the given templates; determine how to place bases on a map based on clues involving proportions.

  18. PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    back and forth, tense Arched, rigid or jerking CRY No cry (awake or asleep) Moans or whimpers; occasional complaint Crying steadily, screams or sobs, frequent complaints CONSOLABILITY Content, relaxed for Scoring Post-operative Pain in Young Children (1997) Pediatric Nursing. 23(3): 293-297. #12;PAIN SCALES

  19. Scaling the Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adventure Engineering,

    Students learn how to determine map distances and areas using the map scale. They get a feel for how much an area represents on the map in relation to the size they are suggesting for their underground caverns to shelter the Alabraska population.

  20. A scale of Negroidness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanford Golin; Maria V. Mickwitz; Donald H. McBurney

    1971-01-01

    Examined whether perceived physiognomic negroidness is a scalable dimension that might be developed for research use. 103 white and 23 black psychology students served as raters of 91 color photographs of black and white 4th and 5th grade schoolchildren. Results suggest that negroidness can be quantified. 6 female and 6 male pictures, with known scale values, were selected for the

  1. Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This table presents the modified Mercalli Intensity Scale (MMI), a measure of earthquake intensity based on shaking severity and observed effects of earthquakes. It includes MMI value, a description of shaking severity, and a summary and full description of damage effects. Each MMI value is accompanied by an illustration showing its expected effects.

  2. Professor Sir Gabriel Horn MD ScD FRS FRCP, 9 Dec 1927 2 Aug 2012 Gabriel Horn was appointed to the Cambridge Chair of Zoology in 1977 and

    E-print Network

    to reveal the role of sleep in memory. Neural network modelling based on the neurobiological results in Neurobiology in the Department of Anatomy, University of Cambridge. His first publication, while a medical neurobiology. The work proceeded in a series of logical steps, eventually providing compelling evidence

  3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77 Massachusetts Ave, E40-279, Cambridge, MA 02139 Phone: 617.253.0753 > fax: 617.258.7570 > agelab@mit.edu > agelab.mit.edu

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77 Massachusetts Ave, E40-279, Cambridge, MA 02139 potential caregivers for every person #12;2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77, exhaustion, depression, and neglect of self-care (Family Caregiver Alliance, 2006). Family caregivers

  4. Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 72, pp. 1924. With 1 figure. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 19 Pervasive effects of P element mutagenesis on body size in

    E-print Network

    Mackay, Trudy F.C.

    1998-01-01

    Cambridge University Press 19 Pervasive effects of P element mutagenesis on body size in Drosophila on the second or third chromosome. The lines were scored for their body size, measured as thorax length. P inserts were associated with highly significant effects on body size, although the genotypes

  5. Genet. Res., Camb. (1997), 70, pp. 117124. With 3 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1997 Cambridge University Press 117 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X

    E-print Network

    Keightley, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cambridge University Press 117 Mapping quantitative trait loci for body weight on the X chromosome in mice of a large sex-linked effect accounting for 25% of the divergence between mouse lines selected for body cases, or 17% and 20% of the 10 week body weight in males and females respectively. Dominance effects

  6. The efficacy of lamotrigine in a resistant case of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosagro-Escámez, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Noelia; Gómez-Merino, Patricia; de la Vega, Irene; Carrasco, José L

    2011-01-01

    The individuals with depersonalizattion disorder suffer from a painful feeling that their body and mental experiences or the experiences of the environment seem become unreal, distant or mechanical. This phenomenon is often associated with other mental disorders, as in the case presented. Among the many psychoactive drugs studied, none of them has been shown to be the treatment of choice. Among those with which the best results are obtained are opioid receptor antagonists, the combination of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with lamotrigine and clorimipramine. We are presenting a resistant case that responded to lamotrigine. PMID:21769750

  7. Basal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Stanton, B R; David, A S; Cleare, A J; Sierra, M; Lambert, M V; Phillips, M L; Porter, R J; Gallagher, P; Young, A H

