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1

Harvard University: Environmental Chemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Chemistry group at Harvard University created this website to promote its research in the understanding and quantification of chemistry of surfaces in environmental chemical systems. Users can learn about the group's many projects that deal with the shared topic: "What controls the formation and reactivity of a surface?" Researchers can find out about the group's seminars held at Harvard and can download many of the related publications. The website publicizes the efforts and backgrounds of the eleven people involved with environmental chemistry. Students and educators can view short, fascinating movies dealing with its results.

2

Harvard University: Ecology WWW Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by Harvard University, this extensive list of hyperlinked, ecology-related resources and organizations was compiled by Anthony R. Brach (of the Harvard University Herbaria and Missouri Botanical Garden) for use by researchers, teachers, and students. Visitors can locate a wide variety of websites by browsing a 14-part alphabetical list, or by using a keyword search engine. Examples from the list include the Atlantic Cooperative Wildlife Ecology Research Network, the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University, Kansas State University Range Research, the Organization of Biological Field Stations, the U.S. National Agricultural Library, the Orthopterists' Society, and many more. The Ecology WWW Page has mirror sites in Canada, and at the University of Lyon, in France.

3

Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

2012-01-01

4

Cambridge University: Digital Image Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over the course of the past eight centuries, Cambridge University has come into the possession of more than a few important documents. Their online digital image collection may be seen as an important first stop for anyone interested in perusing some of these remarkable materials. These documents include The Portsmouth and Macclesfield Collection, which contains the writings and ideas of Sir Isaac Newton, and the sketchbooks of Conrad Martens, who accompanied Charles Darwin on board the Beagle. That is far from all, however, as visitors can also browse the pages of the 13th century illuminated volume, "The Life of King Edward the Confessor". All in all, it is a lovely collection and one that scholars with any interest in English history will want to examine and recommend to their colleagues and students.

5

Harvard University: Harvard@Home Videos of Lectures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Harvard@Home website lets visitors download video footage from research, teaching, and public addresses at Harvard (for more see Scout Report Dec 5, 2003). This 45-minute video features Professors Benedict H. Gross and William A. Stein taking "a modern approach to the ancient mathematical problem of solving cubic equations." A glossary of terms, slide images and audience Q&A are also included.

6

HarvardScience: Science and Engineering at Harvard University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Harvard's Science and Engineering Department website has much to offer, and even non-science and engineering folks will find a great deal to enjoy here. Articles such as "Using nanotechnology to improve a cancer treatment" and "New treatment extends life of melanoma patients by an average of four months in large clinical trial" can be read in full by clicking on the "full story" link at the end of each article's description on the homepage. A section called "In the Field" contains reports of Harvard students and professors working off campus. One of the more recent articles is entitled "I thought a bomb went off", and it is about a Harvard Medical School assistant professor who was in Haiti when the devastating January earthquake struck. Click on the photo next to the full story to see a makeshift clinic for 45,000 people. The doctor relays her feeling of helplessness when she was without supplies, without trained help, and the sheer number of injured. She resorted to using first aid kits from cars and cleverly used license plates she ripped off of cars to use as splints.

7

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University: Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University provides this in-depth Web site featuring plants found at the Arboretum and related information. Visitors to this site will find sections featuring selected plants at the Arboretum, collections management, on-site projects, a plant-information hotline, and a detailed table listing bloom times for dozens of plants; guidelines for adjusting dates for localities beyond New England are provided. The Featured Plants section, for example, includes a look at 18 of the Arboretum's 600+ trees and shrubs over 100 years old and a detailed introduction to the art of bonsai. Plant lovers anywhere should enjoy this interesting and nicely presented Web site.

2003-01-01

8

Harvard University Iranian Oral History Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the Harvard University Center for Middle Eastern Studies, this site offers a selection of transcripts from the project's collection of interviews with 134 people "who either played major roles in important political events and decisions [in Iran] from the 1920s to the 1970s or witnessed these events from close range." At the site, visitors will find detailed information about the project, a list of interview subjects, a list of publications, information on accessing the full collection at libraries around the world, and the collection of online excerpts. At present, there are transcripts from interviews with sixteen individuals, two of which can only be viewed in Persian.

9

University of Cambridge: Science Festival  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Science Festival aims to provide the public with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of scientific interest and concern and to raise aspirations by encouraging young people to consider a career in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.Each year, the Festival welcomes over 30,000 visitors to over 250 events and receives extensive national and local media coverage. Over 170 event coordinators organise talks, interactive demonstrations, hands-on activities, film showings and debates with the assistance of around 1,000 staff and students from departments and organisations across the University and research institutions, charities and industry in the eastern region. In addition, over 150 people volunteer their time to act as stewards to ensure visitors have a safe and enjoyable Festival experience.

10

The New Classified Research. Corporate Sponsored Biomedical Research and the Reign of Secrecy at Harvard University. A Harvard Watch Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvard Watch asserts that withholding essential information from public scrutiny is not uncommon at Harvard University. Maintaining that Harvard has reversed its position from extolling the virtues of public disclosure to one of imposing secrecy, the document suggests that this about face is linked to the university's recent collaboration with…

Bourke, Jaron

11

76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University has...remains may contact the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard...

2011-10-11

12

HHMI/Harvard University Biological Sciences Multimedia Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from Harvard University contains a series of multimedia "edu-mentaries"⢠that cover microarray technology, DNA sequencing, protein analysis, Northern and Southern blotting, and antibodies.

Robert A. Lue (Harvard University;Molecular and Cellular Biology); Alain Viel (Harvard University;Research Biologist); Leigh Stimolo (Harvard University;Media Producer)

2010-05-28

13

University of Cambridge : Mathematics Enrichment (nrich)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

University of Cambridge offers this website, Mathematics Enrichment (nrich), with problems, games and articles on mathematics for students ages 5 to 19. The problems are organized by Tiers (1 to 3) and follow the UK education system, but a guide for international educators is given in the Help section. Each problem includes a question, related resources, pictures or diagrams, a form for students to submit their solution, hints for students having difficulty, and notes for parents and teachers. The website is updated monthly and offers a weekly problem. This months theme is the mathematics of making journeys, with the path of the Olympic Torch as an intriguing lead-in to the topic. Registered users can pose questions and post messages in the discussion forum, both of which are also viewable by non-registered viewers. Registration is simple and does not cost anything.

2007-12-12

14

University of Cambridge: Mathematics Enrichment (nrich)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

University of Cambridge offers this website, Mathematics Enrichment (nrich), with problems, games and articles on mathematics for students ages 5 to 19. The problems are organized by Tiers (1 to 3) and follow the UK education system, but a guide for international educators is given in the Help section. Each problem includes a question, related resources, pictures or diagrams, a form for students to submit their solution, hints for students having difficulty, and notes for parents and teachers. The website is updated monthly and offers a weekly problem. This months' theme is "the mathematics of making journeys," with the path of the Olympic Torch as an intriguing lead-in to the topic. Registered users can pose questions and post messages in the discussion forum, both of which are also viewable by non-registered viewers. Registration is simple and does not cost anything.

15

Center for International Development at Harvard University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Established in 1998 by the Harvard Institute for International Development and the Kennedy School of Government, the Center for International Development (CID) is Harvard's primary center for research on sustainable international development. The CID is currently headed by Professor Dani Rodrik, who provides oversight and direction for the Center. On the site, visitors can learn about upcoming international development conferences sponsored by the Center, read about the various persons working at the Center, learn about various research programs, along with reading various reports associated with each area of inquiry. The site also contains a host of links to online research data sets for persons working in the field of international development, and to the Center's working papers and special reports. Some of the more compelling working papers address the situation of sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa and the rise and fall of the Indonesian economy.

16

Still a Bad Idea. A Critique of Harvard University's Medical Science Partners Proposal. A Harvard Watch Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1988, Harvard University unveiled plans for Medical Science Partners (MSP), a venture capital fund intended to invest in and commercialize faculty biomedical projects. Critical of what is perceived as a "15 year long trend" wherein Harvard has "forged deeper and more extensive ties with the biomedical industry," the document asserts that MSP…

Weissman, Robert; Bourke, Jaron

17

77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that...

2012-08-02

18

75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined...

2010-09-24

19

75 FR 28648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology professional staff...

2010-05-21

20

Harvard University and the Emergence of International Collegiate Athletics, 1869-1874.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The influence that Harvard University has had on the development of international collegiate sports is explored. Rowing and football were the first athletic activities to be played by Harvard with colleges in other countries. (DF)

Lipping, Alar

1984-01-01

21

Harvard University -- Harvard@Home: Professor Edward O. Wilson, On the Relation of Science and the Humanities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by Harvard@Home, and part of Harvard University's Science Center Research Lecture Series, this website presents an hour-long lecture by the prominent entomologist, Professor E.O. Wilson. In his intriguing lecture titled, On the Relation of Science and the Humanities, Professor Wilson discusses the link between genetic evolution and cultural evolution. In addition to the lecture, the site provides a glossary, background information, and a brief biography of Dr. Wilson. Note: Although the video footage is a bit choppy, the audio transmission is clear and relays the lecture content nicely.

22

SPOKEN DOCUMENT RETRIEVAL FOR TREC9 AT CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY - DRAFT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents work done at Cambridge University for the TREC-9 Spoken Document Retrieval (SDR) track. The CU- HTK transcriptions from TREC-8 with Word Error Rate (WER) of 20.5% were used in conjunction with stopping, Porter stem- ming, Okapi-style weighting and query expansion using a con- temporaneous corpus of newswire. A windowing\\/recombination strategy was applied for the case where story

S. E. Johnson; P. Jourlin; K. Sp; P. C. Woodland

1998-01-01

23

Harvard University: Museum of Comparative Zoology Type Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located at Harvard University, the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) "insect type collection, one of the largest in North America, currently preserves the primary types of more than 28,000 species, representing 29 orders, 565 families, and 7, 578 genera." This database makes records from the MCZ insect type collection available to Internet users. Records include high resolution images, Type Label Data, Type Stage and Status, and, when available, Current Species Name. Site visitors can browse the enormous list of records, or use the search engine which has fields for Order, Name, Type Designation, Region and Label Data, and more. In addition, visitors can peruse smaller groupings of recently added and all-time-favorite type specimen images. This site also links to other Database Collections including the MCZ Amphibian, Reptile, and Fish Collections, as well as Orthoptera Species File Online, and New Zealand Hemiptera.

24

University of Cambridge Department Of Materials Science and Metallurgy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Cambridge Department Of Materials Science and Metallurgy page offers information on current research ranging from the creation of new materials to improving existing materials. Considered "one of the leading materials science departments in the world," the department's research page points to more detailed pages outlining the work of seventeen groups. Research within the groups includes atomistic simulation, composites and coatings, device materials, high temperature stability of materials, materials chemistry, and the like. A special search feature allows users to easily locate information on research in progress by investigator, research topic, and supporting agency. Also available online are grant reports from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

25

Success in the US: Are Cambridge International Assessments Good Preparation for University Study?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the research being conducted by University of Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate for continued studies in colleges and universities. The primary purpose of the research is to highlight…

Shaw, Stuart; Bailey, Clare

2011-01-01

26

Harvard University High Energy Physics. [Annual report, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect

The mainly experimental research program in high energy physics at Harvard is summarized in a descriptive fashion according to the following outline: Proton{endash}antiproton colliding beam program at Fermilab -- CDF (forward/backward electromagnetic calorimeters -- FEM, central muon extension -- CMX, gas calorimetry and electronics development, front-end electronics upgrades, software development, physics analysis, timetable), electron -- positron collisions in the upsilon region -- CLEO (the hardware projects including CLEO II barrel TOF system and silicon drift detector R&D, physics analysis), search for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations with the NOMAD experiment at CERN, the solenoidal detector collaboration at the SSC, muon scattering at FNAL -- E665, the L3 experiment, and phenomenological analysis of high-energy {bar p}p cross sections. 149 refs.

Not Available

1993-11-01

27

The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although Radcliff, the women's college affiliated with Harvard for over a century, ceased to formally exist in 1999, it became the highly regarded Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Headed by the noted historian Drew Gilpin Faust, the mission of the Institute is "to create an academic community where individuals can pursue advanced work in academic disciplines, professions, or creative arts." At the institute's homepage, visitors can learn about the fellowship opportunities available at Radcliffe, along with reading about various research programs and upcoming events, such as lectures and conferences. Perhaps one of the best features of the site are the various archived audio and video recordings of speeches and conferences that have taken place at Radcliffe in recent years. For example, visitors can view the proceedings of a recent national conference on lethal school violence or watch and listen to the novelist Zadie Smith speak on "the morality of the novel."

28

Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Practical ethics are the focus of this appealing website from Harvard's Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics. Practical ethics courses were rare when the Center opened its doors 30 years ago, but the founders wisely felt the need to focus on it. Those visitors who are unfamiliar with practical ethics should start by clicking on "Center" found on the top right side of the homepage. From there, visitors can click on "What is Practical Ethics". After this introduction to the field, visitors should skip down to the "News & Events" link, also on the right side of the page, and then go to the "Lectures & Events" category. A thorough summary of each lecture from the Center's free public lecture series, is accessible by clicking on "More", at the bottom of each lecture description. Visitors interested in searching the lectures from earlier years can click on "Past Lectures & Events" located below the "Lectures & Events" category. The "Research & Publications" link has "Working Papers", "Publications", and "Reports" to view, along with the "Prandial Philosophy Post", a brief argument raised during one of the center's lunch seminars or at one of their public lectures.

29

Buckling of structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., June 17-21, 1974  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The papers deal with such topics as the buckling and post-buckling behavior of plates and shells; methods of calculating critical buckling and collapse loads; finite element representations for thin-shell instability analysis; theory and experiment in the creep buckling of plates and shells; creep instability of thick shell structures; analytical and numerical studies of the influence of initial imperfections on the elastic buckling of columns; mode interaction in stiffened panels under compression; imperfection-sensitivity in the interactive buckling of stiffened plates; buckling of stochastically imperfect structures; and the Liapunov stability of elastic dynamic systems. A special chapter is devoted to design problems, including the design of a Mars entry 'aeroshell', and buckling design in vehicle structures. Individual items are announced in this issue.

Budiansky, B.

1976-01-01

30

University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy Image Gallery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This gallery presents scientific images produced by members of the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy at Cambridge University. The colorful images are drawn from electron microscopy, applied superconductivity, device materials, and microstructural kinetics. More information about the images and the groups conducting the research are provided.

2007-05-21

31

Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

2012-01-01

32

Harvard Days.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Excerpted from the second volume of his three-part autobiography, this essay describes B. F. Skinner's first year as a graduate student at Harvard University. Although he focuses on his study of psychology, particularly behaviorism, Skinner also discusses his interest in physiology. (JMD)

Skinner, B. F.

1979-01-01

33

The Beginning of "Free Money" Ideology in American Universities: Charles W. Eliot at Harvard, 1869-1909  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rather than banking enormous gifts, Harvard University built its wealth by adhering to a coherent strategy that gradually became the common sense--the prevailing ideology--of how to build and maintain the wealth of private universities. President Charles W. Eliot formulated this "free money" strategy over the course of his administration from 1869…

Kimball, Bruce A.; Johnson, Benjamin Ashby

2012-01-01

34

Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge  

PubMed Central

Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education.

Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

2014-01-01

35

COMMERCIALIZING A DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY BASED UPON UNIVERSITY IP THROUGH OPEN INNOVATION: A CASE STUDY OF CAMBRIDGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the use of a university spin-out firm to bring a potentially disruptive technology to market. The focus for discussion is how a spin-out can build a technology ecosystem of providers of complementary resources to enable partner organizations to build competence in a novel and potentially disruptive technology. The paper uses the illustrative case of Cambridge Display Technology

TIM MINSHALL; STUART SELDON; DAVID PROBERT

2007-01-01

36

Degrees of Influence: The Politics of Honorary Degrees in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, 1900-2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The universities of Oxford and Cambridge had developed different attitudes towards the award of honorary degrees through the early and middle decades of the twentieth century. Recently, both have adopted a similar cautious and apolitical stance. This essay describes the role of honorary degrees in the production and reproduction of their cultural…

Heffernan, Michael; Jons, Heike

2007-01-01

37

City of Cambridge: CityViewer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is the best way to experience the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts? You could read a history of Harvard University, take a walking tour, or perhaps browse a topical website. But why not look at the Cambridge CityViewer for edification? This unique tool "allows the public to view, query, mark up, and print custom maps using only a web browser." Notedly, the viewer works best with Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox. Visitors can check out ten different topical overlays, including those dealing with city parks, construction projects, land parcels, sewers, zoning, and traffic. There are many ways to get started, such as performing a simple search, an advanced search, or even just by typing in a street name and number. For anyone with an interest in urban history, planning, and land use, this site is a rare treat.

38

Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

Dryer, M. (editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

1980-01-01

39

Joint Services Electronics Program: Annual Progress Report Number 103, 1 October 1988 - 31 July 1989 (Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Electronic Theory of Semiconductor Alloys and Superlattices. Pressure Dependence of Photo luminescence Excitation in GaAs/A1(x)Ga(1-x)As Multi-Quantum Wells.; X-Ray Surface Characterization; High Temperature Superconductivity; Quantum and chargi...

M. Tinkham

1989-01-01

40

The Global Reproductive Health Forum (GRHF): Health, Rights, and Gender at Harvard University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Global Reproductive Health Forum @ Harvard (GRHF), a Website maintained by the Harvard School of Public Health, promotes the discussion of gender, reproductive rights, and sexual health, as well as distributing diverse educational information about these issues. The GRHF contains nine topic sections; each section provides an organized compilation of briefly annotated Internet resources, including mailing lists, Websites, and electronic publications. Sections cover issues such as Gender, Biology, and Technology; Reproductive Rights; Population and Family Planning; and Maternal Health. The GRHF also hosts an interactive bulletin board, allowing visitors to post and respond to messages relevant to reproductive health. The entire site is searchable. A Spanish version of the GRHF is available, and a French version is under construction.

1998-01-01

41

"He sees the development of children's concepts upon a background of sociology": Jean Piaget's honorary degree at Harvard University in 1936.  

PubMed

In the recent memory, Jean Piaget has been known as a cognitive developmental psychologist. But in 1936 when Harvard gave him his first honorary degree, he was recognized mainly as a sociologist. Why did Harvard honor him in 1936? Who knew his work well enough to nominate him? This article will address these questions by exploring archival documents from different sources. Evidence draws our attention to a broad social and intellectual endeavor in philanthropy, other social sciences, and especially industrial research that brought Piaget across the water. This article also attempts to interpret the circumstances of the nomination process inside and outside of Harvard University by using a theory of institutional design. It suggests that embodied in Harvard's honor of Piaget in 1936 was an idealistic act in social designing for a future society. PMID:15022668

Hsueh, Yeh

2004-02-01

42

Harvard Observing Project (HOP): Undergraduate and graduate observing opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Harvard Observing Project (HOP) engages undergraduate students in observational astronomy and gives graduate students extra teaching experience beyond their required teaching fellowships. This project offers students opportunities to see if they are interested in astronomy, introduces them to scientific research, and provides an opportunity for them to interact with graduate students in an informal setting. Observations are made using the 16” Clay Telescope atop the Science Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. We have observed as part of the Pro-Am White dwarf Monitoring (PAWM) and Target Asteroids! projects, and most recently we have been monitoring SN2014J in the Messier 82 galaxy (see poster by M. McIntosh).

Bieryla, Allyson; Newton, Elisabeth R.

2014-06-01

43

Research consortium led by scientists at the University of Oxford and Harvard Medical School creates the world’s most advanced genetic map:  

Cancer.gov

A consortium led by scientists at the University of Oxford and Harvard Medical School has constructed the world’s most detailed genetic map. A genetic map specifies the precise areas in the genetic material of a sperm or egg where the DNA from the mother and father has been reshuffled in order to produce this single reproductive cell.

44

Implementation of the Harvard Case Method through a Plan-Do-Check-Act Framework in a University Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2005, the Harvard Business School began to promote the Harvard case method (HCM) within the Asian region. Because of differences in classroom culture between Asian and Western countries, Asian participants' reaction to the HCM implementation is of interest. This study explores how the western initiated method was implemented in one of the Asian…

Shieh, Ruey S.; Lyu, Jr Jung; Cheng, Yun-Yao

2012-01-01

45

Cambridge Cosmology: Relic Radiation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic background radiation present in our Universe. Also covered are topics such as the present temperature of the Universe as taken by the COBE satellite, fluctuations seen at the 'edge' of the Universe, and possible causes of these fluctuations.

Shellard, Paul

46

Harvard Public Health Review  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Harvard University's School of Public Health has a number of online outreach websites that address such topics as alcohol use among college students and HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment in the developing world. These topics and many others are covered in detail in the Harvard Public Health Review, which is available on this site. One of the more recent issues addressed public health concerns in China and India such as HIV/AIDS and these two countries' respective national health care systems. Currently, visitors have access to issues that date back to Fall 1998. Another feature of the site allows users to sign up to receive the latest edition of the Review via email.

47

Harvard@home  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While not everyone can afford to attend Harvard University, the Harvard@home site allows people around the world to listen and watch to a number of special lectures, talks, and public addresses that take place at this august institution. Established in March 2001, the programs range in time from 45 minutes to 3 hours, and address a broad range of topics, including the humanities, current affairs, college life, and the natural sciences. Some of the more notable programs include an hour long lecture by Professor Edward O. Wilson on the relation of science and the humanities, a three-hour program on the state of the global environment,a 50-minute talk by Professor Diana Eck on Shiva, and finally, a talk on the legacy and genius of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

48

Byron Emerson Wall - John Venn, James Ward, and the Chair of Mental Philosophy and Logic at the University of Cambridge - Journal of the History of Ideas 68:1  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1897, Cambridge University created a professorship in Mental Philosophy and Logic; despite the double name it was filled by a “mental philosopher,” James Ward, who did no work in logic. The chief logician candidate, John Venn, then turned his attention elsewhere, leaving Cambridge without senior leadership in logic. Ward himself turned to other philosophical issues, doing little further original

Byron E. Wall

2007-01-01

49

Harvard: Systems Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features Systems Research at Harvard University. Projects described on this website focus on distributed computing, sensor networks, file systems, and systems integration. Researchers from the System Group also develop educational resources, including a platform for teaching an Introduction to Computer Sciences course and an instructional operating system. The researchers provide overviews of their projects and related publications are available to download. Past projects include a project that explored methodologies for application-specific benchmarking and a project that proposed a framework for developing Web applications with client-side storage.

50

Scholars, Inc.: Harvard Academics in Service of Industry and Government. [A Harvard Watch Report].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The interaction of Harvard University scholars with outside institutions is examined, as is the need for the university to monitor and regulate these outside activities. Harvard scholars were found to maintain 38 directorships with Fortune 500 companies, 60 ties to the biotechnology industry, over 500 contacts between faculty at the Business…

Weissman, Robert

51

Harvard Map Collection: Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Not surprisingly, Harvard University has one of the largest map collections in the United States, with over 500,000 items. While not all of these items have been digitized for this site, visitors can take advantage of hundreds of the items here. First-time visitors should read the "Introduction" area and then browse through some of the map indexes. The site also includes technical information on the collection, and a selection of "Search Strategies". Some of the maps here document 17th century London, maps of the Revolutionary War, and towns in Massachusetts. The detailed search engine allows users to search by collection, keyword, and those records that have digital objects. Finally, the site also includes links to the Harvard Geospatial Library and the Harvard College Library.

52

Harvard Life Sciences/HHMI Outreach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains animations and other resources for several life science topics explored at summer or fall workshops for high school teachers at Harvard UniversityâÂÂs Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Robert A. Lue (Harvard University;); Tara Bennett (Harvard University;); Susan Johnson (Harvard University;)

2010-05-28

53

Revision Planned for the Cambridge Latin Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes a discussion on the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) held during the 1980 ACL Institute at the University of New Hampshire by CLC users and Cambridge University Press representatives. Emphasizes suggestions by users on grammar instruction strategies better suited to American students' needs. (MES)

Sebesta, Judith Lynn

1980-01-01

54

HE SEES THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN’S CONCEPTS UPON A BACKGROUND OF SOCIOLOGY: Jean Piaget’s Honorary Degree at Harvard University in 1936  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the recent memory, Jean Piaget has been known as a cognitive developmental psychologist. But in 1936 when Harvard gave him his first honorary degree, he was recognized mainly as a sociologist. Why did Harvard honor him in 1936? Who knew his work well enough to nominate him? This article will address these questions by exploring archival documents from different

Yeh Hsueh

2004-01-01

55

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138  

Microsoft Academic Search

During Voyager l's encounter with Jupiter, two images were obtained on small portions of Jupiter's dark side. These were recorded through the narrow angle camera without a filter, partly to search for fireballs. The corresponding images during Voyager 2 were taken with filters at considerably longer range so that they need not be considered as part of the search, especially

T. C. DUXBURY

1981-01-01

56

Celebrations and Tough Questions Follow Harvard's Move to Open Access  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In light of a decision by members of Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences to make access to their scholarly papers free, advocates of open access celebrated, but some publishers expressed concern. Members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to provide the university with copies of their published articles and…

Guterman, Lila

2008-01-01

57

Harvard M.B.A.: A Golden Passport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite increasing competition from Stanford University in California and a number of other graduate business schools, an M.B.A. degree from Harvard is still regarded as the great golden passport to life in the upper class. Discusses the salary and business advantages in having a Harvard M.B.A. and the attitudes of three graduates on what the…

Knight, Michael

1978-01-01

58

Harvard and Money; A Memorandum on Issues and Choices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses some of the financial issues and choices with which Harvard University will have to cope in an environment of increased stringency: issues of money-allocation, money raising, and money management. Part I presents highlights of Harvard's recent financial history and its prospects in quantitative terms. Part II presents some…

Harvard Univ., Cambridge , MA. Univ. Committee on Governance.

59

Harvard Education Letter, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the 6 issues in volume 18 of the Harvard Education Letter, a bimonthly newsletter addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January/February--"Curriculum Access in the Digital Age" (David T. Gordon) and "Using Charters To Improve Urban Schools"…

Gordon, David T., Editor

2002-01-01

60

Harvard Education Letter, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the six issues in volume 16 of the Harvard Education Letter, a bimonthly newsletter addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Grade Inflation: What's Really behind All Those A's?" (Birk) and "Every Friday was Fight Day"…

Gordon, David T., Ed.

2000-01-01

61

Harvard and the Academic Glass Ceiling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drew Gilpin Faust was recently appointed president of Harvard University, and is the first female to hold the position. Women now lead half of the eight institutions that make up the Ivy League. But focusing on highly accomplished women such as Faust misses a larger point. Women may be taking faculty positions in record numbers, but most of those…

Drago, Robert

2007-01-01

62

Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Third Annual Report of the Executive Director, July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report of the third year of Harvard's Program on Technology and Society contains summaries of research done on the relationship of technology to education, biomedical science, business, and social and political change in general. The research group on education, concentrating on secondary education, concluded that high schools in ten years are…

Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Program on Technology and Society.

63

Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1974, the Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID) is an interdisciplinary center at Harvard University whose mission is to assist the economic growth of developing nations. Publications on-site include an extensive compilation of Development Discussion Papers (1974-present) with selected full text on agricultural and food policy, education, taxation, economic reform, and environmental issues (1995-present), as well as research stemming from the Consulting Assistance on Economic Reform project (CAER) and International Tax Program. Recent HIID book reviews are also available, and interested parties may examine compilations on the East Asian Financial Crisis and the External Debt Problem in Central America at the Research page.

Development., Harvard I.

1998-01-01

64

Cambridge Desegregation Succeeding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes the desegration plan of Cambridge, Massachusetts, as an example of a successful attempt at accomodating "freedom of choice" while at the same time meeting existing state and federal desegregation standards. Argues that the Cambridge plan has transfer value for other school systems. (KH)

Alves, Michael J.

1983-01-01

65

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 6, November-December 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Is History... History?: Standards, Accountability, and the Future of Our Nation's Past (Robert Rothman); (2) Curriculum Access for All: How Teachers Can Use Universal Design…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2005-01-01

66

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 6, November-December 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) When Worlds Collide: Universal PreK Brings New Challenges for Public Elementary Schools (David McKay Wilson); (2) Answers and Questions: Schools Survey Their Students--and…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2008-01-01

67

UNC and Harvard researchers discover new mechanism for cancer progression  

Cancer.gov

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and Harvard researchers have discovered an alternative mechanism for activating Ras that does not require mutation or hormonal stimulus. In healthy cells, Ras transmits hormone signals into the cell that prompt responses such as cell growth and the development of organs and tissues. A mutation on the RAS gene can chronically activate those signals, leading to tumor initiation and progression. Harvard University is home to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

68

Harvard Iranian Oral History Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Oral histories can be quite fascinating, and a number of significant collections have been placed online as of late. One of the best-known projects might be Harvard University's own Iranian Oral History Project (IOHP). The collection consists of the personal accounts of over 150 individuals who were eyewitnesses (or active participants) to a range of crucial political events in Iran from the 1920s to the 1980s. Visitors can start their journey through this site by going to the "About" section, where they can learn about the history of the IHOP and the interviewing process. After that, visitors can go the actual "Transcripts" area, where they can view an index of interviews, and in certain cases, they can listen to audio recordings of these conversations.

69

Exceptional Portable Sundials at Harvard  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard University has the largest assemblage of sundials in North America. The dials date from the 16th to the 19th centuries, and most are designed to be carried in one’s pocket or put on a window sill. They take advantage of the sun’s changing altitude, azimuth, hour angle, or a combination of the foregoing in order to find the time. Many are also usable at a wide range of latitudes, and therefore are suitable tools for travelers. Fashioned of wood, paper, ivory, brass, and silver, the sundials combine mathematical projections of the sun’s apparent motion with artistry, fashion, and exquisite craftsmanship. This paper will explore the wide variety of sundials and what they tell us about the people who made and used them.

Schechner, Sara

2014-06-01

70

CambridgeSoft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CambridgeSoft provides a variety for software for chemical structure drawing and visualization, including the popular ChemDraw and Chem3D programs. Chem3D Ultra includes computational chemistry capability.

71

BakerBooks: Harvard Business School Baker Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Baker Library at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Adminstration in 1999 released this replacement to the print publication Baker Library Recent Additions. The BakerBook section New Books at Baker Library features a monthly listing of new acquisitions by subject (September 1998-present) and New Books from HBS Press offers the latest titles from the Harvard Business School Press. The Faculty Books in Print section, an in-depth bibliography, is a "continuously updated" list of in-print books published by Harvard Business School faculty. Edited books containing articles or chapters by HBS faculty are also included for additional access to current research (1990-present).

1999-01-01

72

Cambridge Public Libraries: Directories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cambridge Room at the Cambridge Public Library has a vast storehouse of material related to the history of this most historic American city. Recently, they have allowed the staff at the Internet Archive access to a variety of materials, resulting in a number of primary documents that now reside on this site. Here, users can access the annual Cambridge business directories which profile local business leaders, institutions, organizations, and much more. These very substantial volumes contain advertisements, address directories, and other pieces of information that document the ebbs and flows of the business community throughout the area. The dates range from 1884 to 1931 and users can search through each volume for key words, addresses, names, and dates.

73

Harvard Law School Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1946 by 30 law students returned from the war, the Harvard Law School Forum has remained a nonprofit, student-run organization that sponsors a variety of speakers and panel discussions featuring political, literary, and cultural luminaries from around the world. Over the years, many of these discussions have been broadcast on the radio or otherwise recorded and are now available online in their entirety. Past programs currently offered in RealPlayer format include, to name just a few, Henry Kissinger, Timothy Leary, Jimmy Hoffa, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Shimon Peres, Carl Sagan, F. Lee Bailey, Mario Cuomo, Ralph Nader, Helen Thomas, Charlton Heston, and Vince McMahon. The site also features a guide to past programs (sorted by decade and some with photos or associated press clippings), a photo gallery, and information on upcoming speakers. The site is an ongoing project, and additional recordings and other materials will be added as they are prepared or become available.

74

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) combines the resources and research facilities of the Harvard College Observatory and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to pursue studies of those basic physical processes that determine the nature and evolution of the university. The site provides information on the organization's research activities, grouped into six topic areas: the solar system; stars, planets, and origins; galaxies; cosmology; laboratory astrophysics; and extreme astrophysics. The education and outreach page includes links to professional development materials, curriculum materials, and information on informal education programs and education research projects. Other materials include an image gallery, an almanac on the current night sky, and information on four strategic science themes selected by CfA for concentration of expertise and investments: cosmology, galaxies, stars and planets, and extreme astrophysics.

75

Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1964, the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies maintains a strong link to the Harvard School of Public Health along with other policy institutes at the university. On their homepage, visitors can read their latest press releases, learn about the activities of their associates, and various fellowship opportunities. Along with these general areas, the web-browsing public may be more interested in taking a look at the âÂÂPublicationsâ area of the site. Here they will find the latest edition of their in-house newsletter, the Bow Street Bulletin, along with several online books (such as âÂÂPublic-Private Partnerships for Public HealthâÂÂ) and their working papers series, which includes works dating back to 1991. The site is rounded out by a selection of links that will lead visitors to related online resources such as separate websites on road traffic injuries and reproductive health rights.

