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1

Selenium in soils of the Lower Wasatch Formation, Campbell County, Wyoming: Geochemistry, distribution, and environmental hazards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Seleniferous Shingle series soils and sandstone outcrops of section 27, T 48 N, R 71 W, Wyoming are mapped on aerial photography by their association with Astragalus bisulcatus. Chemical leachate analyses and atomic absorption methods reveal all studied Samsil and Shingle soils to contain acid, base, and water soluble selenium compounds, and that water extractions showed varied concentration behavior due to soil pH. Acid-soluble selenium is found to be associated with smectite. Statistical analyses confirm that A. bisulcatus presence has a weak influence on soil-lens organic selenium concentration, and determine the importance of other geobotanical factors for convertor presence. Environmental procedures of high selenium lens burial, convertor plant eradication, and revegetated site monitoring are recommended. Usage of density analysis and photographic enlargement are used to successfully produce both a control area and a Campbell County, Wyoming regional map of A. bisulcatus supportive soils and outcrops using Skylab photography.

Kolm, K. E.

1975-01-01

2

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01

3

Western energy related overhead monitoring project. Phase 2: Summary. [Campbell County, Wyoming and coal strip mines in Montana and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assistance by NASA to EPA in the establishment and maintenance of a fully operational energy-related monitoring system included: (1) regional analysis applications based on LANDSAT and auxiliary data; (2) development of techniques for using aircraft MSS data to rapidly monitor site specific surface coal mine activities; and (3) registration of aircraft MSS data to a map base. The coal strip mines used in the site specific task were in Campbell County, Wyoming; Big Horn County, Montana; and the Navajo mine in San Juan County, New Mexico. The procedures and software used to accomplish these tasks are described.

Anderson, J. E. (principal investigator)

1979-01-01

4

Application of computer graphics to generate coal resources of the Cache coal bed, Recluse geologic model area, Campbell County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-sulfur subbituminous coal resources have been calculated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7 1/2 minute quadrangles, Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 275 coal thickness measurements obtained from drill hole data are evenly distributed throughout the area. The Cache coal and associated beds are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth from the surface to the Cache bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The thickness of the coal is as much as 31 feet, but in places the Cache coal bed is absent. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources calculated by computer show the bed to contain 2,316 million short tons or about 6.7 percent more than the hand-calculated figure of 2,160 million short tons.

Schneider, G.B.; Crowley, S.S.; Carey, M.A.

1982-01-01

5

Geology of the Pumpkin Buttes Area of the Powder River Basin, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 200 uranium occurrences have been examined in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Wyoming. Uranium minerals are visible at most of these places and occur in red and buff sandstone lenses in the Wasatch formation of Eocene age. The uranium minerals are disseminated in buff sandstone near red sandstone, and also occur in red sandstone in manganese oxide concretions and uraninite concretions.

Sharp, William Neil; White, Amos McNairy

1956-01-01

6

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2002: A County-By-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide and county trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

7

76 FR 78234 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY; Mackey Road...NFS) land on Thunder Basin National Grassland. The proposal comprises new construction...National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2250 East Richards Street,...

2011-12-16

8

Hydrologic conditions near Glendo, Platte County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glendo area of Platte and Carbon Counties, Wyo., about 250 square miles in extent, is in the Great Plains physiographic province. It is bordered on the west by the Laramie Range and on the east by the Hartville uplift. The North Platte River and Horseshoe and Middle Bear Creeks are the principal streams that drain the area. Gentle to steep hills, which lie between 4,450 and 6,360 feet above sea level, characterize the topography. Approximately 7,600 acres of land is cultivated in the Horseshoe Creek valley and 1,000 or more acres in the Cassa Flats of the North Platte River and Middle Bear Creek valleys. The average annual precipitation of 13.15 inches and the streamflow diverted for irrigation from Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River are usually inadequate to sustain crops during the entire growing season. Sedimentary rocks, which underlie about 99 percent of the Glendo area, range in age from Cambrian(?) to Recent and in thickness from about 3,000 to 4,700 feet. Beds of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age dip steeply away from the Laramie Range and the Hartville uplift to form a large syncline, which is interrupted by the Elkhorn anticline in the central part of the area. Beds of Tertiary and Quaternary age that were deposited over the older structural features and later were partly removed by erosion have dips of less than 6 ? . The 'Converse sand' of local usage at the top of the Hartville Formation of Mississippian(7), Pennsylvanian, and Permian age, the White River Formation of Oligocene age, and the flood-plain deposits of Recent .age are the most important aquifers in the Glendo area. The Hartville Formation consists predominantly of hard limestone and dolomite and of lesser amounts of sandstone and shale ; its thickness ranges from 850 to 1,050 feet throughout most of the area. The 'Converse sand' is an artesian aquifer consisting of fine- to medium-grained porous sandstone having an average thickness of about 80 feet. Recharge to the Hartville Formation is mainly from seepage of surface water from Glendo Reservoir and Spring Creek; ground water is discharged from the formation to the overlying White River Formation and the alluvium in the North Platte River valley near Cassa and to four wells in the Horseshoe Creek valley. Flowing wells yielding from a few gallons per minute to 175 gpm (gallons per minute) or more from the 'Converse sand' can probably be located in an area from ? mile to 1? miles wide and about 4? miles long in the lower Horseshoe Creek valley. The depth to the 'Converse sand' in this area depends upon the topographic relief and distance from the outcrop and ranges from 250 to about 1,000 feet. The discharge induced by pumping a well in the aquifer in the 'Converse sand' would probably amount to about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown. Values of 2,000, 2,100, and 10,300 gpd (gallons per day) per ft for the coefficient of transmissibility of the 'Converse sand' were obtained from aquifer tests at three wells. The chemical analyses of samples from the Hartville Formation ('Converse. sand' included) indicate that the water in the formation is of fairly good quality and adequate for domestic, stock, and irrigation uses, although the fluoride content is low and the water is hard. The White River Formation is composed of as much as 575 feet of fractured siltstone and claystone, and the flood-plain deposits include up to 65 feet of silt, sand, and gravel. Precipitation is the main type of recharge to the rocks of Tertiary age. Recharge to the alluvium in the valleys of Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River occurs mainly by seepage of ground water from. underlying beds, by infiltration of irrigation water, and by infiltration of streamflow as bank storage. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage to streams, by underflow, and by evapotranspiration and artificially by wells. In 1961, the total discharge from 38 wells in the White River and Arikaree Formations and 2

Welder, G.E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

1965-01-01

9

Ground-water resources of Natrona County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Natrona County covers an area of 5.369 square miles in central Wyoming. The climate is arid except in the mountainous areas. The county includes parts of the Great Plains, Middle Rocky Mountains, Wyoming Basin, and Southern Rocky Mountains physiographic provinces. There is wide variation of topography. More than 30 geologic formations are exposed in the county, 28 of which are known to yield water to wells and springs. The formations range in age from Precambrian to Holocene. Ground water in approximately 40 percent of the county contains more than 1.000 mg/l (milligrams per liter) of dissolved solids. Water chemically suitable for livestock can be developed at depths of less than 1,000 feet throughout most of the area. Many of the geologic formations were deposited under similar conditions and have similar water-bearing properties; also. water from these rocks deposited under similar conditions tends to have similar chemical characteristics. For this report, the stratigraphic section has been arbitrarily divided into six rock units based on similarity of deposition. The igneous and metamorphic rock unit includes rocks of Precambrian age and igneous intrusives and extrusives of Tertiary age. These rocks probably would not yield more than about 5 gpm (gallons per minute) to wells. The water is usually calcium bicarbonate type and contains less than 500 mg/l of dissolved solids. The marine rock unit includes formations of Cambrian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian and Permian age, having a maximum total thickness of about 1,900 feet. The Madison Limestone of Mississippian age and the Tensleep Sandstone and the Casper Formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian age supply the largest yields to wells and springs in the county. In the northeastern part of the county, flow from each of three wells in the Madison reportedly is more than 4.000 gpm. Each of three wells in the Tensleep in the same area flows more than 400 gpm. Yields of springs in the Casper Formation near Casper Mountain range from about 1.0 to 17 cubic feet per second. Ground water from near the outcrop of all these formations usually contains less than 500 rag/l of dissolved solids. The dissolved-solids content increases with distance from the outcrop and in places is more than 3.200 mg/l. Several types of water were found in this unit including sodium sulfate, calcium sodium sulfate, calcium sulfate, sodium calcium sulfate, sodium chloride, and calcium bicarbonate.

Crist, Marvin A.; Lowry, Marlin E.

1972-01-01

10

Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-12-01

11

77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-04-16

12

77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-01-25

13

77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000.BX0000; WYW173408] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-05-25

14

76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW161248] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2011-05-13

15

Viral Surveillance during the 2006 Vesicular Stomatitis Outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2006, we collected 12203 biting flies from a vesicular stomatitis outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming. Flies were identified to the species level and viruses were isolated and identified by RT-PCR. We detected vesicular stomatitis virus-New Jersey serotype in two pools of Simulium bivittatum, W...

16

Airborne radioactivity Survey of part of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 133 square miles of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Henderson, J.R.

1954-01-01

17

Mineral resources of the Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area is about 20 mi east-southeast of Encampment in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by middle Proterozoic gabbro, granite, and hornblende gneiss, which is locally cut by pegmatite dikes. There are no identified resources and no potential for undiscovered energy resources in this study area. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for industrial mineral is low.

du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

1989-01-01

18

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 266 square miles of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Henderson, J.R.

1954-01-01

19

Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

which does not show a change in seismic character below the top of the Minnelusa Formation (Pml) at the producing wells. The location of this section is shown in Figure 17b. NW Q3 44 44 a ~ ~ 4 SE ( 2 288 ? ~ 2 388g- 56 ~2. 388 l. 65 l. 89 l89 2... troughs. The location of this section is shown in Figure 3. 15 5P 4 3P 2 i. 988 - - ~' . . ' ~~i. 988 yl~~~~ 2. f88 ? ~ ~~~~ -g ~~-~, ~~ ~2. i 88 P88 ~~~ mW Q - ~ -~ +' ~~~+fgiA% P P88 scale8i. 3dv TRACE i88 FIG. 6. Black and white seismic...

Walters, Donna Lynn

2012-06-07

20

76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2008 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA for the James Campbell and Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuges (the Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge CCP was completed in fall 2010). Simultaneously, we released...

