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1

Selenium in soils of the Lower Wasatch Formation, Campbell County, Wyoming: Geochemistry, distribution, and environmental hazards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Seleniferous Shingle series soils and sandstone outcrops of section 27, T 48 N, R 71 W, Wyoming are mapped on aerial photography by their association with Astragalus bisulcatus. Chemical leachate analyses and atomic absorption methods reveal all studied Samsil and Shingle soils to contain acid, base, and water soluble selenium compounds, and that water extractions showed varied concentration behavior due to soil pH. Acid-soluble selenium is found to be associated with smectite. Statistical analyses confirm that A. bisulcatus presence has a weak influence on soil-lens organic selenium concentration, and determine the importance of other geobotanical factors for convertor presence. Environmental procedures of high selenium lens burial, convertor plant eradication, and revegetated site monitoring are recommended. Usage of density analysis and photographic enlargement are used to successfully produce both a control area and a Campbell County, Wyoming regional map of A. bisulcatus supportive soils and outcrops using Skylab photography.

Kolm, K. E.

1975-01-01

2

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01

3

Evaluation of the native hydraulic characteristics of the Felix coal (Eocene, Wasatch Formation) and associated strata, Hoe Creek site, Campbell County, Wyoming. [Methods and methods of interpretation explained  

Microsoft Academic Search

The native hydraulic characteristics of the shallow (35- to 50-m-deep) Felix coal and adjacent strata have been estimated from the results of comprehensive field tests at the Campbell County, Wyoming, site of proposed in situ coal-gasification experiments. The field tests involved withdrawal of water from and water injection into wells completed in the Felix coal. Measurement of the effects of

R. Stone; D. F. Snoeberger

1976-01-01

4

Western energy related overhead monitoring project. Phase 2: Summary. [Campbell County, Wyoming and coal strip mines in Montana and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assistance by NASA to EPA in the establishment and maintenance of a fully operational energy-related monitoring system included: (1) regional analysis applications based on LANDSAT and auxiliary data; (2) development of techniques for using aircraft MSS data to rapidly monitor site specific surface coal mine activities; and (3) registration of aircraft MSS data to a map base. The coal strip mines used in the site specific task were in Campbell County, Wyoming; Big Horn County, Montana; and the Navajo mine in San Juan County, New Mexico. The procedures and software used to accomplish these tasks are described.

Anderson, J. E. (principal investigator)

1979-01-01

5

Aquifer Protection and Community Viz™ in Albany County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the results of an alternative futures analysis for implementation of a joint city\\/county aquifer protection plan in Albany County, southeastern Wyoming, U.S.A. The ArcView-based Community Viz™ planning support system software was used to evaluate major environmental, economic and social indicators impacted by three different scenarios: continuation of existing trends, aquifer protection, and density shift. Indicators were compared

Scott N. Lieske; Jeffrey D. Hamerlinck; Dennis M. Feeney; Alan Frank; Diana G. Hulme; Mike Knapp

6

78 FR 65420 - Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties, New...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties...at the location of the existing Portageville Bridge (also known as the ``Portage High Bridge'') over the Genesee River in Wyoming...

2013-10-31

7

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2000: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 23 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) low birth-weight babies; (4) early prenatal care; (5) infants deaths; (6) child deaths; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

8

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2002: A County-By-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide and county trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

9

Characterization of Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2004-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 15 river miles long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson (fig. 1). Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, began studying Fish Creek in 2004 to describe the hydrology of the creek and later (2007?08) to characterize the water quality and the biological communities. The purpose of this fact sheet is to summarize the study results from 2004 to 2008.

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2010-01-01

10

Hydrologic conditions near Glendo, Platte County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glendo area of Platte and Carbon Counties, Wyo., about 250 square miles in extent, is in the Great Plains physiographic province. It is bordered on the west by the Laramie Range and on the east by the Hartville uplift. The North Platte River and Horseshoe and Middle Bear Creeks are the principal streams that drain the area. Gentle to steep hills, which lie between 4,450 and 6,360 feet above sea level, characterize the topography. Approximately 7,600 acres of land is cultivated in the Horseshoe Creek valley and 1,000 or more acres in the Cassa Flats of the North Platte River and Middle Bear Creek valleys. The average annual precipitation of 13.15 inches and the streamflow diverted for irrigation from Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River are usually inadequate to sustain crops during the entire growing season. Sedimentary rocks, which underlie about 99 percent of the Glendo area, range in age from Cambrian(?) to Recent and in thickness from about 3,000 to 4,700 feet. Beds of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age dip steeply away from the Laramie Range and the Hartville uplift to form a large syncline, which is interrupted by the Elkhorn anticline in the central part of the area. Beds of Tertiary and Quaternary age that were deposited over the older structural features and later were partly removed by erosion have dips of less than 6 ? . The 'Converse sand' of local usage at the top of the Hartville Formation of Mississippian(7), Pennsylvanian, and Permian age, the White River Formation of Oligocene age, and the flood-plain deposits of Recent .age are the most important aquifers in the Glendo area. The Hartville Formation consists predominantly of hard limestone and dolomite and of lesser amounts of sandstone and shale ; its thickness ranges from 850 to 1,050 feet throughout most of the area. The 'Converse sand' is an artesian aquifer consisting of fine- to medium-grained porous sandstone having an average thickness of about 80 feet. Recharge to the Hartville Formation is mainly from seepage of surface water from Glendo Reservoir and Spring Creek; ground water is discharged from the formation to the overlying White River Formation and the alluvium in the North Platte River valley near Cassa and to four wells in the Horseshoe Creek valley. Flowing wells yielding from a few gallons per minute to 175 gpm (gallons per minute) or more from the 'Converse sand' can probably be located in an area from ? mile to 1? miles wide and about 4? miles long in the lower Horseshoe Creek valley. The depth to the 'Converse sand' in this area depends upon the topographic relief and distance from the outcrop and ranges from 250 to about 1,000 feet. The discharge induced by pumping a well in the aquifer in the 'Converse sand' would probably amount to about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown. Values of 2,000, 2,100, and 10,300 gpd (gallons per day) per ft for the coefficient of transmissibility of the 'Converse sand' were obtained from aquifer tests at three wells. The chemical analyses of samples from the Hartville Formation ('Converse. sand' included) indicate that the water in the formation is of fairly good quality and adequate for domestic, stock, and irrigation uses, although the fluoride content is low and the water is hard. The White River Formation is composed of as much as 575 feet of fractured siltstone and claystone, and the flood-plain deposits include up to 65 feet of silt, sand, and gravel. Precipitation is the main type of recharge to the rocks of Tertiary age. Recharge to the alluvium in the valleys of Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River occurs mainly by seepage of ground water from. underlying beds, by infiltration of irrigation water, and by infiltration of streamflow as bank storage. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage to streams, by underflow, and by evapotranspiration and artificially by wells. In 1961, the total discharge from 38 wells in the White River and Arikaree Formations and 2

Welder, G. E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

1965-01-01

11

Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-11-01

12

Library of the Year 2008: Laramie County Library System, Wyoming--The Impact Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features Laramie County Library System (LCLS) of Cheyenne, Wyoming, which is named as Gale/"Library Journal" 2008 Library of the Year. It is not just strong, effective publicity or the fine new building or even a staff built around its ability to connect with the people, although all of those things add to the impact of Wyoming's…

Berry, John N., III

2008-01-01

13

Estimated use of water in Lincoln County, Wyoming, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Total water use in Lincoln County, Wyoming in 1993 was estimated to be 405,000 Mgal (million gallons). Water use estimates were divided into nine categories: public supply, self-supplied domestic, commercial, irrigation, livestock, indus ial, mining, thermoelectric power, and hydro- electric power. Public supply water use, estimated to be 2,160 Mgal, primarily was obtained from springs and wells. Shallow ground water wells were the primary source of self-supplied domestic water, estimate to be 1.7 Mgal, and 53 percent of those wells were drilled to a depth of 100 feet or less. Commercial water use, estimated to be 117 Mgal, was obtained from public-supply systems. Surface water supplied an estimated 153,000 Mgal of the total estimated water use of 158,000 Mgal for irrigation in 1993. Sprinkler and flood irrigation technology were used about equally in the northern part of Lincoln County and flood irrigation was the primary technology used in the southern part. Livestock, industrial, and mining were not major water users in Lincoln County in 1993. Livestock water use totaled an estimated 203 Mgal. Industrial water use was estimated to be 120 Mgal from self-supplied water sources and 27 Mgal from public supplied water source Mining water use was an estimated 153 Mgal. Thermoelectric and hydroelectric power generation used surface water sources. Thermoelectric power water use was an estimated 5,900 Mgal. An estimated 238,000 Mgal of water was used to generate hydroelectc power at Fontenelle Reservoir on the Green River.

Ogle, K. M.; Eddy-Miller, C. A.; Busing, C. J.

1996-01-01

14

Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-12-01

15

77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-01-25

16

76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW161248] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2011-05-13

17

77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-04-16

18

77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000.BX0000; WYW173408] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-05-25

19

Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

is present and a single, higher amplitude, positive kick when the producing interval is absent. Since the real seismic data contain frequencies up to 80 hertz the large impedance contrast over the very thin interval can be and is detected. v I..., CO 80201. Robertson, James D. and Henry A. Nogami, 1984, Complex seismic trace analysis of thin beds: Geophysics, v. 49, n. 4, p. 344- 352. Taner, M. T. , F. Koehler, and R. E. Sheriff, 1979, Complex seismic trace analysis: Geophysics, v. 44, n...

Walters, Donna Lynn

2012-06-07

20

Depositional environments of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones, Recluse area, Campbell County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

. The feldspar is largely orthoclase with some plagioclase. Chert is present as both grains and remobi li zed grains which act as cement. Mica is generally muscovite. Rock fragments are polycrys talli ne quartz, metaquartzi te, and quartz with rutile.... The feldspar is largely orthoclase with some plagioclase. Chert is present as both grains and remobi li zed grains which act as cement. Mica is generally muscovite. Rock fragments are polycrys talli ne quartz, metaquartzi te, and quartz with rutile...

Stoudt, David Luther

2012-06-07

21

Pesticides in Ground Water - Niobrara and Weston Counties, Wyoming, 2005-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1991, members of local, State, and Federal governments, as well as industry and interest groups, formed the Ground-water and Pesticide Strategy Committee to prepare the State of Wyoming's generic Management Plan for Pesticides in Ground Water. Part of this management plan is to sample and analyze Wyoming's ground water for pesticides. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Ground-water and Pesticide Strategy Committee, began statewide implementation of the sampling component of the State of Wyoming's generic Management Plan for Pesticides in Ground Water. During 2005-2006, baseline monitoring was conducted in Niobrara and Weston Counties. This Fact Sheet describes and summarizes results of the baseline monitoring in Niobrara and Weston Counties.

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.

2007-01-01

22

Spread Creek anticline, Teton County, Wyoming: A study in structural form and petroleum exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spread Creek anticline is a large, doubly-plunging, closed anticlinal structure in northeast Teton County, Wyoming. The area of closure is approximately 20 mi long and 2 mi wide. Closure based on surface geoloyy may exceed 2000 ft. No commercial guantities of hydrocarbons have been established by exploratory drilling. Eleven deep exploratory tests and four shallow core holes have been drilled

Blackstone; D. L. Jr

1989-01-01

23

LeRoy Storage, Uinta County, Wyoming: A case history in attempted control of gas migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leroy Gas Storage Facility, an aquifer storage development in Uinta County, Wyoming, by Mountain Fuel Supply Company, is presented as a case history. This field represents a complex problem in aquifer storage due to the uncontrolled migration of gas to the surface. Considerable effort in reservoir engineering and planning has resulted in apparent and probable arrest of ''uncontrolled'' gas migration,

R. Araktingi; M. E. Benefield; Z. Bessenyei; K. H. Coats; M. R. Tek

1982-01-01

24

78 FR 28897 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COMMISSION [Docket No. 040-09068; License SUA-1598; NRC-2008-0391] Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental...

2013-05-16

25

Environment of deposition and reservoir properties of Teapot sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF TEAPOT SANDSTONES (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WELL DRAW FIELD, CONVERSE COUNTY, WYOMING A Thesis JOHN JOSEPH SULLIVAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the reguirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1982 Major Subject: Geology ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF TEAPOT SANDSTONES (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WELL DRAW FIELD, CONVERSE COUNTY, WYOMING A Thesis...

Sullivan, John Joseph

2012-06-07

26

North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the draft environmental impact statement for a proposed exploratory oil drilling operation in Shoshone National Forest in Wyoming describes the drilling equipment and support facilities required for the operation. Marathon Oil Company's purpose is to test the gas and oil potential of underlying geologic structures. Although Marathon plans a reclamation and revegetation program, there would be erosion during the operation. Noise from the drilling and helicopter activity would disrupt wildlife and vacationers in nearby Yellowstone Park. Confrontations with the grizzly bear population would increase. The legal mandate for the assessment was the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920.

Not Available

1984-01-01

27

78 FR 48461 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW172684] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Hay Creek II Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2013-08-08

28

Shallow Early Cretaceous oil production in Wind Creek\\/Tomcat Creek area, Crook County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over 1.5 million bbl of oil have been produced from the Early Cretaceous Fall River and Lakota Formations on the east side of the Powder River basin in the Wind Creek\\/Tomcat Creek area, Crook County, Wyoming. Producing depths range from 42 ft at the Barton Ranch field to over 2528 ft at an unnamed field. The gravity of the gas-free

Arthur G. Randall

1986-01-01

29

76 FR 78939 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. In-Person Viewing or Pickup...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

2011-12-20

30

76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. The Draft CCP/ EA will also...

2011-06-30

31

Computer program and data listing for two-dimensional ground-water model for Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is a supplement to the report, ' Effect of pumpage on ground-water levels as modeled in Laramie County, Wyoming, ' published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Open-File Report 80-1104. The computer program and data used to model ground-water conditions in post-Cretaceous rocks in Laramie County are listed. (USGS)

Crist, M.A.

1983-01-01

32

Selected Hydrogeologic Data for the High Plains Aquifer in Southwestern Laramie County, Wyoming, 1931-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office, created a hydrogeologic database for southwestern Laramie County, Wyoming. The database contains records from 166 wells and test holes drilled during 1931-2006. Several types of information, including well construction; well or test hole locations; lithologic logs; gamma, neutron, spontaneous-potential, and single-point resistivity logs; water levels; and transmissivities and storativities estimated from aquifer tests, are available in the database. Most wells and test holes in the database have records containing information about construction, location, and lithology; 77 wells and test holes have geophysical logs; 70 wells have tabulated water-level data; and 60 wells have records of aquifer-test results.

Hallberg, Laura L.; Mason, Jon P.

2007-01-01

33

Mineral resources of the Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area is about 4 mi south of Encampment, in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by Archean felsic gneiss and early Proterozoic quartzite; both are intruded by minor middle Proterozoic mafic plutonic rock. Gneiss occurs throughout the eastern and northwestern parts of the study area; whereas, quartzite occurs in the western and southwestern parts. This study area has no identified resources and no potential for energy resources. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for undiscovered industrial minerals is low.

du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

1989-01-01

34

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2001: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7) chronic…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

35

Some Features of Wyoming Big Sagebrush Communities on Gravel Pediments of the Green River in Daggett County, Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crown cover of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) and other shrubs, frequency of under- story species, and ground cover were considered in context of ungulate grazing on Quaternary gravel pediments associated with the Green River in Daggett County, Utah. Maximum sagebrush crown cover was found at 22% inside an exclosure that had kept all ungulates out for about

Sherel Goodrich; Dwain Nelson; Natalie Gale

1999-01-01

36

Geologic map of the Sand Creek Pass quadrangle, Larimer County, Colorado, and Albany County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New geologic mapping within the Sand Creek Pass 7.5 minute quadrangle defines geologic relationships within the northern Front Range of Colorado along the Wyoming border approximately 35 km south of Laramie, Wyo. Previous mapping within the quadrangle was limited to regional reconnaissance mapping; Eaton Reservoir 7.5 minute quadrangle to the east (2008), granite of the Rawah batholith to the south (1983), Laramie River valley to the west (1979), and the Laramie 30' x 60' quadrangle to the north (2007). Fieldwork was completed during 1981 and 1982 and during 2007 and 2008. Mapping was compiled at 1:24,000-scale. Minimal petrographic work was done and no isotope work was done in the quadrangle area, but detailed petrographic and isotope studies were performed on correlative map units in surrounding areas as part of a related regional study of the northern Front Range. Stratigraphy of Proterozoic rocks is primarily based upon field observation of bulk mineral composition, macroscopic textural features, and field relationships that allow for correlation with rocks studied in greater detail outside of the map area. Stratigraphy of Phanerozoic rocks is primarily based upon correlation with similar rocks to the north in the Laramie Basin of Wyoming and to the east in the Front Range of Colorado.

Workman, Jeremiah B.; Braddock, William A.

2010-01-01

37

Spread Creek anticline, Teton County, Wyoming: A study in structural form and petroleum exploration  

SciTech Connect

Spread Creek anticline is a large, doubly-plunging, closed anticlinal structure in northeast Teton County, Wyoming. The area of closure is approximately 20 mi long and 2 mi wide. Closure based on surface geoloyy may exceed 2000 ft. No commercial guantities of hydrocarbons have been established by exploratory drilling. Eleven deep exploratory tests and four shallow core holes have been drilled on or adjacent to the fold, one of which reached strata of Cambrian age. The axis of the fold migrate to the northeast with depth. For part of the fold, there may be no dip reversal and therefore no closure at the level of the Permian Phosphoria Formation and the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone. Natural gas seeps are probably due to degassing of coal beds near the surface and do not reflect a deep trapped hydrocarbon accumulation.

Blackstone, D.L. Jr. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (USA))

1989-04-01

38

Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

39

LeRoy Storage, Uinta County, Wyoming: A case history in attempted control of gas migration  

SciTech Connect

Leroy Gas Storage Facility, an aquifer storage development in Uinta County, Wyoming, by Mountain Fuel Supply Company, is presented as a case history. This field represents a complex problem in aquifer storage due to the uncontrolled migration of gas to the surface. Considerable effort in reservoir engineering and planning has resulted in apparent and probable arrest of ''uncontrolled'' gas migration, although more time will be needed to evaluate and monitor the results of recent efforts. Incorporated in the evaluation of the leakage problem has been updated geological information, locating and correcting possible well problems, computer simulation, extensive logging, tracer surveys, surface monitoring and related engineering evaluation. A computer program developed to simulate a unique history match, including the effect of a time and pressure dependent leak, and a comprehensive analysis of data leading to the possible control of the leak by proper operation storage pressures are described.

Araktingi, R.; Benefield, M.E.; Bessenyei, Z.; Coats, K.H.; Tek, M.R.

1982-09-01

40

Recognition of paleoenvironments in Muddy Sandstones of Buffalo Creek area, Sheridan County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In 1983, Hershey Oil Company drilled the 1-10 Buffalo Creek well in the NW 1/4, NE 1/4, Sec. 10, T56N, R78W, Sheridan County, Wyoming. The primary target was a Paleozoic reservoir. The Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone was penetrated and tested a minor amount of oil, which prompted a more detailed examination of the Muddy Sandstone. Exploration techniques used for the Muddy Sandstone included a series of sequential isolith maps based on data from the few widely spaced wells in the area. The top of the subjacent Skull Creek Shale and the bottom of a superjacent bentonite marker were used as boundaries. This method revealed the apparent transgressive nature of the remnant Muddy Sandstone. No cores were taken over the Muddy interval, so all petrographic and lithologic data were obtained from cuttings and open-hole logs. A paleoenvironmental study was done using the High Resolution Dipmeter Tool. The data were processed to obtain detailed Cluster and Geodip plots. The dipmeter information defined a remnant northeast-southwest-trending, transgressive barrier bar overlying a tidal-channel sequence oriented northwest-southeast. The length of the tidal channel would be relatively short, but due to channel migration, could be nearly as wide as the barrier bar is long.

Granitto, M.; Jorgensen, S.D.

1986-09-01

41

Shallow Early Cretaceous oil production in Wind Creek/Tomcat Creek area, Crook County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Over 1.5 million bbl of oil have been produced from the Early Cretaceous Fall River and Lakota Formations on the east side of the Powder River basin in the Wind Creek/Tomcat Creek area, Crook County, Wyoming. Producing depths range from 42 ft at the Barton Ranch field to over 2528 ft at an unnamed field. The gravity of the gas-free oil ranges from 17/sup 0/ API at Barton Ranch to over 49/sup 0/ API in the deeper reservoir rocks located at an unnamed oil field. Oil has been trapped in Lakota channel sandstones and Fall River nearshore sandstones on the Black Hills monocline within a catchment area located on the northeast side of the large northeast-southwest-trending Gillette arch. Currently, the oldest producible oil on or east of the central Black Hills monocline is Early Cretaceous in age. This oil is the highest structural, active, primary production along the west-central flank of the Black Hills uplift. Two Permian-Pennsylvanian fields are located structurally higher, but one is a thermal tertiary project and the other has been abandoned.

Randall, A.G.

1986-08-01

42

Recognition of paleoenvironments in Muddy Sandstone of Buffalo Creek area, Sheridan County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In 1983, Hershey Oil Company drilled the 1-10 Buffalo Creek well in the NW 1/4 NE 1/4, Sec. 10, T56N, R78W, Sheridan County, Wyoming. The primary target was a Paleozoic reservoir. The Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone was penetrated, and it tested a minor amount of oil, which prompted a more detailed examination of the Muddy sandstones. Exploration techniques used for the Muddy sandstones included a series of sequential isolith maps based on data from the few widely spaced wells in the area. The top of the subjacent Skull Creek Shale and the bottom of a superjacent bentonite marker were used as boundaries. This method revealed the apparent transgressive nature of the remnant Muddy sandstones. No core was taken over the Muddy interval, so all petrographic and lithologic data were obtained from cuttings and open-hole logs. A paleo-environmental study was done using the High-Resolution Dipmeter tool. The data were processed to obtain detailed Cluster and Geodip plots. The dipmeter information defined a remnant northeast-southwest-trending, transgressive barrier bar overlying a tidal-channel sequence oriented northwest-southeast. The length of the tidal channel would be relatively short but, due to channel migration, could be nearly as wide as the barrier bar is long.

Granitto, M.; Jorgensen, S.D.

1986-08-01

43

Hydrologic evaluation of the Arikaree Formation near Lusk, Niobrara and Goshen counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age is an aquifer of large areal extent and is composed of very fine grained, poorly bedded, loosely to moderately cemented sandstone and interbedded silt, limestone, and many concretionary layers. The area studied is about 800 square miles in southern Niobrara and northern Goshen Counties of Wyoming. Long-term average annual recharge to the aquifer from streams and precipitation is estimated to total about 24,270 acre-feet. Pumpage from public-supply and irrigation wells is estimated to have totaled about 48,000 acre-feet from 1938 through 1972. This pumpage did not cause any noticeable decrease in natural discharge and it is assumed there has been no significant change in ground-water storage. Pumpage is estimated to total about 39,500 acre-feet for the 3-year period 1973 through 1975. A digital model was developed to simulate the ground-water system in the Arikaree Formation. The model can be used to indicate the general effect of applying hydraulic stresses to the aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

Crist, M.A.

1977-01-01

44

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Spook site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings 48 mi northeast of Casper, in Converse County, Wyoming. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 187,000 tons of tailings at the Spook site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover makes and gamma densitometers for measuring cross-sectionally averaged mass velocity in steady steam-water flow are presented. The results are interpreted ntation.

Not Available

1981-10-01

45

Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in Wyoming. Especially in the winter, the proportionately large, continuous gain of groundwater into Fish Creek in the perennial section keeps most of the creek free of ice. Because sunlight can still reach the streambed in Fish Creek and the water is still flowing, aquatic plants continue to photosynthesize in the winter, albeit at a lower level of productivity. Additionally, the cobble and large gravel substrate in Fish Creek provides excellent attachment points for aquatic plants, and when combined with Fish Creek’s channel stability allows rapid growth of aquatic plants once conditions allow during the spring. The aquatic plant community of Fish Creek was different than most streams in Wyoming in that it contains many different macrophytes—including macroalgae such as long streamers of Cladophora, aquatic vascular plants, and moss; most other streams in the state contain predominantly algae. From the banks of Fish Creek, the bottom of the stream sometimes appeared to be a solid green carpet. A shift was observed from higher amounts of microalgae in April/May to higher amounts macrophytes in August and October, and differences in the relative abundance of microalgae and macrophytes were statistically significant between seasons. Differences in dissolved-nitrate concentrations and in the nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio were significantly different between seasons, as concentrations of dissolved nitrate decreased from April/May to August and October. It is likely that dissolved-nitrate concentrations in Fish Creek were lower in August and October because macrophytes were quickly utilizing the nutrient, and a negative correlation between macro-phytes and nitrate was found. Macroinvertebrates also were sampled because of their role as indicators of water quality and their documented responses to perturbation such as degradation of water quality and habitat. Statistically significant seasonal differences were noted in the macroinvertebrate community. Taxa richness and relative abundance of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, which tend to be intolerant of water-

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

46

Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer system, commonly called the High Plains aquifer in many publications, is a nationally important water resource that underlies a 111-million-acre area (173,000 square miles) in parts of eight States including Wyoming. Through irrigation of crops with groundwater from the High Plains aquifer system, the area that overlies the aquifer system has become one of the major agricultural regions in the world. In addition, the aquifer system also serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents of the region. The High Plains aquifer system is one of the largest aquifers or aquifer systems in the world. The High Plains aquifer system underlies an area of 8,190 square miles in southeastern Wyoming. Including Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present in parts of five counties in southeastern Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 8 percent of Wyoming, and 5 percent of the aquifer system is located within the State. Based on withdrawals for irrigation, public supply, and industrial use in 2000, the High Plains aquifer system is the most utilized source of groundwater in Wyoming. With the exception of the Laramie Mountains in western Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present throughout Laramie County. In Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is the predominant groundwater resource for agricultural (irrigation), municipal, industrial, and domestic uses. Withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation (primarily in the eastern part of the county) is the largest use of water from the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County and southeastern Wyoming. Continued interest in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County prompted a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office to update the potentiometric-surface map of the aquifer system in Laramie County. Groundwater levels were measured in wells completed in the High Plains aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

2011-01-01

47

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

48

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

1953-01-01

49

Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

50

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

51

Geology and ground-water resources of Goshen County, Wyoming; Chemical quality of the ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Goshen County, which has an area of 2,186 square miles, lies in southeastern Wyoming. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the county by determining the character, thickness, and extent of the waterbearing materials; the source, occurrence, movement, quantity, and quality of the ground water; and the possibility of developing additional ground water. The rocks exposed in the area are sedimentary and range in age from Precambrian to Recent. A map that shows the areas of outcrop and a generalized section that summarizes the age, thickness, physical character, and water supply of these formations are included in the report. Owing to the great depths at which they lie beneath most of the county, the formations older than the Lance formation of Late Cretaceous age are not discussed in detail. The Lance formation, of Late Cretaceous age, which consists mainly of beds of fine-grained sandstone and shale, has a maximum thickness of about 1,400 feet. It yields water, which usually is under artesian pressure, to a large number of domestic and stock wells in the south-central part of the county. Tertiary rocks in the area include the Chadron and Brule formations of Oligocene age, the Arikaree formation of Miocene age, and channel deposits of Pliocene age. The Chadron formation is made up of two distinct units: a lower unit of highly variegated fluviatile deposits that has been found only in the report area; and an upper unit that is typical of the formation as it occurs in adjacent areas. The lower unit, which ranges in thickness from a knife edge to about 95 feet, is not known to yield water to wells, but its coarse-grained channel deposits probably would yield small quantities of water to wells. The upper unit, which ranges in thickness from a knife edge to about 150 feet, yields sufficient quantities of water for domestic and stock uses from channel deposits of sandstone under artesian pressure. The Brule formation, which is mainly a siltstone, ranges in thickness from a knife edge to about 450 feet and yields water to domestic and stock wells from fractures and from lenses of sandstone. The Arikaree formation ranges in thickness from a knife edge to about 1,000 feet, and yields water to several domestic and stock wells in the northwestern part of the area. The Pliocene channel deposits, which probably do not exceed 25 feet in thickness, are not a source of water for wells in Goshen County. The upland deposits, which are mainly of Pleistocene age, generally are dry and do not serve as aquifers; however, test drilling revealed several deep, buried channels occupied by deposits which probably would yield moderate quantities of water to wells if a sufficient saturated thickness were penetrate The deposits of the third terrace, which are of Pleistocene age, range in thickness from a knife edge to about 210 feet and yield water to a large number of irrigation wells in the area. The flood-plain deposits, which are of Pleistocene and Recent age, range in thickness from a knife edge to about 200 feet. Those in the valley of the North Platte River yield abundant water to many large supply wells. The flood-plain deposits along the valley of Rawhide Creek consist mainly of fine-grained materials and yield large supplies of water to well only in the lower stretches of the creek valley near its confluence with the valley of the North Platte River. The deposits along the valleys of Horse and Bear Creeks generally are relatively thin and fine grained. In the vicinity of Ls grange, however, the deposits, which are about 45 feet thick, yield moderate, supplies of water to several irrigation wells. Other Recent deposits in the area--dune sand, loesslike deposits, and slope wash--generally are fine grained and relatively thin and, hence, are not important sources of ground water. The unconsolidated sand and gravel of the flood-plain and terrace deposits are the principal aquifers in the area. In some places

Rapp, J.R.; Visher, F.N.; Littleton, R.T.; Durum, W.H.

1957-01-01

52

Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek have been increasing in recent years. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the water quality and biological communities in Fish Creek. Water-quality samples were collected for analyses of physical properties and water chemistry (nutrients, nitrate isotopes, and wastewater chemicals) between March 2007 and October 2008 from seven surface-water sites and three groundwater wells. During this same period, aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate samples were collected and habitat characteristics were measured at the surface-water sites. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate nutrient concentrations (that influence biological indicators of eutrophication) and potential sources of nutrients by using stable isotope analysis and other indicator chemicals (such as caffeine and disinfectants) that could provide evidence of anthropogenic sources, such as wastewater or septic tank contamination in Fish Creek and adjacent groundwater, and (2) characterize the algal, macrophyte, and macroinvertebrate communities and habitat of Fish Creek. Nitrate was the dominant species of dissolved nitrogen present in all samples and was the only bioavailable species detected at concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level in all surface-water samples. Average concentrations of dissolved nitrate in surface water were largest in samples collected from the two sites with seasonal flow near Teton Village and decreased downstream; the smallest concentration was at downstream site A-Wck. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in groundwater were consistently greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. Orthophosphate was the primary dissolved species of phosphorus present in all surface-water and groundwater samples. The average concentration of dissolved orthophosphate in surface water was largest in samples collected from near Teton Village; samples from all other sites had similar average concentrations. Concentrations of dissolved orthophosphate in groundwater also were typically greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. The aquatic plant communities in Fish Creek typically were composed of a mixture of macrophytes, macroalgae, microalgae, and moss. The composition of the aquatic plant community in Fish Creek appeared to shift in the downstream direction in 2007. On average, the proportion of macrophytes ranged from about 1 percent at site A-R1U, the most upstream site, to 54 percent of the plant community at site A-R6D, the farthest downstream site sampled during 2007. The downstream increase in macrophytes was accompanied by a downstream decrease in microalgae. The average proportion of microalgae ranged from 80 percent at site A-R1U to 24 percent at site A-R6D. The proportion of the macroalgae Cladophora in the aquatic plant community was relatively high at sites A-Wck and A-R3D in both 2007 and 2008.