2002-01-01

76

Cambridge Dictionary of Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Held up by the heliopause? Floored by the flatness problem? Intimidated by MACHOs? With the Cambridge Astronomy Dictionary you'll no longer be defeated by such astronomical jargon! These and 3,200 additional words, names, and abbreviations used in amateur and professional astronomy, are clearly and concisely defined. Entries include information from modern and classical astronomy, including: -- A comprehensive selection of

Jacqueline Mitton

2001-01-01

77

Cambridge Desegregation Succeeding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides an overview of the controversy concerning "freedom of choice" desegregation plans and presents a case study of the plan adopted by Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1981. Following the introduction, a short explanation of the plan's distinctive feature, controlled open enrollment, is given. (Under controlled open enrollment, no…

Alves, Michael

1983-01-01

78

Cambridge Cosmology: Cosmic Strings and Other Defects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology discusses cosmic strings and other defects in our Universe. It begins with phase transitions in the early Universe, and how cosmic strings and other defects formed early on. Cosmic string evolution and dynamics are discussed while looking at high-resolution numerical cosmic string simulations. Also covered are possible explanations for the origin of large-scale structures (such as galaxies) and texture models of these structures.

Shellard, Paul; Martins, Carlos; Sornborger, Andrew

79

Cambridge Cosmology: Quantum Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explains the concepts of quantum gravity and quantum cosmology, and how they are useful in understanding space and the space-time continuum. This includes the M-theory, formerly known as the string theory, and the Holographic Principle, in order to explain phenomena such as black holes and the first one-hundredth of a second of the Big Bang.

Hertog, Thomas; Herdeiro, Carlos; Chamblin, H.; Ashbourn, J.; Reall, Harvey

80

SN 2014J and the Harvard Observing Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A chance discovery on January 21, 2014 by Steve Fossey et al. of University College London during an undergraduate telescope training session revealed the closest type Ia supernova in the past 42 years. The bright SN 2014J was observed by undergraduates and graduate students alike in the Harvard Observing Project (see poster by A. Bieryla) with the Clay Telescope at Harvard University. Observations were obtained in multiple filters starting January 24, 2014, prior to the supernova reaching its peak brightness, and monitoring will continue as the supernova fades in brightness. We will present multiple band light curve photometry and color RGB images of SN 2014J and its host galaxy M82.

McIntosh, Melissa; Bieryla, Allyson; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Lewis, John A.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Alexander, Kate Denham; Blanchard, Peter

2014-06-01

81

The Harvard Education Letter, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of volume 14 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in the six issues of this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Multi-Age Classrooms: An Age-Old Grouping Method Is Still Evolving" (Walser), "Teachers Wanted:…

Graves-Desai, Kelly, Ed.; Eaton, Susan, Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

1998-01-01

82

The Harvard Education Letter, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of volume 13 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary and secondary education. Articles in the six issues of this volume include: (1) January-February --"Making Detracking Work" (Lynn and Wheelock), "Developing a Culture of High Expectations for Teaching and…

Graves-Desai, Kelly, Ed.; Maloney, Karen, Ed.

1997-01-01

83

The Harvard Education Letter, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of volume 12 of the Harvard Education Letter, published bimonthly and addressing current issues in elementary-secondary education. Articles in this volume include the following: (1) January-February--"Early Reports From Kentucky on Cash Rewards for 'Successful' Schools Reveal Many Problems" (Miller), "New Ideas Like…

Miller, Edward Ed.; Graves-Desai, Kelly, Ed.; Maloney, Karen, Ed.

1996-01-01

84

Getting Personal: Harvard Medical School's Approach to Debt Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program of the financial aid office at Harvard University Medical School (Massachusetts) that helps students with debt management and personal financial planning through presentations to seniors by professionals in insurance and financial planning and by offering two individual consultations with a physician financial planning…

Gibbons, Kathleen

2000-01-01

85

Tenure at Harvard Med: No Immunity from Ill Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Charges of plagiarism led to the resignation of Dr. Shervert Frazier from Harvard Medical School. Examines broader implications surrounding the dismissal of tenured faculty for "cause." Summarizes decision in "McConnell v. Howard University" as indicative that dismissal for cause is a genuine issue of fact subject to judicial review. (MLF)

Stokes, Jerome W. D.; Reese, Christopher J.

1989-01-01

86

Harvard Humanities Students Discover the 17th Century Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article profiles Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt's new course, "Travel and Transformation in the Early 17th Century." The product of an intense, months-long collaboration between computing specialists, graduate students, librarians, and scholars, the course makes innovative use of all the tools and technical know-how a major university…

Howard, Jennifer

2007-01-01

87

K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson's Phenocam project, a network of near remote sensing digital phenology cameras that send images of forest, shrub, and grassland vegetation cover at more than 130 diverse sites in North America to the digital archives at the University of New Hampshire. Our school district is now part of this network providing a digital image every half hour of the mixed deciduous/ coniferous forest canopy due north from Overlook Middle School in Ashburnham, Massachusetts. As a part of the Phenocam network, students at the K-12 level have expanded the scope of phenological monitoring that is part of the Harvard Forest LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program protocol, Buds, Leaves, and Global Warming. I have developed a series of lessons comparing student data to phenology data derived from Phenocam network images and Modis satellites. The Phenocam Project and the RET program is supported by NASA.

Bennett, K.

2012-12-01

88

Evolution of physics examining 1940-2000 at Cambridge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much controversy exists about the supposed changing examination standards. Emphasis has been placed on the standards of GCSE and A-level examinations. However, many large employers recruit graduates, and so university examination standards also deserve attention. Here, Cambridge University Part II (third year undergraduate) examinations in Physics are studied since 1940. Trends in prescriptiveness, choice of questions, and other variables were found.

Roberts, A.; Brown, L. M.

2001-07-01

89

Harvard U. Receives First U.S. Patent Issued on Animals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A patent awarded to Harvard University for the genetic alteration of mice in cancer research is the first ever issued on an animal, at the same time that legislation putting a moratorium on animal patents is pending in Congress. (MSE)

Wheeler, David L.

1988-01-01

90

Investigating the Impact of Cambridge International Assessments on U.S. Stakeholders: Student and Teacher Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the continuing program to study the impact of its international assessments, the University of Cambridge International Examinations ("Cambridge") has undertaken a series of studies investigating the impact on a range of US stakeholders. This paper reports on research designed to respond to a series of washback and impact questions…

Shaw, Stuart

2011-01-01

91

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117...Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m....

2010-07-01

92

33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117...Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m....

2009-07-01

93

Still Having Her Say: More than a Decade after Becoming a Household Name, Harvard Law Professor Lani Guinier Holds True to Her Beliefs, Principles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the accomplishments of Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law at Harvard University law school. The first and only African American woman to hold a tenured faculty position at the Harvard University law school, Guinier has put her visibility to use by speaking out on issues of race, gender and democratic…

Roach, Ronald

2004-01-01

94

Cambridge Physics: Past, Present and Future  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Opened in 1874, the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge is one of the oldest teaching laboratories in England. Researchers at the Laboratory have made key findings regarding the electron, positive rays, and the nucleus. This interactive site was created by staff members at the Cavendish (with the collaboration of the physics department) in order to educate the public about their work and history. First-time visitors should scroll over the boxes on the homepage to learn more about some of their key discoveries as a way of becoming familiarized with their work. Moving on, the "Past, Present, Future" area provides a virtual tour of the Cavendish Laboratory, along with biographies of the key figures who've worked at the Laboratory since the 19th century.

95

Thinking about a 'Marshall Plan' for Eastern Europe. Summary of a Conference. Held in Cambridge, Massachusetts on February 10, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A February 1990 conference at Harvard University focused on the future role of U.S. foreign assistance in Central and Eastern Europe, taking into account the needs of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and Romania. The document summarizes conferen...

1990-01-01

96

Harvard Jean Monnet Table of Contents Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by the Harvard Law School Jean Monnet Chair (first reviewed in the December 5, 1997 Scout Report), this site publishes the tables of contents for 58 journals (in eight languages) "relevant in European Integration research" received by the Harvard Law Library. Users can browse the newest arrivals (updated biweekly) or back issues (1998-99) by journal title. Table of content pages list titles, authors, and page numbers, and offer a link to the journal's homepage. An internal search engine is also provided. This is a useful and well-designed resource for scholars and professionals in European law.

97

Teaching for Understanding: Harvard Comes to Pennell Elementary. A Teacher Research Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the 2002-03 school year, one Philadelphia fifth grade class developed a core curriculum designed to teach every child the 21st century basic skills: the ability to think, learn, and create. This effort was a pilot for a rigorous Harvard University based program to develop proficiency for each child in a mixed ability classroom of 29…

Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

98

Leadership, Ethics, and Corporate Responsibility: Initiatives at the Harvard Business School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses problems of teaching business ethics. Describes studies conducted among faculty and students. Concludes that actions and the broader school culture are more influential than special programs and rhetoric. Reports on a required ethics course at the beginning of Harvard University's Master's in Business Administration (MBA) program,…

Gentile, Mary C.

1991-01-01

99

Harvard/Florida HR 4796 Page: Astronomers Discover Possible Planet-forming Disk  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronomers, using the Keck II telescope in Hawaii, along with a team of scientists from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the University of Florida, Gainesville, using the Cerro Tololo Observatory in Chile, "have discovered what appears to be the clearest evidence yet of a budding solar system around a nearby star." HR 4796, about 220 light years from Earth, "shows a swirling disk of dust around the star" that portends the building of a star system. The Harvard/Florida HR 4796 page contains additional information and a link to another image of the disk of HR 4796.

1998-01-01

100

Harvard College Observatory: Shapley's Factory for PhD Degrees?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When Harlow Shapley assumed the Directorship of Harvard College Observatory in 1921, there was no program in place there to train the next generation of astronomers. In 1923, using the Pickering Fund for women assistants, Shapley hired a young English woman, Cecilia Payne, to work on stellar spectra. Just two short years later, Payne completed her research and wrote a celebrated thesis on stellar atmospheres. Because Harvard University was not prepared to confer a PhD degree on a woman at that time, Payne presented her thesis to Radcliffe College. Thus, in 1925 she became the first person to receive a PhD in astronomy for a research project at HCO. By 1933, a PhD in Astronomy had been conferred on eight graduate students who had undertaken research projects at HCO: four men who received their degree from Harvard, and four women, from Radcliffe. In subsequent years, however, the equal distribution of degrees for men and women quickly changed. When the 30th degree was bestowed in 1943, only 10 of the candidates were women. By 1955, when the 60th degree was conferred, only 14 women had received a PhD. In just two decades, then, the ratio of women astronomers had steadily dropped from a solid 50% at the height of the Shapley era to slightly less than 25% at his retirement. Also, until the mid-1960s, the women astronomers still had to apply to Radcliffe for their PhD degrees. This paper will briefly examine the funding and research topics of some of the HCO PhD candidates in the Shapley Era (1921-1955). It will also highlight some of their subsequent contributions to 20th-century American Astronomy.

Welther, B. L.

2000-12-01

101

The Annie Jump Cannon Video Project at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The heart of this poster paper is the screening of the new 25-minute educational video, ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors.'' It explores the life and work of Annie Jump Cannon through the eyes of sixth-grade students. A production of the Science Media Group at the CfA, the video was created to interest and inspire girls and minorities, in particular, to continue their study of history and physical science in high school. Recent studies show that science teachers are successfully using videotapes in the classroom to supplement traditional methods of teaching. Other reports show that capable girls and minority students tend to drop science in high school. Our goal, then, was to create a video to stimulate the curiosity and natural interest in science of these younger students. With the help of the Public Affairs Office at the CfA, we arranged to visit local schools to talk to sixth-grade science teachers and their students about the video project. Boys and girls were both eager to participate in it. By lottery, we chose a dozen youngsters of multi-cultural backgrounds to attend a three-day workshop, during which we videotaped them discovering facts about Cannon's childhood and career. Barbara Welther, historian and principal investigator, took the group to the Harvard University Archives to look at some Cannon memorabilia. To learn about spectra, each student assembled a spectroscope from a kit and observed solar lines. CfA astronomers then led the group in various activities to explore the types of stellar spectra that Cannon classified and published in The Henry Draper Catalogue 75 years ago.% and that astronomers still study today. ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors'' shows young people actively engaged in the process of discovery and offers teachers a novel tool to stimulate discussion of topics in science, history, women's studies, and careers. It is intended for use in schools, libraries, museums, planetariums, as well as for personal interest. For more information and/or a copy of the videotape, contact the authors at the CfA, Cambridge, MA.

Lupfer, C.; Welther, B. L.; Griswold, A.

1993-05-01

102

Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

2005-01-01

103

Harvard Center for Neurodegeneration and Repair  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Harvard Center for Neurodegeneration and Repair (HCNR). Visitors to this extensive Web site will find loads of information and resources for each of HCNR's core areas: Center for Translational Neurology Research, Center for Brain Imaging, Center for Molecular Pathology, Laboratory for Drug Discovery in Neurodegeneration, and Center for Bioinformatics. The site is quite nicely designed, and even includes an introductory video.

2008-10-06

104

First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 12, 871-875, (1998). W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, and A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels. Chemical Society Reviews , 27, 1998. S. Lou, F. Holland, F. Rohrer, K. Lu, B. Bohn, T. Brauers, C. C. Chang, H. Fuchs, R. Häseler, K. Kita, Y. Kondo, X. Li, M. Shao, L. Zeng, A. Wahner, Y. Zhang, W. Wang, and A. Hofzumahaus, Atmospheric OH reactivities in the Pearl River Delta - China in summer 2006: measurement and model results, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 11243-11260, (2010). V. Sinha, J. Williams, J.N. Crowley, and J. Lelieveld., The Comparaptive Reactivity Methode - a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air, Atmos. Env., 38, 2511-2522, (2008).

Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

2013-12-01

105

Second International Harvard Conference on Internet and Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This conference, recently held at Harvard University, brought together such Internet and computer luminaries as US Supreme Court Justice Steven Breyer, Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. (CEO of IBM Corporation), Scott G. McNealy (CEO of Sun Microsystems), Steve Ballmer (Executive Vice President of Microsoft), Esther Dyson (Chairperson, EdVenture Holdings), Kim Polese (CEO of Marimba, Inc.), and Ira Magaziner (Policy Development Advisor to President Clinton). RealPlayer Speeches and question and answer sessions are available at the site, as well as selected sessions and socratic panels. In addition, the entire three hour and 45 minute proceedings of the first day are available. Note that the most direct access to the audio content is via the day links on the home page.

1998-01-01

106

Cambridge-Cambridge X-ray Serendipity Survey. 2: Classification of X-ray Luminous Galaxies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Surv...

1994-01-01

107

Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site  

DOE Data Explorer

Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

108

Ideology, Class and Rationality: A Critique of Cambridge International Examinations' "Thinking Skills" Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article undertakes a critique of the aims and objectives of "Thinking Skills", one of the most widely and internationally used curricula in the teaching of thinking, offered by the University of Cambridge International Examinations. By engaging in a critical discourse analysis of how political and class biases are (re-)produced in the forms…

Lim, Leonel

2012-01-01

109

James Clerk Maxwell's Cambridge Manuscripts: Extracts Relating to Control and Stability - II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Maxwell's manuscripts held at Cambridge University Library contain several items of interest from a control or stability point of view. The extract reproduced in Part II consists of a draft of the first half of Maxwell's essay on the stability of the moti...

A. T. Fuller

1981-01-01

110

The watershed years of 1958-1962 in the Harvard Pigeon Lab.  

PubMed Central

During the years 1958-1962, the final years of support by the National Science Foundation for B. F. Skinner's Pigeon Lab in Memorial Hall at Harvard University, 20 or so pigeon experiments (plus some with other organisms) ran concurrently 7 days a week. The research style emphasized experimental analyses, exploratory procedures, and the parametric exploration of variables. This reminiscence describes some features of the laboratory, the context within which it operated, and the activities of some of those who participated in it.

Catania, A Charles

2002-01-01

111

Microsoft Cambridge at TREC9: Filtering Track  

Microsoft Academic Search

1 Summary Apart from a short description of our Query Track contri- bution, this report is concerned with the Adaptive Filter- ing track only. There is a separate report in this volume (1) on the Microsoft Research Cambridge participation in QA track. A number of runs were submitted for the Adaptive Fil- tering track, on all tasks (adaptive filtering, batch

Stephen E. Robertson; Steve Walker

2000-01-01

112

Microsoft Cambridge at TREC 2002: Filtering Track  

Microsoft Academic Search

SW alker † 1 Summary Apart from a short description of our Query Track contri- bution, this report is concerned with the Adaptive Filter- ing track only. There is a separate report in this volume (1)on the Microsoft Research Cambridge participation in QA track. A number of runs were submitted for the Adaptive Fil- tering track, on all tasks (adaptive

Stephen E. Robertson; Steve Walker; Hugo Zaragoza; Ralf Herbrich

2002-01-01

113

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might

Michael Hoskin

1996-01-01

114

The Cambridge Photographic Guide to the Planets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cambridge Photographic Guide to the Planets includes a broad selection of the latest images of the planets, moons, comets, and asteroids of the Earth's Solar System. Beginning with a comprehensive introduction to the planetary system, its origin and its evolution, physicist Frederick Taylor devotes each chapter to a different planet or Solar System body, with a thorough presentation of

Fredric W. Taylor

2001-01-01

115

77 FR 3118 - Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel, Cambridge, MD  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2011-1164] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel...Coast Guard is establishing a temporary security zone encompassing certain waters of...

2012-01-23

116

The Harvard Classics and Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction, 1909-1917  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At the turn of the 20th century there was increased interest in bringing the benefits of a liberal arts education to the general public. A number of prominent leaders in the field of education, including such personages as Charles W. Eliot (who was the president of Harvard), edited various works that were thought to stand as representative as the best and most valuable writings down through the centuries. One such legendary set was the 50-volume, "Five-Foot Shelf" of books and then the 20-volume Shelf of Fiction. Published originally between 1909 and 1917, The Harvard Classics and the Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction comprised much of what was (and is) great in the field of literary endeavor. The people at Bartleby.com have placed the entire set online for the general public, along with the special volume of lectures originally composed for the set that introduce the reader to some of the primary themes of these works. On this site, visitors will find various works as the pensive observations offered by Marcus Aurelius in his Meditations and Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops To Conquer. Additionally, the Shelf of Fiction section contains such important works as Vanity Fair by Thackeray and two short stories by the celebrated French author Guy de Maupassant.

117

NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

2003-03-01

118

Cambridge Elementary students enjoy gift of computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Children at Cambridge Elementary School, Cocoa, Fla., eagerly unwrap computer equipment donated by Kennedy Space Center. Cambridge is one of 13 Brevard County schools receiving 81 excess contractor computers thanks to an innovative educational outreach project spearheaded by the Nasa k-12 Education Services Office at ksc. Behind the children is Jim Thurston, a school volunteer and retired employee of USBI, who shared in the project. The Astronaut Memorial Foundation, a strategic partner in the effort, and several schools in rural Florida and Georgia also received refurbished computers as part of the year-long project. Ksc employees put in about 3,300 volunteer hours to transform old, excess computers into upgraded, usable units. A total of $90,000 in upgraded computer equipment is being donated.

1999-01-01

119

Harvard@Home: Living Healthier, Living Longer: Part I  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Harvard@Home, these two websites contain a collection of video presentations from an Alumni College and Harvard Medical School event titled Living Healthier, Living Longer. The video presentations feature expert doctors discussing a variety of health issues including aging, menopause, prostate cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cardiology, nutrition, stress management, and more. Presenters also address the history of the Harvard Medical School, and new cancer research. The presentations range from approximately 15 to 30 minutes in length. In addition to the video clips, the site includes accompanying slides, and short biographies of the presenters.

120

Communications from the psychological laboratory of Harvard University: Automatic reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports experiments on automatic reactions, based on earlier work (Stein & Solomons, 1896). The stimulus was the sound of an electric hammer and the mode of distraction was the reading of light literature. Reaction-times were measured for 8 Ss, using a chronoscope. Results show that the Ss were divided into 3 groups depending on their response patterns: One group required

Leon M. Solomons

1899-01-01

121

Rediscovering Long-Neglected Nantucket and Harvard Variables  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several ``lost" variable stars previously discovered at the Maria Mitchell Observatory and at Harvard Observatory were reinvestigated. These variables had not been studied for decades, and accurate coordinates and light elements were unknown for them. We rediscovered these stars as variables using the MMO photographic plate collection, and further study was accomplished with both the MMO and the Moscow University plate collection. The stars were identified in positional catalogs and their light elements were improved based on new photographic estimates. Two types of variables were revealed: eclipsing binaries and miras. Two very interesting eclipsers were studied, VX Sct and V936 Aql. The former is characterized by a period exceeding one month, and thus it probably contains a giant component. V936 Aql shows a light curve characteristic of Algol variables with ellipsoidal components or beta Lyrae variables, with a distinct secondary minimum. However, it possesses a rather short period (0.48 days), more typical of W Ursae Majoris stars or cataclysmic variables. Of the six miras studied, AO Sct, AV Sct, and SW Sct had experienced period changes over the course of several decades. AV Sct actually underwent two period changes in 35 years. BI Sct has maintained its period since it was previously studied. The light elements and positions of CV Sgr and VV Sct were determined reliably for the first time.

Tam, F.; Samus, N.

1998-12-01

122

Root phenology at Harvard Forest and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Roots are hidden from view and heterogeneously distributed making them difficult to study in situ. As a result, the causes and timing of root production are not well understood. Researchers have long assumed that above and belowground phenology is synchronous; for example, most parameterizations of belowground carbon allocation in terrestrial biosphere models are based on allometry and represent a fixed fraction of net C uptake. However, using results from metaanalysis as well as empirical data from oak and hemlock stands at Harvard Forest, we show that synchronous root and shoot growth is the exception rather than the rule. We collected root and shoot phenology measurements from studies across four biomes (boreal, temperate, Mediterranean, and subtropical). General patterns of root phenology varied widely with 1-5 production peaks in a growing season. Surprisingly, in 9 out of the 15 studies, the first root production peak was not the largest peak. In the majority of cases maximum shoot production occurred before root production (Offset>0 in 32 out of 47 plant sample means). The number of days offset between maximum root and shoot growth was negatively correlated with median annual temperature and therefore differs significantly across biomes (ANOVA, F3,43=9.47, p<0.0001). This decline in offset with increasing temperature may reflect greater year-round coupling between air and soil temperature in warm biomes. Growth form (woody or herbaceous) also influenced the relative timing of root and shoot growth. Woody plants had a larger range of days between root and shoot growth peaks as well as a greater number of growth peaks. To explore the range of phenological relationships within woody plants in the temperate biome, we focused on above and belowground phenology in two common northeastern tree species, Quercus rubra and Tsuga canadensis. Greenness index, rate of stem growth, root production and nonstructural carbohydrate content were measured beginning in April 2012 through August 2013 at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA, USA. Greenness and stem growth were highest in late May and early June with one clear maximum growth period. In contrast, root growth was characterized by multiple production peaks. Q. rubra root growth experienced many small flushes around day of year (DOY) 156 (early June) and one large peak on 234 (late August). T. canadensis root growth peaked on DOY 188 (early July), 234.5 (late August) and 287 (mid-October). However, particular phenological patterns varied widely from site to site. Despite large spatial heterogeneity, it appears that Q. rubra experiences greater overall root production as well as more allocation to roots during the growing season. The storage pool of nonstructural carbohydrates experiences a mid-summer drawdown in Q. rubra but not T. canadensis roots. Timing of belowground C allocation to root growth and nonstructural carbohydrate accumulation may be regulated by climate factors as well as endogenous factors such as vessel size, growth form, or tradeoffs in C allocated between plant organs. Plant roots supply substrate to microbial communities and hence their production feeds back to other plant and soil processes that affect ecosystem C fluxes.

Abramoff, R. Z.; Finzi, A.

2013-12-01

123

Team from Harvard and Wash U. studies adolescent alcohol consumption and breast cancer:  

Cancer.gov

A team from Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis investigated childhood and adolescent risk factors for benign breast disease among girls with a family history of breast cancer. Benign breast disease, a large class of breast ailments that can cause breast lumps or breast pain, is a known risk factor for breast cancer. The authors found that among adolescent girls with a family history of breast cancer (or maternal benign breast disease), there was a significant association between amount of alcohol consumed and further increased risk of getting benign breast disease as young women.

124

Teacher's Guide to Accompany the Cambridge Latin Course. Tentative Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to assist teachers using the "Cambridge Latin Course," a multimedia instructional system developed in the United Kingdom which can be adapted to the needs of pupils of varying backgrounds, ages, and abilities. The Guide focuses on Unit I, the first level of the Cambridge materials. The materials are especially suited to…

Masciantonio, Rudolph

125

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2009-07-01

126

40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality...

2010-07-01

127

75 FR 38128 - Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland, Including Employees of Sensata...Division Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland Working Off-Site in Falmouth...formerly known as Airpax Corporation, Cambridge, Maryland. The notice will soon...

2010-07-01

128

How Big Is Our Universe?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive resource from Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics uses images and activities to understand the scope and scale of our universe. Featured are technologies used by generations of explorers.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2005-12-17

129

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might revolve around the sun? How did Christopher Columbus abuse his knowledge of a lunar eclipse predicted by an astronomical almanac? Packed with anecdotes and intriguing detail, this book describes how we observed the sky and interpreted what we saw at different periods of history; how this influenced our beliefs and mythology; and how great astronomers contributed to what we now know. The result is a lively and highly visual history of astronomy - a compelling read for specialists and non-specialists alike.

Hoskin, Michael

130

Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week, Bartleby.com (last reviewed in the December 10, 1999 Scout Report) announced the online publication of all eighteen volumes of the classic Cambridge History of English and American Literature. This excellent free resource "comprises the largest public reference work of literary criticism and history on the Internet." Originally published in 1907-1921, the volumes include 303 chapters and more than 11,000 pages, edited and written by a worldwide panel of 171 leading scholars and thinkers of the early twentieth century. The online version features over 5,600 files, searchable by keyword and browseable by volume, chapter, and section. The electronic Cambridge History also includes chapter and bibliography indexes. Although a bit dated in parts, these eighteen volumes are a valuable, and now easily accessible, research tool for secondary and university students.

131

Harvard Education and Research Center, Final Progress Report July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Harvard Educational Resource Center for Occupational Safety and Health (renamed Harvard Education and Research Center in 1997) holds as its primary objective the training of leaders in occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, occupational-health nur...

A. Backus C. Love D. C. Christiani H. Hu L. Fitzgerald P. M. Adams S. Rudnick T. J. Smith

1999-01-01

132

33 CFR 100.101 - Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. 100.101 Section 100.101...Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. (a) Regulated area. The Thames River at New London, Connecticut, from the Penn...

2010-07-01

133

33 CFR 100.101 - Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. 100.101 Section 100.101...Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. (a) Regulated area. The Thames River at New London, Connecticut, from the Penn...

2009-07-01

134

Harvard Studies in Syntax and Semantics, Volume 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following articles on syntax and semantics were researched at the Harvard Syntax Workshop: (1) "Clause Reduction in Spanish," by Judith Aissen and David Perlmutter; (2) "Reduced WH-Questions," by Robin Bechhofer; (3) "Reduction in Conjoined WH-Questions," by Robin Bechhofer; (4) "On Subject-to-Object Raising in Arabic," by Joel Clinkenbeard;…

Hankamer, Jorge, Ed.; Aissen, Judith, Ed.

135

The Harvard Radio Meteor Project Meteor Velocity Distribution Reappraised  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative distribution of atmospheric encounter speeds at constant mass for observations made as part of the Harvard Radio Meteor Project synodic year observations has been recalculated using a cumulative mass index, ? = 1.1 ± 0.1, and the mass velocity relation from F. Verniani (1973, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 8429-8462), ? = 4.23 ± 0.07. A discrepency in the

A. D. Taylor

1995-01-01

136

Archaeoastronomy with the Harvard College Observatory Plate Collection  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been studying variable stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) discovered using the MACHO project photometry database. Since these stars were not discovered until the 1990's, it would be of great interest to know their behavior in the past. This is possible using the extensive collection of plates of the LMC contained in the Harvard College Observatory collection.

Geoffrey Clayton; Chris Dolese; Douglas Welch

2000-01-01

137

The Gremlins of Governance: A "Trusteeship" Q&A with Richard Chait, Research Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Richard Chait, Research Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, regarding the three major challenges that face college and university governing boards today--in the areas of board structure, planning, and trustee selection. In the interview, Chait shares his concern about the state of…

Chait, Richard

2009-01-01

138

Harvard U.'s Request for Commercial Rights to New Strain of Mouse Forces Debate in Europe over Whether Animals Can Be Patented.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The European Patent Convention has informed Harvard University that its application for a patent on a genetically engineered mouse may be refused. The application was the first to obtain patent protection across most of Europe for a transgenic animal, one which has been implanted with genes from another animal. (MSE)

Chronicle of Higher Education, 1989

1989-01-01

139

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 5, September-October 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Confronting the Autism Epidemic: New Expectations for Children with Autism Means a New Role for Public Schools (Kate McKenna); (2) Internet Research 101: How to Help Middle…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2007-01-01

140

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 1, January-February 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Using Theater to Teach Social Skills: Researchers Document Improvements for Children with Autism (Patti Hartigan); (2) The Family Model of Schooling Revisited: Few Teachers,…

Walser, Nancy, Ed.

2012-01-01

141

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 4, July-August 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Progressions in Science: A New Approach Emphasizes Sustained Instruction in Big Ideas (Patti Hartigan); (2) Putting the "Boy Crisis" in Context: Finding Solutions to…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2010-01-01

142

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 5, September-October 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "R" is for Resilience: Schools Turn to "Asset Development" to Build on Students' Strengths (Nancy Walser); (2) Beyond Bargaining: What Does It Take for School District-Union…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2006-01-01

143

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2007-01-01

144

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 1, January-February 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Beyond the Gap: What Educators and Researchers Are Learning from High-Achieving African American and Latino Students (Michael Sadowski); (2) Aiming for AYP: The Quest to Make…

Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2005-01-01

145

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 3, May-June 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Adding Value to Student Assessment: Does "Value-Added Assessment" Live Up to Its Name? (Anand Vaishnav); (2) No Adolescent Left Behind? California's Testing and Accountability…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.; Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2005-01-01

146

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 3, May-June 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Making Schools Safer for LGBT Youth: Despite Signs of Progress, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students Say Harassment Persists (Michael Sadowski); (2) Rx for a…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2006-01-01

147

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 3, May-June 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Improving Teaching and Learning through Instructional Rounds (Lee Teitel); (2) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in the Age of Testing: New Reports Outline Key Principles…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2009-01-01

148

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Road to School Improvement: It's Hard, It's Bumpy, and It Takes as Long as It Takes (Richard F. Elmore and Elizabeth A. City); (2) Better Teaching with Web Tools: How…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2007-01-01

149

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 1, January-February 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Parents on Board: Strong Home-School Connections Enrich Learning Opportunities for Immigrant Kids--and Their Parents, Too (Sue Miller Wiltz); (2) Volcanoes and…

Gordon, David T., Ed.

2004-01-01

150

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 3, May-June 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Equity, Access, and Opportunity": Despite Challenges, More Districts Adopt One-to-One Laptop Programs (Colleen Gillard); (2) Small Kids, Big Words: Research-Based Strategies…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2008-01-01

151

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 6, November-December 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Video Games Take Testing to the Next Level: Researchers See Promise in Game-Like Assessments That Measure Complex Skills (Robert Rothman); (2) An Academic Foothold for…

Walser, Nancy, Ed.

2010-01-01

152

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 3, May-June 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Taking Care of Novice Teachers: Researchers Suggest How Administrators Can Keep Their Newer Teachers Teaching and Maintain a First-Rate Faculty (Reino Makkonen); (2) Assessing…

Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2004-01-01

153

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 2, March-April 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Preparing the "Highly Qualified Principal": Will New Training and Recruitment Programs Reshape the Profession? (Alexander Russo); (2) Out-of-School Programs Boost Achievement,…

Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2004-01-01

154

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 1, January-February 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Greening of Environmental Ed: Teachers Focus on Complexity, Evidence, and Letting Students Draw Their Own Conclusions (Lucy Hood); (2) Like Teacher, Like Student: Online PD…

Walser, Caroline T., Ed.