    2001-10-10

    Depersonalisation disorder may occur during severe anxiety or following a traumatic event, suggesting a possible role of stress hormones. This study investigated basal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with depersonalisation disorder. Salivary cortisol levels were measured at four time points over 12 h in patients with depersonalisation disorder (N=13), major depressive disorder (MDD, N=14) and healthy controls (N=13). Beck Depression Inventory scores were significantly higher in depersonalised subjects than controls, while MDD subjects demonstrated higher scores than both groups. Basal cortisol levels of depersonalised subjects were significantly lower than those of MDD subjects but not healthy controls. These results point to reduced basal activity of the HPA axis in depersonalisation disorder. This pilot study supports the distinction between depersonalisation disorder and major depressive disorder which should be examined in a larger sample. PMID:11600192

  8. Early Development of Scaling Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2004-01-01

    The map is a small-scaled version of the space it represents. It has been argued that children have difficulty interpreting maps because they do not understand scale relations. Recent research has shown that even preschoolers can solve problems that involve scaling in one dimension. This study examined whether early scaling ability extends to…

  9. Measuring Growth with Vertical Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    A vertical score scale is needed to measure growth across multiple tests in terms of absolute changes in magnitude. Since the warrant for subsequent growth interpretations depends upon the assumption that the scale has interval properties, the validation of a vertical scale would seem to require methods for distinguishing interval scales from…

  10. Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as much as 96 percent of total solids resided within 9 feet of the curb. Median accumulation rates of street solids and median washoff of street solids after rainstorms on multifamily and commercial land-use streets were also similar at about 33 and 22 pounds per curb-mile per day, and 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Results indicate that solids on the streets tested in Cambridge, Mass., can recover to pre-rainstorm yields within 1 to 3 days after washoff. The finer grain-size fractions tended to be more readily washed from the roadway surfaces during rainstorms. Street solids in the coarsest grain-size fraction on multifamily streets indicated an average net increase following rainstorms and are likely attributed to debris run-on from trees, lawns, and other plantings commonly found in residential areas. In seven experiments between May and December 2010, the median removal efficiency of solids from street surfaces following a single pass by a regenerative-air street cleaner was about 82 percent on study sites in the multifamily land-use streets and about 78 percent on the commercial land-use streets. Median street-solid removal efficiency increased with increasing grain size. This type of regenerative-air street cleaner left a median residual street-solid load on the street surface of about 100 pounds per curb-mile. Median concentrations of organic carbon and total phosphorus (P) on multifamily streets were about 35 and 29 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. The median total mass of organic carbon and total P in street solids on multifamily streets was 68 and 75 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. More than 87 percent of the mass of total P was determined to be in solids greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter for both land-use types. The median total accumulation rate for total P on multifamily streets was about 5 times greater than on commercial streets. Total P accumulation in the medium grain-size fraction was nearly the same for streets within both land-use types at 0.004 p

  11. Collagen structure deciphered CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--For the first time, an MIT researcher's atom-by-atom study of the

    E-print Network

    Buehler, Markus J.

    connection between quantum chemistry, molecular structure, material properties and collagen's physiological that begin at the atomistic scale treating individual chemical interactions based on quantum mechanical's work represents a breakthrough in understanding how molecular and tissue properties are linked

  12. Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M. (editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

  13. Small scale windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Robert; Vickers, Mike; Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank

    2007-01-01

    In this letter the authors report experimental results on an optimized small scale piezoelectric windmill, which can solve the problems associated with autonomous sensor networks in outdoor, remote or inaccessible locations. The whole structure of the windmill is made of plastic, and it utilizes 18 piezoelectric bimorphs which makes this design extremely cost effective. The windmill was tested at average wind speed of 10miles/h and it provided 5mW continuous power. The threshold wind speed for the windmill was found to be of the order of 5.4miles/h. Further, the authors present analysis on two other windmill structures which illustrate the design parameters required for small scale windmill.