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2010-01-01

53

Campbell Creek marine zone: Its extent, component facies, and relation to coals of Kanawha Formation in southern Kanawha County, West Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent widening of the West Virginia turnpike has provided extensive exposure through the Campbell Creek marine zone, enabling a much clearer view of its stratigraphy and sedimentary facies. Nineteen stratigraphic sections were measured and described in detail in the Belle and Cedar Grove 7.5' quadrangles.

Ronald L. Martino

1988-01-01

54

Einstein in Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

Elliot, Ian

1996-01-01

55

The Mythic Image Joseph Campbell  

E-print Network

The Mythic Image Joseph Campbell bollingen c Mythologist Joseph Campbell was a masterful, narratives. His interest in comparative mythology began in child- hood, when the young Joe Campbell was taken in literature and dreams became a lifelong preoccupation. Campbell's best-known work is The Hero with a Thousand

Landweber, Laura

56

ROBERT E. CAMPBELL CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. CAMPBELL CURRICULUM VITAE Updated Jul 1, 2014 ! PRESENT ADDRESS Department of Chemistry-8231 (Fax) Email: robert.e.campbell@ualberta.ca Web: http://www.chem.ualberta.ca/~campbell/ Twitter or Bioorganic Chemistry for doctoral research of outstanding quality. #12;Campbell, Robert! Curriculum Vitae

Campbell, Robert E.

57

Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

Not Available

1994-02-01

58

Geologic history and palynologic dating of Paleocene deposits, western Rock Springs uplift, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene, a northwest-southeast trending anticline developed in the area of the present Rock springs uplift in southwestern Wyoming. This ancestral structure was eroded to a surface of fairly low relief on which a paleosol developed. The surface was formed on the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation throughout the study area. In the early middle Paleocene (P3 palynomorph zone), topographic lows on the erosion surface were infilled by alluvial deposits that accumulated in channel, floodplain, and backswamp environments. An organic-rich facies contains numerous coal beds and is middle to late Paleocene in age (P3 to P5 zones). The assemblage of pollen that defines the late middle Paleocene (P4 zone) is absent from the area suggesting a hiatus, although no lithologic break was observed at this boundary. The younger organic-poor facies begins in the late Paleocene (P5 zone) and continues to the top of the studied sequence. This change in facies has been used to map the contact between the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age in this area, and the Wasatch Formation which was though to be of Eocene age. This study demonstrates that, as currently mapped, the lower part of the Wasatch Formation is Paleocene in age. Stratigraphically higher parts of the Wasatch, which presumably contain rocks of latest Paleocene (P6 zone) and earliest Eocene age, were not studied. -Authors

Kirschbaum, M.A.; Nelson, S.N.

1988-01-01

59

Mineral resources of the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area (WY-010-335) located near the western edge of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. There has been neither mining activity nor oil and gas production within the study area. Total identified (sum of measured, indicated, and inferred) and undiscovered (hypothetical) subbituminous coal resources beneath the study area are estimated to be 805 million tons and 275 tons, respectively. There are no other identified resources within the study area. Mineral resource assessment of this study area defines a low potential for metals, sand and gravel, bentonite and glass sand, a low potential for oil and geothermal sources, a low potential for gas in Paleozoic rocks, lower Mesozoic rocks, and some conventional sandstone reservoirs of Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age, a moderate potential for gas in some conventional sandstone reservoirs of Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age, and a high potential for gas in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs of Cretaceous and early Tertiary age and coal (by subsurface analysis). The study area also has a high potential for undiscovered paleontological resources.

Hadley, D.G.; Ryder, R.T.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; McLeod, K.E. (US Geological Survey (US)); Jeske, R.E. (Bureau of Mines (US))

1990-09-01

60

Haybarn field, Fremont County, Wyoming, an upper Fort Union (Paleocene) stratigraphic trap  

SciTech Connect

In the fall of 1981, Northwest Exploration Co. drilled the discovery well for Haybarn field. The field is located in the Wind River basin of Wyoming and produces stratigraphically trapped 43/sup 0/ API gravity, 80/sup 0/F pour point oil and associated gas from the Paleocene upper Fort Union Formation; these rocks are thought of generally as poor exploration targets and gas-prone at best. The reservoir is an arkosic sandstone deposited along the front of a lacustrine delta system. Clays in the reservoir are almost entirely secondary. Despite the precipitation of diagenetic kaolinite and chlorite, the reservoir capacity has remained high with porosities ranging from 18 to 26% and averaging about 20%. Reservoir permeabilities average about 7 md. Transmissibility has been enhanced in some zones by natural vertical fractures. The fractures also provide an avenue for water from lower water sands. The resistivities of the formation waters are variable, making electric log calculations difficult. The R/sub w/ of the productive sand tongue in the discovery well ranges from 0.35 ohm-meters at the top to 1.40 at the base, over a vertical distance of 75 ft (23 m). Oil production is limited to the upper, more saline portion. Both the petroleum source and the trapping mechanism for the field appear to be the lacustrine Waltman Shale. The depositional system responsible for Haybarn field is not unique. Similar oil fields remain to be found in other parts of the Wind River basin.

Robertson, R.D.

1983-08-01

61

Haybarn field, Fremont County, Wyoming: an upper Fort Union (Paleocene) stratigraphic trap  

SciTech Connect

Haybarn field was discovered in the fall of 1981 and produces stratigraphically trapped 43.7/sup 0/ API gravity oil from shallow reservoir sandstones in the upper member of the Fort Union Formation. The sandstones were deposited in a marginal lacustrine delta front setting in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The interfingering lacustrine Waltman Shale has provided the trapping mechanism for the field. The Waltman Shale also appears to be the petroleum source; this primary source, however, was probably deposited in deeper portions of the basin north of the field rather than immediately adjacent to the reservoir. The reservoir sandstones are arkosic and have excellent porosity averaging about 20%. Clays in the reservoir appear to be entirely secondary suggesting that the sandstones were deposited in a high energy, wave-dominated depositional system. Electrical log evaluation of the Upper Fort Union reservoirs is complicated by variations in formation water resistivities between and within the sandstone tongues. The uppermost section of the Upper Fort Union member tends to be fresh water-bearing, while the producing zones in the lower portion of the member have much lower, more saline R/sub w/'s.

Robertson, R.D.

1984-04-01

62

Ground-water resources and geology of northern and central Johnson County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Northern and central Johnson County, Wyo., is an area of about 2,600 square miles that lies principally in the western part of the Powder River structural basin but also includes the east flank of the Bighorn Mountains. Sedimentary rocks exposed range in age from Cambrian to Recent and have an average total thickness of about 16,000 feet. Igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age crop out in the Bighorn Mountains. Rocks of pre-Tertiary age, exposed on the flanks and in the foothills of the Bighorns, dip steeply eastward and lie at great depth in the Powder River basin. The rest of the project area is underlain by a thick sequence of interbedded sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Paleocene and Eocene age. Owing to the regional structure, most aquifers in Johnson County contain water under artesian pressure. The Madison Limestone had not been tapped for water in Johnson County at the time of the present investigation (1963), but several wells in eastern Big Horn and Washakie Counties, on the west flank of the Bighorn Mountains, reportedly have flows ranging from 1,100 to 2,800 gallons per minute. Comparable yields can probably be obtained from the Madison in Johnson County in those areas where the limestone is fractured or cavernous. The Tensleep Sandstone reportedly yields 600 gallons per minute to a pumped irrigation well near its outcrop in the southwestern part of the project area. Several flowing wells tap the formation on the west flank of the Bighorn Mountains. The Madison Limestone and the Tensleep Sandstone have limited potential as sources of water because they can be developed economically only in a narrow band paralleling the Bighorn Mountain front in the southwestern part of the project area. Overlying the Tensleep Sandstone is about 6,000 feet of shale, siltstone, and fine-grained sandstone that, with a few exceptions, normally yields only small quantities of water to wells. The Cloverly Formation and the Newcastle Sandstone may yield moderate quantities of water to wells; but, in some areas, properly constructed wells tapping both formations might yield large quantities of water. The Shannon Sandstone Member of the Cody Shale will probably yield only small quantities of water to Wells, but it is the best potential source of ground water in the stratigraphic interval between the Newcastle and Parkman Sandstones. The Parkman Sandstone and the Lance Formation yield water to relatively shallow wells principally in the southwestern part of the project area. The Fort Union Formation yields adequate supplies of water for stock and domestic use from relatively shallow wells near its outcrop almost everywhere in the county. A few deep wells tap the Fort Union along the Powder River valley in the northeastern part of Johnson County. Some of these wells flow, but their flows rarely exceed 10 gallons per minute; larger yields could be undoubtedly be obtained by pumping. The Wasatch Formation is the principal source of ground water in Johnson County. It yields adequate supplies to many relatively shallow stock and domestic wells, some of which flow, but much larger yields probably would require pumping lifts that are prohibitive for most purposes. The Kingsbury Conglomerate and Moncrief Members of the Wasatch Formation, though, may yield moderate quantities of water in some places. Alluvial deposits underlying the valleys of the Powder River and Crazy Woman, Clear, and Piney Creeks are potential sources of moderate to large supplies of water in the Powder River drainage basin. The permeability of these deposits decreases with distance from the Bighorn Mountain front, so that largest yields can probably be obtained along the upper reaches of these streams. Most ground water utilized in the project area is for domestic and stock supplies and is obtained from drilled wells and from springs. Water for irrigation is obtained almost entirely by diverting flows of perennial streams. The discharge of wel

Whitcomb, Harold A.; Cummings, T. Ray; McCullough, Richard A.

1966-01-01

63

Geologic controls on producibility at Clear Creek Field, Uinta County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Production from the eolian Nugget formation at Clear Creek field in the southwest Wyoming thrust belt is controlled in large part by permeability anisotropy emplaced at the time of deposition and subsequent reorientation of the formation as a result of folding. Maximum permeability in this eolian system occurs in and parallel to dune slip-face bedding planes. Vertical permeability across less porous interdunal deposits ranges from two to three orders of magnitude less than the maximum permeability in the dune deposits. At the time of Nugget deposition the dune orientation was predominantly northwest-southeast with the slipfaces dipping to the southwest, giving a northwest-southeast orientation to the axis of maximum permeability (K/sub max/ axis). This K/sub max/ axis was curved or bent during subsequent folding of the sediments, giving it various orientations depending on structural position. Higher gas oil ratios are observed at Clear Creek where the separation of oil zone perfs from the gas cap along the K/sub max/ axis is smaller. These higher gas oil ratios result as gas is preferentially ''channeled'' along the slipface bedding planes to the oil zone perfs. In situations as at Clear Creek, where the oil zone is thin and a gas cap is present, oil zone completions must be located where the K/sub max/ axis is near horizontal, thus maximizing the separation of perfs from the gas cap. This reduces the ''channeling'' of gas along the K/sub max/ axis and maximizes oil zone recoveries. Another parameter affecting producibility is rock deformation due to faulting. Faulting in the Nugget results in the development of intense gouge zones along and adjacent to fault planes. These gouge zones represent potential barriers to flow.

Alexander, W.G.

1986-01-01

64

Coal resource occurrence and coal development potential maps of the southwest quarter of North Star School 15-minute quadrangle, Campbell County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of the water resources of the Port Gamble Indian Reservation, Wash., has shown that there is probably a substantial quantity of good quality ground and surface water available to provide for further development of the reservation. Groundwater supplies are available from an artesian aquifer underlying the reservation near sea level. This aquifer is estimated to be capable of supplying at least 90 gallons per minute, continuously, without greatly increasing chances for seawater intrusion. This quantity of water is enough to supply about 800 to 900 additional residents on the reservation. Another artesian aquifer, relatively unexplored, was noted underlying the previously mentioned artesian aquifer. This lower aquifer may be capable of supplying additional groundwater for use on the reservation. Groundwater quality was found to be good for most uses, being moderately hard and having moderately high iron concentrations. No evidence of pollution of the groundwater was found during this study from either seawater intrusion or contamination from a nearby solid-waste disposal site. Surface-water resources studied on the reservation included two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, whose 7-day low flows were estimated to be 0.4 and 0.2 cubic foot per second, respectively, for a 20-year estimated recurrence interval. The surface-water quality was also found to be good for most uses and was within the limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for untreated drinking water. Thus, the water from these two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, could be used as domestic supplies to supplement the groundwater withdrawals. (USGS)

IntraSearch, Inc.

1979-01-01

65

Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and labortory studies were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. A search of U.S. Bureau of Land Management, State, and county records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of the study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of the area precludes much usage of the material. About two-thirds of the study area is under lease for oil and gas. The entire study area has moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

66

Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and laboratory studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines. A search of US Bureau of Land Management, State, and County records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of this study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of this area precludes much usage of this material. About two-thirds of this study area is under lease for oil and gas. This entire study area has a moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and a low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

67

Wyoming Kids Count in Wyoming Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 20 indicators, including the following: (1) poverty and population; (2) welfare reform; (3) certified day care facilities; (4) births; (5) infant deaths;…

Wyoming Children's Action Alliance, Cheyenne.

68

Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

Not Available

1982-01-01

69

Geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Ogallala Formation and White River Group, Belvoir Ranch near Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of Tertiary lithostratigraphic units (Ogallala Formation and White River Group) that typically compose or underlie the High Plains aquifer system in southeastern Wyoming were described physically and chemically, and evaluated at a location on the Belvoir Ranch in Laramie County, Wyoming. On the basis of this characterization and evaluation, three Tertiary lithostratigraphic units were identified using physical and chemical characteristics determined during this study and previous studies, and these three units were determined to be correlative with three identified hydrogeologic units composing the groundwater system at the study site—a high-yielding aquifer composed of the entire saturated thickness of the heterogeneous and coarse-grained fluvial sediments assigned to the Ogallala Formation (Ogallala aquifer); an underlying confining unit composed primarily of very fine-grained volcaniclastic sediments and mudrocks assigned to the Brule Formation of the White River Group and some additional underlying sediments that belong to either the Brule or Chadron Formation, or both (Brule confining unit); and an underlying low-yielding aquifer composed primarily of poorly sorted fluvial sediments assigned to the Chadron Formation of the White River Group (Chadron aquifer). Despite widely varying sediment heterogeneity and consolidation, some limited hydraulic connection throughout the full vertical extent of the Ogallala aquifer was indicated but not conclusively proven by interpretation of similar chemical and isotopic characteristics, modern apparent groundwater ages, and similar hydraulic-head responses measured continuously in two Ogallala aquifer monitoring wells installed for this study at two different widely separated (83 feet) depth intervals. Additional work beyond the scope of this study, such as aquifer tests, would be required to conclusively determine hydraulic connection within the Ogallala aquifer. Groundwater levels (hydraulic heads) measured continuously using water-level recorders in both monitoring wells completed in the Ogallala aquifer showed a consistent strong upward vertical gradient in the Ogallala aquifer, indicating the potential for water to move from deeper to shallower parts of the aquifer, regardless of the time of year and the presumed effects of pumping of public-supply and industrial wells in the area. Continuous measurement of groundwater levels in the shallowest monitoring well, installed near the water table, and examination of subsequently constructed water-level hydrographs indicated substantial groundwater recharge is likely during the spring of 2009 and 2010 from the ephemeral stream (Lone Tree Creek) located adjacent to the study site that flows primarily in response to spring snowmelt from the adjacent Laramie Mountains and surface runoff from precipitation events. Using the water-table fluctuation method, groundwater recharge was estimated to be about 13 inches for the period beginning in early October 2009 and ending in late June 2010, and about 4 inches for the period beginning in March 2011 and ending in early July 2011. Comparison of previously measured groundwater levels (hydraulic heads) and groundwater-quality characteristics in nearby monitoring wells completed in the Chadron aquifer with those measured in the two monitoring wells installed for this study in the Ogallala aquifer, combined with detailed lithologic characterization, strongly indicated the Brule confining unit hydraulically confines and isolates the Chadron aquifer from the overlying Ogallala aquifer, thus likely limiting hydraulic connection between the two units. Consequently, because of the impermeable nature of the Brule confining unit and resulting hydraulic separation of the Ogallala and Chadron aquifers, and compared with local and regional hydrostratigraphic definitions of the High Plains aquifer system, the groundwater system in Tertiary lithostratigraphic units overlying the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation at the location studied on the Belvoir Ranch was

Bartos, Timothy T.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Webster, Daniel M.

2014-01-01

70

75 FR 6065 - Extension of Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Moore...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC Draft SEISs (the Lost Creek ISR Project in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, and the Nichols Ranch ISR...Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyoming). Following the end of the...Project in Campbell County, Wyoming--Supplement to the...

2010-02-05

71

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Sweetwater county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 125 square miles of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of nine radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J. R.

1954-01-01

72

Guidebook to the coal geology of the Powder River coal basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This survey of Wyoming's Powder River Coal Basin was done in June 1980, with emphasis on coal geology and specifically environments of coal deposition. A geologic map explanation was included. The survey included: (1) the regional depositional framework of the uranium- and coal-bearing Wasatch (Eocene) and Fort Union (Paleocene) Formations, Powder River Basin; (2) the Lake De Smet Coal Seam: the product of active basin-margin sedimentation and tectonics in the Lake De Smet Area, Johnson County, Wyoming, during Eocene Wasatch time; (3) fluvial coal settings of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Clear Creek Area; (4) coal resources of the Powder River Coal basin; (5) survey of chemical and petrographic characteristics of Powder River Basin coals; and (6) the Rawhide Coal Mine, Campbell County, Wyoming. The depositional framework of the Fort Union and Wasach formations is characterized by a northward-flowing intermountain basinal fluvial system. The paleogeographic reconstruction of the fluvial settings of the Tongue River Member deposits in the Powder River-Clear Creek area sugges two important subenvironments of coal accumulation. The thickest and most important coals are found in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and the Eocene Wasatch Formation. Each section was discussed in detail. (DP)

Glass, G.B. (ed.)

1980-01-01

73

Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of Wyoming and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Structurally linear elements in the vicinity of the Rock Springs Uplift, Sweetwater County, Wyoming are reported for the first time. One element trends N 40 deg W near Farson, Wyoming and the other N 65 deg E from Rock Springs. These elements confirm the block-like or mosaic pattern of major structural elements in Wyoming.

Blackstone, D. L., Jr.

1972-01-01

74

Dr. Barbara Campbell  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Clemson University Biological Sciences faculty page features Dr. Barbara Campbell, an Assistant Professor involved in several projects studying the metabolic potential of mixed microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Projects include a metagenomics approach to understanding the relationship of a mixed episymbiont community associated with the hydrothermal vent annelid, Alvinella pompejana; characterizing the chemoautotrophic potentials of uncultured bacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents; and the whole genome sequencing of a dominant type of chemoautotroph found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The web page includes information about collaborative research, a list of selected publications, and links related to her projects.

Campbell, Barbara; University, Clemson

75

Ryan Campbell Oral History  

E-print Network

Return to Ryan Campbell's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive Lawrence, KS 66045 Phone: 785-691-5748 All... beyond "fair use" from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library 1301 Hoch Auditoria Dr. University of Kansas...

Campbell, Ryan; Albin, Tami

2009-12-16

76

An integrated geological and geophysical analysis of thrusting in the Hoback Range, Sublette and Teton Counties, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent seismic acquisition and drilling in the Hoback Range of the Wyoming thrust belt have focused on the buried Granite Creek thrust sheet. To date, four wells have penetrated the thrust sheet and have yielded some encouraging results without establishing production. Wells, seismic control, and surface geology help define the sourthern extent of the Granite Creek thrust package as well as the lateral and subsurface geometry of other thrust packages in the area. The Hoback Range provides an excellent view of a frontal thrust zone with several unique attributes. In contrast to most parts of the Cordilleran thrust belt, the regional layer dips east, reflecting the convergence of the northern Moxa arch and the thrust belt. Typical eastward younging of thrusting is not followed, and the order of thrusting can be shown to break back to the west. Unlike other parts of the Wyoming thrust belt, a west-vergent thrust bounds the eastern limit of thrusting and forms a possible triangle zone. The Cache Creek fault merges into the northern end of the range and offers an excellent opportunity to study thrust-belt and foreland interactions. This study illustrates many of the problems typically encountered in areas of complex structure and demonstrated how they may be solved using an integrated geological and geophysical approach.

Sterne, E.J.; William, M.C. (Amoco Production Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01

77

Campbell's and Rubin's Perspectives on Causal Inference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Donald Campbell's approach to causal inference (D. T. Campbell, 1957; W. R. Shadish, T. D. Cook, & D. T. Campbell, 2002) is widely used in psychology and education, whereas Donald Rubin's causal model (P. W. Holland, 1986; D. B. Rubin, 1974, 2005) is widely used in economics, statistics, medicine, and public health. Campbell's approach focuses on…

West, Stephen G.; Thoemmes, Felix

2010-01-01

78

Applied Research Staff: Melba Campbell  

Cancer.gov

Melba J. Campbell is a Program Specialist in the Applied Research Program. She provides administrative support to the Health Services and Economics Branch. Prior to joining ARP, Ms. Campbell was in the Office of Cancer Survivorship (OCS) where she served as a Program Support Specialist. Her roles in OCS included serving as the liaison for Communication, Lead Computer User Group and the Division of Extramural Activities Support (DEAS).

79

An Aerial-Photographic Assessment of Reenacted Handcart Treks on a Section of the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, Fremont County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reenactments of historical pioneer emigrations have increased in popularity since the celebration of these events during the United States bicentennial in 1976. From 1999 to 2006, approximately 70,000 Mormon trekkers traveled the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (hereinafter referred to as the Trail) segment between Sixth Crossing and Rock Creek Hollow in Fremont County, Wyoming. Recent elevated levels of use have raised concerns over potential recreation-related damage to this particularly scenic segment of the Trail. In 2006, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) contracted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct an aerial-photographic assessment of the condition of the Trail between Sixth Crossing and Rock Creek Hollow. Specifically, the USGS was to assess trail conditions for this segment as influenced by handcart use (low, medium, and high intensity of use) and concentrated activities associated with trekking (toilet, rest, and camp sites). Based on these results, there are identifiable management considerations. Toilet and rest sites need to be carefully located relative to where sensitive vegetation or soils occur. The analyses presented here indicate that limiting motorized vehicle use needs to be a priority over that of adjusting the number of trekkers. Additionally, monitoring of the Trail from Sixth Crossing to Rock Creek Hollow segment needs to consider explicit management targets, such as minimum acceptable levels of bare ground or trail width, and the establishment of permanent monitoring plots to evaluate targets and measure responses to altered management activities.

McDougal, Robert R.; Waltermire, Robert G.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Germaine, Stephen S.; Nielsen, Scott E.; Nielsen, Charlene C.; Hanson, Leanne; Bowen, Zachary H.

2008-01-01

80

Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

McLaughlin, J. F.; Frost, C. D.; Sharma, S.

2011-01-01

81

Stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis of aquifer systems, Atlantic Rim, Carbon County, Wyoming: Implications for production of coalbed natural gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production requires the extraction of considerable volumes of water from target formations. This process can dynamically alter local aquifers and affect the larger hydrologic systems of a producing area. An analytical method that provides immediate, cost-effective quantitative information on both resource (methane) and habitat (coalbed aquifer) would help to optimize gas production. This study used a combination of field measurements, water chemistry analysis, and isotopic analysis, both stable (delta13C DIC, deltaO, deltaD) and radiometric (87Sr/ 86Sr), to analyze and characterize the CBNG aquifers and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Waters were sampled and analyzed from streams, springs, and CBNG wells across the Atlantic Rim. Samples were first grouped on the basis of geologic location, and then additionally defined by isotopic and water chemistry analysis into Mesaverde Group springs, Lewis Shale springs, Steele Shale springs, Sand Hill springs, enriched delta 13CDIC springs, methane springs, and subsurface samples (monitoring and CBNG wells). Two distinct water chemistry types are evident in Atlantic Rim samples, Ca-Mg-SO4-type and Na-HCO3-type waters. Atlantic Rim samples also had distinct radiogenic isotopic signatures. Stream water sourced from the Sierra Madre and waters associated with the Mesaverde Group have the highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios, whereas spring samples from the Lewis Shale have the lowest 87Sr/ 86Sr. delta13CDIC, which is enriched by bacterial methanogenesis, was used to identify coalbed waters from other natural waters. Positive delta13CDIC identified spring waters that originated from Mesaverde coalbed aquifers, including methane springs. Strongly positive delta13CDIC of Atlantic Rim CBNG samples identified those coalbed aquifers that are hydraulically isolated, whereas lower delta13CDIC identified wells within open aquifer systems and wells with inefficient casing. This study demonstrated that delta13C DIC was able to help identify hydraulic aquifer isolation, well casing integrity, springs associated with methanogenic coalbed aquifers, and areas of peak methanogenic activity, all of which can be utilized to assess gas potential and promote efficient CBNG production. This abstract supports a supplementary file.

McLaughlin, J. Fred

82

Wyoming Kids Count Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The 1997 report has been expanded to include detailed information on the status of children by categories of welfare, health, and education. The first part of the factbook documents trends by county for 15 indicators: (1) poverty and population; (2)…

Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

83

Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical sampling survey of molybdenum mineralization near Schiestler Peak, Temple Peak Quadrangle, Sublette County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A brief geologic reconnaissance and geochemical survey of molybdenum mineralization near Schiestler Peak, Sublette County, Wyo., indicates that molybdenite occurs in this area as disseminations and blebs in granitic or quartz monzonitic rocks intruded by felsic dikes of similar composition. Samples of stream sediments, panned concentrates from stream sediments, soils, rocks, and water were collected in the geochemical survey. Analytical results show that in reconnaissance, panned concentrates are the best of the sample types used in this study to detect molybdenum mineralization. More detailed analysis of the distribution of the molybdenum is best achieved through the collection of rock samples. Hydrothermal alteration is generally not conspicuous in the study area; however, rock samples that contain molybdenite are usually slightly enriched in silver, copper, lead, and in several instances, gold. Conversely, there appear to be negative associations between molybdenum and zinc and between molybdenum and several of the rare-earth elements. Mo concentrations in the rock samples with no visible molybdenite range from undetectable at a sensitivity of 5 parts per million (ppm) to 700 ppm. Mo content in rock samples containing visible molybdenite ranges from 10 ppm to greater than 2,000 ppm. Stream-sediment values range from undetected to 15 ppm; panned concentrates from undetected to 15 ppm; soils from undetected to 20 ppm. Analyses of the water samples indicate Mo concentrations from 0.8 parts per billion (ppb) to 4.8 ppb. As currently understood, this deposit is not extensive or continuous, but drilling to provide information on the vertical extent of mineralization may alter this opinion.

Lee, G. K.; Antweiler, J. C.; Love, J. D.; Benedict, J. F.

1982-01-01

84

Water Resources of Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

85

Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

None

1982-01-01

86

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Campbell, Janis, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Campbell, Janis, Ph.D.  Back to CRCHD Ongoing Research CNP Project Listing Janis Campbell, Ph.D. CNP Project Listing CNP Pilot Projects Project Investigator Biography Campbell, Janis, Ph.D. University of

87

STATUS REVIEW OF THE BEAR LODGE MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ( Zapus hudsonius campestris ) IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The Bear Lodge meadow jumping mouse ( Zapus hudsonius campestris ) is one of 2 subspecies of the meadow jumping mouse that occur in Wyoming. It occurs in northeastern Wyoming (Crook and Weston counties) and adjacent portions of South Dakota. In Wyoming, it has been documented only in the Belle Fourche River basin. The second subspecies, Preble's meadow jumping

Gary P. Beauvais

2000-01-01

88

Campbell's Rule for Estimating Entropy Changes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Campbell's rule for estimating entropy changes is discussed in relation to an earlier article by Norman Craig, where it was proposed that the approximate value of the entropy of reaction was related to net moles of gas consumed or generated. It was seen that the average for Campbell's data set was lower than that for Craig's data set and…

Jensen, William B.

2004-01-01

89

Land and natural resource information and some potential environmental effects of surface mining of coal in the Gillette area, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Campbell County, along the east margin of the Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming, contains more coal than any other county in the United States. The principal deposit is the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed. The bed is 50-100 feet (15-30 meters) thick over large areas, lies less than 200 feet (60 meters) deep in a north-south trending strip nearly 100 miles (161 kilometers) long and 2-3 miles (3-5 kilometers) wide, and contains an estimated 15 billion tons (13.6 billion metric tons) of sub-bituminous, low-sulfur coal that is presently considered to be accessible to surface mining. Extensive mining of this deposit has the potential for causing a variety of environmental impacts and has been a matter of much public concern and debate in recent years. An integrated program of geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and related studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in central Campbell County provides basic information about the land and its resources, including (1) characteristics of the landscape, (2) properties of rocks and surface materials, (3) depth and thickness of coal, (4) streamflow, (5) depth to ground water, (6) quality of ground water, (7) sediment yield, (8) concentrations of trace elements in soils, rocks, coal, vegetation, and water, and (9) current land use. The data are used to analyze and predict some of the potential environmental effects of surface mining, such as the extent of land disturbance, nature and degree of landscape modification, and disruption of surface-water and ground-water systems. Advance knowledge and understanding of these and other problems are useful in the planning and regulation of future leasing, mining, reclamation, and related activities.

Keefer, William Richard; Hadley, R.F.

1976-01-01

90

15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Wyoming Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

91

Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

2008-01-01

92

Dexter Campbell Kozen June 9, 2014  

E-print Network

Dexter Campbell Kozen June 9, 2014 Office Home Computer Science Department 209 Cayuga Heights Road 11/94­ Joseph Newton Pew, Jr. Professor in Engineering 1 #12;Dexter C. Kozen 2 Awards, Honors, Grants

Kozen, Dexter

93

Alfred Walter Campbell and the visual functions of the occipital cortex.  