2011-06-30

21

78 FR 48461 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW172684] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Hay Creek II Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2013-08-08

22

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2001: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7) chronic…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

23

Some Features of Wyoming Big Sagebrush Communities on Gravel Pediments of the Green River in Daggett County, Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crown cover of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) and other shrubs, frequency of under- story species, and ground cover were considered in context of ungulate grazing on Quaternary gravel pediments associated with the Green River in Daggett County, Utah. Maximum sagebrush crown cover was found at 22% inside an exclosure that had kept all ungulates out for about

Sherel Goodrich; Dwain Nelson; Natalie Gale

1999-01-01

24

Geologic map of the Sand Creek Pass quadrangle, Larimer County, Colorado, and Albany County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New geologic mapping within the Sand Creek Pass 7.5 minute quadrangle defines geologic relationships within the northern Front Range of Colorado along the Wyoming border approximately 35 km south of Laramie, Wyo. Previous mapping within the quadrangle was limited to regional reconnaissance mapping; Eaton Reservoir 7.5 minute quadrangle to the east (2008), granite of the Rawah batholith to the south (1983), Laramie River valley to the west (1979), and the Laramie 30' x 60' quadrangle to the north (2007). Fieldwork was completed during 1981 and 1982 and during 2007 and 2008. Mapping was compiled at 1:24,000-scale. Minimal petrographic work was done and no isotope work was done in the quadrangle area, but detailed petrographic and isotope studies were performed on correlative map units in surrounding areas as part of a related regional study of the northern Front Range. Stratigraphy of Proterozoic rocks is primarily based upon field observation of bulk mineral composition, macroscopic textural features, and field relationships that allow for correlation with rocks studied in greater detail outside of the map area. Stratigraphy of Phanerozoic rocks is primarily based upon correlation with similar rocks to the north in the Laramie Basin of Wyoming and to the east in the Front Range of Colorado.

Workman, Jeremiah B.; Braddock, William A.

2010-01-01

25

Geologic Map of the Eaton Reservoir Quadrangle, Larimer County, Colorado and Albany County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New geologic mapping of the Eaton Reservoir 7.5' quadrangle defines geologic relationships in the northern Front Range along the Colorado/Wyoming border approximately 35 km south of Laramie, Wyo. Previous mapping within the quadrangle was limited to regional reconnaissance mapping (Tweto, 1979; Camp, 1979; Burch, 1983) and some minor site-specific studies (Carlson and Marsh, 1986; W. Braddock, unpub. mapping, 1982). Braddock and others (1989) mapped the Diamond Peak 7.5' quadrangle to the east, Burch (1983) mapped rocks of the Rawah batholith to the south, W. Braddock (unpub. mapping, 1981) mapped the Sand Creek Pass 7.5' quadrangle to the west, and Ver Ploeg and Boyd (2000) mapped the Laramie 30' x 60' quadrangle to the north. Field work was completed during 2005 and 2006 and the mapping was compiled at a scale of 1:24,000. Minimal petrographic work and isotope dating was done in connection with the present mapping, but detailed petrographic and isotope studies were carried out on correlative map units in surrounding areas as part of a related regional study of the northern Front Range. Classification of Proterozoic rocks is primarily based upon field observation of bulk mineral composition, macroscopic textural features, and field relationships that allow for correlation with rocks studied in greater detail outside of the map area.

Workman, Jeremiah B.

2008-01-01

26

Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in Wyoming. Especially in the winter, the proportionately large, continuous gain of groundwater into Fish Creek in the perennial section keeps most of the creek free of ice. Because sunlight can still reach the streambed in Fish Creek and the water is still flowing, aquatic plants continue to photosynthesize in the winter, albeit at a lower level of productivity. Additionally, the cobble and large gravel substrate in Fish Creek provides excellent attachment points for aquatic plants, and when combined with Fish Creek’s channel stability allows rapid growth of aquatic plants once conditions allow during the spring. The aquatic plant community of Fish Creek was different than most streams in Wyoming in that it contains many different macrophytes—including macroalgae such as long streamers of Cladophora, aquatic vascular plants, and moss; most other streams in the state contain predominantly algae. From the banks of Fish Creek, the bottom of the stream sometimes appeared to be a solid green carpet. A shift was observed from higher amounts of microalgae in April/May to higher amounts macrophytes in August and October, and differences in the relative abundance of microalgae and macrophytes were statistically significant between seasons. Differences in dissolved-nitrate concentrations and in the nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio were significantly different between seasons, as concentrations of dissolved nitrate decreased from April/May to August and October. It is likely that dissolved-nitrate concentrations in Fish Creek were lower in August and October because macrophytes were quickly utilizing the nutrient, and a negative correlation between macro-phytes and nitrate was found. Macroinvertebrates also were sampled because of their role as indicators of water quality and their documented responses to perturbation such as degradation of water quality and habitat. Statistically significant seasonal differences were noted in the macroinvertebrate community. Taxa richness and relative abundance of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, which tend to be intolerant of water-

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

27

Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer system, commonly called the High Plains aquifer in many publications, is a nationally important water resource that underlies a 111-million-acre area (173,000 square miles) in parts of eight States including Wyoming. Through irrigation of crops with groundwater from the High Plains aquifer system, the area that overlies the aquifer system has become one of the major agricultural regions in the world. In addition, the aquifer system also serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents of the region. The High Plains aquifer system is one of the largest aquifers or aquifer systems in the world. The High Plains aquifer system underlies an area of 8,190 square miles in southeastern Wyoming. Including Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present in parts of five counties in southeastern Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 8 percent of Wyoming, and 5 percent of the aquifer system is located within the State. Based on withdrawals for irrigation, public supply, and industrial use in 2000, the High Plains aquifer system is the most utilized source of groundwater in Wyoming. With the exception of the Laramie Mountains in western Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present throughout Laramie County. In Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is the predominant groundwater resource for agricultural (irrigation), municipal, industrial, and domestic uses. Withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation (primarily in the eastern part of the county) is the largest use of water from the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County and southeastern Wyoming. Continued interest in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County prompted a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office to update the potentiometric-surface map of the aquifer system in Laramie County. Groundwater levels were measured in wells completed in the High Plains aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

2011-01-01

28

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

29

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

30

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

31

Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

32

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

1953-01-01

33

Mineral resources of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The combined investigations of the US Geological Survey, the US Bureau of Mines, and the Geological Survey of Wyoming have identified gold resources in a lode-type gold vein west of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area in the adjacent Lewiston mining district. Extensions of this vein into the study area may contain 20,000 tons of gold resources; however, subsurface sampling

W. C. Day; R. H. Hill; D. M. Kulik; D. C. Scott; W. D. Hausel

1988-01-01

34

Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek have been increasing in recent years. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the water quality and biological communities in Fish Creek. Water-quality samples were collected for analyses of physical properties and water chemistry (nutrients, nitrate isotopes, and wastewater chemicals) between March 2007 and October 2008 from seven surface-water sites and three groundwater wells. During this same period, aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate samples were collected and habitat characteristics were measured at the surface-water sites. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate nutrient concentrations (that influence biological indicators of eutrophication) and potential sources of nutrients by using stable isotope analysis and other indicator chemicals (such as caffeine and disinfectants) that could provide evidence of anthropogenic sources, such as wastewater or septic tank contamination in Fish Creek and adjacent groundwater, and (2) characterize the algal, macrophyte, and macroinvertebrate communities and habitat of Fish Creek. Nitrate was the dominant species of dissolved nitrogen present in all samples and was the only bioavailable species detected at concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level in all surface-water samples. Average concentrations of dissolved nitrate in surface water were largest in samples collected from the two sites with seasonal flow near Teton Village and decreased downstream; the smallest concentration was at downstream site A-Wck. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in groundwater were consistently greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. Orthophosphate was the primary dissolved species of phosphorus present in all surface-water and groundwater samples. The average concentration of dissolved orthophosphate in surface water was largest in samples collected from near Teton Village; samples from all other sites had similar average concentrations. Concentrations of dissolved orthophosphate in groundwater also were typically greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. The aquatic plant communities in Fish Creek typically were composed of a mixture of macrophytes, macroalgae, microalgae, and moss. The composition of the aquatic plant community in Fish Creek appeared to shift in the downstream direction in 2007. On average, the proportion of macrophytes ranged from about 1 percent at site A-R1U, the most upstream site, to 54 percent of the plant community at site A-R6D, the farthest downstream site sampled during 2007. The downstream increase in macrophytes was accompanied by a downstream decrease in microalgae. The average proportion of microalgae ranged from 80 percent at site A-R1U to 24 percent at site A-R6D. The proportion of the macroalgae Cladophora in the aquatic plant community was relatively high at sites A-Wck and A-R3D in both 2007 and 2008.

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2010-01-01

35

Pam Campbell  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Drilling Platform exploded and sank, causing the largest oil spill yet recorded. Samples from the oil spill were collected by Louisiana USGS scientists Greg Swayze and Charlie Demas and sent for analysis in Menlo Park, CA. Researcher Pam Campbell performed ma...

2010-05-25

36

Einstein in Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

Elliot, Ian

1996-01-01

37

Selenium in waters in and adjacent to the Kendrick Project, Natrona County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selenium in concentrations exceeding the maximum limit, 0.01 milligrams per liter or 10 micrograms per liter, recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service in 'Drinking-Water Standards, 1962,' Public Health Pub. 956, is present in waters in areas near Casper, Wyo. Some streams containing selenium flow into the North Platte River upstream from several municipalities that obtain water from the river and the alluvium along the river. The area of this investigation includes about 725 square miles in Natrona County in central Wyoming. Study effort was most intensive within the area bounded by the North Platte River, Casper Creek, and Casper Canal, the approximate boundaries of the Kendrick irrigation project. Geologic formations in the area contain selenium that may have been derived from deposits of seleniferous material or from volcanic emanations brought down by rain. Formations older than Cretaceous age were not considered as important sources of selenium in waters of the area, because no irrigation water is applied to areas underlain by these rocks. The selenium concentration in 82 samples of Cretaceous rocks ranged from less than 10 to 4,200 ?g/kg (micrograms per kilogram of sample); no correlation was found between selenium concentration and the depth at which the sample was collected. Of four samples of Tertiary rocks analyzed, three contained no selenium and one had a selenium concentration of 40 ?g/kg. The selenium concentration in 93 samples of Quaternary rocks ranged from less than 10 to 52.0 ?g/kg, and the highest selenium concentration was generally found at depths less than 4 feet. No geologic formation has consistently high concentrations of selenium, but high concentrations were found at points throughout the study area. Probably the rocks in any locality could be the source of selenium in the water in the surrounding vicinity. The selenium concentration in water from some wells fluctuates widely. It is concluded that the selenium concentrations in the ground water in these areas have not reached a state of equilibrium in the aquifer. It is possible that such nonequilibrium conditions exist in aquifers throughout much of the area. If so, statements in this report concerning- trends of selenium concentration in ground water are somewhat speculative.Poison Spring Creek, Poison Spider Creek, Oregon Trail Drain, and Casper Creek are the principal tributaries that contribute selenium to the North Platte River. The selenium load, expressed in pounds per day, in Poison Spring Creek and Poison Spider Creek decreased slightly during the first year of sampling and increased slightly during the second year of sampling. The selenium load in Oregon Trail Drain is greatest in late winter and early spring during the period of low flow; the selenium load in Casper Creek varies, but shows no correlation with season and little correlation with stream discharge. The North Platte River above and below the irrigation project had consistently low selenium concentrations, 10 ?g/l (micrograms per liter) or less, in the period April 1968 through June 1969. The total selenium load contributed to the North Platte River from tributaries in the study area is almost undetectable after mixing with the river water. From the fall of 1968 .to the spring of 1969, results of water sampling in areas influenced by irrigation show that the selenium concentration increased at 29 percent of the locations (average net increase of 64 ?g/l), decreased at 34 percent of the locations (average net decrease of 80 ?g/l), and had little (10 ?g/l or .less) or no change at 37 percent of the locations. As a comparison, results of water sampling in areas not influenced by irrigation showed that the selenium concentration increased at 2 percent of the locations (average net increase of 30 ?g/l), decreased at 26 percent of the locations (average net decrease of 30?g/l), and had little or no change at 72 percent of the locations. It is not possible to

Crist, Marvin A.