2011-01-01

155

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 6, November-December 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Platooning" Instruction: Districts Weigh Pros and Cons of Departmentalizing Elementary Schools (Lucy Hood); (2) Behind the Classroom Door: A Rare Glimpse Indicates the…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2009-01-01

156

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 5, September-October 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching 21st Century Skills: What Does It Look Like in Practice? (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting and Spending: Schools and Districts Share Lessons on the Effective Uses of…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2008-01-01

157

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 4, July-August 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Beyond Auto Shop 1: Is Career and Technical Education a Promising Path for High School Reform? (Lucy Hood); (2) The School Readiness Gap: Prekindergarten--Not Just…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2006-01-01

158

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 2, March-April 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Educating Teenage Immigrants: High Schools Experiment with Ways to Group New English-Language Learners (Lucy Hood); (2) Hot Topics and Key Words: Pilot Project Brings Teachers…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2008-01-01

159

Validation of the Harvard Cancer Risk Index: A Prediction Tool for Individual Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

c Validation of the Harvard Cancer Risk Index: A Prediction Tool for Individual Cancer Risk Daniel J. Kima,b,*, Beverly Rockhillc, Graham A. Colditza,b,d,e a Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

160

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 6, November-December 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Telling Tales Out of Charter School: What Educators and Policymakers Can Learn from the Successes and Failures of Charters (Robert Rothman); (2) One Charter School's Formula…

Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2004-01-01

161

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 2, March-April 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Course Credits on the Quick: Controversial Online Recovery Programs Speed the Path to Graduation (Andrew Brownstein); (2) Collaborating to Make Schools More Inclusive…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2012-01-01

162

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 6, November-December 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) With Cheating on the Rise, Schools Respond (David McKay Wilson); (2) Waldorf Education in Public Schools: Educators Adopt--and Adapt--This Developmental, Arts-Rich Approach…

Walser, Nancy, Ed.

2011-01-01

163

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 2, March-April 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Money and Motivation: New Initiatives Rekindle Debate over the Link between Rewards and Student Achievement (David McKay Wilson); (2) An Inexact Science: What Are the Technical…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2009-01-01

164

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charters and Unions: What's the Future for This Unorthodox Relationship? (Alexander Russo); (2) From Special Ed to Higher Ed: Transition Planning for Disabled Students Focuses…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2010-01-01

165

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 5, September-October 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching Students to Ask Their Own Questions: One Small Change Can Yield Big Results (Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana); (2) Voice of Experience: Jerry Weast--Leading a System…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2011-01-01

166

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Meeting of the Minds: The Parent-Teacher Conference Is the Cornerstone of School-Home Relations. How Can It Work for All Families? (Laura Pappano); (2) In Search of That "Third…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

2007-01-01

167

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 4, July-August 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Integrated Data Systems Link Schools and Communities: Researchers Combine School and Non-School Data to Inform Interventions and Policy (Patti Hartigan); (2) Student-Directed…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2011-01-01

168

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Unleashing the "Brain Power" of Groups in the Classroom: The Neuroscience behind Collaborative Work (Nancy Walser); (2) Putting AP to the Test: New Research Assesses the…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

2010-01-01

169

Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 4, July-August 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Early Childhood Education at a Crossroads: Access to Preschool Has Come a Long Way, but Critical Choices Lie Ahead (Deborah Stipek); (2) Bridging the PreK-Elementary Divide:…

Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.; Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

2005-01-01

170

Undergraduate Physics Education at Radcliffe and Harvard 1895-1953  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effort to get more women to continue in physics is ongoing and many hypotheses exist as to why the gender ratio lags more in physics than in other fields. A historical investigation can offer insights to the origin of this persistent problem. Radcliffe College offered to female students an education supposedly equivalent to that offered to male students at Harvard. I track physics classes at Radcliffe and Harvard from Radcliffe's charter year to the year the physics classes fully merged. Data on instructors, enrollment, and later employment offers insights to trends in physics education over time and how the genders were affected differently even when multiple variables are isolated across the two single-gender groups.

Behrman, Joanna

2013-03-01

171

Harvard@Home: Reproductive Health in the 21st Century  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Harvard@Home, this website presents more than seven hours of video clips from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's third-annual conference on women, gender, and society held in October of 2004. Titled _Reproductive Health in the 21st Century_, the "conference examines a broad array of issues surrounding reproductive health and features panels of distinguished physicians, scholars, and health policy advocates discussing the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of medical and technological advances in the field and their global implications." Conference topics include The Politics and Ethics of Bodily Integrity; In Vitro Fertilization in the Muslim Middle East; Women Workers as Reproducers; and The Moral Issue of Sex Selection, to name a few. In addition to the video clips, the website contains topic summaries, short biographies of the numerous panelists, a feedback survey form, and links to related Harvard@Home programs. This site is also reviewed in the February 4, 2005_NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

172

Andover-Harvard Library: Holocaust Rescue and Relief: Digitized Records of the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A humanitarian crisis was brewing in Prague in 1939, and the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha went to investigate when they heard about it. From their initial work the Universal Unitarian Service Committee (UUSC) was born, and they eventually worked to establish food and clothing distribution centers, hospitals, and homes for children. The Andover-Harvard Theological Library is the official archive for the records of the Committee, and they have worked with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum to digitize approximately 257 boxes of UUSC material dating from 1939 to 1967. Visitors can get started by clicking on the collection name on the homepage, and then reading the scope and content note for each area. The sections here include "Executive Director Records", "General Administrative Records", and "Special Initiatives". The site presents a rather unique record of the UUSC's activities over a 25-year period, and it is a collection that is quite well organized and worth viewing.

173

Gambling with the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

Hawking, Stephen

2002-05-01

174

NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

Simpson, J. J.

2011-12-01

175

78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code...CFR), this is notice that on July 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810,...

2013-08-26

176

Pricing road space: back to the future? The Cambridge experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cambridge is a small free standing city in the UK with a population of 105 000. In recent years it has endured a worsening congestion problem essentially as a result of employment growth within the city and the narrow street layout. This is not a unique problem but one which is particularly acute in historic cities. In 1990, Congestion Metering

Stephen Ison

1996-01-01

177

The Paired Format in the Cambridge Speaking Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent articles in this journal (Foot 1999; Saville and Hargreaves 1999) have focused on the advantages and disadvantages of the paired format of the Cambridge Speaking Tests. This article aims to contribute to the debate by considering how the pairing of candidates may impact upon the language sample produced and could affect the assessment…

Norton, Julie

2005-01-01

178

The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

Armstrong, Michael

2010-01-01

179

Increased Parental Choice and Effective Desegregation Outcomes: A Cambridge Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a policy adopted in 1981 in Cambridge public schools: No child is assigned to school on the basis of residence, and all parents and students are given the opportunity to gain admission to their preferred desegregated school within the city. Such systemwide, controlled open enrollment is working to prevent resegregation. (GC)

Alves, Michael J.

1984-01-01

180

Environmental Assessment: A Case Study of Cambridge, Massachusetts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project undertaken to advance the systematic analysis of public responses, attitudes, opinions, preferences, and values relating to the environment is discussed in this report, the third in a series of eight. The reports fall into two general categories: five describe and compare responses to representative milieus in New York, Boston, Cambridge…

Lowenthal, David

181

77 FR 64143 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab By Notice dated June 18, 2012, and...June 26, 2012, 77 FR 38086, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts...determined that the registration of Cambridge Isotope Lab to manufacture the listed basic...

2012-10-18

182

The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development was started in 1987 by Professors Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt. The Project's primary goal is "to understand and foster the conditions under which sustained, self-determined social and economic development is achieved among American Indian nations." To accomplish this goal, the Project has sponsored a number of conferences and events, and as also offered advisory services to interested persons and tribal leaders. The "Publications" area is a good way to take a look at the fruits of their labors, as it includes the archives of the Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs and a variety of field reports, such as "Renewing Beauty: Options for Navajo Land Management and Decision Making".

183

Feasibility Study of the University Component of the HSMHA Development Evaluation Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is an outline of a proposed program in health evaluation based at Harvard University, as the university component of the HSMHA (Health Services and Mental Health Administration) Developmental Evaluation Plan. The report outlines the program wit...

R. Berry

1972-01-01

184

Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Universe SciPack explores the ways scientists learn about the universe and the current ideas about the origins and formation of the universe. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to the universe including how the universe was formed, formation and destruction of stars and characteristics of the sun and stars in terms of size and composition.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:� Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. � Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".� Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Universe: How We Know What We Know� Select the right instrument given something specific to learn about the universe.� Describe, in simple terms, how scientists analyze light to learn about objects in the universe.� Describe what the study of light can tell us about objects in the universe.� Understand the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum and how the various wavelengths can provide astronomers with different information.� Recognize that astronomers study a wide range of electromagnetic waves, not restricted to visible light.Universe: The Sun as a Star� Reject common misconceptions, such as stars are bits of the Sun. � List characteristics of the Sun that match the definition of a star.� Accurately compare and contrast the characteristics of the Sun with other stars (e.g., mass, distance, size, color).� Recognize the rough ratio of the distance to the Sun and the distance to the next nearest stars on a human scale (i.e., if the sun is 10 feet away, roughly how far is the next nearest star?).� Select the rough estimate of the travel time (at speed of light) to next nearest star from a list.� Describe how astronomers determined that the stars were just like the Sun.Universe: Birth, Life, and Death of Stars� Recount key aspects of the stellar life cycle. � Recognize the variables and conditions that would be needed to make predictions about the life cycle of a star, including the prominent role of initial mass. � Determine whether a reasonable prediction can be made, given certain knowns and unknowns.� Explain how the elements that compose our planet and solar system (and the rest of the universe) were formed.� Explain where the energy released by our Sun and other stars comes from.Universe: The Universe Beyond our Solar System� Arrange various objects in order of size and distance, ranging from space probes and moons to galaxies and galactic clusters.� Catalogue, in simple terms, the objects within a galaxy.� Generally explain "what is within what" (planetary systems, star clusters, galaxies, etc.).� Describe the location of our solar system within the Milky Way galaxy.� Describe the limitations of using parallax, radar, and brightness to measure the distance of objects from Earth, and classify objects whose distance from Earth could be accurately measured using each type of measurement strategy.Universe: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe� Provide a basic description of the conditions at the beginning of the universe.� Give the approximate age of the universe.� Recognize the scientific account of the current state of the universe given different explanations.� Explain the evidence for an expanding universe.� Describe, in simple terms, how scientists use observations of position and motion to learn about objects in the universe.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2007-03-21

185

Harvard study finds men with prostate cancer more likely to die from other causes  

Cancer.gov

Men diagnosed with prostate cancer are less likely to die from the disease than from largely preventable conditions such as heart disease, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the largest study to date that looks at causes of death among men with prostate cancer, and suggests that encouraging healthy lifestyle changes should play an important role in prostate cancer management. The Harvard School of Public Health is part of a consortium that makes up the Dana–Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

186

Vitamin D and multiple health outcomes in the Harvard cohorts.  

PubMed

The hypothesis that vitamin D is inversely associated with multiple health outcomes has been studied in the Harvard cohorts, including the Nurses' Health Study I (n=121,700 female nurses aged 37-64 at baseline in 1984), Nurses' Health Study II (n=116,671 female nurses aged 27-44 years at baseline in 1991), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n=51,529 male health professionals aged 40-75 years at baseline in 1986), and Physicians' Health Study (n=22 071 male physicians aged 40-84 years at baseline in 1982). These studies assessed vitamin D through circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, dietary and supplemental intake, predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin D receptor polymorphisms. This review summarizes studies of vitamin D and various endpoints considered in these cohorts, including risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, elevated plasma C-peptide, various cancers, bone fractures, and multiple sclerosis. Based on the multiple observed benefits of vitamin D, this article postulates recommendations for vitamin D intake in the US population for reduced incidence of multiple health outcomes. PMID:20486209

Wei, Melissa Y; Giovannucci, Edward L

2010-08-01

187

Targeted and all-sky search for nanosecond optical pulses at Harvard-Smithsonian  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have built a system to detect nanosecond pulsed optical signals from a target list of some 10,000 sun-like stars, and have made some 20,000 observations during its two years of operation. A beamsplitter feeds a pair of hybrid avalanche photodetectors at the focal plane of the 1.5m Cassegrain at the Harvard/Smithsonian Oak Ridge Observatory (Agassiz Station), with a coincidence triggering measurement of pulse width and intensity at sub-nanosecond resolution. A flexible web-enabled database, combined with mercifully low background coincidence rates (approximately 1 event per night), makes it easy to sort through far-flung data in search of repeated events from any candidate star. An identical system will soon begin observations, synchronized with ours, at the 0.9m Cassegrain at Princeton University. These will permit unambiguous identification of even a solitary pulse. We are planning an all-sky search for optical pulses, using a dedicated 1.8m f/2.4 spherical glass light bucket and an array of pixelated photomultipliers deployed in a pair of matched focal planes. The sky pixels, 1.5 arcmin square, tessellate a 1.6 by 0.2 degree patch of sky in transit mode, covering the Northern sky in approximately 150 clear nights. Fast custom IC electronics will monitor corresponding pixels for coincident optical pulses of nanosecond timescale, triggering storage of a digitized waveform of the light flash.

Horowitz, Paul; Coldwell, Charles M.; Howard, Andrew B.; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert; Wolff, Jonathan; Zajac, Joe M.

2001-08-01

188

Ovarian Cancer Training Program at the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Award funded the initiation of a mentored research experience in ovarian cancer biology at the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. The primary aims, articulated in the Statement of Work, included creating a mechanism to identify and select outstanding...

M. Seiden

2006-01-01

189

Involving the Business Sector in Community/University Partnerships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how Lesley University's School of Management, an "Implementing Urban Missions" grantee, developed partnerships with the local business community and community-based organizations to support the Area 4 neighborhood in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (EV)

Darlington-Hope, Marian

2002-01-01

190

Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education1  

PubMed Central

The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal–organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout.

Battle, Gary M.; Ferrence, Gregory M.; Allen, Frank H.

2010-01-01

191

The Cambridge Structural Database in retrospect and prospect.  

PubMed

The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) was established in 1965 to record numerical, chemical and bibliographic data relating to published organic and metal-organic crystal structures. The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now stores data for nearly 700,000 structures and is a comprehensive and fully retrospective historical archive of small-molecule crystallography. Nearly 40,000 new structures are added each year. As X-ray crystallography celebrates its centenary as a subject, and the CCDC approaches its own 50th year, this article traces the origins of the CCDC as a publicly funded organization and its onward development into a self-financing charitable institution. Principally, however, we describe the growth of the CSD and its extensive associated software system, and summarize its impact and value as a basis for research in structural chemistry, materials science and the life sciences, including drug discovery and drug development. Finally, the article considers the CCDC's funding model in relation to open access and open data paradigms. PMID:24382699

Groom, Colin R; Allen, Frank H

2014-01-13

192

University of Toronto: Marketing from Scratch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto is regarded as one of Canada's leading academic and research institutions. It has the highest number of students (both undergraduate and graduate), the most faculty members, and the widest range of courses among Canadian universities. It has often been referred to as the "Harvard of the North" because…

Mun, Almira

2008-01-01

193

Colleges and universities continue to respond to students' concerns about sustainability by crafting environmentally-friendly policies and initiatives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

BU makes 'green' honor rollhttp://www.pressconnects.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080729/NEWS01/807290329/1001UO makes honor roll for sustainabilityhttp://www.registerguard.com/csp/cms/sites/dt.cms.support.viewStory.cls?cid=125402&sid=4&fid=1Green Rating Honor Rollhttp://www.princetonreview.com/green-honor-roll.aspx?uidbadge=Harvard Green Campus Initiativehttp://www.greencampus.harvard.edu/Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education [pdf]http://www.aashe.org/index.phpStudents entering college this coming academic year have grown up in a society that is increasingly concerned about the fate of the environment, and many of them have taken active steps to reduce their carbon footprint through a variety of means. Colleges and universities are following suit, and institutions from Harvard University to the University of Oregon are starting to offer "green-friendly" dormitories, solar energy initiatives on campus, and a plethora of compost piles. The Princeton Review acknowledged this welcome trend by offering up their first "Green Rating Honor Roll", which was released earlier this week. The honor roll rankings were developed in tandem with ecoAmerica, a non-profit environmental marketing agency, and the survey used to create these rankings drew on questions about energy use, recycling, transportation, and other metrics. This year's honor roll included Arizona State University, the College of the Atlantic, and Bates College in Maine. Commenting on this recent trend, Julian Dautremont-Smith of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education remarked, "The current generation of students wants to go to schools that take their environmental responsibility seriously. In the last two or three years, it's really picked up, past some sort of tipping point." The first link will take users to an article from this Tuesday's Boston Globe about the growing trend of environmentally friendly initiatives on campuses across the United States. The second link leads to a news piece from the Binghamton Press & Sun Bulletin's Tuesday edition about the recent inclusion of Binghamton University on the green honor roll created by The Princeton Review. Not to be outdone, the Eugene Register-Guard reported about the recent green honor roll nod received by the University of Oregon, and interested parties can read all about it by clicking over to the third link. Moving on, the fourth link will take users to The Princeton Review's Green Ratings Honor Roll. Here, visitors can learn about those institutions that received a "99 rating" in their rating tallies. The fifth link leads to the homepage of the Harvard Green Campus Initiative and visitors can learn about the many projects underway on their grounds in both Boston and Cambridge. The last link leads users to the homepage of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). Here, visitors will find great case study materials, news on campus "green" initiatives, and information on professional development.

2008-08-01

194

University Choice: What Influences the Decisions of Academically Successful Post-16 Students?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The questionnaire survey reported in this paper is part of an ongoing evaluation of the effect of a bursary scheme on recruitment to Cambridge University. It sought to identify factors that encouraged or discouraged highly successful A Level students from applying to Cambridge. Findings reveal three main dimensions associated with the decision to…

Whitehead, Joan M.; Raffan, John; Deaney, Rosemary

2006-01-01

195

77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code...Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on May 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810,...

2012-06-26

196

New software for statistical analysis of Cambridge Structural Database data  

PubMed Central

A collection of new software tools is presented for the analysis of geometrical, chemical and crystallographic data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). This software supersedes the program Vista. The new functionality is integrated into the program Mercury in order to provide statistical, charting and plotting options alongside three-dimensional structural visualization and analysis. The integration also permits immediate access to other information about specific CSD entries through the Mercury framework, a common requirement in CSD data analyses. In addition, the new software includes a range of more advanced features focused towards structural analysis such as principal components analysis, cone-angle correction in hydrogen-bond analyses and the ability to deal with topological symmetry that may be exhibited in molecular search fragments.

Sykes, Richard A.; McCabe, Patrick; Allen, Frank H.; Battle, Gary M.; Bruno, Ian J.; Wood, Peter A.

2011-01-01

197

Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference, August 22-27, 1999, hosted by the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The meeti...

1999-01-01

198

Harvard study shows coffee consumption inversely associated with risk of most common form of skin cancer  

Cancer.gov

Increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee you drink could lower your risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. The researchers, who are affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health, generated their results by conducting a prospective analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Study, a large and long-running study to aid in the investigation of factors influencing women's health, and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, an analogous study for men. Brigham and Women's Hospital is part of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

199

Fungal Taxa Target Different Carbon Substrates in Harvard Forest Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mineralization of soil organic carbon is a major component of the global carbon cycle and is largely controlled by soil microbial communities. However, little is known about the functional roles of soil microbes or whether different microbial taxa target different carbon substrates under natural conditions. To examine this possibility, we assessed the community composition of active fungi by using a novel nucleotide analog technique in soils from the Harvard Forest. We hypothesized that fungal community composition would shift in response to the addition of different substrates and that specific fungal taxa would respond differentially to particular carbon sources. To test this hypothesis, we added a nucleotide analog probe directly to soils in conjunction with one of five carbon compounds of increasing recalcitrance: glycine, sucrose, cellulose, tannin-protein complex, and lignin. During 48 hour incubations, the nucleotide analog was incorporated into newly replicated DNA of soil organisms that proliferated following the addition of the substrates. In this way, we labeled the DNA of microbes that respond to a particular carbon source. Labeled DNA was isolated and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were sequenced and analyzed to identify active fungi to near-species resolution. Diversity analyses at the ?97% sequence similarity level indicated that taxonomic richness was greater under cellulose (Shannon Index: 3.23 ± 0.11 with ± 95% CI) and lignin (2.87 ± 0.15) additions than the other treatments (2.34 ± 0.16 to 2.64 ± 0.13). In addition, community composition of active fungi shifted under glycine, sucrose, and cellulose additions. Specifically, the community under glycine was significantly different from communities under control, cellulose, and tannin-protein (P<0.05). Additionally, the sucrose and cellulose communities were marginally different from the control community (P = 0.059 and 0.054, respectively) and each other (P = 0.058). Together these results support our hypothesis that fungal communities change in response to different carbon sources. We found 11 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) whose relative abundances differed at least marginally significantly among substrates. One OTU related to Mortierella increased in abundance under cellulose, but was absent or rare under the other substrates. Another OTU related to an unidentified Basidiomycete was only present under lignin addition, while yet another OTU closely related to Mortierella macrocystis greatly increased in abundance under tannin-protein and slightly increased in response to lignin and sucrose. This confirms our hypothesis that particular taxa respond differently to specific carbon substrates and suggests that some fungal taxa may specialize in the break-down of particular carbon sources in soils. Overall, our results imply that microbes have varying roles in the mineralization of soil carbon, and thus microbial community composition may be an important control over ecosystem carbon dynamics and storage, especially in relation to global change.

Hanson, C. A.; Allison, S. D.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Mellilo, J. M.; Treseder, K. K.

2006-12-01

200

The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

1994-01-01

201

Analytical data for waters of the Harvard Open Pit, Jamestown Mine, Tuolumne County, California, March 1998-September 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Jamestown mine is located in the Jamestown mining district in western Tuolumne County, California (see Fig. 1). This district is one of many located on or near the Melones fault zone, a major regional suture in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The districts along the Melones fault comprise the Mother Lode gold belt (Clark, 1970). The Harvard pit is the largest of several open pits mined at the Jamestown site by Sonora Mining Corporation between 1986 and 1994 (Fig. 2; Algood, 1990). It is at the site of an historical mine named the Harvard that produced about 100,000 troy ounces of gold, mainly between 1906 and 1916 (Julihn and Horton, 1940). Sonora Mining mined and processed about 17,000,000 short tons of ore, with an overall stripping ratio of about 4.5:1, yielding about 660,000 troy ounces of gold (Nelson and Leicht, 1994). Most of this material came from the Harvard pit, which attained dimensions of about 2700 ft (830 m) in length, 1500 ft (460 m) in width, and 600 ft (185 m) in depth. The bottom of the pit is at an elevation of 870 ft (265 m). Since mining operations ceased in mid-1994, the open pit has been filling with water. As of November, 2000, lake level had reached an elevation of about 1170 ft (357 m). Water quality monitoring data gathered after mine closure showed rising levels of arsenic, sulfate, and other components in the lake, with particularly notable increases accompanying a period of rapid filling in 1995 (County of Tuolumne, 1998). The largest potential source for arsenic in the vicinity of the Harvard pit is arsenian pyrite, the most abundant sulfide mineral related to gold mineralization. A previous study of weathering of arsenian pyrite in similarly mineralized rocks at the Clio mine, in the nearby Jacksonville mining district, showed that arsenic released by weathering of arsenian pyrite is effectively attenuated by adsorption on goethite or coprecipitation with jarosite, depending upon the buffering capacity of the pyrite-bearing rock (Savage and others, 2000). Although jarosite would be expected to dissolve in water having the composition of the developing pit lake, iron oxyhydroxide species (ferrihydrite and goethite) would be stable, and strong partitioning of arsenic onto suspended particles or bottom sediments containing these iron phases would be expected. Arsenic release to the lake would not be expected until stratification develops, producing a reducing, non-circulating hypolimnion in which the iron phases would be destroyed by dissolution. The fact that arsenic concentrations increased rapidly before the pit lake was deep enough to stratify shows that arsenic may not be attenuated in the ways that the earlier Clio mine area study indicated, and suggested that our understanding of release and transport of arsenic in this environment is incomplete. Therefore, in 1997 we decided to study the chemical evolution of the Harvard pit lake as part of a project on environmental impacts of gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, and in early 1998 we developed a cooperative study with several of the investigators in the Stanford University Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences who had done the Clio study. The U.S. Geological Survey portion of the project has been funded by the Mineral Resources Program. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the release and transport of arsenic into the Harvard pit lake and its accumulation there will contribute to more accurate predictions of arsenic release from weathering of sulfide-bearing rocks exposed by mining or other activities or events, and to better forecasts of pit lake evolution in this and similar environments, leading to more effective monitoring and mitigation strategies. An accurate predictive model is needed for the Harvard pit lake to forecast trends in metal concentrations, particularly arsenic, and also concentrations of major cations and anions. As the lake approaches pre-mining groundwater levels the lake water could move down the hydrologic gradient to the southeast into domestic wells, and could also affect the surface

Ashley, R. P.; Savage, K. S.

2001-01-01

202

The "nuts and bolts" of implementing shared medical appointments: the Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates experience.  

PubMed

Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (Harvard Vanguard) decided to develop a Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) program in 2007 for a variety of reasons. The program has launched 86 SMAs in 17 specialties at 12 sites and has exceeded 13 000 patient visits. Currently, the practice offers 54 SMAs and is believed to be the largest program in the country. This article provides an overview regarding staffing, space and equipment, project planning, promotional materials, training programs, workflow development, and the use of quality improvement (ie, LEAN) tools used to monitor the work to be completed and the metrics to date. PMID:22668614

Berger-Fiffy, Jill

2012-01-01

203

Glimpses of an Eclipsed Heritage: Photography of Afghanistan in the Collections of the Fine Arts Library at Harvard  

Microsoft Academic Search

The photographic collections of Harvard's Fine Arts Library have benefited from a recurring interest in augmenting its holdings of the art and architecture, and, latterly, the ethnography of Afghanistan. Approximately 9,000 images reflect nearly 90 years of photography and nearly 70 years of collecting. Starting with Benjamin Rowland and his expedition to Afghanistan in 1936, a series of Harvard scholars

Jeffrey B. Spurr

2005-01-01

204

The Son of an African Revolutionary Goes to Harvard.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the story of Philippe Wamba, the son of an African American woman and an African revolutionary. Wamba describes the huge cultural and racial divide that separates African college students from both white students and African American students at the elite university which he attended, noting that he found himself most comfortable with…

Wamba, Philippe

2000-01-01

205

Implications of Biomedical Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society; Research Review Number One.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A small number of books and articles devoted to the social, political, ethical, and legal implications of the biomedical field and technology have been abstracted for this document. A basic criterion for selection was the focus on questions of overall organization and public policy rather than on more specialized concerns. Topics covered include…

Taviss, Irene, Ed.; Koivumaki, Judith, Ed.

206

Implications of Computer Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lengthy abstracts of a small number of selected books and articles on the implications of computer technology are presented, preceded by a brief state-of-the-art survey which traces the impact of computers on the structure of economic and political organizations and socio-cultural patterns. A summary statement introduces each of the three abstract…

Taviss, Irene; Burbank, Judith

207

Validation of a Tibetan Translation of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to translate and validate the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL) and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) in a Tibetan population. Translated questionnaires were administered to 57 Tibetan survivors of torture/human rights abuses living in the United States and receiving services in a torture treatment program. Participants…

Lhewa, Dechen; Banu, Sophia; Rosenfeld, Barry; Keller, Allen

2007-01-01

208

Training of Generalists in Medicine and Pediatrics: Experience at Harvard, and Adding a General Medicine Track  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Joseph Dorsey describes the development of the Harvard Medical School service program now serving 40,000 members in two health centers. Planning considerations for developing the primary care residency are included. Arnold Relman discusses the role of internal medicine and pediatrics in training primary care physicians noting subspecialization…

Dorsey, Joseph; Relman, Arnold S.

1975-01-01

209

An Insider Perspective on Implementing the Harvard Case Study Method in Business Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides practical guidance on the implementation of the CSM (case study method) using the HBS (Harvard Business School) model. The analysis is based on the first-hand experience of the author as a user and implementer of this mode of instruction. The results are further validated with surveys given to MBA (Master of Business…

Rebeiz, Karim S.

2011-01-01

210

A 2-Year Progress Report of the AACAP-Harvard Macy Teaching Scholars Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) has partnered with the Harvard Macy Program for Healthcare Educators so that selected child and adolescent psychiatry academic faculty might enhance their teaching expertise in order to possibly enhance recruitment of medical students into child and adolescent psychiatry.…

Hunt, Jeffrey; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Hanson, Mark; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.; Cuccio, Anne; Dingle, Arden D.; Glowinski, Anne; Guthrie, Elizabeth; Kelley, Kathy; Malloy, Erin M.; Mehlinger, Renee; O'Melia, Anne; Shatkin, Jess; Anders, Thomas F.

2008-01-01

211

Spotlight on Student Engagement, Motivation, and Achievement. No. 5 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only when students feel engaged both socially and academically can schools and teachers lay the groundwork to motivate achievement. This volume, the fifth in the "Harvard Education Letter" Spotlight series, brings together fifteen seminal articles that examine research and practice on these complex and interrelated issues. Contributors include:…

Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

2009-01-01

212

EVALUATION OF THE HARVARD OZONE PASSIVE SAMPLER ON HUMAN SUBJECTS INDOORS  

EPA Science Inventory

A small, inexpensive ozone passive sampler was developed by Koutrakis et al. (1) to provide a convenient means for measuring ozone. This paper presents validation results of the Harvard ozone passive sampler and investigation of ozone behavior around the human body through a seri...

213

Allometry and built form: revisiting Ranko Bon's work with the Harvard Philomorphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ranko Bon's Master's thesis at Harvard was devoted to the phenomenon of allometry in the forms of buildings. The concept of allometry comes from biology, and refers to changes in the forms of organisms as they alter in size. For example the ratio of volume to surface exposed to the air (including the lungs) is of great functional importance to

Philip Steadman

2006-01-01

214

"Universities, the Major Battleground in the Fight for Reason and Capitalism"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the turn of the twentieth century, the presidents of Harvard University, Columbia University, and the University of Chicago issued declarations bolstering institutional resistance to attempts by external agencies to influence a faculty member's stance on issues of the day. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) emerged some…

Jones, Gary H.

2010-01-01

215

Taking the British Library Forward in the Twenty-First Century; Harvard's Library Digital Initiative: Building a First Generation Digital Library Infrastructure; Spoken Words, Unspoken Meanings: A DLI2 Project Ethnography; Resource Guide for the Social Sciences: Signposting a Dissemination and Support Route for Barefoot and Meta-Librarians in UK Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes four articles that discuss strategic planning in the British Library, including electronic strategies and collaborative partnerships; Harvard University's plans for a digital library infrastructure; the National Gallery of the Spoken Word, a Digital Library Initiative (DLI)-funded project that is language-related; and promoting networked…

Brindley, Lynne; Flecker, Dale; Seadle, Michael; Huxley, Lesly; Ford, Karen

2000-01-01

216

Two Former Harvard Scientists Arrested for Stealing and Violation of Employment Agreement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wednesday, June 19, scientists Jiangyu Zhu, a 30-year old Chinese citizen, and Kayoko Kimbara, a 32-year old Japanese citizen, were charged with stealing trade secrets from a laboratory at Harvard Medical School's department of cell biology. According to the federal complaint, the trade secrets included both biological materials and scientific documents relating to drug research that has the potential to help the body accept transplanted organs. Both scientists were working in the lab of Frank McKeon, a Harvard professor, when they made significant discoveries about several genes that offered a potential means of treating diseases affecting the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. The tools used for the drug research was developed with the help of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and American Cancer Society funds, and are also used to develop anti-rejection drugs and to study genes that regulate a potentially important enzyme.According to the allegations, Mr. Zhu, who worked in the Harvard lab from February 1997 until December 1999, and Ms. Kimbara, who worked there from October 1998 until December 1999, secretly sent three of the newly discovered genes to a Japanese company (a violation of their employment agreements with Harvard). Once receiving the genes, the Japanese company then produced antibodies based on the information. The Japanese company has fully cooperated with the FBI and has returned all research data and products to Harvard. Consequently, both Zhu and Kimbara were arraigned in federal court on charges of conspiracy, theft of trade secrets, and interstate transportation of stolen property. For more information concerning this story, viewers may access the first three links listed above. For information on the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health, and NIH grants and funding opportunities, viewers may access links four, five, and six, respectively.

Green, Marcia.

2002-01-01

217

The Volunteer Health Advisor Program of Cambridge Health Alliance: "A Bridge Between the Community and the Health Care System" Cambridge, Massachusetts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cambridge Health Alliance's Volunteer Health Advisor (VHA) Program was developed to create an effective and cost efficient outreach network to improve community health status. The program's mission is to improve community health by working collaboratively with faith-based and community-based organizations to recruit, train, and support a…

Perspectives in Peer Programs, 2005

2005-01-01

218

A Funding Initiative for Community-Based Participatory Research: Lessons from the Harvard Catalyst Seed Grants  

PubMed Central

Background The National Institutes of Health–funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) have increasingly focused on community-engaged research and funded investigators for community-based participatory research (CBPR). However, because CBPR is a collaborative process focused on community-identified research topics, the Harvard CTSA and its Community Advisory Board (CERAB) funded community partners through a CBPR initiative. Objectives We describe lessons learned from this seed grants initiative designed to stimulate community–academic CBPR partnerships. Methods The CBPR program of the Harvard CTSA and the CERAB developed this initiative and each round incorporated participant and advisory feedback toward program improvement. Lessons Learned Although this initiative facilitated relevant and innovative research, challenges included variable community research readiness, insufficient project time, and difficulties identifying investigators for new partnerships. Conclusion Seed grants can foster innovative CBPR projects. Similar initiatives should consider preliminary assessments of community research readiness as well as strategies for meaningful academic researcher engagement.