PubMed

In his pioneering cytoarchitectonic studies of the human brain, Alfred Walter Campbell identified two structurally different areas in the occipital lobes and assigned two different kinds of visual functions to them. The first area, the visuosensory, was essentially on the mesial surface of the calcarine fissure. It was the terminus of nervous impulses generated in the retina and was where simple visual sensations arose. The second area, the visuopsychic, which surrounded or invested the first, was where sensations were interpreted and elaborated into visual perceptions. I argue that Campbell's distinction between the two areas was the starting point for the eventual differentiation of areas V1-V5. After a brief outline of Campbell's early life and education in Australia and of his Scottish medical education and early work as a pathologist at the Lancashire County Lunatic Asylum at Rainhill near Liverpool, I summarise his work on the human brain. In describing the structures he identified in the occipital lobes, I analyse the similarities and differences between them and the related structures identified by Joseph Shaw Bolton. I conclude by proposing some reasons for how that work came to be overshadowed by the later studies of Brodmann and for the more general lack of recognition given Campbell and his work. Those reasons include the effect of the controversies precipitated by Campbell's alliance with Charles Sherrington over the functions of the sensory and motor cortices. PMID:23218905

Macmillan, Malcolm

2014-07-01

94

Candy Draw: significant new Minnelusa field, Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Candy Draw field is located in T53N, R69W, Campbell County, Wyoming. It was discovered by Santa Fe Energy Company in June 1985. Production is from a stratigraphic trap in the lower B sandstone of the Permian Minnelusa Formation. Nine wells are capable of production, and further development is underway. Proven reserves are 9 million bbl of oil. Primary recoverable reserves are calculated at 1 million bbl, or 11% of oil in place. An additional 2 million bbl are estimated to be recoverable from secondary waterflood. Gross ultimate reserves from the nine producing wells are 3 million bbl, or 33% of oil in place. Candy Draw field was discovered by utilizing seismic stratigraphy to confirm regional geologic mapping of the lower B sandstone and overlying Opeche Shale. A lower B sandstone buildup was projected on trend and modeled after Wagonspoke field. Sonic logs were used to construct synthetic seismic models, which indicated that a lower B sandstone buildup could be seen on seismic data. Two seismic lines were acquired with data in the 55 to 65-Hz frequency range. A strike line showed a strong-amplitude anomaly present over the field which matched models that indicated 35 ft of lower B sandstone was present with 25% porosity. Computer modeling indicated that less than 20 ft of sandstone with porosity values of 10 to 12% could not be resolved due to the similar velocity of the Opeche Shale. This was confirmed by development drilling. Modeling from existing well control is critical due to the complex lithology of the Minnelusa Formation. Pitfalls exist, but seismic data have become a valuable tool for Minnelusa exploration.

Gallivan, L.B.; Bjorlie, S.C.

1986-08-01

95

Summary of inorganic compositional data for groundwater, soil-water, and surface-water samples collected at the Headgate Draw subsurface drip irrigation site, Johnson County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupancic, John W.

2011-01-01

96

Health assessment for Mystery Bridge Road/US Highway 20 Site, Brookhurst Subdivision, Evansville, Natrona County, Wyoming, Region 8. CERCLIS No. WYD981546005. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Mystery Bridge Road, U.S. Highway 20 site, also known as the Brookhurst Subdivision (BSD), is located adjacent to industrial sites in Wyoming. The sites include a natural gas processing facility, an oil and gas well servicing company, and a railroad siding. Organic chemicals from the industrial sites have contaminated the underlying aquifer and resulted in contamination of downgradient drinking water wells in the BSD. The list of organic contaminants detected on-site include toluene, xylene, benzene, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. An estimated 414 persons in the subdivision rely on groundwater wells for potable water. An alternative supply of potable water has been provided for these residents.

Not Available

1990-04-04

97

Surface-water quality in the Campbell Creek basin, Anchorage, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four streams in the Campbell Creek Basin were sampled during different flow conditions for an 18-month period. North Fork Campbell and South Fork Campbell Creeks drain areas virtually undisturbed by man 's activities. The other two streams, Little Campbell Creek and the main stem Campbell Creek, drain areas that have been urbanized. The water from South Fork Campbell and North Fork Campbell Creeks is of good quality and does not adversely affect the water quality of the main stem Campbell Creek. Little Campbell Creek, which has been affected by urbanization, impacts the water quality of Campbell Creek during lowland snowmelt periods when discharges from South Fork Campbell and North Fork Campbell Creeks are small. High concentrations of suspended sediment in Campbell Creek may be contributed by Little Campbell Creek. Fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations are highest at Little Campbell Creek and probably account for most of the high coliform concentrations at Campbell Creek. (USGS)

Brabets, T.P.; Wittenberg, L.A.

1983-01-01

98

Report on preliminary data for Madison Limestone test well no.1, NE1/4 SE1/4 section 15, T. 57 N., R. 65 W., Crook County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides the preliminary data for the Madison Limestone test well no. 1 in Crook County, Wyoming, including test-well history, geology of the test well, hydrologic testing, and geochemistry. The test well was drilled to a depth of 4,341 feet to determine the water-resource potential of the Madison Limestone and associated rocks to meet future water needs in a 188,000 sq mi region that includes the coal-rich area of the Northern Great Plains. Drilling and testing were designed to yield a maximum of stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, and hydrologic information. All significant water-bearing units contain relatively freshwater (less than 2,000 mg/liter dissolved solids). Three water-bearing units, which are now cased off, may be potential sources of ground water in the area of the test well. These are the Hulett Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation, the Minnekahta Limestone, and the upper sandy part of the Minnelusa Formation. (Woodard-USGS)

Blankennagel, Richard K.; Miller, W. R.; Brown, D. L.; Cushing, E. M.

1977-01-01

99

Clear Creek Athletic Complex Marv Kay Stadium at Campbell Field  

E-print Network

Marv Kay Stadium at Campbell Field Mines Athletic Center · Operations · New home to track and footballClear Creek Athletic Complex Marv Kay Stadium at Campbell Field Mines Athletic Center #12;· Site Creek Athletic Complex Marv Kay Stadium at Campbell Field Mines Athletic Center #12;Mines Master Plan

100

Coalbed Methane in Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Coalbed methane (CH4) is a natural gas and valuable energy resource that occurs in coal beds. This site, hosted by an energy development corporation, explains the geology and stratigraphy of Wyoming in the context of the formation of coalbed methane and its occurrence in Wyoming. Maps, cross sections, stratigraphic columns and fence diagrams are provided to explain Cretaceous and Tertiary coalbed methane-plays in Wyoming.

Black Diamond Energy, Inc.

101

Honors Education and Stone-Campbell Heritage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author explores the Stone-Campbell tradition, which produced the North American Disciples of Christ and Churches of Christ. In this tradition he finds the distinctive combination of three emphases to promote civic virtues in an honors context: (1) the individual pursuit of truth; (2) reliance on Scripture; and (3) the drive…

Willerton, Chris

2010-01-01

102

Sensor-Emitter Simulation Description Adam Campbell  

E-print Network

Sensor-Emitter Simulation Description Adam Campbell July 7, 2009 1 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 1 DISCRETIZATION and EMITTER DISCRETIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.4 BACKGROUND COLOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.3.2 SENSOR COLOR i and EMITTER COLOR i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2

Stanley, Kenneth O.

103

A. Malcolm Campbell Biology Department and GCAT  

E-print Network

A. Malcolm Campbell Biology Department and GCAT Wofford College September 12, 2011 From Synthetic Biology to Natural Learning #12;1. Introduce synthetic biology 2. Applications of synthetic biology 3. Synthetic biology research at Davidson College 4. Why make biological computers? 5. How do we prepare

Campbell, A. Malcolm

104

Wyoming Children's Factbook 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The first section of the report describes the issues affecting Wyoming's families, health, and teens. The second section consists of a sampling of programs aimed at addressing problems in children's well-being in the areas of teen pregnancy, child abuse,…

Wyoming P.A.R.E.N.T., Laramie.

105

Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

Larry Demick

2012-11-01

106

24. Top 30/7. Plan of superstructure details. Wyoming Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. Top 30/7. Plan of superstructure details. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

107

20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. Wyoming ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

108

23. Top 30/6. Plan of superstructure sections. Wyoming Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Top 30/6. Plan of superstructure sections. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

109

22. Top 30/5. Plan of superstructure elevations. Wyoming Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. Top 30/5. Plan of superstructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

110

77 FR 43611 - Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW154148, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Marshall & Winston, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW154148 for land in Carbon County, Wyoming. The petition was...

2012-07-25

111

Procedure for evaluating observation-well networks in Wyoming, and application to northeastern Wyoming, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A sequence of steps was developed for evaluating and modifying the existing, long-term, observation-well network in any part of Wyoming. The State was subdivided geographically into nine groundwater areas, including the northeastern Wyoming groundwater area, based on major structural features. Northeastern Wyoming was the first of the nine areas to be evaluated using these procedures. The stratigraphic units of Wyoming were grouped into five rock units on the basis of age, similar depositional environments, and water-yielding properties. Activities likely to affect groundwater in northeastern Wyoming were evaluated. The most important monitoring needs in the area are related to: (1) Oil-field waterflooding; (2) surface mining of coal; (3) increasing municipal use of groundwater, and (4) need for general resource information. The 18 observation wells in the existing (1986) network meet most of the needs identified. Seven additional wells need to be added to the network, whereas four wells in the network can be discontinued. Water level data from the 18 observation wells are presented by county. Maps and hydrographs are accompanied by brief discussions of information related to the records obtained. (USGS)

Wallace, J.C.; Crist, M.A.

1989-01-01

112

Bitter bonanza in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Mineral and energy-related exploration, such as the drilling activity in the Overthrust Belt for petroleum, has made Wyoming a leading energy supplier in the U.S. The energy boom has had many unfortunate effects on the state's environment. Environmental degradation caused by exploration and production in Wyoming includes loss of habitat, poaching of wildlife, water pollution from oil dumping and erosion, and impacts from squatter's camps.

Randall, D.

1980-12-01

113

Using Joseph Campbell to Improve Students' Response to Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Shows how teachers can use the videotapes and writings of Joseph Campbell to help students see patterns in literature and respond personally to it. Presents Campbell's explanation of the monomyth of the hero's journey, and discusses three works in which the pattern is present. (SR)

Barnum, Carol M.

1992-01-01

114

Wyoming State Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

115

76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land...SUMMARY: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered...The following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been...

2011-03-25

116

77 FR 40147 - Boston and Maine Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-in Worcester County, MA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Heywood Branch, between mileposts 27.29 and 27.43, in Gardner, Worcester County, Mass.\\1\\ The line traverses United...Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A. Gardner, Clearance Clerk. [FR Doc. 2012-16577 Filed...

2012-07-06

117

Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B: oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled Part B of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). Part B consists of oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar energy resource information in support of the WLCI. The WLCI represents the USGS partnership with other Department of the Interior Bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners, all of whom collaborate to maintain healthy landscapes, sustain wildlife, and preserve recreational and grazing uses while developing energy resources in southwestern Wyoming. This product is the second and final part of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming series (also see USGS Data Series 683, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/683/), and encompasses all of Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties, as well as areas in Fremont County that are in the Great Divide and Green River Basins.

Biewick, Laura R. H.; Wilson, Anna B.

2014-01-01

118

Evaluation of organic matter, Subsurface temperature nd pressure with regard to gas generation in low-permeability upper cretaceous and lower tertiary sandstones in Pacific Creek area, sublette and Sweetwater Counties, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations of a sequence of Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary rocks in the Pacific Creek area of Wyoming show that studies of organic matter content, type, and maturity in conjunction with subsurface temperature and reservoir pressure, will help define prospective gas-saturated intervals and delineate areas of maximum gas-resource potential. The onset of overpressuring occurs at about 11,600 ft (3,500 m),

B. E. Law; C. W. Spencer; N. H. Bostick

1980-01-01

119

Wyoming Natural Resources Data Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wyoming Natural Resources Data Clearinghouse Web site, which "has the largest clearinghouse of digital geospatial data for Wyoming" is part of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center. Users can search the spatial data using keywords, browse using a clickable atlas of the state, or browse the individual categories including climate, land management, land / environmental, mineral, water, and more. Each of the listings describes the type of data, its scale and source, and even includes a picture of what it looks like on screen. Easy to use and navigate, the site does a good job of making the free Wyoming specific data accessible to anyone.

2008-10-22

120

Campbell, William Wallace (1862-1938)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomer, born in Hancock County, OH. Trained as an engineer, became director of Lick Observatory, measured stellar radial velocities with the Mills photographic spectrograph (which he designed) and published them (with Joseph Moore) in a catalog (1928). From studies of the Martian atmosphere, he deduced that it could not support life. Founded the Lick southern station in Chile, discovered nume...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

121

Wyoming Community College Commission Annual Report, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) serves the system of Wyoming's seven community colleges. Wyoming's seven community colleges provide affordable, accessible and lifelong education. The Wyoming Community College Commission supports the colleges through advocacy, coordination and collaboration. In partnership with the colleges, the…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2010

2010-01-01

122

Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These specific data are being used for assessing the effect of disturbance resulting from wind energy development within Wyoming on sage-grouse populations.

O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

2010-01-01

123

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2010-01-01

124

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2013-01-01

125

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2011-01-01

126

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2012-01-01

127

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

... 2014-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2014-01-01

128

UC Student-Athlete of the Month for May-Paris Campbell By: Ashley Duvelius  

E-print Network

UC Student-Athlete of the Month for May- Paris Campbell By: Ashley Duvelius Paris Campbell, senior, College of Engineering and Applied Science's (CEAS) is proud to honor Paris Campbell Scholar Athlete management. She advises other student-athletes by saying, "Keep a tight knit schedule and always know what

Franco, John

129

Evidence of Construct Validity of the Interest Scales on the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored evidence of the construct validity of the interest scales on the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey (CISS; Campbell, Hyne, & Nilsen, 1992) by testing evidence for convergent validity with the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; Hansen & Campbell, 1985). Two hypotheses were formulated. First, matching CISS and SII scales were…

Sullivan, Brandon A.; Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

2004-01-01

130

Muon hyperfine fields in rare earth hosts I. A. Campbell  

E-print Network

L-27 Muon hyperfine fields in rare earth hosts I. A. Campbell Laboratoire de Physique des Solides in a rare earth host the electric field gradient created by the muon charge will affect the orientation of neighbouring rare earth moments and so will lead to strong dipolar fields at the muon site. J. Physique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Mathematical and Statistical Opportunities in Cyber Security Scott Campbell  

E-print Network

Mathematical and Statistical Opportunities in Cyber Security Juan Meza Scott Campbell David Bailey problems exist within cyber security research that can be helped by advanced mathematics and statistics large and complex systems like the Internet. Our second assumption is that many proposed cyber security

Bailey, David H.

132

Contributions to the Flora and Plant Ecology of Campbell Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native plant species newly recorded for Campbell Island are: Lycopodium cf. australianum, Rumex flexuosus, R. negleclus, Cotula dispersa subsp. dispersa, Acianthus viridis, and possibly Puccinellia macquariensis hitherto regarded as an endemic grass of Macquarie Island. Additions to the exotic flora include cultivars, garden escapes, and otner largely ephemeral introductions. These are: the weeds Cardamine hirsuta, Polygonum convolvulus, Geranium pusillum, Hypericum

Colin D. Meurk

1975-01-01

133

Bioinformatics is Like A Band-aid A. Malcolm Campbell  

E-print Network

Bioinformatics is Like A Band-aid A. Malcolm Campbell University of Georgia January 11, 2013 1 pull 4Thursday, January 24, 2013 #12;1. My Definition of Bioinformatics 2. Jump Right In (rip it off) 3, January 24, 2013 #12;Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics mostly juniors and seniors majority biology

Campbell, A. Malcolm

134

Oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters Timothy J. Campbell,1,2  

E-print Network

Oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters Timothy J. Campbell,1,2 Gurcan Aral,1 Shuji Ogata,3 Rajiv K of aluminum nanoclusters 20 nm diameter is investigated using a parallel molecular dynamics approach based-O bonding. Local stresses in the oxide scale cause rapid diffusion of aluminum and oxygen atoms. Analyses

Southern California, University of

135

Floral biology of hybrid zones Diane R. Campbell1  

E-print Network

a monstrosity. The evolu- tionary biologist's view of hybrids has changed similarly. Based largely on animal attributed to human activity (Mayr 1963). However, evolutionary biologists now ascribe to hybrids a muchCHAPTER 18 Floral biology of hybrid zones Diane R. Campbell1 and George Aldridge2 1 Department

Campbell, Diane

136

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell  

E-print Network

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell Department of Applied can move in one dimension. We study the effect of friction on the design and performance of a feedback that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor performance - small amplitude oscillations

Campbell, Sue Ann

137

Vehicles to Belief: Aristotle's Enthymeme and George Campbell's Vivacity Compared.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central concepts from two rhetorical systems (the enthymeme in Aristotle's rhetoric and vivacity in George Campbell's) may be understood as the connection between speech act and ascension to belief. A review of the literature indicates a gap in the scholarly works seeking to compare and contrast the periods developed by D. Ehninger's systems…

Roob, Andy

138

Shirley Campbell's Ideology of Historiographic Legitimation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines a number of poems in which Shirley Campbell challenges the myth of historical objectivity by suggesting that the history of African diasporic peoples and societies has been obliterated in Europe's agenda to relegate them to positions of subservience and deny even their very existence. The poetic voice declares that…

Ramsay, Paulette A.

2014-01-01

139

of Learning and Development Mark H. Bickhard Robert L. Campbell  

E-print Network

Department of Psychology 17 Memorial Drive East Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015 mhb0@lehigh.edu http://www.lehigh.edu/~mhb0/mhb0.html Robert L. Campbell Department of Psychology Brackett Hall 410A Clemson University better at learning. That requirement is a functional topology in the space of possible constructive

Bickhard, Mark H.

140

Multimodal Speaker Authentication using Nonacoustic Sensors* W. M. Campbell, T. F. Quatieri, J. P. Campbell, C. J. Weinstein  

E-print Network

of these sensors is that they are less influenced by acoustic noise than a microphone. A drawback of having manyMultimodal Speaker Authentication using Nonacoustic Sensors* W. M. Campbell, T. F. Quatieri, J. P and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government. Abstract Many nonacoustic sensors are now available

141

An Analysis of “Meme Haylay Haylay and His Turquoise” using Joseph Campbell’s Model of the Hero’s Journey  

E-print Network

84 An Analysis of “Meme Haylay Haylay and His Turquoise” using Joseph Campbell’s Model of the Hero’s Journey A. Steven Evans* At a cursory glance, the Bhutanese folktale “Meme Haylay Haylay and His Turquoise”1 might be sidelined as a simple... of the tale will look at it from multiple vantage points: (a) the folktale itself; (b) the symbolism found within the tale; (c) a rendering of the story in light of its symbolism; (d) the folktale and its symbols through the structure of Joseph Campbell’s...

Evans, A Steven

2006-01-01

142

75 FR 62140 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159733, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Sun Cal Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159733 for land in Sublette County, Wyoming. The petition was filed...

2010-10-07

143

Agricultural land-use classification using landsat imagery data, and estimates of irrigation water use in Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka counties, 1992 water year, Upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the upper Snake River Basin study unit, land- and water-use data were used to describe activities that have potential effects on water quality, including biological conditions, in the basin. Land-use maps and estimates of water use by irrigated agriculture were needed for Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka Counties (south-central Idaho), four of the most intensively irrigated counties in the study unit. Land use in the four counties was mapped from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data for the 1992 water year using the SPECTRUM computer program. Land-use data were field verified in 108 randomly selected sections (640 acres each); results compared favorably with land-use maps from other sources. Water used for irrigation during the 1992 water year was estimated using land-use and ancillary data. In 1992, a drought year, estimated irrigation withdrawals in the four counties were about 2.9 million acre-feet of water. Of the 2.9 million acre-feet, an estimated 2.12 million acre-feet of water was withdrawn from surface water, mainly the Snake River, and nearly 776,000 acre-feet was withdrawn from ground water. One-half of the 2.9 million acre-feet of water withdrawn for irrigation was considered to be lost during conveyance or was returned to the Snake River; the remainder was consumptively used by crops during the growing season.

Maupin, Molly A.

1997-01-01

144

77 FR 34894 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...submitted the amendment to address required ownership and control rule changes that OSM identified...included changes to Wyoming's rules for ownership and control. Wyoming also submitted...Safety and Health Administration, USDA Forest Service, U.S. Geological...

2012-06-12

145

Wyoming: Territory to Statehood, Unit VI.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for elementary school students, this unit on the Wyoming evolution from territory to statehood provides concepts, activities, stories, resources, and maps. Concepts stress the five national flags which have flown over Wyoming, several other territories Wyoming was a part of, construction of the Union Pacific railroad, problems of the new…

Robinson, Terry

146

Review of Nitidotachinus Campbell (Staphylinidae, Tachyporinae) from Mainland China  

PubMed Central

Abstract The genus Nitidotachinus Campbell of Mainland China is reviewed with descriptions of five new species: Nitidotachinus anhuiensis sp. n. (Anhui), Nitidotachinus bini sp. n. (Zhejiang), Nitidotachinus brunneus sp. n. (Zhejiang), Nitidotachinus capillosus sp. n. (Zhejiang), and Nitidotachinus xiangi sp. n. (Hubei). Nitidotachinus excellens concolor Schülke is synonymized with Nitidotachinus excellens syn. n. All treated species are described with their major diagnostic characters illustrated. An identification key to the species is given. PMID:25349517

Zheng, Dan-Lin; Li, Li-Zhen; Zhao, Mei-Jun

2014-01-01

147

Retinoprotective effect of Epithalon in campbell rats of various ages.  

PubMed

We studied the retinoprotective effect of Epithalon administered to the offspring of Campbell rats during postnatal ontogeny and to mothers before mating and during pregnancy. After this treatment the morphological structure and functional activity of the retina were preserved for a longer period compared to control rats (by 2 times) and to the animals receiving the peptide only during postnatal ontogeny (by 30%). PMID:12910293

Khavinson, V Kh; Razumovsky, M I; Trofimova, S V; Razumovskaya, A M

2003-05-01

148

Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode  

SciTech Connect

Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What is proposed here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA-made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. A theoretical model of the signal is used to calculate the calibration coefficient. The model's input parameters come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements were made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE and results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration. The tested fission chamber calibration coefficient is roughly 2*10{sup -26} A{sup 2}/Hz/(c/s). Both numerical and empirical methods give consistent results, however a deviation of about 15% was observed. (authors)

Geslot, Benoit; Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Di Salvo, Jacques; Breaud, Stephane; Villard, Jean-Francois [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx, LDCI, F-13108 S Paul Lez Durance, (France); Unruh, Troy C. [INL, Idaho Natl Lab, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2012-08-15

149

Gravity interpretation of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

E-print Network

. JJ) and interpre- tive structure models. . 10 Figure Figure Figure Density interpretation from the density log of the Mountain Fuel Supply Company Church Buttes Unit Well 19, Church Buttes Field (SE NE 8-16N-112M) Uinta County, Wyoming... '; re the opogr eph", ' e: Di es "icn of orro of . he large=t st& natural features in *he Rock; I'r'!our;? I;ain Fore and Province. The structure of the meum!, aine ha' 'oeon variou, . l; interpr et ed a" (1) a . ertical block up!. ift, (Z) compr...

Parks, Pamela Hennis

2012-06-07

150

A new Wyoming phytosaur  

E-print Network

& WHARTON (1936), from the Dockum Group in Howard County, Texas. To these should be added the species described by CASE (1929) as Brachysuchus megalodon, also from the Dockum of Texas, for GREGORY has recently reported (at annual meeting of Society... of the roof. Normal outlines of these parts were adjusted to the preserved edges of the skull. Most features of Angistorhinus aeolamnis arc closely comparable to those of A. megalodon. The snout of A. aeolamnis is longer and narrower; at a point halfway back...

Eaton, T. H., Jr.

1965-08-01

151

Wyoming's "Education Reform & Cost Study."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A history of education in the state of Wyoming, along with a description of recent legislative initiatives, are presented in this paper. It opens with statewide reorganizations begun in the 1960s that unified school districts and equalized property valuation. A decade later a court order ruled the system inequitable and new laws provided for a…

Meyer, Joseph B.

152

77 FR 61657 - Indiana Northeastern Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-In Branch and St. Joseph Counties, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Abandonment Exemption--In Branch and St. Joseph Counties, MI Indiana Northeastern Railroad...milepost 100.69 near Sturgis in St. Joseph County, Mich. (the Line). The Line...October 2, 2012. By the Board, Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings....

2012-10-10

153

Commercial, or usable, size Campbell Chinese type windmill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An adequately large, home-use size, model of the Campbell Chinese type windmill has been designed, built, debugged and partially tested. Two basic windmills, operating side by side and assembled on one supporting structure, constitute the complete windmill. This complete windmill can be readily tilted down to a horizontal position to provide protection from destructive winds or to make upper parts accessible for maintenance. Minimum feasible weight was a design aim, and some important weight reduction features are included in the descriptions. The testing of only one basic windmill on the supporting structure has been started.

Campbell, J. S.

154

Campbell's monkeys concatenate vocalizations into context-specific call sequences  

PubMed Central

Primate vocal behavior is often considered irrelevant in modeling human language evolution, mainly because of the caller's limited vocal control and apparent lack of intentional signaling. Here, we present the results of a long-term study on Campbell's monkeys, which has revealed an unrivaled degree of vocal complexity. Adult males produced six different loud call types, which they combined into various sequences in highly context-specific ways. We found stereotyped sequences that were strongly associated with cohesion and travel, falling trees, neighboring groups, nonpredatory animals, unspecific predatory threat, and specific predator classes. Within the responses to predators, we found that crowned eagles triggered four and leopards three different sequences, depending on how the caller learned about their presence. Callers followed a number of principles when concatenating sequences, such as nonrandom transition probabilities of call types, addition of specific calls into an existing sequence to form a different one, or recombination of two sequences to form a third one. We conclude that these primates have overcome some of the constraints of limited vocal control by combinatorial organization. As the different sequences were so tightly linked to specific external events, the Campbell's monkey call system may be the most complex example of ‘proto-syntax’ in animal communication known to date. PMID:20007377

Ouattara, Karim; Lemasson, Alban; Zuberbühler, Klaus

2009-01-01

155

The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group: Early Development and Progress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group was inaugurated in 2000 to prepare, update, and disseminate systematic reviews on what works to reduce crime or improve justice. After providing a brief description of a systematic review and the origins of the Campbell Collaboration, this paper provides an overview of the first 36 months of the…

Petrosino, Anthony; Farrington, David P.; Sherman, Lawrence W.

2003-01-01

156

Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell  

E-print Network

Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell Peter J, Transformation, Evolution, Edited by W. Schelkle, W.-H. Krauth, M. Kohli, and G. Ewarts. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag cultural evolution was Donald T. Campbell's paper "Variation and Selective Retention in Sociocultural

Richerson, Peter J.

157

Modeling Energy Use and Technological Change for Policy Makers: Campbell Watkins'  

E-print Network

testing of dynamic specifications of this relationship. But he conducted this work always with a concern remains "undiminished." More hard-nosed researcher-practitioners like Campbell would certainly help. 1. In to Campbell, I survey the last 30 years of modeling energy use for assisting policy makers, an area where his

158

Perspectives and opportunities for Renewable Energy and National Security Mike Campbell  

E-print Network

2.30pm Perspectives and opportunities for Renewable Energy and National Security Mike Campbell. Such a challenge and the connection and interplay between energy, national and global security is evidenced today Security Dr. Mike Campbell USC Smart Energy Summit January 27,2012 1 #12;Presentation Outline · Motivation

Levi, Anthony F. J.

159

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #1 -Cellular Communications  

E-print Network

). #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2003 4 6 pts. 8) Explain the concepts of voltage and currentDr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2003 1 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #1 - Cellular Communications There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able to complete within 2

Campbell, A. Malcolm

160

Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl Jung was…

Thomson, Karen M.

161

Wyoming fossils change theories about extinction Casper, Wyoming -Wednesday, March 12, 2003  

E-print Network

larger animals. According to a paper assessing modern extinction rates by British scientists Robert MayWyoming fossils change theories about extinction Casper, Wyoming - Wednesday, March 12, 2003 about extinction News Wyoming Casper National World AP News UPI News Business Opinion Sports Obituaries

Wilf, Peter

162

DISTRIBUTIONAL INFORMATION ON BIRDS FROM EGG SETS COLLECTED BY HENRY ROGERS DüRKEE IN 1870 IN SOUTHWESTERN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Henry Rogers Durkee collected 74 egg sets of 27 avian species in 1870 at Gilmer, Uinta County, in southwestern Wyoming. Despite the paucit}' of documented breeding evidence from this region during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his material at the Smithsonian Institution was generally overlooked and has never been criti- cally examined. Durkee's egg sets included 5 species

Douglas B. McNair; James E Dean

2003-01-01

163

HUSTON PARK ROADLESS AREA, WYOMING.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A probable resource potential for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in stratiform sulfide deposits is assigned to areas in the northern and southeastern parts of the Huston Park Roadless Area, Wyoming. These areas are underlain by volcanic rock successions favorable for stratiform sulfide deposits. However, no indication of mineralized rock was identified during a mineral survey. Study of granites of the southern Sierra Madre are needed to determine whether or not they have promise as a source of tin and tungsten.

Houston, Robert, S.; Lane, Michael, E.

1984-01-01

164

Generalized potentiometric-surface map of the High Plains aquifer in Wyoming, 1981  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A potentiometric-surface map shows the general configuration of the water surface for the High Plains Aquifer, which is composed of Oligocene age and younger rocks in southeastern Wyoming. The potentiometric contours are shown at 100-foot intervals on a map at a scale of 1:250,000. The High Plains Aquifer in Wyoming underlies an area of 8,190 square miles and geologically consists of the White River Formation of Oligocene age, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age, the Ogallala Formation of late Miocene age, and alluvial deposits of Quaternary age. The altitude of the potentiometric surface declines from about 7 ,100 feet in southwestern Laramie County to about 4,100 feet in eastern Goshen County. Typically, the slope is between 20 and 30 feet per mile; the general direction of flow is eastward. (USGS)

Avery, Charles; Pettijohn, Robert A.