1975-01-01

38

Mineral resources of the Bobcat Draw Badlands Wilderness Study Area, Bir Horn and Washakie Counties, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Bobcat Draw Wilderness Study Area is in the Bighorn Basin about 45 mi west of Worland, Wyoming, and is underlain by early Tertiary sedimentary rocks. No resources were identified in this study area, which lacks mines or prospects, but is mostly under lease for oil and gas. This study area has a high potential for oil and gas and for subeconomic resources of coal and a moderate potential for a deep-seated geothermal energy resource. The resource potential for oil shale and metals, including uranium, is low.

Gibbons, A.B.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

39

Photogeologic maps of the Miles Ranch and Love Ranch quadrangles, Fremont and Natrona Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Love Ranch and Miles Ranch quadrangles are in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming (fig. 1). The rocks exposed in the quadrangles are sedimentary, and range in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary. The youngest formation in the quadrangles, the Wind River formation of Eocene age, is uranium bearing in adjacent areas. Within the two quadrangles the Wind River formation unconformably overlies all the older rocks. In Miles Ranch quadrangle the Wind River formation is divided, on the basis of photointerpretation, into an upper and lower unit; the relationship of these units to units of the Wind River formation, as mapped in adjoining areas, has not been determined.

Minard, James Pierson

1957-01-01

40

Molluscan record from a Mid-Cretaceous borehole in Weston County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A core borehole in the Osage oilfield on the west flank of the Black Hills uplift in eastern Wyoming penetrated, in decending order, most of the Carlile Shale, all of the Greenhorn Formation, and the upper part of the underlying Belle Fourche Shale. Molluscan fossils are abundant in parts of the core and indicate an age span of early Coniacian to the middle Cenomanian. Most of the fossils are bivalves and ammonites; gastropods are scarce. Fossils in the cores indicate the following zones: Lower Coniacian Cremnoceramus? waltersdorfensis Upper Turonian Scaphites coroensis S. nigricollensis S. whiifieldi S. warreni Middle Turonian Collignoniceras woollgari Lower Turonian Mytiloides mytiloides Mytiloides aff. M. duplicostatus Upper Cenomanian Sciponoceras gracile Dunveganoceras albertense D. pondi Middle Cenomanian Acanthoceras amphibolum

Cobban, William Aubrey

1984-01-01

41

Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

Not Available

1994-02-01

42

1983 Landsat soil-gas geochemical survey of Patrick Draw area, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Geosat test site at Patrick Draw, Wyoming, was resampled during the summer field season of 1983, to conduct a more detailed soil-gas survey on and around the area's producing fields. The results of this study agree with the 1980 Geosat assessment that the faults and fractures visible as linear features on satellite and aircraft imagery provide paths for active microseepage of hydrocarbons from depth to the near surface. This association is particularly true near the earlier described blighted sage zone, where extensive resampling reveals a much wider area of anomalously high free soil-gas values and fluorescence than was previously reported. Discriminant analysis suggests that the geochemical seepage signature found over the fields differs statistically from that present for adjacent areas of no known production. This observation was found to be true for all three soil-gas techniques used in this study. Anomaly patterns appear to be related to the type of soil-gas sample studied. Data obtained from shallow free soil-gas samples reveal that direct anomalies, controlled by faults and fractures, formed over production, whereas data obtained from samples treated by acid-extraction or thermal/mechanical disaggregation techniques exhibit magnitude lows over the producing areas. Such patterns indicate halo features around the composite producing areas. At present, this conflicting behavior cannot be explained.

Richers, D.M.; Jones, V.T.; Matthews, M.D.; Maciolek, J.; Pirkle, R.J.; Sidle, W.C.

1986-06-01

43

Geologic history and palynologic dating of Paleocene deposits, western Rock Springs uplift, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene, a northwest-southeast trending anticline developed in the area of the present Rock springs uplift in southwestern Wyoming. This ancestral structure was eroded to a surface of fairly low relief on which a paleosol developed. The surface was formed on the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation throughout the study area. In the early middle Paleocene (P3 palynomorph zone), topographic lows on the erosion surface were infilled by alluvial deposits that accumulated in channel, floodplain, and backswamp environments. An organic-rich facies contains numerous coal beds and is middle to late Paleocene in age (P3 to P5 zones). The assemblage of pollen that defines the late middle Paleocene (P4 zone) is absent from the area suggesting a hiatus, although no lithologic break was observed at this boundary. The younger organic-poor facies begins in the late Paleocene (P5 zone) and continues to the top of the studied sequence. This change in facies has been used to map the contact between the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age in this area, and the Wasatch Formation which was though to be of Eocene age. This study demonstrates that, as currently mapped, the lower part of the Wasatch Formation is Paleocene in age. Stratigraphically higher parts of the Wasatch, which presumably contain rocks of latest Paleocene (P6 zone) and earliest Eocene age, were not studied. -Authors

Kirschbaum, M.A.; Nelson, S.N.

1988-01-01

44

Geology and mineral resources of the Mud Springs Ranch Quadrangle, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mud Springs Ranch quadrangle occupies an area of 56 mF (square miles) on the southeast flank of the Rock Springs uplift in southwestern Wyoming. The climate is arid and windy. The landscape is mostly poorly vegetated and consists of north-trending ridges and valleys that are dissected by dry drainages. Sedimentary rocks exposed in the quadrangle are 5,400 ft (feet) thick and are mostly gray sandstone, siltstone, and shale, gray and brown carbonaceous shale, and thin beds of coal. They compose the Blair, Rock Springs, Ericson, Almond, and Lewis Formations of Cretaceous age and the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. The structure is mostly homoclinal, having southeast dips of 5?-12? in the northern part of the quadrangle, but minor plunging folds and one small fault are present in the southern part of the quadrangle. Three coal beds in the Fort Union Formation and 15 coal beds in the Almond Formation exceed 2.5 ft in thickness, are under less than 3,000 ft of overburden, and are potentially minable. Geographic stratigraphic, and resource data are present for each bed of minable coal. The total minable coal resources are estimated to be about 283 million short tons. Nine coal and rock samples from outcrops were analyzed to determine their quality and chemical composition. Four dry oil and gas test wells have been drilled within the quadrangle area, but structurally controlled stratigraphic-trap prospects remain untested.

Roehler, Henry W.

1979-01-01

45

Geologic controls on producibility at Clear Creek Field, Uinta County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Production from the eolian Nugget formation at Clear Creek field in the southwest Wyoming thrust belt is controlled in large part by permeability anisotropy emplaced at the time of deposition and subsequent reorientation of the formation as a result of folding. Maximum permeability in this eolian system occurs in and parallel to dune slip-face bedding planes. Vertical permeability across less porous interdunal deposits ranges from two to three orders of magnitude less than the maximum permeability in the dune deposits. At the time of Nugget deposition the dune orientation was predominantly northwest-southeast with the slipfaces dipping to the southwest, giving a northwest-southeast orientation to the axis of maximum permeability (K/sub max/ axis). This K/sub max/ axis was curved or bent during subsequent folding of the sediments, giving it various orientations depending on structural position. Higher gas oil ratios are observed at Clear Creek where the separation of oil zone perfs from the gas cap along the K/sub max/ axis is smaller. These higher gas oil ratios result as gas is preferentially ''channeled'' along the slipface bedding planes to the oil zone perfs. In situations as at Clear Creek, where the oil zone is thin and a gas cap is present, oil zone completions must be located where the K/sub max/ axis is near horizontal, thus maximizing the separation of perfs from the gas cap. This reduces the ''channeling'' of gas along the K/sub max/ axis and maximizes oil zone recoveries. Another parameter affecting producibility is rock deformation due to faulting. Faulting in the Nugget results in the development of intense gouge zones along and adjacent to fault planes. These gouge zones represent potential barriers to flow.

Alexander, W.G.

1986-01-01

46

Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and labortory studies were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. A search of U.S. Bureau of Land Management, State, and county records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of the study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of the area precludes much usage of the material. About two-thirds of the study area is under lease for oil and gas. The entire study area has moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

47

Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and laboratory studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines. A search of US Bureau of Land Management, State, and County records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of this study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of this area precludes much usage of this material. About two-thirds of this study area is under lease for oil and gas. This entire study area has a moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and a low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

48

Geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Ogallala Formation and White River Group, Belvoir Ranch near Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of Tertiary lithostratigraphic units (Ogallala Formation and White River Group) that typically compose or underlie the High Plains aquifer system in southeastern Wyoming were described physically and chemically, and evaluated at a location on the Belvoir Ranch in Laramie County, Wyoming. On the basis of this characterization and evaluation, three Tertiary lithostratigraphic units were identified using physical and chemical characteristics determined during this study and previous studies, and these three units were determined to be correlative with three identified hydrogeologic units composing the groundwater system at the study site—a high-yielding aquifer composed of the entire saturated thickness of the heterogeneous and coarse-grained fluvial sediments assigned to the Ogallala Formation (Ogallala aquifer); an underlying confining unit composed primarily of very fine-grained volcaniclastic sediments and mudrocks assigned to the Brule Formation of the White River Group and some additional underlying sediments that belong to either the Brule or Chadron Formation, or both (Brule confining unit); and an underlying low-yielding aquifer composed primarily of poorly sorted fluvial sediments assigned to the Chadron Formation of the White River Group (Chadron aquifer). Despite widely varying sediment heterogeneity and consolidation, some limited hydraulic connection throughout the full vertical extent of the Ogallala aquifer was indicated but not conclusively proven by interpretation of similar chemical and isotopic characteristics, modern apparent groundwater ages, and similar hydraulic-head responses measured continuously in two Ogallala aquifer monitoring wells installed for this study at two different widely separated (83 feet) depth intervals. Additional work beyond the scope of this study, such as aquifer tests, would be required to conclusively determine hydraulic connection within the Ogallala aquifer. Groundwater levels (hydraulic heads) measured continuously using water-level recorders in both monitoring wells completed in the Ogallala aquifer showed a consistent strong upward vertical gradient in the Ogallala aquifer, indicating the potential for water to move from deeper to shallower parts of the aquifer, regardless of the time of year and the presumed effects of pumping of public-supply and industrial wells in the area. Continuous measurement of groundwater levels in the shallowest monitoring well, installed near the water table, and examination of subsequently constructed water-level hydrographs indicated substantial groundwater recharge is likely during the spring of 2009 and 2010 from the ephemeral stream (Lone Tree Creek) located adjacent to the study site that flows primarily in response to spring snowmelt from the adjacent Laramie Mountains and surface runoff from precipitation events. Using the water-table fluctuation method, groundwater recharge was estimated to be about 13 inches for the period beginning in early October 2009 and ending in late June 2010, and about 4 inches for the period beginning in March 2011 and ending in early July 2011. Comparison of previously measured groundwater levels (hydraulic heads) and groundwater-quality characteristics in nearby monitoring wells completed in the Chadron aquifer with those measured in the two monitoring wells installed for this study in the Ogallala aquifer, combined with detailed lithologic characterization, strongly indicated the Brule confining unit hydraulically confines and isolates the Chadron aquifer from the overlying Ogallala aquifer, thus likely limiting hydraulic connection between the two units. Consequently, because of the impermeable nature of the Brule confining unit and resulting hydraulic separation of the Ogallala and Chadron aquifers, and compared with local and regional hydrostratigraphic definitions of the High Plains aquifer system, the groundwater system in Tertiary lithostratigraphic units overlying the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation at the location studied on the Belvoir Ranch was