  14. An elastica arm scale.

    PubMed

    Bosi, F; Misseroni, D; Dal Corso, F; Bigoni, D

    2014-09-01

    The concept of a 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free to slide in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measurement of load within a certain range of use. Finally, we show that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications for locomotion of serpents, plumbing and smart oil drilling. PMID:25197248

  15. On the outer scale of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, H. A. R.; Beyrich, F.

    2009-09-01

    The well-known Kolmogorov and Tatarskii similarity relations for spectra in the atmospheric surface layer are derived for an eddy-size region between the outer and inner scale (L0 and l0 respectively). Remarkably few studies are devoted to the outer scale L0. Tatarski (1992) defined it through the ratio of twice the variance and the structure parameter of temperature to the power 3/2. In most studies L0 is assumed to be proportional to the height z (Wheelon, 2001, pag. 79). In our study we will introduce an alternative definition for L0.. Next, its behavior will be investigated analyzing different data sets gathered under a wide range of conditions and observations height. During daytime, L0 appears to vary with z indeed, but with lot of scatter and systematic differences. The consequences of these findings for different remote sensing techniques such a scintillometry will be discussed. Tatarskii, V.I., 1992: Review of scintillation phenomena, in: Tatarskii et al. (Eds.): Wave Propagation in Random Media (Scintillation), Spie Press, 2-16. Wheelon, A.D., 2001: Electromagnetic Scintillation, part I Geometrical Optics, Cambridge University Press, 455 pp

  16. The Extragalactic Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Donahue, Megan; Panagia, Nino

    1997-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Early history of the distance scale problem, S. van den Bergh; Cosmology: From Hubble to HST, M. S. Turner; Age constraints nucleocosmochronology, J. Truran; The ages of globular clusters, P. Demarque; The linearity of the Hubble flow M. Postman; Gravitational lensing and the extragalactic distance scale, R. D. Blandford andT . Kundic; Using the cosmic microwave background to constrain the Hubble constant A. Lasenby and T M. Jones; Cepheids as distance indicators, N. R. Tanvir; The I-band Tully-Fisher relation and the Hubble constant, R. Giovanell; The calibration of type 1a supernovae as standard candles, A. Saha; Focusing in on the Hubble constant, G. A. Tammann & M. Federspiel; Interim report on the calibration of the Tully-Fisher relation in the HST Key Project to measure the Hubble constant, J. Mould et al.; Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale, W. L. Freedman, B. F. Madore and T R. C. Kennicutt; Novae as distance indicators, M. Livio; Verifying the planetary nebula luminosity function method, G. H. Jacoby; On the possible use of radio supernovae for distance determinations, K. W. Weiler et al.; Post-AGB stars as standard candles, H. Bond; Helium core flash at the tip of the red giant branch: a population II distance indicator, B. F. Madore, W. L. Freedman and T S. Sakai; Globular clusters as distance indicators, B. C. Whitmore; Detached eclipsing binaries as primary distance and age indicators, B. Paczynski; Light echoes: geometric measurement of galaxy distances, W. B. Sparks; The SBF survey of galaxy distances J. L. Tonry; Extragalactic distance scales: The long and short of it, V. Trimble.

  17. Skin, Scales and Skulls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center

    2009-01-01

    In this activity, learners examine body parts (including skin, scales, and skulls) from fish, mammals and reptiles. Questions are provided to help encourage learner investigations. Several activities are described, including object identification (what animal and what part of the animal?), free sorting of the objects, and a discussion of similarities, differences, and protective functions of the animal parts. It's written for use as a cart demo in a museum or aquarium, but could be done anywhere animal body parts are available.

  18. Scale invariant feature transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lindeberg

    2012-01-01

    Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is an image descriptor for image-based matching developed by David Lowe (1999, 2004). This descriptor as well as related image descriptors are used for a large number of purposes in computer vision related to point matching between different views of a 3-D scene and view-based object recognition. The SIFT descriptor is invariant to translations, rotations

  19. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  20. Scales and comparison classes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Clinton Bale

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses comparison classes—sets that relativize the interpretation of gradable adjectives, often specified with\\u000a for-clauses as in John is smart for a linguist. Such a discussion ultimately lends support to the thesis that scales, degrees, measure functions, and linear orders are\\u000a grammatically derived from more basic relations between individuals. Three accounts of comparison classes are compared and\\u000a evaluated. The