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  1. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  2. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements

  3. 75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (66 FR 51464, October 9, 2001) from four to seven... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains...

  4. The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge integrated clerkship: an innovative model of clinical education.

    PubMed

    Ogur, Barbara; Hirsh, David; Krupat, Edward; Bor, David

    2007-04-01

    The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (HMS-CIC) is a redesign of the principal clinical year to foster students' learning from close and continuous contact with cohorts of patients in the disciplines of internal medicine, neurology, obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. With year-long mentoring, students follow their patients through major venues of care. Surgery and radiology also are taught longitudinally, grounded in the clinical experiences of a cohort of patients and in a brief immersion experience working directly with an attending surgeon. Students participate in weekly, case-based tutorials integrating instruction in the basic sciences with training to address the common and important issues in medicine, as identified by national organizations. In addition, they participate in a social science curriculum that focuses on self-reflection, communication skills, ethics, population sciences, and cultural competence. In the pilot year (July 2004 to July 2005), HMS-CIC students performed at least as well as traditional students in tests of content knowledge and skills, as measured by National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Exams and the fourth-year Objective Structured Clinical Exam, and they scored higher on a year-end comprehensive clinical skills self-assessment examination, suggesting that they retained content knowledge better. From surveys, HMS-CIC students were much more likely to see patients before diagnosis and after discharge and to receive feedback and mentoring from experienced faculty than were their traditionally educated peers. HMS-CIC students expressed more satisfaction with their curriculum and felt better prepared to cope with the professional challenges of patient care, such as being truly caring, involving patients in decision making, and understanding how the social context affects their patients. PMID:17414198

  5. The Cambridge Experimentation Review Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reproduced is the report made by a citizens' group in Cambridge, Massachusetts and presented to the city council that outlines safety regulations for the conduct of recombinant DNA research at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (CS)

  6. Mass Deacidification in the Harvard University Library. A Report on the 1991/92 Pilot Operational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Univ. Library.

    This report examines the institutional level deacidification program that was formalized and instituted at Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts)) for its research libraries. The report is organized into six sections. The first section, which describes the project's background, discusses the acidic paper problem, available mass…

  7. The New Classified Research. Corporate Sponsored Biomedical Research and the Reign of Secrecy at Harvard University. A Harvard Watch Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Jaron

    Harvard Watch asserts that withholding essential information from public scrutiny is not uncommon at Harvard University. Maintaining that Harvard has reversed its position from extolling the virtues of public disclosure to one of imposing secrecy, the document suggests that this about face is linked to the university's recent collaboration with…

  8. The New Classified Research. Corporate Sponsored Biomedical Research and the Reign of Secrecy at Harvard University. A Harvard Watch Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Jaron

    Harvard Watch asserts that withholding essential information from public scrutiny is not uncommon at Harvard University. Maintaining that Harvard has reversed its position from extolling the virtues of public disclosure to one of imposing secrecy, the document suggests that this about face is linked to the university's recent collaboration with

  9. Embedding Sustainable Development at Cambridge University Engineering Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, Richard A.; Ainger, Charles M.; Cruickshank, Heather J.; Guthrie, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The paper seeks to examine the latest stage in a process of change aimed at introducing concepts of sustainable development into the activities of the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, UK. Design/methodology/approach--The rationale behind defining the skills which future engineers require is discussed and vehicles for

  10. Embedding Sustainable Development at Cambridge University Engineering Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, Richard A.; Ainger, Charles M.; Cruickshank, Heather J.; Guthrie, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The paper seeks to examine the latest stage in a process of change aimed at introducing concepts of sustainable development into the activities of the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, UK. Design/methodology/approach--The rationale behind defining the skills which future engineers require is discussed and vehicles for…

  11. Still a Bad Idea. A Critique of Harvard University's Medical Science Partners Proposal. A Harvard Watch Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Robert; Bourke, Jaron

    In 1988, Harvard University unveiled plans for Medical Science Partners (MSP), a venture capital fund intended to invest in and commercialize faculty biomedical projects. Critical of what is perceived as a "15 year long trend" wherein Harvard has "forged deeper and more extensive ties with the biomedical industry," the document asserts that MSP…

  12. Harvard University and the Emergence of International Collegiate Athletics, 1869-1874.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipping, Alar

    1984-01-01

    The influence that Harvard University has had on the development of international collegiate sports is explored. Rowing and football were the first athletic activities to be played by Harvard with colleges in other countries. (DF)

  13. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

  14. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these

  15. Much Ado about Something? James Bryant Conant, Harvard University, and Nazi Germany in the 1930s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Wayne J.; Smith, Marybeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the actions of noted Harvard University president James Bryant Conant, taken in regard to the Nazi government in Germany, from the time of Conant's becoming president of Harvard University in 1933 to the time of the widespread pogrom in Germany of 9-10 November 1938, known as Kristallnacht. Conant's attitudes and actions…

  16. 76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University has completed an inventory of human remains, in... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Peabody Museum of...

  17. Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective

  18. Harvard University High Energy Physics. [Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The mainly experimental research program in high energy physics at Harvard is summarized in a descriptive fashion according to the following outline: Proton{endash}antiproton colliding beam program at Fermilab -- CDF (forward/backward electromagnetic calorimeters -- FEM, central muon extension -- CMX, gas calorimetry and electronics development, front-end electronics upgrades, software development, physics analysis, timetable), electron -- positron collisions in the upsilon region -- CLEO (the hardware projects including CLEO II barrel TOF system and silicon drift detector R&D, physics analysis), search for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations with the NOMAD experiment at CERN, the solenoidal detector collaboration at the SSC, muon scattering at FNAL -- E665, the L3 experiment, and phenomenological analysis of high-energy {bar p}p cross sections. 149 refs.

  19. The Target of the Question: A Taxonomy of Textual Features for Cambridge University "O" Levels English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Shanti Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the typical textual features that are most frequently targeted in short-answer reading comprehension questions of the Cambridge University "O" Level English Paper 2. Test writers' awareness of how textual features impact on understanding of meanings in text decisions will determine to great extent their decisions

  20. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

  1. The Target of the Question: A Taxonomy of Textual Features for Cambridge University "O" Levels English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Shanti Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the typical textual features that are most frequently targeted in short-answer reading comprehension questions of the Cambridge University "O" Level English Paper 2. Test writers' awareness of how textual features impact on understanding of meanings in text decisions will determine to great extent their decisions…

  2. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points

  3. Counselling for Language Learning at the University of Cambridge. Progress Report on an Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Edith; Tealby, Amanda

    A counselling service to facilitate foreign language instruction for students desiring it was undertaken as an experiment at Cambridge University during the 1980-81 academic year. Its aims were twofold: (1) to provide a mechanism whereby students could be heard and their needs responded to, and (2) to insure that alternatives to the already…

  4. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society 1964-1972. A Final Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Program on Technology and Society.

    Eight years of research by the Harvard University's Program on Technology and Society are summarized. Lengthy abstracts of the 29 books and 164 articles that resulted from the Program, as well as interim accounts of projects not yet completed are presented. The report is divided into four parts; institutions (including business, education, and…

  5. Harvard University: Green Loan Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Green Loan Fund at Harvard University has been an active source of capital for energy efficiency and waste reduction projects for almost a decade. This case study examines the revolving fund's history from its inception as a pilot project in the 1990s to its regeneration in the early 2000s to its current operations today. The green revolving…

  6. Student and Course Factors Predicting Satisfaction in Undergraduate Courses at Harvard University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civian, Janet T.; Brennan, Robert T.

    This study investigated predictors of Harvard University (Massachusetts) student ratings of courses. Data were drawn from 33,180 evaluations of 1,114 undergraduate courses in 47 departments. Predictors examined at the student level included satisfaction with the course, perceived course difficulty, whether the course was in the student's major,…

  7. Lessons from Recent Web Surveys at Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheskis-Gold, Rena; Loescher, Ruth; Shepard-Rabadam, Elizabeth; Carroll, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the entire process necessary to developing a university-wide web survey, from the community-building process for creating support for the survey and determining the questions, to the specific tasks necessary for designing and administering an efficient web product. (Contains 17 tables.)

  8. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education. PMID:24899813

  9. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education. PMID:24899813

  10. Harvard Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    Excerpted from the second volume of his three-part autobiography, this essay describes B. F. Skinner's first year as a graduate student at Harvard University. Although he focuses on his study of psychology, particularly behaviorism, Skinner also discusses his interest in physiology. (JMD)

  11. The Potential Impact of High-Speed Networking on Teaching and Learning: A Case Study from Cambridge University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aston, J.; Gienke, M.

    1995-01-01

    A report on the SuperJANET high-speed network included interviews conducted at Cambridge University (England) on the use of computers and audiovisual aids in university teaching and learning. Results indicated the emergence of two main uses of the technology: (1) as a means of communication between students and teachers, and (2) as a means of…

  12. The Beginning of "Free Money" Ideology in American Universities: Charles W. Eliot at Harvard, 1869-1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Bruce A.; Johnson, Benjamin Ashby

    2012-01-01

    Rather than banking enormous gifts, Harvard University built its wealth by adhering to a coherent strategy that gradually became the common sense--the prevailing ideology--of how to build and maintain the wealth of private universities. President Charles W. Eliot formulated this "free money" strategy over the course of his administration from 1869…

  13. The Beginning of "Free Money" Ideology in American Universities: Charles W. Eliot at Harvard, 1869-1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Bruce A.; Johnson, Benjamin Ashby

    2012-01-01

    Rather than banking enormous gifts, Harvard University built its wealth by adhering to a coherent strategy that gradually became the common sense--the prevailing ideology--of how to build and maintain the wealth of private universities. President Charles W. Eliot formulated this "free money" strategy over the course of his administration from 1869

  14. Degrees of Influence: The Politics of Honorary Degrees in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, 1900-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Michael; Jons, Heike

    2007-01-01

    The universities of Oxford and Cambridge had developed different attitudes towards the award of honorary degrees through the early and middle decades of the twentieth century. Recently, both have adopted a similar cautious and apolitical stance. This essay describes the role of honorary degrees in the production and reproduction of their cultural…

  15. The EmbARK Programme: Project Update: DCI, the Harvard University Art Museums and EmbARK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notman, Andrea T.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the history of automation at the Harvard University Art Museums, the collaboration between the museum and a vendor in developing a collections management system, and the current status of the project from the museum's perspective. Topics include imaging technology and image management; file structure; and management of change. (LRW)

  16. Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied

  17. Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied…

  18. 75 FR 28648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology professional staff in...

  19. "He sees the development of children's concepts upon a background of sociology": Jean Piaget's honorary degree at Harvard University in 1936.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2004-02-01

    In the recent memory, Jean Piaget has been known as a cognitive developmental psychologist. But in 1936 when Harvard gave him his first honorary degree, he was recognized mainly as a sociologist. Why did Harvard honor him in 1936? Who knew his work well enough to nominate him? This article will address these questions by exploring archival documents from different sources. Evidence draws our attention to a broad social and intellectual endeavor in philanthropy, other social sciences, and especially industrial research that brought Piaget across the water. This article also attempts to interpret the circumstances of the nomination process inside and outside of Harvard University by using a theory of institutional design. It suggests that embodied in Harvard's honor of Piaget in 1936 was an idealistic act in social designing for a future society. PMID:15022668

  20. Harvard Observing Project (HOP): Undergraduate and graduate observing opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieryla, Allyson; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2014-06-01

    The Harvard Observing Project (HOP) engages undergraduate students in observational astronomy and gives graduate students extra teaching experience beyond their required teaching fellowships. This project offers students opportunities to see if they are interested in astronomy, introduces them to scientific research, and provides an opportunity for them to interact with graduate students in an informal setting. Observations are made using the 16” Clay Telescope atop the Science Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. We have observed as part of the Pro-Am White dwarf Monitoring (PAWM) and Target Asteroids! projects, and most recently we have been monitoring SN2014J in the Messier 82 galaxy (see poster by M. McIntosh).

  1. A world from brave to new: Talcott Parsons and the war effort at Harvard University.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, U

    1999-01-01

    This article argues that for Parsons and some of his colleagues at Harvard, the Second World War and the post-war period provided a context in which their work contributed to the transformation from totalitarianism to democracy in Central Europe (especially Germany) and Japan. The various agendas of Parsons' work are shown, supplemented by that of three of his colleagues with whom he collaborated (Gordon W. Allport, Carl J. Friedrich, Clyde Kluckhohn). The immediate effect of this work, for Parsons, however, meant frustration rather than fame, and his eventual reputation, I maintain, came unexpectedly with the third of his three attempts in the immediate post-war period to sum up what he believed were crucial insights that the Second World War had yielded concerning the ways in which sociology could contribute to the analytical understanding of democracy. The significance of this work is that it was both political and scientific. Because of the world situation of the 1940s, when the Holocaust in Germany was the nadir of civilization, Parsons believed that social science could contribute to the cause of making the world safe for future democracy. In the 1940s, this future depended on brave citizens, or such might have been Parsons' worldview. Targets envisaged for the 1950s, then, were community and citizenship in the newly democratic societies such as (West) Germany, the land that defeated Nazism. PMID:10398174

  2. Catching up with Harvard: Results from Regression Analysis of World Universities League Tables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses regression analysis to test if the universities performing less well according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world universities league tables are able to catch up with the top performers, and to identify national and institutional factors that could affect this catching up process. We have constructed a dataset of 461

  3. Catching up with Harvard: Results from Regression Analysis of World Universities League Tables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses regression analysis to test if the universities performing less well according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world universities league tables are able to catch up with the top performers, and to identify national and institutional factors that could affect this catching up process. We have constructed a dataset of 461…

  4. Implementation of the Harvard Case Method through a Plan-Do-Check-Act Framework in a University Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Ruey S.; Lyu, Jr Jung; Cheng, Yun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Harvard Business School began to promote the Harvard case method (HCM) within the Asian region. Because of differences in classroom culture between Asian and Western countries, Asian participants' reaction to the HCM implementation is of interest. This study explores how the western initiated method was implemented in one of the Asian…

  5. Implementation of the Harvard Case Method through a Plan-Do-Check-Act Framework in a University Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Ruey S.; Lyu, Jr Jung; Cheng, Yun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Harvard Business School began to promote the Harvard case method (HCM) within the Asian region. Because of differences in classroom culture between Asian and Western countries, Asian participants' reaction to the HCM implementation is of interest. This study explores how the western initiated method was implemented in one of the Asian

  6. Revision Planned for the Cambridge Latin Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebesta, Judith Lynn

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes a discussion on the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) held during the 1980 ACL Institute at the University of New Hampshire by CLC users and Cambridge University Press representatives. Emphasizes suggestions by users on grammar instruction strategies better suited to American students' needs. (MES)

  7. Report absolves Harvard in case of fakery.

    PubMed

    Broad, W J

    1982-02-12

    A committee composed of Harvard faculty members and the deans of the Johns Hopkins, New York University, and Tufts University medical schools has decided that Harvard Medical School officials acted reasonably in allowing John Darsee to perform research for six months after he confessed to fabrication of research data. Although the committee found justification for Harvard's slowness in notifying the National Institutes of Health that Darsee was working on a federal study, an NIH spokesman has faulted Harvard on national television for its delay in reporting the problem. Excerpts from the committee's report, and its suggestions for preventing dishonesty in scientific research, are included here. PMID:7058339

  8. How Harvard Rules: Reason in the Service of Empire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpbour, John, Ed.

    This collection of 26 essays examines the historical position of Harvard University as one of the nation's most influential institutions. Included are: (1) "Introducing Harvard: A Social, Philosophical, and Political Profile" (John Trumpbour); (2) "How Harvard is Ruled: Administration and Governance at the Corporate University" (Robert Weissman);…

  9. How Harvard Rules: Reason in the Service of Empire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpbour, John, Ed.

    This collection of 26 essays examines the historical position of Harvard University as one of the nation's most influential institutions. Included are: (1) "Introducing Harvard: A Social, Philosophical, and Political Profile" (John Trumpbour); (2) "How Harvard is Ruled: Administration and Governance at the Corporate University" (Robert Weissman);

  10. The Universities in a Steady State: The Prospect from Cambridge. Report of the General Board on the Long-Term Development of the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerva, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The report contains background to the present situation in Cambridge and nationally, discussion of decreasing growth rate and fixed upper limit to future growth, examination of "steady state" problems (e.g. how to maintain flexibility for change within a fixed budget), analysis of problems in transition to steady state including increase in…

  11. The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory: Contributions to World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folk, G. Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The war contributions of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory in Cambridge, MA, were recorded in 169 Technical Reports, most of which were sent to the Office of the Quartermaster General. Earlier reports were sent to the National Research Council and the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Many of the reports from 1941 and later dealt with

  12. The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory: Contributions to World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folk, G. Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The war contributions of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory in Cambridge, MA, were recorded in 169 Technical Reports, most of which were sent to the Office of the Quartermaster General. Earlier reports were sent to the National Research Council and the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Many of the reports from 1941 and later dealt with…

  13. An investigation into the impact of question structure on the performance of first year physics undergraduate students at the University of Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Valerie; Jardine-Wright, Lisa; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    We describe a study of the impact of exam question structure on the performance of first year Natural Sciences physics undergraduates from the University of Cambridge. The results show conclusively that a student’s performance improves when questions are scaffolded compared with university style questions. In a group of 77 female students we observe that the average exam mark increases by 13.4% for scaffolded questions, which corresponds to a 4.9 standard deviation effect. The equivalent observation for 236 male students is 9% (5.5 standard deviations). We also observe a correlation between exam performance and A2-level marks for UK students, and that students who receive their school education overseas, in a mixed gender environment, or at an independent school are more likely to receive a first class mark in the exam. These results suggest a mis-match between the problem-solving skills and assessment procedures between school and first year university and will provide key input into the future teaching and assessment of first year undergraduate physics students.

  14. Cambridge, 1945-1948.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Martin

    1987-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences at and perceptions of St. John's College, Cambridge, between 1945 and 1948. Relates influences on and changes in his social, cultural, political and artistic values. (DMM)

  15. Reflections on Boycotts: An Open Letter to the Harvard Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Derek C.

    The question of what the university should do when it purchases goods and services from firms that are said to have acted improperly is considered by the president of Harvard University. It has been proposed that Harvard join national boycotts to force companies to stop engaging in specific practices that are thought to be improper. Several…

  16. Selecting Research Collections for Digitization: Applying the Harvard Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2000-01-01

    Librarians at Harvard University have written the most comprehensive guide to selecting research collections for digitization. This article applies the Harvard Model to a digitization project at Indiana University in order to evaluate the appropriateness of the model for use at another institution and to adapt the model to local needs. (Contains 7…

  17. Buying Access to Ivy--A Way to Revive Harvard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    Of the many, many articles written on Harvard University's endowment woes, the author has yet to read one actually sympathetic with Harvard. Perhaps this reflects one's gleeful voyeurism when the high-and-mighty fall, or sense of justice that the reckless should pay for their recklessness, or belief that no university truly needs or deserves such

  18. Celebrations and Tough Questions Follow Harvard's Move to Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    In light of a decision by members of Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences to make access to their scholarly papers free, advocates of open access celebrated, but some publishers expressed concern. Members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to provide the university with copies of their published articles and…

  19. Buying Access to Ivy--A Way to Revive Harvard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    Of the many, many articles written on Harvard University's endowment woes, the author has yet to read one actually sympathetic with Harvard. Perhaps this reflects one's gleeful voyeurism when the high-and-mighty fall, or sense of justice that the reckless should pay for their recklessness, or belief that no university truly needs or deserves such…

  20. CAMPATH-1H (Cambridge University).

    PubMed

    Rioux, P

    1999-02-01

    CAMPATH-1H, a T-cell-depleting, humanized monoclonal antibody, is under development by LeukoSite and ILEX for the potential treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In August 1998, ILEX completed enrollment of a pivotal clinical trial of CAMPATH-1H in the treatment of CLL. The study has enrolled 94 patients at 20 centers in the US and Europe. It is anticipated that achievement of the target response would result in a biologics license application being filed with the FDA in mid-1999. Preliminary unaudited results reported by one of the clinical sites were positive. Additional potential therapeutic areas include vasculitis and multiple sclerosis. Preliminary studies have also shown the antibody may reverse acute renal transplant rejection episodes and be useful in ex vivo purging of bone marrow to remove potentially malignant cells. The US FDA has granted Fast Track designation to CAMPATH. The product has orphan drug status. PMID:16160950

  1. The RGO, Cambridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henbest, N.

    1986-08-01

    Despite intense lobbying by astronomers, MPs, local government officers and peers of the realm, the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) has confirmed its decision to move the Royal Greenwich Observatory from Herstmonceux. They have chosen Cambridge as the RGO's new home.

  2. Harvard and Money; A Memorandum on Issues and Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge , MA. Univ. Committee on Governance.

    This report discusses some of the financial issues and choices with which Harvard University will have to cope in an environment of increased stringency: issues of money-allocation, money raising, and money management. Part I presents highlights of Harvard's recent financial history and its prospects in quantitative terms. Part II presents some…

  3. Harvard Education Letter, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David T., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six issues in volume 16 of the Harvard Education Letter, a bimonthly newsletter addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Grade Inflation: What's Really behind All Those A's?" (Birk) and "Every Friday was Fight Day"…

  4. Harvard Education Letter, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David, T., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six issues in volume 17 of the Harvard Education Letter, a bimonthly newsletter addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Charters and Districts: Three Stages in an Often Rocky Relationship" (Kelly) and "'We Don't Allow…

  5. Harvard Education Letter, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David T., Editor

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 6 issues in volume 18 of the Harvard Education Letter, a bimonthly newsletter addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January/February--"Curriculum Access in the Digital Age" (David T. Gordon) and "Using Charters To Improve Urban Schools"…

  6. Harvard and the Academic Glass Ceiling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Drew Gilpin Faust was recently appointed president of Harvard University, and is the first female to hold the position. Women now lead half of the eight institutions that make up the Ivy League. But focusing on highly accomplished women such as Faust misses a larger point. Women may be taking faculty positions in record numbers, but most of those…

  7. HARVARD'S INDOOR AIR POLLUTION/HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An indoor air pollution/acute respiratory health study is being conducted by researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health. Upper and lower respiratory symptoms of 300 children living in Watertown, Massachusetts, have been recorded on a daily diary by a parent. Ev...

  8. Medicine at Harvard. The First 300 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry K.; Altschule, Mark D.

    An assessment of Harvard's contributions to medicine is less a chronology than an introduction to key discoveries and the ideas that made them possible, presented in the framework of medical education. The emphasis is on the men themselves as well as their medicine. Of major concern are the roles played by the University of Pennsylvania Medical…

  9. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Third Annual Report of the Executive Director, July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Program on Technology and Society.

    The report of the third year of Harvard's Program on Technology and Society contains summaries of research done on the relationship of technology to education, biomedical science, business, and social and political change in general. The research group on education, concentrating on secondary education, concluded that high schools in ten years are…

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 6, November-December 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) When Worlds Collide: Universal PreK Brings New Challenges for Public Elementary Schools (David McKay Wilson); (2) Answers and Questions: Schools Survey Their Students--and…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 6, November-December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Is History... History?: Standards, Accountability, and the Future of Our Nation's Past (Robert Rothman); (2) Curriculum Access for All: How Teachers Can Use Universal Design

  12. Alchemy in Cambridge. An Annotated Catalogue of Alchemical Texts and Illustrations in Cambridge Repositories.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Alchemy in Cambridge captures the alchemical content of 56 manuscripts in Cambridge, in particular the libraries of Trinity College, Corpus Christi College and St John's College, the University Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum. As such, this catalogue makes visible a large number of previously unknown or obscured alchemica. While extant bibliographies, including those by M.R. James a century ago, were compiled by polymathic bibliographers for a wide audience of researchers, Alchemy in Cambridge benefits from the substantial developments in the history of alchemy, bibliography, and related scholarship in recent decades. Many texts are here identified for the first time. Another vital feature is the incorporation of information on alchemical illustrations in the manuscripts, intended to facilitate research on the visual culture of alchemy. The catalogue is aimed at historians of alchemy and science, and of high interest to manuscript scholars, historians of art and historians of college and university libraries. PMID:26245008

  13. Exceptional Portable Sundials at Harvard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechner, Sara

    2014-06-01

    The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard University has the largest assemblage of sundials in North America. The dials date from the 16th to the 19th centuries, and most are designed to be carried in one’s pocket or put on a window sill. They take advantage of the sun’s changing altitude, azimuth, hour angle, or a combination of the foregoing in order to find the time. Many are also usable at a wide range of latitudes, and therefore are suitable tools for travelers. Fashioned of wood, paper, ivory, brass, and silver, the sundials combine mathematical projections of the sun’s apparent motion with artistry, fashion, and exquisite craftsmanship. This paper will explore the wide variety of sundials and what they tell us about the people who made and used them.

  14. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  15. The Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Colin R.; Bruno, Ian J.; Lightfoot, Matthew P.; Ward, Suzanna C.

    2016-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal–organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  16. Evolution of physics examining 1940-2000 at Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Brown, L. M.

    2001-07-01

    Much controversy exists about the supposed changing examination standards. Emphasis has been placed on the standards of GCSE and A-level examinations. However, many large employers recruit graduates, and so university examination standards also deserve attention. Here, Cambridge University Part II (third year undergraduate) examinations in Physics are studied since 1940. Trends in prescriptiveness, choice of questions, and other variables were found.

  17. Black Faculty at Harvard: Does the Pipeline Defense Hold Water?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore

    1994-01-01

    The hiring practices of Harvard University are examined as they relate to the argument that black college faculty members are not available because there are no blacks in the "pipeline" of Ph.D.s. This spurious defense is an anachronism that must be reexamined in considering racial diversity at America's universities. (SLD)

  18. SN 2014J and the Harvard Observing Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Melissa; Bieryla, Allyson; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Lewis, John A.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Alexander, Kate Denham; Blanchard, Peter

    2014-06-01

    A chance discovery on January 21, 2014 by Steve Fossey et al. of University College London during an undergraduate telescope training session revealed the closest type Ia supernova in the past 42 years. The bright SN 2014J was observed by undergraduates and graduate students alike in the Harvard Observing Project (see poster by A. Bieryla) with the Clay Telescope at Harvard University. Observations were obtained in multiple filters starting January 24, 2014, prior to the supernova reaching its peak brightness, and monitoring will continue as the supernova fades in brightness. We will present multiple band light curve photometry and color RGB images of SN 2014J and its host galaxy M82.

  19. AmeriFlux US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1)

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, J. William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1). Site Description - The Harvard Forest tower is on land owned by Harvard University. The site is designated as an LTER site. Most of the surrounding area was cleared for agrigulture during European settlement in 1600-1700. The site has been regrowing since before 1900 (based on tree ring chronologies) and is now predominantly red oak and red maple, with patches of mature hemlock stand and individual white pine. Overstory trees were uprooted by hurricane in 1938. Climate measurements have been made at Harvard Forest since 1964.

  20. Bit by Bit: Innovating at the Periphery to Extend Harvard's Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laserna, Catalina; Leitner, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Faculty instructional time is a critical resource at all universities, but particularly in a major research institution like Harvard. Operating on the periphery of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard's division of Continuing Education is often at a disadvantage when attempting to recruit senior faculty. However, through its distance…

  1. Investigating the Impact of Cambridge International Assessments on U.S. Stakeholders: Student and Teacher Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    As part of the continuing program to study the impact of its international assessments, the University of Cambridge International Examinations ("Cambridge") has undertaken a series of studies investigating the impact on a range of US stakeholders. This paper reports on research designed to respond to a series of washback and impact questions…

  2. Harvard participation in the UA1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlf, J.W.

    1985-12-31

    This report is a renewal proposal to continue Harvard`s participation in the UA1 experiment on proton-antiproton collisions. The proposed activity emphasizes events with large missing energy and W and Z neutral decays. (LSP)

  3. HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS PROGRESS REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

    THIS REPORT OF HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS PRESENTS DRAFTS OF THREE SPEECHES DELIVERED TO THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICS TEACHERS (AAPT) MEETING, FEBRUARY, 1967. THE ADDRESS BY GERALD HOLTON DEALS WITH THE AIMS AND PROGRESS OF THE PROJECT. DISCUSSED ARE (1) PROJECT PARTICIPANTS, (2) AIMS AND CONTENT, (3) THE NEW EMPHASIS, (4) SURVEY OF COURSE

  4. The Harvard Education Letter, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves-Desai, Kelly, Ed.; Eaton, Susan, Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of volume 14 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in the six issues of this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Multi-Age Classrooms: An Age-Old Grouping Method Is Still Evolving" (Walser), "Teachers Wanted:…

  5. The Harvard Education Letter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Edward Ed.; Graves-Desai, Kelly, Ed.; Maloney, Karen, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document is comprised of volume 12 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary-secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Early Reports From Kentucky on Cash Rewards for 'Successful' Schools Reveal Many Problems" (Miller), "New Ideas Like…

  6. The Harvard Education Letter, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Edward, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document is comprised of volume 11 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in the volume's six issues are: (1) January-February--"The Old Model of Staff Development Survives in a World Where Everything Else Has Changed" (Miller), "Giving Voice to Our…

  7. Harvard Humanities Students Discover the 17th Century Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt's new course, "Travel and Transformation in the Early 17th Century." The product of an intense, months-long collaboration between computing specialists, graduate students, librarians, and scholars, the course makes innovative use of all the tools and technical know-how a major university

  8. Getting Personal: Harvard Medical School's Approach to Debt Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program of the financial aid office at Harvard University Medical School (Massachusetts) that helps students with debt management and personal financial planning through presentations to seniors by professionals in insurance and financial planning and by offering two individual consultations with a physician financial planning…

  9. Meeting the Challenge, Overcoming the Odds: Harvard Student Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauchupin, Marcella; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Four Native American graduate students from Harvard University discuss experiences that led them to pursue advanced degrees, challenges they have experienced in higher education, the relevance of their cultures and languages to their education, the racism encountered in their college careers, and resources they have created to help support them in…

  10. Harvard and MIT to offer free online college courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2012-06-01

    A 60m initiative to provide free online academic courses has been set up by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Called edX, it will be open to anyone and will not involve any form of admissions process.

  11. Evaluation Report of Indian Education Administrator Training Program at Universities of Harvard, Penn State, and Minnesota. (Graphic Description). Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 22.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitka, Eugene; And Others

    Cost-effectiveness of the American Indian Administrator Training Program as implemented at three universities constitutes the focus of this Bureau of Indian Affairs' program evaluation. This evaluation represents data derived from program participant questionnaires; onsite visits; personal interviews (students, directors, professors, and

  12. The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    2003-10-01

    The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System provides a comprehensive, funamental, and up-to-date description of the solar system. It is written in a concise, light and uniform style, without being unnecessarily weighted down with specialized materials or the variable writing of multiple authors. It is filled with vital facts and information for astronomers of all types and for anyone with a scientific interest in the Earth, our Moon, all the other planets and their satellites, and related topics such as asteroids, comets, meteorites and meteors. The language, style, ideas and profuse illustrations will attract the general reader as well as professionals. A thorough report for general readers, it includes much compact reference data. Metaphors, similes and analogies will be of immense help to the lay person or non-science student, and they add to the enjoyment of the material. Vignettes containing historical, literary and even artistic material make this book unusual and interesting, and enhance its scientific content. Kenneth Lang is professor of astronomy in the Physics and Astronomy Department at Tufts University. He is the author of several astrophysics books, including The Sun from Space (Springer Verlag, 2000), Astrophysical Formulae: Radiation, Gas Processes, and High Energy Physics (Springer Verlag, 1999), Sun, Earth and Sky (Copernicus Books, 1997), Astrophysical Data: Planets and Stars (Springer Verlag, 1993), and Wanderers in Space: Exploration and Discovery in the Solar System (Cambridge, 1991),

  13. Space Radar Image of Harvard Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the area surrounding the Harvard Forest in north-central Massachusetts that has been operated as a ecological research facility by Harvard University since 1907. At the center of the image is the Quabbin Reservoir, and the Connecticut River is at the lower left of the image. The Harvard Forest itself is just above the reservoir. Researchers are comparing the naturally occurring physical disturbances in the forest and the recent and projected chemical disturbances and their effects on the forest ecosystem. Agricultural land appears dark blue/purple, along with low shrub vegetation and some wetlands. Urban development is bright pink; the yellow to green tints are conifer-dominated vegetation with the pitch pine sand plain at the middle left edge of the image appearing very distinctive. The green tint may indicate pure pine plantation stands, and deciduous broadleaf trees appear gray/pink with perhaps wetter sites being pinker. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 42.50 degrees North latitude and 72.33 degrees West longitude and covers an area of 53 kilometers 63 by kilometers (33 miles by 39 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received.

  14. K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson's Phenocam project, a network of near remote sensing digital phenology cameras that send images of forest, shrub, and grassland vegetation cover at more than 130 diverse sites in North America to the digital archives at the University of New Hampshire. Our school district is now part of this network providing a digital image every half hour of the mixed deciduous/ coniferous forest canopy due north from Overlook Middle School in Ashburnham, Massachusetts. As a part of the Phenocam network, students at the K-12 level have expanded the scope of phenological monitoring that is part of the Harvard Forest LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program protocol, Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming. I have developed a series of lessons comparing student data to phenology data derived from Phenocam network images and Modis satellites. The Phenocam Project and the RET program is supported by NASA.

  15. The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, Brian

    The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

  16. Harvard U. Receives First U.S. Patent Issued on Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A patent awarded to Harvard University for the genetic alteration of mice in cancer research is the first ever issued on an animal, at the same time that legislation putting a moratorium on animal patents is pending in Congress. (MSE)

  17. Harvard's Economics Department. The Storm over Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipset, Seymour Martin

    1975-01-01

    Presents an historical perspective and an analysis of the current problems being faced by the Harvard Department of Economics concerning faculty appointments, faculty ideology, and student attitudes. (PG)

  18. Reflections on Divestment of Stock: An Open Letter to the Harvard Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Derek C.

    The proposal that Harvard University sell its stock in American corporations in South Africa is discussed by the university's president. The proposal is based on the desire that the university respond as part of a pressure group using the leverage of purchases, endowment, and prestige as a university to push for social or political ends. Many…

  19. RELIGIOUS ATTITUDES OF COLLEGE STUDENTS AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY, RADCLIFFE COLLEGE, AND LOS ANGELES CITY COLLEGE--HIGHLIGHTS OF COMPARATIVE STUDIES MADE IN 1946-48 AND IN 1966-67.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOLD, BENJAMIN KNOX

    QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEYS OF THE RELIGIOUS ATTITUDES OF STUDENTS AT HARVARD, RADCLIFFE, AND LOS ANGELES CITY COLLEGE (LACC) WERE CONDUCTED IN 1946-48 AND AGAIN IN 1966-67. SELECTED RESULTS FROM THE TWO STUDIES ARE COMPARED. AT EACH OF THE INSTITUTIONS RELIGIOUS BELIEFS HAVE BECOME MORE LIBERAL SINCE 1946, BUT RELIGIOUS COMMITMENT AND TRADITIONAL…

  20. The Harvard Mystique. The Power Syndrome That Affects Our Lives, From Sesame Street to the White House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Enrique Hank

    Harvard University's effect on American life is examined through investigation of its pervasive mystique, magnitude of power, fallacies, controversies, and its ramifications on both the national and international scenes. Viewed from its modest beginning in 1638 to the present, Harvard is described as "a multinational academic conglomerate, the…

  1. Alliances in Human Biology: The Harvard Committee on Industrial Physiology, 1929-1939.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Jason

    2015-08-01

    In 1929 the newly-reorganized Rockefeller Foundation funded the work of a cross-disciplinary group at Harvard University called the Committee on Industrial Physiology (CIP). The committee's research and pedagogical work was oriented towards different things for different members of the alliance. The CIP program included a research component in the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Elton May's interpretation of the Hawthorne Studies; a pedagogical aspect as part of Wallace Donham's curriculum for Harvard Business School; and Lawrence Henderson's work with the Harvard Pareto Circle, his course Sociology 23, and the Harvard Society of Fellows. The key actors within the CIP alliance shared a concern with training men for elite careers in government service, business leadership, and academic prominence. But the first communications between the CIP and the Rockefeller Foundation did not emphasize training in human biology. Instead, the CIP presented itself as a coordinating body that would be able to organize all the varied work going on at Harvard that did not fit easily into one department, and it was on this basis that the CIP became legible to the President of Harvard, A. Lawrence Lowell, and to Rockefeller's Division of Social Sciences. The members of the CIP alliance used the term human biology for this project of research, training and institutional coordination. PMID:26024783

  2. When Harvard said no to eugenics: the J. Ewing Mears Bequest, 1927.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    James Ewing Mears (1838-1919) was a founding member of the Philadelphia Academy of Surgery. His 1910 book, The Problem of Race Betterment, laid the groundwork for later authors to explore the uses of surgical sterilization as a eugenic measure. Mears left $60,000 in his will to Harvard University to support the teaching of eugenics. Although numerous eugenic activists were on the Harvard faculty, and two of its Presidents were also associated with the eugenics movement, Harvard refused the Mears gift. The bequest was eventually awarded to Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. This article explains why Harvard turned its back on a donation that would have supported instruction in a popular subject. Harvard's decision illustrates the range of opinion that existed on the efficacy of eugenic sterilization at the time. The Mears case also highlights a powerful irony: the same week Harvard turned down the Mears legacy, the U.S. Supreme Court endorsed eugenic sterilization in the landmark case of Buck v. Bell. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., graduate of Harvard and former member of its law faculty wrote the opinion in that case, including the famous conclusion: "Three generations of imbeciles are enough." PMID:25959351

  3. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  4. Harvard participation in the UA1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlf, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a renewal proposal to continue Harvard's participation in the UA1 experiment on proton-antiproton collisions. The proposed activity emphasizes events with large missing energy and W and Z neutral decays. (LSP)

  5. The Four Faces of Harvard's EFB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1974

    1974-01-01

    In designing the Educational Facilities Building for Harvard's school of Public Health, the architect had to reconcile a modern building not only with the older structures around it, but also with a trapezoidal site. (Author/MLF)

  6. The Harvard Radio Meteor Project Meteor Velocity Distribution Reappraised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. D.