1984-01-01

165

Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

2003-12-17

166

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

SciTech Connect

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01

167

Preliminary Assessment of Burrowing Owl Population Status in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, little is known about Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) abundance in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WCFD) classifies the Burrowing Owl as a Species of Special Concern. We identified available data sources to assess Burrowing Owl distribution and population trends in Wyoming and conducted a population survey in eastern Wyoming. The WGFD's Wildlife Observation System (WOS), initiated in

NICOLE M. KORFANTA; LOREN W. AYERS; STANLEY H. ANDERSON; DAVID B. MCDONALD

2001-01-01

168

Applicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for Miami-Dade County, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability of CS616 soil water sensors (Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT, USA) to estimate soil water content by comparing CS616 sensor data to tensiometer measurements. The study site was in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and consists of sandy loam soil and grass vegetation which is representative of the regions urban landscape. A traditional

K. Koryto; K. Migliaccio

2010-01-01

169

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of Frio Sandstone, McCampbell Deep Field, Aransas County, Texas  

E-print Network

blandpedi Textularia selgi Anomolia bilateralis Eocene Vicksburg Vicksburg Textularia warreni Jackson of the Frio relative to other Tertiary formations. At the base, the Jackson Group is a transgressive marine shale in which minor fluctuations... warreni. In past studies, the Frio has been subdivided into upper and lower units based on the occurrence of Nodosaria ~bl d d', H *, t. h*F 'o t th k d *d its nature to yield a meaningful environmental interpreta- tion if treated only as one or two...

Turner, James Rickey

2012-06-07

170

Multiply Charged Thorium Crystals for Nuclear Laser Spectroscopy C. J. Campbell,1  

E-print Network

Multiply Charged Thorium Crystals for Nuclear Laser Spectroscopy C. J. Campbell,1 A. V. Steele,1 L a sensitive probe of the effects of the chemical environment and atomic electron charge states on nuclear

Kuzmich, Alex

171

A SURVEY OF VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION NEEDS IN GOSHEN COUNTY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS STUDY WAS FUNDED BY THE WYOMING STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO DETERMINE THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF GOSHEN COUNTY AND TO RECOMMEND APPROPRIATE ACTION ON THE FINDINGS. SEPARATE QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, EMPLOYERS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY, AND SELECTED COUNTY ADULTS. THE NEWS MEDIA GAVE THE PROJECT WIDE…

DODGE, LARRY D.

172

A Review of "John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought" by Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns  

E-print Network

of materials related to John Milton, editions and studies and artworks, in the world? (31). Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns. John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. xvi + 488 pp. + 48 illus. $39.95. Review by anna k.... nardo, louisiana state university. John Milton?s life makes a great story, and Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns tell it well. By their account, Milton ?is flawed, self- contradictory, self-serving, arrogant, passionate, ruthless, ambitious...

Nardo, Anna K.

2009-01-01

173

A key and synopsis of the mosses of Campbell Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The moss flora of Campbell Island (52°33?S, 169°08?E) is reported to consist of 119 species, 3 varieties, and 1 form. A key is given. Historically, Campbell Island is important because of the numerous type specimens collected there. Sixty-eight of these taxa are reported as new to the island. The new combinations Thamnobryum pandum (H. f. & W.) Vitt* and Hypopterygium

Dale H. Vitt

1974-01-01

174

Surveillance for Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from wyoming, USA.  

PubMed

Baylisascaris procyonis is a common roundworm of raccoons that causes severe clinical disease in many vertebrates, including humans. The distribution of B. procyonis in the US is poorly documented in portions of its range and has not been reported from Wyoming. Our objectives were to determine the statewide distribution and prevalence of this parasite in raccoons in Wyoming, using intestinal and fecal examinations. We examined 363 raccoons from 23 Wyoming counties in 2009-11, testing the reliability of two methods (intestinal extrusion and incision) to determine worm burdens. We found 163 raccoons (45%) positive for B. procyonis. The two methods of examination did not differ, although extrusion missed some infections. Neither age nor sex affected apparent prevalence or worm burdens. Prevalence did not differ with land use, yet burden was highest among rural raccoons. Fecal examination revealed that juvenile raccoons had a higher proportion of patent infections than adults, but neither sex nor location were indicators of prevalence. Egg density (eggs per gram of feces) did not differ by sex or age; however, rural raccoons had higher egg densities than urban/suburban animals. Understanding the distribution and prevalence of B. procyonis in Wyoming, especially in and around highly populated areas, is an important step in educating the general public and medical community on the potential risks of raccoon roundworm infection. PMID:25014908

Pipas, Michael J; Page, L Kristen; Kazacos, Kevin R

2014-10-01

175

Original Article Burning and Mowing Wyoming Big  

E-print Network

, WY 82071, USA ABSTRACT Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis) treatments are often Artemisia tridentata, Centrocercus urophasianus, early brood-rearing, greater sage-grouse, habitat man sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) has generally been conducted to restore or enhance sagebrush communities

Beck, Jeffrey L.

176

50 CFR 32.70 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.70 Wyoming. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2012-10-01

177

50 CFR 32.70 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.70 Wyoming. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2011-10-01

178

50 CFR 32.70 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.70 Wyoming. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2013-10-01

179

78 FR 10512 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part...Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior...Wyoming program'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of...

2013-02-14

180

A review of "Literary Circles and Gender in Early Modern Europe: A Cross-Cultural Approach" by Julie Campbell  

E-print Network

with compelling historical context and astute literary analysis. Julie Campbell. Literary Circles and Gender in Early Modern Europe: A Cross- Cultural Approach. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2006. viii + 221 pp. $89.95. Review by LISSA BEAUCHAMP DESROCHES..., UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK, FREDERICTON. Julie Campbell?s study of how gender operates in the literary circles and salons of early modern Europe relies on a balance between genders as a matter of fact and gender as a matter for discourse. In other words...

Desroches, Lissa Beauchamp

2007-01-01

181

“The Aquinas of the Rednecks”: reconciliation, the southern character, and the bootleg ministry of Will D. Campbell  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white activist and celebrated author Will D. Campbell was a Mississippi-born Southern Baptist minister who worked in the South during the civil rights movement, formally for the National Council of Churches, but informally in support of civil rights organizations and as a mediator in southern communities. This article examines both Campbell’s career arc and his semi-autobiographical fiction to understand

Benjamin Houston

2012-01-01

182

New frontiers in old areas - Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The first producing oil well in Wyoming was drilled in 1883 on Dallas dome in the central part of the state; in 1983 it was still capable of production. The first geologic map of Wyoming, published by W.C. Knight in 1900, showed 14 oil fields and oil seeps. The next map, Map of the Wyoming Oil fields, was published anonymously in 1917 and showed 62 oil fields, some of which were imaginary and others, such as Lost Cabin, that were found and first produced 40 years after the map was published. Oil and gas field overprints on the geologic maps of Wyoming in 1925, 1955, and 1985 showed about 41, 155, and 780 oil fields and 30, 88, and 400 gas fields. In the thrust belt of western Wyoming, more than 25 oil and gas fields have been discovered since 1975. Five rank as giant oil (100 million bbl) of gas (1 tcf) fields. Two fields, Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek and Riley ridge, may be among the ten largest oil and gas fields in the world as of 1985. The large number of oil and gas fields discovered, in part because of stratigraphic plays, between 1955 and 1985 in the Green River and Powder River basins suggests that additional fields will be found in these basins and in other Wyoming basins as drilling continues. Production, mostly from depths of less than 10,000 ft, will increase as drilling techniques become more sophisticated. Oil and gas also may be obtained in the future from within, as well as from under, volcanic rocks in northwestern Wyoming and from under the basin-margin thrust faults.

Love, J.D.; Christiansen, A.C.

1986-05-01

183

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

...The portion within the City of Riverton Rock Springs, WY: Sweetwater County (part...Attainment. The portion within the City of Rock Springs Sheridan, WY: Sheridan County...portion within the City of Riverton. Rock Springs, WY: Sweetwater County...

2014-07-01

184

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...The portion within the City of Gillette Jackson, WY: Teton County (part) Unclassifiable...Attainment. The portion within the City of Jackson Lander, WY: Fremont County (part...portion within the City of Gillette. Jackson, WY: Teton County (part)...

2010-07-01

185

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The portion within the City of Gillette Jackson, WY: Teton County (part) Unclassifiable...Attainment. The portion within the City of Jackson Lander, WY: Fremont County (part...portion within the City of Gillette. Jackson, WY: Teton County (part)...

2011-07-01

186

The Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Management of Williams-Campbell Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Williams-Campbell syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by the absence of cartilage in subsegmental bronchi leading to formation of bronchiectasis distal to the affected bronchi. The differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis is broad and the rarity of the disease poses a diagnostic and management challenge for clinicians. This present review aims to help the understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathophysiological features, diagnostic modalities, management and differential diagnosis of Williams-Campbell syndrome. A MedLine/PubMed search was performed identifying all relevant articles. No restrictions were used for publication dates. The author used the keywords “Williams-Campbell syndrome,” “non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis” and “congenital bronchiectasis” finding 503, 195 and 489 articles, respectively.

Noriega Aldave, Adrian Pedro; William Saliski, DO

2014-01-01

187

Nd isotopic evidence for the antiquity of the Wyoming province  

E-print Network

and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 ABSTRACT Sm-Nd isotopic data on Late Archean age variety of ages was exposed and eroding in Late Archean time. The predominance ofMiddle Archean model ages different from the rest. The Nd isotopic characteristics of Archean rocks from the Wyoming province contrast

Reiners, Peter W.

188

The University of Texas at Dallas Academic Governance 800 West Campbell Road, AD 23, Richardson, TX 75080-3021  

E-print Network

The University of Texas at Dallas Academic Governance 800 West Campbell Road, AD 23, Richardson, TX, SGA President 2009-2010 Academic Senate: Amin Gutierrez de Piñeres, Sheila Izen, Joseph Anderson, Mark;The University of Texas at Dallas Academic Governance 800 West Campbell Road, AD 23, Richardson, TX

O'Toole, Alice J.

189

Defining American Heroes: Analyzing the Metamorphosis of the War Hero in Twentieth Century War Films Using Joseph Campbell's, "Hero's Journey."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "The Hero's Journey" Joseph Campbell identifies the patterns that inform the myths of the "hero" throughout recorded history. By using Campbell's template, this paper examines how the American war hero is portrayed and has been portrayed in film. The paper states that Americans not only define their war heroes in films but also use these film…

Frith, Luci A.

190

Simon Campbell on the ups and downs of drug discovery and development. Interview by Jayne Carey and Samantha Barton.  

PubMed

Simon Campbell discusses his role in the development of sildenafil and doxazosin, as well as his current role as President of the RSC. Campbell goes on to give his opinions on how technological advances are influencing the changing roles of synthetic and medicinal chemists. PMID:15708739

Campbell, Simon

2005-02-15

191

Sir Francis Joseph Campbell and His Family: The First Family in Professional Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author discusses the pivotal roles of Sir Francis Campbell (1832-1914) and members of his family, especially his son Charles Campbell, in the evolution of the blindness field to a professional and reason-based service.

Welsh, Richard L.

2008-01-01

192

78 FR 5514 - Supplemental Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for License Renewal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project...ISR) of uranium at the Willow Creek Project (formally known as...Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming. The NRC has prepared a Supplemental...requested comments from the Wyoming Department of...

2013-01-25

193

Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of Wyoming and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The Wyoming investigation has progressed according to schedule during the Jan. - Feb., 1973 report period. A map of the maximum extent of Pleistocene glaciation was compiled for northwest Wyoming from interpretations of glacial features seen on ERTS-1 imagery. Using isodensitometry as a tool for image enhancement, techniques were developed which allowed accurate delineation of small urban areas and provided distinction of broad classifications within these small urban centers.

Marrs, R. W.; Breckenridge, R. M.

1973-01-01

194

Assessment of vaccine exemptions among wyoming school children, 2009 and 2011.  

PubMed

During 2010-2011, varicella vaccination was an added requirement for school entrance in Wyoming. Vaccination exemption rates were compared during the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 school years, and impacts of implementing a new childhood vaccine requirement were evaluated. All public schools, grades K-12, were required to report vaccination status of enrolled children for the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 school years to the Wyoming Department of Health. Exemption data were analyzed by exemption category, vaccine, county, grade, and rurality. The proportion of children exempt for ?1 vaccine increased from 1.2% (1,035/87,398) during the 2009-2010 school year to 1.9% (1,678/89,476) during 2011-2012. In 2011, exemptions were lowest (1.5%) in urban areas and highest (2.6%) in the most rural areas, and varicella vaccine exemptions represented 67.1% (294/438) of single vaccination exemptions. Implementation of a new vaccination requirement for school admission led to an increased exemption rate across Wyoming. PMID:24407317

Pride, Kerry R; Geissler, Aimee L; Kolasa, Maureen S; Robinson, Byron; Van Houten, Clay; McClinton, Reginald; Bryan, Katie; Murphy, Tracy

2014-10-01

195

Radiative cooling of fullerenes K. Hansen and E. E. B. Campbell  

E-print Network

the fragmentation probabil- ity vs cooling time. The fullerenes were a homemade mixture of mainly C60 and some C70 in relation to breakdown graphs for C2 loss from C60. In the presence of such a cooling channel that may comRadiative cooling of fullerenes K. Hansen and E. E. B. Campbell Max Born Institut, Rudower Chaussee

Hansen, Klavs

196

Dysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell  

E-print Network

tibial muscles [9]. Recent work has shown that loss of dysferlin compromises Ca2+ -dependent meDysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell The ability to repair membrane for dysferlin in this repair process in muscle, possibly as a Ca2+ sensor that triggers vesicle fusion

Campbell, Kevin P.

197

EyePhone: Activating Mobile Phones With Your Eyes Emiliano Miluzzo, Tianyu Wang, Andrew T. Campbell  

E-print Network

EyePhone: Activating Mobile Phones With Your Eyes Emiliano Miluzzo, Tianyu Wang, Andrew T. Campbell are studying new tech- niques to ease the human-mobile interaction. We propose EyePhone, a novel "hand the eye and infer its position on the mobile phone display as a user views a particular application

Campbell, Andrew T.

198

EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTROL OF ARSENIC EMISSIONS AT THE CAMPBELL RED LAKE GOLD SMELTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The Campbell Red Lake Mines Gold Smelter at Balmerton, Ontario, Canada, has developed and implemented a successful control strategy for arsenic emissions from a nonferrous smelting operation. The Red Lake smelter uses cyclones and a hot electrostatic precipitator to recover metal...

199

Compositions of Group IVB Iron Meteorites and Their Parent ANDREW J. CAMPBELL*,1  

E-print Network

Compositions of Group IVB Iron Meteorites and Their Parent Melt ANDREW J. CAMPBELL*,1 AND MUNIR IVB iron meteorites Cape of Good Hope, Hoba, Skookum, Santa Clara, Tawallah Valley, Tlacotepec. INTRODUCTION It is believed that the magmatic iron meteorite groups represent fractionally crystallized cores

Campbell, Andrew

200

Testosterone exposure, dopaminergic reward, and sensation-seeking in young men Benjamin C. Campbell a,  

E-print Network

]. Finally, sensation-seeking was associated with free T among a sample of adolescents with Attention DeficitTestosterone exposure, dopaminergic reward, and sensation-seeking in young men Benjamin C. Campbell form 4 December 2009 Accepted 14 December 2009 Available online xxxx Keywords: Testosterone Sensation-seeking

Little, Tony

201

Fitts' Law Predictions with an Alternative Pointing Device (Wiimote) Bryan A. Campbell1  

E-print Network

Fitts' Law Predictions with an Alternative Pointing Device (Wiimote®) Bryan A. Campbell1® Wiimote® enabled testing of both zero- and first-order of control for a Fitts' Law- style pointing task using the same device. The Wiimote® differs from standard computer input devices in that the user has

Byrne, Mike

202

The History and Development of the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This overview of the development of the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey includes a series of questions answered in the construction process related to domains assessed, item content, response format, scale construction, length, item bias, scoring scales, and interpretation. The addition of skill items to the interest items is described. (SK)

Campbell, David

2002-01-01

203

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford Kirsten Morris  

E-print Network

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford of friction on the design and performance of feedback controllers that aim to stabilize the pendulum in the upright position. We show that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor

Morris, Kirsten

204

Mark Campbell, PhD (Iowa State University) Teaching Areas: Soils; Plant Science; Forage Crops  

E-print Network

Grant's Farm Monsanto U.S. Department of Agriculture (NRCS) USDA Meat Animal Research Center (NE and industrial application. campbell@truman.edu · Emily Costello, BS (Truman State University) Teaching Areas Areas: Anatomy and Physiology; Comparative Anatomy; Animal Health sguffey@truman.edu · Bill Kuntz, BS

Gering, Jon C.

205

Exploring the infrared universe from Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 2.3 m infrared telescope at Jelm Mountain, Wyoming, is described in terms of its design and operating characteristics. The basic principles of IR astronomy are reviewed, together with an overview of the type of objects which lend themselves to IR observation, e.g., young hot stars, gaseous nebulae, stellar envelopes, etc. Attention is given to mechanisms whereby background and source

R. D. Gehrz; J. A. Hackwell

1978-01-01

206

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

207

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

208

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

2007-01-01

209

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

2006-01-01

210

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

211

Paleotectonics of Frontier Formation in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The most intense and widespread pre-Laramide structural deformation of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in Wyoming is associated with the Wall Creek sandstone of the Frontier Formation. Most of the evidence of structural deformation is found immediately below the regional unconformity at the base of this sandstone. Regionally, an isopach map from the top of the Frontier Formation to the top of the Mowry Formation shows strong and persistent thinning onto a north-trending arch in western Wyoming and thickening into a northwest trending basin in eastern Wyoming. Part of the thinning onto the western arch is caused by progressively deeper erosion of a regional unconformity at the base of the Wall Creek sandstone, and regional onlap of the Wall Creek sandstone above the unconformity. There is also some westward thinning of the lower Frontier interval, however, which is not related to the Wall Creek unconformity. Of the more specific paleostructures discussed, the north-trending anticlines in the vicinity of the Moxa arch in southwestern Wyoming are particularly well developed. An east-west anticline in the Bison basin area appears to have been faulted on the south flank, and a broad arch on the west side of the Powder River basin may have influenced paleocurrents and sandstone depositional trends of the productive First Frontier Sandstone of that area.

Curry, W.H. III

1983-08-01

212

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Wyoming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Wyoming edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

213

Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Over 150 million gallons of water a day are brought to the surface in the oil fields of Wyoming. The temperature of this water is nearly always greater than 90/sup 0/F, and ranges as high as 230/sup 0/F. The location, volume, temperature, and present use status of co-produced oil field thermal waters are presented briefly.

Hinckley, B.S.

1983-08-01

214

76 FR 80310 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...provides for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation...including; adding the term ``surface'' back into Wyoming's rules...reinstating the definition of ``Surface coal mining and reclamation...rules; adding the 1:24,000 scale requirement for maps...

2011-12-23

215

78 FR 13004 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...provides for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation...including: Adding the term ``surface'' back into Wyoming's rules...reinstating the definition of ``Surface coal mining and reclamation...rules; adding the 1:24,000 scale requirement for maps...

2013-02-26

216

Wyoming Community College Commission Agency Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on outcomes of community college programs monitored by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC). The document covers the following WCCC objectives: (1) Study of tuition rates for the community colleges; (2) Negotiation of contracts and provision of financial support for administrative computing system components and…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

217

Cretaceous References: Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site supplies a comprehensive list of references relevant to Cretaceous stratigraphy, paleogeography, tectonics and petroleum exploration in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Montana. The references range from the 1930's to the 1990's cover a variety of specific topics. Additional information and references are available on the site's home page under resources.

Inc., Petrodynamics

218

Hydrothermal commercialization baseline for state of Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming does have numerous hot springs; but there has been little development effort in geothermal energy, since the state's primary interests are in coal, gas and oil. The hot springs of Thermopolis are among the largest in the world. Recent data from the central portion of the state indicate the potential for electric power generation from geothermal energy. Oil and

J. A. Hanny; B. C. Lunis

1979-01-01

219

Didymoceras puebloense, a new species of heteromorph ammonite from the Upper Campanian of Colorado and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Didymoceras puebloense nov. sp. is described from the upper Campanian zones of Didymoceras nebrascense and Didymoceras stevensoni in Pueblo and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, and Weston County, Wyoming in the United States Western Interior. The species is characterized by a middle helical growth stage in which the successive whorls are widely separated followed by a terminal pendant U-shaped sector of the adult body chamber. Ornament is of distant, narrow bituberculate ribs usually separated by a nontuberculate rib. Widely separated poorly-defined constrictions with associated collar ribs are occasionally present. The style of coiling in middle and later growth resembles that of those growth stages in upper Campanian Didymoceras, whereas the ornament recalls that of middle Campanian representatives of the genus in the Western Interior.

Cobban, W. A.; Kennedy, W. J.; Scott, G. R.

1997-01-01

220

Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

1993-04-01

221

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01

222

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

...2014-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2014-07-01

223

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2011-07-01

224

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2013-07-01

225

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2010-07-01

226

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2012-07-01

227

78 FR 21565 - Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE AGENCY...licensee of KJWY(TV), channel 2, Jackson, Wyoming, that it agrees to the reallocation of channel 2 from Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington,...

2013-04-11

228

Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These data represent locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 2012. We assigned each wind turbine to a wind farm and, in these data, provide information about each turbine’s potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, the status of the land ownership where the turbine exists, the county each turbine is located in, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with each wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some of the attributes are estimates based on the information we found via the American Wind Energy Association and other on-line reports. The locations are derived from National Agriculture Imagery Program (2009 and 2012) true color aerial photographs and have a positional accuracy of approximately +/-5 meters. These data will provide a planning tool for wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Fort Collins Science Center and other government and non-government organizations. Specifically, we will use these data to support quantifying disturbances of the landscape as related to wind energy as well as to quantify indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set represents an update to a previous version by O’Donnell and Fancher (2010).

O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

2014-01-01

229

CIG's deep massive frac in Wyoming improves deliverability  

SciTech Connect

A recently completed massive frac job - one of the deepest yet - has enabled CIG Exploration Co. to achieve a substantial increase in gas productivity on its Bullfrog Unit No. 1 in the Wind River Basin. Location of the Bullfrog Unit No. 1 is 6-36N-86E, Natrona County, Wyoming. The field designation is the Waltman Deep. The well was perforated in 5 zones; these 5 perforated intervals have a total of 231 holes. The sands which were perforated and treated are the muddy (19,830-872), Lakota (20,060-099), Morrison (20,226-276), and Sundance (20,298-338) (20,455-510). The frac job was set up for a spearhead of 30,000 bl of 100 mesh sand and gelled water, followed by 4300 bbl of cross-linked gel containing 30,000 lb of 40-70 mesh bauxite and 127,500 lb of 20-40 mesh bauxite. A well bore schematic is included and the fracturing procedure is described.

Leonard, J.E.

1981-08-31

230

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins have been defined through analysis of over 14,000 oil well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logging of 380 wells, measurement of rock thermal conductivities, calculation of 60 heat-flow values, drilling of 9 geothermal exploratory wells, conductive thermal modeling, and the study of existing geologic, hydrologic, and thermal spring data. All data have been integrated into interpretations

Heasler

1983-01-01

231

Oropharyngeal dysphagia assessment and treatment efficacy: setting the record straight (response to Campbell-Taylor).  

PubMed

In September 2008, an article was published in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association criticizing current dysphagia assessment and management practices performed by speech-language pathologists in Long-Term Care (LTC) settings. In the same issue, an editorial invited dialogue on the points raised by Campbell-Taylor. We are responding to this call for dialogue. We find Campbell-Taylor's interpretation of the literature to be incomplete and one-sided, leading to misleading and pessimistic conclusions. We offer a complementary perspective to balance this discussion on the 4 specific questions raised: (1) Is the use of videofluoroscopy warranted for evaluating dysphagia in the LTC population? (2) How effective are thickened liquids and other interventions for preventing aspiration and do they contribute to reduction of morbidity? (3) Can aspiration be prevented and is its prevention important? and (4) Is there sufficient evidence to justify dysphagia intervention by speech language pathologists? PMID:19111855

Coyle, James L; Davis, Lori A; Easterling, Caryn; Graner, Darlene E; Langmore, Susan; Leder, Steven B; Lefton-Greif, Maureen A; Leslie, Paula; Logemann, Jeri A; Mackay, Linda; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Murray, Joseph T; Sonies, Barbara; Steele, Catriona M

2009-01-01

232

Speed of call delivery is related to context and caller identity in Campbell's monkey males  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Call rate can be a salient feature in animal communication. Depending on the species, different psychological variables appear to influence call rates but the exact nature of these relationships remains poorly explored. Here, we demonstrate for free-ranging Campbell’s monkeys that the call rates of four different alarm series (termed H, K, K+, and B series) vary systematically as a function of context, associated behaviour, and identity of the caller. K+ series were given more rapidly to predation than non-predation events, K+ and K series more rapidly to visual than auditory predator detection, and H series more rapidly while counterattacking an eagle than staying put. Finally, there were individual differences in B series, suggesting that call rate potentially provides listeners with cues about the caller’s anti-predator behaviour, event type experienced, and his identity.

Lemasson, Alban; Ouattara, Karim; Bouchet, Hélène; Zuberbühler, Klaus

2010-11-01

233

Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of Wyoming and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Significant results of the Wyoming investigation during the first six months include: (1) successful segregation of Precambrian metasedimentary/metavolcanic rocks from igneous rocks; (2) discovery of iron formation within the metasedimentary sequence; (3) mapping of previously unreported tectonic elements of major significance; (4) successful mapping of large scale fractures of the Wind River Mountains; (5) sucessful distinction of some metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary lithologies by color-additive viewing of ERTS images; (6) mapping and interpretation of glacial features in western Wyoming; and (7) development of techniques for mapping small urban areas.

Marrs, R. W.

1973-01-01

234

Gender, culture, and astrophysical fieldwork: Elizabeth Campbell and the Lick Observatory-Crocker eclipse expeditions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The article is organized as follows. It begins with an overview of women in nineteenth-century American science. It then describes the culture of mountaintop observatories and life on Mount Hamilton. Elizabeth Campbell's unique role in the Crocker-Lick expeditions drew upon her equally unique role in the observatory, and also on the meaning given to women's work in general on the mountain. The bulk of the article focuses on the Campbells and their expeditions to India in 1898, Spain in 1905, and the South Pacific in 1908. The third section compares the Lick Observatory expeditions to those conducted by David Todd of Amherst College. Todd's wife, Mabel Loomis Todd, went into the field several times with her husband, but her place in the field was radically different from Elizabeth Campbell's, a difference that can be ascribed to a combination of local culture and personality. Finally, it compares American expeditions to British expeditions of the period, to see what the absence of British women on expeditions can tell us about the way national scientific styles and cultures affected gender roles in science.

Pang, A. S.-K.

235

Chemical analyses of selected thermal springs and wells in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Basic chemical data for 27 selected thermal well and springs in Wyoming are presented. The samples were gathered from 1979 through 1982 in an effort to define geothermal resources in Wyoming. The basic data for the 27 analyzed samples generally include location, temperature, flow, date analyzed, and a description of what the sample is from. The chemical analyses for the sample are listed.

Heasler, H.P.

1984-06-01

236

Seeds and Seedling Establishment of Wyoming Big Sagebrush  

Microsoft Academic Search

Success with Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) depends on good seed vigor, and rapid seedling development. These characteristics are influenced by harvesting, processing, storing, and sowing. In this paper we discuss research findings related to those activities: (1) It appears that Wyoming big sagebrush growing on the western edge of the Great Plains might hold viable seed longer into

D. T. Booth; Y. Bai

237

What Does Energy Development Mean for Wyoming? A Community Study at Hanna, Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The enormous but often overlooked impact of energy resource development on small Western United States communities can be illustrated by the experiences of the traditional coal mining town of Hanna, Wyoming. Coal development doubled the population between 1970 and 1972, and required the addition of a sewer system and a police force, plus the…

Nellis, Lee

238

Wyoming Community College Commission Statewide Strategic Plan: Planning for the Future of Wyoming's Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the national spotlight on community colleges, Wyoming is poised to become a leader through its efforts to align the programs of its seven community colleges with defined state interests. As local economies become more globally focused and knowledge-based, community colleges are a critical way for learners to gain access to postsecondary…

Richards, Amanda; Sipes, Laurel; Studier, Carol; Staklis, Sandra; Farr, Beverly; Horn, Laura J.

2009-01-01

239

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins have been defined through analysis of over 14,000 oil well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logging of 380 wells, measurement of rock thermal conductivities, calculation of 60 heat-flow values, drilling of 9 geothermal exploratory wells, conductive thermal modeling, and the study of existing geologic, hydrologic, and thermal spring data. All data have been integrated into interpretations of the thermal structure of the Big Horn, Wind River, Washakie, Great Divide, Green River, Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley basins of Wyoming. Controlling factors for the formation of geothermal resources in these basins are regional heat flow, rock thermal conductivity values, depths to regional aquifers, and hydrologic flow directions. Regional basin heat-flow values range from about 40 to 80 milliwatts/m/sub 2/; measured thermal conductivities are in the general range of 1.5 to 4.0 watts/m/sup 0/K; and depths to aquifers are up to 11,000 m (36,000 ft). This results in regional geothermal gradients for Wyoming basins in the range of 15/sup 0/ to 40/sup 0/C/km (44/sup 0/ to 116/sup 0/F/mi) with predicted maximum aquifer temperatures near 300/sup 0/C (570/sup 0/F). Anomalous geothermal areas within the basins contain measured thermal gradients as high as 400/sup 0/C/km (1,160/sup 0/F/mi) over shallow depth intervals. These anomalous areas are the combined result of local geologic structures and hydrologic flow. A simplified model for such areas requires water movement through a syncline with subsequent heating due to regional heat flow and thermal conductivities of overlying rock units. Consequent flow of the heated water up over an anticline produces a localized area of anomalous geothermal gradients.

Heasler, H.P.

1983-08-01

240

Counties with Established Counties without Established  

E-print Network

Counties with Established Burn Bans Counties without Established Burn Bans Outdoor Burn Bans For More Information Please Contact Your Local County Judge's Office or County Website Email updates to: burnban@tfs.tamu.edu Link to see if your county is under a RED FLAG WARNING

241

78 FR 76855 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Campbell County, WY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...applications for the amendment of previously-filed right-of-way applications or...authorizations to increase the term of the grants...will be subject to the following reservations: 1. A right-of-way thereon for...

2013-12-19

242

Miniature endplate potential frequency and amplitude determined by an extension of Campbell's theorem.  