Tendulkar, Shalini A.; Chu, Jocelyn; Opp, Jennifer; Geller, Alan; DiGirolamo, Ann; Gandelman, Ediss; Grullon, Milagro; Patil, Pratima; King, Stacey; Hacker, Karen

2013-01-01

219

Evaluation of environmental filtration control of engineered nanoparticles using the Harvard Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES)  

PubMed Central

Applying engineering controls to airborne engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is critical to prevent environmental releases and worker exposure. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two air sampling and six air cleaning fabric filters at collecting ENPs using industrially relevant flame-made engineered nanoparticles generated using a versatile engineered nanomaterial generation system (VENGES), recently designed and constructed at Harvard University. VENGES has the ability to generate metal and metal oxide exposure atmospheres while controlling important particle properties such as primary particle size, aerosol size distribution, and agglomeration state. For this study, amorphous SiO2 ENPs with a 15.4 nm primary particle size were generated and diluted with HEPA-filtered air. The aerosol was passed through the filter samples at two different filtration face velocities (2.3 and 3.5 m/min). Particle concentrations as a function of particle size were measured upstream and downstream of the filters using a specially designed filter test system to evaluate filtration efficiency. Real time instruments (FMPS and APS) were used to measure particle concentration for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm. Membrane-coated fabric filters were found to have enhanced nanoparticle collection efficiency by 20–46 % points compared to non-coated fabric and could provide collection efficiency above 95 %.

Echevarria-Vega, Manuel E.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Santeufemio, Christopher; Schmidt, Daniel; Demokritou, Philip; Ellenbecker, Michael

2013-01-01

220

Applying problem-based learning to the teaching of anatomy: the example of Harvard Medical School  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of problem-based learning techniques into the teaching of anatomy has been subject to great controversies.\\u000a This paper debates the rationale behind this concept using the example of the curriculum of Harvard Medical School in which\\u000a problem-based learning techniques have been used during the past 20 years. The anatomy curriculum is covered during the eight\\u000a first weeks of the medical

René Yiou; Daniel Goodenough

2006-01-01

221

A Funding Initiative for Community-Based Participatory Research: Lessons from the Harvard Catalyst Seed Grants  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Background: The National Institutes of Health-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) have increasingly focused on community-engaged research and funded investigators for community-based participatory research (CBPR). However, because CBPR is a collaborative process focused on community-identified research topics, the Harvard CTSA and its Community Advisory Board (CERAB) funded community partners through a CBPR initiative.Objectives: We describe lessons learned from this

Karen Hacker; Ann DiGirolamo; Shalini A. Tendulkar; Ediss Gandelman; Jocelyn Chu; Stacey King; Jennifer Opp; Pratima Patil; Alan Geller; Milagro Grullon

2011-01-01

222

A Funding Initiative for Community-Based Participatory Research: Lessons from the Harvard Catalyst Seed Grants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The National Institutes of Health-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) have increasingly focused on community-engaged research and funded investigators for community-based participatory research (CBPR). However, because CBPR is a collaborative process focused on community-identified research topics, the Harvard CTSA and its Community Advisory Board (CERAB) funded community partners through a CBPR initiative. Objectives: We describe lessons learned from

Karen Hacker; Ann DiGirolamo; Shalini A. Tendulkar; Ediss Gandelman; Jocelyn Chu; Stacey King; Jennifer Opp; Pratima Patil; Alan Geller; Milagro Grullon

2011-01-01

223

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 91-086-2235, Harvard Industries, Inc., Trim Trends Division, Bryan, Ohio.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from management and the Allied Industrial Workers of America, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions in the Trim Trends Division of Harvard Industries (SIC-3442), Bryan, Ohio. Concern was expressed abou...

N. C. Burton Y. Boudreau K. A. Grant

1992-01-01

224

The Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD): graduate outcomes of the first MB/PhD programme in the UK.  

PubMed

We reviewed outcomes of the Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programme for the period 1989-2010. Of the 90 alumni contacted, 80 (89%; 24 women) completed an anonymous questionnaire. Thirty were academic staff and 35 were in general professional (core) or higher medical training. Of the latter, 11 were specialty registrars, six were academic clinical fellows and three held academic foundation year posts. Eight alumni were overseas, including five in North America. Most (95%) respondents considered that their academic career goals were facilitated by the programme. Sixty-eight of the 80 alumni had conducted further research, 63 (79%) were active in research, and 90% had explicit plans for further full-time research. Twelve graduates had further substantive research support (six clinician scientist awards and three senior fellowships) and two were Wellcome Trust postdoctoral MB/PhD fellows. Alumni included two full university professors, one reader, six senior lecturers, two assistant professors and nine university clinical lecturers. MB/PhD programmes offer an alternative training pathway for clinician-scientists in UK medical schools: the Cambridge programme promotes scientific discovery and sustained academic development within the context of contemporary medicine and clinical practice. PMID:23342406

Cox, Timothy M; Brimicombe, James; Wood, Diana F; Peters, D Keith

2012-12-01

225

A concept in the right place at the wrong time: congestion metering in the city of Cambridge  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 1990s the concept of congestion metering was considered in the context of the city of Cambridge. A trial was undertaken in October 1993 but it did not proceed beyond this stage. Why was this so? The paper attempts first to outline the reasons why the city of Cambridge presented an ideal opportunity for the implementation of some

Stephen Ison

1998-01-01

226

"Teaching Physics as one of the humanities": The history of (harvard) project Physics, 1961-1970  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the United States after World War II, science had come to occupy a central place in the minds of policy makers, scientists, and the public. Negotiating different views between these groups proved a difficult task and spilled into debates over the role and scope of science education. To examine this process, this dissertation traces the history of Harvard Project Physics (HPP), a high-school physics curriculum from the 1960s that incorporated a humanistic and historical approach to teaching science. The narrative begins with the rise of General Education in the 1940s. Under the leadership of Harvard president James Conant, faculty at Harvard developed several Natural Science courses that connected science to history as a way to teach students about science and its relationship to culture. By the late 1950s this historical approach faced resistance from scientists who viewed it as misrepresenting their disciplines and called for students to learn specialized subject matter. With the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), in the early 1960s scientists' vision of science education emerged in high-school classrooms across the country. By the mid 1960s, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and the Daddario Amendment to the NSF, the political and education landscape began to change. These laws transformed the goals of two of the NSF and the Office of Education (USOE). These organizations faced demands to work together to develop projects that would speak to domestic concerns over equity and diversity. Their first joint educational venture was HPP. In order to succeed, HPP had to speak to the needs of disciplinary-minded scientists at the NSF, equity-minded educators at the USOE, and results-focused politicians in Congress. This work argues that HPP succeeded because it met the needs of these various stakeholders regarding the roles of science and education in American society.

Meshoulam, David

227

Provisional Approaches to Goals for School Mathematics; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 37.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-6. In view of the experiences of other curriculum groups and of the general discussions since 1963, the present report initiates the next step in evolving the "Goals".…

Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

228

Symmetry Motion Classes; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 40.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. This document details the planning and response for each of ten lessons involving symmetry motions. The problems focused on (1) combining motions in a given order,…

McLane, Lyn

229

Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a…

Armstrong, Michael

2011-01-01

230

Legacies, Policies and Prospects: One Year on from the Cambridge Primary Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the "Cambridge Primary Review." The "Review" has been supported from the beginning by Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, and this has given it the independence which is essential to its credibility. Its remit was to investigate, report and make recommendations on the condition and future of primary education in England. Its scope…

Alexander, Robin

2011-01-01

231

What To Look for in ESL Admission Tests: Cambridge Certificate Exams, IELTS, and TOEFL.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Familiarizes test users with issues to consider when employing assessments for screening and admission purposes. Examines the purpose, content, and scoring methods of three English-as-a-Second-Language admissions tests--the Cambridge certificate exams, International English Language Teaching System, and Test of English as a Foreign…

Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline; Turner, Carolyn E.

2000-01-01

232

The Walsworth Group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Walsworth Group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics created this website to present its multidisciplinary research using state-selected atoms. The website provides images and lengthy descriptions of the center's many experimental research projects such as low magnetic field MRI for humans and granular media dynamics. Researchers can view abstracts and download papers describing recent results. The site does provide downloads for numerous student theses, but, in order to view many of them, users need to save the link first.

233

Harvard-led study finds cancer may require simpler genetic mutations than previously thought  

Cancer.gov

Chromosomal deletions in DNA often involve just one of two gene copies inherited from either parent. But scientists haven't known how a deletion in one gene from one parent, called a "hemizygous" deletion, can contribute to cancer. A research team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has now provided an answer. The most common hemizygous deletions in cancer, their research shows, involve a variety of tumor suppressing genes called STOP genes (suppressors of tumorigenesis and proliferation) that scatter randomly throughout the genome, but that sometimes cluster in the same place on a chromosome. And these clusters tend to be deleted as a group.

234

Research productivity, university revenue, and scholarly impact (citations) of 169 British, Canadian and United States universities (1977)  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and sixty-nine universities, comprising three separate samples from Britain, Canada, and the United States were evaluated in terms of their productivity across all disciplines. The 1977Arts and Humanities, Social Science, andScience Citation Indices were used as the basis for counting the total number of publications from each of the universities. The 10 overall most productive universities were Harvard

J. P. Rushton; S. Meltzer

1981-01-01

235

Frank Aydelotte, Oxford University, and the Thought Movement in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Frank Aydelotte is best remembered for developing in the 1930s and 1940s the nation's most innovative and influential honors program, based on the education he received as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. As coordinator of freshman English at Indiana University, Aydelotte attacked the dominant Harvard model of instruction while promoting a method…

Moran, Michael G.

236

Radioactive waste management at a large university medical research complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes radioactive waste management at Harvard University. To contain costs and to reduce the impact of the low-level radioactive waste policy act, the program takes advantage of decay in storage, incineration, special packaging techniques, and increased training and awareness. A series of metrics, numerical ratios, are presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the radioactive waste management program. Through

J. Ring; F. Osborne; W. Lorenzen

1995-01-01

237

Academic-industrial relations before the blockbuster drugs: lessons from the Harvard Committee on Pharmacotherapy, 1939-1943.  

PubMed

Increasing discussion has developed in recent years over the nature of the relationship between academic medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. This article narrates the history of a little-known attempt at Harvard Medical School between 1939 and 1943 to establish an interdisciplinary, academic-industrial Committee on Pharmacotherapy to enhance and rationalize the relationship between the field of academic research in pharmacotherapeutics and the pharmaceutical industry. Using original archival materials, the authors depict the functioning of the committee, which was headed by Soma Weiss and included such members as Fuller Albright, Henry Beecher, and Walter Cannon. The committee would be collectively funded by seven pharmaceutical companies and was to be predicated on collaboration, both across the entire university and between academia and industry. It was expected to transform the bench-to-bedside study and testing of therapeutic compounds, to redefine the teaching of pharmacotherapy, and to create a unified forum through which to discuss the overall academic-industrial relationship and more specific issues such as patents. Unfortunately, the program proved to be short-lived, the victim of such contingent factors as the untimely death of Soma Weiss and America's entry into World War II, as well as such more fundamental factors as the inadequate and temporary nature of the funding stream and unresolved tensions regarding the goals of the committee on the part of both the medical school and its industry supporters. Nevertheless, these early forays into collaborative bench-to-bedside translational research and the rationalization of academic-industrial relations remain instructive today. PMID:21346508

Podolsky, Scott H; Greene, Jeremy A

2011-04-01

238

Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

Adelstein, S.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Office of Sponsored Programs

1995-02-01

239

A Daring Experiment: Harvard and Business Education for Women, 1937-1970  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Women have been educated at the Harvard Business School (HBS) since 1937, and this online exhibit from the Baker Library at HBS provides a wealth of material on the period from "the first daring experiment in 'practical education' for women" in 1937 to 1970, when women became residents in HBS dormitories. The materials here are organized chronologically into areas like "Co-Education: Women and Men at Harvard Business School, 1963-1970". As users proceed through this collection, they will find images from the period, along with short essays that flesh out the various ways in which women were incorporated into the academic programs and life of the HBS. Visitors can also take a look at the "Oral Histories Collection" area which includes interviews with four women who graduated from the program during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. The site is rounded out by a brief guide to the in situ archival collections held at the Baker Library which deal with this subject.

240

Was Early Entry a Competitive Advantage? US Universities That Entered Computing in the 1940s  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses whether early entry was a competitive advantage in academic computing. This is accomplished by examining the first three decades of computing at five universities - MIT, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia and Princeton - that initiated computing programs in the 1940s.

William Aspray

2000-01-01

241

The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Innovative University illustrates how higher education can respond to the forces of disruptive innovation , and offers a nuanced and hopeful analysis of where the traditional university and its traditions have come from and how it needs to change for the future. Through an examination of Harvard and BYU-Idaho as well as other stories of…

Christensen, Clayton M.; Eyring, Henry J.

2011-01-01

242

Edward Y. Hartshorne and the Reopening of German Universities, 1945-1946: His Personal Account.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Characterizes U.S. Edward Y. Hartshorne as a "manager of German social recovery." An instructor at Harvard University and protege of sociologist Talcott Parsons, Hartshorne was instrumental in the post-war reopening of German universities. Discusses Hartshorne's activities in military intelligence and psychological warfare, as well as the…

Tent, James F.

1997-01-01

243

Digitization Procedures of Analogue Seismograms from the Adam Dziewonski Observatory (HRV) at Harvard, MA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This project explores methods of digitization of analogue seismic recordings for better preservation and to facilitate data distribution to the community. Different techniques are investigated using seismograms from one particular station, the Adam Dziewonski Observatory (HRV) at Harvard, Massachusetts. This seismological station, still in operation as a part of the Global Seismographic Network today, is one of the oldest stations in the United States. The station was built in 1933, and since its installation, the station has produced approximately 16,000 analogue seismograms. The majority of these recordings were taken between 1933 and 1953, with some intermittent recordings between 1962 and 1998 after digital seismometers had become a standard. These analogue seismograms have the potential of expanding the database for seismological research such as identification of events previously not catalogued. Due to poor storage environment at the station, some of the records, especially those on regular type of paper, are damaged beyond repair. Nevertheless, many of the records on photographic paper are in better condition, and we have focused on a subset of these recordings that are least damaged. Even these seismograms require cleaning and, in consultation with the Weissman Preservation Center of Harvard Library, preparation techniques for the photographic records are examined. After the seismograms are cleaned and flattened, three different equipments are investigated for digitization, i.e., a copy machine, scanner, and camera. These instruments allow different imaging resolutions, ranging from 200 dots per inch (dpi) to 800 dpi. The image resolution and the bit depth have a wide range of implications that are closely linked to the digitization program one chooses to convert the image to time series. We explore three different software for this conversion, SeisDig (Bromirski and Chuang, 2003), Teseo2 (Pintore and Quintiliani, 2008), and NeuraLog (www.neuralog.com), and determine advantages and disadvantages associated with each software. One of the important features of the software is the automatic tracing algorithms. The success of the automatic tracing depends upon many factors, and this is examined using examples from long and short period recordings with high amplitude (thin and fading lines), and long and short period recordings with low amplitude (well-defined lines). Automatically traced data are also compared to manually traced samples. Based upon these results, we propose a set of procedures and recommendations for cleaning, imaging scheme including resolution and bit depth, and digitization software. Ultimately, we would like to outline a robust procedure for mass seismogram digitization and process all the Harvard station recordings and make them available to the community through the IRIS Data Management Center.

Torpey, M.; Ishii, M.

2010-12-01

244

U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CALIBRATION OF HARVARD PM SAMPLERS (UA-L-6.1)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for calibrating Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers. This procedure applies directly to the Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers used during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the Border study. Keywords: lab; equipment;...

245

U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR HARVARD PM IMPACTOR CALIBRATION AND LEAK TESTING (UA-L-7.1)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the periodic calibration and leak testing of Harvard particulate matter (PM) impactor units. This procedure applies directly to the calibration and leak testing of Harvard PM impactor units used during the Arizona NHEXAS ...

246

NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR HARVARD PM IMPACTOR CALIBRATION AND LEAK TESTING (UA-L-7.1)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the periodic calibration and leak testing of Harvard particulate matter (PM) impactor units. This procedure applies directly to the calibration and leak testing of Harvard PM impactor units used during the Arizona NHEXAS ...

247

NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CALIBRATION OF HARVARD PM SAMPLERS (UA-L-6.1)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for calibrating Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers. This procedure applies directly to the Harvard particulate matter (PM) samplers used during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: lab; equipmen...

248

Conveying the Meaning of the Economic Crisis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late summer of 2008, after the 2007-2008 fiscal year's books had closed, the nation's wealthiest universities were confronted with an unfamiliar sight: single-digit endowment returns. Not since 2003 had Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Princeton University (Princeton, New Jersey), or Stanford University (Stanford, California)…

Anderson, Luke A.

2010-01-01

249

Calculated Sunspot and Quiet-Sun Mg II Profiles Compared With IRIS DataEugene Avrett and Hui TianHarvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new sunpsot model has been derived, consistent with the SUMER atlas data of Curdt, et al. and Mg II profile data from IRIS. Comparisons are made with Quiet-Sun results from both sources. It is necessary to include molecules in the sunspot model not only account for the low brightness temperatures near 1850 /AA but also for the density variations higher in the atmosphere. The minimum temperature is roughly 2500 K in the sunspot model and 4500 K for the quiet Sun. The Mg II H line profile is centrally reversed in both cases, with the peak intensity originating where the temperature rises abruptly from the minimum value. The line center is formed at the top of the chromosphere where the temperature rises abruptly from 10,000 K into the chromosphere-corona transition region. The calculated Mg II line center intensity is much smaller than observed, for models constrained by the EUV continuum data.

Avrett, Eugene H.

2014-06-01

250

Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

Dupree, Andrea K.

1998-01-01

251

Recent improvements to the Cambridge Arabic Speech-to-Text systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes recent improvements to the Cambridge Arabic Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition (LVSCR) Speech-to-Text (STT) system. It is shown that Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) features trained on phonetic targets can improve the performance of both phonemic and graphemic systems. Also, a morphological decomposition scheme is extended from the graphemic domain to the phonetic domain, and particular attention is given

Marcus Tomalin; Frank Diehl; Mark J. F. Gales; Junho Park; Philip C. Woodland

2010-01-01

252

Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW\\/m2 steady-state, 1 GW\\/m2 in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>1024 m-2 s-1) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (1018 neutrons\\/m2 s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator

G. M. Wright; H. S. Barnard; Z. S. Hartwig; P. W. Stahle; R. M. Sullivan; K. B. Woller; D. G. Whyte

2011-01-01

253

Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW?m2 steady-state, 1 GW?m2 in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>1024 m?2 s?1) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (1018 neutrons?m2 s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator

G. M. Wright; H. S. Barnard; Z. S. Hartwig; P. W. Stahle; R. M. Sullivan; K. B. Woller; D. G. Whyte

2011-01-01

254

New books in review  

Microsoft Academic Search

RHETORIC IN GRECO?ROMAN EDUCATION. By Donald Lemen Clark. New York: Columbia University Press, 1957; pp. xiii+ 285. $4.50.ENGLISH POLITICS IN THE EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (Harvard Historical Monographs XXVIII). By Robert Walcott, Jr. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1956; pp. viii+291. $3.50.CONGRESSMAN ABRAHAM LINCOLN. By Donald W. Riddle. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1957; pp. x+280. $4.50.REVIVALISM AND SOCIAL REFORM IN MID

Carroll Arnold; Charles Daniel Smith; Earl W. Wiley; Paul H. Boase; J. W. Bachman; William G. McCollom; Edward Partridge; John H. McDowell; Jack Clay; John A. Walker; Garff B. Wilson; David Laird; H. F. Harding; Elizabeth Carr; James W. Abel; Edcar E. Willis; Dorothy Kester; C. Van Riper; Lester L. Hale; Ruth Beckey Irwin; Johnnye Akin; Huber Ellingsworth; Earl Cain; Dwight L. Freshley; N. Edd Miller; A. L. McLeod; Ordean G. Ness

1957-01-01

255

Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds and Observations of VOC Oxidation at Harvard Forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to oxidant concentrations and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in forested environments depends on the emission rates of these compounds. Recent findings have suggested that the emission rates of BVOCs and the range of species emitted could be larger than previously thought. In this study, Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to obtain fast (<1 Hz) measurements of the predominant BVOC species, including isoprene, monoterpenes, and oxygenated BVOCs, above the canopy at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA) during the summers of 2005, 2007, and 2008. Together with vertical wind data, these measurements are used to determine fluxes of BVOCs out of the forest using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method. Concentrations of additional VOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein and terpene oxidation products were also measured. Isoprene is the dominant emitted species, with peak emission rates and midday mixing ratios of ca. 4 mg isoprene m-2 h-1 and ca. 5 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene emission rates are expected to vary with temperature and radiation (PAR) levels, and are compared to standard emission algorithms based on these parameters. Interannual variability in isoprene emission rates is also observed, and contributing factors are explored. In contrast to isoprene, maximum monoterpene concentrations typically were less than 1 ppbv and occurred in the early evening, with a local minimum at midday. Monoterpene fluxes are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of isoprene. The amplitude of the flux diurnal cycle suggests monoterpene emissions at Harvard Forest may exhibit light dependence as well as temperature dependence. Fluxes of oxygenated VOCs, including methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and oxygenated terpenes that have rarely been observed previously, are also reported, and the dependence of their emission rates on factors such as time of year, temperature, radiation levels, and meteorological conditions are investigated.

McKinney, K. A.; Pho, T.; Vasta, A.; Lee, B. H.

2009-12-01

256

WiFi Weather Station and Snow Depth Monitoring System for Snow Research at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PI, Dr. Rob Hellstrom, has been studying snow cover at the Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research (HFR) station over the past three years (Hellstrom, 2008). This research has applied leading-edge sensor technology to measure the impact of various types of forest cover on winter and spring season snow accumulation and the newly installed wireless network at HFR provides

Robert Hellström

2010-01-01

257

Salvaging "Academic Disaster Areas": The Black College Response to Christopher Jencks and David Riesman's 1967 Harvard Educational Review Article  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1967, the "Harvard Educational Review" published an article entitled "The American Negro College" by Christopher Jencks and David Riesman. The article dealt a stinging blow to Black colleges--labeling them "academic disaster areas." Using a historical methodology, I show the strategic ways in which Black college leaders and the United Negro…

Gasman, Marybeth

2006-01-01

258

Harvard researchers find that red meat consumption is linked to increased risk of total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality  

Cancer.gov

A new study from Harvard School of Public Health researchers has found that red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. The results also showed that substituting other healthy protein sources, such as fish, poultry, nuts, and legumes, was associated with a lower risk of mortality.

259

Universities of the Third Age: Learning in Retirement. Trends and Issues Alert No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief suggests that Universities of the Third Age (U3As) provide learning opportunities for older adults. Worldwide, they typically take one of two forms. Based on the first U3A founded in 1973, the French model is university based and offers mostly formal courses. Arising in Cambridge in 1981, the British model emphasizes informal,…

Kerka, Sandra

260

Selection and Admission Procedures at the University of Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland (UBLS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland (UBLS) is a regional four-year liberal arts university influenced by the British educational system. Admission to UBLS is contingent on: (1) scoring high on the Cambridge Overseas School Certificate (COSC), (2) scoring high on the General Certificate of Education (GCE) Examination, (3) scoring high…

Sebatane, E. Molapi

261

Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

Flynn, Emily Alinder

2013-01-01

262

Time Domain Astronomy with the Harvard Plates: from Cepheids to DASCH  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ~500,000 Harvard glass plate photographic negatives are the world’s largest and most complete (full sky; 107y time span) database for Time Domain Astronomy (TDA) on days-months-decades to century timescales. With plate fields of view ranging from 3o - 30o exposed quasi-randomly full sky from 1885 - 1992, any object is observed ~1000 - 3000 times, with limiting magnitudes ranging from B =12-18. I briefly review some of the colorful history of this massive plate-taking project and a few of the pivotal discoveries (e.g. the “Leavitt Law” for the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation) made by visual studies of the plates by the true TDA pioneers, the likely <300 different visual users of the plates. I then describe our Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project to fully digitize and reduce this wealth of data 1 Pb) and provide it on spinning disk to the full astronomical community and public. Using the full-sky APASS catalog giving BVR magnitudes (for V ~9-17) as well as GSC2.3.2 for both fainter and brighter stars, DASCH does spatially resolved (0.25o -0.6o bins) photometric calibrations to derive B magnitudes with rm 0.1mag over the full plate and over the (typically) ~6-8 different principal plate series (telescopes and plate scales) covering any given object, along with ~0.3-1 arcsec astrometry (depending on plate scale) for each stellar object averaged over ~1year. The high speed/precision scanner, plate processing, and analysis pipeline have now enabled the first data releases (DR1-DR3) of 12 to cover full sky and already enabled a wealth of new discoveries. I describe a few examples, such as: K2III giants with decadal variations; a new class of Symbiotic novae; ~50-100y recurrence times for black hole X-ray binary outbursts; and QPOs from 3C273. The DASCH data are increasingly available 15% now; 100% in 3.5y) for TDA on largely unexplored timescales. We are grateful to NSF for support with grants AST-0407380, AST-0909073 and AST-1313370.

Grindlay, Jonathan E.

2014-06-01

263

Reliability and physiologic correlates of the Harvard Alumni Activity Survey in a general population.  

PubMed

The reliability of the Harvard Alumni Activity Survey (HAAS) and its association with physiologic measures was assessed in a large sample of men and women aged 25-65 years residing in the Boston metropolitan area in 1987. Reliability was estimated by comparing HAAS energy expenditure reports (kcal/week) from two separate interviews conducted 7-12 weeks apart. The test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.58 for the entire sample, but was considerably higher (r = 0.69) for those whose activity patterns had not changed from one interview to the next. HAAS self-reports were compared to two physiologic measures known to be affected by physical activity: high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) and body mass index (BMI). The natural logarithm of weekly HAAS expenditures was positively correlated with HDLC (r = 0.14, p less than 0.01) and negatively correlated with BMI (r = 0.13, p less than 0.01) for all respondents. These statistically significant associations persisted when adjusted for other covariates influencing physiologic status. The reliability coefficients and physiologic correlations for the HAAS in this sample are comparable to those reported for physical activity instruments requiring more intensive data collection and scoring procedures. PMID:1753263

Washburn, R A; Smith, K W; Goldfield, S R; McKinlay, J B

1991-01-01

264

Geologic map of the Harvard Lakes 7.5' quadrangle, Park and Chaffee Counties, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Harvard Lakes 1:24,000-scale quadrangle spans the Arkansas River Valley in central Colorado, and includes the foothills of the Sawatch Range on the west and Mosquito Range on the east. The Arkansas River valley lies in the northern end of the Rio Grande rift and is structurally controlled by Oligocene and younger normal faults mostly along the west side of the valley. Five separate pediment surfaces were mapped, and distinctions were made between terraces formed by the Arkansas River and surfaces that formed from erosion and alluviation that emanated from the Sawatch Range. Three flood deposits containing boulders as long as 15 m were deposited from glacial breakouts just north of the quadrangle. Miocene and Pliocene basin-fill deposits of the Dry Union Formation are exposed beneath terrace or pediment deposits in several places. The southwestern part of the late Eocene Buffalo Peaks volcanic center, mostly andesitic breccias and flows and ash-flow tuffs, occupy the northeastern corner of the map. Dated Tertiary intrusive rocks include Late Cretaceous or early Paleocene hornblende gabbro and hornblende monzonite. Numerous rhyolite and dacite dikes of inferred early Tertiary or Late Cretaceous age also intrude the basement rocks. Basement rocks are predominantly Mesoproterozoic granites, and subordinately Paleoproterozoic biotite gneiss and granitic gneiss.

Kellogg, Karl S.; Lee, Keenan; Premo, Wayne R.; Cosca, Michael A.

2013-01-01

265

The psychopharmacology algorithm project at the Harvard South Shore Program: an update on schizophrenia.  

PubMed

This article is an update of the algorithm for schizophrenia from the Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program. A literature review was conducted focusing on new data since the last published version (1999-2001). The first-line treatment recommendation for new-onset schizophrenia is with amisulpride, aripiprazole, risperidone, or ziprasidone for four to six weeks. In some settings the trial could be shorter, considering that evidence of clear improvement with antipsychotics usually occurs within the first two weeks. If the trial of the first antipsychotic cannot be completed due to intolerance, try another until one of the four is tolerated and given an adequate trial. There should be evidence of bioavailability. If the response to this adequate trial is unsatisfactory, try a second monotherapy. If the response to this second adequate trial is also unsatisfactory, and if at least one of the first two trials was with risperidone, olanzapine, or a first-generation (typical) antipsychotic, then clozapine is recommended for the third trial. If neither trial was with any these three options, a third trial prior to clozapine should occur, using one of those three. If the response to monotherapy with clozapine (with dose adjusted by using plasma levels) is unsatisfactory, consider adding risperidone, lamotrigine, or ECT. Beyond that point, there is little solid evidence to support further psychopharmacological treatment choices, though we do review possible options. PMID:23656760

Osser, David N; Roudsari, Mohsen Jalali; Manschreck, Theo

2013-01-01

266

Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.  

PubMed

At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two. PMID:22974374

Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

2013-02-01

267

The clinical course of body dysmorphic disorder in the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project (HARP).  

PubMed

This report prospectively examines the course of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) for up to 8 years in a sample of 514 participants in the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project, a naturalistic, longitudinal study of anxiety disorders. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) BDD was assessed with a reliable semi-structured measure. For participants with BDD, severity of BDD symptoms was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation Psychiatric Status Rating scale. At the initial assessment, 17 participants (3.3%; 95% confidence interval = 1.8%-4.8%) had current BDD; 22 (4.3%; 95% confidence interval = 2.6%-6.1%) had lifetime BDD. Participants with BDD had significantly lower Global Assessment Scale scores than those without BDD, indicating poorer functioning. The probability of full recovery from BDD was 0.76, and probability of recurrence, once remitted, was 0.14 over the 8 years. In conclusion, among individuals ascertained for anxiety disorders, the probability of recovering from BDD was relatively high and probability of BDD recurrence was low. PMID:21206248

Bjornsson, Andri S; Dyck, Ingrid; Moitra, Ethan; Stout, Robert L; Weisberg, Risa B; Keller, Martin B; Phillips, Katharine A

2011-01-01

268

George Ellery Hale's Early Solar Research at Chicago, Kenwood, Harvard, and Yerkes Observatories, 1882-1904  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Growing up in Chicago, George Ellery Hale, later the prime spirit in founding the AAS, was a precocious boy scientist. He was deeply interested in spectroscopy and astrophysics from an early age. His wealthy parents encouraged Hale's aspirations with magazines, books, and instruments, and he acquired his first telescope when he was 14. He knew as mentors classical astronomers S. W. Burnham and George W. Hough, but he preferred astrophysics and designed his own Kenwood Physical Obseervatory around a grating in a Rowland circle mounting, fed by a heliostat, both built for him by instrument-maker John A. Brashear. For his undergraduate thesis at MIT, Hale invented and (at Harvard College Observatory) demonstrated the spectroheliograph. With it, and a high-quality 12-in refractor at his later Kenwood Astrophysical Observatory (at the same site, the Hale family home, 4 miles from the present Hilton Hotel where the SPD, HAD and AAS are meeting) Hale did excellent solar research, especially on promineneces, flocculi, and the near-ultraviolet spectrum of the chromosphere. As a teen-ager and a young adult Hale traveled widely, and met several important piuoneer solar physicists, including Charles A. Young, Jules Janssen, Samuel P. Langley, and Henry Rowland. Hale designed Yerkes Observatory for solar and stellar research, and headed the solar work himself. One of his aims always was to compare other stars with the sun. Hale's telescopes, instruments, methods, and resulting papers will be described and illustrated by numerous slides.

Osterbrock, D. E.

1999-05-01

269

Cambridge Municipal Airport, Cambridge, Minnesota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed project contemplates the acquisition of land to permit future construction of a new single runway at the present airport site and to provide for clear zones and related facilities for the runway. Ultimately, the project will include an asphal...

1971-01-01

270

Normal Range of Cambridge Low Contrast Test; a Population Based Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the range of contrast sensitivity (CS) and its determinants in a normal population, Mashhad, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional population based study, 4,453 individuals were invited of whom 3,132 persons agreed to participate (response rate, 70.4%). CS data from 2,449 eligible individuals were analyzed. CS was determined using the Cambridge low contrast square-wave grating test, and its associations with age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) refractive error, were analyzed. Results Mean age of the participants was 29.1±17.3 (range, 4-89) years and 66.4% were female. Mean CS was 239.6±233.3 and 234.6±228.6 cps in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean binocular CS was 310.9±249.0 cps. Multiple linear regression showed that CS was inversely correlated with older age (?=-1.1, P<0.001), female gender (?=-40.1, P<0.001), poorer BCVA (?=-165.4, P<0.001), and severity of myopia (?=-10.2, P<0.001). Conclusion The normal range of Cambridge low-contrast grating test reported herein may serve as a reference for the general population in Iran. Our findings can be used for both research and clinical applications, particularly for evaluations of the outcomes of refractive surgery. In the current study, CS was lower in older subjects, myopic individuals and patients with lower BCVA.

Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Heravian, Javad; Abdolahinia, Tahereh; Norouzi Rad, Reza; Asgari, Soheila; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

2014-01-01

271

The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge  

PubMed Central

Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances.

Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L.; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

2013-01-01

272

The Harvard Clean Energy Project. Large-scale computational screening and design of molecular motifs for organic photovoltaics on the World Community Grid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic solar cells are one of the promising approaches to ubiquitously establishing renewable energy sources; alas the necessary 10% energy conversion efficiency remains elusive. We present the Harvard Clean Energy Project (CEP, http:\\/\\/cleanenergy.harvard.edu) which is concerned with the screening and design of organic photovoltaics (and organic electronics in general) by means of first-principles computational quantum chemistry. We use modern DFT

Johannes Hachmann; Roberto Olivares-Amaya; Sule Atahan-Evrenk; Carlos Amador-Bedolla; Alan Aspuru-Guzik

2011-01-01

273

The Soul of the American University. From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the role of Protestantism in America's colleges and universities, tracing the history of the influence of religion on these institutions from preeminence to obscurity, from the founding of Harvard in the 1630s through the collapse of the traditional establishment in the 1960s. Ranging from stories of many of our pace-setting…

Marsden, George M.

274

The Making of the Modern University: Intellectual Transformation and the Marginalization of Morality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, which is based on research at eight universities--Harvard (Massachusetts), Yale (Connecticut), Columbia (New York), Johns Hopkins (Maryland), Chicago (Illinois), Stanford (California), Michigan, and California at Berkeley explores the transition from the classical college, with its broad nineteenth-century conceptions of morality and…

Reuben, Julie A.

275

Mental Health Service Usage by Students Attending an Historically Black College/University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The advent of a changing world market and global economy has intensified the pressure experienced by today's college students. Competition for jobs, admittance into graduate school programs, and membership into prestigious honor societies led Dr. Richard Kadison, chief of mental health services at Harvard University and author of "College of the…

Henderson, Floyd T., II; Geyen, Dashiel; Rouce, Sandra D.; Griffith, Kimberly Grantham; Kritsonis, William Allan

2007-01-01

276

A View of the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This lavishly illustrated photographic exploration of the universe will delight everyone intrigued by the night sky. This is the finest collection of color photographs of star clusters, galaxies, and nebulae ever published. Working with the world's most sophisticated telescopes and his own revolutionary techniques, world renowned astronomical photographer David Malin captures distant worlds and phenomena in their astonishing natural colors. These unique pictures are accompanied by nontechnical captions and a lucid text accessible and inspiring to the general reader as well as to astronomers and photographers. The foremost astronomical photographer in the world, David Malin is the discoverer of an enigmatic galaxy now known as Malin-1 and the coauthor of Colours of the Stars and Catalogue of the Universe, both published by Cambridge University Press. His photographs have appeared in locations as diverse as Australian postage stamps and the cover of Life magazine.

Malin, David F.

1993-11-01

277

Testing the Bouchet-Morton Complementary Hypothesis at Harvard Forest using Sap Flux Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bouchet-Morton Complementary Relationship (CR) states that at a given surface moisture availability (MA), changes in actual evapotranspiration (ETa) are reflected in changes in potential evapotranspiration (ETp) such that ETa + ETp = 2ET0, where ET0 is an assumed equilibrium evaporation condition at which ETa = ETp = ET0 at maximum MA. Whereas ETp conceptually includes a potential transpiration component, existing CR model estimates of ET_ {p are based upon the Penman combination equation for open water evaporation (ETp,Pen). Recent CR investigations for a temperate grassland at FIFE suggest, however, that the convergence between ETa and ETp,Pen will only occur if a maximum canopy conductance is included in the estimation of ETp. The purpose of this study was to conduct a field investigation at Harvard Forest to test the hypothesis that a CR-type relationship should occur between red maple ( Acer rubrum L.) actual transpiration and red maple potential transpiration, i.e., transpiration given unlimited root- zone MA via localized irrigation. Just as pan evaporation (ETp,Pen) is a physical gauge of ETp, we therefore question whether a well- irrigated maple is a potential transpirator. Daily averages of whole-tree transpiration for our co- occurring irrigated red maple network and reference network were calculated using high-frequency constant-heat sap flux sensor (i.e., Granier-type) measurements. Soil moisture, temperature and matric potential parameters were measured using Campbell Scientific sensors. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between potential and actual transpiration differs significantly from ETa and ETp,Pen in the context of CR, adding useful insight into both ETp estimation and the understanding of physiological response to MA variability.

Pettijohn, J. C.; Salvucci, G. D.; Phillips, N. G.; Daley, M. J.

2005-12-01

278

The affect of a clearcut environment on woody debris respiration rate dynamics, Harvard Forest, Massachusetts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At an ecosystem scale, the distribution of carbon is largely a function of stand development and disturbance processes. Clearcut logging remains a common practice both in the United States and globally and typically results in elevated storage of carbon in onsite woody debris and detritus. The residence time and decomposition rate of this woody debris and detritus will affect the rate of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and thus affect the long term consequences of such disturbances on carbon flux and storage. The removal of a forest canopy also affects a site's microclimate including the albedo, air temperature, air humidity, as well as soil temperature and moisture, many of the same factors that affect the rate of woody debris decomposition. Thus it could be expected that differences in woody debris characteristics (e.g. size, abundance, state of decay), as well as differences in microclimate, between mature and recently clearcut forest sites, would result in differences in piece and site-level woody debris decomposition rates. Although woody debris stocks post-harvest have been well characterized, few studies have explored post-disturbance woody debris respiration rates, which directly measures carbon emissions from woody debris, distinguishing decomposition from mass loss due to fragmentation or leaching. This study addressed the question: does a clearcut environment in a temperate forest affect the rate of decomposition of coarse woody debris? The rate of respiration of downed spruce logs were repeatedly measured in-situ using an LI-6250 gas analyzer in Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts. Treatments included clear-cut, shaded clear-cut, mature spruce stand, and transfer (from clearcut to spruce stand). Gas analyzer measurements were accompanied by measurements of log temperature and percent water, soil temperature, moisture and pH, as well as light levels, air temperature and humidity to determine dominant drivers of respiration rates.

Vanderhoof, M. K.; Williams, C. L.

2011-12-01

279

Better Management for Better Schools: A Review of the Structure and Functions of the Central Office of Cambridge Public Schools. Advisory Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reviews the structure and functions of the Central Office of Cambridge Public Schools, Massachusetts. During the 1990s, the Cambridge school system and other Massachusetts school districts faced intense pressure to raise student achievement in the face of redefined public expectations for public schools. This change in expectations is…

Spence, Lewis H.

280

Factors Affecting Reservoir and Stream-Water Quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area and Implications for Source-Water Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking water source area, ...

M. C. Waldron G. C. Bent

2001-01-01

281

[Screening for depersonalization-derealization with two items of the cambridge depersonalization scale].  

PubMed

Depersonalization (DP) and derealization (DR) are considered to be highly underdiagnosed. Therefore the development of screening instruments is important. From the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) two items were extracted discriminating best patients with clinical significant DP from patients without DP. These two Items were assembled to a short version of the CDS. This short version (CDS-2) was tested in a sample of 38 patients with clinical significant DP-DR and 49 patients without or only mild DP-DR. Scores were compared against clinical diagnoses based on a structured interview (gold standard). The CDS-2 was able to differentiate patients with clinical significant DP well from other groups (cut-off of CDS-2>or=3, sensitivity=78.9%, specifity=85.7%) and also showed high reliability (Cronbachs alpha=0.92). Therefore the CDS-2 can be considered as a useful tool for screening and identification of DP-DR. PMID:19544244

Michal, Matthias; Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Tschan, Regine; Edinger, Jens; Lichy, Marcel; Knebel, A; Tuin, Inka; Beutel, Manfred

2010-05-01

282

Asian Influenza in 1963 in Two General Practices in Cambridge, England  

PubMed Central

A clinical, epidemiological and virological investigation was conducted on patients in two general practices in Cambridge, England, during an influenza epidemic between February and April 1963. The epidemiological pattern differed from that of the 1957-58 Asian influenza epidemic in that the overall incidence was considerably lower (3.2%) and that the highest attack rates were not in school children but in pre-school children (71.5 per 1000 persons). Virological investigation confirmed the diagnosis of Influenza A2 infection in 56 of 63 patients (89%). Isolations were made in 29 of 51 specimens tested. Serological studies revealed that the complement fixation test was more reliable than hemagglutination - inhibition or neutralization tests. Clinical features resembled those reported in previous epidemics, cough, headache and limb pains being prominent features.

Banatvala, J. E.; Reiss, B. B.; Anderson, T. B.; Nitkin, Betty C.

1965-01-01

283

State Control, Religious Deference and Cultural Reproduction: Some Problems with Theorising Curriculum and Pedagogy in the Cambridge Primary Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article offers a critique of the quality of theorising underlying proposals on curriculum and pedagogy in the Cambridge Primary Review. Despite its strengths, the review is seen as omitting consideration of three major areas in primary education: gifted pupils, teacher effectiveness research and the private sector. Questions are raised about…

Campbell, R. J.

2011-01-01

284

State control, religious deference and cultural reproduction: some problems with theorising curriculum and pedagogy in the Cambridge Primary Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article offers a critique of the quality of theorising underlying proposals on curriculum and pedagogy in the Cambridge Primary Review. Despite its strengths, the review is seen as omitting consideration of three major areas in primary education: gifted pupils, teacher effectiveness research and the private sector. Questions are raised about the review's use of evidence about a broad and

R. J. Campbell

2011-01-01

285

M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

Blazer, Christie

2011-01-01

286

A survey on worries of pregnant women - testing the German version of the Cambridge Worry Scale  

PubMed Central

Background Pregnancy is a transition period in a woman's life characterized by increased worries and anxiety. The Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) was developed to assess the content and extent of maternal worries in pregnancy. It has been increasingly used in studies over recent years. However, a German version has not yet been developed and validated. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the extent and content of worries in pregnancy on a sample of women in Germany using a translated and adapted version of the Cambridge Worry Scale, and (2) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the German version. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study and enrolled 344 pregnant women in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Women filled out structured questionnaires that contained the CWS, the Spielberger-State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI), as well as questions on their obstetric history. Antenatal records were also analyzed. Results The CWS was well understood and easy to fill in. The major worries referred to the process of giving birth (CWS mean value 2.26) and the possibility that something might be wrong with the baby (1.99), followed by coping with the new baby (1.57), going to hospital (1.29) and the possibility of going into labour too early (1.28). The internal consistency of the scale (0.80) was satisfactory, and we found a four-factor structure, similar to previous studies. Tests of convergent validity showed that the German CWS represents a different construct compared with state and trait anxiety but has the desired overlap. Conclusions The German CWS has satisfactory psychometric properties. It represents a valuable tool for use in scientific studies and is likely to be useful also to clinicians.

2009-01-01

287

Validation of the Harvard Lyman-? in situ water vapor instrument: Implications for the mechanisms that control stratospheric water vapor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Building on previously published details of the laboratory calibrations of the Harvard Lyman-? photofragment fluorescence hygrometer (HWV) on the NASA ER-2 and WB-57 aircraft, we describe here the validation process for HWV, which includes laboratory calibrations and intercomparisons with other Harvard water vapor instruments at water vapor mixing ratios from 0 to 10 ppmv, followed by in-flight intercomparisons with the same Harvard hygrometers. The observed agreement exhibited in the laboratory and during intercomparisons helps corroborate the accuracy of HWV. In light of the validated accuracy of HWV, we present and evaluate a series of intercomparisons with satellite and balloon borne water vapor instruments made from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the tropics and midlatitudes. Whether on the NASA ER-2 or WB-57 aircraft, HWV has consistently measured about 1-1.5 ppmv higher than the balloon-borne NOAA/ESRL/GMD frost point hygrometer (CMDL), the NOAA Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer (CFH), and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite in regions of the atmosphere where water vapor is <10 ppmv. Comparisons in the tropics with the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite show large variable differences near the tropopause that converge to ˜10% above 460 K, with HWV higher. Results we show from the Aqua Validation and Intercomparison Experiment (AquaVIT) at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe do not reflect the observed in-flight differences. We illustrate that the interpretation of the results of comparisons between modeled and measured representations of the seasonal cycle of water entering the lower tropical stratosphere is dictated by which data set is used.

Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Spackman, J. R.; Hintsa, E. J.; Hanisco, T. F.; Moyer, E. J.; St. Clair, J. M.; Sargent, M. R.; Anderson, J. G.

2009-12-01

288

Harvard study finds modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interaction may not substantially improve risk prediction  

Cancer.gov

Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers have found that detailed knowledge about your genetic makeup—the interplay between genetic variants and other genetic variants, or between genetic variants and environmental risk factors—may only change your estimated disease prediction risk for three common diseases by a few percentage points, which is typically not enough to make a difference in prevention or treatment plans. It is the first study to revisit claims in previous research that including such information in risk models would eventually help doctors either prevent or treat diseases.

289

Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: providing an IND/IDE consult service in a decentralized network of academic healthcare centers.  

PubMed

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator-initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor-investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator-initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter-institutional capacity. PMID:24455986

Kim, Min J; Winkler, Sabune J; Bierer, Barbara E; Wolf, Delia

2014-04-01

290

Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt  

SciTech Connect

Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

2012-03-01

291

Workshop on Environmental Technology Assessment Held at the University of Cambridge, England Held on 24-26 April, 1985.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Regulative and Technical Measures for Air Pollution Control in the Federal Republic of Germany; Abatement Technologies for Air Pollutants; Economic Issues in the Control of Air Pollution; Megatrends in Water Treatment Technologies; Emerging Tech...

P. W. R. Beaumont R. K. Jain R. S. Engelbrecht

1985-01-01

292

Contemporary exercise physiology: fifty years after the closure of Harvard Fatigue Laboratory.  

PubMed

The relationships between the discipline of exercise physiology and the activities of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory were examined. Even though 5 decades have elapsed since the Laboratory's closure, its existence, leaders, and accomplishments continue to be revered by exercise physiologists. The Laboratory was unique because it was the first research facility of its type and because no single exercise physiology laboratory in the United States since 1947 has been able to attract the stature of the national and international investigators that conducted the interdisciplinary research published by the Laboratory. Despite the inference from its name, the Laboratory's purpose was not to advance the discipline of exercise physiology; rather, it was to advance our understanding and interactions of applied physiology, physiology, and sociology. Consequently, its contributions to the critical mass of exercise physiology literature were limited even though may of the publications were seminal in nature. As documented by the Horvaths, the closure resulted in the establishment of many different research laboratories by former Laboratory staff members and associates (R.E. Johnson at Illinois, Horvath at Santa Barbara, and Dill at Nevada); however, their impact on exercise physiology was delayed because Keys and Robinson had left for Minnesota and Indiana, respectively, well in advance of closing. Unfortunately, the administrative structure and organization of the Laboratory was not conducive to the training of Ph.D candidates with an interest in exercise physiology. Consequently, only two individuals graduated during its existence. Since departments of physiology or biology had limited faculty or interest in preparing students for such a future before and after closure, departments of physical education with specialization graduate programs in exercise physiology assumed this responsibility, which was facilitated by post-World War II funding that supported mass education, graduate training, health related research, and facility development. Today, the majority of the leaders in exercise physiology are the "products" of the specialization movement. Although undergraduates were encouraged to participate in the research activities, the talented faculty of the Laboratory did not offer formal courses in exercise physiology. Thus, the development of an academic discipline in exercise physiology was left to institutions that required a science-oriented curriculum in their undergraduate and graduate degree programs in physical education, exercise science, or kinesiology. The emergence of exercise physiology as a discipline in the United States was enhanced by the publications of the Journal of Applied Physiology in 1948 and by Medicine and Science in Sports in 1969. These were peer-reviewed journals that were interested in publishing research studies on exercise topics. Two other reasons contributed to its development. The first was the creation of an Applied Physiology Study Section at the National Institute of Health in 1964, whose purpose was to evaluate grant proposals in subject matter area intrinsic to exercise physiology, while the second reason was the formation of the American College of Sports Medicine in 1954. ACSM was an important for the establishment of the discipline because it had an organizational structure that encouraged exercise physiologists to join, provided opportunities for members to present at regional and national meetings, and would publish their findings. Although the American Physiological Society had been established more than a 100 years ago, only a limited number of its members were interested and active in exercise physiology at the time of the Laboratory's closure or at the beginning of the specialization era (1963). However, in 1977, APS created a membership section that included exercise physiology in its title. Currently, both APS and ACSM are effectively representing the professional interests of exercise ph PMID:9696994

Tipton, C M

1998-01-01

293

Testing the Cambridge Quality Checklists on a review of disrupted families and crime  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews of the relationship between non-manipulated factors (e.g. low empathy) and offending are becoming more common, and it is important to consider the methodological quality of studies included in such reviews. Aims To assess aspects of the reliability and validity of the Cambridge Quality Checklists, a set of three measures for examining the methodological quality of studies included in systematic reviews of risk factors for offending. Methods All 60 studies in a systematic review of disrupted families and offending were coded on the CQC and codes compared with the effect sizes derived from the studies. Results Overall, the CQC was easy to score, and the relevant information was available in most studies. The scales had high inter-rater reliability. Only 13 studies scored high on the Checklist of Correlates, 18 scored highly on the Checklist of Risk Factors and none scored highly on the Checklist of Causal Risk Factors. Generally, studies that were of lower quality had higher effect sizes. Conclusions The CQC could be a useful method of assessing the methodological quality of studies of risk factors for offending but might benefit from additional conceptual work, changes to the wording of some scales and additional levels for scoring. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Jolliffe, Darrick; Murray, Joseph; Farrington, David; Vannick, Claire

2012-01-01

294

Factor structure of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale in trauma-exposed college students.  

PubMed

This study examined the factor structure of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS; M. Sierra & G. E. Berrios, 2000 ), a 29-item self-report measure of depersonalization. The CDS was based on a conceptualization of depersonalization as a multidimensional construct, a theoretical perspective that has received limited empirical attention. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on CDS item scores in a sample of 534 trauma-exposed college students. Results failed to support factor structures of the CDS previously reported in the literature and instead supported a 2-factor solution, with 1 factor representing a sense of unreality and detachment and a 2nd factor representing emotional and physical numbing. Implications regarding the structural validity of the CDS are discussed. [Supplementary material is available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Trauma & Dissociation for the following resource: Four tables with the following information: inter-correlations among CDS items from Samples 1 and 2; Sierra et al. (2005 ) four-factor model and Simeon et al. (2008 ) five-factor model estimated factor loadings, covariances, and R-square in Sample 1; Factor loadings for 3-7 factor EFA models in Sample 1; and estimated factor loadings for one-factor CFA model in Sample 2.]. PMID:23627478

Blevins, Christy A; Witte, Tracy K; Weathers, Frank W

2013-01-01

295

Bone anchored hearing aids: a second fixture reduces auditory deprivation in Cambridge.  

PubMed

Bone anchored hearing aids are well established for canal atresia, otosclerosis and chronic suppurative otitis media. Refinements in technique to maximise gain while keeping the complications to a minimum are desirable. This study was taken up in order to explore the potential advantage of a second or spare fixture placed at the time of primary surgery. A group of patients who underwent BAHA insertion at The Emmeline Centre for Cochlear Implants and Bone Anchored Hearing Aids, Addenbrookes hospital, Cambridge, UK with the placement of a spare fixture between 1999 and 2002 were compared to those patients with one fixture BAHA undertaken from 1991. Main outcome measures were complications encountered and duration of disability, (i.e. loss of hearing while waiting for new fixture placement). Both groups had similar incidence of complications, but the group with two fixtures suffered a shorter period of disability when a fixture failed. In our experience the use of second or spare fixture reduces the duration of disability. It engenders no additional complications with minimal extra cost. PMID:17415580

Durvasula, V S P; Patel, H; Mahendran, S; Gray, R F

2007-09-01

296

Using a neural network to proximity correct patterns written with a Cambridge electron beam microfabricator 10.5 lithography system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This letter describes the initial results of using a theoretical determination of the proximity function and an adaptively trained neural network to proximity-correct patterns written on a Cambridge electron beam lithography system. The methods described are complete and may be applied to any electron beam exposure system that can modify the dose during exposure. The patterns produced in resist show the effects of proximity correction versus noncorrected patterns.

Cummings, K. D.; Frye, R. C.; Rietman, E. A.

1990-10-01

297

A Robust Method of Measuring Other-Race and Other-Ethnicity Effects: The Cambridge Face Memory Test Format  

PubMed Central

Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian).

McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

2012-01-01

298

A robust method of measuring other-race and other-ethnicity effects: the Cambridge Face Memory Test format.  

PubMed

Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

2012-01-01

299

The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

Seider, Scott C.

2012-01-01

300

Restorative Justice Programs, Gender, and Recidivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Restorative justice programs, which attempt to reintegrate offenders into society by building and strengthening interpersonal relationships, may provide the juvenile justice system with an effective option for female offenders. If women and men have different values, and women value connections with others while men value independence and autonomy [Gilligan, C. (1982). In A Different Voice. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press],

Lori Elis

2005-01-01

301

Macro Simulations for PCs in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The macroeconomic model in Ray C. Fair's textbook, "Specification, Estimation, and Analysis of Macroeconometric Models" (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984), has been programed to run on a personal computer. The model consists of 128 equations. The model's potential for use as a teaching tool is discussed. (RM)

Case, Karl E.; Fair, Ray C.

1985-01-01

302

Bootstrapping Word Order in Prelexical Infants: A Japanese-Italian Cross-Linguistic Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning word order is one of the earliest feats infants accomplish during language acquisition [Brown, R. (1973). "A first language: The early stages", Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.]. Two theories have been proposed to account for this fact. Constructivist/lexicalist theories [Tomasello, M. (2000). Do young children have adult…

Gervain, Judit; Nespor, Marina; Mazuka, Reiko; Horie, Ryota; Mehler, Jacques

2008-01-01

303

Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference, August 22-27, 1999, hosted by the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The meeting is a forum for presenting and discussing new chemical and isotopic measurements, experimental and theoretical results, and discoveries in geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

1999-01-01

304

Figured World of History Learning in a Social Studies Methods Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers how one teacher educator, Dr. Gomez, took up revisionist history and inquiry in her social studies methods\\u000a classroom. The concepts of figured worlds (Holland et al., 1998) [Holland, D., Lachicotte, W. Jr., Skinner, D., & Cain, C. (1998). Identity and agency in cultural worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press], and artifacts and mediation (Holland & Cole, 1995; Vygotsky

Cecil Robinson

2007-01-01

305

Considerations for a revision of the fern family Vittariaceae for Flora Malesiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lindsay, S. (Arnold Arboretum & Harvard University Herbaria, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA) 2003. Considerations for a revision of the fern family Vittariaceae for Flora Malesiana. Telopea 10(1): 99-112. The Vittariaceae is a family of mostly tropical epiphytic or lithophytic fern species. The family is particularly well represented in Malesia but the number of species present and the

Stuart Lindsay

306

One, two, three, four, nothing more: An investigation of the conceptual sources of the verbal counting principles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the publication of [Gelman, R., & Gallistel, C. R. (1978). The child’s understanding of number. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on the development of verbal counting as a representation of number, the nature of the ontogenetic sources of the verbal counting principles has been intensely debated. The present experiments explore proposals according to which the verbal counting

Mathieu Le Corre; Susan Carey

2007-01-01

307

Cultural Consumption Patterns in South Africa: An Investigation of the Theory of Cultural Omnivores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contrary to Bourdieu's theory ("Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste". Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press (1984)) that cultural consumption of so-called "high" versus popular culture is determined by socio-economic class, Peterson ("Poetics" 21:243-258, 1992; "Poetics" 33:257-282, 2005) finds that higher income…

Snowball, J. D.; Jamal, M.; Willis, K. G.

2010-01-01

308

Figured World of History Learning in a Social Studies Methods Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers how one teacher educator, Dr. Gomez, took up revisionist history and inquiry in her social studies methods classroom. The concepts of figured worlds (Holland et al., 1998) [Holland, D., Lachicotte, W. Jr., Skinner, D., & Cain, C. (1998). "Identity and agency in cultural worlds." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press], and…

Robinson, Cecil

2007-01-01

309

New books  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Globe Playhouse. By John C. Adams. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1942; pp. 419. $5.00.Voice Science. By Lyman Spicer Judson and Andrew Thomas Weaver. New York: F. S. Crofts & Co. 1942; pp. 377 + xvii. $3.75.The Rhetoric of Alcuin and Charlemagne. A Translation, with an Introduction, the Latin Text, and Notes. By Wilbur Samuel Howell. (Princeton Studies in English,

John Dolman Jr; Giles Wilkeson Gray; Donald C. Bryant; Albert H. Marckwardt; Barnard Hewitt; J. Calvin Callaghan; Lucile Folse; Donald Hayworth; J. Garber Drushal; Howard Gilkinson; Wayne Thompson; Merel R. Parks; John E. Dietrich; Karl R. Wallace; Herbert V. Hake

1942-01-01

310

One, Two, Three, Four, Nothing More: An Investigation of the Conceptual Sources of the Verbal Counting Principles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the publication of [Gelman, R., & Gallistel, C. R. (1978). "The child's understanding of number." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on the development of verbal counting as a representation of number, the nature of the ontogenetic sources of the verbal counting principles has been intensely debated. The present…

Le Corre, Mathieu; Carey, Susan

2007-01-01

311

Is Performance in English as a Second Language a Relevant Criterion for Admission to an English Medium University?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined whether the current entry requirement at the National University of Lesotho of a Cambridge Overseas School Certificate (COSC) credit in English helps in the selection of the most promising students. Found that performance in school-level English is hardly correlated with academic performance, when controlling for overall school…

Seelen, L. P.

2002-01-01

312

Policies to increase the social value of science and the scientist satisfaction. An exploratory survey among Harvard bioscientists.  

PubMed Central

Basic research in the biomedical field generates both knowledge that has a value per se regardless of its possible practical outcome and that has the potential to produce more practical benefits. Policies can increase the benefit potential to society of basic biomedical research by offering various kinds of incentives to basic researchers. In this paper we argue that soft incentives or “nudges” are particularly promising. However, to be well designed, these incentives must take into account the motivations, goals and views of the basic scientists. In the paper we present the results of an investigation that involved more than 300 scientists at Harvard Medical School and affiliated institutes. The study shows that basic researchers’ support for soft incentives is such that the transformative value of fundamental investigations can be increased without affecting the spirit of the basic research and scientists’ work satisfaction. After discussing the findings, we suggest a few examples of nudges and discuss one in more detail.

Ballabeni, Andrea

2014-01-01

313

Harvard-led study finds extending trastuzumab for 2 years does not significantly improve outcomes versus 1 year  

Cancer.gov

One year of treatment with the targeted drug trastuzumab is as good as two years of treatment for women with HER2-positive early breast cancer who have already received initial treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy as needed, researchers have found. The HERA trial, which has been run by the Breast International Group since 2001--and led by researchers from the Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute--is an international, multi-center, phase III randomized study involving 5,102 women with early HER2-positive breast cancer. Details of the study were presented at the ESMO 2012 Congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology in Vienna.

314

College Binge Drinking in the 1990s: A Continuing Problem Results of the Harvard School of Public Health 1999 College Alcohol Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999, the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study resurveyed colle ges that participated in the 1993 and 1997 surveys. Responses to mail questionnaires from more than 14 000 students at 119 nationally r epresentative 4-year col- leges in 39 states were compared with responses recei ved in 1997 and 1993. Two of 5 students (44%) were binge

Henry Wechsler; Jae Eun Lee; Meichun Kuo; Hang Lee

2000-01-01

315

The validation of in situ measurements of water isotopes on the NASA WB57: scientific implications of the Harvard Hoxotope and ICOS observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Water Isotope Intercomparison mission that grew from the spirit of validation that is essential for the in situ instruments that support the AURA mission, has provided a new high quality data set of water isotope observations with the built in capability for critical evaluation. We will discuss the observations of the two Harvard water vapor isotope instruments with a

T. F. Hanisco; J. M. St. Clair; E. J. Moyer; E. M. Weinstock; J. R. Spackman; F. N. Keutsch; J. B. Smith; D. M. Sayres; J. G. Anderson; R. L. Herman; R. Troy; T. P. Bui

2005-01-01

316

Underage College Students' Drinking Behavior, Access to Alcohol, and the Influence of Deterrence Policies: Findings from the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underage drinking is a major problem at American colleges, but little is known about the extent of alcohol use in dif- ferent student groups, in different colleges, and in states with dif- ferent control policies. We used data from the 2001 and 3 previous Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Studies that compared responses of underage students with those

Henry Wechsler; Jae Eun Lee; Toben F. Nelson; Meichun Kuo

2002-01-01

317

Evaluation of a brief anti-stigma campaign in Cambridge: do short-term campaigns work?  

PubMed Central

Background In view of the high costs of mass-media campaigns, it is important to understand whether it is possible for a media campaign to have significant population effects over a short period of time. This paper explores this question specifically in reference to stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems using the Time to Change Cambridge anti-stigma campaign as an example. Methods 410 face-to-face interviews were performed pre, during and post campaign activity to assess campaign awareness and mental health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Results Although campaign awareness was not sustained following campaign activity, significant and sustained shifts occurred for mental health-related knowledge items. Specifically, there was a 24% (p < 0.001) increase in persons agreeing with the statement: If a friend had a mental health problem, I know what advice to give them to get professional help, following the campaign. Additionally, for the statement: Medication can be an effective treatment for people with mental health problems, there was a 10% rise (p = 0.05) in the proportion of interviewees responding 'agree' or 'strongly agree' following the campaign. These changes, however, were not evident for attitudinal or behaviour related questions. Conclusions Although these results only reflect the impact of one small scale campaign, these preliminary findings suggest several considerations for mass-media campaign development and evaluation strategies such as: (1) Aiming to influence outcomes pertaining to knowledge in the short term; (2) Planning realistic and targeted outcomes over the short, medium and long term during sustained campaigns; and (3) Monitoring indirect campaign effects such as social discourse or other social networking/contact in the evaluation.

2010-01-01

318

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Dorchester County, Maryland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Maryland, penetrated 3,299 feet of unconsolidated Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments and bottomed in quartz-monzonite gneiss. The well was drilled to provide data for a study of the aquifer system of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Twenty-one core samples were collected. Six sand zones were tested for aquifer properties and sampled for ground-water chemistry. Point-water heads were measured at seven depths. Environmental heads (which ranged from - 18.33 to + 44.16 feet relative to sea level)indicate an upward component of flow. A temperature log showed a maximum temperature of 41.9 degrees Celsius and a mean temperature gradient of 0.00838 degrees Celsius per foot. The water analyses delineated the freshwater-saltwater transition zone between 2,650 and 3,100 feet. The ground water changes progressively downward from a sodium bicarbonate to a sodium chloride character. Clays in the analyzed core samples belong to the montmorillonite and kaolinite groups, and mean cation exchange capacity ranged from 8.3 to 38.9 milliequivalents per 100 grams. Vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities measured in cores ranged from 1.5 x 10 6 to 1.3 feet per day and from 7.3 x 10 -6 to 1.3 feet per day, respectively, but the most permeable sands were not cored. Porosity was 1.5 percent in the quartz monzonite bedrock and ranged from 22.4 to 41 percent in the overlying sediments. Transmissivities from aquifer tests ranged from 25 to 850 feet squared per day; horizontal hydraulic conductivities ranged from.2.5 to 85 feet squared per day, and intrinsic permeabilities ranged from 0.8 to 23 micrometers squared. Fossils identified in core samples include palynomorphs, dinoflagellates, and foraminifers.