    1995-07-01

    The relative distribution of atmospheric encounter speeds at constant mass for observations made as part of the Harvard Radio Meteor Project synodic year observations has been recalculated using a cumulative mass index, α = 1.1 ± 0.1, and the mass velocity relation from F. Verniani (1973, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 8429-8462), γ = 4.23 ± 0.07. A discrepency in the bias-corrected values reported by Z. Sekanina and R. B. Southworth (1975, NASA Contractor Report CR 2316, Smithsonian Institution, Cambridge, MA) is identified as a possible typographical error with the relative numbers of high speed meteors increased by 10 2 times over that of the previous analysis. The reappraised distribution is in good agreement with that reported by J. E. Erickson (1968, J. Geophys. Res. 73, 3721-3762) but is based on data with considerably improved statistical reliability and samples a mass range more directly applicable to spacecraft impact studies. The mean impact speed weighted to equivalent crater diameter using a mass-velocity relation, mv2, is 23.6 km sec -1. This value moves the S. G. Love and D. E. Brownlee (1993, Science 262, 550-553) mass influx peak to 8 × 10-6 g (175-μm-diameter particles), half the previous mass, and brings their cumulative flux curve into much closer agreement with Grün et al. (1985, Icarus 62, 244-272).

  7. Unfinished Business: Luyten's Harvard Variables - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David B.

    2000-08-01

    W. J. Luyten discovered 1,764 variable stars during the Bruce Proper Motion Survey of the southern sky on Harvard plates during the 1930s. Most have remained unstudied to the present day because the variables are generally fainter than 12th magnitude and Luyten did not publish identification charts. This paper begins an investigation of Luyten's variables on Harvard patrol plates and reports types, periods, magnitude ranges, improved positions, and finding charts for UV Pyx, HS Vel, NSV 4234, and NSV 4286.

  8. The Rise and Demise of Harvard's B.S. Program in Anatomy, Physiology, and Physical Training: A Case of Conflicts of Interest and Scarce Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Roberta J.

    1992-01-01

    A century ago, Harvard University established a B.S. degree program in anatomy, physiology, and physical training. The paper examines the circumstances surrounding the program's inception and rapid demise, focusing on nineteenth-century interest in the subject and related developments at Harvard. (SM)

  9. 6. Photocopy of lithograph (from Cambridge Historical Commission) Ebenezer Tappan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of lithograph (from Cambridge Historical Commission) Ebenezer Tappan and Lodowick H. Bradford, lithographers ca. 1850 EAST FRONT - Middlesex County Superior Court Building, Third, Otis & Thorndike Streets, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  10. 1. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST (OLD HARVARD STREET BRIDGE AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST (OLD HARVARD STREET BRIDGE AT LEFT, NEW BRIDGE AT RIGHT) - Old Harvard Street Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek at National Zoological Park, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  12. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the

  13. Race and Higher Education: Rethinking Pedagogy in Diverse College Classrooms. Harvard Educational Review Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Annie, Ed.; Tuitt, Frank, Ed.

    This collection, reprinted from the "Harvard Educational Review," is designed to help educators understand how the changing demographics of the college and university students in this country have complicated the manner in which higher education institutions think about what it means to teach in racially diverse classrooms. Part 1, "Racial and…

  14. Teaching for Understanding: Harvard Comes to Pennell Elementary. A Teacher Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    During the 2002-03 school year, one Philadelphia fifth grade class developed a core curriculum designed to teach every child the 21st century basic skills: the ability to think, learn, and create. This effort was a pilot for a rigorous Harvard University based program to develop proficiency for each child in a mixed ability classroom of 29…

  15. Evolution of SOLAR, Harvard's Client/Server-Based Fundraising Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, James E.

    1995-01-01

    The Harvard University (Massachusetts) central computing and development offices collaborated to develop a prototype client/server fund-raising system that allows personnel to easily and quickly access and share prospect information. Its successful development is attributed to use of some traditional project management principles and practices.…

  16. Cambridge Elementary students enjoy gift of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Children at Cambridge Elementary School, Cocoa, Fla., eagerly unwrap computer equipment donated by Kennedy Space Center. Cambridge is one of 13 Brevard County schools receiving 81 excess contractor computers thanks to an innovative educational outreach project spearheaded by the Nasa k-12 Education Services Office at ksc. Behind the children is Jim Thurston, a school volunteer and retired employee of USBI, who shared in the project. The Astronaut Memorial Foundation, a strategic partner in the effort, and several schools in rural Florida and Georgia also received refurbished computers as part of the year-long project. Ksc employees put in about 3,300 volunteer hours to transform old, excess computers into upgraded, usable units. A total of $90,000 in upgraded computer equipment is being donated.

  17. The Annie Jump Cannon Video Project at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupfer, C.; Welther, B. L.; Griswold, A.

    1993-05-01

    The heart of this poster paper is the screening of the new 25-minute educational video, ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors.'' It explores the life and work of Annie Jump Cannon through the eyes of sixth-grade students. A production of the Science Media Group at the CfA, the video was created to interest and inspire girls and minorities, in particular, to continue their study of history and physical science in high school. Recent studies show that science teachers are successfully using videotapes in the classroom to supplement traditional methods of teaching. Other reports show that capable girls and minority students tend to drop science in high school. Our goal, then, was to create a video to stimulate the curiosity and natural interest in science of these younger students. With the help of the Public Affairs Office at the CfA, we arranged to visit local schools to talk to sixth-grade science teachers and their students about the video project. Boys and girls were both eager to participate in it. By lottery, we chose a dozen youngsters of multi-cultural backgrounds to attend a three-day workshop, during which we videotaped them discovering facts about Cannon's childhood and career. Barbara Welther, historian and principal investigator, took the group to the Harvard University Archives to look at some Cannon memorabilia. To learn about spectra, each student assembled a spectroscope from a kit and observed solar lines. CfA astronomers then led the group in various activities to explore the types of stellar spectra that Cannon classified and published in The Henry Draper Catalogue 75 years ago.% and that astronomers still study today. ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors'' shows young people actively engaged in the process of discovery and offers teachers a novel tool to stimulate discussion of topics in science, history, women's studies, and careers. It is intended for use in schools, libraries, museums, planetariums, as well as for personal interest. For more information and/or a copy of the videotape, contact the authors at the CfA, Cambridge, MA.

  18. A guide to the Harvard referencing system.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, M

    This article explains how to reference an academic work using the Harvard system. Instructions comply with the relevant British standards, i.e. BS 5605:1990, BS 1629:1989 and BS 6371:1983. The importance of referencing in an approved manner is discussed and problem areas such as joint authors, corporate authorship and unpublished works are examined. The issue of second-hand references that are not addressed by the standards is also explained. PMID:7599488

  19. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 12, 871-875, (1998). W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, and A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels. Chemical Society Reviews , 27, 1998. S. Lou, F. Holland, F. Rohrer, K. Lu, B. Bohn, T. Brauers, C. C. Chang, H. Fuchs, R. Häseler, K. Kita, Y. Kondo, X. Li, M. Shao, L. Zeng, A. Wahner, Y. Zhang, W. Wang, and A. Hofzumahaus, Atmospheric OH reactivities in the Pearl River Delta - China in summer 2006: measurement and model results, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 11243-11260, (2010). V. Sinha, J. Williams, J.N. Crowley, and J. Lelieveld., The Comparaptive Reactivity Methode - a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air, Atmos. Env., 38, 2511-2522, (2008).

  20. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  1. Imagining Harvard: Changing Visions of Harvard in Fiction, 1890-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Christian K.; Clark, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Harvard is easily the most recognizable American institution of higher education, freighted with rich associations to the nation's leaders. This article provides an opportunity to examine the history of higher education through a lens often overlooked--fiction. By doing so, the authors provide a richer understanding of a particular institution and…

  2. Imagining Harvard: Changing Visions of Harvard in Fiction, 1890-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Christian K.; Clark, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Harvard is easily the most recognizable American institution of higher education, freighted with rich associations to the nation's leaders. This article provides an opportunity to examine the history of higher education through a lens often overlooked--fiction. By doing so, the authors provide a richer understanding of a particular institution and

  3. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  4. The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, Michael

    Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might revolve around the sun? How did Christopher Columbus abuse his knowledge of a lunar eclipse predicted by an astronomical almanac? Packed with anecdotes and intriguing detail, this book describes how we observed the sky and interpreted what we saw at different periods of history; how this influenced our beliefs and mythology; and how great astronomers contributed to what we now know. The result is a lively and highly visual history of astronomy - a compelling read for specialists and non-specialists alike.

  5. Crimson Tide: The Harvard Books on Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    The Harvard Books on Astronomy, a series of crimson clad, fully illustrated volumes, cornered, for more than a generation, the market of readers interested in astronomy. A large number of astronomers owe their first serious initiation to the literature of astronomy to these books. Their style, presentation, design, and tone marked a clear departure from the inherited traditions in the field. Each summed up a field, awarded points for merit, and staked out paths for future study. No doubt each of the more mature readers of this abstract has his or her favorite volume, and even his or her own favorite edition of a particular volume. How the volumes evolved and what happened to the series with Harlow Shapley's retirement are not only questions in the history of the book but also form a commentary on the standards of scientific writing for the educated public. For this the major evidence comes from the volumes by Shapley himself, Leo Goldberg and Lawrence Aller, and the Boks. This paper discusses the origins of the series, the purpose of the works, the varying successes of the volumes, and the impact they had on the future astronomical community. In part, this is a contribution to the impact of Harlow Shapley upon the wider field and the role of Harvard in the American astronomical community. It is also a meditation upon the ways of recruitment into the field and forming ways of looking at research problems.

  6. Political Activity at Harvard College Observatory in the Shapley ERA (1921-1952): Controversy and Consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, Barbara L.

    1993-12-01

    Soon after Harlow Shapley became director of HCO in 1921, he established himself as a scientist who would speak out and take action on national and international issues. Recognizing the importance of international cooperation in astronomy, he frequently traveled abroad and in turn invited foreign scientists to visit and work at HCO. By the mid-1930s, Shapley was actively rescuing refugee scientists in war-torn Europe and placing them in American universities. Both Harvard and the FBI took note of his activities. Shapley feared intervention of any kind from either academia or the government. Desperate for funding, however, he finally went to Washington and lobbied Congress to set up the NSF. Through 1945, when Truman succeeded Roosevelt, Shapley pursued his political activities freely. That year he travelled to Moscow to represent Harvard at the 220th anniversary celebration of the Academy of Sciences. In Moscow he advocated international cooperation between Soviet and American scientists. Consequently, Shapley was subpoenaed for interrogation in 1946 by John Rankin, who served during the Truman administration as a one-man committee to investigate un-American activities. The ordeal infuriated Shapley. Headlines about it infuriated some Harvard alumni who urged the university to fire him. Although Shapley was nearing retirement, President Conant stood by his right to keep his job. By 1950, when Senator Joseph McCarthy was compiling a list of Communist sympathizers in the State Department, the FBI had a dossier on Shapley. McCarthy subpoenaed Shapley, but could not intimidate him. The Senator continued the witch hunt with Shapley's associates. First he harassed Martha Betz Shapley, then Donald Menzel. Both cleared themselves. Other associates, such as Bart Bok, were spared. Ultimately, the interrogation worked in Menzel's favor. It disassociated him from Shapley's ideology and political activities. When the Harvard Corporation sought the next director of HCO, Menzel became the candidate of choice.

  7. The Harvard Pigeon Lab under Herrnstein.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2002-01-01

    The history of the Harvard Pigeon Lab is a history of two periods of remarkable productivity, the first under Skinner's leadership and the second under Herrnstein's. In each period, graduate students flocked to the leader and then began stimulating one another. Chance favored Herrnstein's leadership, too, because an unusually large number of graduate students were admitted in the fall of 1962. In each period, productivity declined as the leader lost interest in the laboratory and withdrew. Directly and indirectly, the laboratory finally died as a result of the cognitive "revolution." Skinner and his students saw the possibility of a natural science of behavior and set about establishing that science based on concepts such as response rate, stimulus control, and schedules of reinforcement. Herrnstein and his students saw that the science could be quantitative and set about making it so, with relative response rate, the matching law, and the psychophysics of choice (analogous to S. S. Stevens' psychophysics). The history might provide a golden research opportunity for someone interested in the impact of such self-organizing research groups on the progress of science. PMID:12083686

  8. Stack-Based Buffer Overflows in Harvard Class Embedded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Kristopher; Oman, Paul

    Many embedded devices used to control critical infrastructure assets are based on the Harvard architecture. This architecture separates data and program memory into independent address spaces, unlike the von Neumann architecture, which uses a single address space for data and program code. Buffer overflow attacks in desktop and server platforms based on the von Neumann model have been studied extensively. However, buffer overflows in Harvard architectures have only just begun to receive attention. This paper demonstrates that stack-based buffer overflow vulnerabilities exist in embedded devices based on the Harvard architecture and that the vulnerabilities are easily exploited. The paper shows how the reversal in the direction of stack growth simplifies attacks by providing easier access to critical execution controls. Also, the paper examines defense techniques used in server and desktop systems and discusses their applicability to Harvard class machines.

  9. The Case for Sustainable Laboratories: First Steps at Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolliams, Jessica; Lloyd, Matthew; Spengler, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratories typically consume 4-5 times more energy than similarly-sized commercial space. This paper adds to a growing dialogue about how to "green" a laboratory's design and operations. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is divided into three sections. The first section reviews the background and theoretical issues. A case is made…

  10. The Case for Sustainable Laboratories: First Steps at Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolliams, Jessica; Lloyd, Matthew; Spengler, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratories typically consume 4-5 times more energy than similarly-sized commercial space. This paper adds to a growing dialogue about how to "green" a laboratory's design and operations. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is divided into three sections. The first section reviews the background and theoretical issues. A case is made

  11. Root phenology at Harvard Forest and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramoff, R. Z.; Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Roots are hidden from view and heterogeneously distributed making them difficult to study in situ. As a result, the causes and timing of root production are not well understood. Researchers have long assumed that above and belowground phenology is synchronous; for example, most parameterizations of belowground carbon allocation in terrestrial biosphere models are based on allometry and represent a fixed fraction of net C uptake. However, using results from metaanalysis as well as empirical data from oak and hemlock stands at Harvard Forest, we show that synchronous root and shoot growth is the exception rather than the rule. We collected root and shoot phenology measurements from studies across four biomes (boreal, temperate, Mediterranean, and subtropical). General patterns of root phenology varied widely with 1-5 production peaks in a growing season. Surprisingly, in 9 out of the 15 studies, the first root production peak was not the largest peak. In the majority of cases maximum shoot production occurred before root production (Offset>0 in 32 out of 47 plant sample means). The number of days offset between maximum root and shoot growth was negatively correlated with median annual temperature and therefore differs significantly across biomes (ANOVA, F3,43=9.47, p<0.0001). This decline in offset with increasing temperature may reflect greater year-round coupling between air and soil temperature in warm biomes. Growth form (woody or herbaceous) also influenced the relative timing of root and shoot growth. Woody plants had a larger range of days between root and shoot growth peaks as well as a greater number of growth peaks. To explore the range of phenological relationships within woody plants in the temperate biome, we focused on above and belowground phenology in two common northeastern tree species, Quercus rubra and Tsuga canadensis. Greenness index, rate of stem growth, root production and nonstructural carbohydrate content were measured beginning in April 2012 through August 2013 at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA, USA. Greenness and stem growth were highest in late May and early June with one clear maximum growth period. In contrast, root growth was characterized by multiple production peaks. Q. rubra root growth experienced many small flushes around day of year (DOY) 156 (early June) and one large peak on 234 (late August). T. canadensis root growth peaked on DOY 188 (early July), 234.5 (late August) and 287 (mid-October). However, particular phenological patterns varied widely from site to site. Despite large spatial heterogeneity, it appears that Q. rubra experiences greater overall root production as well as more allocation to roots during the growing season. The storage pool of nonstructural carbohydrates experiences a mid-summer drawdown in Q. rubra but not T. canadensis roots. Timing of belowground C allocation to root growth and nonstructural carbohydrate accumulation may be regulated by climate factors as well as endogenous factors such as vessel size, growth form, or tradeoffs in C allocated between plant organs. Plant roots supply substrate to microbial communities and hence their production feeds back to other plant and soil processes that affect ecosystem C fluxes.

  12. Astronomy for Everyone: Harvard's Move Toward an All-Inclusive Astronomy Lab and Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieryla, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    Harvard University has a growing astronomy program that offers various courses to the undergraduate concentrators, secondaries and non-majors. Many of the courses involve labs that use the 16-inch DFM Clay Telescope for night-time observations and the heliostat for observing the Sun. The goal is to proactively adapt the lab and telescope facilities to accommodate all students with disabilities. The current focus is converting the labs to accommodate visually impaired students. Using tactile images and sound, the intention is to create an experience equivalent to that of a student with full sight.

  13. The watershed years of 1958-1962 in the Harvard Pigeon Lab.

    PubMed

    Catania, A Charles

    2002-05-01

    During the years 1958-1962, the final years of support by the National Science Foundation for B. F. Skinner's Pigeon Lab in Memorial Hall at Harvard University, 20 or so pigeon experiments (plus some with other organisms) ran concurrently 7 days a week. The research style emphasized experimental analyses, exploratory procedures, and the parametric exploration of variables. This reminiscence describes some features of the laboratory, the context within which it operated, and the activities of some of those who participated in it. PMID:12083685

  14. The watershed years of 1958-1962 in the Harvard Pigeon Lab.

    PubMed Central

    Catania, A Charles

    2002-01-01

    During the years 1958-1962, the final years of support by the National Science Foundation for B. F. Skinner's Pigeon Lab in Memorial Hall at Harvard University, 20 or so pigeon experiments (plus some with other organisms) ran concurrently 7 days a week. The research style emphasized experimental analyses, exploratory procedures, and the parametric exploration of variables. This reminiscence describes some features of the laboratory, the context within which it operated, and the activities of some of those who participated in it. PMID:12083685

  15. The Cambridge Concise History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Preface; 1. Astronomy before history Clive Ruggles and Michael Hoskin; 2 Astronomy in antiquity Michael Hoskin; 3. Astronomy in China Christopher Cullen; 4. Islamic astronomy Michael Hoskin and Owen Gingerich; 5. The Astrolabe Michael Hoskin; 6. Medieval Latin astronomy Michael Hoskin and Owen Gingerich; 7. From geometry to physics: astronomy transformed Michael Hoskin; 8. The refracting telescope in the seventeenth century J. A. Bennett; 9. Newton and Newtonianism Michael Hoskin; 10. The astronomy of the universe of stars Michael Hoskin; 11. The message of starlight: the rise of astrophysics David Dewhirst and Michael Hoskin; 12. Astronomy's widening horizons Michael Hoskin and Owen Gingerich; Reference Guide; Chronology; Glossary; Further reading; Picture acknowledgments; Index.

  16. The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

  17. [Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Studies 9-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials are a part of a series of studies sponsored by the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics which reflects the ideas of CCSM regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-12. Feasibility Studies 9-13 contain a wide range of topics. The following are the titles and brief descriptions of these studies. Number…

  18. 76 FR 12729 - Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... AGENCY Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... evaluating assessments. This includes evaluating the applicability of the data and methods used in the... pesticide data or risk. The contractor may develop policy options for evaluation and consideration by...

  19. The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.

  20. The Harvard Catalyst Common Reciprocal IRB Reliance Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sabune J.; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of duplicative Institutional Review Board (IRB) review for multi-institutional studies is a desirable goal to improve IRB efficiency while enhancing human subject protections. Here we describe the Harvard Catalyst Master Reciprocal Common IRB Reliance Agreement (MRA), a system that provides a legal framework for IRB reliance, with the potential to streamline IRB review processes and reduce administrative burden and barriers to collaborative, multi-institutional research. The MRA respects the legal autonomy of the signatory institutions while offering a pathway to eliminate duplicative IRB review when appropriate. The Harvard Catalyst MRA provides a robust and flexible model for reciprocal reliance that is both adaptable and scalable. PMID:25196592

  1. 77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab... 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  2. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab... 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  3. Harvard Humanities Students Discover the 17th Century Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt's new course, "Travel and Transformation in the Early 17th Century." The product of an intense, months-long collaboration between computing specialists, graduate students, librarians, and scholars, the course makes innovative use of all the tools and technical know-how a major university…

  4. The Armagh-Dunsink-Harvard Telescope: from dream to oblivion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, C. John

    2007-11-01

    The Armagh-Dunsink-Harvard (ADH) Telescope was an instrument with a checkered history that, unlike many telescopes that have a productive life of many decades, has now all but faded from memory. Nevertheless, its story is worth telling, if for no other reason than the part it played in Irish and international astronomy in the crucial years following the Second World War.

  5. Aerosol mass spectrometer measurements at Harvard Forest during NEAQS 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canaragatna, M.; Slowik, J.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.

    2003-12-01

    An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was installed on a 30 m high platform at Harvard Forest during the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) 2002, a multi agency campaign designed to characterize gas and aerosol pollutants passing through the northeastern U.S. and the outflow over the Atlantic Ocean. The AMS provided size and chemically speciated aerosol mass loadings for nitrates, sulfates, ammonium, chloride and organic carbon. The Harvard Forest site is situated in a rural setting in central Massachusetts, with few known local sources of particulate sulfates and nitrates. Despite the location, Harvard Forest was subjected to several large particulate mass pollution events during July and August 2002. A detailed back trajectory analysis correlates the large, sulfate dominated particle events with source emitters (cities, power plants, etc.) in the region, mainly west of Harvard Forest. Comparisons with G1 aircraft data support the hypothesis that much of the boundary layer particulate matter is generated and transported within the North Eastern region and not transported long distances from outside regions within the US. A well defined example of long distance transport was observed on July 9th when mass spectral markers for biomass burning correlated with high CO levels identifying a Quebec fire plume. Results from a comprehensive study to apportion the sulfate and organics loadings with respect to sources will be presented.

  6. Preliminary Report on the Status of Women at Harvard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

    Section I of this report on the status of women at Harvard discusses the inclusion of women in the faculty, administration, and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Women are underrepresented at the highest and most visible levels of the faculty. Though women constitute roughly 20 percent of the students taught in the Faculty of Arts and…

  7. Northern Studies at Northern Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Review: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Arts and Social Sciences of the North, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Describes college programs and research projects focused on the Arctic, northern studies, or northern concerns at Athabasca University (Alberta), the University of British Columbia, the University of Alaska Anchorage, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Scott Polar Institute at the University of Cambridge (England), and Kent State University…

  8. Harvard U.'s Request for Commercial Rights to New Strain of Mouse Forces Debate in Europe over Whether Animals Can Be Patented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The European Patent Convention has informed Harvard University that its application for a patent on a genetically engineered mouse may be refused. The application was the first to obtain patent protection across most of Europe for a transgenic animal, one which has been implanted with genes from another animal. (MSE)

  9. Trends in Marijuana and Other Illicit Drug Use among College Students: Results from 4 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study Surveys--1993-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Lee, Jae Eun; Wechsler, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined changes in college students' illicit drug use, patterns of polydrug use, and the relationship between students' ages of initiation of substance use and later use of marijuana and other illicit drugs between 1993 and 2001. Data from 119 US colleges and universities in the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study…

  10. The Gremlins of Governance: A "Trusteeship" Q&A with Richard Chait, Research Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chait, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Richard Chait, Research Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, regarding the three major challenges that face college and university governing boards today--in the areas of board structure, planning, and trustee selection. In the interview, Chait shares his concern about the state of…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Unleashing the "Brain Power" of Groups in the Classroom: The Neuroscience behind Collaborative Work (Nancy Walser); (2) Putting AP to the Test: New Research Assesses the

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 2, March-April 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Talking 'bout Evolution: High School Science Teachers Share Strategies for Dealing with Controversy in the Classroom (Nancy Walser); (2) Standards-Based Evaluation for…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 6, November-December 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Telling Tales Out of Charter School: What Educators and Policymakers Can Learn from the Successes and Failures of Charters (Robert Rothman); (2) One Charter School's Formula…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 1, January-February 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Using Theater to Teach Social Skills: Researchers Document Improvements for Children with Autism (Patti Hartigan); (2) The Family Model of Schooling Revisited: Few Teachers,

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 4, July-August 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Putting the Brakes on "Summer Slide": Modified School Calendars Build in Time to Enrich Learning and Sustain Gains (Brigid Schulte); (2) Closing the Achievement Gap with…

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 5, September-October 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Scenes from the School Turnaround Movement: Passion, Frustration, Mid-Course Corrections Mark Rapid Reforms (Laura Pappano); (2) The Media Savvy Educator: How to Work with the…

  17. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Unleashing the "Brain Power" of Groups in the Classroom: The Neuroscience behind Collaborative Work (Nancy Walser); (2) Putting AP to the Test: New Research Assesses the…

  18. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 1, January-February 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Leadership Lessons From Schools Becoming "Data Wise" (Jennifer L. Steele and Kathryn Parker Boudett); (2) A Guide on the Side: Mentors Help New Leaders Prepare for Life in the…

  19. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Road to School Improvement: It's Hard, It's Bumpy, and It Takes as Long as It Takes (Richard F. Elmore and Elizabeth A. City); (2) Better Teaching with Web Tools: How…

  20. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 1, January-February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Greening of Environmental Ed: Teachers Focus on Complexity, Evidence, and Letting Students Draw Their Own Conclusions (Lucy Hood); (2) Like Teacher, Like Student: Online PD…

  1. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 6, November-December 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Video Games Take Testing to the Next Level: Researchers See Promise in Game-Like Assessments That Measure Complex Skills (Robert Rothman); (2) An Academic Foothold for

  2. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 2, March-April 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Course Credits on the Quick: Controversial Online Recovery Programs Speed the Path to Graduation (Andrew Brownstein); (2) Collaborating to Make Schools More Inclusive

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 6, November-December 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) With Cheating on the Rise, Schools Respond (David McKay Wilson); (2) Waldorf Education in Public Schools: Educators Adopt--and Adapt--This Developmental, Arts-Rich Approach…

  4. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charters and Unions: What's the Future for This Unorthodox Relationship? (Alexander Russo); (2) From Special Ed to Higher Ed: Transition Planning for Disabled Students Focuses…

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;…

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 4, July-August 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Taking the Measure of New Teachers: California Shifts from Standardized Tests to Performance-Based Assessment as a Condition of Licensure (Robert Rothman); (2) When 1/2 + 1/3 =…

  7. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 3, May-June 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Art into School, Byte by Byte: Innovative Programs Use Technology to Expand Access to the Arts (Patti Hartigan); (2) Differentiated Instruction Reexamined: Teachers…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;

  9. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Meeting of the Minds: The Parent-Teacher Conference Is the Cornerstone of School-Home Relations. How Can It Work for All Families? (Laura Pappano); (2) In Search of That "Third

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 2, March-April 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Hybrid Schools for the iGeneration: New Schools Combine "Bricks" and "Clicks" (Brigid Schulte); (2) Dual Language Programs on the Rise: "Enrichment" Model Puts Content Learning…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 1, January-February 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Across Distance: Virtual-Instruction Programs Are Growing Rapidly, but the Impact on "Brick-and-Mortar" Classrooms Is Still up in the Air (Kristina Cowan); (2) Wanted:…

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 2, March-April 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.; Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Testing Goes to Preschool: Will State and Federal Testing Programs Advance the Goal of School Readiness for All Children? (Robert Rothman); (2) Reinforcement, Richness, and…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 3, May-June 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Improving Teaching and Learning through Instructional Rounds (Lee Teitel); (2) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in the Age of Testing: New Reports Outline Key Principles…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 5, September-October 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Invisible Hand in Education Policy: Behind the Scenes, Economists Wield Unprecedented Influence (David McKay Wilson); (2) Bonding and Bridging: Schools Open Doors for…

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 4, July-August 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Putting the Brakes on "Summer Slide": Modified School Calendars Build in Time to Enrich Learning and Sustain Gains (Brigid Schulte); (2) Closing the Achievement Gap with

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 1, January-February 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Beyond the Gap: What Educators and Researchers Are Learning from High-Achieving African American and Latino Students (Michael Sadowski); (2) Aiming for AYP: The Quest to Make…

  17. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 5, September-October 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching Students to Ask Their Own Questions: One Small Change Can Yield Big Results (Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana); (2) Voice of Experience: Jerry Weast--Leading a System…

  18. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 1, January-February 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David T., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Parents on Board: Strong Home-School Connections Enrich Learning Opportunities for Immigrant Kids--and Their Parents, Too (Sue Miller Wiltz); (2) Volcanoes and…

  19. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 5, September-October 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Scenes from the School Turnaround Movement: Passion, Frustration, Mid-Course Corrections Mark Rapid Reforms (Laura Pappano); (2) The Media Savvy Educator: How to Work with the

  20. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 2, March-April 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Educating Teenage Immigrants: High Schools Experiment with Ways to Group New English-Language Learners (Lucy Hood); (2) Hot Topics and Key Words: Pilot Project Brings Teachers…

  1. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 5, September-October 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching 21st Century Skills: What Does It Look Like in Practice? (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting and Spending: Schools and Districts Share Lessons on the Effective Uses of…

  2. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 6, November-December 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Platooning" Instruction: Districts Weigh Pros and Cons of Departmentalizing Elementary Schools (Lucy Hood); (2) Behind the Classroom Door: A Rare Glimpse Indicates the…

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 4, July-August 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Beyond Auto Shop 1: Is Career and Technical Education a Promising Path for High School Reform? (Lucy Hood); (2) The School Readiness Gap: Prekindergarten--Not Just…

  4. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 2, March-April 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Money and Motivation: New Initiatives Rekindle Debate over the Link between Rewards and Student Achievement (David McKay Wilson); (2) An Inexact Science: What Are the Technical…

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 6, November-December 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Video Games Take Testing to the Next Level: Researchers See Promise in Game-Like Assessments That Measure Complex Skills (Robert Rothman); (2) An Academic Foothold for…

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 4, July-August 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Integrated Data Systems Link Schools and Communities: Researchers Combine School and Non-School Data to Inform Interventions and Policy (Patti Hartigan); (2) Student-Directed…

  7. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 1, January-February 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Using Theater to Teach Social Skills: Researchers Document Improvements for Children with Autism (Patti Hartigan); (2) The Family Model of Schooling Revisited: Few Teachers,…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 1, January-February 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The "Data Wise" Improvement Process: Eight Steps for Using Test Data to Improve Teaching and Learning (Kathryn Parker Boudett, Elizabeth A. City, and Richard J. Murnane); (2)

  9. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes that were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms.

  10. The Harvard case of Xu Xiping: exploitation of the people, scientific advance, or genetic theft?

    PubMed

    Sleeboom, Margaret

    2005-04-01

    A unique history and make-up of a population may make it an attractive research target for population geneticists and pharmaco-genomic investors. The promise of pharmaceutical profits and advances in medical knowledge attracted Harvard researchers and the company Millennium Pharmaceuticals to remote areas in Anhui Province, Central China, leading to international diplomatic disagreements about issues such as the ownership of genetic material and informed consent (IC). This article discusses the role of genomics and genetic sampling in China, the way it is related to population policies (the new eugenics), the national importance of genetic materials and the conflicts it led to between the Chinese government and Harvard University. Here many consider the Xu Xiping case as textbook example of ruthless Western exploitation of development countries, illustrating the cold rationality of science in the process of globalisation. Ten perspectives on this case show that this view is simplistic and contributes little to an understanding of bioethical issues important to the population actually donating the samples. Viewing the Xu Xiping case as the nexus of the intertwinement of international, transnational, national, and local interest groups shows how different interest groups make use of different units of analysis. It also clarifies why the same practice of genetic sampling continues under a different regime, and why the discussion about genetic sampling has shifted from a concern with health care of the poor to an issue of international exploitation, terrorism and development. PMID:16552917

  11. Ultra-narrowband SETI at Harvard/Smithsonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Paul

    Equipment developed to detect ultranarrow-band carriers is described. Consideration is given to the Drake-Helou effect, ultranarrow-band spectrum analyzers, and the 1978 Arecibo experiments. The design and operation of the small portable ultranarrow-band spectrum analyzer (suitcase SETI), the 'Sentinel' a 64 K-channel Fourier analyzer, the megachannel extraterrestrial assay, 'META', and the Harvard-Smithsonian 84-foot disk are described. Schematic diagrams of the equipment are presented.

  12. Cheminformatics Research at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Glen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Molecular Informatics, formerly Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics (UCMSI), at the University of Cambridge is a world-leading driving force in the field of cheminformatics. Since its opening in 2000 more than 300 scientific articles have fundamentally changed the field of molecular informatics. The Centre has been a key player in promoting open chemical data and semantic access. Though mainly focussing on basic research, close collaborations with industrial partners ensured real world feedback and access to high quality molecular data. A variety of tools and standard protocols have been developed and are ubiquitous in the daily practice of cheminformatics. Here, we present a retrospective of cheminformatics research performed at the UCMSI, thereby highlighting historical and recent trends in the field as well as indicating future directions. PMID:26435758

  13. Reginald Crundall Punnett: First Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. W. F.

    2012-01-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett’s career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of “partial coupling” in the sweet pea (later “linkage”) and to the diagram known as Punnett’s square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described. PMID:22964834

  14. A histological study of retrieved Cambridge acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Roger A; Field, Richard E; Jones, Eric; Sood, Asheesh; Rushton, Neil

    2010-01-01

    A new uncemented acetabular component, the Cambridge cup, has been designed to mimic the anatomy and physiology of subchondral bone in order to minimise stress shielding and enhance long-term component stability. Cambridge cups were implanted in a cohort of 50 women who presented with displaced sub-capital fracture of the femoral neck. The cups were manufactured with an hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Twenty six cups were implanted after removal of the HA. Twelve Cambridge cups were retrieved post-mortem between two and 84 months after implantation. Histological and histomorphometric testing was undertaken to analyse the residual HA coating thickness, bone apposition to the implant surface and particulate wear debris in the surrounding tissues. The HA-coated implants showed significantly greater bone apposition to the implant surface with significantly less fibrous tissue formation than the uncoated implants. Where HA resorption occurred, bone and bone marrow was seen adjacent to the implant. Excessive wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene liner was not seen. The HA-coated components demonstrated good initial bone implant bonding and the flexible carbon polymer appeared to maintain stability following HA resorption. The uncoated implants showed little or no bony apposition but had a fibrous membrane apposed to the implant surface. This may be explained by a combination of micro-motion at the bone implant interface and having a component surface finish that was poorly suited to osseous attachment. Hydroxyapatite coated acetabular components can provide reliable osseous attachment. Subsequent HA resorption need not compromise medium-term osseous fixation to an appropriate implant surface. PMID:20235075

  15. The Cambridge digital Seismic recorder for land and marine use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, T. R. E.; Barton, P. J.

    1990-02-01

    The Cambridge digital Seismic recorder is a simple, cheap and versatile recording system for portable equipment. The recorder stores data in digital form onto high-quality "Walkman" cassette recorders, with a capacity of over 5 megabytes per cassette. Most of the recorder functions are implemented in software, so that the system can be adapted for a wide variety of uses. We describe its use as the recording system with ocean bottom Seismometers for controlled-source Seismology and as a triggered recorder for micro-earthquake recording.