PubMed Central

A method based upon an extension of Campbell's theorem is used to measure the amplitude, waveform, and frequency of occurrence of miniature endplate potentials (mepps) at rapidly secreting neuromuscular junctions of frog cutaneous pectoris muscles. Measurements of the variance, skew, and power spectrum of the fluctuations in membrane potential are used to deduce the mepp parameters. These estimates of mepp amplitude and frequency are insensitive to slow drifts in membrane potential that preclude the conventional application of Campbell's theorem, which uses the mean and variance. The new method becomes unreliable at high mepp frequencies because the distribution of the values of membrane potential approaches a Gaussian thereby reducing the accuracy of skew measurements. Frequencies approaching 10(4) s-1 can be measured, however, if the data are high-pass filtered. The method has been tested with computer simulated data and applied to junctions exposed to La3+; the effects of Ca2+ on the La3+-induced secretion have been explored. Some muscles were fixed after treatment with La3+, and changes in nerve terminal ultrastructure were assessed by morphometric analysis of electron micrographs. Horseradish peroxidase was used to obtain information about vesicle recycling. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:3872137

Segal, J R; Ceccarelli, B; Fesce, R; Hurlbut, W P

1985-01-01

243

Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

Larry Demick

2012-11-01

244

US hydropower resource assessment for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Wyoming.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01

245

Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

2011-01-01

246

Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

2011-01-01

247

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Spook, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action is complete at the Spook Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Wyoming. Based on an evaluation of site characterization data, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, US Department of Energy, and state of Wyoming have concurred in the determination that a program to monitor ground water is not required because ground water in the uppermost aquifer is Class 3 (limited use) (40 CFR 192.21(g)(1993)).

Not Available

1994-03-01

248

JANUARY 2007 MINNESOTA COUNTIES 5 helps counties  

E-print Network

JANUARY 2007 MINNESOTA COUNTIES 5 Extension workshop helps counties communicate their contributions to the common good By Laura Kalambokidis and Ryan Pesch County government service providers can readily provide services. While participants who directly benefit from county programs are a source of crucial political

Amin, S. Massoud

249

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251 16th  

E-print Network

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251://goldenplains.colostate.edu Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Kit Carson, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington Edgar at 970-522-3200, extension 276. Golden Plains Area Washington County #12;

250

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics  

E-print Network

. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 3 3 pts. 5) In the presence of oxygen, eukaryotic yeast cells organisms extract more or less energy than bacterial cells do that only catabolize glucose via cellular respiration? Explain your answer in two sentences or less. 7 pts. 6) Draw a picture that tracks the movement

Campbell, A. Malcolm

251

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics  

E-print Network

conditions not used in the study guide. #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2007 3 6 pts. 5) Explain with anyone until all exams are turned in at 10:30 am on Wednesday April 18. EXAMS ARE DUE AT CLASS TIME features that are important to its overall function in glycolysis. 10 pts. 3) Consider the evolution

Campbell, A. Malcolm

252

PUBLICATIONS 78. Campbell, D.R., M. Forster, and M. Bischoff. 2014. Selection of trait combinations through  

E-print Network

through bee and fly visitation to flowers of Polemonium foliosissimum, Journal of Evolutionary Biology. Bischoff, M., D.R. Campbell, J. M. Lord, and A. W. Robertson. 2013. The relative importance of solitary bees and syrphid flies as pollinators of two outcrossing plant species in the New Zealand alpine

Campbell, Diane

253

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering  

E-print Network

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 � Spring 2007 1 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 � Cancer, HIV, & Genetic may find the cure for cancer." 6 pts. 4) List all the molecules carried by HIV inside its capsid. #12

Campbell, A. Malcolm

254

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take-Home Exam #4 Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering  

E-print Network

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Spring 2007 1 Biology 111 Take-Home Exam #4 ­ Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should example for each type. 6 pts. 4) Here are some western blot data for a cancer patient. a. What is wrong

Campbell, A. Malcolm

255

Equivalence of Computer-Based and Paper-Pencil Administrations of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

First-, second-, and third-year students enrolled in an introductory educational psychology class at Texas A&M University in College Station were administered either a pencil-and-paper or computerized version of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory. The same or other version of the test was administered after 2 weeks. Focus is on equivalence of…

Vansickle, Timothy R.; Kapes, Jerome T.

256

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2010 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 Evolution & Cells  

E-print Network

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 � Fall 2010 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 � Evolution & Cells There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able answers to a maximum of 6 sentences total. Propose a mechanism for the origin of primitive cells from

Campbell, A. Malcolm

257

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2010 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 Evolution & Cells  

E-print Network

to a maximum of 6 sentences total. Propose a mechanism for the evolution of primitive cells from abioticDr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2010 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 ­ Evolution & Cells There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able

Campbell, A. Malcolm

258

Microfossils from the Neoarchean Campbell Group, Griqualand West Sequence of the Transvaal Supergroup, and their paleoenvironmental and evolutionary implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oldest filament- and colonial coccoid-containing microbial fossil assemblage now known is described here from drill core samples of stromatolitic cherty limestones of the Neoarchean, ? 2600-Ma-old Campbell Group (Ghaap Plateau Dolomite, Lime Acres Member) obtained at Lime Acres, northern Cape Province, South Africa. The assemblage is biologically diverse, including entophysalidacean (Eoentophysalis sp.), probable chroococcacean (unnamed colonial coccoids), and oscillatoriacean

Wladyslaw Altermann; J. William Schopf

1995-01-01

259

Formation of Metal in the CH Chondrites ALH 85085 and PCA ANDREW J. CAMPBELL* AND MUNIR HUMAYUN  

E-print Network

and processes that occurred in the solar nebula during the early stages of solar system evolution. Examination). The thermal structure of the protoplanetary disk, or solar nebula, was governed by the mass accretion rate in the inner solar nebula (e.g. Meibom et al., 2000; Campbell et al., 2001). Thus, interpreting t

Campbell, Andrew

260

VALIDATION AND REGULARIZATION IN DIFFUSION MRI TRACTOGRAPHY J. S. W. Campbell, P. Savadjiev, K. Siddiqi, and G. B. Pike  

E-print Network

]. The first work on 3D fibre reconstruction using diffusion MRI used diffusion tensor (DT) data, so named because it is obtained by modeling the diffusion probability density function (pdf) as an anisotropic 3DVALIDATION AND REGULARIZATION IN DIFFUSION MRI TRACTOGRAPHY J. S. W. Campbell§, P. Savadjiev, K

Siddiqi, Kaleem

261

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Fall 2002 Fall 2002 Biology 111 Exam #4 Cancer, HIV and Final Roundup  

E-print Network

in the resulting cell. 8 pts. 5) a) Why is it difficult to demonstrate that a virus caused a particular patient's cancer? b) If you knew one virus was associated with causing the patient's type of cancer, design an experiment to determine if this virus is a provirus in the cancer. #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Fall

Campbell, A. Malcolm

262

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2002 Fall 2002 Biology 111 Exam #3 BioEnergetics  

E-print Network

this work, I have followed and will continue to observe all regulations regarding it, and I am unaware grown at 80º C for 3 hours. Lecture Questions: 6 pts. 2) Use photosynthesis as an example of the two laws of thermodynamics. In other words, use photosynthesis to define the two laws. #12;Dr. Campbell

Campbell, A. Malcolm

263

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 Classical Genetics  

E-print Network

Lecture Questions: 6 pts. 2) List the mechanisms used in meiosis that result in diversity for the F1Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 ­ Classical are not allowed to use your notes, old tests, the internet, or any books, nor are you allowed to discuss the test

Campbell, A. Malcolm

264

National Association of Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With 3066 U.S. counties, the National Association of Counties (NACo) has the arduous task of making sure the nations counties are acknowledged and understood in the halls of the White House and Congress. NACo, the only national government organization devoted to highlighting and improving the understanding of county issues, "collects, researches, publishes and disseminates a variety of different information for, on and about counties." On their Web site, viewers have access to a comprehensive and in-depth database of county information including county population; census bureau quick facts; elected county officials; county codes and ordinances; county policies; links to Capitolimpact.com, which provides nationwide county statistics such as economic and demographic data; and much more. This site is easily navigable, has counties arranged alphabetically by state, and would be of value to anyone living inside a county domain --- which is just about everyone.

2002-01-01

265

Characterization of submarine glacial landforms and lowstand fluvial systems from western Campbell Island, New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Campbell Island is the southernmost of New Zealand’s subantarctic islands, located about 600 km south of the South Island at 52.33°S, 169.09°E. The volcanic strata of this remote, unpopulated ~113 km2 island are eroded by a series of steep-sided valleys that are assumed to be glacial in origin. This is evidenced by their U-shapes, ground moraine, and rocky hills along the sides of the valleys with roches-moutonées geometries. At least two of these valleys, Perseverance Harbour and Northeast Harbour, have basal levels that are beneath current sea level. This enables the investigation of the floors of these fiords with high-frequency marine seismic imaging techniques. Perseverance Harbour is ~9 km long with water depths of 35 to 45 m in the center. Northeast Harbour is ~3.5 km long with water depths of 15 to 25 m in the center. Sea level during the last glacial maximum is expected to have been ~120 m below the current level. The shoreline east of Campbell Island therefore would have been 6 - 10 km east of the present day coast. Water depths on this coast rapidly fall to 60 to 70 m and then follow a gentler gradient outward and beyond the inferred lowstand shoreline. Detailed investigations of seafloor features around Campbell Island are lacking. The relatively-shallow water depths on the leeward (east) side of Campbell Island provide an opportunity to examine the floors of the fiords and the adjacent shelf for evidence of glacial processes and associated sedimentation. Of particular interest are (1) determining the extent of past glacial cover on and around the island, and (2) observing glacial and periglacial erosional processes on the seafloor. In March 2009, a detailed high-frequency seismic survey was undertaken in Perseverance and Northeast Harbours and on the eastern shelf of the island. Data recorded included single-channel Chirp and electro-acoustic (boomer) sub-bottom imaging, and interferometric side scanning sonar (C3D). A network of ~42 lines was collected that provided full C3D bathymetric coverage of the seafloor within the harbours and good coverage on the shelf. Data were collected in water depths from <10 m in some parts of the harbours to >150 m on the eastern part of the shelf. Unusually calm and stable weather conditions resulted in ideal conditions for data collection; data quality is high. Boomer data successfully imaged the upper 20 to 60 m of sub-seafloor sediments and sedimentary rocks. Chirp data imaged a maximum of 20 m. Preliminary results suggest that terminal moraines co-incide with the mouths of Perseverance and Northeast Harbours. Present erosion and sediment transport off the island are expected to be minimal. This would suggest that glaciers did not extend out onto the present-day shelf of the island during the last glacial lowstand. Observations also support the existence of sub-aerially eroded channels on the eastern shelf of the island that appear to be sourced from glacial valleys onshore. Further investigations are required to link glacial and periglacial processes with the development of these channels.

Fraser, H. L.; Gorman, A. R.; Wilson, G. S.; Preskett, S.

2009-12-01

266

Estimation of Growing Season ET using Wyoming ET Calculator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate estimations of Evapotranspiration (ET) and Consumptive Irrigation Requirement (CIR) are essential for water resources planning and management. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office currently determines monthly reference evapotranspiration (ET) with an Excel Spreadsheet ET model using average monthly data from a nearby weather station (usually an airport weather station) for the irrigated area of interest, and interpolates them into daily reference ET using either linear or cubic functions. The purpose of this project is to replace the current Excel model with a GIS-based ET calculator. Our approach uses daily weather data to calculate daily reference and actual ET, and then aggregate actual ET into monthly and seasonal ET. Among many reference ET equations available, the ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration Equation (ASCE-ET) and the Hargreaves-Samani equations were selected to calculate daily reference ET. Wyoming ET Calculator, a GIS-based ET tool, was developed to calculate daily potential ET, CIR, and actual ET, using daily reference ET, crop coefficients, effective precipitation ratios, and water stress factors. Total monthly and growing season ET and CIR were determined over the Upper Green River Basin in Wyoming. The long term trends of these totals from 1960-2009 were analyzed and compared to trends in weather data (minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, and dew point temperature). We also evaluated the total monthly and growing season ET from Wyoming ET Calculator against satellite-based ET (METRIC ET) estimations for June, July, and August of 2009 around an irrigated area near the Wind River Mountain Range in Wyoming. The total monthly ET from Wyoming ET Calculator agrees very well with total monthly ET from METRIC for well-watered crop areas. For other areas, the Wyoming ET Calculator tends to overestimate total monthly ET values than METRIC, because the tool assumes all NLCD crop area are being irrigated.

Rasmussen, R. W.; Park, G.

2011-12-01

267

78 FR 49685 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Revised General...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...State of Wyoming; Revised General Conformity Requirements and an Associated Revision...of Chapter 8 that addresses general conformity requirements and a new Section 5 to...and additions to Wyoming's general conformity requirements in order to align...

2013-08-15

268

Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.  

SciTech Connect

Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyomingâ??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyomingâ??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

2010-03-26

269

Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

Nichols, D. J.; Jacobson, S. R.

1982-01-01

270

Reconnaissance examination of selected oil sand and oil spring occurrences in Wyoming. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous oil seeps and oil sands have been reported in the literature in Wyoming. Clark and Glass (Clark, M., and Glass, G.B., 1982, Review of reported tar sand occurrences and recent projects in Wyoming: Geological Survey of Wyoming Open File Report 82-5, 49 p.) reviewed the literature for reports of occurrences and catalogued 78 reported occurrences of shallow or outcropping

Ver Ploeg

1986-01-01

271

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2008-2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission in 2002. These indicators, while providing some…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2010

2010-01-01

272

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2009-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission in 2002. These indicators, while providing some…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2011

2011-01-01

273

77 FR 33235 - Public Land Order No. 7791; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6928; Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Land Order No. 6928; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...associated with the Crandall Creek Administrative Site...Lane Avenue, Cody, Wyoming 82414, 307-578-5151...Yellowstone Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009, 307-775-6189...associated with the Crandall Creek Administrative...

2012-06-05

274

76 FR 75900 - Notice of Application for Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Meeting; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...protect the USFS Crandall Creek Administrative Site...State Director, BLM, Wyoming State Office, 5353 Yellowstone...associated with the Crandall Creek Administrative Site...in writing to the BLM Wyoming State Director at...

2011-12-05

275

The Spirit and Influence of the Wyoming Resolution: Looking Back to Look Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the 1986 Wyoming Conference on English, a group of graduate students and part-time and tenure-line faculty formulated a statement known as the Wyoming Resolution, a rallying cry to improve composition teachers' pay, benefits, and working conditions. Adopted by the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in 1987, the Wyoming

McDonald, James C.; Schell, Eileen E.

2011-01-01

276

Canopy Growth and Density of Wyoming Big Sagebrush Sown with Cool-Season Perennial Grasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-mining revegetation efforts often require grass seeding and mulch applications to stabilize the soils at the same time as shrub seeding, creating intraspecific competition between seeded shrubs and grasses that is not well understood. Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle and Young) (Wyoming big sagebrush) is the dominant premining shrub on many Wyoming mines. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality,

Ann L. Hild; Gerald E. Schuman; Laurel E. Vicklund; Mary I. Williams

2006-01-01

277

[Perception, Philosophical Issues, 7, ed. E. Villanueva, Atascadero: Ridgeview (1995): 325-50] Note: page references to Campbell's paper in this text are to the manuscript  

E-print Network

. John Campbell's paper, "Molyneux's Problem" (see above), raises a number of interesting and important and tell which was the globe and which the cube? (Locke 1975, II, ix, 8) If there is no phenomenal

Indiana University

278

Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

E-print Network

OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Approved as to style and content by: o n . pan (Chairman of Committee) Ear R. os sn (Member... and Pete Petersen. Thanks go to Paul Nixon and Dr. Bob Clark at the Mobil Field Research Lab, for allowing me to participate in their structural geology seminar and an airplane flight over Wyoming. Neither the burdens nor the rewards of graduate school...

Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

2012-06-07

279

A model for soil surface evaporation based on Campbell's retention curve  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThe objective of this study was to develop and verify a simple analytical model for one-dimensional non-steady upward flow from shallow and falling water table with minimum input data. Consequently, an analytical model was derived based on the Richards' equation with the Campbell's parametric retention model. This study proposes a model that uses the measurement of water table depth drawdown and some soil physical properties to estimate evaporation, instead of measuring evaporation rate itself. Nine relatively large lysimeters were packed with sandy loam, silty clay loam, and silty clay soil textures to obtain the data needed for evaluating the proposed model. The results indicate a reasonable agreement between the experimental data and the proposed model (root mean square error, RMSE = 2.11-4.22 mm/day). For the experimental period (64 days), however, there is some discrepancy between observation and simulation data. The reasons for this discrepancy may be attributed to vapor upward flow, evaporation which takes place from the lysimeters side gaps resulting from soil shrinkage and collapse of macropores resulting from soil packing.

Zarei, Ghasem; Homaee, Mehdi; Liaghat, Abdol Majid; Hoorfar, Abdol Hosain

2010-01-01

280

Contribution to CCN Workshop report from University of Wyoming group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The group's CCN counter is described. It is a static, horizontal, parallel plate thermal gradient diffusion chamber. Examples of the application of the CCN are presented and include the CCN spectra measured during the winter of 1978-79 near Elk Mountain, Wyoming. Comparisons of droplet concentrations derived from upwind CCN spectra are covered.

Rogers, D. C.; Politovich, M. K.

1981-01-01

281

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-print Network

Chapter PQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA By G.D. Stricker Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

282

76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L51100000-GA0000-LVEMK09CK36; WYW172657] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal...

2011-06-17

283

76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW177903] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

2011-04-01

284

76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW163340] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

2011-03-01

285

76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW174596] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Hilight Field...

2011-10-17

286

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-print Network

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

287

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-print Network

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

288

University of Wyoming: College and University Systems Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Division of Computer Services at the University of Wyoming is a combined academic and administrative installation. Administrative systems are developed through a team approach, with representatives from the user office, the Institutional Data Management group, and the Division of Computer Services. (MLW)

CAUSE/EFFECT, 1981

1981-01-01

289

Cloud Creek structure, central Wyoming, USA: Impact origin confirmed  

Microsoft Academic Search

The circular Cloud Creek structure in central Wyoming, USA is buried beneath ~1200 m of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and has a current diameter of ~7 km. The morphology\\/morphometry of the structure, as defined by borehole, seismic, and gravity data, is similar to that of other buried terrestrial complex impact structures in sedimentary target rocks, e.g., Red Wing Creek in North

D. S. Stone; A. M. Therriault

2003-01-01

290

GOLDEN EAGLE PREDATION ON PRONGHORNS IN WYOMING'S GREAT DIVIDE BASIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1980-85, while studying pronghorn antelope in Wyoming's Great Divide Basin, we recorded seven inci- dents of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) attacking prong- horns (Antilocapra americana). Most reported observa- uons of golden eagle predation on pronghorns involve newborn fawns during spring and summer (Beale and Smith 1973, Barrett 1978, Beale 1978, Bodie 1978, Von Gunten 1978, Autenrieth 1980), but a

R. D. DEBLINGER; A. WILLIAM ALLDREDGE

291

NO-TILL GRAIN PRODUCTION IN WYOMING: STATUS AND POTENTIAL  

E-print Network

1 NO-TILL GRAIN PRODUCTION IN WYOMING: STATUS AND POTENTIAL Jay B. Norton Department of Renewable-term research shows that conservation tillage, especially no-till, can achieve both while reducing fuel and fertilizer needs. But costs of conversion and perceptions about lower yields prevent adoption of no-till

Norton, Jay B.

292

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative data management and integration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six Federal agencies, two State agencies, and two local entities formally support the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) and work together on a landscape scale to manage fragile habitats and wildlife resources amidst growing energy development in southwest Wyoming. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was tasked with implementing targeted research and providing scientific information about southwest Wyoming to inform the development of WLCI habitat enhancement and restoration projects conducted by land management agencies. Many WLCI researchers and decisionmakers representing the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of Wyoming, and others have overwhelmingly expressed the need for a stable, robust infrastructure to promote sharing of data resources produced by multiple entities, including metadata adequately describing the datasets. Descriptive metadata facilitates use of the datasets by users unfamiliar with the data. Agency representatives advocate development of common data handling and distribution practices among WLCI partners to enhance availability of comprehensive and diverse data resources for use in scientific analyses and resource management. The USGS Core Science Informatics (CSI) team is developing and promoting data integration tools and techniques across USGS and partner entity endeavors, including a data management infrastructure to aid WLCI researchers and decisionmakers.

Latysh, Natalie; Bristol, Sky

2011-01-01

293

A new species of Oryzopsis (Gramineae) from Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oryzopsis hymenoides (Roem. & Schult.) Ricker (Gramineae: Stipeae) is a widely distributed species, common to the arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States. A morphologically distinct form of O. hymenoides was described by Johnson (1945) as Oryzopsis hyraenoides var. contracta. This taxon Occurs only in the Big Hollow area of southern Wyoming, where it exists sympatrically with O.

Yaakov Shechter; B. Lennart Johnson

1966-01-01

294

SAVANNAH SPARROWS NESTING IN ALPINE HABITAT IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) nests were found in alpine willow habitat at 3150 m elevation in the Beartooth Mountains of northern Wyoming, USA during July 1988. These are the first documented alpine nests for this species south of Canada. The nesting conditions are described and discussed in terms of a recent colonization of alpine habitat by a small, expanding

PAUL HENDRICKS; COLEEN PIDGEON

295

Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation  

E-print Network

Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation Bob Budd, Chairman Governor of Endangered Species Act · Broad distribution of Sage-grouse #12;History of the Issue · Petitioning under: "Not Warranted" · 2007: Sage Grouse Summit led to establishment of SGIT · 2007: December decision

Wyoming, University of

296

Body Measuremenls of Western Jumping Mice from Northwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ecology of tlrc western jumping mouse (Z.tpn( priniept aabeufu) was investigated by Clark (1971) in Grand Teton Narional Park, \\\\Fyoming. In conjunction with rhar study, body measure- ments were made on 115 mice. This paper reports those data (Table 1). The only previously published morphological data on Z. p. utdhensir from Wyoming were by Iong (1965). He listed average

Tim W. Clark

297

Abundance of Adult Saugers across the Wind River Watershed, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The abundance of adult saugers Sander canadensis was estimated over 179 km of continuous lotic habitat across a watershed on the western periphery of their natural distribution in Wyoming. Three-pass depletions with raft-mounted electrofishing gear were conducted in 283 pools and runs among 19 representative reaches totaling 51 km during the late summer and fall of 2002. From 2 to

Craig J. Amadio; Wayne A. Hubert; Kevin Johnson; Dennis Oberlie; David Dufek

2006-01-01

298

INVESTIGATION OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION NEAR PAVILLION, WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

In response to complaints by domestic well owners regarding objectionable taste and odor problems in well water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated a ground water investigation near the town of Pavillion, Wyoming under authority of the Comprehensive Environmental ...

299

Learning to Read the Earth: Wyoming Field Studies in  

E-print Network

Learning to Read the Earth: Wyoming Field Studies in Ecology and Paleontology Four credits :: June-grass prairie ecology featuring animals and plants that co-evolved over the ages. We will explore prairie basins activities on the planet's values, no matter where life's journey takes them. Explore :: Discover :: Engage

Elliott, Emily M.

300

The Oregon Trail: Wyoming Students Construct a CD-ROM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the work of four Wyoming high school students who created a CD-ROM collection of Oregon Trail documents for use by fourth graders. The students reviewed 60 boxes of diaries, government documents, prints, and artifacts, becoming historians themselves as they created the electronic database. Includes photographs and illustrations. (MJP)

Holt, Pol William

1998-01-01

301

Comprehensive System of Personnel Development: Wyoming Statewide Needs Assessment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the outcomes of a review of the Wyoming Department of Education's Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) in meeting the professional development needs of special education. There were two phases of the 1997-1998 CSPD needs assessment process. Phase One consisted of telephone interviews with both regular (n=26)…

Olson, Christine; Azin-Manley, Mariam

302

FURTHER STUDIES ON TRYPANOSOMES IN GAME ANIMALS IN WYOMING 1100  

Microsoft Academic Search

Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American bison (Bison bison) being brought

NEWTON KINGSTON; E. TOM; GEORGE M. THOMAS; B LINDA McHOLLANDand; MALCOLM S. TRUEBLOOD

303

Use of Spatial Resources by Fishes in Grayrocks Reservoir, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relative abundance of fishes in different habitat types and sampling areas of a reservoir in eastern Wyoming was assessed with experimental gill nets during summer 1989. Seven of 12 species captured in the gill nets were numerous enough to enable statistical evaluation: quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), shorthead redhorse (Moxostoma macrolepidotum),

Wayne A. Hubert; Daniel T. OShea

1992-01-01

304

Seeded Native Shrub Establishment on Disturbed Sites in Southwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical wildlife habitat supporting mule deer, antelope, and sage grouse in high elevation rangeland and sagebrush ecosystems of southwest Wyoming is threatened by an expanding population and energy exploration and development. Our objective was to evaluate native shrub species establishment for restoration after disturbance. In October 2005, on a well-pad disturbance, 16 accessions of 13 native shrub species were drill-seeded

James S. Jacobs; MT Bozeman; R. Winslow; Karen J. Clause; Pinedale WY; Roger Hybner

305

Browsing Effects on Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plants and Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of likely yearlong browsing by several wild ungulate species on individual Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) plants and communities was studied. The investigation was conducted near Gardiner, MT, in the ungu- late-rich boundary line area of the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range. Plant level responses were measured in this study and related to reported community responses. Individual

Carl L. Wambolt; Trista Hoffman

306

Enhancing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Establishment with Cultural Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) has proven difficult to re- establish by direct seeding on mined lands in the western U.S. This paper reviews research accomplishments over the last decade that address ecological and cultural practices to enhance big sagebrush establishment. Direct-placed topsoil, mulching and arbuscular mycorrhizae have been shown to positively influence seedling establishment of this species

G. E. Schuman; D. T. Booth; R. A. Olson

307

Coalbed Methane Product Water Chemistry in Three Wyoming Watersheds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Powder River Basin in Wyoming has become one of the most active areas of coalbed methane (CBM) development in the western United States. Extraction of methane from coalbeds requires pumping of aquifer water, which is called product water. Two to ten extraction wells are manifolded into one discharge point and product water is released into nearby unlined holding ponds.

Ian H. McBeth; Katta J. Reddy; Quentin D. Skinner

2003-01-01

308

Leroy Storage Facility, Uinta County, Wyoming: A Case History of Attempted Gas-Migration Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case history of Leroy storage is unique because it involved definite migration away from the originally intended storage horizon as evidenced by seepage of gas to the surface. Several techniques were coordinated in an effort to understand, monitor, control, and reduce the leak. These included various logging, surveying, sampling, and testing techniques, tracer work, computer simulation, and engineering analysis.

R. E. Araktingi; M. E. Benefield; Z. Bessenyei; K. H. Coats; M. R. Tek

1984-01-01

309

Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Blue Gap quadrangle, eastern Washakie Basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides a geologic map of the Blue Gap 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface.

Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

2005-01-01

310

Economic geology of the Copper Mountain Supracrustal Belt, Owl Creek Mountains, Fremont County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Archean stratigraphy and associated mineral deposits at Copper Mountain were investigated to determine if this supracrustal belt has potential commercial mineral deposits. It was concluded Copper Mountain lacks the stratigraphic and structural character of a classical greenstone belt, exhibits higher metamorphic grade, and may be better classified as a high-grade terrain. However, potential is noted for stratiform Au associated with iron formation, stratiform W associated with gneiss, and Cu-Au mineralization in strike veins. 63 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs. (ACR)

Hausel, W.D.; Graff, P.J.; Albert, K.G.

1985-01-01

311

Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

1986-08-01

312

Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the

M. H. Bailey; K. A. Sundell

1986-01-01

313

The South Fork detachment fault, Park County, Wyoming: discussion and reply ( USA).  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Blackstone (1985) published an interpretation of South form detachment fault and related features. His interpretation of the area between Castle and Hardpan transverse faults is identical to mine of 1941. Subsequent detailed mapping has shown that the structure between the transverse faults is more complicated than originally envisioned and resurrected by Blackstone. The present paper describes and discusses geologic features that are the basis for my interpretations; also discussed are differences between my interpretations and those of Blackstone. Most data are shown on the geologic map of the Wapiti Quadrangle (Pierce and Nelson, 1969). Blackstone's 'allochthonous' masses are part of the South Form fault. Occurrences of Sundance Formation, which he interpreted as the upper plate of his 'North Fork fault', are related to Heart Mountain fault. Volcaniclastic rocks south of Jim Mountain mapped as Aycross Formation by Torres and Gingerich may be Cathedral Cliffs Formation, emplaced by movement of the Heart Mountain fault. - Author

Pierce, W.G.

1986-01-01

314

Diagenesis of the Upper Cretaceous Teapot Sandstone, Well Draw Field, Converse County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

. The clay minerals originated either as alteration rima on detri- tal silicates or as precipitates from pore fluids. Alteration rims on micas and volcanic rock fragments typically consist of illite, smec- tite, and mixed layer illite/smectite; rims... on biotites and other rock fragments contain chlorite in addition. Feldspars typically are altered to kaolinite. Precipitated clays occur in three forms: 1) thin, unoriented, grain coating chlorite and kaolinite, 2) pore lining mixed layer illite...

Conner, Steven Pursel

2012-06-07

315

Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Doty Mountain quadrangle, eastern Washakie basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides a geologic map of the Doty Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. Detailed measured sections are provided for the type sections of the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The data set was collected as part of a larger effort to acquire data on Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin. Regions in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin have potential for coal development and were considered previously for coal leasing by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

2006-01-01

316

Platinum and associated elements at the New Rambler mine and vicinity, Albany and Carbon Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Platinum-group metals in the Medicine Bow Mountains were first identified by W. C. Knight in 1901. In the Medicine Bow Mountains, these metals are commonly associated with copper, silver, or gold in shear zones that cut a series of mafic igneous and metamorphic rocks. At the New Rambler mine, where the initial discovery was made, about 50,000 tons of mine and mill waste contain an average of 0.3 percent copper, 7 ppm (parts per million) silver, 1 ppm platinum plus palladium, and 0.7 ppm gold. This material is believed to be from a low-grade envelope around the high-grade pod of complex ore that was mined selectively in the old workings. Soil samples in the vicinity of the New Rambler mine exhibit a wide range of content of several elements associated with the ore. Most of the variation can be attributed to contamination, from the mine workings. Even though soil samples identify a low-level copper anomaly that persists to the limit of the area sampled, soils do not offer a promising medium for tracing mineralization owing to the blanket of transported overburden. Stream sediments, if preconcentrated for analysis, do reveal anomalies not only in the contaminated stream below the New Rambler mine, but in adjacent drainage and on Dave Creek. Examination of a spectrum of elements in heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediment may contribute to knowledge of the nature of the mineralization and of the basic geology of the environment. The sampling of bedrock exposures is not particularly fruitful because outcrops are sparse and the exposed rocks are the least altered and mineralized. Bedrock sampling does, however, provide information on the large size and provincial nature of the platinum-rich area. We feel that a properly integrated program of geological, geophysical, and geochemical exploration in the Medicine Bow Mountains and probably in the Sierra Madre to the west has a reasonable probability of successfully locating a complex ore body.