Trapp, Henry, Jr.; Knobel, Leroy L.; Meisler, Harold; Leahy, P. Patrick

1984-01-01

319

Essential Steps for Web Surveys: A Guide to Designing, Administering and Utilizing Web Surveys for University Decision-Making. Professional File. Number 102, Winter 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past few years, several Harvard paper surveys were converted to Web surveys. These were high-profile surveys endorsed by the Provost and the Dean of the College, and covered major portions of the university population (all undergraduates, all graduate students, tenured and non-tenured faculty). When planning for these surveys started in…

Cheskis-Gold, Rena; Loescher, Ruth; Shepard-Rabadam, Elizabeth; Carroll, Barbara

2006-01-01

320

Two Approaches to the Use of Blogs in Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers' Professional Development: A Comparative Study in the Context of Two Universities in the UK and the US  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the use of blogs for pre-service language teacher education in two national settings, the UK (University of Cambridge) and the US (University of South Florida). Taking two approaches to blogging and to learning through blogging (one based on self-reflection and a constructivist approach and one based on social and…

Fisher, Linda; Kim, Deoksoon

2013-01-01

321

Shuttle Astronauts Visit NASA's X-Ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge to Coordinate Plans for Launch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-- June 25, 1998 Eileen Collins, the first U.S. woman commanderof a Space Shuttle mission and her fellow astronauts for NASA s STS-93 mission toured the Operations Control Center (OCC) for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) today. AXAF is scheduled for launch on January 26, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. They met with the staff of the OCC and discussed how the status of the observatory will be monitored while in the shuttle bay and during deployment. "We are honored to have this historic shuttle crew visit us and familiarize themselves with the OCC," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the AXAF Science Center, which operates the OCC for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory through a contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "It is appropriate that a pathbreaking shuttle mission will deploy the premier X-ray observatory of this century." AXAF is the third of NASA s Great Observatories along with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. It will observe in greater detail than ever before the hot, violent regions of the universe that cannot be seen with optical telescopes. Exploding stars, black holes and vast clouds of gas in galaxy clusters are among the fascinating objects that AXAF is designed to study. The satellite is currently in the final stages of testing at TRW Space and Electronics Group,the prime contractor, in Redondo Beach, California. In late August it will be flown aboard a specially-outfitted Air Force C-5 aircraft to Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be integrated with a Boeing booster and then installed in the Shuttle bay. The shuttle crew that will take AXAF into space includes Collins (Col., USAF), Jeffrey Ashby (Cmdr., USN), pilot; Steven Hawley, Ph.D., mission specialist; Catherine Cady Coleman, Ph.D. (Major, USAF), mission specialist; and Michel Tognini (Col., French Air Force), mission specialist. While visiting the OCC the crew learned how critical data (temperatures, voltages, etc.,) will be monitored while AXAF is in the bay of the shuttle. This information will be relayed to the shuttle from the OCC via Johnson Space Center. The condition of the satellite during launch and the first few orbits will determine if it can be sent on its way. Unlike the Hubble Space telescope, AXAF will not be serviceable after it is in orbit. When the satellite has been released into space from the shuttle bay, a built in propulsion system will boost it into a large elliptical orbit around Earth. The nearest the observatory will come to Earth is 6,200 miles and its furthest point will be more than a third of the way to the moon. This means that the telescope will have approximately 52 hours of observing time each orbit. AXAF images will show fifty times more detail than any previous X-ray telescope. The revolutionary telescope combines the ability to make sharp images while measuring precisely the energies of X-rays coming from cosmic sources. The impact AXAF will have on X-ray astronomy can be compared to the difference between a fuzzy black and white and a sharp color picture.

1998-06-01

322

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual mean specific conductance for water year 2005 which was 737 uS/cm. However, the annual mean specific conductance at Stony Brook near Route 20 in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) station 01104460), on the principal tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir, and at USGS station 01104475 on a smaller tributary to the Stony Brook Reservoir were about 15 and 13 percent lower, respectively, than the previous annual mean specific conductances of 538 and 284 uS/cm, respectively for water year 2005. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir decreased from 553 uS/cm in the 2005 water year to 514 uS/cm in the 2006 water year. Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during water year 2006. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 4 days. Composite samples, consisting of as many as 100 subsamples, were collected by automatic samplers during storms. Concentrations of most dissolved constituents were generally lower in samples of stormwater than in samples collected during base flow; however, the average concentration of total phosphorus in samples of stormwater were from 160 to 1,109 percent greater than the average concentration in water samples collected during base-flow conditions. Concentrations of total nitrogen in water samples collected during base-flow conditions and composite samples of stormwater at USGS stations 01104415, 01104460, and 01104475 were similar, but mean concentrations of total nitrogen in samples of stormwater differed by about 0.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) from those in water samples collected during base-flow conditions at U.S. Geological Survey stations 01104433 and 01104455. In six water samples, measurements of pH were lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) national recommended freshwater quality criteria and the USEPA secondary drinking water-standa

Smith, Kirk P.

2008-01-01

323

"Universe" event at AIMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

2008-06-01

324

Validation of a French adaptation of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire among torture survivors from sub-Saharan African countries  

PubMed Central

Background To date no validated instrument in the French language exists to screen for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in survivors of torture and organized violence. Objective The aim of this study is to adapt and validate the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) to this population. Method The adapted version was administered to 52 French-speaking torture survivors, originally from sub-Saharan African countries, receiving psychological treatment in specialized treatment centers. A structured clinical interview for DSM was also conducted in order to assess if they met criteria for PTSD. Results Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the HTQ Part 4 was adequate (0.95). Criterion validity was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis that generated good classification accuracy for PTSD (0.83). At the original cut-off score of 2.5, the HTQ demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity (0.87 and 0.73, respectively). Conclusion Results support the reliability and validity of the French version of the HTQ.

de Fouchier, Capucine; Blanchet, Alain; Hopkins, William; Bui, Eric; Ait-Aoudia, Malik; Jehel, Louis

2012-01-01

325

The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation  

PubMed Central

Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session.

Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

2013-01-01

326

A comparison of food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: USDA's MyPyramid, NHLBI's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard's Healthy Eating Pyramid.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to compare food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: the US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard University's Healthy Eating Pyramid. Estimates of nutrient values associated with following each of the food guides at the 2,000-calorie level were made using a composite approach. This approach calculates population-weighted nutrient composites for each food group and subgroup, assuming average choices within food groups. Nutrient estimates were compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes and other goals and limits. Recommendations were similar regarding almost all food groups for both the type and amount of foods. Primary differences were seen in the types of vegetables and protein sources recommended and the amount of dairy products and total oil recommended. Overall nutrient values were also similar for most nutrients, except vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium. These food guides were derived from different types of nutrition research, yet they share consistent messages: eat more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; eat less added sugar and saturated fat; and emphasize plant oils. PMID:18313434

Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M

2008-03-01

327

Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104455) were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. The annual mean specific conductance for Fresh Pond Reservoir increased from 514 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) in the 2004 water year to 553 ?S/cm for the 2005 water year. Water samples were collected from four tributaries during base-flow and stormflow conditions in December 2004, and July, August, and September 2005 and analyzed for suspended sediment, 6 major dissolved ions, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, 8 total metals, 18 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 61 pesticides and metabolites, and Escherichia coli bacteria. Concentrations for most dissolved constituents in samples of stormwater were generally lower than the concentrations observed in samples collected during base flow; however, concentrations of total phosphorus, PAHs, suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals were substantially greater in stormwater samples. Concentrations of dissolved chloride and total recoverable manganese in water samples collected during base-flow conditions from three tributaries exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking water standards of 250 and 0.05 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Concentrations of total recoverable manganese exceeded the secondary drinking water standard in samples of stormwater from each tributary. Concentrations of total recoverable iron in water samples exceeded the (USEPA) secondary drinking water standard of 0.3 mg/L periodically in water samples collected at (USEPA) stations 01104415, 01104455, and 01104475, and consistently in all water samples collected at USGS station 01104433. Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in water samples collected during base flow ranged from 4 to 1,400 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (col/100mL). Concentrations of Escherichia coli bacteria in composite samples of stormwater ranged between 1,700 to 43,000 c

Smith, Kirk P.

2007-01-01

328

Trends in College Binge Drinking During a Period of Increased Prevention Efforts: Findings from 4 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study Surveys: 1993–2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2001 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study surveyed students at 119 4-year colleges that par- ticipated in the 1993, 1997, and 1999 studies. Responses in the 4 survey years were compared to determine trends in heavy alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, and encounters with college and community prevention efforts. In 2001, approximately 2 in 5 (44.4%) college students

Henry Wechsler; Jae Eun Lee; Meichun Kuo; Mark Seibring; Toben F. Nelson; Hang Lee

2002-01-01

329

Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Objective: Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×105 cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. Results: This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (p<0.005), cytotoxicity increased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (p<0.001), and the Harvard cement group failed to showed no noticeable change in cytotoxicity with time. Conclusion: Although this study has limitations, it provides evidence that Harvard zinc phosphate cement is the most cytotoxic product and Panavia F2 appears to be the least cytotoxic cement over time.

Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-zadeh Baghban, Alireza

2011-01-01

330

Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: A mixed-methods analysis  

PubMed Central

Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009–2010). Even in Britain's leading ‘cycling city’, cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a ‘park-and-ride’ site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could ‘afford’ to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio-economic range. This suggests the importance of combining individual-level ‘healthy travel’ interventions with measures aimed at creating travel environments in which all social groups can pursue healthy and satisfying lives.

Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R.; Ogilvie, David

2012-01-01

331

Children's Discourse: Person, Space and Time across Languages. Cambridge Studies in Linguistics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This original comparative study explores two central questions in the study of first language acquisition: What is the relative impact of structural and functional determinants? What is universal versus language-specific during development? The study addresses these questions in three domains of child language: reference to entities, the…

Hickmann, Maya

332

Parameter evaluation and model validation of ozone exposure assessment using Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study data.  

PubMed

To examine factors influencing long-term ozone (O3) exposures by children living in urban communities, the authors analyzed longitudinal data on personal, indoor, and outdoor O3 concentrations, as well as related housing and other questionnaire information collected in the one-year-long Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study. Of 224 children contained in the original data set, 160 children were found to have longitudinal measurements of O3 concentrations in at least six months of 12 months of the study period. Data for these children were randomly split into two equal sets: one for model development and the other for model validation. Mixed models with various variance-covariance structures were developed to evaluate statistically important predictors for chronic personal ozone exposures. Model predictions were then validated against the field measurements using an empirical best-linear unbiased prediction technique. The results of model fitting showed that the most important predictors for personal ozone exposure include indoor O3 concentration, central ambient O3 concentration, outdoor O3 concentration, season, gender, outdoor time, house fan usage, and the presence of a gas range in the house. Hierarchical models of personal O3 concentrations indicate the following levels of explanatory power for each of the predictive models: indoor and outdoor O3 concentrations plus questionnaire variables, central and indoor O3 concentrations plus questionnaire variables, indoor O3 concentrations plus questionnaire variables, central O3 concentrations plus questionnaire variables, and questionnaire data alone on time activity and housing characteristics. These results provide important information on key predictors of chronic human exposures to ambient O3 for children and offer insights into how to reliably and cost-effectively predict personal O3 exposures in the future. Furthermore, the techniques and findings derived from this study also have strong implications for selecting the most reliable and cost-effective exposure study design and modeling approaches for other ambient pollutants, such as fine particulate matter and selected urban air toxics. PMID:16295276

Xue, Jianping; Liu, Shi V; Ozkaynak, Halûk; Spengler, John D

2005-10-01

333

Contrast Sensitivity—An Unnoticed Factor of Visual Perception in Children with Developmental Delay: Normal Data of the Cambridge Low Contrast Gratings Test in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contrast sensitivity is one of several factors necessary to obtain good visual quality. The aim of this study was to develop normal data on the Cambridge Low Contrast Gratings test in children and to compare these data with data from a group of children with developmental delay. Ninety-nine normal children (aged 2-14 years) and 146 children with developmental delay were

Lisbeth Sandfeld Nielsen; Sidse Kringelholt Nielsen; Liselotte Skov; Hanne Jensen

2007-01-01

334

Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8…

Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

2010-01-01

335

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2011-01-01

336

Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

2011-01-01

337

Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during the study period. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 3 days. Composite sampl

Smith, Kirk P.

2011-01-01

338

A Private Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes and provides access to a twenty-minute video documentary on education research for grade 5-12 educators. With its opening scene at a Harvard graduation, this video program explores why so few students truly grasp basic science concepts. The program traces the problem through interviews with Harvard graduates and their professors, as well as with a bright ninth-grader who has some confused ideas about the orbits of the planets. This site also provides individual program descriptions as a printable page and information about how to buy videos and materials. The video is also available as streaming video if the teacher or instructor signs in.

Shapiro, Irwin

2007-12-12

339

Taking Measure of the Universe: How Big? How Old? How Do We Know?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supernovae, exploding stars that shine as brightly as a billion Suns, areastonishing events which offer the best method for measuring the size andshape of the universe. Professor Kirshner explains how stars explodeand how astronomers piece together clues from these brilliant disastersto understand the age, shape, and fate of the Universe. Click here for more info.Robert P. Kirshner is Professor of Astronomy at Harvard University,where he chaired the department from 1990 to 1997. In Fall 1997 he was onsabbatical at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University ofCalifornia, Santa Barbara.Kirshner's scientific work has centered on supernova explosions andtheir application to measuring t he Universe. The author of over 150scientific publications, Kirshner is Principal Investigator for SINS, theSupernova Intensive Study with the Hubble Space Telescope. He is a memberof the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.At Harvard, Kirshner teaches a large core curriculum coursecalled Matter in the Universe. Dubbed "the David Letterman of astronomy"by his colleagues for his entertaining lecture manner, he has writtenpopular articles for National Geographic, ScientificAmerican, Natural History, Sky and Telescope, and theWorld Book Encyclopedia.

Kirshner, Robert

1997-11-01

340

HARVARD PARTICLE CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The Center encompassed four highly interdisciplinary and integrated projects designed to address the four scientific questions presented above. Project 1  investigated the health effects of PM in the Normative Aging Study cohort, in Eastern Massachusetts; ...

341

Support for the Harvard University Water Vapor and Total Water Instruments for the 2004 NASA WB57 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to improve our understanding of the role clouds play in the climate system, NASA is investing considerable effort in characterizing clouds with instruments ranging from passive remote sensors on board the EOS platforms, to the forthcoming active remote sensors on Cloudsat and Calipso. These missions, when taken together, have the capacity to advance our understanding of the coupling between various components of the hydrologic cycle and the atmospheric circulation, and hold the additional potential of leading to significant improvements in the characterization of cloud feedbacks in global models. This is especially true considering that several of these platforms will be flown in an identical orbit within several minutes of one another-a constellation of satellites known as the A-Train. The algorithms that are being implemented and developed to convert these new data streams from radiance and reflectivity measurements into geophysical parameters invariably rely on some set of simplifymg assumptions and empirical constants. Uncertainties in these relationships lead to poorly understood random and systematic errors in the retrieved properties. This lack of understanding introduces ambiguity in interpreting the data and in using the global data sets for their intended purposes. In light of this, a series of flights with the W57F was proposed to address certain specific issues related to the basic properties of mid latitude cirrus clouds: the NASA WE357 Middle Latitude Cirrus Experiment ("MidCiX"). The science questions addressed are: 1) Can cloud property retrieval algorithms developed for A-Train active and passive remote sensing measurements accurately characterize the microphysical properties of synoptic and convectively generated cirrus cloud systems? 2) What are the relationships between the cirrus particle mass, projected area, and particle size spectrum in various genre of cirrus clouds? 3) Does the present compliment of state of the art in situ cloud probes provide the level of precision and accuracy needed to develop and validate algorithms and to contribute to our understanding of the characteristics and microphysical processes operating in cirrus clouds?

Anderson, James G.

2005-01-01

342

National Institute of Justice John B. Pickett Fellowship in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1992, the National Institute of Justice established the John B. Pickett Fellowship in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at the Kennedy School of Government. The Fellowship was created in memory of John Pickett, NIJs first Director of Planning and ...

2003-01-01

343

Identifying Signatures of Climatic Influence on Forest Net Carbon Exchange From 20 years of Observations at Harvard Forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major goal of carbon cycle science has been to understand the influence of climate on the carbon budgets of important ecosystems. Climate will influence ecosystems both through shifts in the mean state and changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events. The components of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE), photosynthesis and respiration, may respond independently and separately to climatic controls. This complicates attribution of NEE variations directly to climatic control.. The 20 year carbon flux record at Harvard Forest is an ideal data set to examine the climatic influence on NEE because it is long enough that changes in mean climate are detectable, and it includes multiple incidents of different extreme events. Our approach determines a mean functional response to environmental variables and uses this response to generate a predicted response to direct climate forcing. The difference between observations and this prediction (Figure 1) can be examined to identify changes in ecosystem function associated with climate anomalies and extreme events. An important observation from this analysis is that direct climate forcing by temperature and light does not account for interannual variability and long-term trends in NEE. Whether the mean response is defined by statistical fitting, or a process-based ecosystem model the predictions capture hourly variations driven by diel cycles, and annual seasonality, but do not reproduce the patterns observed at longer time scales. Warmer mean temperatures have extended the frost-free season and we observe earlier onset of net carbon uptake in the spring and continuation of net carbon uptake later into the fall. Extreme events, which have left detectable evidence of change in ecosystem structure, include severe ice storms, tropical storms, short-term droughts, and a wide variation in winter temperatures and depth of snow. Weather anomalies, however, tend to be short and influence particular seasons rather than affecting the overall annual net carbon balance. The mix of species and heterogeneity across the landscape appear to provide resilience that reduces the overall impact of extreme climate events on NEE at this site.igure 1. Annual sums of NEE, GEE, and Reco are plotted for 1992:2009 and shown in black. Values predicted by a model fitted to temperature and light are shown in green.

Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Lindaas, J.; Keenan, T. F.

2012-12-01

344

Reviews of Books  

Microsoft Academic Search

AZAR GAT. War in Human Civilization. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. xv, 822. $45.00 (us). Reviewed by William R. ThompsonROBIN WATERFIELD. Xenopkon's Retreat: Greece, Persia, and the End of the Golden Age. Cambridge, MA and London: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006. Pp. xiii, 248. $27.95 (us). Reviewed by Noreen HumbleVICTOR H. MAIR, ed. Contact

William R. Thompson; Noreen Humble; Paul D. Buell; Paul Bushkovitch; Leo K. Shin; John France; William Chester Jordan; Richard L. Kagan; Geoff Wade; Felipe Fernández-Armesto; Margaret Sankey; Andrew S. Thompson; France A. J. Szabo; Jennifer Mori; Stuart McCook; James D. Nason; Timothy A. Anna; Eric Van Young; Evelyn S. Rawski; Christopher Schmidt-Nowara; Kent G. Deng; Alan Booth; Patricia M. E. Lorcin; Norman Etherington; E. Patricia Tsurumi; Matthew Seligmann; Amber Lloydlangston; Vicki Caron; Sarah Ansari; Joseph A. Kéthichian; Roger Chickering; Hector Mackenzie; Evan Mawdsley; Brian R. Sullivan; Calder Walton; David J. Smith; James F. Gebhardt; Susan L. Carruthers; Donna Harsh; Alan P. Dobson; Tim Dunne; Walter K. Andersen; Joaquín Roy; Nicholas J. White; Kenton Clymer; Shahram Akbarzadeh; James Sperling; Howard Adelman; David M. Reimers; Stein Tønnesson; Milton L. Mueller; Kathy Bowrey; Michael Clarke; Brian McAllister Linn; Gerard Toal; Colin Elman

2007-01-01

345

Reviews of Books  

Microsoft Academic Search

JONATHAN M. HALL. Hellenicity: Between Ethnicity and Culture. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2002. Pp. xx, $50.00(US). Reviewed by Jeremy McInereyWILLIAM V. HARRIS. Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2001. Pp. xii, 468. 849–95 (US). Reviewed by Paul J. BurtonDIANA SPENCER. The Roman Alexander: Reading a Cultural

Jeremy McInerney; Paul J. Burton; Erich S. Gruen; John A. Agnew; Charles G. Nauert Jr; Trevor Burnard; H. G. Koenigsberger; Eva Keller; Mark A. Kishlansky; Hala Fattah; Max J. Okenfuss; J. C. D. Clark; Monika Streissler; Michael Hochedlinger; Hugh Brogan; Owen Connelly; Frank J. Coppa; Geoffrey Bolton; Judith Bassett; Michael H. Fisher; Penny Carson; Alan Atkinson; Stephan H. Lindner; Eduardo Posada-Carbó; Steven Palmer; Lothar Höbelt; Pitman B. Potter; E. H. H. Green; Peter M. Beattie; James Edward Miller; Bill Nasson; Hew Strachan; Soon-Won Park; Jonathan Swainger; David Day; Derek Hopwood; Bruce A. Elleman; Jay Winter; Kenneth P. Werrell; Kenneth Mouré; Edwin Bacon; Donald Harman Akenson; Joseph A. Fry; Bettina Gransow; Henry A. Turner Jr; Christopher M. Meissner; Peter Calvert; Thomas W. Zeiler; Sigurd Hess; John R. Lampe; Frances Early; Scott Lucas; B. W. Muirhead; Stephen A. Garrett; Mark Bradley; Fred H. Lawson; David M. Olson; Joaquín Roy; Chiarella Esposito; Wray Vamplew; Kenneth Kyle; Alfred E. Eckes; Christopher Coker; Peter Bergmann; Brian C. Schmidt; Charles A. Kupchan

2003-01-01

346

Universal Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article explains the concept of 'Universal Time' (UT), sometimes referred to as 'Coordinated Universal Time' (UTC). Topics include how UTC is measured, who uses it, and a brief discussion of the historical context of this time standard.

347

Brown University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The computing at Brown University was formalized in 1960. Computing history, current university computing, and a description of the Institute for Research in Information and Scholarship are discussed. The installation of a broadband communications network (BRUNET) was recently completed. (MLW)

CAUSE/EFFECT, 1984

1984-01-01

348

University of Illinois at Navy Pier Photographs (1945-1948)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Until the creation of the University of Illinois at Navy Pier in 1946, the city of Chicago did not have a formal public undergraduate school. The location was an interesting choice, as the Navy Pier had been used for three decades for a variety of purposes. The school was later nicknamed "Harvard on the Rocks", and until the campus moved to the Near West Side in 1965, it acquired quite a bit of character. This fine photograph collection documents the Navy Pier campus, and is housed at the Richard J. Daley Library at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Visitors can scroll through the photos at their leisure, and they can also add photos to their own personal collection via the "lightbox" feature. Visitors should be sure to note how the photos show the transformation of the site from a naval facility into an institution of higher education, complete with a vast ballroom, curiously shaped classrooms, and a trolley line.

349

First AXAF Fellowships Awarded  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AXAF (Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility) Science Center has announced the selection of five scientists to inaugurate the AXAF Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. Competition for the fellowships was open to all recent astronomy and astrophysics graduates worldwide. The AXAF Fellows will work for three years at a host astronomical institution in the United States where they will investigate topics broadly related to the scientific mission of AXAF. Additional AXAF Fellows will be selected each year over the course of the program. The AXAF Fellowship Program is a joint venture between NASA and the AXAF Science Center in cooperation with the host institutions. The AXAF Science Center is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts and funded by NASA through the Marshall Space Flight Center. "We are elated at the outstanding group of Fellows," said Harvey Tananbaum, the Director of the AXAF Science Center. "They will be working during the exciting period when the first X-ray images will be received from AXAF." Nancy Remage Evans, AXAF Fellowship Program Coordinator added, "The program will also encourage AXAF related work at institutions throughout the United States." An independent panel of scientists selected the honorees. The first AXAF Fellows and the host institutions at which they will hold their fellowships are: David Buote (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tiziana Di Matteo (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Ann Esin (California Institute of Technology), Joseph Mohr (University of Chicago), and Edward Moran (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). AXAF, the third of NASA's Great Observatories after the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, is the largest and most sophisticated X-ray telescope ever built. When it is launched in December of this year, AXAF's high resolution will provide new information about exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies, and other extremely hot regions of the universe. Further information about the AXAF satellite is available at the World Wide Web at http://xrtpub.harvard.edu/. Further information about the Fellowship program is available at http://asc.harvard.edu/fellows/. Supplemental Information on 1998 AXAF Fellows: * David Buote graduated from MIT, Cambridge MA 02139 * Tiziana DiMatteo graduated from Cambridge University, Cambridge CB30HA UK * Ann Esin graduated from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 * Joseph Mohr graduated from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 * Edward Moran graduated from Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027

1998-03-01

350

EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic and particle spectrum, from what is expected to be common sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as well as neutrinos, have created great excitement, lively discussions and have given birth to collaborations for joint analyses and observations. A special thank you to our non-gravitational wave presenters and participants for making the time to join us. We hope this will be the beginning of a long tradition for this workshop. In this workshop we also introduced the student prize for the best poster. Twenty student posters participated in this competition. Pinkesh Patel of Caltech was the prize winner on a 'Resampling Technique to Calculate the F-statistic', co-authored with X Siemens and R Dupuis. We are grateful to the MIT Kavli Institute for providing the financial support for the cash prize that accompanied this. We would like to thank the local and international organizing committees for putting together a great scientific program, all the conference presenters and participants and finally the CQG editorial staff for making this conference proceeding volume happen.

Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

2008-09-01

351

Using Rasch Analysis to Test the Cross-Cultural Item Equivalence of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist Across Vietnamese and Cambodian Immigrant Mothers  

PubMed Central

A major challenge in conducting assessments in ethnically and culturally diverse populations, especially using translated instruments, is the possibility that measures developed for a given construct in one particular group may not be assessing the same construct in other groups. Using a Rasch analysis, this study examined the item equivalence of two psychiatric measures, the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), measuring traumatic experience, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL), assessing depression symptoms across Vietnamese- and Cambodian American mothers, using data from the Cross-Cultural Families (CCF) Project. The majority of items were equivalent across the two groups, particularly on the HTQ. However, some items were endorsed differently by the two groups, and thus are not equivalent, suggesting Cambodian and Vietnamese immigrants may manifest certain aspects of trauma and depression differently. Implications of these similarities and differences for practice and the use of IRT in this arena are discussed.

Choi, Yoonsun; Mericle, Amy; Harachi, Tracy W.

2012-01-01

352

Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Timothy J. Colton, Moscow: Governing the Socialist Metropolis. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1996, xvi + 939 pp., £28.50.Reiner Weichhardt (ed.), Status of Economic Reforms in Cooperation Partner Countries in the mid?1990s: Opportunities, Constraints, Security Implications. Brussels: NATO, 1996, 293 pp.Pal Gáspár (ed.), Changes and Challenges: Economic Transformation in East?Central Europe. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1995, 146 pp.Ian

Catherine Merridale; Martin Myant; Ed Clark; Richard R. Berry; John Thirkell; Ben Slay; Peter Kirkow; Jane McDermid; Christa L. Walck; Douglas Sutherland; Andrew Apostolou; Jorgen S. Nielsen; David M. Crowe; Robert F. Miller; Tom Gallagher; Darrell Slider; Christopher Williams; David Brandenberger; David Saunders

1997-01-01

353

New books in review  

Microsoft Academic Search

NATURAL LANGUAGE FOR DEAF CHILDREN. By Mildred A. Groht. Washington, D. C: The Volta Bureau, 1958; pp. xix+185?$5.70.THE CASE FOR BASIC EDUCATION. Edited by James D. Koerner. Boston: Little, Brown, 1959; pp. xiii+256. $4.00.THE FIRST MODERN COMEDIES: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ETHEREGE, WYCH?ERLEY AND CONGREVE. By Norman N. Holland. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1959; pp. 274. $5.50.BERNARD SHAW AND THE

Vincent H. Knauf; Thorrel B. Fest; Kalman A. Burnim; David Wiley; Jonathan Curvin; Albert T. Martin; Joseph G. Green; Eugene K. Bristow; Loren Reid; Harry P. Kerr; Melvin H. Miller; Herbert Feinstein; David Lindsey; John F. Wilson; Robert C. Jeffrey; Raymond Yeager; Robert T. Oliver; Dwight L. Freshley; Paul Carmack

1960-01-01

354

Interlanguage pragmatics in the zone of proximal development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development (ZPD) has been fruitfully applied in L2 research that examines second and foreign language learning. This paper considers the applicability of the ZPD to interlanguage pragmatics instruction and research. First, the ZPD is defined [Vygotsky, L.S., 1978. Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA], and definitions are queried

Amy Snyder Ohta

2005-01-01

355

Parent University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description of the Parent University program of the San Rafael (California) City Schools is presented. The Parent University is described as a 1-day event in which parents are offered a variety of seminars and workshops on topics in education and parenting. Materials included in this document are: (1) an overview of the second annual Parent…

Howlett, Hoyt S.

356

Overseas Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

357

An Orchestra's Guide to the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe here an interdisciplinary program that combines astronomy and music in a unique and unprecedented fashion. This is an intensive program in which students prepare for and perform with a professional orchestra. For many of its participants, it is a life-changing experience. For us, it is a conduit for developing, implementing and disseminating truly innovative and interdisciplinary science education and outreach. The team, headed by composer Arthur Bloom, who created the original and highly successful music program, includes astronomers, teachers, educators, and evaluators. We are working in collaboration with a school in Berwins Heights and with graduate students in astronomy from the University of Maryland in College Park under the supervision of Cole Miller. The evaluation of the program is done under the supervision of Hiro Yoshikawa (Harvard University). The program received seed funding from an IDEAS grant awarded to Arthur Bloom in 2003. This unique collaboration provides an opportunity to develop innovative and interdisciplinary educational and outreach materials, leverage investment and broadly disseminate our results, share costs, link with school systems, target underserved and underrepresented populations, cultivate new sources of media attention, and enhance interest and learning in astronomy.

Harrus, I.; RIME Arthur Bloom Collaboration

2005-12-01

358

Development and validation of a preference based measure derived from the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) for use in cost utility analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Pulmonary Hypertension is a severe and incurable disease with poor prognosis. A suite of new disease-specific measures - the\\u000a Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) - was recently developed for use in this condition. The purpose\\u000a of this study was to develop and validate a preference based measure from the CAMPHOR that could be used in cost-utility analyses.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Items were

Stephen P McKenna; Julie Ratcliffe; David M Meads; John E Brazier

2008-01-01

359

Universal Truths.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

Horgan, John

1990-01-01

360

Washington University  

Cancer.gov

The Washington University Small Animal Imaging Resource (WUSAIR), one of the five original Small Animal Imaging Resource Program (SAIRP) centers funded in 1999, provides state-of-the-art facilities and infrastructure for MRI, PET, CT and optical imaging of mice, rats and other small laboratory animals. Located in the heart of the Washington University Medical Center, WUSAIR combines instrumental and intellectual capabilities found at few other institutions.

361

Stanford University  

Cancer.gov

Stanford University has a rapidly expanding program for the molecular imaging of living subjects. Through significant investments by the University in new space, infrastructure, and new faculty recruitments the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) was established. Dr. Sam Gambhir, Professor of Radiology and Bioengineering was recruited and appointed by the Dean of the Medical School as Director of the MIPS. He works closely with Dr. Christopher Contag, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and of Microbiology and Immunology, Co-Director of the MIPS.

362

Plasma universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This single-page reading underlines how abundant plasmas are in the universe. The reading, which is the final page in a tutorial about the plasma phase of matter, points out that understanding plasma is central to understanding what happens in the universe. Through space technologies, researchers have been able to study plasmas in areas like those shown in the images that illustrate this reading. One of the images shows plasma loops on the Sun. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Institute, Space S.

2005-01-01

363

Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as much as 96 percent of total solids resided within 9 feet of the curb. Median accumulation rates of street solids and median washoff of street solids after rainstorms on multifamily and commercial land-use streets were also similar at about 33 and 22 pounds per curb-mile per day, and 35 and 40 percent, respectively. Results indicate that solids on the streets tested in Cambridge, Mass., can recover to pre-rainstorm yields within 1 to 3 days after washoff. The finer grain-size fractions tended to be more readily washed from the roadway surfaces during rainstorms. Street solids in the coarsest grain-size fraction on multifamily streets indicated an average net increase following rainstorms and are likely attributed to debris run-on from trees, lawns, and other plantings commonly found in residential areas. In seven experiments between May and December 2010, the median removal efficiency of solids from street surfaces following a single pass by a regenerative-air street cleaner was about 82 percent on study sites in the multifamily land-use streets and about 78 percent on the commercial land-use streets. Median street-solid removal efficiency increased with increasing grain size. This type of regenerative-air street cleaner left a median residual street-solid load on the street surface of about 100 pounds per curb-mile. Median concentrations of organic carbon and total phosphorus (P) on multifamily streets were about 35 and 29 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. The median total mass of organic carbon and total P in street solids on multifamily streets was 68 and 75 percent greater, respectively, than those found on commercial streets. More than 87 percent of the mass of total P was determined to be in solids greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter for both land-use types. The median total accumulation rate for total P on multifamily streets was about 5 times greater than on commercial streets. Total P accumulation in the medium grain-size fraction was nearly the same for streets within both land-use types at 0.004 p

Sorenson, Jason R.

2013-01-01

364

Carbon and water exchange of a younger, drier deciduous forest compared to the long-term study site at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured carbon and water exchange by the eddy covariance method at a younger, drier deciduous forest and compared it to the well-known Harvard Forest deciduous site during two growing seasons (2002 and 2003) and an intervening dormant season. Forests at both sites are dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra) and red maple (Acer rubrum), but the younger forest is situated near a hilltop, as opposed to the long-term Harvard Forest site, which is in a lowland area within 100 m of a stream and about 200 m from a bog. The younger forest had a maximum tree age of about 44 years within 200 m of the eddy flux tower (owing to an intense fire in the autumn of 1957); this compares to maximum tree ages of 65 to 90 years, depending on exact location, near the long-term site. The younger, drier forest stored about 1.7 Mg C/ha from May 2002 through April 2003. We estimate that this was about 30% less than annual storage in the older, moister forest at the long-term site, but as the 12-month periods on which this comparison is based are not completely overlapping for the two sites, this comparison may change slightly. Light-saturated net ecosystem carbon uptake of both sites was about 22 ? mol m-2 s-1 in June 2002, but by August the value for the drier site was only about 20 ? mol m-2 s-1 compared to about 24 ? mol m-2 s-1 for the long-term site, suggesting that water availability may have become a limiting factor for photosynthesis in the drier forest. At the younger site in 2003 compared to 2002, we estimated less C storage in May and June but more C storage in July, August and September, with an overall increase in growing season C storage of about 0.4 Mg/ha. Lower early-growing season in carbon storage in 2003 versus 2002 was associated with slightly lower net ecosystem carbon uptake at all light levels in June 2003 compared to a year earlier. Cloudy and cool weather in May and early June 2003 reduced C uptake directly by reducing light available for photosynthesis, and apparently also caused a delay in leaf maturation and the development of photosynthetic capacity in the trees' foliage.