Bartos, Timothy T.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Webster, Daniel M.

2014-01-01

49

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J.R.

1954-01-01

50

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Sweetwater county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 125 square miles of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of nine radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J.R.

1954-01-01

51

35. Photocopied July 1978. (MTU, John F. Campbell Collection) VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

35. Photocopied July 1978. (MTU, John F. Campbell Collection) VIEW LOOKING NORTH SHOWING NO. 6 SHAFT-ROCKHOUSE. NOTE STEEL BATTER BRACE THAT HAS BEEN ADDED. 1912. - Quincy Mining Company, Hancock, Houghton County, MI

52

Sedimentary facies and reservoir characteristics of Cretaceous J Sandstone at Torrington field (North), Goshen County, Wyoming, exploration and development implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Torrington field (North) is productive from the Lower Cretaceous J sandstone in the Wyoming portion of the Denver basin. The trapping mechanism is stratigraphic, with reservoir sandstones enveloped laterally and updip by shale-dominated lithofacies. The field has produced 13,000 bbl of oil from two wells since its discovery in late 1981. Three major sedimentary environments and their associated facies, characteristic

D. L. Mikesh; R. F. Lafollette

1983-01-01

53

Coal resource occurrence and coal development potential maps of the southwest quarter of North Star School 15-minute quadrangle, Campbell County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of the water resources of the Port Gamble Indian Reservation, Wash., has shown that there is probably a substantial quantity of good quality ground and surface water available to provide for further development of the reservation. Groundwater supplies are available from an artesian aquifer underlying the reservation near sea level. This aquifer is estimated to be capable of supplying at least 90 gallons per minute, continuously, without greatly increasing chances for seawater intrusion. This quantity of water is enough to supply about 800 to 900 additional residents on the reservation. Another artesian aquifer, relatively unexplored, was noted underlying the previously mentioned artesian aquifer. This lower aquifer may be capable of supplying additional groundwater for use on the reservation. Groundwater quality was found to be good for most uses, being moderately hard and having moderately high iron concentrations. No evidence of pollution of the groundwater was found during this study from either seawater intrusion or contamination from a nearby solid-waste disposal site. Surface-water resources studied on the reservation included two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, whose 7-day low flows were estimated to be 0.4 and 0.2 cubic foot per second, respectively, for a 20-year estimated recurrence interval. The surface-water quality was also found to be good for most uses and was within the limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for untreated drinking water. Thus, the water from these two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, could be used as domestic supplies to supplement the groundwater withdrawals. (USGS)

IntraSearch Inc.

1979-01-01

54

Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

2012-03-27

55

Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

1993-07-01

56

the Campbell Sports Center join the campbell legacy  

E-print Network

the Campbell Sports Center join the campbell legacy the columbia campaign for athletics: achieving excellence #12;the Campbell Sports Center transforming columbia athletics Through The Columbia Campaign transformation is the construction of The Campbell Sports Center at the Baker Athletics Complex, named in honor

Qian, Ning

57

An Aerial-Photographic Assessment of Reenacted Handcart Treks on a Section of the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, Fremont County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reenactments of historical pioneer emigrations have increased in popularity since the celebration of these events during the United States bicentennial in 1976. From 1999 to 2006, approximately 70,000 Mormon trekkers traveled the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail (hereinafter referred to as the Trail) segment between Sixth Crossing and Rock Creek Hollow in Fremont County, Wyoming. Recent elevated levels of use have raised concerns over potential recreation-related damage to this particularly scenic segment of the Trail. In 2006, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) contracted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct an aerial-photographic assessment of the condition of the Trail between Sixth Crossing and Rock Creek Hollow. Specifically, the USGS was to assess trail conditions for this segment as influenced by handcart use (low, medium, and high intensity of use) and concentrated activities associated with trekking (toilet, rest, and camp sites). Based on these results, there are identifiable management considerations. Toilet and rest sites need to be carefully located relative to where sensitive vegetation or soils occur. The analyses presented here indicate that limiting motorized vehicle use needs to be a priority over that of adjusting the number of trekkers. Additionally, monitoring of the Trail from Sixth Crossing to Rock Creek Hollow segment needs to consider explicit management targets, such as minimum acceptable levels of bare ground or trail width, and the establishment of permanent monitoring plots to evaluate targets and measure responses to altered management activities.

McDougal, Robert R.; Waltermire, Robert G.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Germaine, Stephen S.; Nielsen, Scott E.; Nielsen, Charlene C.; Hanson, Leanne; Bowen, Zachary H.

2008-01-01

58

Geology and ground-water resources of Platte County, Wyoming, with a section on Chemical quality of the water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Platte County, Wyo., has an area of 2,114 square miles and, in 1950, had a population of 7,925; it lies within parts of two major physiographic provinces, the northern extension of the Southern Rocky Mountains and the northwestern part of the Great Plains. The Laramie Range and related structures lie along the western margin of the county and constitute the eastern limit of the Rocky Mountain Front Range. The High Plains section of the Great Plains province extends eastward from the Laramie Range over the remainder of the county. The original surface of the High Plains has been deeply eroded, and in the northeastern part of the county it is broken by the broad uplifted structural platform of the Hartville Hills. The North Platte River and its tributaries have entrenched their channels as much as 1,000 feet into the plains, leaving wide, very flat intervalley areas that are interrupted by a few isolated buttes and outlying ridges. Well-defined terraces, locally called the Wheatland Flats, have been formed in central Platte County. The climate is semiarid, the average annual precipitation being about 15 inches. Farming and stockraising are the principal occupations in the county. Most of the rocks exposed in the county are of Tertiary and Quaternary age, although rocks as old as Precambrian crop out locally. The Arikaree and Brule formations and younger deposits, including Tertiary ( ?) deposits (undifferentiated) and terrace, flood-plain, and other alluvial deposits, underlie more than two-thirds of the county. Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian rocks crop out in the other third and underlie the younger rocks at great depths elsewhere. Small supplies of ground water adequate for domestic and stock use can be obtained from shallow wells in the Casper, Hartville, Cloverly, Brule, and Arikaree formations and in the terrace and flood-plain deposits. Small to moderate amounts of ground water can be obtained from the 'Converse sand' of the Hartville formation. Several flowing wells obtain water from this sand near Glendo. Moderate to large supplies of ground water adequate for small-scale irrigation or industrial uses or for public supply can be obtained from properly constructed wells penetrating thick saturated sections of the Arikaree formation and from the terrace and flood-plain deposits. Large supplies of ground water can be obtained from the flood-plain deposits of the North Platte River near Guernsey, where wells commonly yield more than 1,000 gpm (gallons per minute). The aquifers with greatest potential for additional groundwater development in Platte County, in decreasing order of importance, are the flood-plain deposits along the North Platte River and its tributaries, the Arikaree formation and terrace deposits in parts of the Wheatland Flats, and the 'Converse sand' in the general vicinity of Glendo.

Morris, D.A.; Babcock, H.M.; Langford, R.H.

1960-01-01

59

Wyoming Kids Count Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The 1997 report has been expanded to include detailed information on the status of children by categories of welfare, health, and education. The first part of the factbook documents trends by county for 15 indicators: (1) poverty and population; (2)…

Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

60

Water Resources of Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

61

Preliminary reconnaissance survey for thorium, uranium, and rare-earth oxides, Bear Lodge Mountains, Crook County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An area about 6 miles north of Sundance, in the Bear Lodge Mountains, in Crook County, Wyo., was examined during August 1950 for thorium, uranium, and rare-earth oxides and samples were collected. Uranium is known to occur in fluorite veins and iron-manganese veins and in the igneous rocks of Tertiary age that compose the core of the Bear Lodge Mountains. The uranium content of the samples ranges from 0.001 to 0.015 percent in those from the fluorite veins, from 0.005 to 0.018 percent in those from the iron-manganese veins, and from 0.001 to 0.017 percent in those from the igneous rocks. The radioactivity of the samples is more than that expected from the uranium content. Thorium accounts for most of this discrepancy. The thorium oxide content of samples ranges from 0.07 to 0.25 percent in those from the iron-manganese veins and from 0.07 to 0.39 percent in those from the sedimentary rocks, and from0.04 to 0.30 in those from the igneous rocks. Rare-earth oxides occur in iron-manganese veins and in zones of altered igneous rocks. The veins contain from 0.16 to 12.99 percent rare-earth oxides, and the igneous rocks, except for two localities, contain from 0.01 to 0.42 percent rare-earth oxides. Inclusions of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks in the intrusive rocks contain from 0.07 to 2.01 percent rare-earth oxides.

Wilmarth, V.R.; Johnson, D.H.

1953-01-01

62

3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by 'The Campbell Studios', ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by 'The Campbell Studios', 1122 North 3rd Avenue, Tucson, Arizona. c. 1881 Copied for Survey through courtesy of Harry Drachman. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST, SHOWING PRINCIPAL STRUCTURE - Mission San Cosme del Tucson, Menlo Park, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

63

Ryan Campbell Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Ryan Campbell Oral History Part 1 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player... Lawrence, KS 66045 Requestors must identify: 1. Type of publication 2. Proposed title 3. Specific passages to be quoted 4. Anticipated uses of the passages 5. Publisher's name 6. Expected date of publication ...