Theobald, P.K.; Thompson, Charles Emmet

1968-01-01

317

Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY  

E-print Network

#12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

Bolding, M. Chad

318

Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy  

E-print Network

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

2007-01-01

319

County by County in Ohio Genealogy. Revised.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The State Library of Ohio's genealogy collection of over 8,000 items is listed by county. Within each county listing the sources are designated as atlases, cemetery and death records, census records (the majority from the 1800's), family-church-Bible reco...

P. Khouw

1978-01-01

320

Outbreak of vertigo in Wyoming: possible role of an enterovirus infection.  

PubMed

An epidemiologic investigation was conducted to characterize and evaluate the possibility of a viral aetiology of an outbreak of acute vertigo in Hot Springs Country, Wyoming, during autumn 1992. Case-finding identified Hot Springs County residents who sought medical attention for new onset vertigo during 1 August, 1992-31 January 1993. Thirty-five case-patients and 61 matched controls were interviewed and serum specimens were obtained during January 1993. Case-patients were more likely than controls to report symptoms (e.g. fatigue, sore throat, fever, diarrhoea) of antecedent acute illness. Case-patients did not have a significantly greater prevalence or mean titre of IgG antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus than controls. Serologic evidence of recent enterovirus infection (IgM antibodies) was found for 74% of case-patients compared with 54% of controls (P < 0.05), suggesting a possible association between vertigo and enterovirus infection. Future studies are needed to define the role of enteroviruses in innerear diseases. PMID:8760963

Simonsen, L; Khan, A S; Gary, H E; Hanson, C; Pallansch, M A; Music, S; Holman, R C; Stewart, J A; Erdman, D D; Arden, N H; Arenberg, I K; Schonberger, L B

1996-08-01

321

Washington County Comprehensive plan  

E-print Network

Washington County Comprehensive plan October 2010 #12;This page is intentionally blank. #12;Table of ConTenTs #12;ii Washington County Comprehensive plan · 2010 #12;iii Table of ConTenTs Table of Con Washington County Comprehensive plan · 2010 4. makIng The Case for PlannIng 17 Collective vs. Individual

322

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

323

Wyoming LaW RevieW VOLUME 11 2011 NUMBER 2  

E-print Network

Wyoming LaW RevieW VOLUME 11 2011 NUMBER 2 RaceandameRicanindian TRibalnaTionhood Matthew L (1997). Member, Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians; Chief Justice, Poarch Band of Creek.S. 544, 565­66 (1981). #12;296 WyomIng LaW revIeW Vol. 11 consented to the judgments of tribal sovereigns

324

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

2013-03-01

325

Qualification Plan for Phase One of True-MidPacific Geothermal Venture: James Campbell - Kahaualea Project, Island of Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop the geothermal resources of the James Campbell Estate, comprising acres in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The geothermal resource is assumed to exist in the vicinity of the East Rift of the Kilauea volcano. The location of the proposed geothermal well field and the geothermal-electric power plant are shown on Dwg. No. E-04-001. Access to the project area will be provided by a new road extension from the boundary road south from Glenwood on Highway 11.

None

1981-06-01

326

Response of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) to defoliation of understory grasses and drought.  

E-print Network

??Water potential, leaf conductance, growth, nitrogen content, and seedling survival of Wyoming Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) following defoliation of the herbaceous understory were… (more)

Purrington, Teal Mackenzie

1992-01-01

327

Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part A - Coal and wind  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To further advance the objectives of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming State Geological Survey (WSGS) have compiled Part A of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming. Focusing primarily on electrical power sources, Part A of the energy map is a compilation of both published and previously unpublished coal (including coalbed gas) and wind energy resources data, presented in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data package. Energy maps, data, documentation and spatial data processing capabilities are available in a geodatabase, published map file (pmf), ArcMap document (mxd), Adobe Acrobat PDF map (plate 1) and other digital formats that can be downloaded at the USGS website. Accompanying the map (plate 1) and the geospatial data are four additional plates that describe the geology, energy resources, and related infrastructure. These tabular plates include coal mine (plate 2), coal field (plate 3), coalbed gas assessment unit (plate 4), and wind farm (plate 5) information with hyperlinks to source publications and data on the internet. The plates can be printed and examined in hardcopy, or accessed digitally. The data represent decades of research by the USGS, WSGS, BLM and others, and can facilitate landscape-level science assessments, and resource management decisionmaking.

Biewick, Laura R.H.; Jones, Nicholas R.

2012-01-01

328

Further studies on trypanosomes in game animals in Wyoming II.  

PubMed

Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American Bison (Bison bison) being brought into Wyoming from Nebraska. Nineteen additional bison were negative for trypanosomes by blood cultures. Identification of species was not possible due to the failure to obtain bloodstream trypomastigotes from this host. Trypanosomes were recovered from 8 of 57 pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana). This is the first report of Trypanosoma sp. from bison and from pronghorn; the trypanosome from moose was identified as Trypanosoma cervi from bloodstream trypomastigotes. In 1978, natural transplacental transmission of trypanosomes was found to occur in 1 of 15 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) fetuses, examined near term by blood culture. No trypanosomes were found in 18 male deer fetuses examined in 1979. Of 100 free-ranging elk from western Wyoming examined by blood culture in 1979, 71 were infected. These data are compared with data from 1973-74. PMID:7338978

Kingston, N; Thorne, E T; Thomas, G M; McHolland, L; Trueblood, M S

1981-10-01

329

Geology of Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Devils Tower is a steep-sided mass of igneous rock that rises above the surrounding hills and the valley of the Belle Fourche River in Crook County, Wyo. It is composed of a crystalline rock, classified as phonolite porphyry, that when fresh is gray but which weathers to green or brown. Vertical joints divide the rock mass into polygonal columns that extend from just above the base to the top of the Tower. The hills in the vicinity and at the base of the Tower are composed of red, yellow, green, or gray sedimentary rocks that consist of sandstone, shale, or gypsum. These rocks, in aggregate about 400 feet thick, include, from oldest to youngest, the upper part of the Spearfish formation, of Triassic age, the Gypsum Spring formation, of Middle Jurassic age, and the Sundance formation, of Late Jurassic age. The Sundance formation consists of the Stockade Beaver shale member, the Hulett sandstone member, the Lak member, and the Redwater shale member. The formations have been only slightly deformed by faulting and folding. Within 2,000 to 3.000 feet of the Tower, the strata for the most part dip at 3 deg - 5 deg towards the Tower. Beyond this distance, they dip at 2 deg - 5 deg from the Tower. The Tower is believed to have been formed by the intrusion of magma into the sedimentary rocks, and the shape of the igneous mass formed by the cooled magma is believed to have been essentially the same as the Tower today. Devils Tower owes its impressiveness to its resistance to erosion as compared with the surrounding sedimentary rocks, and to the contrast of the somber color of the igneous column to the brightly colored bands of sedimentary rocks.

Robinson, Charles Sherwood

1956-01-01

330

Copyright 2008 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. Wunder, S., B. Campbell, P. G. H. Frost, J. A. Sayer, R. Iwan, and L. Wollenberg. 2008. When donors get  

E-print Network

, S., B. Campbell, P. G. H. Frost, J. A. Sayer, R. Iwan, and L. Wollenberg. 2008. When donors get cold) that Never Happened Sven Wunder 1 , Bruce Campbell 2,3 , Peter GH Frost 1 , Jeffrey A. Sayer 4 , Ramses Iwan

Vermont, University of

331

Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

1989-01-01

332

DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html  

E-print Network

1 DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html [Johnson, 2005] Steven Johnson bottleneck in shipments from the nation's most important vein of low-sulfur coal has cut into coal supplies of railroad that the Union Pacific and BNSF Railways use to transport coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin

Tesfatsion, Leigh

333

An Examination of Development of Wyoming's Alternative Assessment System, the Body of Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overarching purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the patterns of development and implementation of Body of Evidence (BOE) science systems throughout the state of Wyoming, using an emerging and relatively open mixed methods design. BOEs were first launched throughout Wyoming a decade ago, and are ongoing today. Through interviews…

Dowding, Sharla Kay

2011-01-01

334

Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir study, Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek Field, southwestern Wyoming thrust belt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek field is a giant sour gas and condensate reservoir located in extreme southwestern Wyoming in the Fossil basin area of the Wyoming thrust belt. Discovered in 1977, the field contains 36 wells within an area 13 mi long and 2 mi wide. Porous dolomites of the Mississippian Mission Canyon formation contain over 70% of total proven reserves.

J. L. Sieverding; P. E. Flynn; P. M. Harris

1987-01-01

335

Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report. Academic Year 2005-2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides annualized enrollment information for the Wyoming community college system for the 2005-2006 academic year. During this year, credit headcount at Wyoming's community colleges increased by 6.1%, the largest annual enrollment increase during the last decade. The report also indicates that the difference between enrollments of…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

2006-01-01

336

Tectonic Structures Responsible for Anisotropic Transmissivities in the Paleozoic Aquifers, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A structure contour map datum on top of the Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone aquifer was drafted by the Wyoming Geological Survey. The map covers approximately 7,200 square miles in the southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming including Washakie and Hot Springs Co...

D. L. Blackstone, P. W. Huntoon

1984-01-01

337

Enigmatic Fossil Footprints from the Sundance Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sundance Formation (Middle-Upper Jurassic) of Wyoming is well known for pterosaur footprints. Two new partial trackways from the upper Sundance Formation of the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area (BICA) of north-central Wyoming are enigmatic. The trackways are preserved in rippled, flaser bedded, glauconitic sand and mud. The deposits were laid down in tidal flats, behind barrier islands, along the

Jerald D. Harris; Kenneth J. Lacovara

2004-01-01

338

SUMMER FOOD HABITS AND TROPHIC OVERLAP OF ROUNDTAIL CHUB AND CREEK CHUB IN MUDDY CREEK, WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin have experienced substantial de- clines in abundance and distribution, and are extirpated from most of Wyoming. Muddy Creek, in south-central Wyoming (Little Snake River watershed), contains sympatric populations of native roundtail chub (Gila robusta), bluehead sucker, (Catostomus discobolus), and flannelmouth sucker (C. latipinnis), and represents an area of high conservation concern because

Michael C. Quist; Michael R. Bower; Wayne A. Hubert; Kevin Bestgen

2006-01-01

339

Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

Naeser, Nancy D.

1984-01-01

340

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2011-07-01

341

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2012-07-01

342

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2013-07-01

343

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2010-07-01

344

A WATERBORNE OUTBREAK OF NORWALK-LIKE VIRUS AMONG SNOWMOBILERS - WYOMING, 2001  

EPA Science Inventory

In February 2001, episodes of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health from persons who had recently vacationed at a snowmobile lodge in Wyoming. A retrospective cohort study found a significant association between water consumption and illness, a...

345

Growth Response of Wyoming Big Sagebrush to Heavy Browsing by Wild Ungulates  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exclosure in a Wyoming big sagebrush Wyoming big sagebrush plants that were not subjected to 35 years of winter browsing by elk, mule deer, and

Trista L. Hoffman; Carl L. Wambolt

346

EFFECTS OF WILDLIFE UTILIZATION ON WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH GROWTH AND SURVIVAL ON RECLAIMED MINE LANDS1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ensuring Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) survival remains a challenge on many mines even years after initial establishment. Wildlife utilization may be a major influence on its survival. A wildlife exclosure was erected in June 2001 on a portion of a study initiated in 1990 at the North Antelope\\/Rochelle Mine in northeastern Wyoming. Investigations

Kristene A. Partlow; Gerald E. Schuman; Richard A. Olson; Scott E. Belden

347

Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

NONE

1996-03-01

348

Update on coal in Big Horn basin, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Big Horn Coal basin is located within the topographic and structural basin of the same name and is defined by the limits of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation in northwestern Wyoming and the Eagle Sandstone in south-central Montana. The coal in this basin ranges in rank from high volatile C bituminous (based primarily on resistance to weathering) to subbituminous B coal. In general, the Mesaverde and Eagle coals are highest in heat content, averaging over 10,500 Btu/lb; the Fort Union coals in the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Grass Creek fields average about 10,200 Btu/lb and are second highest in heating value. The Meeteetse Formation contains coals that average 9,800 Btu/lb, the lowest heating values in the basin. An average heating value for all coal in the basin is slightly less than 10,000 But/lb. The average sulfur content of all coals in this basin is less than 1%, with a range of 0.4 to 2.2%. Coal mining in the Big Horn Coal basin began in the late 1880s in the Red Lodge field and has continued to the present. Almost 53 million tons of coal have been mined in the basin; nearly 78% of this production (41 million tons) is from bituminous Fort Union coal beds in the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Bridger coal fields, Montana. Original in-place resources for the Big Horn Coal basin are given by rank of coal: 1,265.12 million tons of bituminous coal resources have been calculated for the Silvertip field, Wyoming, and the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Bridger fields, Montana; 563.78 million tons of subbituminous resources have been calculated for the remaining Wyoming coal fields.

Jones, R.W.

1983-08-01

349

Feasibility study, FY95s EEAP. Utility Monitoring Control System (UMCS)/Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The UMCS feasibility study evaluated the economic benefits of monitoring and controlling various facility and utility systems at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Potential savings associated with the UMCS include energy savings, maintenance and operation labor cost savings, and cost avoidance due to equipment failures.

NONE

1996-01-19

350

Kenneth J. Turner, Liam S. Docherty, Feng Wang and Gavin A. Campbell. Managing Home Care Networks, in Robert Bestak, Laurent George,  

E-print Network

Kenneth J. Turner, Liam S. Docherty, Feng Wang and Gavin A. Campbell. Managing Home Care Networks. on Networks, pp. 354-359, IEEE Computer Society, March 2009. Managing Home Care Networks Kenneth J. Turner Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA, UK {kjt,lsd,fw,gca}@cs.stir.ac.uk Abstract Home care networks are a new

Turner, Ken

351

NOAA Beach Water Quality Experimental Forecasts David Rockwell1, Kent Campbell1, Greg Mann2, Richard Wagenmaker2, and David Schwab3  

E-print Network

NOAA Beach Water Quality Experimental Forecasts David Rockwell1, Kent Campbell1, Greg Mann2., Ann Arbor, MI 48108 Abstract Timely accurate forecasts of beach water quality is critical to protect are developing and testing beach management forecast decision support systems (FDSS) at five beaches in Michigan

352

Gavin A. Campbell and Kenneth J. Turner. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call Control, in L. du Bousquet and J.-L. Richier, editors,  

E-print Network

and Communication Systems, IOS Press, Amsterdam, September 2007. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call Control Gavin AGavin A. Campbell and Kenneth J. Turner. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call Control, in L. du, UK gca | kjt @cs.stir.ac.uk Abstract. Policies exhibit conflicts much as features exhibit interaction

Turner, Ken

353

Kenneth J. Turner and Gavin A. Campbell. Goals and Conflicts in Telephony, in Masahide Nakamura and Stephan Reiff-Marganiec (eds.),  

E-print Network

and Communications Systems, pp. 3-18, IOS Press, Amsterdam, June 2009. Goals and Conflicts in Telephony Kenneth J. Call Control, Goal, Goal Conflict, Goal Refinement, Policy-Based Management 1. Introduction GoalsKenneth J. Turner and Gavin A. Campbell. Goals and Conflicts in Telephony, in Masahide Nakamura

Turner, Ken

354

Gavin A. Campbell and Kenneth J. Turner. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call Control, in Lydie du Bousquet and Jean-Luc Richier (eds.), Proc. 9th Int. Conf.  

E-print Network

and Communications Systems, pp. 83-98, IOS Press, Amsterdam, May 2008. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call ControlGavin A. Campbell and Kenneth J. Turner. Policy Conflict Filtering for Call Control, in Lydie du, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK e-mail: gca -- kjt @cs.stir.ac.uk Abstract. Policies exhibit conflicts much

Turner, Ken

355

Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a comparison of results from both Slave and Superior cratons throughout the Archean and Proterozoic. The data will test the prior connections, or lack thereof, among the Archean cratons in Laurentia, and help assess whether there was a supercontinent during the Archean-Proterozoic transition.

Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

2010-12-01

356

CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

1984-01-01

357

Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming.  

PubMed

On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9 degrees C. PMID:16592797

Leopold, L B

1980-04-01

358

Redescription of Bellerophon bittneri (Gastropoda: Triassic) from Wyoming.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bellerophon bittneri Newell and Kummel is an Early Triassic bellerophontacean from the Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River Mountains. The available type material consists of one fair, but incomplete, external mold, which resembles a Bellerophon but is actually a Retispira. After repeated search, additional specimens were found at one locality in the southern Wind River Range of Wyoming; Retispira bittneri is redescribed from this new material. Like other Triassic bellerophontaceans, there is nothing unusual about the species apart from occurrence in the Mesozoic; it is clearly congeneric with Permian Retispira from underlying rocks. -Authors

Yochelson, E.L.; Boyd, D.W.; Wardlaw, B.

1985-01-01

359

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report consists of a map (scale 1:500,000) that shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in Wyoming. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through the rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 miles, 30 to 200 miles, 200 to 500 miles, and more than 500 miles. (USGS)

Cooley, M.E.

1983-01-01

360

Geologic Mapping and Geologic History: Sheep Mountain, Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Half way through the second semester of our year-long integrated Sed/Strat and Structure course we travel to Sheep Mountain, Wyoming where the students spend 5 days describing and measuring section and the constructing geologic and structural maps. The field data gathered then form the basis for a paper titled: "Geologic History of the Sheep Mountain Region". In addition to simply making geologic maps, stratigraphic sections and structural cross-sections, the students have to put the local geology into the broader contexts of the Big Horn Basin and sequences of western orogenies.

Malinconico, Lawrence L.

361

Gravity interpretation of the northern Overthrust Belt, Idaho and Wyoming  

E-print Network

). Stratigraphic +hrow on the major faults is approximately 20, 000 feet (6100 m) (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). 1 LB I I 2 V V 4 T V V SNAKE v ' RIVER PLAIN ) I V V 4 F . L. ~. + + L k'22 Ace v v P IDAHO Tco WYOMING ~ F CI IJTI E ON IFF... overthrust. The Paris thrust is part of the Pari s-!!i liard thrust zone which lies to the west of the Bear Lake in Idaho, extends possibly as far as the Snake River Plain to the north, and continues into Utah on the south. As documented by surface...

Silver, Wendy Ilene

2012-06-07

362

The University of Wyoming's small scientific balloon program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over 500 small scientific balloons have been launched by the University of Wyoming's Atmospheric Physics Group from 26 locations over the globe in a study of stratospheric aerosol physics and chemistry which began in 1971. These flighs have led to a basic understanding of the evolution of sulfurous gases, injected into the stratosphere by major volcanic eruptions, into sulfuric acid aerosol droplets. The recent use of new, thin film balloon technology, to reduce cost and simplify launch techniques, has been a major advantage to the program.

Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Kjome, N. T.; Olson, G. L.; Martell, D. W.

1985-01-01

363

County Staff or Area Staff?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

McIntryre explores the questions of county-based extention and increased specialization in Indiana. He compares the multi-county with individual county systems using variables including clientele's reactions to the two systems. (NL)

McIntyre, William J.

1970-01-01

364

Too Many Counties?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every state in the United States is divided into smaller units of local government. For example, Georgia has 159 counties. Proponents of reducing the number of counties argue for consolidation on the basis of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Activities are suggested to help secondary students explore this issue. (RM)

Williams, Elmer D.

1985-01-01

365

Sheridan County Recreation Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pilot project investigating the feasibility of year-round recreational programs in rural counties of populations of less than 10,000 is described in this report. (Sheridan County, Kansas, was chosen as the project site.) Part I, the introductory section, briefly defines recreation and its relation to human needs. Part II provides a geographic…

Webster, Elaine

366

Hancock County Awards Gala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

2008-01-01

367

POPULATION ESTIMATES AND ASPECTS OF HIBERNATION IN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MICE (ZAPUS HUDSONIUS PREBLEI) ALONG SOUTH BOULDER CREEK, BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius prebler) occurs along the Front Range of Colorado and in south-central Wyoming. The present study uses PIT-tagging to mark individual jumping mice and mark-recapture analyses for population estimates and survival rates along South Boulder Creek and a ditch fed by it in Boulder County, Colorado. There was total of 256 individuals and 586 captures

Carron A. Meaney; Norman W. Clippinger; Bruce Lubow

368

Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

2008-01-01

369

Reconnaissance examination of selected oil-sand outcrops in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Numerous surface occurrences of oil sands and oil seeps have been reported in the geologic literature for Wyoming. Seventy-eight reported occurrences are listed in Wyoming Geological Survey Open-File Report 82-5. Most of the listed deposits are taken from old references with vague descriptions and locations. Field reconnaissance examinations of selected oil-sand occurrences were conducted to describe them better and to assess their potential economic importance. A reconnaissance geologic map of each examined deposit was constructed, and the deposits were sampled and described. Ten occurrences were described during the 1984 and 1985 field seasons. The oil-sand occurrences were all sandstone reservoirs ranging from Pennsylvanian to Tertiary. Based on these reconnaissance examinations, only three occurrences appeared to be potentially significant. The Rattlesnake Hills occurrence, west of Casper, is an asymmetrical anticline with oil-impregnated sands in the Mesaverde Formation, Frontier Formation, and, most extensively, the Muddy Sandstone. Other formations in the structure contain minor amounts of oil staining. The Muddy Creek occurrence, southwest of Rawlins, contains oil-impregnated sandstones in the lower Wasatch Formation. This stratigraphically controlled trap dips to the west into the Washakie basin. The Conant Creek occurrence, southeast of Riverton, includes stratigraphically controlled oil sands in the relatively flat Wagon Bed Formation.

Ver Ploeg, A.

1986-08-01

370

LEON COUNTY 4-H County Events 2012  

E-print Network

, friendly environment and to develop self confidence and poise. Participation also counts toward county'ers experience in the preparation and delivery of a show-and-tell presentation, with confidence in a public members Categories - Animal Science Individual/Family Resources Citizenship, Leadership, & Communication

Watson, Craig A.

371

Walton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL  

E-print Network

to reduce coastal storm damages by constructing berms and dunes along 18.8 miles of Walton County shorelineWalton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL 13 December 2012 ABSTRACT, several coastal storms have eroded the coastline of Walton County, resulting in recession

US Army Corps of Engineers

372

Clark county monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since 1988, Clark County has been one of the counties designated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' (AULG). The AULG designation is an acknowledgement by the federal government that could be negatively impacted to a considerable degree by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. These negative effects would have an impact on residents as individuals and the community as a whole. As an AULG, Clark County is authorized to identify 'any potential economic, social, public health and safety, and environmental impacts' of the potential repository (42 USC Section 10135(C)(1)(B)(1)). Toward this end, Clark County has conducted numerous studies of potential impacts, many of which are summarized in the Clark County's Impact Assessment Report that was submitted by the DOE and the president of the United States in February 2002. Given the unprecedented magnitude and duration of the DoE's proposal, as well as the many unanswered questions about the number of shipments and the modal mix, the estimate of impacts described in these studies are preliminary. In order to refine these estimates, Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department's Nuclear Waste Division is continuing to assess potential impacts. In addition, the County has implemented a Monitoring Program designed to capture changes to the social, environmental, and economic well-being of its residents resulting from the Yucca Mountain project and other significant events within the County. The Monitoring Program acts as an 'early warning system' that allows Clark County decision makers to proactive respond to impacts from the Yucca Mountain Project. (authors)

Conway, Sheila [Urban Environmental Research, 10100 W. Charleston Boulevard Las Vegas, 89135 (United States); Auger, Jeremy [Applied Analysis, 10100 West Charleston Blvd, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89135 (United States); Navies, Irene [Clark County, Department of Comprehensive Planning, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2007-07-01

373

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

374

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

375

Wisconsin County Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether you're interested in Reedsburg, Rhinelander, or Rubicon, the Wisconsin County Histories website will not fail those keen on the history of the Badger State. Created by the Wisconsin Historical Society, this archive provides access to more than 80 standard histories of Wisconsin counties, most of which were published between 1850 and 1920. The majority of the volumes are over several hundred pages long, and they include detailed passages on cities within their respective counties, along with sketches of prominent leaders. Visitors can use the drop-down menu available on the homepage to find specific volumes, or they can also perform a full text search across all of the histories.

376

Pontotoc County Government Summer  

E-print Network

, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures #12;Pontotoc County Zip Home Phone Cell Phone Email School Grade Completed Date Of Birth Parent/Guardian Home Phone Cell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

377

BRIDGER WILDERNESS AND GREEN-SWEETWATER ROADLESS AREA, WYOMING.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource appraisal of the Bridger Wilderness and contiguous Green-Sweetwater Roadless Area in Wyoming was made. This rugged and remote region is mostly Precambrian crystalline granitic rocks that contain only small and discontinuous areas of mineralization. The area is considered to have little promise for metallic mineral deposits. Sedimentary rocks in the area have minor coal seams and beds of phosphate rock, but the coal beds are thin and of limited extent, and the phosphate rock is low-grade compared to similar rocks elsewhere in the region. A probable potential for oil and gas at depth, assigned to part of the area, is based on the assumption that oil- and gas-bearing rocks exist at depth below a low-angle thrust fault and a wedge of Precambrian crystalline rock.

Worl, Ronald G.; Ryan, George S.

1984-01-01

378

Glaciation of northwestern Wyoming interpreted from ERTS-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis of ERTS Imagery has shown a number of alpine glacial features can be recognized and mapped successfully. Although the Wyoming mountains are generally regarded as the type locality for Rocky Mountain glaciation some areas have not been studied from a glacial standpoint because of inaccessibility or lack of topographic control. ERTS imagery provides an excellent base for this type of regional geomorphic study. A map of maximum extent of Wisconsin Ice, flow directions and major glacial features was compiled from interpretation of the ERTS imagery. Features which can be mapped are large moraines, outwash fans and terraces. Present-day glaciers and snowfields are easily discriminated and mapped. Glaciers and glacial deposits which serve as aquifers play a significant role in the hydrologic cycle and are important because of the increasing demand placed on our water resources. ERTS provides a quick and effective method for change detection and inventory of these vital resources.

Breckenridge, R. M.

1973-01-01

379

Outplanting Wyoming big sagebrush following wldfire: stock performance and economics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

mycorrhizal amendments. Most mortality occurred during the first year after planting; this period is the greatest barrier to establishment of sagebrush stock. The proportion of healthy stock in Year 1 was positively related to subsequent survival to Year 3. Costs were minimized, and survival maximized, by planting container stock or bare-root stock with a hydrogel dip. Our results indicate that outplanting is an ecologically and economically effective way of establishing Wyoming big sagebrush. However, statistical analyses were limited by the fact that data about initial variables (stock quality, site conditions, weather) were often unrecorded and by the lack of a replicated experimental design. Sharing consistent data and using an experimental approach would help land managers and restoration practitioners maximize the success of outplanting efforts.

Dettweiler-Robinson, Eva; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Evans, James R.; Newsome, Heidi; Davies, G. Matt; Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.; Easterly, Richard T.; Salstrom, Debra; Dunwiddle, Peter W.

2013-01-01

380

Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

Not Available

1981-10-01

381

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado,  

E-print Network

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South. Antelope Creek, Lincoln, NE ..................... 26-2 4. Bear Creek Lake, CO.................................. 26-3 5. Big Sioux River & Skunk Creek, Sioux Falls, SD ......................................... 26

US Army Corps of Engineers

382

77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming...sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United...party electing to participate in this exploration program must send written notice...

2012-07-10

383

78 FR 26563 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Revised General...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...State of Wyoming; Revised General Conformity Requirements and an Associated Revision...of Chapter 8 that addresses general conformity requirements and a new Section 5 to...and additions to the State's general conformity requirements in order to align...

2013-05-07

384

75 FR 53981 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming...the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920...reinstatement from Royal Oil, LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW174414...Weaver, Chief, Fluid Minerals Adjudication, at...

2010-09-02

385

Geochemical Evolution of Water in the Madison Aquifer in Parts of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the results of an investigation to determine the geochemical reactions controlling water chemistry in the Madison aquifer underlying the northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming. In the report, the geohydro...

J. F. Busby, L. N. Plummer, R. W. Lee, B. B. Hanshaw

1991-01-01

386

77 FR 61019 - Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Bureau of Land Management [LLWY910000 L16100000.XX0000] Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council AGENCY...The following must accompany all nominations: --Letters of reference from represented interest or organizations, --A...

2012-10-05

387

Tailings basin reclamation: Atlantic City Iron Mine, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

An 81 ha (200 ac) tailings impoundment at a taconite operation in Wyoming abandoned in 1985 has been a source of blowing dust. The site qualified for reclamation under Wyoming's Abandoned Mine Land program. The reclamation design included: incorporating commercially available organic amendments and fertilizers into a 300 mm (12 in.) thick cap of a sterile gravelly clay loam cover material, planting trees in the protective wind/snow shadows of rock beams and rock snow fences, lowering the water level n a flooded mine pit that was feeding uncontrolled seeps, and constructing a wide tailings pond spillway that allows flood control while minimizing seasonal water level fluctuations in the pond. The construction of the earthwork aspects of the design were completed over two construction seasons, including work during the winter at this high-altitude (2,470 m [8,100 ft.]) site. This occurred because snow from an early winter storm that collected behind the rock beams and rock snow fences was slow to melt. Furthermore, the increased snow catch made the site too wet the following spring to allow seeding during the normal seeding window; a fall planting was necessary. The rocky nature of the cover material prompted the development of innovative reclamation approaches, including fabricating a rock rake bulldozer blade and applying organic soil amendments by aerial spraying. A randomly-configured two-acre test plot was installed to evaluate the benefits of various soil amendments as the site matures. Future work on the site will include tree seedling planting and plugging of a decant pipeline.

Gusek, J.J.; Richmond, T.C.

1999-07-01

388

Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

1993-01-01

389

Seed weight variation of Wyoming sagebrush in northern Nevada.  