  16. Urban Design Conference. New Communities - One Alternative. Proceedings (12th, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 7-8, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Design.

    The nature of this conference, the product of a year's work by an interdisciplinary team, was that of a giant critique, where the subject of discussion was a high-density, compact new city. Participants in the conference gave their comments and questions on the New Communities Project material that had been presented in both verbal and graphic…

  17. Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes, meaning that the application of renewable energy systems would result in annual net zero energy use in the homes. The homes were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. For this project, CARB drew on its experience working with Rural Development Inc. on a series of affordable townhomes in northern Massachusetts. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms. The basic strategy was to design a very efficient thermal enclosure while minimizing incremental cost increases compared with standard construction. Using BEopt modeling software, the team established the requirements of the enclosure and investigated multiple assembly options. They settled on double-wall construction with dense-pack cellulose fill. High performance vinyl windows (U-0.24, solar heat gain coefficient [SHGC]-0.22), a vented R-59 attic, and exceptional air sealing completed the package.

  18. From Cape Town to Cambridge: Orthopaedic trauma in contrasting environments

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, John E; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the trauma experience gained by a trainee at a United Kingdom major trauma centre and a secondary level hospital in South Africa. METHODS: A profile of inpatient trauma cases during a five-week period in Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge and Somerset Hospital, Cape Town was created. This was achieved by recording various parameters for each patient admitted including age, gender, injury, mechanism of injury and postal/area code. This, together with details of the departments themselves, allows a comparison of the amount and variety of orthopaedic trauma cases experienced by an individual trainee in each setting. RESULTS: The trauma profiles differed significantly. Patients in Cape Town were younger and more likely to be male. In the young, injury in Cape Town was more likely to occur due to assault or being struck by a vehicle, whilst patients in Cambridge were more likely to be injured whilst in a vehicle or in high energy falls. In older patients, trauma at both centres was almost exclusively due to mechanical falls. In a given age group, injuries at the two centres were similar, however the majority of patients admitted to Addenbrooke’s were elderly, resulting in less variation in the overall injury profile. CONCLUSION: The trauma profile of a major trauma centre in the United Kingdom is less varied than that of a South African secondary centre, with significantly fewer cases per surgeon. This suggests a more varied training experience in the developing world with a greater caseload. PMID:27190759

  19. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education1

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Gary M.; Ferrence, Gregory M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metalorganic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout. PMID:20877495

  20. NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

  1. Gambling with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  2. Harvard ER-2 OH laser-induced fluorescence instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, Paul O.; Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    The Harvard ER-2 OH instrument is scheduled to be integrated into the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft ozone payload in August 1992. Design and fabrication is presently underway. This experiment is a descendant of a balloon borne instrument designed and built in the mid-1980s. The ER-2 instrument is being designed to measure OH and HO2 as part of the NASA ozone payload for the investigation of processes controlling the concentration of stratospheric ozone. Although not specifically designed to do so, it is hoped that valid measurements of OH and HO2 can be made in the remote free troposphere with this instrument.

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Wood Engraving of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Wood Engraving of Lawrence Hill From Hamilton Vaughan Bail, Views of Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1949 - Plate LXI. Plate taken from Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, Vol. 7, No. 7, June 14, 1851, p. 112. - Harvard University, Lawrence Hall, 3 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  4. Multiple sclerosis in the Cambridge health district of east Anglia.

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, C J; Fraser, M B; Wood, N W; Compston, D A

    1992-01-01

    A survey of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the Cambridge Health District has identified 374 cases in a population of 288,410, giving a prevalence of 130 per 100,000. A total of 322 cases (86%) had either clinically definite or probable multiple sclerosis on 1 July 1990 (112 per 100,000) and 52 cases (14%) had suspected multiple sclerosis (18 per 100,000.) The incidence during 1989-91 was 5.94 per 100,000 per year. The prevalence figure is higher than in recent surveys from other southern parts of the United Kingdom, but correction for the age and sex characteristics of the at risk population eliminates these differences. The overall prevalence of multiple sclerosis is probably between 108 and 120 per 100,000 in the southern United Kingdom. PMID:1431950

  5. The Cambridge Controlled Choice Program: Improving Educational Equity and Integration. Education Policy Paper Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Norma

    A plan to promote parental school choice, namely, the Cambridge Controlled Choice School Desegregation Plan, is described in this report. The introduction presents a definition and the history of school choice, and the second chapter offers a program description of the community context, an overview of the public school situation in Cambridge,…

  6. The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

  7. Encouraging Participation in Case Discussions: A Comparison of the MICA and the Harvard Case Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desiraju, Ramarao; Gopinath, C.

    2001-01-01

    Management students used either the Harvard Case Method (n=33) or McAleer Interactive Case Analysis (n=31) to analyze case studies. The McAleer group was better prepared and participated more in discussions; they performed consistently better than the Harvard group on case analyses and recall of content. (Contains 21 references.) (SK)

  8. The University for Industry and Local Information, Advice and Guidance Partnerships. Report on a NICEC/CRAC Policy Consultation Held in Association with the National Advisory Council for Careers and Educational Guidance (Cambridge, England, February 24-25, 1999). Conference Briefing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Tony

    The University for Industry (UFI) and local information, advice, and guidance (IAG) partnerships are two key aspects of the British Government's lifelong learning strategy. UFI's key role is to expand the demand for and supply of learning and to exploit the learning potential of information and communication technologies. The main UFI activities…

  9. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Materials and Methods: Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. Results: FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit. PMID:26600830

  10. 75 FR 38128 - Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland, Including Employees of Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power..., 2010, applicable to workers of Sansata Technologies MA, Incorporated, Power Controls Division,...

  11. WebCSD: the online portal to the Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ian R.; Bruno, Ian J.; Cole, Jason C.; Macrae, Clare F.; Pidcock, Elna; Wood, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    WebCSD, a new web-based application developed by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, offers fast searching of the Cambridge Structural Database using only a standard internet browser. Search facilities include two-dimensional substructure, molecular similarity, text/numeric and reduced cell searching. Text, chemical diagrams and three-dimensional structural information can all be studied in the results browser using the efficient entry summaries and embedded three-dimensional viewer. PMID:22477776

  12. A qualitative evaluation of the Harvard Cancer Risk Index.

    PubMed

    Emmons, K M; Koch-Weser, S; Atwood, K; Conboy, L; Rudd, R; Colditz, G

    1999-01-01

    There is an extensive amount of information in the popular press about cancer risk factors. The volume and sometimes contradictory nature of this information makes it difficult for individuals to understand their own level of risk or how one risk factor compares with another. The Harvard Cancer Risk Index (HCRI) was developed by an interdisciplinary working group of epidemiologists and behavioral scientists to educate the public about the major risk factors associated with the 11 most common forms of cancer in the United States. Following the development and validation of the HCRI, we initiated a qualitative research study to obtain initial feedback on the wording and presentation of the index and to elicit information regarding the meaning of risks, perception of cancer, and interpretation of the HCRI results. The results indicated that the HCRI was well received by participants and that they highly regarded the inclusion of information related to the latest risks for cancer and the description of the mechanisms by which these factors impact on risk. Personalization of the risk score helped participants to focus on behaviors that they could change. However, dissatisfaction with the HCRI was noted by some participants because exposures they believed to be important were not included (e.g., poverty, toxic waste, air pollution). Evaluation of the impact of the index on intention to change provided preliminary evidence that this may be an effective toll for helping mobilize individuals toward change across a number of risk factors. Further quantitative evaluation of the HCRI is planned. PMID:10977287

  13. Targeted and all-sky search for nanosecond optical pulses at Harvard-Smithsonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Paul; Coldwell, Charles M.; Howard, Andrew B.; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert; Wolff, Jonathan; Zajac, Joe M.

    2001-08-01

    We have built a system to detect nanosecond pulsed optical signals from a target list of some 10,000 sun-like stars, and have made some 20,000 observations during its two years of operation. A beamsplitter feeds a pair of hybrid avalanche photodetectors at the focal plane of the 1.5m Cassegrain at the Harvard/Smithsonian Oak Ridge Observatory (Agassiz Station), with a coincidence triggering measurement of pulse width and intensity at sub-nanosecond resolution. A flexible web-enabled database, combined with mercifully low background coincidence rates (approximately 1 event per night), makes it easy to sort through far-flung data in search of repeated events from any candidate star. An identical system will soon begin observations, synchronized with ours, at the 0.9m Cassegrain at Princeton University. These will permit unambiguous identification of even a solitary pulse. We are planning an all-sky search for optical pulses, using a dedicated 1.8m f/2.4 spherical glass light bucket and an array of pixelated photomultipliers deployed in a pair of matched focal planes. The sky pixels, 1.5 arcmin square, tessellate a 1.6 by 0.2 degree patch of sky in transit mode, covering the Northern sky in approximately 150 clear nights. Fast custom IC electronics will monitor corresponding pixels for coincident optical pulses of nanosecond timescale, triggering storage of a digitized waveform of the light flash.

  14. A Referendum on the State of Astronomy at Harvard: Choosing Harlow Shapley's Successor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, David H.

    2006-12-01

    Harlow Shapley, the Director of the Harvard College Observatory for over three decades, was scheduled for retirement in 1952. His predecessor, E. C. Pickering, had held the office for some 42 years. Therefore naming successors at Harvard was something of a rarity, and as a result, the process engaged many issues that illuminate how astronomy as a profession changed during Shapley's tenure, and the changing place of Harvard astronomy within the profession. Harvard's case was not unique--similar issues were raised at other major American observatories when it came time for a change in administration--but no American Observatory was scrutinized as closely as was Shapley's, or as sharply. Despite Shapley's wishes, echoed by his senior staff, for a quick decision on a successor, Harvard President James B. Conant asked J. Robert Oppenheimer to form a blue ribbon review panel to assess the state of astronomy at Harvard before a search for a new director could take place. The committee, mainly physicists, came back with a brutal assessment. My paper will outline this assessment and examine its recommendations as indicators of how the norms, standards and practices of the American astronomical profession were undergoing profound change in the Cold War era. This research has been supported in part by a grant from the Naitonal Science Foundation.

  15. University of Toronto: Marketing from Scratch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mun, Almira

    2008-01-01

    Established in 1827, the University of Toronto is regarded as one of Canada's leading academic and research institutions. It has the highest number of students (both undergraduate and graduate), the most faculty members, and the widest range of courses among Canadian universities. It has often been referred to as the "Harvard of the North" because…

  16. Tropospheric reactive nitrogen speciation, deposition, and chemistry at Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Cassandra Volpe

    Reactive nitrogen trace gases are central to the photochemistry of the troposphere: they participate in powerful catalytic cycles, stimulate ozone (O3) production, affect the concentration of the hydroxyl radical (OH), terminate reaction chains, and contribute to acid precipitation. They also have profound influences on the biosphere, since the form of nitrogen available to plants via wet and dry deposition affects nutrient loading, acid stress, and toxicity. We quantify the relative and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO 3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO 2)) to total reactive nitrogen deposition at a typical Northeastern U.S. forest under a wide range of seasonal, meteorological, and transport conditions. A new tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) was designed, built, and deployed on top of a 22 m tower at Harvard Forest to measure HNO3 and NO2 concentrations, with 1 s detection limits of several hundred pmol mol-1. The TDLAS NO 2 data were used to determine the eddy covariance flux. Other observations at the site included concentrations and fluxes of total odd nitrogen (NO y), NO, sensible heat and water vapor; and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) concentration. At night, NO2 deposition depended quadratically on NO 2 concentration. During the day, eddy flux observations of coupled downward NO and upward NO2 fluxes above the forest were driven by gradients of light and eddy diffusivity through the canopy, and represented no net NO x flux. NO2 flux can be parameterized as a simple function of light, concentration (linear and quadratic terms), and stomatal conductance. Average net NOx deposition velocity was 0.2 cm s-1 with little variation between day and night. A dry deposition inferential method (DDIM) was used to estimate the hourly deposition velocity of HNO3. Weekly aggregates (simulating standard dry deposition network procedures) introduced noise but no significant bias into the HNO3 flux. HNO3 concentrations were slightly lower under clean (NW flow) conditions compared to more polluted (SW); inferred Vd(HNO3) was nearly the same for the two flow regimes, as low as 2 cm s-1 at night and up to 8 cm s-1 during the day. The concentration and flux budgets of NOy were essentially closed for the NW, and unaccounted by up to 50% for the SW. The deposition velocity of the unmeasured species (SW) was approximately 3 cm s-1.

  17. Taxonomic review of the New World spider genus Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 (Araneae, Clubionidae).

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Regiane; Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio

    2015-01-01

    Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 is characterized and redescribed, including 49 species occurring from the United States to Argentina. Thirty seven previously known species are redescribed: Elaver achuca (Roddy, 1966) revalidated, E. balboae (Chickering, 1937), E. barroana (Chickering, 1937), E. calcarata (Kraus, 1955), E. carlota (Bryant, 1940), E. chisosa (Roddy, 1966), E. crinophora (Franganillo, 1934), E. crocota (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. albicans (Franganillo, 1930) name restored, E. depuncta O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. elaver (Bryant, 1940), E. excepta (L. Koch, 1866), E. grandivulva (Mello-Leitão, 1930), E. hortoni (Chickering, 1937), E. implicata (Gertsch, 1941), E. juana (Bryant, 1940), E. kohlsi (Gertsch & Jellison, 1939), E. linguata (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. madera (Roddy, 1966), E. mirabilis (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) new. comb., E. mulaiki (Gertsch, 1935), E. multinotata (Chickering, 1937), E. orvillei (Chickering, 1937), E. placida O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. portoricensis (Petrunkevitch, 1930), E. quadrata (Kraus, 1955), E. richardi (Gertsch, 1941), E. sericea O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. sigillata (Petrunkevitch, 1925), E. simplex (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. texana (Gertsch, 1933), E. tigrina O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 name restored, E. tricuspis (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. tristani (Banks, 1909), E. tumivulva (Banks, 1909), E. valvula (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) and E. wheeleri (Roewer, 1933). Ten new species are described: E. candelaria n. sp. and E. helenae n. sp. from Mexico; E. arawakan n. sp. from Haiti; E. lizae n. sp. from Costa Rica; E. darwichi n. sp. from Ecuador; E. juruti n. sp., E. tourinhoae n. sp. and E. vieirae n. sp. from Brazil; E. shinguito n. sp. from Peru and E. beni n. sp. from Bolivia. The female of E. hortoni is described for the first time. Lectotypes are designated for E. sigillata and its actual female is described for the first time. Four new synonyms are proposed: E. languida (Gertsch, 1941) is synonimized with E. multinotata; E. dorothea (Gertsch, 1935) with E. wheeleri; E. exempta (Gertsch & Davis, 1940) with E. placida and E. vulnerata (Kraus, 1955) with E. calcarata. The drawings in the original descriptions of E. kawitpaaia (Barrion & Litsinger, 1995) and E. turongdaliriana (Barrion & Litsinger, 1995) are sufficiently informative to exclude these species from Elaver but not to accurately establish its generic affiliation. Thus, until the types become available for examination, these species must remain as Clubionidae incertae sedis. Heterochemmis (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) is synonymized with Elaver and Heterochemmis mutatus Gertsch & Davis,1940 is recognized as a junior synonym of Elaver mirabilis n. comb., the type species of Heterochemmis. New records are presented for E. valvula, E. balboae, E. brevipes (Keyserling, 1891), E. grandivulva and E. lutescens (Schmidt, 1971). Two species described by Franganillo, E. tenera (Franganillo, 1935) and E. tenuis (Franganillo, 1935), are considered species inquirendae. PMID:26624731

  18. Communities Complicate Gene Transplant Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1976-01-01

    Confrontations have arisen between local communities and universities involved in molecular biology research. The situation in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is described in which citizens have opposed work undertaken at Harvard and MIT. (LBH)

  19. Water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, 2005-8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Waldron, Marcus C.

    2015-01-01

    During 2005-8, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, measured concentrations of sodium and chloride, plant nutrients, commonly used pesticides, and caffeine in base-flow and stormwater samples collected from 11 tributaries in the Cambridge drinking-water source area. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, to establish a baseline for future comparisons, and to describe trends in surface-water quality. The data also were used to assess the effects of watershed characteristics on surface-water quality and to inform future watershed management.

  20. 2 Richest University Endowments Linked to Bush's Financial and Political Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basinger, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Reports evidence that George W. Bush's financial and political success has been linked to the two richest university endowments in the United States--Harvard University and the University of Texas System, specifically the University of Texas Investment Management Company. Notes that officials of both universities' management companies denied any…

  1. Geotechnical centrifuge use at University of Cambridge Geotechnical Centre, August-September 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A geotechnical centrifuge applies elevated acceleration to small-scale soil models to simulate body forces and stress levels characteristic of full-size soil structures. Since the constitutive behavior of soil is stress level development, the centrifuge offers considerable advantage in studying soil structures using models. Several experiments were observed and described in relative detail, including experiments in soil dynamics and liquefaction study, an experiment investigation leaning towers on soft foundations, and an experiment investigating migration of hot pollutants through soils.

  2. New Life for Old Data: Digitization of Data Published in the Harvard Annals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M. R.; Saladyga, M.; Paxson, K. B.; Stine, R. J.; Froschlin, C.; Rupp, A.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) We describe the volunteer-driven project to digitize published visual observations found in the Annals of the Harvard College Observatory, the publication of record for Harvard's variable star data archives prior to the founding of the AAVSO. The addition of published data from the 19th and early 20th centuries to the AAVSO International Database has the potential to enable significant new science by extending long term light curves farther back in time with high-quality visual and photographic data. AAVSO volunteers working on this project have together digitized over well over 10,000 observations from the Harvard Annals, adding decades to the light curves of some stars. We highlight the work done so far, and show the potential to expand the project by both AAVSO Headquarters and by the volunteers themselves.

  3. Fungal Taxa Target Different Carbon Substrates in Harvard Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. A.; Allison, S. D.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Mellilo, J. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    The mineralization of soil organic carbon is a major component of the global carbon cycle and is largely controlled by soil microbial communities. However, little is known about the functional roles of soil microbes or whether different microbial taxa target different carbon substrates under natural conditions. To examine this possibility, we assessed the community composition of active fungi by using a novel nucleotide analog technique in soils from the Harvard Forest. We hypothesized that fungal community composition would shift in response to the addition of different substrates and that specific fungal taxa would respond differentially to particular carbon sources. To test this hypothesis, we added a nucleotide analog probe directly to soils in conjunction with one of five carbon compounds of increasing recalcitrance: glycine, sucrose, cellulose, tannin-protein complex, and lignin. During 48 hour incubations, the nucleotide analog was incorporated into newly replicated DNA of soil organisms that proliferated following the addition of the substrates. In this way, we labeled the DNA of microbes that respond to a particular carbon source. Labeled DNA was isolated and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were sequenced and analyzed to identify active fungi to near-species resolution. Diversity analyses at the ≥97% sequence similarity level indicated that taxonomic richness was greater under cellulose (Shannon Index: 3.23 ± 0.11 with ± 95% CI) and lignin (2.87 ± 0.15) additions than the other treatments (2.34 ± 0.16 to 2.64 ± 0.13). In addition, community composition of active fungi shifted under glycine, sucrose, and cellulose additions. Specifically, the community under glycine was significantly different from communities under control, cellulose, and tannin-protein (P<0.05). Additionally, the sucrose and cellulose communities were marginally different from the control community (P = 0.059 and 0.054, respectively) and each other (P = 0.058). Together these results support our hypothesis that fungal communities change in response to different carbon sources. We found 11 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) whose relative abundances differed at least marginally significantly among substrates. One OTU related to Mortierella increased in abundance under cellulose, but was absent or rare under the other substrates. Another OTU related to an unidentified Basidiomycete was only present under lignin addition, while yet another OTU closely related to Mortierella macrocystis greatly increased in abundance under tannin-protein and slightly increased in response to lignin and sucrose. This confirms our hypothesis that particular taxa respond differently to specific carbon substrates and suggests that some fungal taxa may specialize in the break-down of particular carbon sources in soils. Overall, our results imply that microbes have varying roles in the mineralization of soil carbon, and thus microbial community composition may be an important control over ecosystem carbon dynamics and storage, especially in relation to global change.

  4. Analytical data for waters of the Harvard Open Pit, Jamestown Mine, Tuolumne County, California, March 1998-September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, R.P.; Savage, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Jamestown mine is located in the Jamestown mining district in western Tuolumne County, California (see Fig. 1). This district is one of many located on or near the Melones fault zone, a major regional suture in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The districts along the Melones fault comprise the Mother Lode gold belt (Clark, 1970). The Harvard pit is the largest of several open pits mined at the Jamestown site by Sonora Mining Corporation between 1986 and 1994 (Fig. 2; Algood, 1990). It is at the site of an historical mine named the Harvard that produced about 100,000 troy ounces of gold, mainly between 1906 and 1916 (Julihn and Horton, 1940). Sonora Mining mined and processed about 17,000,000 short tons of ore, with an overall stripping ratio of about 4.5:1, yielding about 660,000 troy ounces of gold (Nelson and Leicht, 1994). Most of this material came from the Harvard pit, which attained dimensions of about 2700 ft (830 m) in length, 1500 ft (460 m) in width, and 600 ft (185 m) in depth. The bottom of the pit is at an elevation of 870 ft (265 m). Since mining operations ceased in mid-1994, the open pit has been filling with water. As of November, 2000, lake level had reached an elevation of about 1170 ft (357 m). Water quality monitoring data gathered after mine closure showed rising levels of arsenic, sulfate, and other components in the lake, with particularly notable increases accompanying a period of rapid filling in 1995 (County of Tuolumne, 1998). The largest potential source for arsenic in the vicinity of the Harvard pit is arsenian pyrite, the most abundant sulfide mineral related to gold mineralization. A previous study of weathering of arsenian pyrite in similarly mineralized rocks at the Clio mine, in the nearby Jacksonville mining district, showed that arsenic released by weathering of arsenian pyrite is effectively attenuated by adsorption on goethite or coprecipitation with jarosite, depending upon the buffering capacity of the pyrite-bearing rock (Savage and others, 2000). Although jarosite would be expected to dissolve in water having the composition of the developing pit lake, iron oxyhydroxide species (ferrihydrite and goethite) would be stable, and strong partitioning of arsenic onto suspended particles or bottom sediments containing these iron phases would be expected. Arsenic release to the lake would not be expected until stratification develops, producing a reducing, non-circulating hypolimnion in which the iron phases would be destroyed by dissolution. The fact that arsenic concentrations increased rapidly before the pit lake was deep enough to stratify shows that arsenic may not be attenuated in the ways that the earlier Clio mine area study indicated, and suggested that our understanding of release and transport of arsenic in this environment is incomplete. Therefore, in 1997 we decided to study the chemical evolution of the Harvard pit lake as part of a project on environmental impacts of gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, and in early 1998 we developed a cooperative study with several of the investigators in the Stanford University Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences who had done the Clio study. The U.S. Geological Survey portion of the project has been funded by the Mineral Resources Program. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the release and transport of arsenic into the Harvard pit lake and its accumulation there will contribute to more accurate predictions of arsenic release from weathering of sulfide-bearing rocks exposed by mining or other activities or events, and to better forecasts of pit lake evolution in this and similar environments, leading to more effective monitoring and mitigation strategies. An accurate predictive model is needed for the Harvard pit lake to forecast trends in metal concentrations, particularly arsenic, and also concentrations of major cations and anions. As the lake approaches pre-mining groundwater levels the lake water could move down the hydrologic gradient to the southeast into domestic wells, and could also affect the surface water of Woods Creek (see Figures 1-3). This report presents data for water samples collected from March, 1998 through September, 1999. Selected preliminary data for the pit lake for the 1998 calendar year have been reported (Savage and others, 2000).

  5. Norms for the Korean version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Young Don; Kim, Yun Joo

    2009-01-01

    The Korean Version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:K) was adapted and studied in order to determine Korean norms. In total, 271 subjects (175 males and 96 females) participated in the study. Comparisons are made between the Korean samples and previously published international samples. The normative data from the Korean sample on the HGSHS:K are generally congruent, including means and standard deviations, with data from international reference samples. However, the pass rate on the hallucination item on the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A, was significantly different from that of the American sample. Females showed higher overall scores than males. PMID:19031236

  6. The "nuts and bolts" of implementing shared medical appointments: the Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates experience.

    PubMed

    Berger-Fiffy, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (Harvard Vanguard) decided to develop a Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) program in 2007 for a variety of reasons. The program has launched 86 SMAs in 17 specialties at 12 sites and has exceeded 13 000 patient visits. Currently, the practice offers 54 SMAs and is believed to be the largest program in the country. This article provides an overview regarding staffing, space and equipment, project planning, promotional materials, training programs, workflow development, and the use of quality improvement (ie, LEAN) tools used to monitor the work to be completed and the metrics to date. PMID:22668614

  7. Using the Concordancer in Vocabulary Development for the Cambridge Advanced English (CAE) Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somogyi, Emma

    1996-01-01

    Discusses concordancing activities tailored for use with English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in the Cambridge Advanced English course in Australia. The article focuses on students selecting appropriate vocabulary to complete gapped text. Findings indicate that these activities benefit ESL students by providing authentic examples of…

  8. Legacies, Policies and Prospects: One Year on from the Cambridge Primary Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robin

    2011-01-01

    This article features the "Cambridge Primary Review." The "Review" has been supported from the beginning by Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, and this has given it the independence which is essential to its credibility. Its remit was to investigate, report and make recommendations on the condition and future of primary education in England. Its scope…

  9. National Identity, Citizenship and Education for Displacement: Spanish Refugee Children in Cambridge, 1937.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Explores the schooling of refugee children, who were evacuated from the Spanish Civil War to Cambridge between 1937 and 1938. Focuses on how the narrative account of refugee schooling relates to conceptions of national identity. Argues that the education of these children helped social progressives create a new type of citizen. (CMK)

  10. Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a

  11. Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. IV. Preparation of "Interatomic Distances 1960-65"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, F. H.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data obtained by diffraction methods. This paper describes the use of a computer-based file system of both bibliographic information and numeric data to produce a compendium of interatomic distances. (10 references)…

  12. The Effects of Style and Speaking Rate on /l/- Vocalisation in Local Cambridge English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    A study examined the effect of language style and variation in speech rate on the vocalization of /l/ in local Cambridge English. This sociolinguistic feature has been described as marking southeastern varieties of British English and as a connected speech process (CSP) in its sensitivity to variation in speaking rate. Language style variables…

  13. A Computerized Three-Dimensional Program Budget and Its Implementation at Cambridge School Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, S. Godwin

    This report describes the APL (Accountable unit, Program, and line item) budget system, a computerized three-dimensional program budget system that has been implemented in the Cambridge (Massachusetts) School Department. Various chapters discuss the differences between traditional budgeting and program budgeting, present an overview of te APL…

  14. What To Look for in ESL Admission Tests: Cambridge Certificate Exams, IELTS, and TOEFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline; Turner, Carolyn E.

    2000-01-01

    Familiarizes test users with issues to consider when employing assessments for screening and admission purposes. Examines the purpose, content, and scoring methods of three English-as-a-Second-Language admissions tests--the Cambridge certificate exams, International English Language Teaching System, and Test of English as a Foreign…

  15. Provisional Approaches to Goals for School Mathematics; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-6. In view of the experiences of other curriculum groups and of the general discussions since 1963, the present report initiates the next step in evolving the "Goals".

  16. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  17. Raouf Ibrahim, Liquid Sloshing Dynamics: Theory and Applications , Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2005) ISBN 0-521-83885-1 pp. xxi+948, £160, US$275, hbk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohayon, Roger

    2008-08-01

    The appearance of this book is an event. Written by Professor Raouf Ibrahim, an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear vibrations and random responses of liquid-free surface and more generally liquid sloshing dynamics, this book is particularly welcome as it appears as a monumental monograph on various phenomena occurring in sloshing problems, mostly based on analytical results and discussions resulting from various particular tank geometries. As a consequence, this book will be a useful complement to computational mechanics studies of free surface sloshing effects-linear and nonlinear, periodic and random-in earthquake engineering, civil engineering (storage tanks), aerospace engineering (such as liquid propelled launchers), nuclear engineering, naval and offshore engineering, etc.

  18. The Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD): graduate outcomes of the first MB/PhD programme in the UK.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Brimicombe, James; Wood, Diana F; Peters, D Keith

    2012-12-01

    We reviewed outcomes of the Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programme for the period 1989-2010. Of the 90 alumni contacted, 80 (89%; 24 women) completed an anonymous questionnaire. Thirty were academic staff and 35 were in general professional (core) or higher medical training. Of the latter, 11 were specialty registrars, six were academic clinical fellows and three held academic foundation year posts. Eight alumni were overseas, including five in North America. Most (95%) respondents considered that their academic career goals were facilitated by the programme. Sixty-eight of the 80 alumni had conducted further research, 63 (79%) were active in research, and 90% had explicit plans for further full-time research. Twelve graduates had further substantive research support (six clinician scientist awards and three senior fellowships) and two were Wellcome Trust postdoctoral MB/PhD fellows. Alumni included two full university professors, one reader, six senior lecturers, two assistant professors and nine university clinical lecturers. MB/PhD programmes offer an alternative training pathway for clinician-scientists in UK medical schools: the Cambridge programme promotes scientific discovery and sustained academic development within the context of contemporary medicine and clinical practice. PMID:23342406

  19. A 2-Year Progress Report of the AACAP-Harvard Macy Teaching Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Hanson, Mark; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.; Cuccio, Anne; Dingle, Arden D.; Glowinski, Anne; Guthrie, Elizabeth; Kelley, Kathy; Malloy, Erin M.; Mehlinger, Renee; O'Melia, Anne; Shatkin, Jess; Anders, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) has partnered with the Harvard Macy Program for Healthcare Educators so that selected child and adolescent psychiatry academic faculty might enhance their teaching expertise in order to possibly enhance recruitment of medical students into child and adolescent psychiatry.…

  20. Validation of a Tibetan Translation of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lhewa, Dechen; Banu, Sophia; Rosenfeld, Barry; Keller, Allen

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to translate and validate the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL) and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) in a Tibetan population. Translated questionnaires were administered to 57 Tibetan survivors of torture/human rights abuses living in the United States and receiving services in a torture treatment program. Participants…

  1. Searching Harvard Business Review Online. . . Lessons in Searching a Full Text Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    1985-01-01

    This article examines the Harvard Business Review Online (HBRO) database (bibliographic description fields, abstracts, extracted information, full text, subject descriptors) and reports on 31 sample HBRO searches conducted in Bibliographic Retrieval Services to test differences between searching full text and searching bibliographic record. Sample…

  2. The Flip Sides of Full-Text: Superindex and the Harvard Business Review/Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadlez, Eva M.

    1984-01-01

    This article illustrates similarities between two different types of full-text databases--Superindex, Harvard Business Review/Online--and uses them as arena to demonstrate search and display applications of full-text. The selection of logical operators, full-text search strategies, and keywords and Bibliographic Retrieval Service's Occurrence…

  3. College Board Response to "Harvard Educational Review" Article by Santelices and Wilson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This is the College Board's response to a research article by Drs. Maria Veronica Santelices and Mark Wilson in the Harvard Educational Review, entitled "Unfair Treatment? The Case of Freedle, the SAT, and the Standardization Approach to Differential Item Functioning" (see EJ930622).

  4. EVALUATION OF THE HARVARD OZONE PASSIVE SAMPLER ON HUMAN SUBJECTS INDOORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, inexpensive ozone passive sampler was developed by Koutrakis et al. (1) to provide a convenient means for measuring ozone. This paper presents validation results of the Harvard ozone passive sampler and investigation of ozone behavior around the human body through a seri...

  5. An Insider Perspective on Implementing the Harvard Case Study Method in Business Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeiz, Karim S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides practical guidance on the implementation of the CSM (case study method) using the HBS (Harvard Business School) model. The analysis is based on the first-hand experience of the author as a user and implementer of this mode of instruction. The results are further validated with surveys given to MBA (Master of Business…

  6. New Pathways to Medical Education: Learning To Learn at Harvard Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosteson, Daniel C., Ed.; And Others

    This book details how Harvard Medical School (Massachusetts) overcame prevailing educational inertia and developed a curriculum and educational program consistent with preparing students to practice medicine in the 21st century. The New Pathway in General Medical Education program emphasizes both acquiring current knowledge and developing learning…

  7. The Harvard-Yale-Columbia Intensive Summer Studies Program. The Disadvantaged Student in Graduate School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahmer, Harold M.

    The Harvard-Yale-Columbia Intensive Summer Studies Program (ISSP) was established in 1965 to prepare students from predominantly black and selected southern white colleges for graduate study in the arts and sciences, law, medicine, and related fields. In 1966, 59% and in 1967, 71% of the ISSP class went on to graduate school. The original plan…

  8. Newspaper Coverage of the Harvard Medicare Project: Regional Distinctions/Discreet Disregard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, J. Gregory

    A study examined American newspaper coverage of the Harvard Medicare Project proposal of 1986, a major health policy proposal calling for comprehensive reforms in the national health program. Using Burrelle's news clipping service which includes every daily newspaper (over 1500) in the United States, all 75 newspaper articles on the project from…

  9. Spotlight on Student Engagement, Motivation, and Achievement. No. 5 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Only when students feel engaged both socially and academically can schools and teachers lay the groundwork to motivate achievement. This volume, the fifth in the "Harvard Education Letter" Spotlight series, brings together fifteen seminal articles that examine research and practice on these complex and interrelated issues. Contributors include:

  10. Implications of Biomedical Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Research Review Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene, Ed.; Koivumaki, Judith, Ed.

    A small number of books and articles devoted to the social, political, ethical, and legal implications of the biomedical field and technology have been abstracted for this document. A basic criterion for selection was the focus on questions of overall organization and public policy rather than on more specialized concerns. Topics covered include…

  11. Museum of Comparative Zoology Library--The Agassiz Library: Harvard University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Eva S.; Regen, Shari S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the Museum of Comparative Zoology Library reflects the union between the nineteenth century natural history values of Louis Agassiz and the twentieth century library and information science methodology. Special collections, records, cataloging and classification, serials and their classification, policies, services, and procedures are…

  12. Technology and the Individual. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traviss, Irene

    Reports of concern for the effect of technology on the individual are represented in this review publication by abstracts and by subject summaries. Areas of discussion are the relationships of technology, culture, social structure, and the individual to each other. Change in work and leisure patterns, obsolescence in parenthood and citizenship,…

  13. Implications of Computer Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene; Burbank, Judith

    Lengthy abstracts of a small number of selected books and articles on the implications of computer technology are presented, preceded by a brief state-of-the-art survey which traces the impact of computers on the structure of economic and political organizations and socio-cultural patterns. A summary statement introduces each of the three abstract…

  14. Technology and the Polity. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Research Review Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene, Ed.; Burbank, Judith, Ed.

    A small number of selected books and articles which deal with the impact of technological advancement on the American political structure have been abstracted for this document. Materials were chosen for abstracting which presented a significant analysis of issues, a useful compilation of data, or which are representative of different outlooks and…

  15. 75 FR 33328 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... published in the Federal Register (68 FR 48626-48634, August 14, 2003) and a published correction Notice of Inventory Completion (71 FR 70979-70980, December 7, 2006). The correction Notice of December 7, 2006... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology,...

  16. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 58625-58626, October 7, 2008), which itself corrected an earlier NIC published in the Federal Register (72 FR 41524-41525, July 30, 2007). After publication of the notices cited above... (74 FR 40218-40219, August 11, 2009). Consequently, the Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma is...

  17. How Technology Will Shape the Future. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Reprint Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesthene, Emmanuel G.

    1968-01-01

    The development and adoption of new technologies make for changes in social organization and values by creating new possibilities for human action and thus altering the mix of options available to men. Because it alters the conditions of choice, new technology has a high probability of changing individual and social values: adopting new means to…

  18. "Universities, the Major Battleground in the Fight for Reason and Capitalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gary H.

    2010-01-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the presidents of Harvard University, Columbia University, and the University of Chicago issued declarations bolstering institutional resistance to attempts by external agencies to influence a faculty member's stance on issues of the day. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) emerged some…

  19. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

  20. Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    1998-01-01

    This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

  1. District heating and cooling feasibility study, the City of Cambridge (Massachusetts). Final report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Aalto, P.; Timmerman, R.