Campbell, Ryan; Albin, Tami

2009-12-16

64

Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

None

1982-01-01

65

STATUS REVIEW OF THE BEAR LODGE MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ( Zapus hudsonius campestris ) IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The Bear Lodge meadow jumping mouse ( Zapus hudsonius campestris ) is one of 2 subspecies of the meadow jumping mouse that occur in Wyoming. It occurs in northeastern Wyoming (Crook and Weston counties) and adjacent portions of South Dakota. In Wyoming, it has been documented only in the Belle Fourche River basin. The second subspecies, Preble's meadow jumping

Gary P. Beauvais

2000-01-01

66

Dr. Barbara Campbell  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Clemson University Biological Sciences faculty page features Dr. Barbara Campbell, an Assistant Professor involved in several projects studying the metabolic potential of mixed microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Projects include a metagenomics approach to understanding the relationship of a mixed episymbiont community associated with the hydrothermal vent annelid, Alvinella pompejana; characterizing the chemoautotrophic potentials of uncultured bacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents; and the whole genome sequencing of a dominant type of chemoautotroph found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The web page includes information about collaborative research, a list of selected publications, and links related to her projects.

Campbell, Barbara; University, Clemson

67

Wyoming Community College System Spring 2004 Enrollment Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains enrollment information in tabular form from the Wyoming Community College System for the Spring of 2004. Enrollment information on each of the counties in Wyoming can be found in this document. Data is broken down by: college; full-time, part-time, total, and percent credit headcount (includes on-campus, distance education,…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2004

2004-01-01

68

Property description and fact-finding report for NPR-3 Natrona County, Wyoming. Addendum to 22 August 1996 study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase I fact-finding and property description for that study. The United States of America owns 100 percent of the mineral rights and surface rights in 9,321-acre NPR-3. This property comprises the Teapot Dome oil field and related production, processing and other facilities. Discovered in 1914, this field has 632 wells producing 1,807 barrels of oil per day. Production revenues are about $9.5 million per year. Remaining recoverable reserves are approximately 1.3 million barrels of oil. Significant plugging and abandonment (P&A) and environmental liabilities are present.

NONE

1997-05-01

69

Water-quantity, water-quality, soil, and sediment data collected at Goose Egg Spring, Natrona County, Wyoming, May and July 1992  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recent, apparent increases in sediment accumulation in Goose Egg Spring, southwest of Casper, Wyoming, may have been the result of natural environmental processes or quarry operations near the spring in late 1991. Goose Egg Spring is the sole source of water for the Dan Speas Fish Rearing Station. This facility is operated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission and produces about 77,000 kilograms of stockable fish annually. Samples of the spring water, surrounding soils, and bottom sediment were collected. Methods used in obtaining all samples are discussed. Results of chemical analyses of the spring water, stratigraphic description of core samples, particle-size distribution analysis, visual mineralogical assessment, and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize Goose Egg Spring and the immediately surrounding area in May and July 1992.

Ritz, G.F.; Bruce, B.W.

1993-01-01

70

Comparison of computer-based and manual coal resource estimation methods for the Cache coal bed, Recluse Geologic Model Area, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coal resources have been estimated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Geologic Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7?-minute quadrangles in Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 300 coal thickness measurements from drill-hole logs are distributed throughout the area The Cache coal bed and associated strata are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth to the Cache coal bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The coal bed is as much as 31 feet thick but is absent in places. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources estimated by hand show the bed to contain 2,228 million short tons or about 2.6 percent more than the computer-calculated figure of 2,169 million short tons.

Schneider, Gary B.; Crowley, Sharon S.; Carey, Mary Alice

1984-01-01

71

Applied Research Staff: Melba Campbell  

Cancer.gov

Melba J. Campbell is a Program Specialist in the Applied Research Program. She provides administrative support to the Health Services and Economics Branch. Prior to joining ARP, Ms. Campbell was in the Office of Cancer Survivorship (OCS) where she served as a Program Support Specialist. Her roles in OCS included serving as the liaison for Communication, Lead Computer User Group and the Division of Extramural Activities Support (DEAS).

72

Characterization of Interactions between Surface Water and Near-Stream Groundwater along Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, by Using Heat as a Tracer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, a tributary of the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Local residents began observing an increase in the growth of algae and aquatic plants in the stream during the last decade. Due to the known importance of groundwater to surface water in the area, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to characterize the interactions between surface water and near-stream groundwater along Fish Creek. The study has two main objectives: (1) develop an improved spatial and temporal understanding of water flow (fluxes) between surface water and groundwater, and (2) use a two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport model to interpret observed temperature and hydraulic-head distributions and to describe groundwater flow near Fish Creek. The study is intended to augment hydrologic information derived from previously published results of a seepage investigation on Fish Creek. Seepage measurements provide spatially averaged gains and losses over an entire reach for one point in time, whereas continuous temperature and water-level measurements provide continuous estimates of gain and loss at a specific location. Stage, water-level, and temperature data were collected from surface water and from piezometers completed in an alluvial aquifer at three cross sections on Fish Creek at Teton Village, Resor's Bridge, and Wilson from October 2004 to October 2006. The flow and energy (heat) transport model VS2DH was used to simulate flow through the streambed of Fish Creek at the Teton Village cross section from April 15 to October 14, 2006, (183 recharge periods) and at the Resor's Bridge and Wilson cross sections from June 6, 2005, to October 14, 2006 (496 recharge periods). A trial-and-error technique was used to determine the best match between simulated and measured data. These results were then used to calibrate the cross-sectional models and determine horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities. The fluxes of groundwater into the stream or fluxes of stream water into the alluvial aquifer were estimated by using the calibrated VS2DH model for each cross section. Results of the simulations indicated that surface water/groundwater interaction and hydraulic properties were different at the three cross sections. At the most upstream cross section, Teton Village, Fish Creek flowed intermittently and continually gained relatively large quantities of water from April through September. During other times of the year, the stream was dry near the cross section. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in both the horizontal and vertical directions resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Resor's Bridge cross section, about midway between the other two cross sections, was near the point where perennial flow begins. At this cross section, the stream gained water from groundwater during high flow in late spring and summer, was near equilibrium with groundwater during August and September, and lost water to groundwater during the remainder of the year. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity set at 5x10-5 m/s and vertical hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-5 m/s resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Wilson cross section, the most downstream site, was at USGS streamflow-gaging station 13016450. This part of the stream is perennial and was almost always gaining a small volume of water from groundwater. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in the horizontal direction and at 5x10-6 m/s in the vertical direction resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. Quantitative values of the flux from groundwater into surface water were estimated by using VS2DH and ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 cubic meters per day (m3/d) at the Teton Village cross section, from -3.8 to 7.4 m3/d at t

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Essaid, Hedeff I.

2009-01-01

73

Basin-margin depositional environments of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations (Tertiary) in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Johnson County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations along the east flank of the Bighorn Mountains in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Wyoming, consist of continental alluvial fan, braided stream, and poorly drained alluvial plain deposits. The Fort Union conformably overlies the Cretaceous Lance Formation, which is marine in its lower units and nonmarine in its upper part. The formations dip steeply along the western margin of the study area and are nearly horizontal in the central and eastern portions. This structural configuration permits the reconstruction of depositional environments as an aid to understanding: (1) the evolution of the Bighorn uplift and its effects on the depositional patterns marginal to the uplift during Paleocene and Eocene time and (2) the changing depositional environments basinward from the margin of the uplift during a relatively small period of time in the Eocene.

Obernyer, Stanley L.

1979-01-01

74

A Geophysical Study in Grand Teton National Park and Vicinity, Teton County, Wyoming: With Sections on Stratigraphy and Structure and Precambrian Rocks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An integrated geophysical study - comprising gravity, seismic refraction, and aeromagnetic surveys - was made of a 4,600-km2 area in Grand Teton National Park and vicinity, Wyoming, for the purpose of obtaining a better understanding of the structural relationships in the region. The Teton range is largely comprised of Precambrian crystalline rocks and layered metasedimentary gneiss, but it also includes granitic gneiss, hornblende-plagioclase gneiss, granodiorite, and pegmatite and diabase dikes. Elsewhere, the sedimentary section is thick. The presence of each system except Silurian provides a chronological history of most structures. Uplift of the Teton-Gros Ventre area began in the Late Cretaceous; most of the uplift occurred after middle Eocene time. Additional uplift of the Teton Range and downfaulting of Jackson Hole began in the late Pliocene and continues to the present. Bouguer anomalies range from -185 mgal over Precambrian rocks of the Teton Range to -240 mgal over low-density Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of Jackson Hole. The Teton fault (at the west edge of Jackson Hole), as shown by steep gravity gradients and seismic-refraction data, trends north-northeast away from the front of the Teton Range in the area of Jackson Lake. The Teton fault either is shallowly inclined in the Jenny Lake area, or it consists of a series of fault steps in the fault zone; it is approximately vertical in the Arizona Creek area. Seismic-refraction data can be fitted well by a three-layer gravity model with velocities of 2.45 km per sec for the Tertiary and Cretaceous rocks above the Cloverly Formation, 3.9 km per sec for the lower Mesozoic rocks, and 6.1 km per sec for the Paleozoic (limestone and dolomite) and Precambrian rocks. Gravity models computed along two seismic profiles are in good agreement (sigma=+- 2 mgal) if density contrasts with the assumed 2.67 g per cm2 Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks are assumed to be -0.35 and -0.10 g per cm2 for the 2.45 and 3.9 km per sec velocity layers, respectively. The Teton Range has a maximum vertical uplift of about 7 km, as inferred from the maximum depth to basement of about 5 km. Aeromagnetic data show a 400gamma positive anomaly in the Gros Ventre Range, which trends out of the surveyed area at the east edge. Exposed Precambrian rocks contain concentrations of magnetite and hematite. A prominent anomaly of about 100gamma is associated with the Gros Ventre Range, and 100gamma anomalies are associated with the layered gneiss of the Teton Range. On this basis the unmapped Precambrian rocks of the Gross Ventre Range are interpreted as layered gneiss. The sources of the magnetic anomalies, as indicated by depth determination, are at the surface of the Precambrian rocks. A model fitted to a profile across the Gros Ventre Range gives a depth to the Precambrian surface and a susceptibility of 0.0004 emu (electromagnetic units) for the source, which is consistent with modal analyses of the layered gneisses. A residual magnetic map shows that the granitic rocks and layered gneiss probably continue beneath the floor of Jackson Hole east of the Teton fault. The location of aeromagnetic anomalies is consistent with the interpretation that the Teton fault diverges from the front of the Teton Range.

Behrendt, John Charles; Tibbetts, Benton L.; Bonini, William E.; Lavin, Peter M.; Love, J.D.; Reed, John C.

1968-01-01

75

Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

2008-01-01

76

78 FR 2428 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164926, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Wildfire Partners, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164926 for lands in Converse County, Wyoming. The petition was...