PubMed

Seed size is a crucial plant trait that may potentially affect not only immediate seedling success but also the subsequent generation. We examined variation in seed weight of Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young), an excellent candidate species for rangeland restoration. The working hypothesis was that a major fraction of spatial and temporal variability in seed size (weight) of Wyoming sagebrush could be explained by variations in mean monthly temperatures and precipitation. Seed collection was conducted at Battle Mountain and Eden Valley sites in northern Nevada, USA, during November of 2002 and 2003. Frequency distributions of seed weight varied from leptokurtic to platykurtic, and from symmetry to skewness to the right for both sites and years. Mean seed weight varied by a factor of 1.4 between locations and years. Mean seed weight was greater (P < 0.05) in 2003 than in 2002 at both sites. This can partially be attributed to 55% greater precipitation in 2003 than 2002, since mean monthly temperatures were similar (P > 0.05) in all study situations. Simple linear regression showed that monthly precipitation (March to November) explained 85% of the total variation in mean seed weight (P = 0.079). Since the relationship between mean monthly temperature (June-November) and mean seed weight was not significant (r2 = 0.00, P = 0.431), this emphasizes the importance of precipitation as an important determinant of mean seed weight. Our results suggest that the precipitation regime to which the mother plant is exposed can have a significant effect on sizes of seeds produced. Hence, seasonal changes in water availability would tend to alter size distributions of produced offspring. PMID:16524249

Busso, Carlos A; Perryman, Barry L

2005-12-01

390

Scale dependencies in structural analysis as illustrated by chevron folds along the Beartooth Front, Wyoming  

E-print Network

SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis ROBERT ANNAN COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement..., for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Ma)or Sub)oct: Geology SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis by ROBERT ANNAN COOK Approved as to style and content by...

Cook, Robert Annan

2012-06-07

391

A survey of elementary school physical education requirements in the state of Wyoming  

E-print Network

could be enhanced through the use of a specialty teacher. 14 CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY Population All public elementary schools in the state of Wyoming were surveyed for this study (100%%d). Public elementary schools in the state of Wyoming consist.... The results of the credential portion of the survey suggests that students in larger elementary schools have a greater opportunity to be taught by not only a full-time physical education teacher, but a physical education specialist with a bachelor...

Balestrieri, Jay Alan

2012-06-07

392

Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-print Network

HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG "I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Geology HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG Approved as to style...

Larberg, Gregory Martin

2012-06-07

393

Recovery of Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Features in Wyoming Big Sagebrush following Prescribed Fire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of prescribed fire to enhance habitat features for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus )i n Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomin- gensis) in western North America is poorly understood. We evaluated recovery of habitat features important to wintering, nesting, and early brood-rearing Sage-Grouse in Wyoming big sagebrush following prescribed fire. Our case study included 1 year of preburn (1989)

Jeffrey L. Beck; John W. Connelly; Kerry P. Reese

2009-01-01

394

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2011-03-01

395

Laramide deformation of the Rocky Mountain Foreland, southeastern corner of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

E-print Network

. . 74 75 . . . . 75 . 76 LIST OF PLATES PAGE Plate 1. Geologic Map of the Southeastern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Plate 2. View (looking east) of the south limb of the Warm Springs anticline. . . . . Plate 3. View (looking northeast) of the eastern... . . 74 75 . . . . 75 . 76 LIST OF PLATES PAGE Plate 1. Geologic Map of the Southeastern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Plate 2. View (looking east) of the south limb of the Warm Springs anticline. . . . . Plate 3. View (looking northeast) of the eastern...

Derr, Douglas Neanion

2012-06-07

396

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there\\u000a is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities\\u000a with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference\\u000a plots

Kirk W. Davies; Jon D. Bates; Aleta M. Nafus

2011-01-01

397

McFadden, Wyoming: A case study in narrating our changing energy landscapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis uses McFadden, Wyoming, and the Rock Creek Valley to discuss Wyoming's changing energy landscapes and argues that a cultural landscape approach to documenting our historic and cultural resources can contribute to properly siting energy developments. Though Wyoming stands to gain from the construction of wind farms, they should be carefully sited in order to balance environmental and cultural resource preservation with energy needs. Wyoming has a long history as an energy hinterland and provides a significant portion of energy to the U.S. However, the nation's demand for energy should not take precedence over preserving the cultural resources and vast open landscapes that represent Wyoming's heritage. A history of the Rock Creek Valley as a home to Native Americans, a transportation corridor, oil field, and wind farm site is presented along with a discussion of energy consumption and Wyoming's role in the energy market. The thesis also considers the importance of education, public discourse, and narrative as tools for planning a sustainable future with regard to energy, the environment, and cultural resources.

Anderson, Carly-Ann Marie

398

Are there benefits to mowing Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities? An evaluation in southeastern Oregon.  

PubMed

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production (P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment (P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated. PMID:21755343

Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jon D; Nafus, Aleta M

2011-09-01

399

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wyoming big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production ( P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment ( P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated.

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

2011-09-01

400

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

401

The Campbell--Magaard Theorem is inadequate and inappropriate as a protective theorem for relativistic field equations  

E-print Network

Given a particular prescription for the Einstein field equations (EFE's), it is important to have general protective theorems that lend support to it. The prescription of data on a timelike hypersurface for the (n + 1)-d EFE's arises in `noncompact Kaluza--Klein theory', and in certain kinds of braneworlds and low-energy string theory. The Campbell--Magaard (CM) theorem, which asserts local existence (and, with extra conditions, uniqueness) of analytic embeddings of completely general n-d manifolds into vacuum (n + 1)-d manifolds, has often recently been invoked as a protective theorem for such prescriptions. But in this paper I argue that there are problems with loosening the CM thoerem of restrictive meanings in its statement, which is worthwhile thing to do in pursuit of the proposed applications. While I remedy some problems by identifying the required topology, delineating what `local' can be taken to mean, and offering a new, more robust and covariant proof, other problems remain unsurmountable. The theorem lends only inadequate support, both because it offers no guarantee of continuous dependence on the data and because it disregards causality. Furthermore, the theorem is only for the analytic functions which renders it inappropriate for the study of the relativistic equations of modern physics. Unfortunately, there are no known general theorems that offer adequate protection to the proposed applications' prescription. I conclude by making some suggestions for more modest progress.

E. Anderson

2004-09-30

402

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2011-07-01

403

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2012-07-01

404

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2010-07-01

405

Glacial Change in the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upper Green River Basin (GRB) [located in the upper Colorado River Basin] and the upper Wind-Bighorn River Basin (WBRB) [located in the upper Missouri-Mississippi River Basin] are separated by the Wind River Range (WRR) of Wyoming. The WRR is an unbroken 160-kilometer barrier in west central Wyoming that is host to 63 glaciers, the largest concentration of glaciers in the American Rocky Mountains. These glaciers serve as natural water reservoirs and the continued recession of glaciers will impact agricultural water supply in the region. Previous research determined that the glaciers in the WRR contribute approximately 30% of the total streamflow volume during the critical late summer / early fall growing season. However, the previous research was limited in scope to a small number of climatic stations and limited streamflow measurements. The proposed research improves on previous research by evaluating glacial recession in the WRR using remote sensing techniques. Glacier area and terminus position for 42 glacial complexes in the WRR (from 1985 to present) will be evaluated using LANDSAT Imagery and GIS techniques. Next, for selected glaciers, aerial photograph stereopairs will also be obtained from the USGS Earth Resources, Observation and Science (EROS) Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota from 1966 to present. The stereopair images will be utilized to derive the surface elevation of glaciers and calculate volume change. Traditional methods require the user to view the two photos with a stereoscope to view an object in three dimensions. Modern techniques allow this process to be completed digitally. Leica Photogrammetry suite is used to specify the spatial coordinates of each photo and create a block file, a file that consists of two or more photographs of the same area that contain spatial coordinates of each photo. Once the block file is created, the user can view the objects contained in the overlapping portions of the photos and make vertical measurements. This process allows the user to calculate changes in surface area and changes in elevation, thus volume changes can be computed. Glacier volume will also be estimated from glacier surface areas using the Bahr et al. (1997) area-volume scaling method. Finally, field data (real-time differential GPS surface survey, ground penetrating radar of ice thickness and repeat photography) from a summer 2006 site visit to Dinwoody Glacier (located on the east slope of the WRR) will be compared to previous site visits in the past 40 years. The field data will either confirm or reject observations from the remote sensing approach.

Cheesbrough, K.; Edmunds, J.; Kerr, G.; Pochop, L.; Tootle, G.

2007-12-01

406

The University of Wyoming GRB Afterglow Follow-Up Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the Swift era approaches, the University of Wyoming in Laramie has been preparing its two observatories for a robust GRB afterglow follow-up program. The 2.3-m Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) - first of its kind in collecting power and mid-infrared optimization - is located on Jelm Mt. (2944-m elevation) in a semi-arid atmosphere, 40 km southwest of Laramie. On dry, cold winter nights, our estimates show that WIRO's sensitivity in the K-band is comparable to that of a 4-m telescope at Mauna Kea observatory in Hawaii. Three instruments are currently in use at the observatory: WIRO-Prime, WIRO-Spec, and the Goddard IR camera. WIRO-Prime is a 20482 prime-focus camera with a 20 arcmin diameter FOV (f/2.1). Its sensitivity for a 300-s exposure will reach as faint as 24th (23rd) magnitude in V (R). WIRO-Spec is an integral field, holographic spectrometer which utilizes Volume-Phase-Holographic gratings with a 20482 detector. A bundle of 293 fiber optical cables (1 fiber ~ 1 arcsec) connects the Cassegrain platform to the stationary spectrometer, optimizing the image by reduction from f/27 to f/9. At 20th magnitude, a 700-s exposure yields a S/N ratio of ~ 10 at a resolution of ~ 1 Angstrom, sufficient for resolving the MgII doublet [279.8 nm] in GRB host galaxies to determine a 0.4 < z < 2.5 for an operational wavelength range of ~ 400-1000 nm (WIRO-Prime and WIRO-Spec). The Goddard IR Camera is a 2562 InSb camera (FOV ~ 108 arcsec) mounted at Cassegrain and operated at 15K. Available filters for GRB observations include R, I, J, H, and K'. WIRO slew timescale (~ 120 s) is comparable to that of Swift. Red Buttes Observatory (RBO) is located 19 km south of Laramie in a dark site and houses a 0.6-m f/8 Cassegrain DFM reflector. RBO's Apogee AP8p 10242 camera (18 arcmin FOV, sufficiently large for BAT localizations) is available for use with filters U, B, V, R and I. We are in the final stages of implementing fully automated response to Swift BAT alerts at RBO, and expect an average acquisition timescale to random sky positions of ~ 25 s. Thus, rapid GRB detections by RBO can be forwarded to WIRO even while Swift's pointed instruments are performing first integrations.

Savage, S. L.; Norris, J. P.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Pierce, M.; Canterna, R.

2004-09-01

407

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the

F. C. Ethridge; L. K. Burns; W. G. Alexander; G. N. II Craig; A. D. Youngberg

1983-01-01

408

Conservation Opportunities for Securing In-Stream Flows in the Platte River Basin: A Case Study Drawing on Casper, Wyoming’s MunicipalWater Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Platte River Basin consists of tributaries largely in Wyoming, Colorado and Western Nebraska, with the main stem in Central Nebraska. Critical wildlife habitat on the main stem requires additional in-stream flows. The watershed is one hosting multiple resources, a variety of users, and managed by an array of state and federal agencies. This study proposes a basis for securing

Aaron Waller; Donald McLeod; David Taylor

2004-01-01

409

Budgeting in Texas Counties, 1931-1940.  

E-print Network

the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets... the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets...

Bradshaw, H. C.

1941-01-01

410

Hillsborough County Cooperative Extension Service  

E-print Network

Hillsborough County Cooperative Extension Service 5339 County Rd 579 Seffner, Fl., 33584-3334 813 Irrigation Systems Dave Palmer - Extension Agent I - Hillsborough county Extension Service As of this writing of timers, control clocks, and water meters. Similarly, the homeowner could leave the house or go to sleep

Jawitz, James W.

411

STATE/COUNTY BORDERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This data is available for the entire region. The level of detail is primarily suited for region/state/county/basin sized maps. The borders are not accurate enough for small areas like sub-basins and site areas. We use this coverage for general backgrounds and borders only. T...

412

Westchester County Employers Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Westchester County Employers Survey was done in May 2003 in order learn more about employee training needs, how they accomplished these needs, and how it would be possible for the Westchester Community College to fulfill these needs. Out of the 639 surveys sent, 145 were returned in a satisfactory format, which produces a 22.6% return rate.…

Lee, Marcia M.

413

San Diego County Reservation  

E-print Network

San Diego County Brenda Pisgah Iron Mountain Riverside East Imperial East Morongo Reservation) Reservation 60 95 95 95 115 San Diego Banning Yucca Valley Twentynine Palms Desert Hot Springs Palm Springs and Implement Agency-Specific Programs for Solar Energy Development San Francisco San Diego Los Angeles

Laughlin, Robert B.

414

Henry County School Questionnaire.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 14-item questionnaire was designed to measure parent opinion regarding the effect of integration on third grade pupils in Henry County Schools. The questionnaire is not standardized, and field testing has been on a small scale. (See also TM 000 940 for a description of the study, and 942, 943 for the desegregation and school integration…

Goolsby, Thomas M., Jr.; Frary, Robert B.

415

Reclamation planning for sensitive species in southwest Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Surface coal mine land reclamation can be enhanced to improve its attractiveness and usability for sensitive wildlife species. Enhancements for sensitive wildlife have been incorporated into reclamation at the Jim Bridger Coal mine, located in southwest Wyoming. A diverse wildlife population occupies various habitats within the mine`s study area and includes several species listed as sensitive by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The defined postmine land use is wildlife habitat and livestock grazing. The potential for postmine land use by sensitive species is assessed by documenting the species present during premining baseline studies and monitoring their use of habitat on the permit during mining. The collected wildlife information allows the company to adjust and fine-tune the reclamation plan to create and place habitat where it will attract and accommodate indigenous sensitive species, since extensive lead time is often needed to develop enhanced habitats. Examples would be placement of special vegetative mixes to reestablish historic sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) leks or construction of physical entities such as rock structures within current nesting territories for permanent ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) nest sites. Analysis of the species present, and their habitat requirements during the mining process, also allows time to request variances or modifications in the permitted reclamation plan for enhancements not originally accepted by the regulatory authorities.

Harshbarger, R.M. [Bridger Coal Company, Rock Springs, WY (United States)

1997-12-31

416

Magnetostratigraphic correlation of Eocene rocks from the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A paleomagnetic framework has been established for the correlation of the Eocene section throughout the southern and eastern Absaroka Mountains of northwestern Wyoming, and it has been tested against biostratigraphic and rock stratigraphic markers. Correlation is based on the magnetic polarity of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks samples collected from nine sites that include Togwotee Pass, the East Fork basin, the Owl Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages, Phelps Mountain, Carter Mountain, and along the South fork and North fork of the Shoshone River. The remnant magnetization of these samples reflects the polarity of the earth's magnetic field when the rocks were deposited. Magnetic polarity zonations, determined at individual sections, were correlated throughout the region and established horizons that are contemporaneous to within a few thousand years. This represents a method for timing volcanic, tectonic, and depositional events that is more precise than any other technique currently known. In addition, the method provides absolute ages if the polarity zonations can be matched to the pattern of Eocene geomagnetic reversals. Using this approach, it has been determined that (1) the Wiggins Formation in the Carter and Phelps Mountain areas is similar in age to the Tepee Trail Formation in the southeastern Absarokas; (2) the Pitchfork Formation is a transitional facies between the Aycross and Wapiti Formations; and (3) the Eocene section from the upper Willwood to the lower Wiggins was deposited between 52 and 47 Ma.

Shive, P.N.; Sundell, K.A.

1986-08-01

417

Thermal analysis of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and geologic data from over 3,000 oil and gas wells within a 180 km x 30 km area that transect across the southern Powder River Basin in Wyoming, U.S.A., were used to determine the present thermal regime of the basin. Three-dimensional temperature fields within the transect, based on corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and other geologic information, were assessed using: (1) A laterally constant temperature gradient model in conjunction with an L{sub 1} norm inversion method, and (2) a laterally variable temperature gradient model in conjunction with a stochastic inversion technique. The mean geothermal gradient in the transect is 29 C/km, but important lateral variations in the geothermal gradient exist. The average heat flow for the southern Powder River Basin is 52 mW/m{sup 2} with systematic variations between 40 mW/m{sup 2} and 60 mW/m{sup 2} along the transect. Extremely high local heat flow (values up to 225 mW/m{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the Teapot Dome and the Salt Creek Anticline and low heat flow of 25 mW/m{sup 2} occurring locally near the northeast end of the transect are likely caused by groundwater movement.

McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Chapman, D.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1996-11-01

418

Dating of Archean basement in northeastern Wyoming and southern Montana.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rb-Sr whole-rock and U-Pb zircon ages of granite and gneiss cores from three deep drill holes extend known occurrences of Archean rocks in the subsurface of NE Wyoming and S Montanta. Rb-Sr and K- Ar mineral ages are discordant and reflect early or middle Proterozoic disturbance. Highly altered rocks occur in a thin zone immediately below the sub-Cambrian unconformity. Samples from a few metres deeper in the basement are much fresher but show the effects of this alteration in filled fractures and thin adjacent alteration haloes. Whole-rock Rb-Sr systems have retaioned a fair degree of integrity in spite of increased susceptibility to modification because of the disturbed mineral systems. Interaction of the rocks with water a few metres below the sub-Cambrian unconformity probably occurred for only a relatively short time. Fractures filled rapidly with secondary minerals such as chlorite, anhydrite, and carbonate to maintain a relatively impermeable crystalline basement in which the silicates and their contained isotopic systems were preserved.- Author

Peterman, Z. E.

1981-01-01

419

BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

420

Evaluation of base widening methods on flexible pavements in Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface transportation system forms the biggest infrastructure investment in the United States of which the roadway pavement is an integral part. Maintaining the roadways can involve rehabilitation in the form of widening, which requires a longitudinal joint between the existing and new pavement sections to accommodate wider travel lanes, additional travel lanes or modification to shoulder widths. Several methods are utilized for the joint construction between the existing and new pavement sections including vertical, tapered and stepped joints. The objective of this research is to develop a formal recommendation for the preferred joint construction method that provides the best base layer support for the state of Wyoming. Field collection of Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) data, Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) data, base samples for gradation and moisture content were conducted on 28 existing and 4 newly constructed pavement widening projects. A survey of constructability issues on widening projects as experienced by WYDOT engineers was undertaken. Costs of each joint type were compared as well. Results of the analyses indicate that the tapered joint type showed relatively better pavement strength compared to the vertical joint type and could be the preferred joint construction method. The tapered joint type also showed significant base material savings than the vertical joint type. The vertical joint has an 18% increase in cost compared to the tapered joint. This research is intended to provide information and/or recommendation to state policy makers as to which of the base widening joint techniques (vertical, tapered, stepped) for flexible pavement provides better pavement performance.

Offei, Edward

421

Stability of leaning column at Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to reports from climbers that an 8-meter section (referred to as the leaning column) of the most popular climbing route on Devils Tower in northeastern Wyoming is now moving when being climbed, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey inspected the site to determine the stability of the column and the underlying column that serves as a support pedestal. Evidence of a recent tensile spalling failure was observed on the pedestal surface immediately beneath the contact with the overlying leaning column. The spalling of a flake-shaped piece of the pedestal, probably due to the high stress concentration exerted by the weight of the leaning column along a linear contact with the pedestal, is likely causing the present movement of the leaning column. Although it is unlikely that climbers will dislodge the leaning column by their weight alone, the possibility exists that additional spalling failures may occur from the pedestal surface and further reduce the stability of the leaning column and result in its toppling. To facilitate detection of further spalling failures from the pedestal, its surface has been coated with a layer of paint. Any new failures from the pedestal could result in the leaning column toppling onto the climbing route or onto the section of the Tower trail below.

Harp, Edwin L.; Lindsay, Charles R.

2006-01-01

422

Brucellosis in elk I. Serologic and bacteriologic survey in Wyoming.  

PubMed

Incidence of brucellosis in elk (Cervus canadensis) on two winter feedgrounds in Wyoming was examined over a 5-year period by testing serum samples using the standard plate agglutination (SPT) buffered Brucella antigen (BBA), rivanol (Riv) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. Thirty-one percent of 1,165 elk were positive by defined criteria. Considering each test individually, only 29% (106) of 370 positive sera would have been classified as reactors by the SPT, 83% (307) by the BBA test and 86% (314) by the Riv test. The CFT would have identified 85% (267) of 332 positive samples on which it was used. Brucella abortus, type 1, was isolated from 17 of 45 elk necropsied. The SPT identified 59% (10) of these as reactors, the BBA test 94% (16) and the Riv test 88% (15). The CFT identified nine of nine (100%) on which it was used. Prevalence of sero-positive animals increased with age. Brucellosis has been present in one of the two elk herds since at least 1930, and the incidence of infection among mature females in both herds was approximately 50% during this study. No single serologic test should be relied upon to diagnose brucellosis in elk. PMID:416232

Thorne, E T; Morton, J K; Thomas, G M

1978-01-01

423

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Newcastle Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Newcastle 1/sup 0/x2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft) using available surface and subsurface geologic information. Many of the uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the US Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled and described. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, interpreted from an aerial radiometric survey, were outlined. Areas favorable for uranium deposits in the subsurface were evaluated using gamma-ray logs. Based on surface and subsurface data, two areas have been delineated which are underlain by rocks deemed favorable as hosts for uranium deposits. One of these is underlain by rocks that contain fluvial arkosic facies in the Wasatch and Fort Union Formations of Tertiary age; the other is underlain by rocks containing fluvial quartzose sandstone facies of the Inyan Kara Group of Early Cretaceous age. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Tertiary age above the Wasatch Formation, all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and most rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and all rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group.

Santos, E S; Robinson, K; Geer, K A; Blattspieler, J G

1982-09-01

424

Is it topsoil or overburden? Case study of a small mine in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent disputes over the classification of topsoil as overburden have reached the Wyoming Supreme Court. The high court upheld an earlier decision by the Environmental Quality Council that topsoil is overburden according to Wyoming statutes. During the 1999 Wyoming legislative session, bills with amendments to the current statutes failed to reach the floor of the house and senate bodies. The statute amendments would have enhanced the importance of topsoil as a separate material that must be handled in a manner to preserve its integrity for reclamation efforts. Topsoil and subsoil materials from a small gravel mine that was the focus of concerned citizens, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Environmental Quality Council, and the Wyoming Supreme Court were examined to evaluate their suitability o reclamation/revegetation efforts. Soil chemical/physical properties suggested the topsoil and subsoil were suitable as a plant growth media. A greenhouse study using a cool-season and a warm-season grass was conducted to determine the potential for revegetation using the topsoil and subsoil materials as reclamation surface cover. Except for specific materials collected from the gravel/subsoil interface in the native area, revegetation efforts using seed mixtures with the grasses studied would probably be successful.

Vance, G.F.; Spackman, L.K.

1999-07-01

425

MODELING THE HYPERREAL DIMENSION WITH THE GAP-BURDEN METHOD™: SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE LARAMIE RANGE, WYOMING AND THE ASYMMETRY OF TIME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fieldwork in the Laramie Range, Wyoming demonstrated that state structure supports productivity within a discourse that perpetuates stable Wyoming environments. These notions are supported by neo- Hegelian interpretations of space and time, in which time is dominant, continuous and bears a heavy weight in space. Thus, the natural process that describes Wyoming's history describes a competitive economic space in which

Neil M. Manspeizer

2007-01-01

426

Electromagnetic burnfront mapping during A. R. Co. 's 1978 in situ coal gasification project. [Rocky Hill, Wyoming project  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-frequency electromagnetic (HFEM) probing was used to map the position of the burnfront in an underground coal gasification experiment conducted by the Atlantic Richfield Company at Rocky Hill, Wyoming. The coal seam in this experiment was 110 ft thick and approximately 700 ft deep, thicker and deeper than the seam probed during a previous gasification experiment at Hoe Creek, Wyoming.

D. T. Davis; E. F. Laine; R. J. Lytle; J. T. Okada

1979-01-01

427

I N D E X . STREAMS AND L A D S OF WESTERN MONTANA AND NORTHWESTERN WYOMING.  

E-print Network

of fishes obtained iu Montana nnd Wyoming ........................................... 41-5: Aster CreekI N D E X . STREAMS AND L A D S OF WESTERN MONTANA AND NORTHWESTERN WYOMING. Page Annotated list........................................... 20, 21 Atlantio Creek........................................ 26, 21 Beaver Dam Creek

428

75 FR 19592 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Wyoming...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 12-month finding on a petition to list the Wyoming pocket gopher (Thomomys clusius) as endangered or threatened and to designate critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. After review of all available scientific and commercial information, we find that listing the Wyoming pocket gopher as either endangered......

2010-04-15

429

Infiltration from an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas, Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Evolution of water and sediment chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has increased substantially in recent years. Among environmental concerns associated with this development is the fate of groundwater removed with the gas. A preferred water-management option is storage in surface impoundments. As of January 2007, permits for more than 4000 impoundments had been issued within Wyoming. A study

Richard W. Healy; Cynthia A. Rice; Timothy T. Bartos; Michael P. McKinley

2008-01-01

430

Role of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in Korean wines produced from Campbell Early grapes: potential use of Hanseniaspora uvarum as a starter culture.  

PubMed

Several yeasts were isolated from Campbell Early grapes (Vitis labrusca cultivar Campbell Early), the major grape cultivar in Korea, grown in two different regions. PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS I-5.8S-ITS II region showed that 34 isolates out of a total of 40 were in the same group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the major strain belonged to one species, Hanseniaspora uvarum, although they displayed some nucleotide mismatches between them. During spontaneous alcohol fermentation at 20 °C, the two grape musts containing 24 °Brix sugar exhibited similar fermentation patterns with differences in final alcohol production and yeast viable counts. PCR analysis of the yeasts randomly isolated during the fermentation using an intron splice site primer showed changes in yeast flora between 8 and 10 days of fermentation. We found that the dominant yeasts displaying various PCR patterns using the primer remained the same throughout the early stages of fermentation, as determined by molecular typing of their ITS regions using PCR-RFLP, and these yeasts were identical to those isolated from grape berries. Among the isolates, the strain designated SS6 was selected based on its potassium metabisulfite resistance, alcohol production (distillation method), and flavor (by sniffing test) of grape juice. When Campbell Early grape must was inoculated with H. uvarum SS6 cells, no differences in fermentation pattern were observed compared with that inoculated with cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W-3, an industrial wine yeast strain. However, SS6 wine showed higher levels of organic acid (especially lactic acid), aldehydes, and minor alcohols (except n-propyl alcohol), as well as a higher score in sensory evaluation, compared to those of W-3 wine. PMID:23498200

Hong, Young-Ah; Park, Heui-Dong

2013-05-01

431

County Business Patterns 1995  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Census Bureau has made available the state publications for the 1995 version of its annual County Business Patterns 1995 series (Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Data available include employment, payroll, and number of establishments by Standard Industrial Code category. Establishments are further broken down by nine employment size classes ranging from 1-4 to 1,000 or more. The US volume is forthcoming. Complete 1993 and 1994 (also .pdf format) series are available at the site.

1997-01-01

432

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

contracts are made for the purchase of record books, letterheads, miscellaneous stationery items, drugs, laundry work, electric light bulbs, and milk. Quarterly contracts are made for the purchase of bread for the county farm and jail, and monthly... of lumber would be $70 in the case of treated lumber and $220 in the case of untreated lumber. These figures apply to a period of time measured by the life of a treated lumber struc- ture. 8 BULLETIN NO. 653, TEXAS. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

433

Immobilization of Wyoming bears using carfentanil and xylazine.  

PubMed

Seven grizzly (Ursus arctos; four male, three female) and three black (Ursus americanus; two male, one female) bears caught in culvert traps or leg snares were immobilized in northwestern Wyoming with carfentanil and xylazine at doses, respectively, of 0.011 ± 0.001 and 0.12 ± 0.01 mg/kg for grizzly bears and 0.014 ± 0.002 and 0.15 ± 0.04 mg/kg for black bears. These drugs were antagonized with 1 mg/kg naltrexone and 2 mg/kg tolazoline. Induction and recovery times, respectively, were 4.3 ± 0.5 and 7.1 ± 0.8 min for grizzly bears and 5.2 ± 0.4 and 9.1 ± 2.2 min for black bears. Inductions were smooth and uneventful. Recoveries were characterized initially by increased respiration followed by raising of the head, which quickly led to a full recovery, with the bears recognizing and avoiding humans and moving away, maneuvering around obstacles. All bears experienced respiratory depression, which did not significantly improve with supplemental oxygen on the basis of pulse oximetry (P=0.56). Rectal temperatures were normothermic. Carfentanil-xylazine immobilization of bears provided significant advantages over other drug regimens, including small drug volumes, predictable inductions, quick and complete recoveries, and lower costs. On the basis of these data, both grizzly and black bears can be immobilized effectively with 0.01 mg/kg carfentanil and 0.1 mg/kg xylazine. PMID:23778620

Kreeger, Terry J; Bjornlie, Dan; Thompson, Dan; Clapp, Justin; Clark, Colby; Hansen, Cole; Huizenga, Matt; Lockwood, Sam

2013-07-01

434

Abundance of adult saugers across the Wind River watershed, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The abundance of adult saugers Sander canadensis was estimated over 179 km of continuous lotic habitat across a watershed on the western periphery of their natural distribution in Wyoming. Three-pass depletions with raft-mounted electrofishing gear were conducted in 283 pools and runs among 19 representative reaches totaling 51 km during the late summer and fall of 2002. From 2 to 239 saugers were estimated to occur among the 19 reaches of 1.6-3.8 km in length. The estimates were extrapolated to a total population estimate (mean ?? 95% confidence interval) of 4,115 ?? 308 adult saugers over 179 km of lotie habitat. Substantial variation in mean density (range = 1.0-32.5 fish/ha) and mean biomass (range = 0.5-16.8 kg/ha) of adult saugers in pools and runs was observed among the study reaches. Mean density and biomass were highest in river reaches with pools and runs that had maximum depths of more than 1 m, mean daily summer water temperatures exceeding 20??C, and alkalinity exceeding 130 mg/L. No saugers were captured in the 39 pools or runs with maximum water depths of 0.6 m or less. Multiple-regression analysis and the information-theoretic approach were used to identify watershed-scale and instream habitat features accounting for the variation in biomass among the 244 pools and runs across the watershed with maximum depths greater than 0.6 m. Sauger biomass was greater in pools than in runs and increased as mean daily summer water temperature, maximum depth, and mean summer alkalinity increased and as dominant substrate size decreased. This study provides an estimate of adult sauger abundance and identifies habitat features associated with variation in their density and biomass across a watershed, factors important to the management of both populations and habitat. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

Amadio, C.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Johnson, K.; Oberlie, D.; Dufek, D.

2006-01-01

435

Building Healthy Tribal Nations in Montana and Wyoming Through Collaborative Research and Development  

PubMed Central

We describe a collaborative approach to reducing health disparities affecting Montana and Wyoming tribal nations while promoting health-protective practices and interventions among these populations. Under the auspices of the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, a consortium has undertaken activities to (1) establish the research infrastructure necessary for conducting ongoing health disparities research, (2) develop a target research agenda that addresses tribally identified priority health issues and tests the feasibility of interventions, (3) develop increased research skills and cultural competency through mentoring activities, and (4) develop effective collaborative relationships. All research projects are user-defined and -authorized, and participation is voluntary. PMID:15855453

Andersen, Steve R.; Belcourt, Gordon M.; Langwell, Kathryn M.