    1982-07-01

    The City of Cambridge compiled data related to the market for a continued or expanded DHC system. This would build upon existing systems in the City, principally that of the Cambridge Steam Corporation. The study examined various cost alternatives to determine the competitive level which would assure market penetration. It includes an examination of technical issues relating to the existing DHC systems and an investigation of developer receptiveness to DHC. The study also includes an analysis of relevant utility regulations and a synthesis of the component costs of a DHC system. Cambridge's study concluded that cost allocation changes to reflect the true cost of steam would be necessary to assure viability of a DHC system based on the existing system. It recommended efforts with the Department of Public Utilities of Massachusetts to develop a more equitable cost allocation methodology. It also concluded that waste to energy conversion had potential as a heat source for a DHC system. It recommended a more detailed feasibility study to consider these issues in greater detail.

  2. Using Digital Materials in Online Courses: A Cautionary Tale of Georgia State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talab, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    On April 15, 2008, a lawsuit was filed against Georgia State University by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage, supported by the American University Presses (AAP). The complaint asserted ""pervasive, flagrant, and ongoing" unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials...through its electronic course reserves service,…

  3. Using Digital Materials in Online Courses: A Cautionary Tale of Georgia State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talab, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    On April 15, 2008, a lawsuit was filed against Georgia State University by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage, supported by the American University Presses (AAP). The complaint asserted ""pervasive, flagrant, and ongoing" unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials...through its electronic course reserves service,

  4. "They Sweat for Science": The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Self-Experimentation in American Exercise Physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andi

    2015-08-01

    In many scientific fields, the practice of self-experimentation waned over the course of the twentieth century. For exercise physiologists working today, however, the practice of self-experimentation is alive and well. This paper considers the role of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and its scientific director, D. Bruce Dill, in legitimizing the practice of self-experimentation in exercise physiology. Descriptions of self-experimentation are drawn from papers published by members of the Harvard Fatigue Lab. Attention is paid to the ethical and practical justifications for self-experimentation in both the lab and the field. Born out of the practical, immediate demands of fatigue protocols, self-experimentation performed the long-term, epistemological function of uniting physiological data across time and space, enabling researchers to contribute to a general human biology program. PMID:25139499

  5. Evaluation of environmental filtration control of engineered nanoparticles using the Harvard Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES)

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría-Vega, Manuel E.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Santeufemio, Christopher; Schmidt, Daniel; Demokritou, Philip; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Applying engineering controls to airborne engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is critical to prevent environmental releases and worker exposure. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two air sampling and six air cleaning fabric filters at collecting ENPs using industrially relevant flame-made engineered nanoparticles generated using a versatile engineered nanomaterial generation system (VENGES), recently designed and constructed at Harvard University. VENGES has the ability to generate metal and metal oxide exposure atmospheres while controlling important particle properties such as primary particle size, aerosol size distribution, and agglomeration state. For this study, amorphous SiO2 ENPs with a 15.4 nm primary particle size were generated and diluted with HEPA-filtered air. The aerosol was passed through the filter samples at two different filtration face velocities (2.3 and 3.5 m/min). Particle concentrations as a function of particle size were measured upstream and downstream of the filters using a specially designed filter test system to evaluate filtration efficiency. Real time instruments (FMPS and APS) were used to measure particle concentration for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm. Membrane-coated fabric filters were found to have enhanced nanoparticle collection efficiency by 20–46 % points compared to non-coated fabric and could provide collection efficiency above 95 %. PMID:23412707

  6. The living legacy of the Harvard Pigeon Lab: quantitative analysis in the wide world.

    PubMed Central

    Logue, A W

    2002-01-01

    From the Harvard Pigeon Lab of the 1960s arose a behavior-analytic approach that was quantitative and rigorous, rooted in Herrnstein's matching law. Researchers modified the matching law to describe choice behavior in a variety of different settings and examined its relations with other quantitative models. Beginning in the early 1970s, researchers began using the Harvard Pigeon Lab's quantitative framework to study in the laboratory specific aspects of the world outside the laboratory. Much of this work concerned investigations of self-control-choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer. Experiments using a quantitative framework derived from the matching law have also been conducted outside the laboratory; however, these have been far less frequent. Current and future researchers will benefit the field by devising new, creative ways to investigate the matching law and related quantitative models outside the laboratory. Such research can help to demonstrate the validity of these models as basic principles of behavior, can enhance public opinion of and rewards for such research, and can stimulate further development of the Harvard Pigeon Lab's quantitative approach by using that approach with new variables. PMID:12083687

  7. Calculated Sunspot and Quiet-Sun Mg II Profiles Compared With IRIS DataEugene Avrett and Hui TianHarvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrett, Eugene H.

    2014-06-01

    A new sunpsot model has been derived, consistent with the SUMER atlas data of Curdt, et al. and Mg II profile data from IRIS. Comparisons are made with Quiet-Sun results from both sources. It is necessary to include molecules in the sunspot model not only account for the low brightness temperatures near 1850 /AA but also for the density variations higher in the atmosphere. The minimum temperature is roughly 2500 K in the sunspot model and 4500 K for the quiet Sun. The Mg II H line profile is centrally reversed in both cases, with the peak intensity originating where the temperature rises abruptly from the minimum value. The line center is formed at the top of the chromosphere where the temperature rises abruptly from 10,000 K into the chromosphere-corona transition region. The calculated Mg II line center intensity is much smaller than observed, for models constrained by the EUV continuum data.

  8. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    PubMed

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy. PMID:26094204

  9. An adaptation of the Cambridge Colour Test for use with animals.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Katherine; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Recently, molecular biological techniques have presented new opportunities for addressing questions concerning the neural mechanisms involved in color coding, thereby rousing renewed interest in animal color vision testing. We have modified a computer-based assessment tool, the Cambridge Colour Test, to make it suitable for use with animals. Here, the validity and reliability of the testing method were evaluated using squirrel monkeys. Because the chromatic stimuli and the achromatic backgrounds of the test consist of dots that vary in lightness, the stimulus parameters can be adjusted so that animals are not able to use luminance differences to make correct discriminations. Thus, in contrast to methods used previously, this test does not require that time be spent equating the luminance of each chromatic stimulus examined. Furthermore, the computer video-display based design of the testing apparatus can be easily replicated and adapted for use with many species in a variety of settings. In the present experiments, the squirrel monkeys' behavioral results agreed with the predictions for their color vision based on genetic analysis and electroretinography (ERG) spectral sensitivity data. Repeated measurements were highly consistent. Thus, an adaptation of the Cambridge Colour Test provides a valid and reliable method for testing color vision in animals. PMID:16962014

  10. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-04-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances. PMID:24954981

  11. Building America Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency. Efficient operation of the heating system faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68 degrees F) than day (73 degrees F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency, which faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68°F) than day (73° F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  13. "Teaching Physics as one of the humanities": The history of (harvard) project Physics, 1961-1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoulam, David

    In the United States after World War II, science had come to occupy a central place in the minds of policy makers, scientists, and the public. Negotiating different views between these groups proved a difficult task and spilled into debates over the role and scope of science education. To examine this process, this dissertation traces the history of Harvard Project Physics (HPP), a high-school physics curriculum from the 1960s that incorporated a humanistic and historical approach to teaching science. The narrative begins with the rise of General Education in the 1940s. Under the leadership of Harvard president James Conant, faculty at Harvard developed several Natural Science courses that connected science to history as a way to teach students about science and its relationship to culture. By the late 1950s this historical approach faced resistance from scientists who viewed it as misrepresenting their disciplines and called for students to learn specialized subject matter. With the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), in the early 1960s scientists' vision of science education emerged in high-school classrooms across the country. By the mid 1960s, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and the Daddario Amendment to the NSF, the political and education landscape began to change. These laws transformed the goals of two of the NSF and the Office of Education (USOE). These organizations faced demands to work together to develop projects that would speak to domestic concerns over equity and diversity. Their first joint educational venture was HPP. In order to succeed, HPP had to speak to the needs of disciplinary-minded scientists at the NSF, equity-minded educators at the USOE, and results-focused politicians in Congress. This work argues that HPP succeeded because it met the needs of these various stakeholders regarding the roles of science and education in American society.

  14. Polish norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Siuta, Jerzy

    2010-10-01

    The Polish version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A; Shor & Orne, 1962) was administered to 1174 participants (968 women and 206 men). Polish data were compared with other norming studies. Point-biserial item-scale correlations ranged from r = .12 (posthypnotic suggestion item) to r = .49. The Kuder-Richardson correlation of .70 was within the range of the reference samples. Test-retest reliability coefficients were obtained from one group of participants tested twice in the same session (r = .69, p < .05), and another group 8 weeks apart (r = .58, p < .05). Females scored significantly higher than males. PMID:20799122

  15. Measurements of canopy chemistry with 1992 AVIRIS data at Blackhawk Island and Harvard Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Mary E.; Aber, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The research described in this paper was designed to determine if high spectral resolution imaging spectrometer data can be used to measure the chemical composition of forest foliage, specifically nitrogen and lignin concentration. Information about the chemical composition of forest canopies can be used to determine nutrient cycling rates and carbon balances in forest ecosystems. This paper will describe the results relating data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to field measured canopy chemistry at Blackhawk Island, WI and Harvard Forest, MA.

  16. Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Tejal K; Abookire, Susan A; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality is a 2-year physician-oriented training program with a strong operational orientation, embedding trainees in the quality departments of participating hospitals. It also integrates didactic and experiential learning and offers the option of obtaining a master's degree in public health. The program focuses on methodologically rigorous improvement and measurement, with an emphasis on the development and implementation of innovative practice. The operational orientation is intended to foster the professional development of future quality and safety leaders. The purpose of this article is to describe the design and development of the fellowship. PMID:25184234

  17. Drawing the line on natural gas regulation: The Harvard study on the future of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kalt, J.P.; Schuller, F.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Harvard Study on the Future of Natural Gas Policy reflects the ideas, discussions, and debates of nine authors and more than seventy experts from business, government, and academia. These study participants constituted the Executive Working Group, which met in three sessions during 1984-1985. The executive sessions provided forums for the authors to present versions of their chapters at progressive stages of development. The results were invaluable insights and perspectives from parties directly involved in the ongoing debates over the reform of natural gas policy. In addition, a number of participants have contributed written comments on the various chapters of this book.

  18. Evaluation of Harvard Lyman-α Hygrometer and Harvard Herriott Hygrometer measurements from the SEAC4RS flight campaign and AquaVIT2 laboratory comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Smith, J. B.; Wilmouth, D. M.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is central to both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Stratospheric water vapor concentrations influence surface dosages of UV radiation through the production of OH and by controlling the rates of heterogeneous reactions, both of which contribute to the catalytic destruction of ozone [e.g., Anderson et al., 2012]. Water vapor also impacts the radiative properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) directly and via the formation of thin cirrus, with the ability to significantly alter surface warming [Solomon et al., 2010]. However, with the documented disagreement among water vapor measurements on the order of 1 to 2 ppmv in the UT/LS, the atmospheric chemistry and climate community cannot reliably model the chemical and radiative properties of this region, predict the response of this region to anthropogenic climate forcing, or confidently detect trends in water vapor concentrations, particularly at the level of ~1%/year. In response to these concerns, the Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument, designed for in situ measurement aboard NASA's high-altitude WB-57 and ER-2 aircraft, has been reconfigured to include two independent measurement methods for the simultaneous detection of ambient water vapor mixing ratios within a common duct. The dual-axis instrument combines the heritage of the Harvard Lyman-α photo-fragment fluorescence instrument (Ly-α) with the newly designed tunable diode laser direct absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The utilization of two radically different measurement techniques facilitates the identification, diagnosis, and constraint of systematic errors in both the laboratory and flight environments. Here we present comparison data from two recent field campaigns which offered unprecedented opportunities for comparison and the assessment of instrumental accuracy in both the laboratory and in situ environments, 1) The Aqua Validation and Instrument Tests (AquaVIT-2), during April 2013 at the Aerosols Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany, and 2) NASA's Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) mission, operated out of Houston, TX, in August and September of 2013. The Aquavit-2 campaign provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate both axes of the HWV instrument under a controlled laboratory setting, and to compare with other state-of-the-art hygrometers within the international community, many of which have contributed substantially to UT/LS water vapor measurements for several decades. Laboratory efforts, however, are limited by their ability to replicate the unique sampling conditions, e.g., temperature, pressure, flow, chemistry, of the flight environment. Differences in instrument implementation between the laboratory and flight environment must also be considered. The SEAC4RS mission provides an excellent opportunity to further evaluate the performance of the dual-axis instrument in situ. Sampling with the Ly-α and HHH instruments on the ER-2 in the proximity of Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) overpasses and coordinated launches of the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) promises a statistically significant and rich dataset for comparison.

  19. Academic-industrial relations before the blockbuster drugs: lessons from the Harvard Committee on Pharmacotherapy, 1939-1943.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Scott H; Greene, Jeremy A

    2011-04-01

    Increasing discussion has developed in recent years over the nature of the relationship between academic medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. This article narrates the history of a little-known attempt at Harvard Medical School between 1939 and 1943 to establish an interdisciplinary, academic-industrial Committee on Pharmacotherapy to enhance and rationalize the relationship between the field of academic research in pharmacotherapeutics and the pharmaceutical industry. Using original archival materials, the authors depict the functioning of the committee, which was headed by Soma Weiss and included such members as Fuller Albright, Henry Beecher, and Walter Cannon. The committee would be collectively funded by seven pharmaceutical companies and was to be predicated on collaboration, both across the entire university and between academia and industry. It was expected to transform the bench-to-bedside study and testing of therapeutic compounds, to redefine the teaching of pharmacotherapy, and to create a unified forum through which to discuss the overall academic-industrial relationship and more specific issues such as patents. Unfortunately, the program proved to be short-lived, the victim of such contingent factors as the untimely death of Soma Weiss and America's entry into World War II, as well as such more fundamental factors as the inadequate and temporary nature of the funding stream and unresolved tensions regarding the goals of the committee on the part of both the medical school and its industry supporters. Nevertheless, these early forays into collaborative bench-to-bedside translational research and the rationalization of academic-industrial relations remain instructive today. PMID:21346508

  20. Articulating Domestic and Global University Descriptors and Indices of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    At the 2010 American Educational Research Association (AERA) annual conference, a featured invited session focused on "How professors think: inside the curious world of academic judgment." Harvard University professor and author, Michele Lamont, articulated a thoughtful precis of her book. Her material concentrates on the "curious" world of…

  1. Articulating Domestic and Global University Descriptors and Indices of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    At the 2010 American Educational Research Association (AERA) annual conference, a featured invited session focused on "How professors think: inside the curious world of academic judgment." Harvard University professor and author, Michele Lamont, articulated a thoughtful precis of her book. Her material concentrates on the "curious" world of

  2. Two new methods for retrieving an image from noisy, incomplete data and comparison with the Cambridge MaxEnt package.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustundag, D.; Queen, N. M.; Skinner, G. K.; Bowcock, J. E.

    The authors consider two new methods for retrieving an image from noisy, incomplete data, based on the principle of maximum entropy. The image is reconstructed by either placing grains one at a time into image pixels, or transferring them between randomly chosen pairs of pixels on the basis of certain deterministic rules. The performance of the methods is tested for an application in X-ray astronomy and compared with that of the Cambridge MaxEnt package. They also demonstrate the application of the Cambridge MaxEnt package to a real problem in X-ray astronomy.

  3. The rise of pathophysiologic research in the United States: the role of two Harvard hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiologic research, the major approach to understanding and treating disease, was created in the 20th century, and two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Boston City Hospital, played a key role in its development. After the Flexner Report of 1910, medical students were assigned clinical clerkships in teaching hospitals. Rockefeller-trained Francis Weld Peabody, who was committed to investigative, pathophysiologic research, was a critical leader in these efforts. At the Brigham, Harvard medical students observed patients closely and asked provocative questions about their diseases. Additionally, physicians returned from World War I with questions concerning the pathophysiology of wartime injuries. At the Boston City Hospital's new Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Peabody fostered investigative question-based research by physicians. These physicians expanded pathophysiologic investigation from the 1920s. Post-war, Watson and Crick's formulation of the structure of DNA led shortly to modern molecular biology and new research approaches that are being furthered at the Boston Hospitals. PMID:23974504

  4. The Academy at Harvard Medical School: nurturing teaching and stimulating innovation.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E; Neill, Jane M; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2003-07-01

    The Academy at Harvard Medical School, established in 2001, was formed at a critical moment for medical schools in this country. Several decades of enormous growth in the biomedical research and clinical care activities of medical school faculty have resulted in great societal benefit. The unintended consequence has been a decline in faculty time and reward for the educational mission that is unique to a medical school. The impact of this decline is particularly felt now because the explosive growth in the science and technology relevant to medical practice, coupled with dramatic changes in the health care delivery system, calls for new models for the education of the next generation of physicians. The mission of the academy is to renew and reinvigorate the educational mission of Harvard Medical School (HMS). By bringing together a select group of some of the school's most talented and dedicated faculty and providing direct support for their work related to education, the academy has created a unique mechanism for increasing the recognition of teaching contributions of both academy members and the teaching faculty at large, fostering educational innovation, and providing a forum for the exchange of ideas related to medical education that cross departmental and institutional lines. The authors describe the academy's membership criteria, structure, governance, activities, institutional impact, and plans for long-term evaluation, and indicate challenges the academy will face in the future. PMID:12857684

  5. DIGITAL ACCESS TO A SKY CENTURY AT HARVARD: INITIAL PHOTOMETRY AND ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laycock, S.; Tang, S.; Grindlay, J.; Los, E.; Simcoe, R.; Mink, D.

    2010-10-15

    Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) is a project to digitize the collection of {approx}500,000 glass photographic plates held at Harvard College Observatory. The collection spans the time period from 1880 to 1985, during which time every point on the sky was been observed from 500 to 1000 times. In this paper, we describe the DASCH commissioning run, during which we developed the data-reduction pipeline, characterized the plates and fine-tuned the digitizer's performance and operation. This initial run consisted of 500 plates taken from a variety of different plate series, all containing the open cluster Praeseppe (M44). We report that accurate photometry at the 0.1 mag level is possible on the majority of plates, and demonstrate century-long light curves of various types of variable stars in and around M44. DASCH will generate a public online archive of the entire plate collection, including images, source catalogs, and light curves for nearly all astronomical objects brighter than about 17th magnitude.

  6. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  7. A distributed model: redefining a robust research subject advocacy program at the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sabune J; Cagliero, Enrico; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E

    2014-08-01

    The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center ("Harvard Catalyst") Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) Program has reengineered subject advocacy, distributing the delivery of advocacy functions through a multi-institutional, central platform rather than vesting these roles and responsibilities in a single individual functioning as a subject advocate. The program is process-oriented and output-driven, drawing on the strengths of participating institutions to engage local stakeholders both in the protection of research subjects and in advocacy for subjects' rights. The program engages stakeholder communities in the collaborative development and distributed delivery of accessible and applicable educational programming and resources. The Harvard Catalyst RSA Program identifies, develops, and supports the sharing and distribution of expertise, education, and resources for the benefit of all institutions, with a particular focus on the frontline: research subjects, researchers, research coordinators, and research nurses. PMID:24841488

  8. A Distributed Model: Redefining a Robust Research Subject Advocacy Program at the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sabune J.; Cagliero, Enrico; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (“Harvard Catalyst”) Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) Program has reengineered subject advocacy, distributing the delivery of advocacy functions through a multiinstitutional, central platform rather than vesting these roles and responsibilities in a single individual functioning as a subject advocate. The program is processoriented and output-driven, drawing on the strengths of participating institutions to engage local stakeholders both in the protection of research subjects and and in advocacy for subjects’ rights. The program engages stakeholder communities in the collaborative development and distributed delivery of accessible and applicable educational programming and resources. The Harvard Catalyst RSA Program identifies, develops, and supports the sharing and distribution of expertise, education, and resources for the benefit of all institutions, with a particular focus on the front-line: research subjects, researchers, research coordinators, and research nurses. PMID:24841488

  9. Agricultural accidents: A study of 132 patients seen at addenbrooke's hospital, Cambridge, in 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D. K. C.

    1969-01-01

    In a 12-month study 132 patients injured in agricultural accidents were treated at the Accident Service of Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Agricultural machinery and implements were concerned in 50% of the accidents and animals in 10%. The state of immunity against tetanus of these patients was found to be extremely low, only 9% being fully immunized, and 56% having never received a course of prophylactic adsorbed tetanus toxoid. While prevention is obviously the only real solution to accidents of any nature, legislation is not enough to achieve this, and the final responsibility lies with the farmworker to ensure that all safety precautions are followed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5388731

  10. Does the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) Distinguish Between Cognitive Domains in Healthy Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Megan E; Summers, Mathew J; Saunders, Nichole L; Summers, Jeffery J; Vickers, James C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a semiautomated computer interface for assessing cognitive function. We examined whether CANTAB tests measured specific cognitive functions, using established neuropsychological tests as a reference point. A sample of 500 healthy older (M = 60.28 years, SD = 6.75) participants in the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project completed battery of CANTAB subtests and standard paper-based neuropsychological tests. Confirmatory factor analysis identified four factors: processing speed, verbal ability, episodic memory, and working memory. However, CANTAB tests did not consistently load onto the cognitive domain factors derived from traditional measures of the same function. These results indicate that five of the six CANTAB subtests examined did not load onto single cognitive functions. These CANTAB tests may lack the sensitivity to measure discrete cognitive functions in healthy populations or may measure other cognitive domains not included in the traditional neuropsychological battery. PMID:25882162

  11. Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

    1983-07-01

    Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

  12. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Peter

    This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

  13. The Harvard Catalyst Common Reciprocal IRB Reliance Agreement: an innovative approach to multisite IRB review and oversight.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sabune J; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E

    2015-02-01

    Reduction of duplicative Institutional Review Board (IRB) review for multiinstitutional studies is a desirable goal to improve IRB efficiency while enhancing human subject protections. Here we describe the Harvard Catalyst Master Reciprocal Common IRB Reliance Agreement (MRA), a system that provides a legal framework for IRB reliance, with the potential to streamline IRB review processes and reduce administrative burden and barriers to collaborative, multiinstitutional research. The MRA respects the legal autonomy of the signatory institutions while offering a pathway to eliminate duplicative IRB review when appropriate. The Harvard Catalyst MRA provides a robust and flexible model for reciprocal reliance that is both adaptable and scalable. PMID:25196592

  14. Healthy Living Cambridge Kids: a community-based participatory effort to promote healthy weight and fitness.

    PubMed

    Chomitz, Virginia R; McGowan, Robert J; Wendel, Josefine M; Williams, Sandra A; Cabral, Howard J; King, Stacey E; Olcott, Dawn B; Cappello, Maryann; Breen, Susan; Hacker, Karen A

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community-based healthy weight intervention on child weight and fitness. Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have monitored BMI and fitness annually since 2000. Annual increases of overweight and obesity from 2000 (37.0%) to 2004 (39.1%), triggered a multidisciplinary team of researchers, educators, health care, and public health professionals to mobilize environmental and policy interventions. Guided by the social-ecological model and community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, the team developed and implemented Healthy Living Cambridge Kids (HLCK), a multicomponent intervention targeting community, school, family, and individuals. The intervention included city policies and community awareness campaigns; physical education (PE) enhancements, food service reforms, farm-to-school-to-home programs; and family outreach and "BMI and fitness reports". Baseline (2004) to follow-up (2007) evaluation design assessed change in children's weight and fitness status. A cohort of 1,858 K-5th grade children participated: 37.3% black, 14.0% Hispanic, 37.1% white, 10.2% Asian, 1.7% other race; 43.3% were lower income. BMI z-score (0.67-0.63 P < 0.001) and proportion obese (20.2-18.0% P < 0.05) decreased, and mean number of fitness tests (0-5) passed increased (3.7-3.9 P < 0.001). Whereas black and Hispanic children were more likely to be obese at baseline (27.0 and 28.5%, respectively) compared with white (12.6%) and Asian (14.3%) children, obesity among all race/ethnicity groups declined. Concurrent with a 3-year community intervention, modest improvements in obesity and fitness were observed among CPS children from baseline to follow-up. The CBPR approach facilitated sustaining policies and program elements postintervention in this diverse community. PMID:20107461

  15. A survey on worries of pregnant women - testing the German version of the Cambridge Worry Scale

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is a transition period in a woman's life characterized by increased worries and anxiety. The Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) was developed to assess the content and extent of maternal worries in pregnancy. It has been increasingly used in studies over recent years. However, a German version has not yet been developed and validated. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the extent and content of worries in pregnancy on a sample of women in Germany using a translated and adapted version of the Cambridge Worry Scale, and (2) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the German version. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study and enrolled 344 pregnant women in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Women filled out structured questionnaires that contained the CWS, the Spielberger-State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI), as well as questions on their obstetric history. Antenatal records were also analyzed. Results The CWS was well understood and easy to fill in. The major worries referred to the process of giving birth (CWS mean value 2.26) and the possibility that something might be wrong with the baby (1.99), followed by coping with the new baby (1.57), going to hospital (1.29) and the possibility of going into labour too early (1.28). The internal consistency of the scale (0.80) was satisfactory, and we found a four-factor structure, similar to previous studies. Tests of convergent validity showed that the German CWS represents a different construct compared with state and trait anxiety but has the desired overlap. Conclusions The German CWS has satisfactory psychometric properties. It represents a valuable tool for use in scientific studies and is likely to be useful also to clinicians. PMID:20038294

  16. The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Eyring, Henry J.

    2011-01-01

    The Innovative University illustrates how higher education can respond to the forces of disruptive innovation , and offers a nuanced and hopeful analysis of where the traditional university and its traditions have come from and how it needs to change for the future. Through an examination of Harvard and BYU-Idaho as well as other stories of…

  17. The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Eyring, Henry J.

    2011-01-01

    The Innovative University illustrates how higher education can respond to the forces of disruptive innovation , and offers a nuanced and hopeful analysis of where the traditional university and its traditions have come from and how it needs to change for the future. Through an examination of Harvard and BYU-Idaho as well as other stories of

  18. Edward Y. Hartshorne and the Reopening of German Universities, 1945-1946: His Personal Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tent, James F.

    1997-01-01

    Characterizes U.S. Edward Y. Hartshorne as a "manager of German social recovery." An instructor at Harvard University and protege of sociologist Talcott Parsons, Hartshorne was instrumental in the post-war reopening of German universities. Discusses Hartshorne's activities in military intelligence and psychological warfare, as well as the

  19. Conveying the Meaning of the Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Luke A.

    2010-01-01

    In the late summer of 2008, after the 2007-2008 fiscal year's books had closed, the nation's wealthiest universities were confronted with an unfamiliar sight: single-digit endowment returns. Not since 2003 had Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Princeton University (Princeton, New Jersey), or Stanford University (Stanford, California)…

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR HARVARD PM IMPACTOR CALIBRATION AND LEAK TESTING (UA-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the periodic calibration and leak testing of Harvard particulate matter (PM) impactor units. This procedure applies directly to the calibration and leak testing of Harvard PM impactor units used during the Arizona NHEXAS ...

  1. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CALIBRATION OF HARVARD PM SAMPLERS (UA-L-6.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for calibrating Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers. This procedure applies directly to the Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers used during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the Border study. Keywords: lab; equipment;...

  2. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR HARVARD PM IMPACTOR CALIBRATION AND LEAK TESTING (UA-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the periodic calibration and leak testing of Harvard particulate matter (PM) impactor units. This procedure applies directly to the calibration and leak testing of Harvard PM impactor units used during the Arizona NHEXAS ...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CALIBRATION OF HARVARD PM SAMPLERS (UA-L-6.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for calibrating Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers. This procedure applies directly to the Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers used during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: lab; equipmen...

  4. M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2011-01-01

    This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

  5. A FIRST STEP TOWARDS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN A K-12 UNGRADED SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOSTER, GARRETT R.

    A SERIES OF THREE CONFERENCES WAS HELD TO EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING A LONG-RANGE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR AN UNGRADED, K-12 SCHOOL, BASED ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAMBRIDGE CONFERENCE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. OVER 50 MATHEMATICIANS, MATHEMATICS EDUCATORS, AND PERSONS INVOLVED IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  6. Source-Water Protection and Water-Quality Investigations in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Supply System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Norton, Chip; MacDonald, Timothy W.D.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction The Cambridge Water Department (CWD) supplies about 15 million gallons of water each day to more than 95,000 customers in the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most of this water is obtained from a system of reservoirs located in Cambridge and in parts of five other suburban-Boston communities. The drainage basin that contributes water to these reservoirs includes several potential sources of drinking-water contaminants, including major highways, secondary roads, areas of commercial and industrial development, and suburban residential tracts. The CWD is implementing a comprehensive Source-Water Protection Plan to ensure that the highest quality water is delivered to the treatment plant. A key element of this plan is a program that combines systematic monitoring of the drainage basin with detailed investigations of the effects of nonpoint-source contaminants, such as highway-deicing chemicals, nutrients, oxygen-demanding organic compounds, bacteria, and trace metals arising from stormwater runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the CWD and the Massachusetts Highway Department (MassHighway) to develop a better understanding of the sources, transport, and fate of many of these contaminants. This Fact Sheet describes source-water protection and water-quality investigations currently underway in the Cambridge drinking-water supply system. The investigations are designed to complement a national effort by the USGS to provide water suppliers and regulatory agencies with information on the vulnerability of water supplies and the movement and fate of source-water contaminants.

  7. Digitization Procedures of Analogue Seismograms from the Adam Dziewonski Observatory (HRV) at Harvard, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpey, M.; Ishii, M.

    2010-12-01

    This project explores methods of digitization of analogue seismic recordings for better preservation and to facilitate data distribution to the community. Different techniques are investigated using seismograms from one particular station, the Adam Dziewonski Observatory (HRV) at Harvard, Massachusetts. This seismological station, still in operation as a part of the Global Seismographic Network today, is one of the oldest stations in the United States. The station was built in 1933, and since its installation, the station has produced approximately 16,000 analogue seismograms. The majority of these recordings were taken between 1933 and 1953, with some intermittent recordings between 1962 and 1998 after digital seismometers had become a standard. These analogue seismograms have the potential of expanding the database for seismological research such as identification of events previously not catalogued. Due to poor storage environment at the station, some of the records, especially those on regular type of paper, are damaged beyond repair. Nevertheless, many of the records on photographic paper are in better condition, and we have focused on a subset of these recordings that are least damaged. Even these seismograms require cleaning and, in consultation with the Weissman Preservation Center of Harvard Library, preparation techniques for the photographic records are examined. After the seismograms are cleaned and flattened, three different equipments are investigated for digitization, i.e., a copy machine, scanner, and camera. These instruments allow different imaging resolutions, ranging from 200 dots per inch (dpi) to 800 dpi. The image resolution and the bit depth have a wide range of implications that are closely linked to the digitization program one chooses to convert the image to time series. We explore three different software for this conversion, SeisDig (Bromirski and Chuang, 2003), Teseo2 (Pintore and Quintiliani, 2008), and NeuraLog (www.neuralog.com), and determine advantages and disadvantages associated with each software. One of the important features of the software is the automatic tracing algorithms. The success of the automatic tracing depends upon many factors, and this is examined using examples from long and short period recordings with high amplitude (thin and fading lines), and long and short period recordings with low amplitude (well-defined lines). Automatically traced data are also compared to manually traced samples. Based upon these results, we propose a set of procedures and recommendations for cleaning, imaging scheme including resolution and bit depth, and digitization software. Ultimately, we would like to outline a robust procedure for mass seismogram digitization and process all the Harvard station recordings and make them available to the community through the IRIS Data Management Center.

  8. Geochemical characterization of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, using NURE data

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    The geochemical characteristics of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, were identified using data from National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) detailed and reconnaissance geochemical and geophysical surveys. Statistical and cartographic techniques developed during the NURE program were applied to the data, and the results were compared with published geologic mapping, geologic studies, and mineral-occurrence information. Interpretations based on these comparisons resulted in the identification of distinct geochemical environments which represent differing rock types, geologic structures, and mineral-occurrence or -deposit areas. Fifteen areas that have geochemical characteristics indicative of mineral deposits were delineated in this study. Nine of the areas contain elemental data that indicate known and potential base- and precious-metal deposits; four of the areas contain elemental data indicative of uranium deposits; and two of the areas contain data indicative of pegmatite deposits.

  9. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  10. Factors Controlling CO2 Exchange at Harvard Forest on Hourly to Annual Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, W.; urbanski, s p; Barford, C. C.; Budney, J. W.; Daube, B. C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Goulden, M. L.; Fitzjarrald, d; Moore, K.

    2001-12-01

    Carbon dioxide eddy flux measurements at Harvard Forest have revealed annual carbon sequestration ranging from 1.1 to 2.4 MgC/ha (mean ~ 2 MgChayr) from 1991 to 2000. The observed interannual variations reflect short-term (hourly to monthly) response of the ecosystem to environmental forcing (temperature, sunlight, soil moisture) as well as delayed impact of climatic variation on factors such as decay of prior year litter, or mortality or morbidity due to drought stress. Long-term ecological trends (e.g. succession or accumulation of CWD) also likely affect C uptake at Harvard Forest. The role of these processes in controlling carbon exchange at Harvard Forest has been explored through a series of complementary modeling studies. A simple, ecophysiological based modeling study has been conducted to: (1) quantify the instantaneous ecosystem response to controlling climatic variables (temperature and sunlight), averaged over the decade and (2) identify and quantify the mechanisms responsible for inter-annual deviations of ecosystem carbon exchange from the decadal mean climatic response. A first order empirical model was developed to quantify mean ecosystem response to environmental forcing. An empirical model employing a simple respirationphotosynthesis function for ecosystem response to insolation and temperature accounts for nearly 90% of hourly variance of NEE, but very little of the monthly and inter-annual variances. To understand the role of soil moisture in controlling NEE variation on the monthly to inter-annual time scale, a two layer bucket type soil hydrology model was developed. Deviations of the ecosystem behavior from the mean short-term ecosystem response, defined as residuals from the ecophysiological based empirical model, were compared with patterns in the simulated surface layer and deep layer soil moisture. Surprisingly, little correlation was found between the empirical model respiration residuals and soil moisture, but deep layer soil moisture and model GEE residuals in the late summer were significantly correlated. When supplemented with a soil moisture correction term, the simple empirical model explains ca. 13 of the observed interannual variation in mean GEE for August and September. The empirical model explains only a few percent of the late summer variation in GEE when soil moisture is excluded. The influence of respiration from short-lived carbon pools (litter-pool and fine debris) on monthly to inter-annual scale variations in NEE was also investigated employing a monthly time step respiration - mass balance litter-pool model. The results of this investigation indicate the decay of short-lived carbon pools contribute to inter-annual variations of NEE. However, the decay of litter and fine - debris was not conclusively established as the driving mechanism behind inter-annual variations in CO2 sequestration at Harvard Forest.

  11. Portuguese norms for the harvard group scale of hypnotic susceptibility, form a.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    The Portuguese version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) was administered to 313 Portuguese college students. Score distribution, item pass rates, item analysis, and reliability of the HGSHS:A are presented and compared to earlier published reference samples. No differences were found between males and females. Reliability of the HGSHS:A Portuguese version was lower than that reported by most of the studies but within the range of the non-English versions. In general, Portuguese data are congruent with the reference samples and the Portuguese translation of the HGSHS:A. It appears to be a viable instrument for primary screening of hypnotic suggestibility in a Portuguese context. PMID:23427845

  12. AmeriFlux US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site. Site Description - The forest surrounding the Hemlock site has remained pristine with two exceptions. In the early to mid-1700s, European settlers cleared the majority of the forest for agricultural purposes. Selective harvesting of hemlock and chestnut trees occurred up until the early 1900s, when the chestnut blight killed all of the chestnut trees. In the current forest, about 83% of the total basal area of trees is hemlock. The remainder is equally divided between eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and deciduous species, including red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and black birch (Betula lenta). A very thick organic layer (10-20 cm or more) covers the soil surface, and highly decayed coarse woody debris is abundant.