Hadley, J. L.; Kuzeja, P. S.

2004-05-01

365

Inferring long-term carbon sequestration from tree rings at Harvard Forest: A calibration approach using tree ring widths and geochemistry / flux tower data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improving the prediction skill of terrestrial carbon cycle models is important for reducing the uncertainties in global carbon cycle and climate projections. Additional evaluation and calibration of carbon models is required, using both observations and long-term proxy-derived data. Centennial-length data could be obtained from tree-rings archives that provide long continuous series of past forest growth changes with accurate annual resolution. Here we present results from a study conducted at Harvard Forest (Petersham, Massachusetts). The study examines the potential relationship between ?13C in dominant trees and GPP and/or NEE measured by the Harvard Forest flux tower (1992-2010). We have analyzed the ?13C composition of late wood-cellulose over the last 18 years from eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) trees growing in the flux tower footprint. ?13C values, corrected for the declining trend of atmospheric ?13C, show a decreasing trend from 1992 to 2010 and therefore a significant increase in discrimination (?). The intra-cellular CO2 (Ci) calculated from ? shows a significant increase for both tree species and follows the same rate of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) increase (Ci/Ca increases). Interestingly, the net Ci and ? increase observed for both species did not result in an increase of the iWUE. Ci/Ca is strongly related to the growing season Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for both species thus indicating a significant relationship between soil moisture conditions and stomatal conductance. The Ci trend is interpreted as a result of higher CO2 assimilation in response to increasing soil moisture allowing a longer stomata opening and therefore stimulating tree growth. This interpretation is consistent with the observed increase in GPP and the strengthening of the carbon sink (more negative NEE). Additionally, the decadal trends of basal area increment (BAI) calculated from tree-ring widths exhibit a positive trend over the last two decade. Tree-ring width and ?13C results show the potential of these parameters as proxies for reconstructions of past CO2 assimilation and carbon sequestration by woody biomass beyond the time span covered by calibration data, and extending to the centennial time scales encompassed by tree-ring records.

Belmecheri, S.; Maxwell, S.; Davis, K. J.; Alan, T. H.

2012-12-01

366

Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.  

PubMed

As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions. PMID:24056361

Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

2013-10-01

367

Plasma universe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

Alfven, H.

1986-01-01

368

2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

2011-03-01

369

University Wire  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

University Wire is a daily Internet news service for college newspapers. Included are a story of the day, a large list of pointers to Internet resources in topics such as current headlines, politics, medicine and health, and women's resources; a "Kopyedit Korner," with pointers to writing reference materials; a placement center with job openings lists for college journalists; a large selection of pointers to college newspapers; and pointers to general circulation newspapers. Pointers to student and professional journalism organizations, as well as a calendar of journalism related events, are also provided. University Wire is a service of The Main Quad.

1997-01-01

370

Universe Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by Fraser Cain, this modest current awareness service gathers space exploration news stories from around the Internet. The stories, usually four per day, are briefly summarized, and for each, Cain offers links to full-text articles from one or more sources. Users can read Universe Today at the site, which also contains an archive, internal search engine, and related links, or they can subscribe to receive the newsletter by email. Although not as comprehensive as some astronomy news sites, Universe Today does cover some of the top stories and will appeal to the busy general user with an interest in space exploration.

371

Molecular Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fantastic resource for college-level students of chemistry provides abundant images and explanatory text on molecules and molecular systems. The site's main provider is Richard Catlow, Director of the Davy Faraday Research Laboratory at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. Molecular Universe presents a collection of lessons, arranged into categories such as Building in Three Dimensions, Boundaries and Barriers, and The Molecules of Life. The sleek color illustrations demonstrate everything from diamond structure to a DNA molecule. Highlights of the site include a detailed look at protein folding, how molecules taste, and molecules and computers. Both students and professors should journey to the Molecular Universe.

Catlow, C. R. A. (Charles Richard Arthur), 1947-

2000-01-01

372

The Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project - Phase II (HARP-II): Rationale, methods, and features of the sample at intake  

PubMed Central

We describe the rationale, method, and intake demographic and clinical findings of the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II). HARP-II is the first prospective, observational, longitudinal study to describe the characteristics and course of anxiety in African American, Latino, and Non-Latino White individuals. Participants met criteria for at least one of the following disorders: Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia, Agoraphobia without history of Panic Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Initial intake data, collected between 2004 and 2011, are presented for 165 African American, 150 Latino, and 172 Non-Latino White participants. Participants evidenced substantial psychiatric comorbidity (mean number of Axis I disorders = 3.4), and moderate to severe symptoms and functional impairment. HARP-II will examine clinical course, in the context of potential socio-cultural and individual moderators (e.g., discrimination, acculturation, negative affect). Results should lead to improved understanding, prognostics, and treatment of anxiety in diverse populations.

Weisberg, Risa B.; Beard, Courtney; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B.

2012-01-01

373

On the Accuracy of In Situ Water Vapor Measurements in the Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere with the Harvard Lyman-Alpha Hygrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to better constrain atmospheric water vapor mixing ratios and to understand the discrepancies between different measurements of water vapor in the stratosphere and troposphere, we have carefully examined data from the Harvard Lyman-alpha photofragment fluorescence hygrometer, which has flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft from 1992 through 1998. The instrument is calibrated in the laboratory before and after each deployment, and the calibration is checked by direct absorption measurements in the troposphere. On certain flights, the ER-2 flew level tracks during which water vapor varied by up to 80 ppmv, under nearly constant atmospheric conditions. These flights provide a stringent test of our calibration via direct absorption and indicate agreement to within 3%. During the 1997 Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) mission, our Lyman-alpha instrument was compared with a new diode laser hygrometer from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Overall agreement was 5% during the June/July deployment and 1% for potential temperatures of 490 to 540 K. The accuracy of our instrument is shown to be +/-5 %, with an additional offset of at most 0.1 ppmv. Data from this instrument, combined with simultaneous measurements of CH4, and H2, are therefore ideal for studies of the hydrogen budget of the lower stratosphere.

Hintsa, Eric J.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Anderson, James G.; May, Randy D.; Hurst, Dale F.

1999-01-01

374

The Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II): rationale, methods, and features of the sample at intake.  

PubMed

We describe the rationale, method, and intake demographic and clinical findings of the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II). HARP-II is the first prospective, observational, longitudinal study to describe the characteristics and course of anxiety in African American, Latino, and Non-Latino White individuals. Participants met criteria for at least one of the following disorders: Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia, Agoraphobia without history of Panic Disorder, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Initial intake data, collected between 2004 and 2011, are presented for 165 African American, 150 Latino, and 172 Non-Latino White participants. Participants evidenced substantial psychiatric comorbidity (mean number of Axis I disorders=3.4), and moderate to severe symptoms and functional impairment. HARP-II will examine clinical course, in the context of potential socio-cultural and individual moderators (e.g., discrimination, acculturation, negative affect). Results should lead to improved understanding, prognostics, and treatment of anxiety in diverse populations. PMID:22410095

Weisberg, Risa B; Beard, Courtney; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B

2012-05-01

375

Hourly Measurements of Fine Particulate Sulfate and Carbon Aerosols at the Harvard-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Supersite in Boston  

PubMed Central

Hourly concentrations of ambient fine particle sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols (elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], and black carbon [BC]) were measured at the Harvard–U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Supersite in Boston, MA, between January 2007 and October 2008. These hourly concentrations were compared with those made using integrated filter-based measurements over 6-day or 24-hr periods. For sulfate, the two measurement methods showed good agreement. Semicontinuous measurements of EC and OC also agreed (but not as well as for sulfate) with those obtained using 24-hr integrated filter-based and optical BC reference methods. During the study period, 24-hr PM2.5 (particulate matter [PM] ? 2.5 ?m in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations ranged from 1.4 to 37.6 ?g/m3, with an average of 9.3 ?g/m3. Sulfate as the equivalent of ammonium sulfate accounted for 39.1% of the PM2.5 mass, whereas EC and OC accounted for 4.2 and 35.2%, respectively. Hourly sulfate concentrations showed no distinct diurnal pattern, whereas hourly EC and BC concentrations peaked during the morning rush hour between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. OC concentrations also exhibited nonpronounced, small peaks during the day, most likely related to traffic, secondary organic aerosol, and local sources, respectively.

Kang, Choong-Min; Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H.

2013-01-01

376

Exploring the microbially-mediated soil H2 sink: A lab-based study of the physiology and related H2 consumption of isolates from the Harvard Forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric hydrogen (H2) is a secondary greenhouse gas because it attenuates the removal of methane (CH4) from the atmosphere. The largest and most uncertain term in the H2 biogeochemical cycle, microbe-mediated soil uptake, is responsible for about 80% of Earth's tropospheric H2 sink. Recently, the first H2-oxidizing soil microorganisms were discovered (genus Streptomyces) whose low-threshold, high-affinity NiFe-hydrogenase functions at ambient H2 levels (approx. 530 ppb). To better understand the ecological function of this hydrogenase, we conducted a controlled laboratory study of the H2 uptake behavior in accordance with the complex life cycle development of the streptomycetes. Several strains of the genus Streptomyces containing a high-affinity NiFe- hydrogenase were isolated from soil at the Harvard Forest. The presence of this hydrogenase, detected by PCR amplification of the hydrogenase large subunit, predicted H2 uptake behavior in wild-type streptomycetes and in phylogenetically different organisms containing more distantly related versions of the gene. H2 uptake depended on the streptomyces' life cycle, reaching a maximum during spore formation. These findings reveal connections between environmental conditions, organismal life cycle, and H2 uptake. With the rise of H2-based energy sources and a potential change in the tropospheric concentration of H2, understanding the sources and sinks of this trace gas is important for the future.

Rao, D.; Meredith, L. K.; Bosak, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

2012-12-01

377

Widener University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Founded in 1821, Widener University is a two-state (Pennsylvania and Delaware), four-campus, eight-college private institution serving approximately 6,700 students. Following arrival of the new senior vice president and provost in 2004 and subsequent reorganization of vice presidential responsibilities, Student Affairs is now led by a dean of…

Valesey, Brigitte; Allen, Jo

2009-01-01

378

Washington University  

Cancer.gov

Washington University Medical School's concept of an In vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center (ICMIC) envisions a process that will permit the Center to become the focal point for the development of novel in vivo molecular imaging initiatives on campus. This involves further expanding and reinforcing collaborations and enhancing the productivity of multidisciplinary programs in basic cancer cell biology and molecular imaging research.

379

Stanford University  

Cancer.gov

Stanford University has recruited a multidisciplinary team of scientist to address promising quantitative imaging methods to improve the ability of cancer researchers to evaluate tumor burden and treatment response through the support of the Quantitative Imaging Network. To date, progress is thwarted by the lack of software infrastructure to record quantitative imaging information efficiently and reproducibly in the routine clinical workflow, and by the inability to store and share image metadata in standard formats.

380

Vanderbilt University  

Cancer.gov

Vanderbilt University has developed an interdisciplinary group of scientists, supported by the Quantitative Imaging Network to develop integrated high field (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) methods for assessing the effects of molecularly targeted anti-angiogenesis and cytoxic treatments in breast cancer clinical trials. The goal is to provide the breast cancer community with practical data acquisition and analysis protocols that facilitate the translation of advanced imaging technologies into patient management and clinical trials.

381

Vanderbilt University  

Cancer.gov

This application seeks support for a new Small Animal Imaging Resource (SAIR) at Vanderbilt University, dedicated to providing scientific and technical resources and support for non-invasive imaging of small animal models of cancer in vivo. The equipment and personnel needed to support cancer imaging in small animals will be provided by a new center which provides access to a comprehensive array of imaging resources.

382

Open University  

ScienceCinema

Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

None

2011-04-25

383

Our Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will learn about the different planets and the sun. They will learn that the sun is a star that lights and heats the earth. Check out these web sites and then answer the following questions. Blast off to this website. Play a game or two! When you are done, write down which game or games you played and three things you learned about our universe. Kidsastronomy Now, check out the awesome facts about this familiar star. Then ...

D., Mrs.

2006-10-11

384

Universal Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson plan for an activity that explores time zone math. Learners will translate their local time to times in other zones around the world and work with the concept of Universal Time, specifically in reference to the reporting, description and analysis of solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This is activity 10 from Exploring Magnetism Guide 3: Magnetic Mysteries of the Aurora educator guide.

385

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the entire base length of the upstream left wingwall. There was also type-4 stone fill (less than 60 inches diameter) along the downstream end of the downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 10.7 to 17.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance duri

Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

1997-01-01

386

Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right wingwall and right abutment during the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995) for the 100- and 500-year discharges. In addition, the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge is determined and analyzed as another potential worst-case scour scenario. Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.2 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 8.8 to 9.7 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Rich

Ivanoff, Michael A.

1997-01-01

387

Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Fourth Cambridge Radio Survey Catalogue (4C) (Pilkington, Gower, Scott and Wills 1965, 1967)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The machine readable catalogue contains survey data from the papers of Pilkington and Scott and Gower, Scott and Wills. These data result from a survey of radio sources between declinations -07 deg and +80 deg using the large Cambridge interferometer at 178 MHz. The computerized catalog contains for each source the 4C number, 1950 position, measured flux density, and accuracy class. For some sources miscellaneous brief comments such as cross identifications to the 3C catalog or remarks on contamination from nearby sources are given at the ends of the data records. A detailed description of the machine readable catalog as it is currently being distributed by the Astronomical Data Center is given to enable users to read and process the data.

Warren, W. H., Jr.

1983-01-01

388

The Polish Collection at the Alliance College Library in Cambridge Springs, PA: The Origins of the Collection in 1950, Its Rapid Development in the 1970's and the Introduction of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) in 1982.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay outlines the development, present condition, and future direction of the 20,000-volume Polish research collection at Alliance College, located in Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. Alliance College was founded in 1912 by the Polish National Alliance (PNA), a life insurance fraternal organization. In 1931 its entire library collection was…

Kozaczka, Stanley J.

389

The McLean-Harvard First Episode Project: Two-year Stability of DSM-IV Diagnoses in 500 First-Episode Psychotic Disorder Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective Since stability of DSM-IV diagnoses of disorders with psychotic features requires validation, we evaluated psychotic patients followed systematically in the McLean-Harvard First Episode Project. Methods We diagnosed 517 patients hospitalized in a first psychotic illness by SCID-based criteria at baseline and at 24 months to assess stability of specific DSM-IV diagnoses. Results Among 500 (96.7%) patients completing the study, diagnoses remained stable in 74.0%, ranking: bipolar-I disorder (BPD; 96.5%) > schizophrenia (75.0%) > delusional disorder (72.7%) > major depressive disorder with psychotic features (MDD; 70.1%) > brief psychotic disorder (61.1%) > psychosis-NOS (51.5%) ? schizophreniform disorder (10.5%). Most changed diagnoses (22.4% of patients) were to schizoaffective disorder (53.6% of changes in 12.0% of subjects, from: NOS > schizophrenia > schizophreniform = BPD-mixed > MDD > delusional > brief > BPD-manic). Second were to BPD (25.9% of changes, 5.8% of subjects, from: MDD > NOS > brief > schizophreniform). Third were to schizophrenia (12.5% of changes, 2.8% of subjects, from: schizophreniform > NOS > brief = delusional = MDD). These three categories accounted for 92.0% of changes. By logistic regression, diagnostic-change was associated with: nonaffective psychosis > auditory hallucinations > youth > male sex > gradual onset. Conclusions BPD and schizophrenia were more stable diagnoses than delusional disorder or psychotic-MDD and much more than brief psychosis, psychosis-NOS or schizophreniform disorder. Diagnostic changes mainly involved emergence of affective symptoms and were predicted by several premorbid factors. The findings have implications for revisions of DSM and ICD.

Salvatore, Paola; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K.; Sanchez-Toledo, Jesus Perez; Zarate, Carlos A.; Vieta, Eduard; Maggini, Carlo

2009-01-01

390

RAD University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Operated by RAD Data Communications, this site has glossaries and a myriad of tutorials related to computer networks. Students "at Tel Aviv University and the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology" created the tutorials, which are grouped into several categories. These include introductory information, security and application protocols, infrastructure, and network layers. The tutorials are quite well made; most are very comprehensive with diagrams and illustrations. There are even some games and quizzes to reinforce what is presented in the tutorials. The three glossaries give simple, straightforward definitions and descriptions of various terms and technologies.

2002-01-01

391

Afterschool Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This astronomy program is designed for middle school children in out-of-school-time settings. The program explores basic astronomy concepts (like invisible light, telescopes) and focuses on the universe outside the solar system (stars, galaxies, black holes). The program is structured for use in a variety of settings, including astronomy days, summer camps, or year-long afterschool programs. Although session activities build concepts sequentially, each session activity is designed to be freestanding as not all participants may attend every session. A manual provides background information and descriptions of how to conduct each activity. A companion website provides additional information and resources for the program leader.

392

ASL University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

American Sign Language (ASL) University is an online curriculum resource for American Sign Language students, instructors, interpreters, and parents of deaf children. The website provides a wealth of learning tools for both teaching and learning ASL. Teachers are encouraged to use the lessons provided to teach in their own classes. In addition to the available courses, a very comprehensive American Sign Language dictionary is available to help those just learning ASL or those looking to learn how to add to their vocabulary. Furthermore, the site has a newsletter that is distributed through a mailing list.

Vicars, William G.

2007-01-25

393

Wheelchair University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of lecture notes is intended to provide readers with a "practical learning experience on some aspect of wheelchair technology." Several topics on wheeled mobility are covered, including powered wheelchair anatomy and the development of standards. Seating biomechanics, wheelchair cushions, and other details helpful for wheelchair evaluation are given in a series of lecture slides. The last section deals with transportation safety and practices to reduce or prevent crash injuries. Resources on wheelchair research and development are given on the Wheelchair University homepage.

394

Universal Peptidomimetics  

PubMed Central

This paper concerns peptidomimetic scaffolds that can present side-chains in conformations resembling those of amino acids in secondary structures without incurring excessive entropic or enthalpic penalties. Compounds of this type are referred to here as minimalist mimics. The core hypothesis of this paper is that small sets of such scaffolds can be designed to analog local pairs of amino acids (including non-contiguous ones) in any secondary structure, ie they are universal peptidomimetics. To illustrate this concept we designed a set of four peptidomimetic scaffolds (1 – 4). Libraries based on these were made bearing side-chains corresponding to many of the protein-derived amino acids. Modeling experiments were performed to give an indication of kinetic and thermodynamic accessibilities of conformations that can mimic secondary structures. Together peptidomimetics based on scaffolds 1 – 4 can adopt conformations that resemble almost any combination of local amino acid side-chains in any secondary structure. Universal peptidomimetics of this kind are likely to be most useful in the design of libraries for high throughput screening against diverse targets. Consequently, data arising from submission of these molecules to the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) is outlined.

Ko, Eunhwa; Liu, Jing; Perez, Lisa M.; Lu, Genliang; Schaefer, Amber; Burgess, Kevin

2011-01-01

395

The New Universities: Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of the functions and purposes of universities, with reference to their respective importance in England and the United States. The first of 10 articles studying the following English universities in depth--(1) University of Sussex, (2) University of York, (3) University of East Anglia, (4) University of Essex, (5) University of Kent…

Brawne, Michael

1970-01-01

396

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many colleges and universities have carefully maintained archival collections that are consulted by historians and alumni interested in learning first-hand about their storied pasts. Not many institutions of higher learning can boast of such a nice collection of online materials, and certainly this website serves as a good example to others looking to develop such a collection. First-time visitors will want to take a look at the digital image collection, which contains 725 images depicting the campus in West Philadelphia, along with maps, slides, and sketches. Along with performing a simple search, visitors can browse a list of topical collections. Another good feature located here is a reproduction of an 1895 article from Harper's Magazine by Francis N. Thorpe that contains 18 illustrations within its 21 pages. Visitors looking for historical sketches of Penn's history and development will want to browse the section that offers numerous essays, including titles dealing with urban renewal and the university's gradual expansion over the 125 years.

397

Harvard School of Public Health  

MedlinePLUS

... on bike paths read more » HSPH students Why Public Health Serving the underserved read more » Stressed out An ... a difference Learn more today Video series Why Public Health? Students talk about why they enter the field ...

398

[Activities of Harvard College Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With support from this grant, we have: 1) Developed techniques for improving wavelengths and f-values for singly and doubly charged ions of the iron group and have improved the accuracy of Fe III wavelengths by an order of magnitude. New Fe II f-values have also resulted from this work. 2) Measured line oscillator strengths and photoabsorption cross sections for UV molecular spectral feature that have been, or could be, used for searches for and detection of molecules in diffuse and translucent interstellar clouds and for determination of molecular column densities there. In addition, we have determined other molecular parameters -- line assignments, wavelengths, and line widths -- that are essential for theoretical descriptions of the abundance, fractionation, and excitation of interstellar molecules and for comparison of predictions with observations. 3) Measured A-values for spin-changing and other weak lines in low-Z ions. When A-values are available, these spectral features are useful for astrophysical plasma density and temperature diagnostics. Such lines are also used in interstellar abundance determinations in cases where the stronger allowed lines are saturated in astronomical spectra. 4) Taken an activist approach to ensuring that, (i), astronomers have ready access to our data, and, (ii), avenues of communication between data users and producers are strengthened.

Dalgarno, A.; Smith, Peter L.; Stark, G.; Yoshino, K.

2002-01-01

399

The cyclic universe  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cyclic universe model is a modification of the ekpyrotic universe and the pyrotechnic universe models. The cyclic universe goes through the six transitions: the triplet universe, the inflation, the big bang, the quintessence, the big crush, and the deflation transitions. The universe starts with eleven dimensional space-time with two boundary 9-branes separated by a finite gap spanning an intervening

Ding-Yu Chung

2001-01-01

400

Psychological impact of screening for type 2 diabetes: controlled trial and comparative study embedded in the ADDITION (Cambridge) randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the psychological impact of primary care based stepwise screening for type 2 diabetes. Design Controlled trial and comparative study embedded in a randomised controlled trial. Setting 15 practices (10 screening, five control) in the ADDITION (Cambridge) trial in the east of England. Participants 7380 adults (aged 40-69) in the top fourth for risk of having undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (6416 invited for screening, 964 controls). Interventions Invited for screening for type 2 diabetes or not invited (controls), incorporating a comparative study of subgroups of screening attenders. Attenders completed questionnaires after a random blood glucose test and at 3-6 months and 12-15 months later. Controls were sent questionnaires at corresponding time points. Non-attenders were sent questionnaires at 3-6 months and 12-15 months. Main outcome measures State anxiety (Spielberger state anxiety inventory), anxiety and depression (hospital anxiety and depression scale), worry about diabetes, and self rated health. Results No significant differences were found between the screening and control participants at any time—for example, difference in means (95% confidence intervals) for state anxiety after the initial blood glucose test was ?0.53, ?2.60 to 1.54, at 3-6 months was 1.51 (?0.17 to 3.20), and at 12-15 months was 0.57, ?1.11 to 2.24. After the initial test, compared with participants who screened negative, those who screened positive reported significantly poorer general health (difference in means ?0.19, ?0.25 to ?0.13), higher state anxiety (0.93, ?0.02 to 1.88), higher depression (0.32, 0.08 to 0.56), and higher worry about diabetes (0.25, 0.09 to 0.41), although effect sizes were small. Small but significant trends were found for self rated health across the screening subgroups at 3-6 months (P=0.047) and for worry about diabetes across the screen negative groups at 3-6 months and 12-15 months (P=0.001). Conclusions Screening for type 2 diabetes has limited psychological impact on patients. Implementing a national screening programme based on the stepwise screening procedure used in the ADDITION (Cambridge) trial is unlikely to have significant consequences for patients' psychological health. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN99175498.

Griffin, Simon J; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise; French, David P; Sutton, Stephen

2007-01-01

401

The conquest of vitalism or the eclipse of organicism? The 1930s Cambridge organizer project and the social network of mid-twentieth-century biology.  

PubMed

In the 1930s, two concepts excited the European biological community: the organizer phenomenon and organicism. This essay examines the history of and connection between these two phenomena in order to address the conventional 'rise-and-fall' narrative that historians have assigned to each. Scholars promoted the 'rise-and-fall' narrative in connection with a broader account of the devitalizing of biology through the twentieth century. I argue that while limited evidence exists for the 'fall of the organizer concept' by the 1950s, the organicism that often motivated the organizer work had no concomitant fall--even during the mid-century heyday of molecular biology. My argument is based on an examination of shifting social networks of life scientists from the 1920s to the 1970s, many of whom attended or corresponded with members of the Cambridge Theoretical Biology Club (1932-1938). I conclude that the status and cohesion of these social networks at the micro scale was at least as important as macro-scale conceptual factors in determining the relative persuasiveness of organicist philosophy. PMID:24941735

Peterson, Erik

2014-06-01

402

Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Neuropsychological Tests in Differentiating Alzheimer's Disease from Mild Cognitive Impairment: Can the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Be Better than the Cambridge Cognitive Examination?  

PubMed Central

Objective Considering the lack of studies on measures that increase the diagnostic distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and on the role of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) in this, our study aims to compare the utility of the CAMCOG, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in helping to differentiate AD from MCI in elderly people with >4 years of schooling. Method A total of 136 elderly subjects – 39 normal controls as well as 52 AD patients and 45 MCI patients treated at the Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil – were assessed using the MMSE, CAMCOG, clock drawing test (CDT), verbal fluency test (VF), Geriatric Depression Scale and Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire. Results The results obtained by means of a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MoCA is a better screening test for differentiating elderly subjects with AD from those with MCI than the CAMCOG and MMSE as well as other tests such as the CDT and VF. Conclusion The MoCA, more than the CAMCOG and the other tests, was shown to be able to differentiate AD from MCI, although, as Roalf et al. [Alzheimers Dement 2013;9:529-537] pointed out, further studies might lead to measures that will improve this differentiation.

Martinelli, Jose Eduardo; Cecato, Juliana Francisca; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Montiel, Jose Maria

2014-01-01

403

Associations between active commuting and physical activity in working adults: Cross-sectional results from the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the association between time spent in active commuting and in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in a sample of working adults living in both urban and rural locations. Methods In 2009, participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study were sent questionnaires enquiring about sociodemographic characteristics and weekly time spent in active commuting. They were also invited to wear an accelerometer for seven days. Accelerometer data were used to compute the time spent in MVPA. Multiple regression models were used to examine the association between time spent in active commuting and MVPA. Results 475 participants (70% female) provided valid data. On average, participants recorded 55 (SD: 23.02) minutes of MVPA per day. For women, reporting 150 or more minutes of active commuting per week was associated with an estimated 8.50 (95% CI: 1.75 to 51.26, p = 0.01) additional minutes of daily MVPA compared to those who reported no time in active commuting. No overall associations were found in men. Conclusions Promoting active commuting might be an important way of increasing levels of physical activity, particularly in women. Further research should assess whether increases in time spent in active commuting are associated with increases in physical activity.

Yang, Lin; Panter, Jenna; Griffin, Simon J.; Ogilvie, David

2012-01-01

404

Reduction of De Novo Postsurgical Adhesions by Intraoperative Precoating with Sepracoat (HAL-C) Solution: A Prospective, Randomized, Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Multicenter Study ? ? Sepracoat and HAL-C are trademarks; they are the property of Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of Sepracoat (HAL-C; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) solution in reducing the incidence, severity, and extent of de novo adhesion formation at sites without direct surgical trauma or adhesiolysis at the time of gynecologic laparotomy.Design: Prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled multicenter study. Patients underwent gynecologic procedures via laparotomy; approximately 40 days later, surgeons assessed their

Michael P. Diamond

1998-01-01

405

BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty.

Bassett, B. A.

2005-07-01

406

Evidence for stagnation of the Harvard sublobe (Lake Michigan lobe) in Northeastern Illinois, U.S.A., from 24 000 to 17 600 BP and subsequent tundra-like ice-marginal paleoenvironments from 17 600 to 15 700 BP  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Glacial deposits of the last glaciation associated with the Harvard sublobe (Lake Michigan lobe) in northeastern Illinois, U.S.A., occur between sediment with dateable organics. The lower organics include fragments of Picea sp. as young as 24 000 ?? 270 BP. The supraglacial organics occur sparsely in laminated silt and fine sand in landforms that are positioned relatively high on the landscape, such as deposits from ice-walled lakes. These terrestrial organics yield ages that are 2500 to 1300 14C years older than organics at the base of sediment successions in nearby kettle basins. Basal 14C ages from four upland sites range from 17 610 ?? 270 to 16 120 ?? 80 BP. Our revised time-distance diagram of the Harvard sublobe now reflects a period of stagnation from 24 000 to about 17 600 BP. The supraglacial lacustrine silt yielded plant macrofossil assemblages of primarily tundra plants, including Salix herbacea and Dryas integrifolia. These plants likely grew in supraglacial and ice-marginal environments. The ostracode fauna include Cytherissa lacustris and Limnocythere friabilis. Geomorphic relations and ostracode ecology indicate that more than 17 m of ice buttressed some of the supraglacial lakes.

Curry, B. B.; Yansa, C. H.

2004-01-01

407

Screening for type 2 diabetes and population mortality over 10 years (ADDITION-Cambridge): a cluster-randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Summary Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, uncertainty persists around the benefits of screening for type 2 diabetes. We assessed the effect of a population-based stepwise screening programme on mortality. Methods In a pragmatic parallel group, cluster-randomised trial, 33 general practices in eastern England were randomly assigned by the method of minimisation in an unbalanced design to: screening followed by intensive multifactorial treatment for people diagnosed with diabetes (n=15); screening plus routine care of diabetes according to national guidelines (n=13); and a no-screening control group (n=5). The study population consisted of 20?184 individuals aged 40–69 years (mean 58 years), at high risk of prevalent undiagnosed diabetes, on the basis of a previously validated risk score. In screening practices, individuals were invited to a stepwise programme including random capillary blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) tests, a fasting capillary blood glucose test, and a confirmatory oral glucose tolerance test. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. All participants were flagged for mortality surveillance by the England and Wales Office of National Statistics. Analysis was by intention-to-screen and compared all-cause mortality rates between screening and control groups. This study is registered, number ISRCTN86769081. Findings Of 16?047 high-risk individuals in screening practices, 15?089 (94%) were invited for screening during 2001–06, 11?737 (73%) attended, and 466 (3%) were diagnosed with diabetes. 4137 control individuals were followed up. During 184?057 person-years of follow up (median duration 9·6 years [IQR 8·9–9·9]), there were 1532 deaths in the screening practices and 377 in control practices (mortality hazard ratio [HR] 1·06, 95% CI 0·90–1·25). We noted no significant reduction in cardiovascular (HR 1·02, 95% CI 0·75–1·38), cancer (1·08, 0·90–1·30), or diabetes-related mortality (1·26, 0·75–2·10) associated with invitation to screening. Interpretation In this large UK sample, screening for type 2 diabetes in patients at increased risk was not associated with a reduction in all-cause, cardiovascular, or diabetes-related mortality within 10 years. The benefits of screening might be smaller than expected and restricted to individuals with detectable disease. Funding Wellcome Trust; UK Medical Research Council; National Health Service research and development support; UK National Institute for Health Research; University of Aarhus, Denmark; Bio-Rad.

Simmons, Rebecca K; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Sharp, Stephen J; Sargeant, Lincoln A; Williams, Kate M; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

2012-01-01

408

"Inside Einstein's Universe" Using current science to explore key questions about space and time  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As educational organizations across the country celebrate the ideas of the Einstein Relativity Centennial in 2005, the NASA-Smithsonian UniverseForum will highlight the ongoing scientific research that helps us understand space, time, and our place in the cosmos. By connecting scientists across the country to our "Inside Einstein's Universe" resource portfolio and partners, we will promote connections between scientists and educators, and help bring current space scientific investigations to the museum-going public. This poster details the ways in which scientists can contribute to educational efforts over the next sixteen months and make use of new resources to teach audiences of all ages about the themes of the Einstein Centennial. Participating scientists will be able to make use of these resources in future endeavors well beyond 2005. The UniverseForum, located at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, is NASA's official partner in developing and sharing educational resources about the structure and evolution of the universe. Our "Inside Einstein's Universe" program will complement the educational efforts of the American Physics Society's "World Year of Physics 2005" celebration and NASA's "Beyond Einstein" program.

Reinfeld, E. L.; Dussault, M. E.; Gould, R. R.; Grier, J. A.; Steel, S. J.