2013-01-11

77

75 FR 5074 - Wyoming Interstate Company, Ltd.; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assessment for the Proposed Diamond Mountain Compressor Station Project January 25, 2010...assessment (EA) for the Diamond Mountain Compressor Station Project proposed by Wyoming...and maintain the Diamond Mountain Compressor Station in Uintah County, Utah....

2010-02-01

78

Computer modeling of Minnelusa (Pennsylvanian-Permian) paleotopography in eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming, with a case history  

SciTech Connect

Most Minnelusa Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) oil production in the Powder River basin is from paleotopographic traps. These traps occur where upper Minnelusa dune sands are encased in the overlying supratidal red Opeche Shale (Permian). The morphology of these sands suggests northwest-southeast-trending barchanoid sand ridges. Thickness variations in the Opeche mirror the relief on the Minnelusa surface. Opeche isopachous maps are one of the main methods used to explore for Minnelusa paleotopographic traps. Hand-contoured isopachous maps can be subject to ambiguous interpretations in areas of low-density control. This difficulty is partially overcome when the map is mathematically produced. Observations from oil tests in the area indicate that Minnelusa paleotopography is cyclic with a wavelength of approximately 3 mi (5 km). Double Fourier transforms are appropriate in modeling this kind of cyclic data. For a test township, the calculated double Fourier surfaces showed good correlation with the actual data values. This technique was then applied to a Minnelusa prospect in Campbell County, Wyoming. Double Fourier surfaces were calculated for several structural datums and isopach intervals. Additionally, regional dip was determined from a polynomial fit, the section was restored to horizontal, and then was modeled to reveal paleotopography. The paleotopographic-high axes and Opeche thin axes showed remarkable coincidence. This trend is believed to represent the trace of a paleo sand dune. A test well sited using conventional geologic methods plus input from the double Fourier maps confirmed the accuracy of the calculated surface.

Maslyn, R.M.; Phillips, F.J.

1984-04-01

79

Wyoming Community College System Summer 2005 Enrollment Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report includes Summer 2005 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 11 tables.) [For Spring 2005 enrollment report, see ED502747.

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

2006-01-01

80

Wyoming Community College System Fall 2005 Enrollment Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report includes Fall 2005 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For Summer 2005 enrollment report, see ED502746.

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

2006-01-01

81

The Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae)of Wyoming, USA, Revisited.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This survey of the earthworms from 22 of the 23 counties of Wyoming recorded 13 species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, all members of the family Lumbricidae. One of these species, Aporrectodea limicola, is reported for the first time from the state. Current nomenclature is applied to historical records...

82

Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

83

Wyoming State Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

84

Origin of high-permeability reservoirs in Upper Minnelusa Sandstone (Permian) Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana  

SciTech Connect

Petrographic analysis of samples from 8 Minnelusa cores from Campbell County, Wyoming, and Powder River County, Montana, reveals that high-permeability reservoirs (up to 3200 md) are the result of extensive dissolution of early precipitated gypsum or anhydrite cement. The Minnelusa reservoirs are in eolian sandstones (dune and interdune facies) that are very fine to coarse-grained, moderately to bimodally sorted quartz-arenites, subarkoses, and sublitharenites. Dune and interdune sandstones exhibit differences in detrital mineralogy that are the result of postdepositional dissolution of labile grains. The most common cements in the sandstone are anhydrite (0-30%), quartz overgrowths (0-10%), dolomite (0-10%), Kaolinite (< 5%), and illite (< 1%). Most cementation occurred during the pre-Jurassic when the sandstones were buried less than 1500 ft. The porosity network within the sandstone is a combination of primary and secondary porosity created by the dissolution of anhydrite cement. Burial history curves suggest that anhydrite dissolution occurred during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, when the top of the sandstones was still near the surface. During this time, 3 periods of uplift and erosion occurred in which meteoric waters undersaturated in calcium sulfate may have flowed through the sandstones. The distribution of the reservoirs is probably controlled by the regional structure during the periods of flushing. Dune sandstones are the most productive facies in the high-permeability reservoirs. Porosity in the dune facies averages 21% compared with an average of 9% in the interdune facies. This difference is the result of both lower depositional porosity and greater quartz and dolomite cementation in the interdune sandstones. Porosity loss due to mechanical compaction is similar for both facies.

Helmold, K.P.; Loucks, R.G.

1985-02-01

85

Wyoming Indians, Unit II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

Robinson, Terry

86

Wyoming: Jackson Hole  

article title:  Green Knoll Forest Fire     View Larger Image ... the area around Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where the Green Knoll forest fire has raged for many days. Due to the year's low humidity, ... the Grand Teton National Park and Bridger-Teton National Forest Interagency Fire Management Office announced a high risk for the area. ...

2014-05-15

87

Wyoming Government, Unit VII.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

Robinson, Terry

88

76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land...SUMMARY: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered...The following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been...

2011-03-25

89

Fibonacci lengths for certain metacyclic groups C. M. Campbell , P. P. Campbell , H. Doostie y  

E-print Network

Fibonacci lengths for certain metacyclic groups C. M. Campbell #3; , P. P. Campbell #3; , H the Fibonacci orbit of G with respect to the generating set A, denoted FA (G). If FA (G) is periodic we call the length of the period of the sequence the Fibonacci length of G with respect to A, written LENA (G

St Andrews, University of

90

A new Wyoming phytosaur  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August, 1965 Paper 2 A NEW WYOMING PHYTOSAUR By THEODORE H. EATON, JR. [Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas I ABSTRACT The skull of a new species of Angistorhinus, family... fenestrae long and spindle-shaped, skull roof of medium height and broadly curved. The skull, including palate, is complete except for part of the roof. INTRODUCTION The phytosaurs are a suborder, Parasuchia, of large semiaquatic thecodont reptiles known...

Eaton, T. H., Jr.

1965-08-01

91

Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

Callen, John; And Others

92

Editor, Nature: Philip Campbell Publisher: Sarah Greaves  

E-print Network

are not available, we rely on the immune system to clear the host of infectious agents and disease. A betterEditor, Nature: Philip Campbell Publisher: Sarah Greaves Insights Editor: LesleyAnson Editorial Cartwright Radha Clelland Nik Spencer Mick Ayres NATURE |VOL 430|8JULY2004|www.nature.com/nature 241 I

Cai, Long

93

Depositional environment of woodbine sandstones, Polk, Tyler and San Jacinto Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF WOODBINE SANDSTONES, POLK, TYLER AND SAN JACINTO COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by DEANE CAMPBELL FOSS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF WOODBINE SANDSTONES, POLK, TYLER AND SAN JACINTO COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by DEANE CAMPBELL FOSS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head...

Foss, Deane Campbell

2012-06-07

94

Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

None

1982-01-01

95

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County ...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County...

2013-07-01

96

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County ...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County...

2011-07-01

97

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County ...County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County...

2012-07-01

98

75 FR 62140 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159733, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Sun Cal Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159733 for land in Sublette County, Wyoming. The petition was filed...

2010-10-07

99

77 FR 49019 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW175075, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Nova Leasing, LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW175075 for land in Converse County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on...

2012-08-15

100

Agricultural land-use classification using landsat imagery data, and estimates of irrigation water use in Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka counties, 1992 water year, Upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the upper Snake River Basin study unit, land- and water-use data were used to describe activities that have potential effects on water quality, including biological conditions, in the basin. Land-use maps and estimates of water use by irrigated agriculture were needed for Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka Counties (south-central Idaho), four of the most intensively irrigated counties in the study unit. Land use in the four counties was mapped from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data for the 1992 water year using the SPECTRUM computer program. Land-use data were field verified in 108 randomly selected sections (640 acres each); results compared favorably with land-use maps from other sources. Water used for irrigation during the 1992 water year was estimated using land-use and ancillary data. In 1992, a drought year, estimated irrigation withdrawals in the four counties were about 2.9 million acre-feet of water. Of the 2.9 million acre-feet, an estimated 2.12 million acre-feet of water was withdrawn from surface water, mainly the Snake River, and nearly 776,000 acre-feet was withdrawn from ground water. One-half of the 2.9 million acre-feet of water withdrawn for irrigation was considered to be lost during conveyance or was returned to the Snake River; the remainder was consumptively used by crops during the growing season.

Maupin, Molly A.

1997-01-01

101

Wyoming Community College Commission Annual Report, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) collaborates with Wyoming's seven community colleges to provide educational experiences that strengthen, support and enrich communities and prepare students to successfully meet life's challenges and recognize and profit from opportunities. Wyoming's seven community colleges provide affordable,…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

102

Fibonacci lengths for certain metacyclic groups C. M. Campbell  

E-print Network

Fibonacci lengths for certain metacyclic groups C. M. Campbell , P. P. Campbell , H. Doostie and E n - 1, xi+n = n j=1 xi+j-1, i 0, is called the Fibonacci orbit of G with respect to the generating the Fibonacci length of G with respect to A, written LENA(G). In this paper we examine the Fibonacci length

St Andrews, University of

103

SW 540 Campbell Spring 2014 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE  

E-print Network

issues involve intimate partner violence, complex responses of PTSD, other anxiety disorders, depressionSW 540 ­ Campbell Spring 2014 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF SOCIAL WORK SW 540-Military Social Work (3 credits) Instructor: Robert J. Campbell, LCSW, BCD Time: 7:00-8:30 PM EST Wednesdays Email

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

104

Using Joseph Campbell to Improve Students' Response to Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Shows how teachers can use the videotapes and writings of Joseph Campbell to help students see patterns in literature and respond personally to it. Presents Campbell's explanation of the monomyth of the hero's journey, and discusses three works in which the pattern is present. (SR)

Barnum, Carol M.

1992-01-01

105

On the Fibonacci length of powers of dihedral C. M. Campbell , P. P. Campbell , H. Doostie y  

E-print Network

On the Fibonacci length of powers of dihedral groups C. M. Campbell #3; , P. P. Campbell #3; , H the Fibonacci orbit of G with respect to the generating set A, denoted FA (G). If FA (G) is periodic we call the length of the period of the sequence the Fibonacci length of G with respect to A, written LENA (G

St Andrews, University of

106

Habitat use and movements of repatriated Wyoming toads  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We studied habitat use and movements of a repatriated population of federally endangered Wyoming toads (Bufo baxteri) after the breeding season at Mortenson Lake, Albany County, Wyoming, USA. We followed 8 adult toads using telemetry (n = 68 relocations) during periods of activity and observed 59 post-metamorphic juvenile toads (n = 59 locations). Adult toads used habitat with a greater mean vegetation canopy cover (mean = 52.6%) than juveniles (mean = 39.20%). We found adults farther from the shoreline (mean = 1.32 m) than juveniles (mean = 1.04 m). Substrates used by toads had a mean surface temperature of 20.31??C for adults and 23.05??C for juveniles. We found most adult and juvenile toads on saturated substrates. All adult toads sampled did not move outside of a 30 x 500 m area along the east-to-south shore where they were captured. Toads were active diurnally through the end of October. We found toads torpid at night. We compared our results to a similar study of the historic population and found that adult toads of the current population used denser vegetation than those of the historic population. Unlike many bufonids, terrestrial stages of the Wyoming toad appear to depend on saturated substrates. The best logistic regression predictors of adult and juvenile toad presence were surface temperature and distance to shore. Survey transects within the moist margin of the lake (???10 m from water) and after substrates have reached temperatures ???20??C will likely yield more detections.