  13. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  14. Excuse Me. Do You Speak Digital?: Harvard's John Palfrey Explores What It's Like to Be a Digital Native

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    John Palfrey is one busy guy, with an impressive gig. In 2008, he was named the Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School. And when he's not teaching courses on intellectual property and Internet law, there's a good chance he's overseeing the L school's research library. Palfrey,…

  15. The Case Method of Teaching: Community College Faculty Are Taking a "Harvard Method" and Making It Their Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Cynthia

    The Alliance for Business Literacy Education (ABLE), a composite of several Harvard professors, the Education Development Center (EDC), and the League for Innovation in the Community College, is working to promote the nationwide use in community colleges of a teaching strategy known as the case method. The case method combines the freedom of class…

  16. Library Technology and Architecture; Report of a Conference Held at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, February 9, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    The purpose of the conference was to investigate the implications of new technologies for library architecture and to use the findings in planning new Library Research Facility for the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The first half of this document consists of reports prepared by six consultants on such topics as microforms, computers,…

  17. Reanalysis of the Harvard Six Cities Study, part I: validation and replication.

    PubMed

    Krewski, D; Burnett, R T; Goldberg, M; Hoover, K; Siemiatycki, J; Abrahamowicz, M; White, W

    2005-01-01

    Because the results of the Harvard Six Cities Study played a critical role in the establishment of the current U.S. ambient air quality objective for fine particles (PM(2.5)), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, industry, and nongovernmental organizations called for an independent reanalysis of this study to validate the original findings reported by Dockery and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 329, pp. 1753-1759) in 1993. Validation of the original findings was accomplished by a detailed statistical audit and replication of original results. With the exception of occupational exposure to dust (14 discrepancies of 249 questionnaires located for evaluation) and fumes (15/249), date of death (2/250), and cause of death (2/250), the audit identified no discrepancies between the original questionnaires and death certificates in the audit sample and the analytic file used by the original investigators. The data quality audit identified a computer programming problem that had resulted in early censorship in 5 of the 6 cities, which resulted in the loss of approximately 1% of the reported person-years of follow-up; the reanalysis team updated the Six Cities cohort to include the missing person-years of observation, resulting in the addition of 928 person-years of observation and 14 deaths. The reanalysis team was able to reproduce virtually all of the original numerical results, including the 26% increase in all-cause mortality in the most polluted city (Stubenville, OH) as compared to the least polluted city (Portage, WI). The audit and validation of the Harvard Six Cities Study conducted by the reanalysis team generally confirmed the quality of the data and the numerical results reported by the original investigators. The discrepancies noted during the audit were not of epidemiologic importance, and did not substantively alter the original risk estimates associated with particulate air pollution, nor the main conclusions reached by the original investigators. PMID:16020032

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In this book the use of inhomogeneous models in cosmology, both in modelling structure formation and interpreting cosmological observations, is discussed. The authors concentrate on exact solutions, and particularly the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) and Szekeres models (the important topic of averaging is not discussed). The book serves to demonstrate that inhomogeneous metrics can generate realistic models of cosmic structure formation and nonlinear evolution and shows that general relativity has a lot more to offer to cosmology than just the standard spatially homogeneous FLRW model. I would recommend this book to people working in theoretical cosmology. In the introduction (and in the concluding chapter and throughout the book) a reasonable discussion of the potential problems with the standard FLRW cosmology is presented, and a list of examples illustrating the limitations of standard FLRW cosmology are discussed (including potential problems with perturbation methods). In particular, the authors argue that the assumptions of isotropy and spatial homogeneity (and consequently the Copernican principle) must be properly challenged and revisited. Indeed, it is possible for `good old general relativity' to be used to explain cosmological observations without introducing speculative elements. In part I of the book the necessary background is presented (readers need a background in general relativity theory at an advanced undergraduate or graduate level). There is a good (and easy to read) review of the exact spherically symmetric dust Lemaitre-Tolman model (LT) (often denoted the LTB model) and the Lemaitre and Szekeres models. Light propogation (i.e. null geodesics, for both central and off-center observers) in exact inhomogeneous (LT) models is reviewed. In part II a number of applications of exact inhomogeneous models are presented (taken mainly from the authors' own work). In chapter 4, the evolution of exact inhomogeneous models (primarily the LT model, but also the Szekeres model) is studied regarding structure formation. I thought that the authors describe the advantages and drawbacks of the idealized exact solutions used in the physical modelling in a reasonable manner (although more concise conclusions might have been useful). The authors also address the formation of a galaxy with a central black hole, the formation and evolution of rich galactic clusters and voids and other structures, and the effects of radiation in the models. The most interesting application is presented in chapter 5; namely, the effects of inhomogeneities on observations such as the luminosity distance relation and the explanation of the observed dimming of distant SN Ia (which is usually interpreted within the standard FLRW model in terms of the existence of dark energy). The main conclusion of this work is that data can be reproduced within the LT model (via inhomogeneities in general relativity, but without introducing dark energy). In particular, a number of exact LT solutions were surveyed, and a full discussion of various models in the literature (and a critique of the various assumptions) is presented. In the next chapter the possible resolution of the horizon problem without inflation, in terms of shell crossing in a LT model, is discussed. This is perhaps the most controversial chapter of the book. In the final chapter 7, the influence of inhomogeneous structures in the path of a light ray (for both center and off-center observers in a special Szekeres Swiss cheese model) on the observed temperature distribution of the CMB is discussed. This is a very important topic, but only a heuristic and qualitative study is presented here; more work on the multipole moments of higher order would be necessary for a more comprehensive analysis.

  19. Exploitation or Partnership?: An Alternative Approach to University-Industry Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Chris

    1995-01-01

    The Smith Institute, a collaboration between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and Smith System Engineering, takes a different approach to industry-university relationships. It is based on these premises: academic excellence and industrial use are separate measures of project worth, industry is a patron not a customer, and intellectual…

  20. Selection and Admission Procedures at the University of Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland (UBLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebatane, E. Molapi

    The University of Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland (UBLS) is a regional four-year liberal arts university influenced by the British educational system. Admission to UBLS is contingent on: (1) scoring high on the Cambridge Overseas School Certificate (COSC), (2) scoring high on the General Certificate of Education (GCE) Examination, (3) scoring high…

  1. Sex and the university system.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2005-04-01

    The recent uproar over comments about women in science made by Harvard University President Dr. Lawrence Summers has helped focus much needed attention on an issue of great importance. Whatever motivated Dr. Summers to make statements about the "different availability of aptitude at the high end" as a possible explanation for the lack of gender diversity in science and engineering, we should all thank him for putting the question of why there are not more women in science where it belongs - front and center. PMID:15841161

  2. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    SciTech Connect

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  3. Proceedings: National Conference On Issues Facing Black Administrators at Predominantly White Colleges and Universities (1st, Cambridge, MA, June 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.

    In 1982, the first national conference was held to address the issues facing black administrators in predominantly white postsecondary institutions. This volume contains the conference's keynote addresses as well as the nearly 50 individual papers presented. The papers are divided into the following topical areas: (1) economic retrenchment,…

  4. Book Review: Light Curves of Variable Stars by C. Sterken and C. Jaschek 1996, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 052190168

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genderen, A. M.

    Since about the early seventies no proper book on variable stars has been written. The probable reason is the explosive growth of the field of variable-star research during the 25 years since. It was not only the amount of observational data which grew so fast, but also the number of new types of variable stars and the knowledge of the causes of their variability. Variable stars also became of fastly growing importance for distance determinations, for the physics of stellar interiors and for stellar evolution. The two editors, together with seven other experts on variable stars have now found a perfect recipe to write a conveniently-sized book on variable stars. The time was ripe. They compiled a pictorial atlas of at least 200 typical light curves of tens of different kinds of variable stars. The book also gives a clear introduction to the historical background, the photometric systems, the nomenclature and the classifications. Each chapter provides a detailed account of each subclass and gives a concise description of the physical processes responsible for the variations. All specific variables discussed in the text can easily be located with the aid of object-name and subject indexes. The reference list contains about 600 entries, a guarantee that one can access a particular subject quickly and in debt. The quality of the figures and the tables is very good. Very useful is the inclusion of three lists, 'Journal abbreviations', 'Acronyms and abbreviations' and 'Addresses of interest', and of three tables concerning constellation names, Julian dates, and specialized newsletters on variable stars. This unique guide will be absolutely invaluable to students taking courses in variable-star research, as well as for professional and amateur astronomers.

  5. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group. PMID:26193245

  6. Street Versus Rooftop Level Concentrations of Fine Particles in a Cambridge Street Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Fennell, Paul S.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Britter, Rex E.

    2009-04-01

    Dispersion of particles, as evidenced by changes in their number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs), in urban street canyons, is still not well understood. This study compares measurements by a fast-response particle spectrometer (DMS500) of the PNDs and the PNCs (5-1000 nm, sampled at 1 Hz) at street and rooftop levels in a Cambridge UK street canyon, and examines mixing, physical and chemical conversion processes, and the competing influences of traffic volume and rooftop wind speed on the PNDs and the PNCs in various size ranges. PNCs at street level were ≈6.5 times higher than at rooftop. Street-level PNCs followed the traffic volume and decreased with increasing wind speed, showing a larger influence of wind speed on 30-300 nm particles than on 5-30 nm particles. Conversely, rooftop PNCs in the 5-30 nm size range increased with wind speed, whereas those for particles between 30 and 300 nm did not vary with wind speed.

  7. Most Powerful Eruption in the Universe Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Astronomers have found the most powerful eruption seen in the Universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A supermassive black hole generated this eruption by growing at a remarkable rate. This discovery shows the enormous appetite of large black holes, and the profound impact they have on their surroundings. The huge eruption is seen in a Chandra image of the hot, X-ray emitting gas of a galaxy cluster called MS 0735.6+7421. Two vast cavities extend away from the supermassive black hole in the cluster's central galaxy. The eruption - which has lasted for 100 million years and is still going - has generated the energy equivalent to hundreds of millions of gamma-ray bursts. Animation of Eruption from Supermassive Black Hole Animation of Eruption from Supermassive Black Hole This event was caused by gravitational energy release as enormous amounts of matter fell toward a black hole. Most of the matter was swallowed, but some of it was violently ejected before being captured by the black hole. "I was stunned to find that a mass of about 300 million Suns was swallowed," said Brian McNamara of Ohio University in Athens, lead author of the study that appears in the January 6, 2005 issue of Nature. "This is almost as massive as the supermassive black hole that swallowed it." Astronomers are not sure where such large amounts of matter came from. One theory is that gas from the host galaxy catastrophically cooled and was then swallowed by the black hole. Illustration of MS 0735.6+742 Illustration of MS 0735.6+742 The energy released shows that the black hole in MS 0735 has grown very dramatically during this eruption. Previous studies suggest that other large black holes have grown very little in the recent past, and that only smaller black holes are still growing quickly. "This new result is as surprising as it is exciting", said co-author Paul Nulsen of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center of Astrophysics. "This black hole is feasting when it should be fasting." Radio emission within the cavities shows that jets from the black hole erupted to create the cavities. Gas is being pushed away from the black hole at supersonic speeds over a distance of about a million light years. The mass of the displaced gas equals about a trillion Suns, more than the mass of all the stars in the Milky Way. LA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 VLA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 The rapid growth of supermassive black holes is usually detected by observing very bright radiation from the centers of galaxies in the optical and X-ray wavebands, or luminous radio jets. In MS 0735 no bright central radiation is found and the radio jets are faint. Therefore, the true nature of MS 0735 is only revealed through X-ray observations of the hot cluster gas. "Until now we had no idea that this black hole was gorging itself", said co-author Michael Wise of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "The discovery of this eruption shows that X-ray telescopes are necessary to understand some of the most violent events in the Universe." The astronomers estimated how much energy was needed to create the cavities by calculating the density, temperature and pressure of the hot gas. By making a standard assumption, that 10% of the gravitational energy goes into launching the jets, they estimated how much material the black hole swallowed. Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Besides generating the cavities, some of the energy from this eruption should keep the hot gas around the black hole from cooling, and some of it may also generate large-scale magnetic fields in the galaxy cluster. Chandra observers have discovered other cavities in galaxy clusters, but this one is easily the largest and the most powerful. For example, the energy content here exceeds that of the Perseus cavities by 250 times, and dwarfs the cavities in M87 by a factor of 10,000. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  8. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  9. Time Domain Astronomy with the Harvard Plates: from Cepheids to DASCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2014-06-01

    The ~500,000 Harvard glass plate photographic negatives are the world’s largest and most complete (full sky; 107y time span) database for Time Domain Astronomy (TDA) on days-months-decades to century timescales. With plate fields of view ranging from 3o - 30o exposed quasi-randomly full sky from 1885 - 1992, any object is observed ~1000 - 3000 times, with limiting magnitudes ranging from B =12-18. I briefly review some of the colorful history of this massive plate-taking project and a few of the pivotal discoveries (e.g. the “Leavitt Law” for the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation) made by visual studies of the plates by the true TDA pioneers, the likely <300 different visual users of the plates. I then describe our Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project to fully digitize and reduce this wealth of data 1 Pb) and provide it on spinning disk to the full astronomical community and public. Using the full-sky APASS catalog giving BVR magnitudes (for V ~9-17) as well as GSC2.3.2 for both fainter and brighter stars, DASCH does spatially resolved (0.25o -0.6o bins) photometric calibrations to derive B magnitudes with rm 0.1mag over the full plate and over the (typically) ~6-8 different principal plate series (telescopes and plate scales) covering any given object, along with ~0.3-1 arcsec astrometry (depending on plate scale) for each stellar object averaged over ~1year. The high speed/precision scanner, plate processing, and analysis pipeline have now enabled the first data releases (DR1-DR3) of 12 to cover full sky and already enabled a wealth of new discoveries. I describe a few examples, such as: K2III giants with decadal variations; a new class of Symbiotic novae; ~50-100y recurrence times for black hole X-ray binary outbursts; and QPOs from 3C273. The DASCH data are increasingly available 15% now; 100% in 3.5y) for TDA on largely unexplored timescales. We are grateful to NSF for support with grants AST-0407380, AST-0909073 and AST-1313370.

  10. A robust method of measuring other-race and other-ethnicity effects: the Cambridge Face Memory Test format.

    PubMed

    McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

  11. A Robust Method of Measuring Other-Race and Other-Ethnicity Effects: The Cambridge Face Memory Test Format

    PubMed Central

    McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

  12. Developing the Cambridge palliative audit schedule (CAMPAS): a palliative care audit for primary health care teams.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M S; Barclay, S I; Todd, C J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problems with the provision of palliative care have been reported. Audit is one means of improving care. Earlier audits of primary care palliative care have been initiated by general practitioners (GPs) and are predominantly retrospective record reviews. Widely applicable methods for the audit of primary care palliative care do not exist. AIM: To develop relevant palliative care standards and to devise an audit schedule (the Cambridge palliative audit schedule, CAMPAS) suitable for monitoring palliative care in diverse primary care settings. METHOD: Primary health care team (PHCT) members collaborated at all stages. Reasonable outcomes and acceptable interventions for PHCTs were identified and standards developed. Each standard was constructed to ensure uniform interpretation, and CAMPAS was structured to collect data necessary for determining whether the standards were met. RESULTS: Over 50% of PHCTs (n = 20) in the health district were recruited and trained to use CAMPAS. A total of 876 contacts with 29 patients was recorded by PHCTs using CAMPAS. Considerable inter- and intra-PHCT variation was found in the achievement of the standards. CONCLUSIONS: The favourable participation rate suggests commitment to audit and improvement in patient care. Overall, the standards were reported to be suitable. Although 100% achievement of some standards may be unrealistic, the level of attainment for many suggests that it is possible. CAMPAS has been reported to be a useful structure for recording assessments and monitoring care, as well as a usable audit schedule. As an audit tool, it identified areas in need of improvement and facilitated feed-back to participants. Future audit is required to determine whether improvements in care have been effected. PMID:9692279

  13. Hindi translation and validation of Cambridge-Hopkins Diagnostic Questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Allan, Richard P.; Pundeer, Ashwini; Das, Sourav; Dhyani, Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Restless legs syndrome also known as Willis-Ekbom's Disease (RLS/WED) is a common illness. Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq) is a good diagnostic tool and can be used in the epidemiological studies. However, its Hindi version is not available. Thus, this study was conducted to translate and validate it in the Hindi speaking population. Materials and Methods: After obtaining the permission from the author of the CHRLSq, it was translated into Hindi language by two independent translators. After a series of forward and back translations, the finalized Hindi version was administered to two groups by one of the authors, who were blinded to the clinical diagnosis. First group consisted of RLS/WED patients, where diagnosis was made upon face to face interview and the other group — the control group included subjects with somatic symptoms disorders or exertional myalgia or chronic insomnia. Each group had 30 subjects. Diagnosis made on CHRLSq was compared with the clinical diagnosis. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) v 21.0. Descriptive statistics was calculated. Proportions were compared using chi-square test; whereas, categorical variables were compared using independent sample t-test. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the translated version of questionnaire were calculated. Results: Average age was comparable between the cases and control group (RLS/WED = 39.1 ± 10.1 years vs 36.2 ± 11.4 years in controls; P = 0.29). Women outnumbered men in the RLS/WED group (87% in RLS/WED group vs 57% among controls; χ2 = 6.64; P = 0.01). Both the sensitivity and specificity of the translated version was 83.3%. It had the positive predictive value of 86.6%. Conclusion: Hindi version of CHRLSq has positive predictive value of 87% and it can be used to diagnose RLS in Hindi speaking population. PMID:26425008

  14. Harvard Community Health Plan's Mental Health Redesign Project: a managerial and clinical partnership.

    PubMed

    Abrams, H S

    1993-01-01

    Harvard Community Health Plan, founded in 1969 as a staff model HMO, is currently a staff and group model HMO with 521,000 members, 19 health centers and 12 independently owned group practices with 26 locations. In 1987, the Plan initiated a review of its mental health benefit and program because its costs were rising, member and clinician dissatisfaction was increasing and many believed the problem was the nature and scope of the benefit. After two years of study, surveys, interviews, cost and utilization analysis, the Plan identified its professional staff as its key asset but recognized many problem areas, including problems with access, variation from site to site, inconsistent service delivery, lack of consistent utilization management and the need for greater diversity along the spectrum of care available to members. From 1989 to 1990, more than 200 clinicians and support staff were engaged in the process of developing a variety of components to the "mental health redesign program." Three simultaneous efforts included developing a method of categorizing patients, restructuring the delivery system and redesigning the benefit. A Mental Health Patient Assessment Tool was created which assists clinicians in performing comprehensive evaluations, administers the benefit, measures progress and supports outcomes research. Delivery system changes included the implementation of self-referral, access standards, intake triage functions by non-clinical staff, program development and an outpatient utilization management function. PMID:8469725

  15. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    PubMed

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two. PMID:22974374

  16. George Ellery Hale's Early Solar Research at Chicago, Kenwood, Harvard, and Yerkes Observatories, 1882-1904

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    Growing up in Chicago, George Ellery Hale, later the prime spirit in founding the AAS, was a precocious boy scientist. He was deeply interested in spectroscopy and astrophysics from an early age. His wealthy parents encouraged Hale's aspirations with magazines, books, and instruments, and he acquired his first telescope when he was 14. He knew as mentors classical astronomers S. W. Burnham and George W. Hough, but he preferred astrophysics and designed his own Kenwood Physical Obseervatory around a grating in a Rowland circle mounting, fed by a heliostat, both built for him by instrument-maker John A. Brashear. For his undergraduate thesis at MIT, Hale invented and (at Harvard College Observatory) demonstrated the spectroheliograph. With it, and a high-quality 12-in refractor at his later Kenwood Astrophysical Observatory (at the same site, the Hale family home, 4 miles from the present Hilton Hotel where the SPD, HAD and AAS are meeting) Hale did excellent solar research, especially on promineneces, flocculi, and the near-ultraviolet spectrum of the chromosphere. As a teen-ager and a young adult Hale traveled widely, and met several important piuoneer solar physicists, including Charles A. Young, Jules Janssen, Samuel P. Langley, and Henry Rowland. Hale designed Yerkes Observatory for solar and stellar research, and headed the solar work himself. One of his aims always was to compare other stars with the sun. Hale's telescopes, instruments, methods, and resulting papers will be described and illustrated by numerous slides.

  17. Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Broadbridge, Carissa L.; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A.; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. Methods A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Results Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12% and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7% and 3%, respectively). Discussion Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations. PMID:24549491

  18. Strategic, value-based delivery in global health care: innovations at Harvard University and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Rebecca L; Talbot, Julie; ole-MoiYoi, Kileken; Wachter, Keri; Sullivan, Erin; House, Amy; Baron, Jennifer; Beals, Aaron; Beauvais, Sophie; Rhatigan, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Investments in global health have more than doubled over the past decade, generating a cadre of new institutions. To date, most of the funded research in global health has focused on discovery, and, more recently, on the development of new tools, which has tightened the implementation bottleneck. This article introduces the concept of global health delivery and the need to catalog and analyze current implementation efforts to bridge gaps in delivery. Global health delivery is complex and context-dependent and requires an interdisciplinary effort, including the application of strategic principles. Furthermore, delivery is necessary to ensure that the investments in research, discovery, and development generate value for patients and populations. This article discusses the application of value-based delivery to global health. It provides some examples of approaches to aggregating implicit knowledge to inform practice. With global health delivery, the aim is to transform global health scale-up from a series of well-intentioned but often disconnected efforts to a value-based movement based upon 21st-century technology, standards, and efficiency. PMID:21598271

  19. Cardiorespiratory endurance evaluation using heart rate analysis during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test in elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficient management using exercise programs with various benefits should be provided by educational institutions for children in their growth phase. We analyzed the heart rates of children during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test to evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance by calculating their post-exercise recovery rate. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects (n = 77) were categorized into a normal weight and an overweight/obesity group by body mass index. They performed each exercise for 3 minutes. The cardiorespiratory endurance was calculated using the Physical Efficiency Index formula. [Results] The ski simulator and Harvard step test showed that there was a significant difference in the heart rates of the 2 body mass index-based groups at each minute. The normal weight and the ski-simulator group had higher Physical Efficiency Index levels. [Conclusion] This study showed that a simulator exercise can produce a cumulative load even when performed at low intensity, and can be effectively utilized as exercise equipment since it resulted in higher Physical Efficiency Index levels than the Harvard step test. If schools can increase sport durability by stimulating students' interests, the ski simulator exercise can be used in programs designed to improve and strengthen students' physical fitness. PMID:27065556

  20. Cardiorespiratory endurance evaluation using heart rate analysis during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test in elementary school students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficient management using exercise programs with various benefits should be provided by educational institutions for children in their growth phase. We analyzed the heart rates of children during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test to evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance by calculating their post-exercise recovery rate. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects (n = 77) were categorized into a normal weight and an overweight/obesity group by body mass index. They performed each exercise for 3 minutes. The cardiorespiratory endurance was calculated using the Physical Efficiency Index formula. [Results] The ski simulator and Harvard step test showed that there was a significant difference in the heart rates of the 2 body mass index-based groups at each minute. The normal weight and the ski-simulator group had higher Physical Efficiency Index levels. [Conclusion] This study showed that a simulator exercise can produce a cumulative load even when performed at low intensity, and can be effectively utilized as exercise equipment since it resulted in higher Physical Efficiency Index levels than the Harvard step test. If schools can increase sport durability by stimulating students’ interests, the ski simulator exercise can be used in programs designed to improve and strengthen students’ physical fitness. PMID:27065556

  1. The Journey to the Top: Women's Paths to the University Presidency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in higher education reflects a constant battle for access and equity. Although the number of post-secondary institutions steadily increased after Harvard University opened its doors in 1636, almost two hundred years would pass before women students were allowed at some institutions. In the last 50 years, the number of women…

  2. The Journey to the Top: Women's Paths to the University Presidency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in higher education reflects a constant battle for access and equity. Although the number of post-secondary institutions steadily increased after Harvard University opened its doors in 1636, almost two hundred years would pass before women students were allowed at some institutions. In the last 50 years, the number of women

  3. The Soul of the American University. From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, George M.

    This book examines the role of Protestantism in America's colleges and universities, tracing the history of the influence of religion on these institutions from preeminence to obscurity, from the founding of Harvard in the 1630s through the collapse of the traditional establishment in the 1960s. Ranging from stories of many of our pace-setting…

  4. Mental Health Service Usage by Students Attending an Historically Black College/University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Floyd T., II; Geyen, Dashiel; Rouce, Sandra D.; Griffith, Kimberly Grantham; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    The advent of a changing world market and global economy has intensified the pressure experienced by today's college students. Competition for jobs, admittance into graduate school programs, and membership into prestigious honor societies led Dr. Richard Kadison, chief of mental health services at Harvard University and author of "College of the…

  5. The Psychosocial Effect of Residentially-Based Learning Communities on First Year Honors Students in a Highly Selective Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Henry J., III.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities in the United States are currently in the midst of a debate on how to integrate students' academic and social lives in a manner similar to the centuries old model of Oxford and Cambridge. One of the major initiatives by colleges and universities is the re-establishment of residentially-based learning communities whose use

  6. Shuttle Astronauts Visit NASA's X-Ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge to Coordinate Plans for Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-- June 25, 1998 Eileen Collins, the first U.S. woman commanderof a Space Shuttle mission and her fellow astronauts for NASA s STS-93 mission toured the Operations Control Center (OCC) for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) today. AXAF is scheduled for launch on January 26, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. They met with the staff of the OCC and discussed how the status of the observatory will be monitored while in the shuttle bay and during deployment. "We are honored to have this historic shuttle crew visit us and familiarize themselves with the OCC," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the AXAF Science Center, which operates the OCC for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory through a contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "It is appropriate that a pathbreaking shuttle mission will deploy the premier X-ray observatory of this century." AXAF is the third of NASA s Great Observatories along with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. It will observe in greater detail than ever before the hot, violent regions of the universe that cannot be seen with optical telescopes. Exploding stars, black holes and vast clouds of gas in galaxy clusters are among the fascinating objects that AXAF is designed to study. The satellite is currently in the final stages of testing at TRW Space and Electronics Group,the prime contractor, in Redondo Beach, California. In late August it will be flown aboard a specially-outfitted Air Force C-5 aircraft to Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be integrated with a Boeing booster and then installed in the Shuttle bay. The shuttle crew that will take AXAF into space includes Collins (Col., USAF), Jeffrey Ashby (Cmdr., USN), pilot; Steven Hawley, Ph.D., mission specialist; Catherine Cady Coleman, Ph.D. (Major, USAF), mission specialist; and Michel Tognini (Col., French Air Force), mission specialist. While visiting the OCC the crew learned how critical data (temperatures, voltages, etc.,) will be monitored while AXAF is in the bay of the shuttle. This information will be relayed to the shuttle from the OCC via Johnson Space Center. The condition of the satellite during launch and the first few orbits will determine if it can be sent on its way. Unlike the Hubble Space telescope, AXAF will not be serviceable after it is in orbit. When the satellite has been released into space from the shuttle bay, a built in propulsion system will boost it into a large elliptical orbit around Earth. The nearest the observatory will come to Earth is 6,200 miles and its furthest point will be more than a third of the way to the moon. This means that the telescope will have approximately 52 hours of observing time each orbit. AXAF images will show fifty times more detail than any previous X-ray telescope. The revolutionary telescope combines the ability to make sharp images while measuring precisely the energies of X-rays coming from cosmic sources. The impact AXAF will have on X-ray astronomy can be compared to the difference between a fuzzy black and white and a sharp color picture.

  7. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Donald J.; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Samuels, Jay Osi; Sarr, Abdoulaye D.; Chaplin, Beth; Ofuche, Eke; Meloni, Seema T.; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction From 2004–2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Methods Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Results Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Conclusions Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform and encourage the development of other laboratories in resource-limited settings. PMID:26900573

  8. Evaluating remotely sensed phenological metrics in a dynamic ecosystem model at Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Twine, T. E.; Yang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation phenology plays an important role in regulating photosynthesis and other processes of terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic ecosystem models require the representation of phenology to simulate the exchange of matter and energy between the land and atmosphere. Location-specific parameterization with corresponding phenological observations can improve the performance of phenological models incorporated within ecosystem models, but because ground-based phenological observations are limited, phenology derived from remote sensing has been used to parameterize phenological models for use over large areas. Research is ongoing to evaluate whether remotely sensed phenology appropriately represents the phenology observed on the ground and how each method performs in ecosystem models. The goal of this study is to evaluate simulated phenology in the IBIS model using ground-based and remotely sensed phenological information and flux measurements at Harvard Forest. We first compared a set of phenological metrics derived from MODIS surface reflectance data with observed dates of leaf onset and offset. We found that there are large discrepancies between different metrics and most of them do not compare well with ground observations, especially leaf onset. Remotely sensed phenological metrics were then used to parameterize phenological models. Modeled phenology showed a slightly higher bias compared to the corresponding remotely sensed phenology. We then ran IBIS with the three different phenology methods: (1) phenology specified with observations, (2) phenology specified with remotely sensed metrics, and (3) phenology simulated within the model framework. We compared simulated ecosystem productivity with observations to evaluate model performance. We found that the errors in simulated productivity are correlated with the errors in the phenology. Our results suggest that current metrics based on remote sensing may not adequately represent phenology in ecosystem models, and bias in phenology leads to simulated errors in other ecosystem processes. There remains a need to improve the remotely sensed phenological metrics and to validate them at different locations.

  9. The affect of a clearcut environment on woody debris respiration rate dynamics, Harvard Forest, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M. K.; Williams, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    At an ecosystem scale, the distribution of carbon is largely a function of stand development and disturbance processes. Clearcut logging remains a common practice both in the United States and globally and typically results in elevated storage of carbon in onsite woody debris and detritus. The residence time and decomposition rate of this woody debris and detritus will affect the rate of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and thus affect the long term consequences of such disturbances on carbon flux and storage. The removal of a forest canopy also affects a site's microclimate including the albedo, air temperature, air humidity, as well as soil temperature and moisture, many of the same factors that affect the rate of woody debris decomposition. Thus it could be expected that differences in woody debris characteristics (e.g. size, abundance, state of decay), as well as differences in microclimate, between mature and recently clearcut forest sites, would result in differences in piece and site-level woody debris decomposition rates. Although woody debris stocks post-harvest have been well characterized, few studies have explored post-disturbance woody debris respiration rates, which directly measures carbon emissions from woody debris, distinguishing decomposition from mass loss due to fragmentation or leaching. This study addressed the question: does a clearcut environment in a temperate forest affect the rate of decomposition of coarse woody debris? The rate of respiration of downed spruce logs were repeatedly measured in-situ using an LI-6250 gas analyzer in Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts. Treatments included clear-cut, shaded clear-cut, mature spruce stand, and transfer (from clearcut to spruce stand). Gas analyzer measurements were accompanied by measurements of log temperature and percent water, soil temperature, moisture and pH, as well as light levels, air temperature and humidity to determine dominant drivers of respiration rates.

  10. Sleep deficit: the performance killer. A conversation with Harvard Medical School Professor Charles A. Czeisler.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Charles A

    2006-10-01

    Companies today glorify the executive who logs 100-hour workweeks, the road warrior who lives out of a suitcase in multiple time zones, and the negotiator who takes a red-eye to make an 8 A.M. meeting. But to Dr. Charles A. Czeisler, the Baldino Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, this kind of corporate behavior is the antithesis of high performance. In fact, he says, it endangers employees and puts their companies at risk. In this interview, Czeisler describes four neurobiological functions that affect sleep duration and quality as well as individual performance. When these functions fall out of alignment because of sleep deprivation, people operate at a far lower level of performance than they would if they were well rested. Czeisler goes on to observe that corporations have all kinds of policies designed to protect employees- rules against smoking, sexual harassment, and so on-but they push people to the brink of self-destruction by expecting them to work too hard, too long, and with too little sleep. The negative effects on cognitive performance, Czeisler says, can be similar to those that occur after drinking too much alcohol: "We now know that 24 hours without sleep or a week of sleeping four or five hours a night induces an impairment equivalent to a blood alcohol level of .1%. We would never say, 'This person is a great worker! He's drunk all the time!' yet we continue to celebrate people who sacrifice sleep for work." Czeisler recommends that companies institute corporate sleep policies that discourage scheduled work beyond 16 consecutive hours as well as working or driving immediately after late-night or overnight flights. A sidebar to this article summarizes the latest developments in sleep research. PMID:17040040

  11. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2008-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual mean specific conductance for water year 2005 which was 737 uS/cm. However, the annual mean specific conductance at Stony Brook near Route 20 in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) station 01104460), on the principal tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir, and at USGS station 01104475 on a smaller tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir were about 15 and 13 percent lower, respectively, than the previous annual mean specific conductances of 538 and 284 uS/cm, respectively for water year 2005. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir decreased from 553 uS/cm in the 2005 water year to 514 uS/cm in the 2006 water year. Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during water year 2006. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 4 days. Composite samples, consisting of as many as 100 subsamples, were collected by automatic samplers during storms. Concentrations of most dissolved constituents were generally lower in samples of stormwater than in samples collected during base flow; however, the average concentration of total phosphorus in samples of stormwater were from 160 to 1,109 percent greater than the average concentration in water samples collected during base-flow conditions. Concentrations of total nitrogen in water samples collected during base-flow conditions and composite samples of stormwater at USGS stations 01104415, 01104460, and 01104475 were similar, but mean concentrations of total nitrogen in samples of stormwater differed by about 0.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) from those in water samples collected during base-flow conditions at U.S. Geological Survey stations 01104433 and 01104455. In six water samples, measurements of pH were lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) national recommended freshwater quality criteria and the USEPA secondary drinking water-standa

  12. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 3: Ellis, Reber and the Cambridge field station near Hobart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce; Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Low frequency radio astronomy in Tasmania began with the arrival of Grote Reber to the State in 1954. After analysing ionospheric data from around the world, he concluded that Tasmania would be a very suitable place to carry out low frequency observations. Communications with Graeme Ellis in Tasmania, who had spent several years studying the ionosphere, led to a collaboration between the two in 1955 during which year they made observations at Cambridge, near Hobart. Their observations took place at four frequencies between 2.13 MHz and 0.52 MHz inclusive, with the results at the higher frequencies revealing a clear celestial component

  13. The Harvard Automated Phone Task: new performance-based activities of daily living tests for early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Gad A.; Dekhtyar, Maria; Bruno, Jonathan M.; Jethwani, Kamal; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impairment in activities of daily living is a major burden for Alzheimer’s disease dementia patients and caregivers. Multiple subjective scales and a few performance-based instruments have been validated and proven to be reliable in measuring instrumental activities of daily living in Alzheimer’s disease dementia but less so in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and preclinical Alzheimer’s disease. Objective To validate the Harvard Automated Phone Task, a new performance-based activities of daily living test for early Alzheimer’s disease, which assesses high level tasks that challenge seniors in daily life. Design In a cross-sectional study, the Harvard Automated Phone Task was associated with demographics and cognitive measures through univariate and multivariate analyses; ability to discriminate across diagnostic groups was assessed; test-retest reliability with the same and alternate versions was assessed in a subset of participants; and the relationship with regional cortical thickness was assessed in a subset of participants. Setting Academic clinical research center. Participants One hundred and eighty two participants were recruited from the community (127 clinically normal elderly and 45 young normal participants) and memory disorders clinics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital (10 participants with mild cognitive impairment). Measurements As part of the Harvard Automated Phone Task, participants navigated an interactive voice response system to refill a prescription (APT-Script), select a new primary care physician (APT-PCP), and make a bank account transfer and payment (APT-Bank). The 3 tasks were scored based on time, errors, and repetitions from which composite z-scores were derived, as well as a separate report of correct completion of the task. Results We found that the Harvard Automated Phone Task discriminated well between diagnostic groups (APT-Script: p=0.002; APT-PCP: p<0.001; APT-Bank: p=0.02), had an incremental level of difficulty, and had excellent test-retest reliability (Cronbach’s α values of 0.81 to 0.87). Within the clinically normal elderly, there were significant associations in multivariate models between performance on the Harvard Automated Phone Task and executive function (APT-PCP: p<0.001), processing speed (APT-Script: p=0.005), and regional cortical atrophy (APT-PCP: p=0.001; no significant association with APT-Script) independent of hearing acuity, motor speed, age, race, education, and premorbid intelligence. Conclusions Our initial experience with the Harvard Automated Phone Task, which consists of ecologically valid, easily-administered measures of daily activities, suggests that these tasks could be useful for screening and tracking the earliest functional alterations in preclinical and early prodromal AD. PMID:26665121

  14. Comparing Summer 2002 to the Decade-Long Air Quality Record at Harvard Forest: Patterns, Trends, and Anomalies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    The Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) was established in 1990 to quantify deposition of air pollutants to a forest canopy, to examine regional-scale rural air quality, and determine net carbon exchange by a typical New England forest. The measurement site is situated over a mile from the nearest paved road or building and major urban areas are over 100 km away. The observations from this site provide one of the best available records for establishing air quality patterns and trends in eastern North America. The focus of this talk will be NOx, NOy, O3, and CO concentrations. Transport patterns and vertical mixing account for the dominant patterns observed in pollutant concentrations. Southwesterly winds at HF bring elevated concentrations of primary and secondary pollutants while northwesterly winds bring relatively clean background continental air. Emissions of NOx and CO accumulate beneath the nocturnal inversion and reactive species such as O3 are depleted at the surface overnight. Variations in meteorological patterns from year to year complicate comparison of pollutant concentrations. We will make use of Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Trajectories to define periods that should be meteorologically similar. To establish the air quality context for observations during the NEAQS 2002 observation period we compare the probability distributions for pollutant concentration and mean diel cycles in the summer of 2002 with those from 1990-2001. The peak O3 events during June-August 2002 were among the highest recorded at Harvard Forest, but clean air periods had some of the lowest O3 concentrations. NOy concentrations at Harvard Forest tended to be lower across the entire concentration range and for both polluted and clean sector winds. CO concentrations during southwesterly winds were lower in 2002 relative to the typical range, but background concentrations were unchanged. A single event with forest-fire smoke from Quebec had maximum hourly CO concentrations exceeding 600 ppb. These concentrations exceed the peak values for the prior 11 years by over 50%.