2004-12-01

409

BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of nature and other physical differences, which cannot communicate with ours even in principle. Such ensembles are predicted by some versions of inflation, string and M-theory. The anthropic principle is the idea that our universe has (or even must have) the structure, physics, chemistry and all required for me to be writing this and you to be reading it (editors are optional). Both concepts have firm supporters and firm opponents among the 26 male and one female authors. The woman, M-theorist Renata Kallosh, is for, and provides hints of how one might calculate, at least, the likelihood of our universe within an ensemble (a sort of testability). Her chapter is fairly heavy going in isolation, and readers who don't normally think about antisymmetric tensor gauge fields might want to start with John Donaghue, who explains what a particle physicist means by 'naturalness' and suggests that the known spectrum of quark and lepton masses might be a signature of multiverse origins. Given the Templeton sponsorship, you might reasonably want to know the extent to which 'progress in spirituality' has conditioned the topics covered. The answer is 'somewhat', in that authors range from the avowedly atheist (Stephen Hawking) to evangelical Christian quantum cosmologist Don Page, with stop-overs among the Jesuits (William Stoeger), philosophers of religion (Robin Collins), and the (I think) teleologists Paul Davies and John Barrow. There is also among the authors strong divergence of opinion on whether Hugh Everett's version of many worlds is (just) a quantum multiverse (Tegmark), almost certainly correct and meaningful (Page), or almost certainly wrong or meaningless (Carter). And two chapters, by Smolin and Weinberg, suggest that even the classic fine-tuning required for carbon to be formed from three helium nuclei may not be anthropically essential for a habitable universe. The last word belongs to Steven Weinberg. On previous occasions, Martin Rees has said that he has enough confidence in the multiverse to bet his dog's life on it, while Andrei Linde said he would bet his own

Trimble, Virginia

2008-11-01

410

Changes in physical activity and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort  

PubMed Central

Aims To describe change in physical activity over 1 year and associations with change in cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent measurement of self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors at 1 year. Results There was no change in self-reported physical activity over 12 months. Even relatively large changes in physical activity were associated with relatively small changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors after allowing for changes in self-reported medication and diet. For every 30 metabolic equivalent-h increase in recreational activity (equivalent to 10 h/brisk walking/week), there was an average reduction of 0.1% in HbA1c in men (95% CI ?0.15 to ?0.01, P = 0.021) and an average reduction of 2 mmHg in systolic blood pressure in women (95% CI ?4.0 to ?0.05, P = 0.045). Conclusions Few associations were observed between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors in this trial cohort. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction appeared to be driven largely by factors other than changes in self-reported physical activity in the first year following diagnosis.

Barakat, A; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

2013-01-01

411

Are people with negative diabetes screening tests falsely reassured? Parallel group cohort study embedded in the ADDITION (Cambridge) randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess whether receiving a negative test result at primary care based stepwise diabetes screening results in false reassurance. Design Parallel group cohort study embedded in a randomised controlled trial. Setting 15 practices (10 screening, 5 control) in the ADDITION (Cambridge) trial. Participants 5334 adults (aged 40-69) in the top quarter for risk of having undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (964 controls and 4370 screening attenders). Main outcome measures Perceived personal and comparative risk of diabetes, intentions for behavioural change, and self rated health measured after an initial random blood glucose test and at 3-6 and 12-15 months later (equivalent time points for controls). Results A linear mixed effects model with control for clustering by practice found no significant differences between controls and people who screened negative for diabetes in perceived personal risk, behavioural intentions, or self rated health after the first appointment or at 3-6 months or 12-15 months later. After the initial test, people who screened negative reported significantly (but slightly) lower perceived comparative risk (mean difference ?0.16, 95% confidence interval ?0.30 to ?0.02; P=0.04) than the control group at the equivalent time point; no differences were evident at 3-6 and 12-15 months. Conclusions A negative test result at diabetes screening does not seem to promote false reassurance, whether this is expressed as lower perceived risk, lower intentions for health related behavioural change, or higher self rated health. Implementing a widespread programme of primary care based stepwise screening for type 2 diabetes is unlikely to cause an adverse shift in the population distribution of plasma glucose and cardiovascular risk resulting from an increase in unhealthy behaviours arising from false reassurance among people who screen negative. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN99175498.

2009-01-01

412

Correlates of Reported and Recorded Time Spent in Physical Activity in Working Adults: Results from the Commuting and Health in Cambridge Study  

PubMed Central

Background The correlates of physical activity in adults are relatively well studied. However, many studies use self-reported (‘reported’) measures of activity and we know little about the possible differences between the correlates of reported and objective (‘recorded’) measures of physical activity. We compared the correlates of reported and recorded time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in a sample of working adults. Methods In 2009, participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study completed questionnaires assessing individual, socio-demographic, health and contextual characteristics. Recorded time spent in MVPA over seven days was ascertained using accelerometers and reported time spent in MVPA was assessed using the Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire (RPAQ). Correlates of MVPA were investigated using sex-specific linear regression models. Results 486 participants (70% women) provided both reported and recorded physical activity data. 89% recorded at least 30 minutes of MVPA per day. In men, none of the potential explanatory variables were associated with both reported and recorded time spent in MVPA. In women, of all the potential explanatory variables only that of having a standing or manual occupation was associated with both reported (+42 min/day; 95% CI 16.4 to 68.4, p?=?0.001) and recorded (+9 min/day; 95% CI: 3.5 to 15.7, p?=?0.002) time spent in MVPA. Discussion The use of an objective measure of physical activity may influence the correlates which are observed. Researchers may wish to consider using and analysing recorded and reported measures in combination to gain a more complete view of the correlates of physical activity.

Panter, Jenna; Griffin, Simon; Ogilvie, David

2012-01-01

413

Water-quality conditions, and constituent loads and yields in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2005–07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of ongoing development in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply has the potential to be affected by a wide variety of contaminants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1997) through continuous monitoring and discrete sample collection and, since 2004, through systematic collection of streamwater samples during base-flow and stormflow conditions at five primary sampling stations in the drinking-water source area. Four primary sampling stations are on small tributaries in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins; the fifth primary sampling station is on the main stem of Stony Brook and drains about 93 percent of the Cambridge drinking-water source area. Water samples also were collected at six secondary sampling stations, including Fresh Pond Reservoir, the final storage reservoir for the raw water supply. Storm runoff and base-flow concentrations of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of streamflow and specific conductance for six monitoring stations, which include the five primary sampling stations. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. These data also were used to describe how streamwater quality is affected by various watershed characteristics and provide information to guide future watershed management. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), caffeine, and a suite of 59 polar pesticides. Values of physical properties and constituent concentrations varied widely, particularly in samples from tributaries. Median concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4 in samples collected in the Hobbs Brook Basin (39.8, 392, 207, and 21.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively) were higher than those for the Stony Brook Basin (17.8, 87.7, 49.7, and 14.7 mg/L, respectively). These differences in major ion concentrations are likely related to the low percentages of developed land and impervious area in the Stony Brook Basin. Concentrations of dissolved Cl and Na in samples, and those estimated from continuous records of specific conductance (particularly during base flow), often were greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary drinking-water guideline for Cl (250 mg/L), the chronic aquatic-life guideline for Cl (230 mg/L), and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs drinking-water guideline for Na (20 mg/L). Mean annual flow-weighted concentrations of Ca, Cl, and Na were generally positively correlated with the area of roadway land use in the subbasins. Correlations between mean annual concentrations of Ca and SO4 in base flow and total roadway, total impervious, and commercial-industrial land uses were statistically significant. Concentrations of TN (range of 0.42 to 5.13 mg/L in all subbasins) and TP (range of 0.006 to 0.80 mg/L in all subbasins) in tributary samples did not differ substantially between the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. Concentrations of TN and TP in samples collected during water years 2004–07 exceeded proposed reference concentrations of 0.57 and 0.024 mg/L, in 94 and 56 percent of the samples, respectively. Correlations between annual flow-weighted concentrations of TN and percentages of recreational land use and water-body area were statistically significant; however, no significant relation was found between TP and available land-use information. The volume of streamflow affected water-quality conditions at the pri

Smith, Kirk P.

2013-01-01

414

The New Universities. (Architectural Character)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Photographs and comparative statistics are given for each of the following--(1) University of Sussex, (2) University of York, (3) University of East Anglia, (4) University of Essex, (5) University of Kent at Canterbury, (6) University of Warwick, (7) University of Lancaster, (8) University of Technology, Loughborough, (9) Brunel University, (10)…

Brawne, Michael

1970-01-01

415

The Open Systems University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is focused toward a systems understanding of the contemporary university, the American University being the data base. A general systems conceptualization called the open systems university is presented. Comprehensive and generic in character, it is hoped that the theory of the open university will be viable enough to…

Counelis, James Steve

416

The Global University Press  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

Dougherty, Peter J.

2012-01-01

417

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Foreword; Preface; List of figures; 1. The environment of outer space; 2. Orbits; 3. Ground tracks; 4. The occupation of space; 5. Launchers and launch sites; 6. Political and economic aspects; 7. Near-Earth science missions; 8. Exploration beyond geocentric orbit; 9. Earth observation; 10. Telecommunications; 11. Military applications; 12. Man in space; Bibliography; Internet sites; Index.

Verger, Fernand; Sourbès-Verger, Isabelle; Ghirardi, Raymond; Pasco, With contributions by Xavier; Logsdon, Foreword by John M.; Lyle, Translated by Stephen; Reilly, Paul

2003-08-01

418

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Space  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the lift-off of Sputnik in 1957, over 8,000 satellites and spacecraft have been launched from over thirty countries, costing hundreds of billions of dollars. While only about 350 people have made the incredible journey beyond our atmosphere, we all benefit in countless ways from the missions. An authoriative and accessible source that collects information on man's quest to explore

Fernand Verger; Isabelle Sourbès-Verger; Raymond Ghirardi

2003-01-01

419

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, meteorites have caught the imagination of scientist and collector alike. An army of people are now actively searching for them in the hot and cold deserts of Earth. Fascinating extraterrestrial rocks in meteorites are our only contact with materials from beyond the Earth-Moon system. Using well known petrologic techniques, O. Richard Norton reveals in vivid color their

O. Richard Norton

2002-01-01

420

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, meteorites have caught the imagination of scientist and collector alike. An army of people are now actively searching for them in the hot and cold deserts of Earth. Fascinating extraterrestrial rocks in meteorites are our only contact with materials from beyond the Earth-Moon system. Using well known petrologic techniques, O. Richard Norton reveals in vivid color their extraordinary external and internal structures and taking readers to the atomic level, describes the environment within the solar nebula that existed before the planets accreted. Extensively illustrated, this volume is a valuable guide to assist searchers in the field in recognizing the many classes of meteorites and it is a superb reference source for students, teachers and scientists who wish to probe deeper these amazing rocks from space. O. Richard Norton is a contributing editor for Meteorite magazine and the author of The Planetarium and Atmospherium and Rocks from Space (Mountain Press, 1998). For the last 40 years, he has taught astronomy and space sciences at various US institutions.

Norton, O. Richard

2002-03-01

421

RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.  

PubMed

Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals. PMID:24341115

James, Andrew

2013-10-01

422

Analysis of N-H···O hydrogen bonds in new C(O)-NH-P(O)-based phosphoric triamides and analogous structures deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database.  

PubMed

Five new compounds belonging to the phosphoric triamide family have been synthesized: two of them with the formula XC(O)NHP(O)Y [X = CF3 (1) and CClF2 (2), Y = NHCH2C(CH3)2CH2NH] involving a 1,3-diazaphosphorinane ring part, and three 2,6-Cl2C6H3C(O)NHP(O)Z2 phosphoric triamides [Z = NHC(CH3)3 (3), N(CH3)(C6H11) (4) and N(CH3)(CH2C6H5) (5)]. The characterization was performed by (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H, (13)C NMR, IR spectroscopy besides (19)F NMR for fluorine containing compounds (1) and (2), and X-ray single-crystal structure analysis for (1), (3), (4) and (5). In each molecule the P atom has a distorted tetrahedral environment. The N atoms bonded to P atom have mainly sp(2) character with a very slight tendency to a pyramidal coordination for some amido groups. Different types of N-H···O hydrogen bonds have been analyzed for (1), (3), (4) and (5) and 118 other structures (including 194 hydrogen bonds) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database, containing either C(O)-NH-P(O)[N(C)(C)]2 or C(O)-NH-P(O)[NH(C)]2. The participation of N(CP)-H···O=P [N(CP) = the nitrogen atom of the C(O)-NH-P(O) fragment], N-H···O=P, N-H···O=C and N(CP)-H···O=C hydrogen bonds in different hydrogen-bonded motifs are discussed. Moreover, the involvement of the O atoms of C=O or P=O in the [N(CP)-H][N-H]···O=P, [N-H]2···O=P, [N-H]2···O=C and [N-H]3···O=C groups are considered. A histogram of N···O distances, the distribution of N-H···O angles and the scatterplot of N-H···O angles versus N···O distances are studied. PMID:23719705

Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Toghraee, Maryam; Divjakovic, Vladimir; van der Lee, Arie; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; Leyva Ramírez, Marco A; Saneei, Anahid

2013-04-01

423

Learning generalization in problem solving by a blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva).  

PubMed

Pepperberg (The Alex studies: cognitive and communicative abilities of gray parrots. Harvard University Press, Cambridge;1999) showed that some of the complex cognitive capabilities found in primates are also present in psittacine birds. Through the replication of an experiment performed with cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus oedipus) by Hauser et al. (Anim Behav 57:565-582; 1999), we examined a blue-fronted parrot's (Amazona aestiva) ability to generalize the solution of a particular problem in new but similar cases. Our results show that, at least when it comes to solving this particular problem, our parrot subject exhibited learning generalization capabilities resembling the tamarins'. PMID:18575906

de Mendonça-Furtado, Olívia; Ottoni, Eduardo B

2008-10-01

424

Fellowships for women  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass., is offering a variety of fellowship programs in 1987-1988 for women who wish to pursue independent study in academic and professional fields, in creative writing, and in the visual and performing arts. Fellows must live in the Boston area during their appointment and will have office or studio space, auditing privileges, and access to libraries and other resources provided by Radcliffe College and Harvard University. Those in academic fields must have received a doctorate at least 2 years prior to their appointment.

425

Larson Receives Geodesy Section Award  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past 15 years, Kristine Larson has been at the forefront of research in the development and application of high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) techniques to geophysical problems. Kristine received her bachelor's degree in engineering sciences from Harvard University [Cambridge, Mass.] in 1985. She subsequently entered the Ph.D. program in geophysics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography [La Jolla, Calif.]. Working with Duncan Agnew, her dissertation was one of the first to evaluate GPS accuracy and use it for geophysical studies.

Axelrad, Penina; Larson, Kristine M.

2006-06-01

426

"Quantum Field Theory and QCD"  

SciTech Connect

This grant partially funded a meeting, "QFT & QCD: Past, Present and Future" held at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA on March 18-19, 2005. The participants ranged from senior scientists (including at least 9 Nobel Prize winners, and 1 Fields medalist) to graduate students and undergraduates. There were several hundred persons in attendance at each lecture. The lectures ranged from superlative reviews of past progress, lists of important, unsolved questions, to provocative hypotheses for future discovery. The project generated a great deal of interest on the internet, raising awareness and interest in the open questions of theoretical physics.

Jaffe, Arthur M.

2006-02-25

427

Rotational Invariance of the 2d Spin - Spin Correlation Function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the critical temperature in the 2d Ising model on the square lattice, we establish the rotational invariance of the spin-spin correlation function using the asymptotics of the spin-spin correlation function along special directions (McCoy and Wu in the two dimensional Ising model. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1973) and the finite difference Hirota equation for which the spin-spin correlation function is shown to satisfy (Perk in Phys Lett A 79:3-5, 1980; Perk in Proceedings of III international symposium on selected topics in statistical mechanics, Dubna, August 22-26, 1984, JINR, vol II, pp 138-151, 1985).

Pinson, Haru

2012-09-01

428

Universality in Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that in quantum computation almost every gate that operates on two or more bits is a universal gate. We discuss various physical considerations bearing on the proper definition of universality for computational components such as logic gates.

David Deutsch; Adriano Barenco; Artur Ekert

1995-01-01

429

University Examination System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A computer based information system called UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION SYSTEM has been developed for Quaid-i-Azam University (QAU). The system provides efficient means of data storage and retrieval through a variety of fields. During the storage of information...

S. H. Siddiqui

1991-01-01

430

Metaphor and Universal Language.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attempts to identify elements of universal language and probes the limitations of the communication metaphor. Universal language is discussed in terms of the theory of quantum nonlocality and the implications of this theory for communication with extraterrestrial beings. (PCB)

Blown, Eric; And Others

1990-01-01

431

Models for University Government  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Looking at practices of university governments in three countries, the author discusses proposals for administrative and constitutional changes in universities. He makes recommendations to resolve the problems. (Author/MF)

Ross, Murray C.

1971-01-01

432

Northern Arizona University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university nestled below the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona. It enrolls more than 21,000 undergraduate and graduate students at its main campus in Flagstaff, through its 35 statewide sites, and via online program offerings. Within the university organizational system, Student Affairs has a…

Butcher, Michael F.; Saltonstall, Margot; Bickel, Sarah; Brandel, Rick

2009-01-01

433

The University Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

Simplicio, Joseph

2012-01-01

434

A New American University?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews changes in the relationship between American research universities and the federal government from 1945 to the present. During the 1950s and early 1960s, universities were supported in applied science and socially beneficial research. In current times, universities are becoming more autonomous in examining questions of social theory and…

Muller, Steven

1978-01-01

435

The German University System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an attempt to familiarize interested persons with the German university system, the German system of higher education is described including recent changes. Covered are: (1) degrees granted; (2) the organization of the universities; and (3) the social role of the professions. The German universities, in the present changing situation, are…

Schneider, R. T.

436

John Carroll University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

2009-01-01

437

Canadian Association of University Surgeons' Annual Symposium. Surgical simulation: The solution to safe training or a promise unfulfilled?  

PubMed Central

At its 2009 annual symposium, chaired by Dr. William (Bill) Pollett, the Canadian Association of University Surgeons brought together speakers with expertise in surgery and medical education to discuss the role of surgical simulation for improving surgical training and safety. Dr. Daniel Jones, of Harvard University and the 2009 Charles Tator Lecturer, highlighted how simulation has been used to teach advanced laparoscopic surgery. He also outlined how the American College of Surgeons is moving toward competency assessments as a requirement before surgeons are permitted to perform laparoscopic surgery on patients. Dr. Teodor Grantcharov, from the University of Toronto, highlighted the role of virtual reality simulators in laparoscopic surgery as well as box trainers. Dr. Peter Brindley from the University of Alberta, although a strong proponent of simulation, cautioned against an overzealous adoption without addressing its current limitations. He also emphasized simulation’s value in team training and crisis resource management training. Dr. Chris de Gara, also from the University of Alberta, questioned to what extent simulators should be used to determine competency. He raised concerns that if technical skills are learned in isolation, they may become “decontextualized,” and therefore simulation might become counterproductive. He outlined how oversimplification can have an “enchanting” effect, including a false sense of security. As a result, simulation must be used appropriately and along the entire education continuum. Furthermore, far more needs to be done to realize its role in surgical safety.

Brindley, Peter G.; Jones, Daniel B.; Grantcharov, Teodor; de Gara, Christopher

2012-01-01

438

Universities Scale Like Cities  

PubMed Central

Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the ‘gross university income’ in terms of total number of citations over ‘size’ in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities -the top-100 European universities- we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

van Raan, Anthony F. J.

2013-01-01

439

Digital University Photographs: University of Dayton  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Dayton has a wonderful digital collection of photographs of the university. Visitors can search by "popular subject terms" which, perhaps not surprisingly, include the typical college terms of "football", "sports", and "athletes". However, there are also more unconventional terms available including "ghetto", which yields photos of the South Student Neighborhood, popularly known as the "Ghetto". Visitors to the collection will also find fraternity, sorority, and large imposing houses featured in the photographs of the "Ghetto". Visitors shouldn't miss browsing the many aerial views of campus and surrounding neighborhoods from the 1920s. Simply click on "campus", and enjoy the many views. Fans of the actor Tyrone Power should check out the picture of him with the University of Dayton football team in Hollywood in 1939 at Twentieth Century-Fox Studios. Visitors can also browse the collection or use the advanced search option.

440

Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's second oldest…

Potts, Anthony

2012-01-01

441

Raisin Bread Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students examine the idea of inflation in the Universe using rising raisin bread dough as a model for universal expansion. Students will read the Cosmic Times 1993 edition and use two articles: Pancake or Oatmeal Universe - What's for Breakfast and Inflation in the Universe to help them make observations. The students will observe a bowl of oatmeal to explain the lumpiness and smoothness of the universe. Then the students will use raisin bread to describe how the universe went through a period of inflation to expand into its current form today. This lesson is part of the Cosmic Times teacher guide and is intended to be used in conjunction with the 1993 Cosmic Times Poster.

442

University contract research guidelines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concerns have been raised in the past few years over the increasing reliance of universities on contracts with outside agencies, public and private. These concerns have been the subject of meetings by the National Commission on Research, the Pajaro Dunes conference of university presidents and corporation executives, the Association of American Universities, and the Association of American University Professors, among others.The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) recently revised its “Policy #64: The University and Contract Research,” to address these issues in a way that “will help [university] administration and faculty act so that [their] relationship with government agencies or private industry will in no way violate the professional freedoms which have contributed so much to the status of American higher education.” The ACLU has followed the issue, it says, “because of our determination that contractual relationships proceed within a framework that protects fundamental academic freedoms.”

443

Enlistment Propensities of University Students.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Enlistment propensities of undergraduates were assessed through surveys conducted at Northwestern University, University of Arizona, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Illinois-Chicago. The core finding was that there is a definite, a...

C. Moskos

2004-01-01

444

The expansive nondecelerative universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that, among the models of the universe described by Friedmann's (1922, 1924) equations of universe dynamics, the only model which does not contradict observations is the model of a flat expansive nondecelerative universe (ENU), derived by Skalsky and Sukenik (1991, 1992) and Skalsky (1991). This model fulfills the conditions which result from the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum mechanics, and unites them in a complementary manner.

Skalsky, Vladimir

1993-03-01

445

Welcome to the Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A compliment to the Boston Museum of Science's exhibit, Welcome to the Universe is a "collection of web sites" aimed at teaching visitors about the Universe. Sites are organized into six categories: Patterns in the Sky, Size and Scale, Life Story of the Universe, Learning from Light, Additional Astronomy Resources, and Community Solar System. Each section provides a list of web sites and activities for hands-on learning.

446

The Internet University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Internet University, provided by Cape Software, is an annotated listing of over 300 college and university distance learning courses available via the Internet. Course information is arranged by subject from Arts to Sociology. Information is provided about the institution offering the course, as well as tuition, fees, and contact information. A "Providers" section organizes information by college or university. A "Research" section provides links to mailing lists, FTP sites, Usenet newsgroups, and telnet and Web sites with information about "online college and university study resources." In the future Cape Software plans an "Internet High School," with online high school and equivalency providers, and an "Internet Pilgrim," with online spiritual resources.

447

Universally Composable Commitments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new security measure for commitment protocols, called Universally Composable (UC) Commitment. The measure guarantees that commitment protocols behave like an \\\\ideal commitment service,\\

Ran Canetti; Marc Fischlin

2001-01-01

448

Explore the Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The new online exhibit, Explore the Universe, is provided by the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. The site "presents the major discoveries that have given us our current scientific view of the universe, illustrates how the universe is taking shape and probes the mysteries that remain." The exhibit, which is especially interesting when viewed with necessary browsers and multimedia software, delves into the history of space exploration from Galileo and the earliest ideas about the universe to the digital technology of today. The visually stunning exhibit should be enjoyable to explore and offers people of all ages a great way to learn about the human need to know what lies beyond.

2007-12-03

449

The Chinese Television University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of China's Beijing Broadcasting and Television University: background, establishment, administration and structure, students, courses, teaching package, and course production. (JD)

McCormick, R.

1980-01-01

450

Professional Development in the International Year of Astronomy: Expanding the Universe in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Year of Astronomy offers unparalleled opportunity to expand our audiences’ understanding about the universe. However, many learners, students and adults alike, are unfamiliar with the universe beyond the solar system. This collaborative workshop explores strategies for teacher professional development around the origin and evolution of the universe, using the resources of the Beyond the Solar System Professional Development Project as a guide. The Beyond the Solar System (BtSS) Professional Development Project is a NASA-supported initiative from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) designed to foster public understanding of NASA's exciting astronomy and space science research. The BtSS portfolio includes video resources, assessment tools, data about common student ideas, content presentations, online telescope investigations, and other classroom activities designed to deepen content knowledge and improve the quality of teaching and learning about current scientific models and evidence for the origin and evolution of our universe of galaxies. During this session, members of the BtSS Leadership Team from around the country will share their experience using these resources in educator workshops and teacher-training courses, and facilitate discussions among workshop participants about how these materials and pedagogical strategies can be used in their own professional development efforts during the International Year of Astronomy. EPO specialists and scientists will engage in focused exploration of the project's DVD--"Expanding the Universe in the Classroom"--in order make explicit connections between the themes of the International Year of Astronomy and their own work. The goals of this workshop are to equip professional development providers to support IYA education efforts in classrooms, afterschool programs, and informal education venues and to raise awareness about the opportunities for continuing Galileo's legacy of discovery through current science and online telescopes.

Reinfeld, Erika L.; Harman, P.; Lee, M. H.; Bailey, J. M.

2008-05-01

451

Birth of inflationary universes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cosmological model is proposed in which the Universe is created by quantum tunneling from ''nothing'' into a de Sitter space. The tunneling is described by a de Sitter-- p Hawking--Moss instanton. After the tunneling, the model evolves along the lines of the inflationary scenario. It is argued that at any time there exist parts of the Universe which are

Alexander Vilenkin

1983-01-01

452

Astronomy and the Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With three levels to choose from on each page - beginner, intermediate or advanced - this site provides links to webpages that share information that relates to every element of the universe, like the cosmos, star dust, and planets. The information is shared in a clear and interesting way, with updated news and even universe maps.

2001-08-08

453

Arizona State University. Exemplars.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses how the Arizona Board of Regents, which has governing authority over the state's three public universities, dealt with the inability of the universities to respond to new societal needs in a timely manner; a major impediment was felt to be tenure. After a series of meetings of administrators and faculty leaders, the Board…

Wegner, Gregory R.

454

The Enquiring University Teacher.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a guide to an approach to professional development in which one's own teaching is a field of inquiry. The book explores the nature of the university teacher's inquiry and the importance of questioning personal and intellectual values in university teaching. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to the Enquiry"; (2) "The Relationship…

Rowland, Stephen

455

University Rankings in China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the mid 1990s of last Century, university rankings have become very popular in China. Six institutions have published such rankings; some of them have also detailed their ranking methodologies. This paper features a general introduction to university ranking in China, and to the methodologies of each ranking discussed. The paper also…

Liu, Nian Cai; Liu, Li

2005-01-01

456

University Patent Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between university research and public need is discussed from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Examples are cited of European experiences in which there has been obvious industrial motivation for research performed by the universities. The author notes that there are no difficulties with the level of government…

Latker, Norman J.

457

Our Heirarchical Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site discusses several hot topic questions in the astronomy world. For example, the expansion of the universe, dark matter, and how did giant superstructures form out of a smooth universe. There are many pictures and movie clips interspersed throughout the website.

Norman, Michael

2005-04-25

458

University HRD Programs. Symposium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This symposium is comprised of four papers on university human resource development (HRD) programs. "Passions for Excellence: HRD Graduate Programs at United States Universities" (K. Peter Kuchinke) presents an analysis of case studies that reveals convergent and divergent themes related to the genesis of programs and subsequent theoretical…

2002

459

The Universal Solvent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes five exemplary digital resource centers at the University of Virginia used by K-12 learners as well as by university students and faculty. These modern archives contain vast resources of thousands of primary sources, data sets, multimedia files, and analytical tools, all of which are electronically accessible to K-12 schools and…

Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Dawson, Kara

1999-01-01

460

The Pennsylvania State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

2009-01-01

461

The universal propagator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

Klauder, John R.

1993-01-01

462

University-industry interaction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

Hastings, Daniel E.

1990-01-01

463

Understanding University Technology Transfer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

Association of American Universities, 2011

2011-01-01

464

Managing Tomorrow's University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issues addressed in this conference report concern budgeting, the resourceful manager, extramural funding, employer-employee interaction, management information systems, and management of the university in the future. Contents include: the keynote address by F. E. Balderston; "University Budgeting in an Era of Scarce Resources," by F. M. Bowen…

Michalak, Craig L., Ed.

465

Financing University Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the detailed mechanisms of the interplay of knowledge creation and economic growth have been discussed in great detail by endogenous growth theory, this paper is interested in assessing the role that universities play in the knowledge based economy. It does so at the example of best practice scenarios, as currently being undertaken by the University of Oxford, U.C. Berkeley,

Roya Ghafele

2012-01-01

466

Marketing University Outreach Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market" (Vaughan C. Judd); (3)…

Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

467

Modelling University Governance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

Trakman, Leon

2008-01-01

468

University Freedom in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Freedom means the right of the universities to do their scientific activities and to regulate and do the higher education through their organs. The three feet that make up the university freedom are scientific freedom, administrative freedom and financial freedom. Scientific freedom is realized by the freedom of the faculty and teaching staff and…

Dolasir, Semiyha

2006-01-01

469

Scaling Down The Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A unit intended to teach children the size and scale of the Universe. Through hands-on manipulatives the students proceed in sequential stages to create four models, beginning with the Solar System and ending with the entire Universe. They also learn the distance of a light year.

Leger, Victor

2007-03-29

470

The Expanding Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity demonstrates with balloons the expansion of the universe. Distances between points on the balloon are meausred as the balloon expands, showing how all are getting farther apart. After the activity the students are asked questions about the universe's expansion.

Slater, Tim P.

2004-07-16

471

Marquette University Faculty Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1975 handbook is organized into five major sections: university objectives and organization; academic organization; faculty status, benefits, and responsibilities; general university facilities and services; and Milwaukee community services and opportunities. Academic organization focuses on the Office of Academic Affairs, Academic Senate and…

Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI.

472

Leveraging University Creativity.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Today, more than 200 universities are conducting R&D efforts across a broad range of sciences in support of the Department of Defense (DoD). Intricate parts of this research partnership are the University Affiliated Research Centers (UARC), which represen...

J. Broughton

2012-01-01

473

New Openings in University-Industry Cooperation: Aalto University as the Forerunner of European University Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Innovation University (IU)--to be called the Aalto University after Alvav Aalto, a famous Finnish architect and MIT professor--is a new university which will be created through a merger of three existing universities: the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), the Helsinki School of Economics (HSE) and the University of Art and Design…

Markkula, Markku; Lappalainen, Pia

2009-01-01

474

Central Michigan University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Central Michigan University serves Michigan and the larger community as a doctoral/research intensive public university focused on excellent teaching and student-focused learning. The University is committed to providing a broad range of undergraduate and graduate programs and services to prepare its students for varied roles as responsible citizens and leaders in a democratic and diverse society. Its programs encourage intellectual and moral growth, prepare students for meaningful careers and professions, instill the values of lifelong learning, and encourage civic responsibility, public service and understanding among social groups in a global society. The university emphasizes an undergraduate program that maintains a balance between general education and specialization. In addition to educational depth in at least one academic discipline or professional field, the university provides educational experiences in the arts, humanities, natural and social sciences, global cultures, and issues of race and diversity. The university offers selected high quality graduate programs in traditional disciplines and professional fields. Through its College of Extended Learning, the university provides access to higher education programs and lifelong learning opportunities both nationally and internationally through a variety of innovative instructional methods and schedules designed to meet the demands of adult populations. Central Michigan University encourages research, scholarship and creative activity and promotes the scholarly pursuit and dissemination of new knowledge, artistic production and applied research. Through its support of research, the university enhances the learning opportunities of both its undergraduate and graduate students and promotes economic, cultural and social development. The university�s sense of community is reflected through governance structures that allow broadbased participation, opportunities for close student-faculty interaction, and a rich array of residential and campus-based co-curricular activities. Through its partnerships and outreach efforts, the university promotes learning outsideof the traditional classroom and enhances the general welfare of society.

University, Central M.

475

Visions Of The Universe - An IYA Exhibit For Libraries, Schools, And The Public  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In celebration of the International Year of Astronomy, we have created an astronomy exhibit that portrays highlights of the four centuries of discovery since the invention of the telescope. With bold graphical design and stunning imagery, carefully selected scientific stories illustrate the progression of changes in not only our observations of the heavens, but also our understanding of the cosmos. Twelve panels, each 3 feet by 6 feet in size, provide examples from the solar system, to stars, to nebulae, to galaxies, and across the universe. The discoveries within each panel showcase the dramatic advances in astronomy made through observation, insight, and technological advances across history from Galileo and Huygens, to Herchel and Draper, to the Viking Mission and the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhibit will tour 40 libraries across the United States during 2009-2010, with each library sponsoring a series of family and school events as well as involving local astronomers in connecting the public with astronomy. In addition, the digital files of the exhibit panels will be made available for libraries, schools, museums, astronomy departments, and others to download and produce their own copies of the exhibit. In this manner, we hope to bring the wonders of discovering the universe to the largest audience possible during this anniversary celebration. This exhibit is a collaboration of the Space Telescope Science Institute, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the American Library Association through funding from NASA.

Summers, Frank; Smith, D.; Eisenhamer, B.

2009-12-01