Parker, J.M.; Anderson, S.H.

2003-01-01

107

78 FR 77791 - Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-in Scott County, Iowa  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Corporation--Abandonment Exemption--in Scott County, Iowa Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern...33+/- and milepost 0.99 +/- in Scott County, Iowa (the Line). The Line traverses...Decided: December 19, 2013. By the Board. Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of...

2013-12-24

108

Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

109

Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

110

Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

111

COLIN CAMPBELL: 1992*, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School.  

E-print Network

FIRST PAIR COLIN CAMPBELL: 1992*, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School. University in Pharmacology; Associate Director Joint Degree Program in Law, Health & the Life Sciences; Chair, Biological Sciences Policy and Review Council; Member, Graduate Program: Pharmacology; Bioinformatics; Environmental

Minnesota, University of

112

Acid precipitation in southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Snowfall, snowpack, and rainfall samples were collected in Laramie, Wyoming and in the Snowy Range west of Laramie from March to June 1981 to determine the occurrence and sources of acid precipitation in southeast Wyoming. Electrodes measured different pH values in the samples; however, fast-response electrodes yielded higher and apparently more accurate pH measurements. The pH values in the Laramie precipitation and snowpack were typically greater than 5.0, but all the Snowy Range snowpack pH values were less than 5.0. The lower pH values in the Snowy Range snowpack were caused by higher concentrations of the acid-forming nitrate and lower concentrations of the neutralizing calcium. Two organic species, formate and acetate, were detected in the Laramie samples, but had no significant influence on the acidity of the samples. 33 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

Ahern, J.; Baird, C.

1983-09-01

113

Wyoming DOE EPSCoR  

SciTech Connect

All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

Gern, W.A.

2004-01-15

114

University of Wyoming Digital Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since 2002, the University of Wyoming's Digital Initiatives program has been crafting carefully considered collections from their vast storehouse of historical ephemera. The Initiative is a member of the Collaborative Digitization Program, and they have worked on projects such as the Rocky Mountain Online Archive and the Wyoming Memory Portal. This site provides access to all of their digital collections, which include document archives related to the career of noted historian and national activist Grace Raymond Hebard and the travels of Thomas Kennet-Were, an English gentleman who wandered across the United States and Canada in 1868 and 1869. Visitors can search through all of the collections here as they see fit, and educators will also want to click on over to the "Teacher Resources" area for a selection of high quality lesson plans and activities.

115

A Diverse Dinosaur-Bird Footprint Assemblage from the Lance Formation, Upper Cretaceous, Eastern Wyoming: Implications for Ichnotaxonomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diverse assemblage of dinosaur and bird tracks from Niobrara County, Wyoming, represents the first vertebrate ichnofauna reported from the bone-rich Lance Formation (Maastrichtian, Upper Cretaceous). The ichnofauna includes a hadrosaur track with skin impressions; three theropod track types, including the tetradactyl track Saurexallopus zerbsti (ichnosp. nov.); a tridactyl dinosaur footprint with a fusiform digit III; possible Tyrannosaurus tracks; four

Martin G. Lockley; Gregory Nadon; Philip J. Currie

2004-01-01

116

MAJOR SOURCES OF NITROGEN INPUT AND LOSS IN THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING, 1990.  

EPA Science Inventory

Total nitrogen input and loss from cattle manure, fertilizer, legume crops, precipitation, and domestic septic systems in the upper Snake River Basin, Idaho and western Wyoming (1704), were estimated by county for water year 1990. The purpose of these estimations was to rank inp...

117

76 FR 80310 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation...requirements of this Act * * *; and rules...pursuant to this Act.'' See 30 U...OSM identified in response to Wyoming's formally...adding the term ``surface'' back into Wyoming's...the 1:24,000 scale requirement...

2011-12-23

118

78 FR 13004 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation...requirements of this Act * * *; and rules...pursuant to this Act.'' See 30 U...OSM identified in response to Wyoming's formally...Adding the term ``surface'' back into Wyoming's...the 1:24,000 scale requirement...

2013-02-26

119

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Wyoming—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...Entire State X Wyoming—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2010-07-01

120

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-print Network

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development · Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C

121

Campbell, William Wallace (1862-1938)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomer, born in Hancock County, OH. Trained as an engineer, became director of Lick Observatory, measured stellar radial velocities with the Mills photographic spectrograph (which he designed) and published them (with Joseph Moore) in a catalog (1928). From studies of the Martian atmosphere, he deduced that it could not support life. Founded the Lick southern station in Chile, discovered nume...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

122

Preliminary Assessment of Burrowing Owl Population Status in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, little is known about Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) abundance in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WCFD) classifies the Burrowing Owl as a Species of Special Concern. We identified available data sources to assess Burrowing Owl distribution and population trends in Wyoming and conducted a population survey in eastern Wyoming. The WGFD's Wildlife Observation System (WOS), initiated in

NICOLE M. KORFANTA; LOREN W. AYERS; STANLEY H. ANDERSON; DAVID B. MCDONALD

2001-01-01

123

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2012-01-01

124

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2010-01-01

125

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

... 2014-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2014-01-01

126

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2013-01-01

127

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2011-01-01

128

A. Malcolm Campbell Davidson College Bio 111 Bio111 Lab, Pipettor, page 1  

E-print Network

A. Malcolm Campbell Davidson College Bio 111 Bio111 Lab, Pipettor, page 1 How to Use of these stopping #12;A. Malcolm Campbell Davidson College Bio 111 Bio111 Lab, Pipettor, page 2 points is the point

Campbell, A. Malcolm

129

Floods of May 1978 in southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heavy rain and some snow fell on previously saturated ground over southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming during May 16-19, 1978. The maximum amount of 7.60 inches within a 72-hour period observed at Lame Deer, Montana, set a record for the month of May in that region. Heavy flooding occurred in the drainages of the Yellowstone River and its tributaries as well as the Belle Fourche, Cheyenne, and North Platte Rivers. The previous maximum flood of record was exceeded at 48 gaged sites, and the 1-percent chance flood was equaled or exceeded at 24 sites. Flood damage was extensive, exceeding $33 million. Nineteen counties in the two States were declared major disaster areas. Mean daily suspended-sediment discharges exceeded previously recorded maximum mean daily values at four sites on the Powder River. The maximum daily suspended-sediment discharge of 2,810,000 tons per day occurred on May 20 at the Site Powder River near Arvada, Wyoming. (USGS)

Parrett, Charles; Carlson, D.D.; Craig, G.S.; Chin, E.H.

1984-01-01

130

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31

131

Microsoft PowerPoint - 05 Marci Campbell.ppt  

Cancer.gov

Marci Marci Kramish Kramish Campbell, PhD, RD, Principal Investigator Campbell, PhD, RD, Principal Investigator Robert Robert Sandler Sandler , MD, MPH, Co , MD, MPH, Co - - Principal Investigator Principal Investigator Brenda Brenda DeVellis DeVellis , PhD, Co , PhD, Co - - Investigator Investigator Andrea Biddle, PhD , Co Andrea Biddle, PhD , Co - - Investigator Investigator Boyd Switzer PhD , Co Boyd Switzer PhD , Co - - Investigator Investigator David Farrell, MPH, President, People Designs, Inc.

132

Mosquitoes of Grand Teton National Park, Teton County, Wyoming, USA.  

PubMed

An inventory of the mosquitoes of Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway was conducted during 1998 and 2000. Twenty-five culicid species belonging to 3 genera and 5 subgenera were recorded. This is the 1st substantive effort to record the mosquito fauna of this national park since its establishment in 1929. Collection of specimens of Ochlerotatus communis and Ochlerotatus nevadensis from the same larval site supports the species status of Oc. nevadensis. PMID:11804462

Moore, J P

2001-12-01

133

The structural history of the Brady Unit, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Brady Unit is a 100MMBOE+, structural closure on the upthrown side of a large high-angle reverse fault on the east flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. It produces from seven different intervals ranging from the Upper Cretaceous Masaverde Group to the Pennsylvainian Weber Formation, at depths of 5000` to 14000`. The Weber Formation is a 900` thick package of dune and interdune sediments which is productive in its upper third. The south structure is filled close to it`s spill point with a retrograde condensate. Condensate gravity is approximately 51.5{degrees} and a typical initial GOR is 5000:1. The north structure has an unknown gas column with an initial GOR of 27,900:1. The Upper Jurassic Entrada Formation consists of eolian, interdune and shoreline sandstones. The enigmatic nature of the Entrada at Brady stews from the fact that it has a gas column of at least 180` in the lower north structure and it is porous and wet in the higher south structure. This difference becomes are curious when coupled with the fact that five other formations, both younger and older produce on both structures. A 3-D seismic survey was shot over Brady in 1993. Isochrons indicate that the north structure existed prior to Madison deposition. The south structure didn`t become significant until the Upper Cretaceous. The structural history as indicated by a series of isochrons is used to explain the differences in hydrocarbon content of the two structures.

Folcik, J.L.; Mead, R.H. [Union Pacific Resources Co., Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1995-06-01

134

Surveillance for Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from wyoming, USA.  

PubMed

Baylisascaris procyonis is a common roundworm of raccoons that causes severe clinical disease in many vertebrates, including humans. The distribution of B. procyonis in the US is poorly documented in portions of its range and has not been reported from Wyoming. Our objectives were to determine the statewide distribution and prevalence of this parasite in raccoons in Wyoming, using intestinal and fecal examinations. We examined 363 raccoons from 23 Wyoming counties in 2009-11, testing the reliability of two methods (intestinal extrusion and incision) to determine worm burdens. We found 163 raccoons (45%) positive for B. procyonis. The two methods of examination did not differ, although extrusion missed some infections. Neither age nor sex affected apparent prevalence or worm burdens. Prevalence did not differ with land use, yet burden was highest among rural raccoons. Fecal examination revealed that juvenile raccoons had a higher proportion of patent infections than adults, but neither sex nor location were indicators of prevalence. Egg density (eggs per gram of feces) did not differ by sex or age; however, rural raccoons had higher egg densities than urban/suburban animals. Understanding the distribution and prevalence of B. procyonis in Wyoming, especially in and around highly populated areas, is an important step in educating the general public and medical community on the potential risks of raccoon roundworm infection. PMID:25014908

Pipas, Michael J; Page, L Kristen; Kazacos, Kevin R

2014-10-01

135

POPO AGIE PRIMITIVE AREA, WYOMING.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource appraisal was made of the Popo Agie Primitive Area and some adjoining lands. This scenic mountainous region of the Wind River Range in west-central Wyoming is composed largely of ancient granitic rocks in which virtually no evidence of mineral deposits was found. Deep crustal seismic-reflection profiles obtained across the southern Wind River Range suggest the possibility that young sedimentary rocks, similar to those at the surface along the northeast flank of the range, are present at depth beneath the granite in the Popo Agie primitive Area. If present, such buried sedimentary rocks could be petroleum bearing. Additional seismic and gravity studies would probably add valuable information, but ultimately very expensive, very deep drilling will be necessary to test this possibility.