  15. Atmospheric nitrogen inputs and losses along an urbanization gradient from Boston to Harvard Forest, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Rao, P.; Hutyra, L.; Raciti, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most measurement stations for atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition within national monitoring networks are located intentionally away from urban areas and point sources of pollution in order to capture regional trends. Models have been used to spatially predict estimates of N deposition between established deposition collectors, but these models may under-estimate rates of N deposition in areas with local sources of N emissions and often do not account for heterogeneity of the landscape between collectors. For example, urbanization alters N cycling, but the spatiotemporal distribution and impact of these alterations on ecosystems are not well-quantified. We measured fluxes and isotopic composition of atmospheric N inputs and soil leaching losses along an urbanization gradient from Boston, MA to the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. Atmospheric N inputs at urban sites were significantly greater than non-urban sites with NH4+ contributing thrice as much as NO3-. Proximity to urban core correlated positively with NH4+ (R2 = 0.57, p = 0.02) and total inorganic N inputs (R2 = 0.61, p = 0.01); on-road CO2 emissions correlated positively with NO3- inputs (R2 = 0.74, p = 0.003). Inorganic N leaching rates correlated positively with atmospheric N input rates (R2 = 0.61, p = 0.01), but did not differ significantly between urban and non-urban sites (p > 0.05). Our empirical measurements of atmospheric N inputs are greater for urban areas and less for rural areas compared to modeled regional estimates of N deposition. A significant proportion (17 - 100 %) of NO3- leached from four of the nine sites came directly from the atmosphere, indicating that these sites may be experiencing N saturation. In contrast, five of the sites had NO3- leached that came almost entirely from nitrification, indicating that the NO3- in leachate came from biological processes rather than directly passing through. This study improves our understanding of atmospheric N deposition and leaching in urban ecosystems, and highlights the need to incorporate urbanization effects in N deposition models.

  16. A Long Term View of Forest Response to Environmental Change: 25 Years of Studying Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Lindaas, J.; David, F.; David, O.

    2014-12-01

    Forests influence the budgets of greenhouse gases, and understanding how they will respond to environmental change is critical to accurately predicting future GHG trends. The time scale for climate change is long and forest growth is slow, thus very long measurement periods are required to observe meaningful forest response. We established an eddy flux tower within a mixed forest stand dominated by red oak and red maple at the Harvard Forest LTER site in 1989 where CO2, H2O and energy fluxes together with meteorological observations have been measured continuously. An array of plots for biometric measurements was established in 1993. Flux measurement at an adjacent hemlock stand began in 2000. Records of land use and disturbance and vegetation plot data extend back to 1907. The combined suite of measurements merges observations of instantaneous ecosystem responses to environmental forcing with details of vegetation dynamics and forest growth that represent the emergent properties relevant to long-term ecosystem change. Both the deciduous stand and hemlock stand are accumulating biomass. Each has added over 20 Mg-C ha-1 as woody biomass in trees >10cm dbh since 1990, even though the hemlock stand is older. Net carbon exchange shows enhanced uptake in early spring and late fall months in response to warmer temperatures and likely an increase in evergreen foliage at the deciduous site. Net carbon uptake efficiency at the deciduous stand has increased over time as well as indicated by peak NEE under optimum light conditions. The trend is only partly explained by variation in mean leaf area index and cannot be directly attributed to climate response. The combination of longer growing season and increased uptake efficiency yields a general trend of increasing annual NEE (Fig. 1). However, significant excursions in the trend highlight the sensitivity of forest carbon stocks. The pulse of high annual carbon uptake (peak 6 Mg-C ha-1y-1 in 2008) from 2000-2008 is only partially matched by carbon stored in woody biomass, leaving a large fraction of carbon to have accumulated in litter and fine roots in the forest floor, which has as much carbon as the above-ground woody biomass, but shorter turnover time. Invasion by Hemlock wooly adelgid, an insect that kills hemlock trees portends a major shift in NEE for the hemlock stand in the next decade.

  17. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in refugees: assessments with the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Hopkins symptom Checklist-25 in different languages.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, W C; Hovens, J E; Rodenburg, J J

    2001-04-01

    The original versions of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 were written and subsequently validated in the Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese languages. For use in a Dutch treatment center, with refugee patients mostly speaking other languages, additional translations were made. The objective of this study was examination of the psychometric properties of some of these new translations, i.e., the Arabic, Farsi, Serbo-Croatian, Russian, and English bilingual adaptations. It is concluded that the psychometric properties of both tests are adequate across those different cultures and are, in general, applicable to measure symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:11351903

  18. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2007-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104455) were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir increased from 514 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) in the 2004 water year to 553 ?S/cm for the 2005 water year. Water samples were collected from four tributaries during base-flow and stormflow conditions in December 2004, and July, August, and September 2005 and analyzed for suspended sediment, 6 major dissolved ions, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, 8 total metals, 18 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 61 pesticides and metabolites, and Escherichia coli bacteria. Concentrations for most dissolved constituents in samples of stormwater were generally lower than the concentrations observed in samples collected during base flow; however, concentrations of total phosphorus, PAHs, suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals were substantially greater in stormwater samples. Concentrations of dissolved chloride and total recoverable manganese in water samples collected during base-flow conditions from three tributaries exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking water standards of 250 and 0.05 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Concentrations of total recoverable manganese exceeded the secondary drinking water standard in samples of stormwater from each tributary. Concentrations of total recoverable iron in water samples exceeded the (USEPA) secondary drinking water standard of 0.3 mg/L periodically in water samples collected at (USEPA) stations 01104415, 01104455, and 01104475, and consistently in all water samples collected at USGS station 01104433. Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in water samples collected during base flow ranged from 4 to 1,400 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (col/100mL). Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in composite samples of stormwater ranged between 1,700 to 43,000 c

  19. Book review: Modern Plasma Physics, Vol. I: Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas, by Patrick H. Diamond, Sanae-I. Itoh and Kimitaka Itoh, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK), 2010, IX, 417 p., ISBN 978-0-521-86920-1 (Hardback)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, B. V.

    If you want to learn not only the most fundamental things about the physics of turbulent plasmas but also the current state of the problem including the most recent results in theoretical and experimental investigations - and certainly many physicists and astrophysicists do - this series of three excellent monographs is just for you. The first volume "Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas" develops the kinetic theory of turbulence through a focus on quasi-particle models and dynamics. It discusses the concepts and theoretical methods for describing weak and strong fluid and phase space turbulence in plasma systems far from equilibrium. The core material includes fluctuation theory, self-similar cascades and transport, mean field theory, resonance broadening and nonlinear wave-particle interaction, wave-wave interaction and wave turbulence, strong turbulence theory and renormalization. The book gives readers a deep understanding of the fields under consideration and builds a foundation for future applications to multi-scale processes of self-organization in tokamaks and other confined plasmas. In spite of a short pedagogical introduction, the book is addressed mainly to well prepared readers with a serious background in plasma physics, to researchers and advanced graduate students in nonlinear plasma physics, controlled fusions and related fields such as cosmic plasma physics

  20. Book Review: Exploration of the Solar System by Infrared Remote Sensing. R.A. Hanel, B.J. Conrath, D.E. Jennings, R.E. Samuelson, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2003, ISBN 0521 818974

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ian

    2004-12-01

    This book provides an astonishingly comprehensive review of its subject, from the fundamental physics of radiative transfer, through the design, calibration and operation of infrared spectrometers, to a summary of recent results. Along the way, it deals also with the spectra of diatomic and polyatomic molecules, and the structure and composition of planetary atmospheres. The treatment is authoritative-the authors have all been leading researchers in the field, and between them have something like 130 years experience in the study of planetary spectra using ground-based and space-borne instruments. While not shrinking from mathematical rigour, where this is required, the style is generally easy to follow, and should be accessible to postgraduate, and advanced undergraduate students, in relevant disciplines. Moreover, the treatment is so comprehensive that it is hard to imagine that even the most established planetary scientist would not learn something from it. The community can be grateful that the authors have chosen to distil their knowledge into a form suitable for passing on to their colleagues, and most importantly, the next generation of researchers.

  1. How Do Different Types of Schools Prepare Students for Life at Cambridge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Adamson, Clara; Mercer, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Twenty students from different educational backgrounds within the UK were interviewed to investigate how well they considered their secondary school education had prepared them for the educational and social demands of an "elite" university and life within its most traditional colleges. The study asked them how they perceived students…

  2. The Integration of Cambridge: Alexander Crummell as Undergraduate, 1849-1853

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    "When Crummell went up to Queens' College in 1849, the university had never received so conspicuous a figure. He was almost twice the age of his fellow undergraduates... He had been a popular lecturer to vast audiences throughout Great Britain. He was the author of a well-received publication. He was an American. He was a priest. And most…

  3. [Experimental Course in Elementary Number Theory, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Mary Jacqueline

    In the winter of 1965, an experimental course in Elementary Number Theory was presented to a 6th grade class in the Hosmer School, Watertown, Massachusetts. Prior to the introduction of the present material, students had been exposed in class to such topics from the University of Illinois Arithmetic Project as lattices, number lines, frame…

  4. Housing in a Hurry. Proceedings of North Atlantic Conference. (Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 18, 1972.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamison, Robert M.; And Others

    Administrators from the Universities of Delaware, Rhode Island, and Vermont describe the processes that were followed on their respective campuses in the construction of economical and rapidly completed student housing. The design-build approach was utilized in which contractors prepare plans to meet the client's budget and facility requirements.…

  5. Sustaining Faith-Informed Mission at Religiously-Affiliated Colleges and Universities: A Qualitative Case Study of Three Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witek, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Religiously-affiliated colleges and universities have been a vibrant part of American Higher Education since the founding of Harvard in 1636. Despite their unique contribution to higher education, an extensive body of literature documents that strong trends of secularization have taken place within these institutions over the second half of the…

  6. Sustaining Faith-Informed Mission at Religiously-Affiliated Colleges and Universities: A Qualitative Case Study of Three Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witek, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Religiously-affiliated colleges and universities have been a vibrant part of American Higher Education since the founding of Harvard in 1636. Despite their unique contribution to higher education, an extensive body of literature documents that strong trends of secularization have taken place within these institutions over the second half of the

  7. MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  8. Heart Rate Response to a Modified Harvard Step Test: Males and Females, Age 10-69

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Henry J.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Study supported by the Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Michigan, under Grant HE-6378 (National Heart Institute, U.S. Public Health Service) and Grant CD-00246 (U.S. Public Health Service).

  9. Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: A mixed-methods analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R.; Ogilvie, David

    2012-01-01

    Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 20092010). Even in Britain's leading cycling city, cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a park-and-ride site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could afford to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio-economic range. This suggests the importance of combining individual-level healthy travel interventions with measures aimed at creating travel environments in which all social groups can pursue healthy and satisfying lives. PMID:22465380

  10. Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: a mixed-methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R; Ogilvie, David

    2012-06-01

    Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009-2010). Even in Britain's leading 'cycling city', cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a 'park-and-ride' site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could 'afford' to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio-economic range. This suggests the importance of combining individual-level 'healthy travel' interventions with measures aimed at creating travel environments in which all social groups can pursue healthy and satisfying lives. PMID:22465380

  11. Using an Ecological Framework for Understanding and Treating Externalizing Behavior in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacks, Ann M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will review the literature on the rate, stability, and outcomes associated with externalizing behavior problems prior to kindergarten entry. Bronfenbrenner's (The ecology of human development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press) ecological framework will be used to present the factors related to the onset and persistence of…

  12. Cultural Consumption Patterns in South Africa: An Investigation of the Theory of Cultural Omnivores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, J. D.; Jamal, M.; Willis, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to Bourdieu's theory ("Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste". Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press (1984)) that cultural consumption of so-called "high" versus popular culture is determined by socio-economic class, Peterson ("Poetics" 21:243-258, 1992; "Poetics" 33:257-282, 2005) finds that higher income

  13. Street Smarts vs. Book Smarts: The Figured World of Smartness in the Lives of Marginalized, Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt, Beth

    2007-01-01

    How smartness is defined within schools contributes to low academic achievement by poor and racial/ethnic minority students. Using Holland et al.'s (1998) [Holland, D., Lachicotte, W., Skinner, D., & Cain, C. (Eds.) (1998). "Identity and agency in cultural worlds." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] concept of "figured worlds," this paper…

  14. Risk Factors for Boy's Conduct Problems in Poor and Lower-Middle-Class Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonberg, Michael A.; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    The joint trajectory analysis version of Nagin's ("Group-based modeling of development." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005) semiparametric, group-based approach for modeling trajectories was used to assess how boy's trajectories of conduct problems (CP) and neighborhood SES covaried from ages 5 to 12. Participants were recruited from…

  15. Bootstrapping Word Order in Prelexical Infants: A Japanese-Italian Cross-Linguistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Nespor, Marina; Mazuka, Reiko; Horie, Ryota; Mehler, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Learning word order is one of the earliest feats infants accomplish during language acquisition [Brown, R. (1973). "A first language: The early stages", Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.]. Two theories have been proposed to account for this fact. Constructivist/lexicalist theories [Tomasello, M. (2000). Do young children have adult…

  16. Cultures of Teaching in Childhood: Formal Schooling and Maya Sibling Teaching at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Ashley E.

    2004-01-01

    Culture can be thought of a set of shared practices, beliefs, and values that are transmitted across generations through language [Bruner, J. (1990). "Acts of meaning". Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press]. Teaching is one way that culture is transmitted, but forms of teaching vary across cultures and across activity settings within cultures.…

  17. (Re)Framing Educational Possibility: Attending to Power and Equity in Shaping Access to and within Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, V.; Penuel, W. R.; Gutierrez, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Accounts of how culture constitutes the learning activities we accomplish with others are flourishing. These accounts illustrate how participants draw upon, adapt, and contest historically situated social practices, tools, and relations to accomplish their learning goals [Vygotsky: Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978]. Yet, they often lack

  18. Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference, August 22-27, 1999, hosted by the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The meeting is a forum for presenting and discussing new chemical and isotopic measurements, experimental and theoretical results, and discoveries in geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

  19. Child Abuse: Betrayal and Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foynes, Melissa Ming; Freyd, Jennifer J.; DePrince, Anne P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The current study tested several hypotheses about disclosure of childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse derived from Betrayal Trauma Theory [Freyd, J. J. (1996). Betrayal trauma: The logic of forgetting childhood abuse. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press]. We predicted that the duration of time from abuse to its disclosure…

  20. One, Two, Three, Four, Nothing More: An Investigation of the Conceptual Sources of the Verbal Counting Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Corre, Mathieu; Carey, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Since the publication of [Gelman, R., & Gallistel, C. R. (1978). "The child's understanding of number." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on the development of verbal counting as a representation of number, the nature of the ontogenetic sources of the verbal counting principles has been intensely debated. The present…

  1. Sequential Processes In Image Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosslyn, Stephen M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Results of three experiments are reported, which indicate that images of simple two-dimensional patterns are formed sequentially. The subjects included 48 undergraduates and 16 members of the Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass.) community. A new objective methodology indicates that images of complex letters require more time to generate. (TJH)

  2. Cultural Consumption Patterns in South Africa: An Investigation of the Theory of Cultural Omnivores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, J. D.; Jamal, M.; Willis, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to Bourdieu's theory ("Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste". Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press (1984)) that cultural consumption of so-called "high" versus popular culture is determined by socio-economic class, Peterson ("Poetics" 21:243-258, 1992; "Poetics" 33:257-282, 2005) finds that higher income…

  3. Q&A: The nanomaterials designer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibney, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Ali Yetisen's research includes using nanotechnology and biosensors to make environmentally responsive materials for clothes, tattoos, accessories and contact lenses -- materials that could be the future of fashion. Here, Yetisen, who works at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Cambridge, talks about mimicking the diffraction in butterfly wings, transforming gowns, and what fashion designers and materials scientists can learn from each other.

  4. (Re)Framing Educational Possibility: Attending to Power and Equity in Shaping Access to and within Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, V.; Penuel, W. R.; Gutierrez, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Accounts of how culture constitutes the learning activities we accomplish with others are flourishing. These accounts illustrate how participants draw upon, adapt, and contest historically situated social practices, tools, and relations to accomplish their learning goals [Vygotsky: Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978]. Yet, they often lack…

  5. Predicting Early Spelling: The Contribution of Children's Early Literacy, Private Speech during Spelling, Behavioral Regulation, and Parental Spelling Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aram, Dorit; Abiri, Shimrit; Elad, Lili

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to extend understanding of preschoolers' early spelling using the Vygotskian ("Mind in society: the development of higher psychological processes," Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978) paradigm of child development. We assessed the contribution of maternal spelling support in predicting children's…

  6. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  7. Figured World of History Learning in a Social Studies Methods Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cecil

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers how one teacher educator, Dr. Gomez, took up revisionist history and inquiry in her social studies methods classroom. The concepts of figured worlds (Holland et al., 1998) [Holland, D., Lachicotte, W. Jr., Skinner, D., & Cain, C. (1998). "Identity and agency in cultural worlds." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press], and…

  8. 76 FR 14047 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet the definition of unassociated... ornaments was donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by Mary S. Felton and Dr....

  9. 75 FR 8740 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meets the definition of... California; and Wilton Rancheria, California. Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and...

  10. 75 FR 9428 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects...; museum records; consultation evidence; and expert opinion. Officials of the Peabody Museum of...

  11. What Does It Take to Achieve Equality of Opportunity in Education?: An Empirical Investigation Based on Brazilian Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltenberg, Fabio D.; Vandenberghe, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Roemer's [Roemer, J. (1998). "Equality of opportunity". Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on equality of opportunity has contributed to the emergence of a theory of justice that is modern, conceptually clear and easy to mobilize in policy design. Inspired by Roemer's theory, this paper is fundamentally a policy-modeling…

  12. Identity Production in Figured Worlds: How Some Multiracial Students become Racial Atravesados/as

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Using Holland et al.'s ("Identity and agency in cultural worlds," Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1998) theory of identity and their concept of figured worlds, this article provides an overview of how twenty-five undergraduates of color came to produce a Multiracial identity. Using Critical Race Theory methodology with…

  13. Child Abuse: Betrayal and Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foynes, Melissa Ming; Freyd, Jennifer J.; DePrince, Anne P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The current study tested several hypotheses about disclosure of childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse derived from Betrayal Trauma Theory [Freyd, J. J. (1996). Betrayal trauma: The logic of forgetting childhood abuse. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press]. We predicted that the duration of time from abuse to its disclosure

  14. Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during the study period. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 3 days. Composite sampl

  15. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of

  16. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of

  17. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components…

  18. Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8…

  19. Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8

  20. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  1. The greater susceptibility of North Ronaldsay sheep compared with Cambridge sheep to copper-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Haywood, S; Simpson, D M; Ross, G; Beynon, R J

    2005-01-01

    Sheep of the semi-feral North Ronaldsay (copper-sensitive) and domesticated Cambridge (copper-tolerant) breeds were compared in respect of pathological changes and protein expression in the liver as a result of excessive dietary copper. Acute mitochondrial damage and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation with collagen synthesis occurred in response to moderate copper overload in North Ronaldsay but not in Cambridge sheep. Mitochondrial degradative changes occurred either as ballooning degeneration and rupture with subsequent autophagic degradation or as mitochondrial matrical condensation (pyknosis). In North Ronaldsay sheep prolonged exposure to copper produced mitochondrial hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and nuclear damage with necrosis. Cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), an enzyme responsive to oxidative stress, was induced in the liver of Cambridge sheep receiving a Cu-supplemented diet but was undetectable in the non-supplemented control sheep. Conversely, IDH was detected at similar levels in both control and copper-supplemented North Ronaldsay sheep, indicating a lower threshold response, and an enhanced susceptibility, to oxidative stress. "Upregulation" of mitochondrial thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase reductase (antioxidant protein-1) in the hepatic cytosol of the North Ronaldsay (but not Cambridge) sheep affirmed the increased susceptibility of the mitochondria to Cu-induced oxidative stress in this breed. Likewise the upregulation of cathepsin-D indicated increased lysosomal activity and HSC activation. The findings may be relevant to copper toxicosis in human infants. PMID:16099232

  2. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components

  3. Comparative Coh-Metrix Analysis of Reading Comprehension Texts: Unified (Russian) State Exam in English vs. Cambridge First Certificate in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solnyshkina, Marina I.; Harkova, Elena V.; Kiselnikov, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of the comparative study of Reading comprehension texts used in B2 level tests: Unified (Russia) State Exam in English (EGE) and Cambridge First Certificate in English (FCE). The research conducted was mainly focused on six parameters measured with the Coh-Metrix, a computational tool producing indices of the…

  4. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  5. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key

  6. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key…

  7. The Admission and Assimilation of Minority Students at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, 1900-1950.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Synnott, Marcia G.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews policies of college officials in controlling admission of minority students (Jews, Catholics, immigrants) to selected American colleges and universities from 1900-1970. Suggests that institutions of higher education may have to justify their admission policies by submitting them to periodic public or semipublic review. (DB)

  8. TOEFL and FCE Tests as Predictors of Academic Success for Undergraduate Students at the University of Bahrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man M.; Al-Ansari, Saif H.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the multivariate relationship of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the First Certificate of English (FCE), administered by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, and to determine whether students' total score on the TOEFL or their overall score on the FCE tends to be a…

  9. Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era—a Conference at Harvard Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Harvard Medical School convened a meeting of biomedical and clinical experts on 5 March 2015 on the topic of “Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era,” with the goals of discussing the lessons from the recent Ebola outbreak and using those lessons as a case study to aid preparations for future emerging infections. The speakers and audience discussed the special challenges in combatting an infectious agent that causes sporadic outbreaks in resource-poor countries. The meeting led to a call for improved basic medical care for all and continued support of basic discovery research to provide the foundation for preparedness for future outbreaks in addition to the targeted emergency response to outbreaks and targeted research programs against Ebola virus and other specific emerging pathogens. PMID:25995250

  10. The Quantum Theory of Solids Enters American Graduate Programs in the 1930s: John Bardeen at Princeton and Harvard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2003-03-01

    By 1933, the quantum theory of solids, recently developed in Munich and other German centers of physics, came to the United States in the pages of journal and review articles, such as the monumental Handbuch der Physik article "Elektronentheorie der Metalle," coauthored by Arnold Sommerfeld and Hans Bethe. The theory first entered the programs in theoretical physics at Princeton surrounding Eugene Wigner and at MIT surrounding John Slater, before spreading to other institutions. Wigner's first three graduate students -- Frederick Seitz, John Bardeen, and Conyers Herring -- were in the first generation of physicists who called themselves "solid-state" theorists. This talk examines this period of early solid-state theory through the eyes of young John Bardeen, who took his doctorate at Princeton, studying there from 1933 to 1935, and spent the next three years as a postdoc at Harvard working with Percy Bridgman, John Van Vleck, and (at MIT) John Slater.

  11. Essential Steps for Web Surveys: A Guide to Designing, Administering and Utilizing Web Surveys for University Decision-Making. Professional File. Number 102, Winter 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheskis-Gold, Rena; Loescher, Ruth; Shepard-Rabadam, Elizabeth; Carroll, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    During the past few years, several Harvard paper surveys were converted to Web surveys. These were high-profile surveys endorsed by the Provost and the Dean of the College, and covered major portions of the university population (all undergraduates, all graduate students, tenured and non-tenured faculty). When planning for these surveys started in…

  12. Two Approaches to the Use of Blogs in Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers' Professional Development: A Comparative Study in the Context of Two Universities in the UK and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Linda; Kim, Deoksoon

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the use of blogs for pre-service language teacher education in two national settings, the UK (University of Cambridge) and the US (University of South Florida). Taking two approaches to blogging and to learning through blogging (one based on self-reflection and a constructivist approach and one based on social and…

  13. Two Approaches to the Use of Blogs in Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers' Professional Development: A Comparative Study in the Context of Two Universities in the UK and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Linda; Kim, Deoksoon

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the use of blogs for pre-service language teacher education in two national settings, the UK (University of Cambridge) and the US (University of South Florida). Taking two approaches to blogging and to learning through blogging (one based on self-reflection and a constructivist approach and one based on social and

  14. Conformer Generation with OMEGA: Algorithm and Validation Using High Quality Structures from the Protein Databank and Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present the algorithm and validation for OMEGA, a systematic, knowledge-based conformer generator. The algorithm consists of three phases: assembly of an initial 3D structure from a library of fragments; exhaustive enumeration of all rotatable torsions using values drawn from a knowledge-based list of angles, thereby generating a large set of conformations; and sampling of this set by geometric and energy criteria. Validation of conformer generators like OMEGA has often been undertaken by comparing computed conformer sets to experimental molecular conformations from crystallography, usually from the Protein Databank (PDB). Such an approach is fraught with difficulty due to the systematic problems with small molecule structures in the PDB. Methods are presented to identify a diverse set of small molecule structures from cocomplexes in the PDB that has maximal reliability. A challenging set of 197 high quality, carefully selected ligand structures from well-solved models was obtained using these methods. This set will provide a sound basis for comparison and validation of conformer generators in the future. Validation results from this set are compared to the results using structures of a set of druglike molecules extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). OMEGA is found to perform very well in reproducing the crystallographic conformations from both these data sets using two complementary metrics of success. PMID:20235588

  15. Anion Recognition by Pyrylium Cations and Thio-, Seleno- and Telluro- Analogues: A Combined Theoretical and Cambridge Structural Database Study.

    PubMed

    Quiñonero, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyrylium salts are a very important class of organic molecules containing a trivalent oxygen atom in a six-membered aromatic ring. In this manuscript, we report a theoretical study of pyrylium salts and their thio-, seleno- and telluro- analogues by means of DFT calculations. For this purpose, unsubstituted 2,4,6-trimethyl and 2,4,6-triphenyl cations and anions with different morphologies were chosen (Cl-, NO3- and BF4-). The complexes were characterized by means of natural bond orbital and "atoms-in-molecules" theories, and the physical nature of the interactions has been analyzed by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. Our results indicate the presence of anion-π interactions and chalcogen bonds based on both σ- and π-hole interactions and the existence of very favorable σ-complexes, especially for unsubstituted cations. The electrostatic component is dominant in the interactions, although the induction contributions are important, particularly for chloride complexes. The geometrical features of the complexes have been compared with experimental data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. PMID:26114926

  16. Discrimination thresholds of normal and anomalous trichromats: Model of senescent changes in ocular media density on the Cambridge Colour Test.

    PubMed

    Shinomori, Keizo; Panorgias, Athanasios; Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    Age-related changes in chromatic discrimination along dichromatic confusion lines were measured with the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). One hundred and sixty-two individuals (16 to 88 years old) with normal Rayleigh matches were the major focus of this paper. An additional 32 anomalous trichromats classified by their Rayleigh matches were also tested. All subjects were screened to rule out abnormalities of the anterior and posterior segments. Thresholds on all three chromatic vectors measured with the CCT showed age-related increases. Protan and deutan vector thresholds increased linearly with age while the tritan vector threshold was described with a bilinear model. Analysis and modeling demonstrated that the nominal vectors of the CCT are shifted by senescent changes in ocular media density, and a method for correcting the CCT vectors is demonstrated. A correction for these shifts indicates that classification among individuals of different ages is unaffected. New vector thresholds for elderly observers and for all age groups are suggested based on calculated tolerance limits. PMID:26974943

  17. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  18. "Universe" event at AIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  19. PREFACE: Proceedings of the International Conference on Nanoscale Order in Amorphous and Partially Ordered Solids, Trinity College, Cambridge, UK, July 9 11, 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, John; Drabold, David; Elliott, Stephen; Voyles, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Quantifying the structural order in amorphous and partially ordered solids, and the effects of such order on solid-state properties, has been a longstanding challenge in the fields of amorphous glasses, semiconductors, and metals. Significant new understanding has emerged during the past few years thanks to advances in experimental techniques, theoretical approaches, and simulation of structure and properties. The International Conference on Nanoscale Order in Amorphous and Partially Ordered Solids was held at Trinity College, Cambridge UK on July 9-11, 2007. The intent of the workshop was to bring together leading researchers from around the world to report their recent work, discuss the state of the field, and chart future directions. These interactions took place formally via 21 oral and 21 poster presentations, and informally via walks in the Fellows Garden and of course in the pubs of Cambridge. We believe that we speak for all the participants in declaring the conference a great success. The meeting was supported by the FEI company, the US National Science Foundation and Trinity College Cambridge; we are very grateful for their generous support. We would also like to thank the staff and publishers of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their assistance and efficiency in producing this volume.

  20. An Evaluation of Two Different Methods of Assessing Independent Investigations in an Operational Pre-University Level Examination in Biology in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Explored aspects of assessment of extended investigation ("project") practiced in the operational examinations of The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES) for the perspective of construct validity. Samples of the 1993 (n=333) and 1996 (n=259) biology test results reveal two methods of assessing the project. (MAK)

  1. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session. PMID:24324421

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder among refugees: Measurement invariance of Harvard Trauma Questionnaire scores across global regions and response patterns.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Verkuilen, Jay; Ho, Emily; Fan, Yuyu

    2015-12-01

    Despite the central role of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in international humanitarian aid work, there has been little examination of the measurement invariance of PTSD measures across culturally defined refugee subgroups. This leaves mental health workers in disaster settings with little to support inferences made using the results of standard clinical assessment tools, such as the severity of symptoms and prevalence rates. We examined measurement invariance in scores from the most widely used PTSD measure in refugee populations, the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ; Mollica et al., 1992), in a multinational and multilingual sample of asylum seekers from 81 countries of origin in 11 global regions. Clustering HTQ responses to justify grouping regional groups by response patterns resulted in 3 groups for testing measurement invariance: West Africans, Himalayans, and all others. Comparing log-likelihood ratios showed that while configural invariance seemed to hold, metric and scalar invariance did not. These findings call into question the common practice of using standard cut-off scores on PTSD measures across culturally dissimilar refugee populations. In addition, high correlation between factors suggests that the construct validity of scores from North American and European measures of PTSD may not hold globally. PMID:25894706

  3. Policies to increase the social value of science and the scientist satisfaction. An exploratory survey among Harvard bioscientists.

    PubMed Central

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Boggio, Andrea; Hemenway, David

    2014-01-01

    Basic research in the biomedical field generates both knowledge that has a value per se regardless of its possible practical outcome and knowledge that has the potential to produce more practical benefits. Policies can increase the benefit potential to society of basic biomedical research by offering various kinds of incentives to basic researchers. In this paper we argue that soft incentives or “nudges” are particularly promising. However, to be well designed, these incentives must take into account the motivations, goals and views of the basic scientists. In the paper we present the results of an investigation that involved more than 300 scientists at Harvard Medical School and affiliated institutes. The results of this study suggest that some soft incentives could be valuable tools to increase the transformative value of fundamental investigations without affecting the spirit of the basic research and scientists’ work satisfaction. After discussing the findings, we discuss a few examples of nudges for basic researchers in the biomedical fields. PMID:24795807

  4. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2008-09-01

    It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic and particle spectrum, from what is expected to be common sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as well as neutrinos, have created great excitement, lively discussions and have given birth to collaborations for joint analyses and observations. A special thank you to our non-gravitational wave presenters and participants for making the time to join us. We hope this will be the beginning of a long tradition for this workshop. In this workshop we also introduced the student prize for the best poster. Twenty student posters participated in this competition. Pinkesh Patel of Caltech was the prize winner on a 'Resampling Technique to Calculate the F-statistic', co-authored with X Siemens and R Dupuis. We are grateful to the MIT Kavli Institute for providing the financial support for the cash prize that accompanied this. We would like to thank the local and international organizing committees for putting together a great scientific program, all the conference presenters and participants and finally the CQG editorial staff for making this conference proceeding volume happen.

  5. Radioactive waste management at a large university medical research complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, J.; Osborne, F.; Lorenzen, W.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes radioactive waste management at Harvard University. To contain costs and to reduce the impact of the low-level radioactive waste policy act, the program takes advantage of decay in storage, incineration, special packaging techniques, and increased training and awareness. A series of metrics, numerical ratios, are presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the radioactive waste management program. Through the use of this program, the amount of waste disposed of at commercial burial sites decreased from 98 to 1.09% of the wastes generated.

  6. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×105 cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. Results: This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (p<0.005), cytotoxicity increased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (p<0.001), and the Harvard cement group failed to showed no noticeable change in cytotoxicity with time. Conclusion: Although this study has limitations, it provides evidence that Harvard zinc phosphate cement is the most cytotoxic product and Panavia F2 appears to be the least cytotoxic cement over time. PMID:23508355

  7. Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as much as 96 percent of total solids resided within 9 feet of the curb. Median accumulation rates of street solids and median washoff of street solids after rainstorms on multifamily and commercial land-use streets were also similar at about 33 and 22 pounds per curb-mile per day, and 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Results indicate that solids on the streets tested in Cambridge, Mass., can recover to pre-rainstorm yields within 1 to 3 days after washoff. The finer grain-size fractions tended to be more readily washed from the roadway surfaces during rainstorms. Street solids in the coarsest grain-size fraction on multifamily streets indicated an average net increase following rainstorms and are likely attributed to debris run-on from trees, lawns, and other plantings commonly found in residential areas. In seven experiments between May and December 2010, the median removal efficiency of solids from street surfaces following a single pass by a regenerative-air street cleaner was about 82 percent on study sites in the multifamily land-use streets and about 78 percent on the commercial land-use streets. Median street-solid removal efficiency increased with increasing grain size. This type of regenerative-air street cleaner left a median residual street-solid load on the street surface of about 100 pounds per curb-mile. Median concentrations of organic carbon and total phosphorus (P) on multifamily streets were about 35 and 29 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. The median total mass of organic carbon and total P in street solids on multifamily streets was 68 and 75 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. More than 87 percent of the mass of total P was determined to be in solids greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter for both land-use types. The median total accumulation rate for total P on multifamily streets was about 5 times greater than on commercial streets. Total P accumulation in the medium grain-size fraction was nearly the same for streets within both land-use types at 0.004 pounds per curb-mile per day. Accumulation rates within the coarsest and finest grain-size fractions on multifamily streets were about 11 and 82 times greater than those on the commercial streets. Median washoff of total P was 58 and 48 percent from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively, and generally increased with decreasing grain size. Total P median reductions resulting from a single pass of a regenerative-air street cleaner on streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types were about 82 and 62 percent, respectively, and were similar in terms of grain size between both land-use types. A Source Loading and Management Model for Microsoft Windows (WinSLAMM) was applied to a 21.8 acre subcatchment in Cambridge, Mass. The subcatchment area consists of mostly commercial and multifamily land-use types to evaluate the potential reductions of total and particulate solids, and P attributed to street cleaning. Rainwater runoff from rooftops represented between 20 and 50 percent of the total basin runoff. Street surfaces only accounted for about 20 percent of the total basin runoff. Monthly applications of mechanical-brush and vacuum-assisted street cleaners within the subcatchment as defined by SLAMM for areas with long-term (24-hour) on-street parking and monthly parking controls using five average climatic years resulted in total solid reductions of about 3 and 5 percent, respectively. Simulating the regenerative-air street cleaner tested as part of this study resulted in total solid reductions of about 16 percent. Increasing street cleaning frequency to three times weekly increased total solids removal for mechanical-brush, vacuum-assisted, and regenerative-air street cleaners to about 6, 14, and 19 percent, respectively. Monthly applications of mechanical-brush, vacuum-assisted, and regenerative-air street cleaners within the subcatchment resulted in total P reductions of about 1, 3, and 8 percent, respectively. A street cleaning frequency of three times each week for each of the three street-cleaner types increased total P removal to about 3, 7, and 9 percent, respectively.