2005-01-01

436

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

E-print Network

Devonian, upper toV) occurs in Wyoming in the lower part cf the dark shale unit of SANDBERG at Cottonwood Canyon, Big Horn Mountains; throughout the dark shale unit at Bull Lake Creek and Dinwoody Canyon, Wind River Range; and in the basal Madison Limestone... (loc. 12), Teton Canyon (loc. 14), Warm Spring Canyon in the Wind River Range, and Horse Creek in the Washakie Range, all in Wyoming. At Cottonwood Canyon in the Big Horn Mountains (loc. 11) the Devonian-Car- boniferous boundary falls within the dark...

Klapper, G.

1966-05-23

437

Hydrodynamic flow in Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones, Rozet Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-print Network

and other Muddy Formation oil fields. Contour interval 1000 ft (305 m). . . Regional east-west cross section showing variable sandstone development in the Muddy interval from Kitty to Rozet Fields. . . . . . . . . Diagrammatic environments the northern... the format and style of the t ' A ' t' f P t 1 G l~tB 11*t' BELL CREEK MONTANA WYOMING ~ + ~ RECLUSE ~ I ~ ~ ~ GAG DRAW~ G RDZ ET. KITTY~ AX T ~ ~O, BLACK FIDDLER CR. y~ x~ J CLARETON MO ~ TARA WYOMING M I LE S 50 Figure l. Index map...

Smith, David Arthur

2012-06-07

438

A waterborne outbreak of Norwalk-like virus among snowmobilers-Wyoming, 2001.  

PubMed

In February 2001, episodes of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health from persons who had recently vacationed at a snowmobile lodge in Wyoming. A retrospective cohort study found a significant association between water consumption and illness, and testing identified Norwalk-like virus (NLV) in 8 of 13 stool samples and 1 well. Nucleotide sequences from the positive well-water specimen and 6 of the positive stool samples were identical. This multistrain NLV outbreak investigation illustrates the importance of NLV as a cause of waterborne illness and should encourage monitoring for NLVs in drinking water. PMID:12552455

Anderson, Alicia D; Heryford, Annette G; Sarisky, John P; Higgins, Charles; Monroe, Stephan S; Beard, R Suzanne; Newport, Christina M; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Fout, G Shay; Robbins, David E; Seys, Scott A; Musgrave, Karl J; Medus, Carlota; Vinjé, Jan; Bresee, Joseph S; Mainzer, Hugh M; Glass, Roger I

2003-01-15

439

Water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey in Wyoming; fiscal year 1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains lists of streamflow and reservoir stations, peak-flow partial-record stations, chemical-quality stations, sediment stations, and observation wells where water levels are measured in Wyoming. The locations of the basic-data sites are shown on maps. Thirty-two water-resources appraisal projects in Wyoming are also described, including many that are related to the development of energy resources. The general locations of the projects are shown on maps. The report serves as an annual progress report to cooperators and the public. (Woodard-USGS)

Boner, F.C.

1978-01-01

440

Hydrologic data for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust environmental impact statement near Jackson, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information on the quantity and quality of surface and ground water in an area of concern for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust Environmental Impact Statement in northwestern Wyoming is presented without interpretation. The environmental impact statement is being prepared jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service and concerns proposed exploration and development of oil and gas on leased Federal land near Jackson, Wyoming. Information includes data from a gaging station on Cache Creek and from wells, springs, and miscellaneous sites on streams. Data include streamflow, chemical and suspended-sediment quality of streams, and the occurrence and chemical quality of ground water. (USGS)

Craig, G. S., Jr.; Ringen, B. H.; Cox, E. R.

1981-01-01

441

Technical data. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume includes a description of the railway to transport the coal; possible unbalance in the electrical power supply is considered in detail, as well as communications, signalling, etc. The railway will also be used to transport ashes and sludges for waste disposal. Coal fines in the coal supply will be burned to generate power. A very brief description of the coal gasification plant and its components is accompanied by a printout of the dates final engineering is to be completed. Permit applications are listed and socio-economic factors are discussed. The financing plan is discussed in some detail: basically, a loan guarantee from the Synthetic Fuels Corporation; equity provided by investment tax credit, deferred taxes, AFUDC and the sponsors; price support; and gas purchase agreement (this whole section includes several legal details.). (LTN)

None

1982-01-01

442

The nature of the Heart Mountain fault in the vicinity of Dead Indian Hill, Park County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

be necessary for gravity slid1ng on the Heart Mountain surface. Once the upper-plate of the Heart Mountain fault became fragmented and separated into numerous 1solated blocks it does not seem possible that indiv1dual blocks could pass through the steep... the origin of the Heart Mountain blocks presently found east of Dead Indian H111 without the necessity of having the blocks pass through a steep trans- gressive fault. ACKNOBLEDGEI'IENTS I wish to express my sincere thanks and gratitude to Dr. Travis...

Sungy, Eugene Donald

2012-06-07

443

Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs.

NONE

1995-07-01

444

78 FR 20146 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...considering an amendment to Source Materials License SUA-1598...to install two rotary vacuum dryers in the pre-existing...wholly-owned subsidiary of UR-Energy, Inc. of Littleton...include yellowcake rotary vacuum drying as an option within...subsequent offsite shipment of vacuum dried yellowcake up...

2013-04-03

445

Stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis of aquifer systems, Atlantic Rim, Carbon County, Wyoming: Implications for production of coalbed natural gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production requires the extraction of considerable volumes of water from target formations. This process can dynamically alter local aquifers and affect the larger hydrologic systems of a producing area. An analytical method that provides immediate, cost-effective quantitative information on both resource (methane) and habitat (coalbed aquifer) would help to optimize gas production. This study used a

J. Fred McLaughlin

2009-01-01

446

A fossil flora from the Frontier formation of southwestern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper deals with a small but important fossil flora, now known to be of Colorado age, from the vicinity of Cumberland, Lincoln County, Wyo. It was for many years thought to be of Jurassic age, and only within the last decade has its stratigraphic position been established. Although small in number of species, this flora offers information bearing on the physical and climatic conditions that prevailed during early Upper Cretaceous time in this region, and, moreover, it furnishes a series of stratigraphic marks that may be used in the recognition of this horizon elsewhere.

Knowlton, F.H.

1917-01-01

447

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

448

77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

449

Megascopic lithologic studies of coals in the Powder River basin in Wyoming and in adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between 1999 and 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated coalbed methane (CBM) resources in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin. The study also included the CBM resources in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin of North Dakota and the Wyoming portion of the Green River Basin of Wyoming. This project involved the cooperation of the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper, Wyo., and 16 independent gas operators in the Powder River, Williston, and Green River Basins. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with these CBM operators to supply samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, timely results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data. This program resulted in the collection of 963 cored coal samples from 37 core holes. This report presents megascopic lithologic descriptive data collected from canister samples extracted from the 37 wells cored for this project.

Trippi, Michael H.; Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stanton, Ronald W.; Chiehowsky, Lora A.; Moore, Timothy A.

2010-01-01

450

Gas desorption and adsorption isotherm studies of coals in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG), of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper (Wyoming), investigated the coalbed methane resources (CBM) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, from 1999 to the present. Beginning in late 1999, the study also included the Williston Basin in Montana and North and South Dakota and Green River Basin and Big Horn Basin in Wyoming. The rapid development of CBM (referred to as coalbed natural gas by the BLM) during the early 1990s, and the lack of sufficient data for the BLM to fully assess and manage the resource in the Powder River Basin, in particular, gave impetus to the cooperative program. An integral part of the joint USGS-BLM project was the participation of 25 gas operators that entered individually into confidential agreements with the USGS, and whose cooperation was essential to the study. The arrangements were for the gas operators to drill and core coal-bed reservoirs at their cost, and for the USGS and BLM personnel to then desorb, analyze, and interpret the coal data with joint funding by the two agencies. Upon completion of analyses by the USGS, the data were to be shared with both the BLM and the gas operator that supplied the core, and then to be released or published 1 yr after the report was submitted to the operator.

Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; McGarry, Dwain E.; Stillwell, Dean P.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Stillwell, Cathy R.; Ochs, Alan M.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Osvald, Karl S.; Taylor, Sharon L.; Thorvaldson, Marjorie C.; Trippi, Michael H.; Grose, Sherry D.; Crockett, Fred J.; Shariff, Asghar J.

2006-01-01

451

75 FR 49016 - County of Greenville, S.C.-Acquisition Exemption-Greenville County Economic Development Corporation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Exemption--Greenville County Economic Development Corporation The County of...acquire from Greenville County Economic Development Corporation (GCEDC) approximately...See Greenville County Economic Development...

2010-08-12

452

Editor, Nature Philip Campbell  

E-print Network

The biological impact of mass-spectrometry-based proteomics B. F. Cravatt, G. M. Simon & J. R. Yates III 1001? This question is central to an emerging science of biological information processing -- systems biology of haemoglobin crystals in earthworm blood spread on glass plates, to the development of the ultracentrifuge

Cai, Long

453

Editor, Nature Philip Campbell  

E-print Network

Production Editor Sarah Archibald Senior Art Editor Martin Harrison Art Editor Nik Spencer Sponsorship therapy V. Gray-Schopfer, C. Wellbrock & R. Marais 858 Mechanisms of sensory transduction in the skin E. A. Lumpkin & M. J. Caterina 866 Pathogenesis and therapy of psoriasis M. A. Lowes, A. M. Bowcock & J. G

Cai, Long

454

Thomas Campbell Christopher Williams  

E-print Network

is gaining traction that may change the world. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a revolutionary as a written document can be emailed as a PDF and printed in 2D, an "STL" STrATEGIC FOrESIGhT report Could 3D Printing Change the World? Technologies, Potential, and Implications of Additive Manufacturing STr

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

455

Purduesoybeanresearch onboardhistoricspaceflightby Tom Campbell  

E-print Network

promise to bump it up on the timeline. Vierling's experiment was listed on the manifest for STS-95, Glenn of space, Vierling hoped the bacteria could more easily reach the injured area of the soybeans. On earth

456

[Simulation of leaf inclination angle distribution of main tree species in Daxing'an Mountains of China based on the Campbell ellipsoid distribution function].  

PubMed

Leaf inclination angle distribution directly decides the amount of radiation interception by vegetation canopy, and also, decides the size and direction of the incident radiation, being the key parameter in quantitative remote sensing. This paper simulated the leaf inclination angle distribution of the main tree species in Daxing'an Mountains forest region based on the Campbell ellipsoid distribution model and iterative method, and quantitatively analyzed the fitting results of canopy with and without leaf stratification as well as the effects of tree age group on the leaf inclination angle distribution. For the test 6 main tree species, the leaf inclination angle distribution was in planophile shape, and the mean leaf inclination angle was smaller for coniferous tree than for broadleaved tree. Whether with or without stratify, the fitting result and the measured result were basically identical. For Betula platyphylla and Larix gmelinii, the correlation coefficient between the simulated and measured values was 0.8268 and 0.8192, and the root mean square error was 3.7% and 4.3% respectively, indicating that the Campbell model was reliable applied for forest canopy. Considering the effects of tree age group, though the leaf inclination angle distribution trend with leaf stratification had no correlation with age group, the mean leaf inclination angle of young L. gmelinii was relatively smaller than that mature one, suggesting that age group had positive effects on the numerical design of leaf inclination angle distribution and negative effects on the numerical design of extinction coefficient. PMID:24564150

Wang, Xu-Peng; Fan, Wen-Yi; Wen, Yi-Bo

2013-11-01

457

EEO Employment Data Allegheny County  

E-print Network

EEO Employment Data for Allegheny County and the Pittsburgh region February 2008 University Center................................................................................................................. 2 Employment Summary by EEO Occupation Group............................................................................... 3 Employment by Detail Census Occupation Category

Sibille, Etienne

458

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

459

Spatial Variability of Snow Water Isotopes in Montane Southeastern Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prediction of snowmelt runoff from Rocky Mountain annual snowpack remains highly uncertain. Progress is limited by our understanding of how widespread vegetation disturbances from beetle kill and fire, coupled with regional climate changes, influence spatial patterns of snowpack development and evolution. We examined spatial patterns of snow water isotope content, snow depth and density and snow water equivalence in the Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming at peak snowpack in April 2013. The stable isotope composition of snowpack integrates patterns of accumulation, redistribution, sublimation, melt and condensation. Yet the relative importance of these processes and their isotope effects across highly heterogeneous terrain are poorly documented. Physical processes affecting isotopic exchange and fractionation in snowpack, including temperature, relative humidity, turbulent versus laminar flow, and radiation vary at local and catchment scales. Fifteen 150-m snow transects were completed over a variety of cover types and disturbance areas across 2400 to 3200 m elevation. ?2H and ?18O ratios were determined on snow water from the four positions along each transect and from individual snowfall events collected February through April at a single site at 2743 m elevation near the transect locations. ?2H and ?18O values of snowpack all fell on the local meteoric water line, indicating very limited kinetic isotope effects during snow-atmosphere vapor exchange. A decrease of 4 and 0.5 per mil per 100 m increase in elevation was observed in ?2H and ?18O, respectively, across all transect locations. Variance (standard deviation) among the four samples within each transect increased with elevation, ranging up to 46 per mil for ?2H and 13.0 per mil for ?18O at the highest elevation sites. Such local-scale heterogeneity in isotopic composition may reflect varying patterns and magnitudes of accumulation and/or redistribution. Relationships between hydrometeorological forcings and isotope effects on snow water, specifically sublimation, equilibrium vapor exchange, and redistribution, will be investigated further to better understand catchment-level heterogeneity in snowpack evolution. This future research will allow for better characterization of how snowmelt runoff changes in Rocky Mountain watersheds.

Kipnis, E. L.; Chapple, W. D.; Traver, E.; Frank, J. M.; Ewers, B. E.; Miller, S. N.; Williams, D. G.

2013-12-01

460

Relocation of Wyoming Mine Production Blasts Using Calibration Explosions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

- An important requirement for a comprehensive seismic monitoring system is the capability to accurately locate small seismic events worldwide. Accurate event location can improve the probability of determining whether or not a small event, recorded predominantly by local and regional stations, is a nuclear explosion. For those portions of the earth where crustal velocities are not well established, reference event calibration techniques offer a method of increased locational accuracy and reduced locational bias.In this study, data from a set of mining events with good ground-truth data in the Powder River Basin region of eastern Wyoming are used to investigate the potential of event calibration techniques in the area. Results of this study are compared with locations published in the prototype International Data Center's Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB). A Joint Hypocenter Determination (JHD) method was applied to a s et of 23 events. Four of those events with superior ground-truth control (mining company report or Global Positioning System data) were used as JHD reference events. Nineteen (83%) of the solutions converged and the resulting set of station-phase travel-time corrections from the JHD results was then tested. When those travel-time corrections were applied individually to the four events with good ground-truth control, the average locational error reduced the original REB location error from 16.1km to 5.7km (65% improvement). The JHD locations indicated reduced locational bias and all of the individual error ellipses enclosed the actual known event locations.Given a set of well-recorded calibration events, it appears that the JHD methodology is a viable technique for improving locational accuracy of future small events where the location depends on arrival times from predominantly local and/or regional stations. In this specific case, the International Associ ation of Seismology and the Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) travel-time tables, coupled with JHD-derived travel-time corrections, may obviate the need for an accurately known regional velocity structure in the Powder River Basin region.

Finn, C. A.; Kraft, G. D.; Sibol, M. S.; Jones, R. L.; Pulaski, M. E.

461

Ground-water in the upper Star Valley, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The upper Star Valley covers about 55 square miles of lowland in the westernmost part of Wyoming. The altitude of the floor of the valley is 6,000-6,700 feet. The climate is cool; the growing season, short. Annual precipitation averages about 18 inches, and total precipitation in July and August averages 2.2 inches. Additional supplies of water are needed for irrigation of pasture and hay. The principal water-bearing formation is a thick body of gravel of Pleistocene age. Consolidated to semiconsolidated sedimentary formations of Paleozoic to Tertiary age form the surrounding mountains and underlie the gravel. These bedrock formations yield small amounts of water to wells on the margins of the valley. Most of the recharge to the gravel aquifer is received at the heads of alluvial fans by infiltration from tributaries that drain the surrounding mountains. Snow upon the valley floor provides a significant amount of recharge. Water moves toward the Salt River, which flows northward through the valley and which has large gains due to ground-water inflow. On the east side of the valley, the water table is 100-200 feet below land surface at a distance of half a mile from the mountain front. On the west side of the valley, the depth to water is rarely more than 30 feet. Depth to water decreases toward the center of the valley. The gravel aquifer can provide sufficient water for supplemental irrigation. Irrigation supplies of several hundreds of gallons per minute have been developed at two localities on the west side of the valley. Two pumping tests showed values for transmissibility of 82,500 and 370,000 gallons per day per foot in the vicinity of a well on the east side of the valley and a well on the west side, respectively. The ground water is of good quality for irrigation usage through most of the valley. Hardness of the water exceeds 200 parts per million, however, and this characteristic makes the water somewhat undesirable for domestic and industrial use. Water beneath the northwestern part of the valley has relatively high content of sodium and chloride.

Walker, Eugene H.

1965-01-01

462

The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range

M. R. Palmer; N. C. Sturchio

1990-01-01

463

A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO IDENTIFY THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF TWO WATERBORNE OUTBREAKS OF GASTROENTERITIS IN WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

Two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health in 2001. The first was reported in February from recent vacationers of a snowmobile lodge. The second was in October among diners of a tourist saloon. The duration and type of symptoms exhibi...

464

A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-print Network

Chapter SW A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

465

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-print Network

Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

466

Investigation of tar sand and heavy oil deposits of Wyoming for underground coal gasification applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A literature review was conducted to identify and evaluate tar sand and heavy oil deposits of Wyoming which are potentially suitable for in situ processing with process heat or combustible gas from underground coal gasification (UCG). The investigation was undertaken as part of a project to develop novel concepts for expanding the role of UCG in maximizing energy recovery from

1985-01-01

467

Carbonate facies patterns and oil shale genesis in Eocene Green River Formation, Fossil basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facies patterns and associated vertical sequences of kerogenous carbonates (oil shales) of the Green River Formation in Fossil basin, Wyoming, provide new insights into the deposition of oil shale. Unique to Fossil basin is a facies pattern consisting of kerogen-rich calcimicrite at the basin's depocenter succeeded laterally by laminated calcimicrite, bioturbated calcimicrite, and finally calcareous siliciclastics. This same pattern occurs

H. Paul Buchheim

1983-01-01

468

Review of reported tar-sand occurrences and recent projects in Wyoming. [78 occurrences  

Microsoft Academic Search

A synopsis is presented of 78 reported occurrences of shallow, oil-impregnated rocks in Wyoming many of which may be tar sands. (Appendices A and B). In most cases, there are only sketchy descriptions of these occurrences, scattered throughout the literature. This paper is a prelude to much needed studies and evaluations of these individual deposits. In addition, brief descriptions of

M. Clark; G. B. Glass

1983-01-01

469

Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserve base in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated in-place resources of 1.07 trillion short tons of coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. Of that total, with a maximum stripping ratio of 10:1, recoverable coal was 162 billion tons. The estimate of economically recoverable resources was 25 billion tons.

Scott, David C.; Luppens, James A.

2013-01-01

470

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Bighorn Basin Province, Wyoming and Montana, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 989 billion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 72 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 13 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Bighorn Basin Providence of Wyoming and Montana.

2008-01-01

471

Irrigation Canals as Sink Habitat for Trout and Other Fishes in a Wyoming Drainage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Irrigation canals can be a major source of mortality for fish in the Rocky Mountain region. Our study looked at how fish were affected by the irrigation canal system in the Smiths Fork, a tributary to the Bear River in western Wyoming. There are two native species of conservation concern in the Smiths Fork drainage: Bonneville cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii

James J. Roberts; Frank J. Rahel

2008-01-01

472

WILDLIFE MITIGATION TECHNIQUES AT SURFACE COAL MINES IN NORTHEAST WYOMING1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wildlife issues at surface coal mines in the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming have been a topic of discussion since operations first began in the early 1970s. Since then, wildlife monitoring and mitigation programs have evolved to address changing concerns, and incorporate new information and techniques. Over the last 26 years, biologists with Thunderbird - Jones & Stokes (J&S)

Gwyn McKee

473

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado,  

E-print Network

26-1 OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Control 3. Antelope Creek, Lincoln, NE..........................26-2 4. Bear Creek Lake, CO......................................26-3 5. Big Sioux River & Skunk Creek, Sioux Falls, SD

US Army Corps of Engineers

474

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado,  

E-print Network

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South 3. Aberdeen and Vicinity, SD 26-3 4. Antelope Creek, Lincoln, NE 26-3 5. Bear Creek Lake, CO 26-4 6. Big Sioux River & Skunk Creek, Sioux Falls, SD 26-4 7. Bowman-Haley Lake, ND 26-5 8. Buford Trenton

US Army Corps of Engineers

475

Sizes of Prey Consumed by Age0 Brown Trout in Douglas Creek, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

We identified and measured invertebrate prey from 234 age-0 brown trout (Salmo trutta) captured in Douglas Creek, Wyoming during summer 1990. The mean length of invertebrate prey increased as the fish increased from 21 to 65 mm total length. The low variability of invertebrate prey lengths found within individual 5-mm length groups of age-0 brown trout indicates that fish of

Wayne A. Hubert; Howard A. Rhodes

1992-01-01

476

Environmental evaluation and restoration plan of the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site, Wyoming: Topical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments were conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Hoe Creek Site, Wyoming; the Hoe Creek I experiment was conducted in 1976, the Hoe Creek II experiment in 1977, and the Hoe Creek III experiment in 1979. These experiments have had an impact on the land and groundwater quality at the site, and

W. L. Barteaux; G. L. Berdan; J. Lawrence

1986-01-01

477

Petroleum source-bed evaluation of Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve samples of Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone from seven localities in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt region were found to be extremely low in organic matter content, even though the darkest colored and least weathered samples were selected for analysis. We believe that very little organic matter was deposited and preserved in the Twin Creek Limestone in this region. Moreover, rocks

P. J. Swetland; J. M. Patterson; G. E. Claypool

1978-01-01

478

InSAR imaging of movement along the Bull Lake Creek Slide, Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) provides a means of imaging spatially varying kinematics of slow mass movements, such as earthflows. These observations provide critical constraints for understanding earth flow mechanics when considered with topography and meteorological forcings. This study applies InSAR to analyze the Bull Lake Creek Landslide in Wyoming. The Bull Lake Creek Slide is the largest of a

B. Held; F. G. Gomez

2010-01-01

479

Older Hydrothermal Activity along the Northern Yellowstone Caldera Margin at Sulphur Creek, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) is well exposed in the Seven Mile Hole area of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The rhyolitic tuff erupted after the collapse of the Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka) and hosts more than 350 vertical meters of hydrothermal alteration. Two epithermal alteration assemblages with different mineral associations have

J. L. Manion; P. Larson

2008-01-01

480

Influence of geological heterogeneties on secondary recovery from Permian Phosphoria reservoir, Cottonwood Creek Field, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cottonwood Creek Field is on the E. side of the Big Horn basin in northwestern Wyoming. It is on a W.-SW.- dipping monoclinal surface along the SW. flank of Hidden Dome anticline. Reservoir zones interfinger with a red- shale anhydrite facies on the N., E., and SE. The stratigraphic traps for hydrocarbons are the impervious strata of the redbed

R. M. Willingham; J. A. McCaleb

1966-01-01

481

ISOLATION OF BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS FROM A FREE RANGING MULE DEER IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

A noncytopathic type 1a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was isolated from a free- ranging yearling female mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from northwestern Wyoming (USA). The mule deer was emaciated, weak, and salivating, and Arcanobacterium pyogenes was cultured from lung abscesses. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from lung, however, BVDV antigen was not detected by immunohistochemistry. The BVDV genotype

Hana Van Campen; Julia Ridpath; Elizabeth Williams; Jacqueline Cavender; Joan Edwards; Scott Smith; Hall Sawyer

482

Factors Influencing the Size Structure of Brook Trout Populations in Beaver Ponds in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined relations between habitat features and the density and population size structure of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in 25 beaver ponds in southeastern Wyoming. Ponds with low densities of brook trout contained primarily large fish (200–275 mm total length) in good condition (mean relative weight, Wr, > 100) and had a proportional stock density (PSD), defined as the proportion

Shawn L. Johnson; Frank J. Rahel; Wayne A. Hubert

1992-01-01

483

BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE GREAT GRAY OWL IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO AND NORTHWESTERN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, I documented the existence of a breeding population of Great Gray Owls (Strix nebulosa) in southeastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming and recorded aspects of this species' breeding biology between 1980 and 1983. Thirty-eight pairs were found; 25 fledged young at least once. Fifteen nests were documented; 40% in old stick nests and 60% on tops of broken-top

ALAN B. FRANKLIN

484

Planning Project in Juvenile Delinquency: Prevention and Control of Delinquency Among Indian Youth in Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was conducted in an effort to ascertain the magnitude and dimensions of the delinquency problem among the American Indian youths from the Wind River Reservation (Wyoming). During the summer of 1971 data were obtained from the records of the Court of Indian Offenses, the Tribal police, the juvenile officer on the reservation, the Riverton…

Forslund, Morris A.; Meyers, Ralph E.

485

Issues in Species Recovery: An Example Based on the Wyoming Toad  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer reviewed article from Bioscience journal is about species recovery using the Wyoming toad as an example. The identification and recovery of endangered species is difficult because of their rarity, the continuing threats to their survival, and inadequate funding for research and conservation. There have been some success stories, but also a number of failures. Have biologists learned from our failures, or are we repeating the same mistakes? While habitat availability and cost are important limitations to species recovery, other, more easily addressed issues also hamper recovery programs. The Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is an endangered species whose recovery has been stalled by problems that are common to species recovery efforts, especially for animals without significant "charisma." I summarize the research undertaken on the Wyoming toad since its listing, highlight the difficulties in building a scientifically based recovery program, and identify some of the unmet challenges impeding recovery. Although specific to the Wyoming toad, these recommendations are relevant to recovery programs facing similar issues.

VICTORIA J. DREITZ (;)

2006-09-01

486

Instructional Design of Entrepreneurship Courses: Interview Research of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneurs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study investigated the opportunity recognition process of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneur (WBE) Award winners or nominees, in order to better inform the learner analysis and organizational strategy components of instructional design, specifically with respect to entrepreneurship courses. This study may be of significance to post…

Kolb, Belinda J.

2010-01-01

487

Elevation and Stream-Size Thresholds Affect Distributions of Native and Exotic Warmwater Fishes in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to assess the influence of elevation and stream width on the occurrence of 28 native and six exotic fish species using data collected (1954–2003) from 1,114 stream reaches in Wyoming. Medians and ranges of elevation and stream width were used to assess how elevation and stream width influenced the occurrence of individual species and to indicate

Michael C. Quist; Wayne A. Hubert; Frank J. Rahel

2004-01-01

488

Meeting the energy crisis: a case study of Wyoming energy-resource producers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of the work worlds of energy-resource producers in the State of Wyoming. It is based on assumptions that (1) what people perceive as real influences their behavior in the social world, (2) conflicting behavior among groups of people can frequently be traced to conflicting perceptions of social reality, and (3) energy-resource development can best be understood

Throgmorton

1983-01-01

489

Fibrous illite controls productivity in frontier gas sandstones, Moxa Arch, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that core, log, and well-test analyses from two wells recently completed in the Frontier sandstone in the Moxa Arch area of Wyoming revealed that fibrous illite severely reduced gas productivity. In this study area, presence of fibrous illite currently cannot be predicted and effects can be recognized only through laboratory tests on preserved cores.

Luffel, D.L. (ResTech Houston, Inc., TX (United States)); Herrington. K.L. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)); Harrison, C.W. (AGIP Petroleum Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-12-01

490

A first look at geological aspects of ERTS imagery of Wyoming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The analysis of six MSS-5 frames covering most of the western half of Wyoming is discussed. The frames under consideration covered the following areas: (1) Rock Springs, (2) Western Wind River Basin, and (3) Bighorn Basin-Absarokas Mountains. Miscellaneous observations concerning identification of natural and man-made structures are included.

Short, N.

1972-01-01

491

s the sage grouse gather on the Wyoming prairie to find mates this  

E-print Network

A s the sage grouse gather on the Wyoming prairie to find mates this spring, a few of the strutting. But when youcontrolonesideofit,yougetabetteridea of what is going on," Patricelli says. Sage grouse been retired to a card- boardboxwhilePatricelliworksonthemore sophisticated grouse-bot. This radio

Patricelli, Gail

492

56 The Wildlife Professional, Spring 2013 The Wildlife Society Greater Sage-Grouse in Wyoming  

E-print Network

56 The Wildlife Professional, Spring 2013 © The Wildlife Society Greater Sage-Grouse in Wyoming that the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse) could be the perfect surrogate and determined that although sage-grouse face "imminent" threat from factors such as habi- tat fragmentation

Beck, Jeffrey L.

493

77 FR 32665 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming...cost-sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United...party electing to participate in this exploration program must send written notice...

2012-06-01

494

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Accreditation Report, April 1, 2003-March 31, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Higher Learning Commission (HLC), a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA), accredits Wyoming's seven community colleges. Institutional accreditation is a voluntary process that serves the purposes of quality assurance and institutional and program improvement. Colleges that are accredited by the HLC…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2004

2004-01-01

495

A 4000YEAR RECORD OF WOODLAND VEGETATION FROM WIND RIVER CANYON, CENTRAL WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant macrofossil analyses of 16 radiocarbon-dated woodrat middens spanning the past 4000 years from the Wind River Canyon region in central Wyoming provide information concerning late Holocene development of juniper woodlands. The study sites are currently dominated by Juniperus osteosperma, with J. scopulorum present locally. Woodlands in the region were dominated by J. scopulorum from ca 4000 yr BP until

Stephen T. Jackson; Mark E. Lyford; Julio L. Betancourt

496

Primitive Early Eocene bat from Wyoming and the evolution of flight and echolocation  

E-print Network

evolutionary relation- ships among extant lineages5­8 , the fossil record of bats extends over 50 million yearsLETTERS Primitive Early Eocene bat from Wyoming and the evolution of flight and echolocation Nancy, and early evolution of the group remains poorly understood5,7­9 . Here we describe a new bat from the Early

Sullivan, Jack

497

78 FR 759 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172987, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172987, Wyoming...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended...Exploration, Ltd., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW172987