  8. Comprehensive MALDI-TOF Biotyping of the Non-Redundant Harvard Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Transposon Insertion Mutant Library

    PubMed Central

    Oumeraci, Tonio; Jensen, Vanessa; Talbot, Steven R.; Hofmann, Winfried; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; von Neuhoff, Nils; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is ubiquitously present in the aerobic biosphere. As an antibiotic-resistant facultative pathogen, it is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections. Its rapid and accurate identification is crucial in clinical and therapeutic environments. Methods In a large-scale MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based screen of the Harvard transposon insertion mutant library of P. aeruginosa strain PA14, intact-cell proteome profile spectra of 5547 PA14 transposon mutants exhibiting a plethora of different phenotypes were acquired and analyzed. Results Of all P. aeruginosa PA14 mutant profiles 99.7% were correctly identified as P. aeruginosa with the Biotyper software on the species level. On the strain level, 99.99% of the profiles were mapped to five different individual P. aeruginosa Biotyper database entries. A principal component analysis-based approach was used to determine the most important discriminatory mass features between these Biotyper groups. Although technical replicas were consistently categorized to specific Biotyper groups in 94.2% of the mutant profiles, biological replicas were not, indicating that the distinct proteotypes are affected by growth conditions. Conclusions The PA14 mutant profile collection presented here constitutes the largest coherent P. aeruginosa MALDI-TOF spectral dataset publicly available today. Transposon insertions in thousands of different P. aeruginosa genes did not affect species identification from MALDI-TOF mass spectra, clearly demonstrating the robustness of the approach. However, the assignment of the individual spectra to sub-groups proved to be non-consistent in biological replicas, indicating that the differentiation between biotyper groups in this nosocomial pathogen is unassured. PMID:25665154

  9. Crystal structures of four ?-keto esters and a Cambridge Structural Database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Kulsoom; Maurya, Hardesh K; Gupta, Atul; Vasudev, Prema G

    2015-10-01

    The revived interest in halogen bonding as a tool in pharmaceutical cocrystals and drug design has indicated that cyano-halogen interactions could play an important role. The crystal structures of four closely related ?-keto esters, which differ only in the substitution at a single C atom (by H, OMe, Cl and Br), are compared, namely ethyl 2-cyano-5-oxo-5-phenyl-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H22N2O3, (1), ethyl 2-cyano-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C20H24N2O4, (2), ethyl 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21ClN2O3, (3), and the previously published ethyl 5-(4-bromophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21BrN2O3, (4) [Maurya, Vasudev & Gupta (2013). RSC Adv. 3, 12955-12962]. The molecular conformations are very similar, while there are differences in the molecular assemblies. Intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds are found to be the primary interactions in the crystal packing and are present in all four structures. The halogenated derivatives have additional aromatic-aromatic interactions and cyano-halogen interactions, further stabilizing the molecular packing. A database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions using the Cambridge Structural Database [CSD; Groom & Allen (2014). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 662-671] revealed that about 13% of the organic molecular crystals containing both cyano and halogen groups have cyano-halogen interactions in their packing. Three geometric parameters for the C-X...N[triple-bond]C interaction (X= F, Cl, Br or I), viz. the N...X distance and the C-X...N and C-N...X angles, were analysed. The results indicate that all the short cyano-halogen contacts in the CSD can be classified as halogen bonds, which are directional noncovalent interactions. PMID:26422224

  10. Kristian Camilleri: Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher. Cambridge University Press, 2009, ISBN-13:9780521884846, 211 pp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemans, Machiel

    2010-11-01

    The book Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher, by Kristian Camilleri is critically reviewed. The work details Heisenberg’s philosophical development from an early positivist commitment towards a later philosophy of language. It is of interest to researchers and graduate students in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics.

  11. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ON TRACK FOR MEASURING THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Two international teams of astronomers, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, are reporting major progress in converging on an accurate measurement of the Universe's rate of expansion -- a value which has been debated for over half a century. These new results yield ranges for the age of the Universe from 9-12 billion years, and 11-14 billion years, respectively. The goal of the project is to measure the Hubble Constant to ten percent accuracy. The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project team, an international group of over 20 astronomers, is led by Wendy Freedman of Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA, Robert Kennicutt, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and Jeremy Mould, Mount Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory, Australia. The group's interim results, announced at a meeting held at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, are consistent with their preliminary result, announced in 1994, of 80 kilometers per second per megaparsec (km/sec/Mpc), based on observations of a galaxy in the Virgo cluster. 'We have five different ways of measuring the Hubble Constant with HST,' said Dr. Freedman. 'The results are coming in between 68 and 78 km/sec/Mpc.' (For example, at an expansion rate of 75 km/sec/Mpc, galaxies appear to be receding from us at a rate of 162,000 miles per hour for every 3.26 million light-years farther out we look). Two months ago, a second team, led by Allan Sandage, also of the Carnegie Observatories, Abhijit Saha, STScI, Gustav Tammann and Lukas Labhardt, Astronomical Institute, University of Basel, Duccio Macchetto and Nino Panagia, STScI/European Space Agency, reported a slower expansion rate of 57 km/sec/Mpc. The value of the Hubble Constant allows astronomers to calculate the expansion age of the Universe, the time elapsed since the Big Bang. Astronomers have been arguing recently whether the time since the Big Bang is consistent with the ages of the oldest stars. The ages are calculated from combining the expansion rate with an estimate of how much matter is in space. The younger age values from each team assume the Universe is at a critical density where it contains just enough matter to expand indefinitely. The higher age estimates are calculated based on a low density of matter in space. (See 'Science Background' for more information on the expanding Universe.) 'A point of great interest is whether the age of the Universe arrived at this way is really older than the independently derived ages of the oldest stars,' said Saha, an investigator on both Hubble teams. 'The numbers lean on the side that the stellar ages are a little lower, or that the hypothesis that we live in a critical density universe needs to be questioned,' said Saha. 'As further results accumulate over the next few years, we hope to tighten the constraints on these issues.' THE OBSERVATIONS The Key Project team is midway along in their three-year program to derive the expansion rate of the Universe based on precise distance measurements to galaxies. They have now measured Cepheid distances to a dozen galaxies, and are about halfway through their overall program. The Key Project team also presented a preliminary estimate of the distance to the Fornax cluster of galaxies. The estimate was obtained through the detection and measurement with the Hubble Space Telescope of pulsating stars known as Cepheid variables found in the Fornax cluster. The Fornax cluster is measured to be approximately as far away as the Virgo cluster of galaxies -- about 60 million light-years. The Key Project team member who led this effort, Caltech astronomer Barry Madore said, 'This cluster allows us to make independent estimates of the expansion rate of the Universe using a number of different techniques. All of these methods are now in excellent agreement. With Fornax we are now at turning point in this field.' The team is measuring Cepheid distances to the Virgo and Fornax clusters of galaxies as a complementary test. Their strategy is to compare and contrast expansion numbers from a variety of distance indicators. The Key Project team is systematically looking into a variety of methods for measuring distances. They are using Cepheids in a large sample to tie into five or six 'secondary methods'. One such secondary method relates the total luminosity of a galaxy to the rate at which the galaxy is spinning, the Tully-Fisher relation. Another secondary method makes use of a special class of exploding star known as a type Ia supernova. This phase of the Hubble Constant research will be completed within another two years. In contrast, the Sandage team focused on a single secondary distance indicator, one of the same indicators also used by the Key Project team, the type Ia supernova. Sandage maintains that these stars are 'standard bombs' according to theory. He suggests that when they explode they all reach exactly the same intrinsic brightness. This would make them extremely reliable 'standard candles,' (objects with a well-known intrinsic brightness) visible 1,000 times farther away than Cepheids. Since they are intrinsically brighter than any other standard candle, they offer the opportunity for an accurate measurement of the Universe's overall expansion by looking out the farthest. Although both teams are still in disagreement over the precise rate at which the Universe is expanding and on how old it is, they are optimistic that their estimates will continue to converge with further observations and analysis. * * * * Members of the Key Project team include W. Freedman (Carnegie Observatories), R. Kennicutt (University of Arizona), J. Mould (Mount Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatories, Australia), L. Ferrarese (Johns Hopkins University), H. Ford (Johns Hopkins University), J. Graham (Department of Terrestrial Magnetism), M. Han (University of Wisconsin), P. Harding (University of Arizona), J. Hoessel (University of Wisconsin), J. Huchra (Smithsonian/Harvard University), S. Hughes (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge), G. Illingworth (University of California, Santa Cruz), B.F. Madore (IPAC/Caltech), R. Phelps (Carnegie Observatories), A. Saha (Space Telescope Science Institute), N. Silbermann (IPAC), P. Stetson (Dominion Astrophysical Observatory), and S. Sakai (IPAC). Members of the Sandage team include A. Sandage (Carnegie Observatories), A. Saha (Space Telescope Science Institute), G.A. Tammann, and L. Labhardt (Astronomical Institute, University of Basel), F.D. Macchetto and N. Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute/European Space Agency).

  12. HARVARD PARTICLE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center encompassed four highly interdisciplinary and integrated projects designed to address the four scientific questions presented above. Project 1investigated the health effects of PM in the Normative Aging Study cohort, in Eastern Massachusetts;

  13. HARVARD PARTICLE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center encompassed four highly interdisciplinary and integrated projects designed to address the four scientific questions presented above. Project 1 investigated the health effects of PM in the Normative Aging Study cohort, in Eastern Massachusetts; 

  14. Validation of the Harvard Lyman-α in situ water vapor instrument: Implications for the mechanisms that control stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Spackman, J. R.; Hintsa, E. J.; Hanisco, T. F.; Moyer, E. J.; St. Clair, J. M.; Sargent, M. R.; Anderson, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    Building on previously published details of the laboratory calibrations of the Harvard Lyman-α photofragment fluorescence hygrometer (HWV) on the NASA ER-2 and WB-57 aircraft, we describe here the validation process for HWV, which includes laboratory calibrations and intercomparisons with other Harvard water vapor instruments at water vapor mixing ratios from 0 to 10 ppmv, followed by in-flight intercomparisons with the same Harvard hygrometers. The observed agreement exhibited in the laboratory and during intercomparisons helps corroborate the accuracy of HWV. In light of the validated accuracy of HWV, we present and evaluate a series of intercomparisons with satellite and balloon borne water vapor instruments made from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the tropics and midlatitudes. Whether on the NASA ER-2 or WB-57 aircraft, HWV has consistently measured about 1-1.5 ppmv higher than the balloon-borne NOAA/ESRL/GMD frost point hygrometer (CMDL), the NOAA Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer (CFH), and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite in regions of the atmosphere where water vapor is <10 ppmv. Comparisons in the tropics with the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite show large variable differences near the tropopause that converge to ˜10% above 460 K, with HWV higher. Results we show from the Aqua Validation and Intercomparison Experiment (AquaVIT) at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe do not reflect the observed in-flight differences. We illustrate that the interpretation of the results of comparisons between modeled and measured representations of the seasonal cycle of water entering the lower tropical stratosphere is dictated by which data set is used.

  15. Comparison of Stem Map Developed from Crown Geometry Allometry Linked Census Data to Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar at Harvard Forest, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Palace, M. W.; Ducey, M. J.; David, O.; Cook, B. D.; Lepine, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA, USA is the location of one of the temperate forest plots established by the Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) as a joint effort with Harvard Forest and the Smithsonian Institute's Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO) to characterize ecosystem processes and forest dynamics. Census of a 35 ha plot on Prospect Hill was completed during the winter of 2014 by researchers at Harvard Forest. Census data were collected according to CTFS protocol; measured variables included species, stem diameter, and relative X-Y locations. Airborne lidar data were collected over the censused plot using the high spatial resolution Goddard LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal sensor package (G-LiHT) during June 2012. As part of a separate study, 39 variable radius plots (VRPs) were randomly located and sampled within and throughout the Prospect Hill CTFS/ForestGEO plot during September and October 2013. On VRPs, biometric properties of trees were sampled, including species, stem diameter, total height, crown base height, crown radii, and relative location to plot centers using a 20 Basal Area Factor prism. In addition, a terrestrial-based lidar scanner was used to collect one lidar scan at plot center for 38 of the 39 VRPs. Leveraging allometric equations of crown geometry and tree height developed from 374 trees and 16 different species sampled on 39 VRPs, a 3-dimensional stem map will be created using the Harvard Forest ForestGEO Prospect Hill census. Vertical and horizontal structure of 3d field-based stem maps will be compared to terrestrial and airborne lidar scan data. Furthermore, to assess the quality of allometric equations, a 2d canopy height raster of the field-based stem map will be compared to a G-LiHT derived canopy height model for the 35 ha census plot. Our automated crown delineation methods will be applied to the 2d representation of the census stem map and the G-LiHT canopy height model. For future work related to this study, high quality field-based stem maps with species and crown geometry information will allow for better comparisons and interpretations of individual tree spectra from the G-LiHT hyperspectral sensor as estimated by automated crown delineation of the G-LiHT lidar canopy height model.

  16. Support for the Harvard University Water Vapor and Total Water Instruments for the 2004 NASA WB57 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the role clouds play in the climate system, NASA is investing considerable effort in characterizing clouds with instruments ranging from passive remote sensors on board the EOS platforms, to the forthcoming active remote sensors on Cloudsat and Calipso. These missions, when taken together, have the capacity to advance our understanding of the coupling between various components of the hydrologic cycle and the atmospheric circulation, and hold the additional potential of leading to significant improvements in the characterization of cloud feedbacks in global models. This is especially true considering that several of these platforms will be flown in an identical orbit within several minutes of one another-a constellation of satellites known as the A-Train. The algorithms that are being implemented and developed to convert these new data streams from radiance and reflectivity measurements into geophysical parameters invariably rely on some set of simplifymg assumptions and empirical constants. Uncertainties in these relationships lead to poorly understood random and systematic errors in the retrieved properties. This lack of understanding introduces ambiguity in interpreting the data and in using the global data sets for their intended purposes. In light of this, a series of flights with the W57F was proposed to address certain specific issues related to the basic properties of mid latitude cirrus clouds: the NASA WE357 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment ("MidCiX"). The science questions addressed are: 1) Can cloud property retrieval algorithms developed for A-Train active and passive remote sensing measurements accurately characterize the microphysical properties of synoptic and convectively generated cirrus cloud systems? 2) What are the relationships between the cirrus particle mass, projected area, and particle size spectrum in various genre of cirrus clouds? 3) Does the present compliment of state of the art in situ cloud probes provide the level of precision and accuracy needed to develop and validate algorithms and to contribute to our understanding of the characteristics and microphysical processes operating in cirrus clouds?

  17. Universal Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Sarah; Leventhal, Laura

    Universal usability of World Wide Web (Web) environments—that is, having 90% of households as successful users—requires universal access, usability, and universal design. Factors such as Web technology and user-centered design contribute to universal access and usability, but key to universal usability is a universal design methodology. Universal design principles for the Web follow from universal design principles for the built environment, and emphasize perceptibility, self-explanation, and tailorability for the user. Universally usable Web environments offer the benefit of expanded participation, as well as the unanticipated benefits that generally follow from innovative design initiatives. However, to achieve Web universal usability, Web designers need tools that facilitate the design of intuitive interfaces without sacrificing universal access.

  18. Lifelong Learning, Equity and Inclusion. Proceedings [of the] UACE Conference (Cambridge, England, March 29-31, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ground, Ian, Ed.

    This document contains 41 plenary papers, speeches, papers, abstracts, and workshop presentations from a conference on continuing education, lifelong learning, equity, and inclusion in further education (FE) and higher education (HE). The following are among the papers included: "A New Way of Learning: The UfI (University for Industry) Network…

  19. Surveys 2. Eight State-of-the-Art Articles on Key Areas in Language Teaching. Cambridge Language Teaching Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Valerie, Ed.

    The articles in this volume are an overview of work in a number of subjects and disciplines which contribute to the field of applied linguistics and language teaching. Specifically, they treat universal properties common to all languages, the historical developments and central issues in speech act theory, speech research on the various stages of…

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.2 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.8 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  1. The ADDITION-Cambridge trial protocol: a cluster – randomised controlled trial of screening for type 2 diabetes and intensive treatment for screen-detected patients

    PubMed Central

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Simmons, Rebecca K; Williams, Kate M; Barling, Roslyn S; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2009-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, the benefits of such a strategy remain uncertain. Methods and design The ADDITION-Cambridge study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of (i) a stepwise screening strategy for type 2 diabetes; and (ii) intensive multifactorial treatment for people with screen-detected diabetes in primary care. 63 practices in the East Anglia region participated. Three undertook the pilot study, 33 were allocated to three groups: no screening (control), screening followed by intensive treatment (IT) and screening plus routine care (RC) in an unbalanced (1:3:3) randomisation. The remaining 27 practices were randomly allocated to IT and RC. A risk score incorporating routine practice data was used to identify people aged 40–69 years at high-risk of undiagnosed diabetes. In the screening practices, high-risk individuals were invited to take part in a stepwise screening programme. In the IT group, diabetes treatment is optimised through guidelines, target-led multifactorial treatment, audit, feedback, and academic detailing for practice teams, alongside provision of educational materials for newly diagnosed participants. Primary endpoints are modelled cardiovascular risk at one year, and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity at five years after diagnosis of diabetes. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality, development of renal and visual impairment, peripheral neuropathy, health service costs, self-reported quality of life, functional status and health utility. Impact of the screening programme at the population level is also assessed through measures of mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, health status and health service use among high-risk individuals. Discussion ADDITION-Cambridge is conducted in a defined high-risk group accessible through primary care. It addresses the feasibility of population-based screening for diabetes, as well as the benefits and costs of screening and intensive multifactorial treatment early in the disease trajectory. The intensive treatment algorithm is based on evidence from studies including individuals with clinically diagnosed diabetes and the education materials are informed by psychological theory. ADDITION-Cambridge will provide timely evidence concerning the benefits of early intensive treatment and will inform policy decisions concerning screening for type 2 diabetes. Trial registration Current Controlled trials ISRCTN86769081 PMID:19435491

  2. 2010 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    NASA has announced the selection of the 2010 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2010. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Simona Giacintucci (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Boaz Katz (Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, N.J.) * Matthew Kerr (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.) * Matthew Kistler (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Emily Levesque (University of Colorado, Boulder) * Xin Liu (Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.) * Tony Mroczkowski (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) * Ryan O'Leary (University of California at Berkeley) * Dov Poznanski (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Berkeley, Calif.) * Nicolas Yunes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) The Einstein Fellowships are administered for NASA by the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Along with the Hubble and Sagan Fellowships, the Einstein Fellowships are made possible by the Astrophysics Division within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/CfPfellow.2009.html

  3. Microworlds and Expert Systems: Is It Either or Can It Be Both? Report of a Conference Sponsored by the Educational Technology Center (Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 11-12, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a conference held at the Harvard Graduate School of Education which focused on the conceptual distinction between microworld software and expert system software in education. Microworld software is defined as software which lacks a specific teaching and learning agenda, and expert systems as software that…

  4. First AXAF Fellowships Awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    The AXAF (Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility) Science Center has announced the selection of five scientists to inaugurate the AXAF Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. Competition for the fellowships was open to all recent astronomy and astrophysics graduates worldwide. The AXAF Fellows will work for three years at a host astronomical institution in the United States where they will investigate topics broadly related to the scientific mission of AXAF. Additional AXAF Fellows will be selected each year over the course of the program. The AXAF Fellowship Program is a joint venture between NASA and the AXAF Science Center in cooperation with the host institutions. The AXAF Science Center is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts and funded by NASA through the Marshall Space Flight Center. "We are elated at the outstanding group of Fellows," said Harvey Tananbaum, the Director of the AXAF Science Center. "They will be working during the exciting period when the first X-ray images will be received from AXAF." Nancy Remage Evans, AXAF Fellowship Program Coordinator added, "The program will also encourage AXAF related work at institutions throughout the United States." An independent panel of scientists selected the honorees. The first AXAF Fellows and the host institutions at which they will hold their fellowships are: David Buote (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tiziana Di Matteo (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Ann Esin (California Institute of Technology), Joseph Mohr (University of Chicago), and Edward Moran (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). AXAF, the third of NASA's Great Observatories after the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, is the largest and most sophisticated X-ray telescope ever built. When it is launched in December of this year, AXAF's high resolution will provide new information about exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies, and other extremely hot regions of the universe. Further information about the AXAF satellite is available at the World Wide Web at http://xrtpub.harvard.edu/. Further information about the Fellowship program is available at http://asc.harvard.edu/fellows/. Supplemental Information on 1998 AXAF Fellows: * David Buote graduated from MIT, Cambridge MA 02139 * Tiziana DiMatteo graduated from Cambridge University, Cambridge CB30HA UK * Ann Esin graduated from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 * Joseph Mohr graduated from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 * Edward Moran graduated from Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027

  5. Why Does the Universe Inflate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    It is a great pleasure for me to be back again in Chile, to celebrate the 60th birthday of an old friend, and esteemed colleague, Claudio Bunster, whom I have known for almost 40 years. Claudio has done so much for science in general, and for science in Chile in particular. Being in the city of Valdivia where CECS, the center he created, is located, is quite meaningful to me. Twenty-five years ago, we held a Nuffield workshop on the Very Early Universe in Cambridge. The inflation scenario had just been proposed, by Guth and others, to account for many of the otherwise unexplained features of the Hot Big Bang model. The original Old Inflation proposal depicted in Fig. 1, of thin walled bubbles, forming in a meta-stable vacuum state, was shown not to work. If the bubble formation rate was high, the bubbles would be close together, and inflation would not last long enough. On the other hand if the bubble formation rate was low, the bubbles would be so far apart, that they never join up and thermalize.

  6. Who Runs Our Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Inside the academy there is a cultural perspective that it should run itself, in the sense that "business as usual" should be done with no one's hands obviously on the levers. This theory reaches its high point in the "self-government" of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. In this article, the author explores the question, "who runs our…

  7. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Fourth Cambridge Radio Survey Catalogue (4C) (Pilkington, Gower, Scott and Wills 1965, 1967)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The machine readable catalogue contains survey data from the papers of Pilkington and Scott and Gower, Scott and Wills. These data result from a survey of radio sources between declinations -07 deg and +80 deg using the large Cambridge interferometer at 178 MHz. The computerized catalog contains for each source the 4C number, 1950 position, measured flux density, and accuracy class. For some sources miscellaneous brief comments such as cross identifications to the 3C catalog or remarks on contamination from nearby sources are given at the ends of the data records. A detailed description of the machine readable catalog as it is currently being distributed by the Astronomical Data Center is given to enable users to read and process the data.

  8. Assessment of neuropsychological function through use of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Testing Automated Battery: performance in 4- to 12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Luciana, Monica; Nelson, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    In this article, children's performance on subtasks from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Testing Automated Battery (CANTAB) is described. Two samples were recruited, one of which included children who spoke English as a second language. Children in this group also completed subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Revision (WISC-III). Despite the fact that ESL children scored over 1 SD below the norm on the WISC-III Vocabulary subtest, there were no CANTAB performance distinctions between primary versus secondary English-language speakers. In addition, several aspects of CANTAB performance were significantly correlated with verbal and nonverbal IQ. When developmental trends were examined, findings indicated that several aspects of frontal lobe function (memory span, working memory, and planning skills) are not functionally mature, by the age of 12 years. Implications for use of the CANTAB in clinical studies are discussed. PMID:12661972

  9. Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62 milligrams per liter), and lowest in Fresh Pond (54 milligrams per liter). Bed sediments in Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Reservoirs were enriched in iron, manganese, and arsenic relative to those in the impounded lower Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Trophic state indices, calculated for each reservoir based on nutrient concentrations, water-column transparency, and phytoplankton abundances, indicated that the upper and middle basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir were moderately to highly productive and likely to produce algal blooms; the lower basin of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir were similar and intermediate in productivity, and Fresh Pond was relatively unproductive and unlikely to produce algal blooms. This pattern is likely due to sedimentation of organic and inorganic particles in the three basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and in Stony Brook Reservoir. Molar ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus ranged from 55 in Stony Brook Reservoir to 120 in Hobbs Brook Reservoir, indicating that phytoplankton algae in these water bodies may be phosphorus limited and therefore sensitive to small increases in phosphorus loading from the drainage basin. Nitrogen loads were found to be less important than phosphorus to the trophic condition of the reservoirs. Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook, the two principle streams draining the Cambridge drinking-water source area, differed in their relative contributions to many of the estimated constituent loads. The estimated load of fecal coliform bacteria was more than seven times larger for the mainly residential Stony Brook subbasin upstream from Kendal Green, Mass., than it was for the more commercial and industrial Hobbs Brook subbasin, though the drainage areas of the two subbasins differ only by about 20 percent. The State standard for fecal coliform bacteria in streams in the Cambridge drinking-water source area (20 colony forming units per 100 milliliters) was exceeded at all sampling stations. Estimated s

  10. Notes on the genus Harmonicon F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1896 (Araneae, Dipluridae) with description of a new species from French Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Drolshagen, Bastian; Bäckstam, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information on the genus Harmonicon F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1896, a key to the species and a new diagnosis differing from the one in Maréchal and Marty (1998) are provided. A new species is described: Harmonicon oiapoqueae differing from other species of the genus by the morphology of the posterior sternal sigilla, the more recurved, inverted U–shaped fovea, the amount and arrangement of maxillary cuspules, a single row of teeth on the claws of the palpal tarsus, longer and more slender legs III and IV in females, longer embolus, thinner bulb, and longer, more slender legs in males. The status of the putative junior synonyms of Harmonicon, Pseudohermachura Mello-Leitão, 1927 and Prosharmonicon Mello-Leitão, as well as the two species formerly assigned to Harmonicon, Harmonicon nigridorsi Mello-Leitão, 1924 and Harmonicon riveti Simon, 1903, is discussed. PMID:21976989

  11. The jumping spider genus Thiodina Simon, 1900 reinterpreted, and revalidation of Colonus F.O.P-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 (Araneae: Salticidae: Amycoida).

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Abel A; Maddison, Wayne P; Ruiz, Gustavo R S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we call attention to the identity of the type species of Thiodina Simon, 1900, T. nicoleti Roewer, 1951. When Simon proposed the genus, he characterized it based on morphological features found in species he described, but not found in the type species he designated, and whose type specimens, apparently, he had not examined. Nicolet's original description makes it clear that the type species is not closely related to the more familiar species placed in the genus. This misinterpretation was followed by contemporary researchers and survives until today. Here we designate and describe a neotype for T. nicoleti. We revalidate Colonus F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 to transfer most species formerly placed in Thiodina. The combinations Colonus puerperus (Hentz, 1846), Nilakantha cockerelli Peckham & Peckham, 1901 and N. peckhami Bryant, 1940 are restored. The following new combinations are established: Colonus branicki (Taczanowski, 1871) new comb., C. candidus (Mello-Leito, 1922) new comb., C. germaini (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. hesperus (Richman & Vetter, 2004) new comb., C. melanogaster (Mello-Leito, 1917) new comb., C. pallidus (C.L. Koch, 1846) new comb., C. pseustes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) new comb., C. punctulatus (Mello-Leito, 1917) new comb., C. rishwani (Makhan, 2006) new comb., C. robustus (Mello-Leito, 1945) new comb., C. sylvanus (Hentz, 1846) new comb., C. vaccula (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. vellardi (Soares & Camargo, 1948) new comb., Nilakantha beugelorum (Wolff, 1990) new comb., N. crucifera (F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901) new comb., and N. inerma (Bryant, 1940) new comb. Thiodina setosa Mello-Leito, 1947 is tentatively transferred to Cotinusa Simon, 1900. PMID:26623852

  12. The Polish Collection at the Alliance College Library in Cambridge Springs, PA: The Origins of the Collection in 1950, Its Rapid Development in the 1970's and the Introduction of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozaczka, Stanley J.

    This essay outlines the development, present condition, and future direction of the 20,000-volume Polish research collection at Alliance College, located in Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. Alliance College was founded in 1912 by the Polish National Alliance (PNA), a life insurance fraternal organization. In 1931 its entire library collection was…

  13. Methods and Skills for Research on Foreign Educational Systems. A Report on the NASFA/EAIE 1994 Seminars (Coral Gables, Florida, June 3-5 [and] Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, November 22-23). PIER World Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich-Langen, Caroline, Ed.

    The report presents results of two seminars, held in Miami (Florida) and Cambridge (England), in which representatives of two groups, The European Association for International Education and the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs: Association of International Educators, met for intensive discussion of the methods for and design of

  14. On the universal stellar law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander

    In this work, we consider a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to derive and develop the universal stellar law for extrasolar systems. Previously, the statistical theory for a cosmogonic body forming (so-called spheroidal body)has been proposed [1-3]. This theory starts from the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula; it permits us to derive the form of distribution functions, mass density, gravitational potentials and strengths both for immovable and rotating spheroidal bodies as well as to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum[1-3]. If we start from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a protostar (in particular, proto-Sun) inside a prestellar (presolar) nebula then the derived distribution functions of particle (as well as the mass density of an immovable spheroidal body) characterizes the first stage of evolution: from a prestellar molecular cloud (the presolar nebula) to the forming core of protostar (the proto-Sun) together with its shell as a stellar nebula (the solar nebula). This work derives the equation of state of an ideal stellar substance based on conception of gravitating spheroidal body. Using this equation, we obtain the universal stellar law (USL) for the planetary systems connecting temperature, size and mass of each of stars. This work also considers the Solar corona in the connection with USL. Then it is accounting under calculation of the ratio of temperature of the Solar corona to effective temperature of the Sun’ surfaceand modification of USL. To test justice of the modified USLfor different types of stars, the temperature of stellar corona is estimated. The prediction of parameters of stars is carrying out by means of the modified USL,as well as the Hertzsprung-Russell’s dependence [5-7]is derivedby means of USL directly. This paper also shows that knowledge of some characteristics for multi-planet extrasolar systems refines own parameters of stars. In this connection, comparison with estimations of temperatures using of the regression dependences for multi-planet extrasolar systems [8] testifies the obtained results entirely. References 1. Krot, A.M.:2009, A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals41(3), 1481-1500. 2. Krot, A.M.:2012, A models of forming planets and distribution of planetary distances and orbits in the solar system based on the statistical theory of spheroidal bodies. In:Solar System: Structure, Formation and Exploration, ch.9 (Ed. by Matteo de Rossi). New York, Nova Science Publishers, pp. 201-264. - ISBN: 978-1-62100-057-0. 3. Krot, A. M.:2012, A statistical theory of formation of gravitating cosmogonicbodies. Minsk,Bel. Navuka, 4. 448 p. - ISBN 978-985-08-1442-5 [monograph in Russian]. 5. Eddington, A.S.: 1916,On the radiative equilibrium of the stars.Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc.84 (7), 525-528. 6. Jeans, J.: 1929, Astronomy and cosmogony. Cambridge, University Press. 7. Chandrasekhar, S.:1939, An introduction to the study of stellar structure.Cambridge, University Press. 8. Pintr, P., Peřinová, V., Lukš, A., Pathak, A.:2013, Statistical and regression analyses of detected extrasolar systems. Planetary and Space Science, 75(1), 37-45.

  15. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers using the Chandra X-ray Observatory have identified a flickering, four-way mirage image of a distant quasar. A carefully planned observation of this mirage may be used to determine the expansion rate of the universe as well as to measure the distances to extragalactic objects, arguably two of the most important pursuits in modern astronomy. quasar RX J0911.4+0551 This figure is a composite of the X-ray image of the gravitational lens RX J0911.4+551 (top panel) and the light curves of the lensed images A2 (left panel) and A1 (right panel). Credit: NASA George Chartas, senior research associate at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and Marshall W. Bautz, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research, present their findings today at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. "With a carefully planned follow-up, the Chandra observation of quasar RX J0911.4+0551 may lead to a measurement of the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe, in less than a day," said Chartas. The observation would be done not with mirrors but with mirages--four images of a single quasar that capture the quasar's light at different moments of time due to the speed of light and the location of the mirages. Quasars are extremely distant galaxies with cores that glow with the intensity of 10 trillion Suns, a phenomenon likely powered by a supermassive black hole in the heart of the galaxy. This single "point source" image of a quasar may appear as four or five sources when the quasar--from our vantage point on Earth--is behind a massive intervening deflector, such as a dim galaxy. A mirage of images form when the gravity of the intervening deflector forces light rays to bend and take different paths to reach us. The time it takes for light to reach us from the distant object will depend on which path a ray decides to take. "An intervening galaxy can act as a lens," said Bautz. "Now imagine that the distant lensed quasar suddenly became brighter. The mirage images of the quasar will brighten up at different times depending on the difference in the light travel delay." Unlike ordinary galaxies, quasars do vary greatly in their intensity, especially in the X-ray waveband, said Gordon Garmire, Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State. This is caused by the violent and erratic flow of gas into the black hole that is powering the quasar. In quasar RX J0911.4+0551, the astronomers saw a sudden brightening of X-ray intensity that lasted for about 2,000 seconds. This was observed in one of the four mirage images. Measuring the time-delay of the 2,000-second flare--or any flare-- from mirage to mirage can provide the absolute distance to the deflector (intervening galaxy) and can thus be used to estimate the expansion rate of the universe. Sjur Refsdal first proposed this promising method in 1964. The method avoids many uncertainties associated with the classic distance-ladder technique used to measure objects and the Hubble constant. The main difficulty in measuring time-delays is that the brightness of each image has to be carefully monitored over several periods of the time-delay. Also, the quasar has to show sufficient variability over time scales smaller than the time-delay. Most attempts to measure time-delays until now have been made in the optical and radio bands. The modest variability of quasars in these wavebands, however, has made it extremely difficult to place accurate constraints on time-delays. X-ray observations of gravitationally lensed quasars, on the other hand, show strong variability over time scales of hours to days. For example, it has taken almost 20 years of optical and radio monitoring to obtain a universal accepted time-delay for the lensed quasar Q0957+561 to an accuracy of 3percent. Chandra has the potential, the team has found, to determine the time-delay in one observation. "Based on computer models developed at Penn State and MIT, we have identified about ten gravitational lens systems with time-delays of less than a day," said Chartas. "One long observation of each source with a superior X-ray telescope could provide enough data to nail down the Hubble constant in the blink of an eye." The team is planning to apply the gravitational-lens method in the near future to several of these systems using the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The Chandra observations of quasar RX J0911.4+0551 were made on November 2, 1999, using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The effort involved several scientists from Penn State and MIT. ACIS was conceived and developed for NASA by Penn State and MIT under Garmire's leadership. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., in Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Massachusetts. RX J0911.4+551 Handout Constellation Hydra To follow Chandra's progress, visit the Chandra site at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  16. University Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian

    This book explores how universities relate their built environment to academic discourse, asserting that the character of universities is often a charming dialogue between order and disarray. It contains numerous photographs and building plans for example campuses throughout the world. In part 1, "The Campus," chapters are: (1) "Academic Mission…

  17. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  18. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  19. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

  20. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher

  1. Correspondence: World Wide Web access to the British Universities Human Embryo Database

    PubMed Central

    AITON, JAMES F.; MCDONOUGH, ARIANA; MCLACHLAN, JOHN C.; SMART, STEVEN D.; WHITEN, SUSAN C.

    1997-01-01

    The British Universities Human Embryo Database has been created by merging information from the Walmsley Collection of Human Embryos at the School of Biological and Medical Sciences, University of St Andrews and from the Boyd Collection of Human Embryos at the Department of Anatomy, University of Cambridge. The database has been made available electronically on the Internet and World Wide Web browsers can be used to implement interactive access to the information stored in the British Universities Human Embryo Database. The database can, therefore, be accessed and searched from remote sites and specific embryos can be identified in terms of their location, age, developmental stage, plane of section, staining technique, and other parameters. It is intended to add information from other similar collections in the UK as it becomes available. PMID:9034891

  2. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  3. Test-retest reliability analysis of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Tests for the assessment of dementia in older people living in retirement homes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta Matos; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Simões, Mário R

    2016-01-01

    The validity of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Tests has been widely studied, but their reliability has not. This study aimed to estimate the test-retest reliability of these tests in a sample of 34 older adults, aged 69 to 90 years old, without neuropsychiatric diagnoses and living in retirement homes in the district of Lisbon, Portugal. The battery was administered twice, with a 4-week interval between sessions. The Paired Associates Learning (PAL), Spatial Working Memory (SWM), Rapid Visual Information Processing, and Reaction Time tests revealed measures with high-to-adequate test-retest correlations (.71-.89), although several PAL and SWM measures showed susceptibility to practice effects. Two estimated standardized regression-based methods were found to be more efficient at correcting for practice effects than a method of fixed correction. We also found weak test-retest correlations (.56-.68) for several measures. These results suggest that some, but not all, measures are suitable for cognitive assessment and monitoring in this population. PMID:26574661

  4. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part A: Study description.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Louise M; Flechais, Remy S A; Murphy, Anna; Reed, Laurence J; Abbott, Sanja; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Ersche, Karen D; Faluyi, Yetunde; Faravelli, Luca; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Kalk, Nicola J; Kuchibatla, Shankar S; McGonigle, John; Metastasio, Antonio; Mick, Inge; Nestor, Liam; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Smith, Dana G; Suckling, John; Tait, Roger; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, J F William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol dependence are global problems with substantial societal costs. There are few treatments for relapse prevention and therefore a pressing need for further study of brain mechanisms underpinning relapse circuitry. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study is an experimental medicine approach to this problem: using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques and selective pharmacological tools, it aims to explore the neuropharmacology of putative relapse pathways in cocaine, alcohol, opiate dependent, and healthy individuals to inform future drug development. Addiction studies typically involve small samples because of recruitment difficulties and attrition. We established the platform in three centres to assess the feasibility of a multisite approach to address these issues. Pharmacological modulation of reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity were investigated in a monetary incentive delay task, an inhibitory control task, and an evocative images task, using selective antagonists for µ-opioid, dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (naltrexone, GSK598809, vofopitant/aprepitant), in a placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover design. In two years, 609 scans were performed, with 155 individuals scanned at baseline. Attrition was low and the majority of individuals were sufficiently motivated to complete all five sessions (n=87). We describe herein the study design, main aims, recruitment numbers, sample characteristics, and explain the test hypotheses and anticipated study outputs. PMID:26246443

  5. Decision-making deficits in patients diagnosed with disordered gambling using the Cambridge Gambling task: the effects of substance use disorder comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Zois, Evangelos; Kortlang, Noreen; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Lemenager, Tagrid; Beutel, Martin; Mann, Karl; Fauth-Bühler, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Background Disordered gambling (DG) has often been associated with impaired decision-making abilities, suggesting a dysfunction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Aims To our knowledge, no previous study has accurately considered the effect of substance use disorder (SUD) comorbidity (including nicotine dependence) on decision-making impairments in DG. Methods and Materials We employed the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) to assess a big cohort of patients diagnosed with DG (N = 80) against matched healthy controls (HCs) (N = 108). The cohort included DG patients with nicotine and alcohol dependence, alcohol dependence only and 12 “pure” nonsmokers with only DG diagnosis. Results Pure nonsmoking, nicotine dependent as well as alcoholic DGs with current nicotine dependence, demonstrated a decision making profile, characterized by poor decision-making abilities and failure to make right choices (rational), closely resembling that of patients with vmPFC damage. Discussion This suggests that DGs with and without SUD comorbidity are equally affected in that domain of decision making abilities. Additionally, gambling diagnosis combined with alcohol and nicotine dependence involves a group of gambling patients with a relatively riskier decision making profile, showing that these patients apart from making irrational decisions take also more risks. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for SUD comorbidities with useful implications for future research and therapy. Limitations of the current investigation are discussed. PMID:25161815

  6. Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Neuropsychological Tests in Differentiating Alzheimer's Disease from Mild Cognitive Impairment: Can the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Be Better than the Cambridge Cognitive Examination?

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, José Eduardo; Cecato, Juliana Francisca; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Montiel, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the lack of studies on measures that increase the diagnostic distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and on the role of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) in this, our study aims to compare the utility of the CAMCOG, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in helping to differentiate AD from MCI in elderly people with >4 years of schooling. Method A total of 136 elderly subjects – 39 normal controls as well as 52 AD patients and 45 MCI patients treated at the Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil – were assessed using the MMSE, CAMCOG, clock drawing test (CDT), verbal fluency test (VF), Geriatric Depression Scale and Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire. Results The results obtained by means of a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MoCA is a better screening test for differentiating elderly subjects with AD from those with MCI than the CAMCOG and MMSE as well as other tests such as the CDT and VF. Conclusion The MoCA, more than the CAMCOG and the other tests, was shown to be able to differentiate AD from MCI, although, as Roalf et al. [Alzheimers Dement 2013;9:529-537] pointed out, further studies might lead to measures that will improve this differentiation. PMID:24987399

  7. Iodine⋯X(O, N, S) intermolecular contacts: models of thyroid hormone?protein binding interactions using information from the cambridge crystallographic data files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Vivian; Murray-Rust, Peter

    1984-02-01

    Automated methods were used to search the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Files for all compounds containing C?I bonds that had C?I⋯X(O, N, S) contact distances less than 3.55 for O and for N, and less than 4.0 for S. Analysis of these data from 86 crystal structures showed that the distribution of nucleophile (O, N, S) contacts to iodine is non-spherical with the highest density and the shortest contacts (e.g., I⋯O = 2.96 ) and C?I ⋯ X angle, ? = 180. These data suggest that, where possible, that donor group is arranged so that one of its lone pairs is directed toward the iodine atom. Because the thyroid hormones are the only active iodine-containing compounds, C?I⋯X interactions were considered as possible contributros to enhanced protein binding affinity. In the crystal structure of the thyroxineprealbumin complex there is a close contact between the proximal outer-ring iodine of thyroxine and the carbonyl oxygen of Ala-109A in the prealbumin backbone. The geometry of this interaction (I⋯O, 2.96 , C?I⋯O, 161) is within the distribution of the iodineoxygen interactions observed in this analysis, and suggests that this model can explain (in part) the unique role of iodine in the binding of the thyroid hormones to their specific binding proteins.

  8. The Calgary-Cambridge Referenced Observation Guides: an aid to defining the curriculum and organizing the teaching in communication training programmes.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, S M; Silverman, J D

    1996-03-01

    Effective communication between doctor and patient is a core clinical skill. It is increasingly recognized that it should and can be taught with the same rigour as other basic medical sciences. To validate this teaching, it is important to define the content of communication training programmes by stating clearly what is to be learnt. We therefore describe a practical teaching tool, the Calgary-Cambridge Referenced Observation Guides, that delineates and structures the skills which aid doctor-patient communication. We provide detailed references to substantiate the research and theoretical basis of these individual skills. The guides form the foundation of a sound communication curriculum and are offered as a starting point for programme directors, facilitators and learners at all levels. We describe how these guides can also be used on an everyday basis to help facilitators teach and students learn within the experiential methodology that has been shown to be central to communication training. The learner-centred and opportunistic approach used in communication teaching makes it difficult for learners to piece together their evolving understanding of communication. The guides give practical help in countering this problem by providing: an easily accessible aide-mmoire; a recording instrument that makes feedback more systematic; and an overall conceptual framework within which to organize the numerous skills that are discovered one by one as the communication curriculum unfolds. PMID:8736242

  9. Carbon and water exchange of a younger, drier deciduous forest compared to the long-term study site at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, J. L.; Kuzeja, P. S.

    2004-05-01

    We measured carbon and water exchange by the eddy covariance method at a younger, drier deciduous forest and compared it to the well-known Harvard Forest deciduous site during two growing seasons (2002 and 2003) and an intervening dormant season. Forests at both sites are dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra) and red maple (Acer rubrum), but the younger forest is situated near a hilltop, as opposed to the long-term Harvard Forest site, which is in a lowland area within 100 m of a stream and about 200 m from a bog. The younger forest had a maximum tree age of about 44 years within 200 m of the eddy flux tower (owing to an intense fire in the autumn of 1957); this compares to maximum tree ages of 65 to 90 years, depending on exact location, near the long-term site. The younger, drier forest stored about 1.7 Mg C/ha from May 2002 through April 2003. We estimate that this was about 30% less than annual storage in the older, moister forest at the long-term site, but as the 12-month periods on which this comparison is based are not completely overlapping for the two sites, this comparison may change slightly. Light-saturated net ecosystem carbon uptake of both sites was about 22 μ mol m-2 s-1 in June 2002, but by August the value for the drier site was only about 20 μ mol m-2 s-1 compared to about 24 μ mol m-2 s-1 for the long-term site, suggesting that water availability may have become a limiting factor for photosynthesis in the drier forest. At the younger site in 2003 compared to 2002, we estimated less C storage in May and June but more C storage in July, August and September, with an overall increase in growing season C storage of about 0.4 Mg/ha. Lower early-growing season in carbon storage in 2003 versus 2002 was associated with slightly lower net ecosystem carbon uptake at all light levels in June 2003 compared to a year earlier. Cloudy and cool weather in May and early June 2003 reduced C uptake directly by reducing light available for photosynthesis, and apparently also caused a delay in leaf maturation and the development of photosynthetic capacity in the trees' foliage.

  10. Inferring long-term carbon sequestration from tree rings at Harvard Forest: A calibration approach using tree ring widths and geochemistry / flux tower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmecheri, S.; Maxwell, S.; Davis, K. J.; Alan, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Improving the prediction skill of terrestrial carbon cycle models is important for reducing the uncertainties in global carbon cycle and climate projections. Additional evaluation and calibration of carbon models is required, using both observations and long-term proxy-derived data. Centennial-length data could be obtained from tree-rings archives that provide long continuous series of past forest growth changes with accurate annual resolution. Here we present results from a study conducted at Harvard Forest (Petersham, Massachusetts). The study examines the potential relationship between δ13C in dominant trees and GPP and/or NEE measured by the Harvard Forest flux tower (1992-2010). We have analyzed the δ13C composition of late wood-cellulose over the last 18 years from eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) trees growing in the flux tower footprint. δ13C values, corrected for the declining trend of atmospheric δ13C, show a decreasing trend from 1992 to 2010 and therefore a significant increase in discrimination (Δ). The intra-cellular CO2 (Ci) calculated from Δ shows a significant increase for both tree species and follows the same rate of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) increase (Ci/Ca increases). Interestingly, the net Ci and Δ increase observed for both species did not result in an increase of the iWUE. Ci/Ca is strongly related to the growing season Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for both species thus indicating a significant relationship between soil moisture conditions and stomatal conductance. The Ci trend is interpreted as a result of higher CO2 assimilation in response to increasing soil moisture allowing a longer stomata opening and therefore stimulating tree growth. This interpretation is consistent with the observed increase in GPP and the strengthening of the carbon sink (more negative NEE). Additionally, the decadal trends of basal area increment (BAI) calculated from tree-ring widths exhibit a positive trend over the last two decade. Tree-ring width and δ13C results show the potential of these parameters as proxies for reconstructions of past CO2 assimilation and carbon sequestration by woody biomass beyond the time span covered by calibration data, and extending to the centennial time scales encompassed by tree-ring records.

  11. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  12. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  13. Plasma universe

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H.

    1986-09-01

    A model based on the emissions and behavior of the most prevalent material in the universe leads one to view the world as an active and rapidly changing place, and helps one analyze the development of its components.

  14. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  15. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  16. Undulant Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  17. Exploring the microbially-mediated soil H2 sink: A lab-based study of the physiology and related H2 consumption of isolates from the Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D.; Meredith, L. K.; Bosak, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen (H2) is a secondary greenhouse gas because it attenuates the removal of methane (CH4) from the atmosphere. The largest and most uncertain term in the H2 biogeochemical cycle, microbe-mediated soil uptake, is responsible for about 80% of Earth's tropospheric H2 sink. Recently, the first H2-oxidizing soil microorganisms were discovered (genus Streptomyces) whose low-threshold, high-affinity NiFe-hydrogenase functions at ambient H2 levels (approx. 530 ppb). To better understand the ecological function of this hydrogenase, we conducted a controlled laboratory study of the H2 uptake behavior in accordance with the complex life cycle development of the streptomycetes. Several strains of the genus Streptomyces containing a high-affinity NiFe- hydrogenase were isolated from soil at the Harvard Forest. The presence of this hydrogenase, detected by PCR amplification of the hydrogenase large subunit, predicted H2 uptake behavior in wild-type streptomycetes and in phylogenetically different organisms containing more distantly related versions of the gene. H2 uptake depended on the streptomyces' life cycle, reaching a maximum during spore formation. These findings reveal connections between environmental conditions, organismal life cycle, and H2 uptake. With the rise of H2-based energy sources and a potential change in the tropospheric concentration of H2, understanding the sources and sinks of this trace gas is important for the future.

  18. On the Accuracy of In Situ Water Vapor Measurements in the Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere with the Harvard Lyman-Alpha Hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, Eric J.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Anderson, James G.; May, Randy D.; Hurst, Dale F.

    1999-01-01

    In an effort to better constrain atmospheric water vapor mixing ratios and to understand the discrepancies between different measurements of water vapor in the stratosphere and troposphere, we have carefully examined data from the Harvard Lyman-alpha photofragment fluorescence hygrometer, which has flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft from 1992 through 1998. The instrument is calibrated in the laboratory before and after each deployment, and the calibration is checked by direct absorption measurements in the troposphere. On certain flights, the ER-2 flew level tracks during which water vapor varied by up to 80 ppmv, under nearly constant atmospheric conditions. These flights provide a stringent test of our calibration via direct absorption and indicate agreement to within 3%. During the 1997 Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) mission, our Lyman-alpha instrument was compared with a new diode laser hygrometer from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Overall agreement was 5% during the June/July deployment and 1% for potential temperatures of 490 to 540 K. The accuracy of our instrument is shown to be +/-5 %, with an additional offset of at most 0.1 ppmv. Data from this instrument, combined with simultaneous measurements of CH4, and H2, are therefore ideal for studies of the hydrogen budget of the lower stratosphere.

  19. The Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project – Phase II (HARP-II): Rationale, methods, and features of the sample at intake

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Risa B.; Beard, Courtney; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the rationale, method, and intake demographic and clinical findings of the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II). HARP-II is the first prospective, observational, longitudinal study to describe the characteristics and course of anxiety in African American, Latino, and Non-Latino White individuals. Participants met criteria for at least one of the following disorders: Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia, Agoraphobia without history of Panic Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Initial intake data, collected between 2004 and 2011, are presented for 165 African American, 150 Latino, and 172 Non-Latino White participants. Participants evidenced substantial psychiatric comorbidity (mean number of Axis I disorders = 3.4), and moderate to severe symptoms and functional impairment. HARP-II will examine clinical course, in the context of potential socio-cultural and individual moderators (e.g., discrimination, acculturation, negative affect). Results should lead to improved understanding, prognostics, and treatment of anxiety in diverse populations. PMID:22410095

  20. The Power of Exercise and the Exercise of Power: The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory, Distance Running, and the Disappearance of Work, 1919-1947.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2015-08-01

    In the early twentieth century, fatigue research marked an area of conflicting scientific, industrial, and cultural understandings of working bodies. These different understandings of the working body marked a key site of political conflict during the growth of industrial capitalism. Many fatigue researchers understood fatigue to be a physiological fact and allied themselves with Progressive-era reformers in urging industrial regulation. Opposed to these researchers were advocates of Taylorism and scientific management, who held that fatigue was a mental event and that productivity could be perpetually increased through managerial efficiency. Histories of this conflict typically cease with the end of the First World War, when it is assumed that industrial fatigue research withered away. This article extends the history of fatigue research through examining the activities of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory in the 1920s and 1930s. The Laboratory developed sophisticated biochemical techniques to study the blood of exercising individuals. In particular, it found that exercising individuals could attain a biochemically "steady state," or equilibrium, and extrapolated from this to assert that fatigue was psychological, not physiological, in nature. In contrast to Progressive-era research, the Laboratory reached this conclusion through laboratory examination, not of industrial workers, but of Laboratory staff members and champion marathon runners. The translation of laboratory research to industrial settings, and the eventual erasure of physiological fatigue from discussions of labor, was a complex function of institutional settings, scientific innovation, and the cultural meanings of work and sport. PMID:25287571

  1. A Study of the Importance of Education and Cost Incentives on Individual Food Choices at the Harvard School of Public Health Cafeteria

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Karin B.; Bloom, Barry R.; Riccardi, Paul; Rosner, Bernard A.; Willett, Walter C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the importance of cost and awareness of health- or disease-promoting properties of foods and meals for choices by customers of a cafeteria. Design A non-randomized intervention study. Setting A medium size cafeteria in the Harvard School of Public Health. Participants Customers of the cafeteria mainly consisting of public health students, faculty, and school staff and workers from the medical campus. Intervention The purchase of healthy foods and dishes was subsidized and their prices reduced by 20%. This promotion was accompanied by the distribution of educational material. Main Outcome Measures Change in consumption of healthy and less healthy foods. Analysis The geometric mean was used to calculate the change in consumption. Results During the intervention, we observed a 6% increase in the consumption of healthy foods (95% confidence interval [CI]; 5% to 8%), and a 2% decline in the consumption of less-healthy foods (95% CI; −1% to −4%). After the prices returned to their original levels, the consumption of healthy foods increased further to 17% (95% CI; 13% to 20%) and a 2% decline in the consumption of less-healthy foods (95% CI; % 1 to −5%) persisted. Conclusions Subsidizing healthful meals and educating consumers about the importance of a healthy diet can result in a modest increase in the selection of healthy foods and meals that can be maintained beyond the periods of subsidy and promotion. PMID:18460476

  2. APEX Snaps First Close-up of Star Factories in Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    For the first time, astronomers have made direct measurements of the size and brightness of regions of star-birth in a very distant galaxy, thanks to a chance discovery with the APEX telescope. The galaxy is so distant, and its light has taken so long to reach us, that we see it as it was 10 billion years ago. A cosmic "gravitational lens" is magnifying the galaxy, giving us a close-up view that would otherwise be impossible. This lucky break reveals a hectic and vigorous star-forming life for galaxies in the early Universe, with stellar nurseries forming one hundred times faster than in more recent galaxies. The research is published online today in the journal Nature. Astronomers were observing a massive galaxy cluster [1] with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, using submillimetre wavelengths of light, when they found a new and uniquely bright galaxy, more distant than the cluster and the brightest very distant galaxy ever seen at submillimetre wavelengths. It is so bright because the cosmic dust grains in the galaxy are glowing after being heated by starlight. The new galaxy has been given the name SMM J2135-0102. "We were stunned to find a surprisingly bright object that wasn't at the expected position. We soon realised it was a previously unknown and more distant galaxy being magnified by the closer galaxy cluster," says Carlos De Breuck from ESO, a member of the team. De Breuck was making the observations at the APEX telescope on the plateau of Chajnantor at an altitude of 5000 m in the Chilean Andes. The new galaxy SMM J2135-0102 is so bright because of the massive galaxy cluster that lies in the foreground. The vast mass of this cluster bends the light of the more distant galaxy, acting as a gravitational lens [2]. As with a telescope, it magnifies and brightens our view of the distant galaxy. Thanks to a fortuitous alignment between the cluster and the distant galaxy, the latter is strongly magnified by a factor of 32. "The magnification reveals the galaxy in unprecedented detail, even though it is so distant that its light has taken about 10 billion years to reach us," explains Mark Swinbank from Durham University, lead author of the paper reporting the discovery. "In follow-up observations with the Submillimeter Array telescope, we've been able to study the clouds where stars are forming in the galaxy with great precision." The magnification means that the star-forming clouds can be picked out in the galaxy, down to a scale of only a few hundred light-years - almost down to the size of giant clouds in our own Milky Way. To see this level of detail without the help of the gravitational lens would need future telescopes such as ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array), which is currently under construction on the same plateau as APEX. This lucky discovery has therefore given astronomers a unique preview of the science that will be possible in a few years time. These "star factories" are similar in size to those in the Milky Way, but one hundred times more luminous, suggesting that star formation in the early life of these galaxies is a much more vigorous process than typically found in galaxies that lie nearer to us in time and space. In many ways, the clouds look more similar to the densest cores of star-forming clouds in the nearby Universe. "We estimate that SMM J2135-0102 is producing stars at a rate that is equivalent to about 250 Suns per year," says de Breuck. "The star formation in its large dust clouds is unlike that in the nearby Universe, but our observations also suggest that we should be able to use similar underlying physics from the densest stellar nurseries in nearby galaxies to understand star birth in these more distant galaxies." Notes [1] Galaxy clusters are among the most massive objects in the Universe kept together by gravity. They are composed of hundreds to thousands of galaxies, which make up to only about a tenth of their total mass. The bulk of their mass, which amounts to up to a million billion [1015] times the mass of our Sun, is composed of hot gas and dark matter. In this case, the cluster being observed has the designation MACS J2135-010217 (or MACS J213512.10-010258.5), and is at a distance of about four billion light-years. [2] Gravitational lensing is an effect forecast by Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. Due to their gigantic mass and their intermediate position between us and very distant galaxies, galaxy clusters act as extremely efficient gravitational lenses, bending the light coming from background galaxies. Depending on the cluster mass distribution a host of interesting effects are produced, such as magnification, shape distortions, giant arcs, and multiple images of the same source. More information This research was presented in a paper, "Intense star formation within resolved compact regions in a galaxy at z=2.3" (A. M. Swinbank et al., DOI 10.1038/nature08880) to appear online in Nature today. The team is composed of A. M. Swinbank, I. Smail, J. Richard, A. C. Edge, and K. E. K. Coppin (Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, UK), S. Longmore, R. Blundell, M. Gurwell, and D. Wilner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center For Astrophysics, USA), A. I. Harris and L. J. Hainline (Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, USA), A.J. Baker (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, University of New Jersey, USA), C. De Breuck, A. Lundgren and G. Siringo (ESO), R. J. Ivison (UKATC and Royal Observatory of Edinburgh, UK), P. Cox, M. Krips and R. Neri (Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, France), B. Siana (California Institute of Technology, USA), D. P. Stark (Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, UK), and J. D. Younger (Institute for Advanced Study, USA). The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope is a 12-metre telescope, located at 5100 m altitude on the arid plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Andes. APEX operates at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. This wavelength range is a relatively unexplored frontier in astronomy, requiring advanced detectors and an extremely high and dry observatory site, such as Chajnantor. APEX, the largest submillimetre-wave telescope operating in the southern hemisphere, is a collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the Onsala Space Observatory and ESO. Operation of APEX at Chajnantor is entrusted to ESO. APEX is a "pathfinder" for ALMA - it is based on a prototype antenna constructed for the ALMA project, it is located on the same plateau and will find many targets that ALMA will be able to study in extreme detail. ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the world's largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  3. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  4. The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Molly

    2010-01-01

    John Dewey (1859-1952) was a major figure of the American cultural and intellectual landscape in the first half of the twentieth century. While not the originator of American pragmatism, he was instrumental to its articulation as a philosophy and the spread of its influence beyond philosophy to other disciplines. His prolific writings encompass

  5. The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Molly

    2010-01-01

    John Dewey (1859-1952) was a major figure of the American cultural and intellectual landscape in the first half of the twentieth century. While not the originator of American pragmatism, he was instrumental to its articulation as a philosophy and the spread of its influence beyond philosophy to other disciplines. His prolific writings encompass…

  6. Changes in physical activity and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, A; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2013-01-01

    Aims To describe change in physical activity over 1 year and associations with change in cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent measurement of self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors at 1 year. Results There was no change in self-reported physical activity over 12 months. Even relatively large changes in physical activity were associated with relatively small changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors after allowing for changes in self-reported medication and diet. For every 30 metabolic equivalent-h increase in recreational activity (equivalent to 10 h/brisk walking/week), there was an average reduction of 0.1% in HbA1c in men (95% CI ?0.15 to ?0.01, P = 0.021) and an average reduction of 2 mmHg in systolic blood pressure in women (95% CI ?4.0 to ?0.05, P = 0.045). Conclusions Few associations were observed between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors in this trial cohort. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction appeared to be driven largely by factors other than changes in self-reported physical activity in the first year following diagnosis. PMID:22913463

  7. Development and validation of a preference based measure derived from the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) for use in cost utility analyses

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Stephen P; Ratcliffe, Julie; Meads, David M; Brazier, John E

    2008-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Hypertension is a severe and incurable disease with poor prognosis. A suite of new disease-specific measures – the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) – was recently developed for use in this condition. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a preference based measure from the CAMPHOR that could be used in cost-utility analyses. Methods Items were selected that covered major issues covered by the CAMPHOR QoL scale (activities, travelling, dependence and communication). These were used to create 36 health states that were valued by 249 people representative of the UK adult population, using the time trade-off (TTO) technique. Data from the TTO interviews were analysed using both aggregate and individual level modelling. Finally, the original CAMPHOR validation data were used to validate the new preference based model. Results The predicted health state values ranged from 0.962 to 0.136. The mean level model selected for analyzing the data had good explanatory power (0.936), did not systematically over- or underestimate the observed mean health state values and showed no evidence of auto correlation in the prediction errors. The value of less than 1 reflects a background level of ill health in state 1111, as judged by the respondents. Scores derived from the new measure had excellent test-retest reliability (0.85) and construct validity. The CAMPHOR utility score appears better able to distinguish between WHO functional classes (II and III) than the EQ-5D and SF-6D. Conclusion The tariff derived in this study can be used to classify an individual into a health state based on their responses to the CAMPHOR. The results of this study widen the evidence base for conducting economic evaluations of interventions designed to improve QoL for patients with PH. PMID:18718016

  8. Water-quality conditions, and constituent loads and yields in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2005–07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2013-01-01

    The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of ongoing development in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply has the potential to be affected by a wide variety of contaminants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1997) through continuous monitoring and discrete sample collection and, since 2004, through systematic collection of streamwater samples during base-flow and stormflow conditions at five primary sampling stations in the drinking-water source area. Four primary sampling stations are on small tributaries in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins; the fifth primary sampling station is on the main stem of Stony Brook and drains about 93 percent of the Cambridge drinking-water source area. Water samples also were collected at six secondary sampling stations, including Fresh Pond Reservoir, the final storage reservoir for the raw water supply. Storm runoff and base-flow concentrations of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of streamflow and specific conductance for six monitoring stations, which include the five primary sampling stations. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. These data also were used to describe how streamwater quality is affected by various watershed characteristics and provide information to guide future watershed management. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), caffeine, and a suite of 59 polar pesticides. Values of physical properties and constituent concentrations varied widely, particularly in samples from tributaries. Median concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4 in samples collected in the Hobbs Brook Basin (39.8, 392, 207, and 21.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively) were higher than those for the Stony Brook Basin (17.8, 87.7, 49.7, and 14.7 mg/L, respectively). These differences in major ion concentrations are likely related to the low percentages of developed land and impervious area in the Stony Brook Basin. Concentrations of dissolved Cl and Na in samples, and those estimated from continuous records of specific conductance (particularly during base flow), often were greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking-water guideline for Cl (250 mg/L), the chronic aquatic-life guideline for Cl (230 mg/L), and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs drinking-water guideline for Na (20 mg/L). Mean annual flow-weighted concentrations of Ca, Cl, and Na were generally positively correlated with the area of roadway land use in the subbasins. Correlations between mean annual concentrations of Ca and SO4 in base flow and total roadway, total impervious, and commercial-industrial land uses were statistically significant. Concentrations of TN (range of 0.42 to 5.13 mg/L in all subbasins) and TP (range of 0.006 to 0.80 mg/L in all subbasins) in tributary samples did not differ substantially between the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. Concentrations of TN and TP in samples collected during water years 2004–07 exceeded proposed reference concentrations of 0.57 and 0.024 mg/L, in 94 and 56 percent of the samples, respectively. Correlations between annual flow-weighted concentrations of TN and percentages of recreational land use and water-body area were statistically significant; however, no significant relation was found between TP and available land-use information. The volume of streamflow affected water-quality conditions at the primary sampling stations. Turbidity and concentrations of TP were positively correlated with streamflow. In contrast, concentrations of major ions were negatively correlated with streamflow, indicating that these constituents were diluted during stormflows. Concentrations of TN were not correlated with streamflow. Twenty-five pesticides and caffeine were detected in water samples collected in the drinking-water source area and in raw water collected from the Cambridge water-treatment facility intake at the Fresh Pond Reservoir. Imidacloprid, norflurazon, and siduron were the most frequently detected pesticides with the frequency of detections ranging from about 24 to 41 percent. Caffeine was detected in about 37 percent of water samples at concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 1.82 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Although some of the detected pesticides degrade rapidly, norflurazon and siduron are relatively stable and are able to immigrate though the serial reservoir system. Concentrations of 2,4-D, carbaryl, imazaquin, MCPA (2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid), metsulfuron-methyl, norflurazon, siduron, and caffeine were detected more frequently in stormflow samples than in base-flow samples. Concentrations of pesticides did not exceed USEPA drinking-water guidelines or other health standards and were several orders of magnitude less than the lethal exposure level established for several fish species common to the drinking-water source area. Imidacloprid, an insecticide, was the only pesticide with a concentration exceeding available long-term aquatic-life guidelines. Several pesticides correlated significantly with the amount of recreational, residential, and commercial area in the tributary subbasins. Mean annual base-flow concentrations of caffeine correlated significantly with parking-lot land use. For most tributaries, about 70 percent of the annual loads of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4 were associated with base flow. Upward temporal trends in annual loads of Cl and Na were identified on the basis of data for water years 1998 to 2008 for the outlet of the Cambridge Reservoir in the Hobbs Brook Basin; however, similar trends were not identified for the main stem of Stony Brook downstream from the reservoir. The proportions of the TN load attributed to base flow and stormflow were similar in each tributary. In contrast, more than 83 percent of the TP loads in the tributaries and about 73 percent of the TP load in main stem of Stony Brook were associated with stormflow. Mean annual yields of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4 in the Stony Brook Reservoir watershed, which represents most of the drinking-water source area, were 14, 85, 46, and 9 metric tons per square kilometer, respectively. Mean annual yields among the individual tributary subbasins varied extensively. Mean annual yields for the respective constituents increased with an increase in roadway and parking-lot area in the tributary subbasins. Mean annual yields of TN in the tributary subbasins ranged from about 740 to more than 1,200 kilograms per square kilometer and exceeded the yield for the main stem of Stony Brook at USGS station 01104460 upstream from the Stony Brook Reservoir. Mean annual yields estimated for the herbicides 2,4-D and imidacloprid ranged from 34 to 310 grams per square kilometer (g/km2) and 3 to 170 g/km2, respectively. Annual loads for 2,4-D were entirely associated with stormflow. The largest annual load for imidacloprid was estimated for the main stem of Stony Brook; however, the highest annual yield for this pesticide, as well as for benomyl, carbaryl, metalaxyl, and propiconazole, was estimated for a tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir that drains largely residential and recreational areas. Mean annual yields for the herbicide siduron ranged from 6.9 to 35 g/km2 with most of the loads associated with stormflow. Mean annual yields for the insecticide diuron ranged from 2.1 to 4.4 g/km2. Annual yields of caffeine ranged from 11 to 410 g/km2.

  9. Widener University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte; Allen, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1821, Widener University is a two-state (Pennsylvania and Delaware), four-campus, eight-college private institution serving approximately 6,700 students. Following arrival of the new senior vice president and provost in 2004 and subsequent reorganization of vice presidential responsibilities, Student Affairs is now led by a dean of…

  10. Universal Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobryn, Nancy M.

    Universal Studies, a study program designed to help students develop emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually, is described. Development of the personality and character of the individual is emphasized, as are innovation, creativity, individualized instruction, independent learning, and realizing human potential. These goals are characterized…

  11. University Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Martin

    This publication explores a diverse collection of new university buildings. Ranging from the design of vast new campuses, such as that by Wilford and Stirling at Temasek, Singapore, through to the relatively modest yet strategically important, such as the intervention by Allies and Morrison at Southampton, this book examines the new higher…

  12. Universities 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  13. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the

  14. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  15. Universal Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydeen, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines universal school design that is both user-friendly for all students and compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This approach provides the basic functional design issues for easy traffic control, as well as orientation and classrooms that are adaptable to future curricular changes. Discusses new standards that impact design

  16. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, Fernand; Sourbès-Verger, Isabelle; Ghirardi, Raymond; Pasco, With contributions by Xavier; Logsdon, Foreword by John M.; Lyle, Translated by Stephen; Reilly, Paul

    2003-08-01

    Foreword; Preface; List of figures; 1. The environment of outer space; 2. Orbits; 3. Ground tracks; 4. The occupation of space; 5. Launchers and launch sites; 6. Political and economic aspects; 7. Near-Earth science missions; 8. Exploration beyond geocentric orbit; 9. Earth observation; 10. Telecommunications; 11. Military applications; 12. Man in space; Bibliography; Internet sites; Index.

  17. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, O. Richard

    2002-03-01

    In recent years, meteorites have caught the imagination of scientist and collector alike. An army of people are now actively searching for them in the hot and cold deserts of Earth. Fascinating extraterrestrial rocks in meteorites are our only contact with materials from beyond the Earth-Moon system. Using well known petrologic techniques, O. Richard Norton reveals in vivid color their extraordinary external and internal structures and taking readers to the atomic level, describes the environment within the solar nebula that existed before the planets accreted. Extensively illustrated, this volume is a valuable guide to assist searchers in the field in recognizing the many classes of meteorites and it is a superb reference source for students, teachers and scientists who wish to probe deeper these amazing rocks from space. O. Richard Norton is a contributing editor for Meteorite magazine and the author of The Planetarium and Atmospherium and Rocks from Space (Mountain Press, 1998). For the last 40 years, he has taught astronomy and space sciences at various US institutions.

  18. Overview of the reanalysis of the Harvard Six Cities Study and American Cancer Society Study of Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Burnett, Richard T; Goldberg, Mark S; Hoover, B Kristin; Siemiatycki, Jack; Jerrett, Michael; Abrahamowicz, Michal; White, Warren H

    This article provides an overview of the Reanalysis Study of the Harvard Six Cities and the American Cancer Society (ACS) studies of particulate air pollution and mortality. The previous findings of the studies have been subject to debate. In response, a reanalysis team, comprised of Canadian and American researchers, was invited to participate in an independent reanalysis project to address the concerns. Phase I of the reanalysis involved the design of data audits to determine whether each study conformed to the consistency and accuracy of their data. Phase II of the reanalysis involved conducting a series of comprehensive analyses using alternative statistical methods. Alternative models were also used to identify covariates that may confound or modify the association of particulate air pollution as well as identify sensitive population subgroups. The audit demonstrated that the data in the original analyses were of high quality, as were the risk estimates reported by the original investigators. The sensitivity analysis illustrated that the mortality risk estimates reported in both studies were found to be robust against alternative Cox models. Detailed investigation of the covariate effects found a significant modifying effect of education and a relative risk of mortality associated with fine particles and declining education levels. The study team applied spatial analytic methods to the ACS data, resulting in various levels of spatial autocorrelations supporting the reported association for fine particles mortality of the original investigators as well as demonstrating a significant association between sulfur dioxide and mortality. Collectively, our reanalysis suggest that mortality may be attributable to more than one component of the complex mixture of ambient air pollutants for U.S. urban areas. PMID:12959828

  19. Combined proton and photon irradiation for craniopharyngioma: Long-term results of the early cohort of patients treated at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, Markus M.; Linggood, Rita M.; Adams, Judy; Munzenrider, John E. . E-mail: jmunzenrider@partners.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: We report the results of the early cohort of patients treated for craniopharyngioma with combined proton-photon irradiation at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1988, 15 patients with craniopharyngioma were treated in part or entirely with fractionated 160 MeV proton beam therapy. The group consisted of 5 children (median age, 15.9 years) and 10 adults (median age, 36.2 years). Median dose prescribed to the tumor was 56.9 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; 1 proton Gray = 1.1 CGE). The median proton component was 26.9 CGE. Patients were treated after documented recurrence after initial surgery (n = 6) or after subtotal resection or biopsy (n = 9). None had had prior radiation therapy. Results: Median observation period of surviving patients (n = 11) was 13.1 years from radiotherapy. One patient was lost to follow-up with tumor control after 5.2 years. Actuarial 10-year survival rate was 72%. Four patients have died 5-9.1 years after treatment, two from local failure. Actuarial 5- and 10-year local control rates were 93% and 85%, respectively. The functional status of the living adult patients is unaltered from their preradiotherapy status; all of them continued leading normal or near normal working lives. None of the patients treated as a child had experienced recurrence of tumor. One child shows learning difficulties and slight retardation, comparable to his preradiotherapy status. The others have professional achievements within the normal range. Conclusion: Results in terms of survival and local control are comparable with other contemporary series. Although no formal neuropsychological testing was performed, the surrogate measures of lifestyle and professional accomplishments appear to be satisfactory.

  20. Holographic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Sunil

    2012-03-01

    Theory of relativity prohibits faster-than-light communication; we assume information must be transmitted from the sender to the receiver for it to be communicated; however, experimental evidences presented in this paper show waves, be it electromagnetic waves or sound waves, do not carry and communicate information. Information can be communicated instantly without violating of law of causality. Law of causality only suggests that every effect has a cause; it does not suggest cause must precede the effect. This paradigm-shifting paper fully backed up by overwhelming experimental evidences and observations directly from nature shows universe is a hologram and information becomes available across the universe as soon as it is produced.