Pearson, Robert C.; Patten, L.L.

1984-01-01

136

77 FR 34894 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement...Wyoming program) and its coal rules and regulations...regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations...regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation...

2012-06-12

137

Original Article Burning and Mowing Wyoming Big  

E-print Network

, WY 82071, USA ABSTRACT Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis) treatments are often Artemisia tridentata, Centrocercus urophasianus, early brood-rearing, greater sage-grouse, habitat man sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) has generally been conducted to restore or enhance sagebrush communities

Beck, Jeffrey L.

138

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell  

E-print Network

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell Department of Applied can move in one dimension. We study the effect of friction on the design and performance of a feedback that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor performance - small amplitude oscillations

Campbell, Sue Ann

139

Intergestural Timing in English /r/ and Fiona Campbell  

E-print Network

on controversies surrounding English /r/, as it has done for other English segments such as /l/ and nasalsIntergestural Timing in English /r/ Bryan Gick and Fiona Campbell University of British Columbia@interchange.ubc.ca ABSTRACT Relative timing of the gestures of /r/ was measured in initial, final, and intervocalic positions

Handy, Todd C.

140

Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode  

SciTech Connect

Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

2011-06-01

141

how are you feeling android? Andrew T. Campbell, Dartmouth College  

E-print Network

how are you feeling android? Andrew T. Campbell, Dartmouth College smartphone sensing Workshop are open and programmable learning, big data, mining, apps -sensing -feature extraction -inference -learning/adaptation -app specific -privacy we want to push intelligence to the phone phones are open

Campbell, Andrew T.

142

Devon C. Campbell Head, Engineering and Systems Novartis Molecular Diagnostics  

E-print Network

Devon C. Campbell Head, Engineering and Systems ­ Novartis Molecular Diagnostics MIT SDM Systems. Inform dosage Slow metabolizers vs. rapid metabolizers Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) D. Prognostic breast cancer patients $100M Fine Billions in lost sales 6 months incorrect results 3rd party reagent

143

Contributions to the Flora and Plant Ecology of Campbell Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native plant species newly recorded for Campbell Island are: Lycopodium cf. australianum, Rumex flexuosus, R. negleclus, Cotula dispersa subsp. dispersa, Acianthus viridis, and possibly Puccinellia macquariensis hitherto regarded as an endemic grass of Macquarie Island. Additions to the exotic flora include cultivars, garden escapes, and otner largely ephemeral introductions. These are: the weeds Cardamine hirsuta, Polygonum convolvulus, Geranium pusillum, Hypericum

Colin D. Meurk

1975-01-01

144

Campbell's Monkeys Use Affixation to Alter Call Meaning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human language has evolved on a biological substrate with phylogenetic roots deep in the primate lineage. Here, we describe a functional analogy to a common morphological process in human speech, affixation, in the alarm calls of free-ranging adult Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli campbelli). We found that male alarm calls are composed of an acoustically variable stem, which can be followed

Karim Ouattara; Alban Lemasson; Klaus Zuberbühler

2009-01-01

145

The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

Armstrong, Michael

2010-01-01

146

Gary D Couples1 , Campbell G Fleming2  

E-print Network

Gary D Couples1 , Campbell G Fleming2 , Helen Lewis1 , R Stuart Haszeldine3 (1) Heriot as 50 C over distances as short as 5 km. These anomalies can be explained by flow systems using fault, delivering very hot (250 C) fluids to the seabed, causing major zinc-lead mineralization. These fault

Haszeldine, Stuart

147

AVALANCHE THREATS AND MITIGATION MEASURES IN CANADA Cam Campbell1,*  

E-print Network

AVALANCHE THREATS AND MITIGATION MEASURES IN CANADA Cam Campbell1,* , Laura Bakermans2 , Bruce Jamieson2 , Chris Stethem3 1 Canadian Avalanche Centre 2 Department of Civil Engineering, University commissioned report to inventory current and predict future trends in avalanche threats and mitigation programs

Jamieson, Bruce

148

The ISCA Special Interest Group on Speech Synthesis Nick Campbell  

E-print Network

Bloothooft offered support for the creation of Special Interest Groups within (then) ESCA, the European individuals. Just a few weeks after this initial call by ESCA, Nick Campbell of ATR suggested the formation and related disciplines; to provide members of ESCA/ISCA with a special interest in speech synthesis

Möbius, Bernd

149

Avoidable Ignorance and the Role of Cochrane and Campbell Reviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Campbell and Cochrane Collaborations were created to reveal the evidentiary status of claims focusing especially on the effectiveness of specific interventions. Such reviews are constrained by the population of studies available and biases that may influence this availability such as preferred framing of problems. This highlights the…

Gambrill, Eileen

2015-01-01

150

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30...WYOMING § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

2011-07-01

151

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30...WYOMING § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

2013-07-01

152

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30...WYOMING § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

2012-07-01

153

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

...2014-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30...WYOMING § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

2014-07-01

154

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30...WYOMING § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

2010-07-01

155

Carson-Washoe County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Carson-Washoe County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

156

Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Appraiser under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study.

NONE

1996-12-01

157

A new approach to fluid flow modeling of directional permeability in a faulted anticline, Little Sand Draw Field, Big Horn Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little Sand Draw field, Hot Springs County, Wyoming, is a fractured and faulted asymmetric anticlinal oil reservoir. The main producing formation is the Permian Phosphoria Formation. Numerical simulation of this reservoir is important for evaluating reservoir quality and past and future performance. This study presents a new integrated methodology which combines reservoir engineering with geology to improve reservoir characterization, simulation,

Ali Saleh Bin Raba'A

2001-01-01

158

Reclamation techniques in southwestern wyoming.  

PubMed

Bridger Coal Company operates a 5.8 million tpy surface coal mine thrity five miles northeast of Rock Springs. Wyoming. Approximately 20.000 acres are under permit, with disturbance over the life of the mine projected to reach 10,000 acres. Located on the western rim of the continental divide, the mine receives less than 8.5 inches of precipitation annually. Soils in the area are coarse-textured. and problems associated with elevated salinity and sodicity arc encountered.A variety of common reclamation techniques have been modified to reflect these conditions. Soil horizons are segregated during salvage operations (the surface six inches as topsoil and the balance as subsoil). Unsuitable materials are not salvaged. Direct application of soil is used (over 130 acres in 1983) to maximize native plant regeneration and conserve soil fertility. Inter-seeding of seeding failures has proven to be significantly more successful than chisel plowing and reseeding. Broadcast seeding has been ineffective because of strong winds, and a no till drill has been modified to handle diverse seed mixes and rock conditions. The utility of fertilization under typically xeric moisture regimes is being evaluated. A research project has been initiated to assess establishment of a predominately native, diverse seed mix under irrigation, as well as to determine irrigation rates and duration. PMID:24221682

Parady, F E

1985-03-01

159

CT bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of Williams-Campbell syndrome.  

PubMed

Williams-Campbell syndrome, a rare disorder, is characterized by a congenital deficiency of cartilage, typically involving the fourth to the sixth order bronchi, and resulting in expiratory airway collapse and bronchiectasis. The authors report a patient with Williams-Campbell syndrome with type II respiratory failure due to extensive cystic bronchiectasis and secondary emphysema. CT of the thorax showed the affected bronchi had characteristic ballooning on inspiration and collapse on expiration. Three-dimensional images of the tracheobronchial tree were constructed from a volume of data acquired by thin-slice CT scanning. Apart from confirming expiratory collapse of the affected bronchi, these images revealed an absence of the cartilage ring impressions in the bronchial wall, extending bilaterally from the mainstem down to subsegmental bronchi, suggesting cartilage deficiency. PMID:16423213

George, Jojy; Jain, Rajeev; Tariq, Syed M

2006-01-01

160

Review of Nitidotachinus Campbell (Staphylinidae, Tachyporinae) from Mainland China  

PubMed Central

Abstract The genus Nitidotachinus Campbell of Mainland China is reviewed with descriptions of five new species: Nitidotachinus anhuiensis sp. n. (Anhui), Nitidotachinus bini sp. n. (Zhejiang), Nitidotachinus brunneus sp. n. (Zhejiang), Nitidotachinus capillosus sp. n. (Zhejiang), and Nitidotachinus xiangi sp. n. (Hubei). Nitidotachinus excellens concolor Schülke is synonymized with Nitidotachinus excellens syn. n. All treated species are described with their major diagnostic characters illustrated. An identification key to the species is given. PMID:25349517

Zheng, Dan-Lin; Li, Li-Zhen; Zhao, Mei-Jun

2014-01-01

161

Process-scale modeling of elevated wintertime ozone in Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of meteorological variables and trace gas concentrations, provided by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality for Daniel, Jonah, and Boulder Counties in the state of Wyoming, were analyzed for this project. The data indicate that highest ozone concentrations were observed at temperatures of -10 C to 0 C, at low wind speeds of about 5 mph. The median values for nitrogen oxides (NOx) during these episodes ranged between 10 ppbv and 20 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during these periods were insufficient for quantitative analysis. The few available VOCs measurements indicated unusually high levels of alkanes and aromatics and low levels of alkenes. In addition, the column ozone concentration during one of the high-ozone episodes was low, on the order of 250 DU (Dobson unit) as compared to a normal column ozone concentration of approximately 300-325 DU during spring for this region. Analysis of this observation was outside the scope of this project. The data analysis reported here was used to establish criteria for making a large number of sensitivity calculations through use of a box photochemical model. Two different VOCs lumping schemes, RACM and SAPRC-98, were used for the calculations. Calculations based on this data analysis indicated that the ozone mixing ratios are sensitive to (a) surface albedo, (b) column ozone, (c) NOx mixing ratios, and (d) available terminal olefins. The RACM model showed a large response to an increase in lumped species containing propane that was not reproduced by the SAPRC scheme, which models propane as a nearly independent species. The rest of the VOCs produced similar changes in ozone in both schemes. In general, if one assumes that measured VOCs are fairly representative of the conditions at these locations, sufficient precursors might be available to produce ozone in the range of 60-80 ppbv under the conditions modeled.

Kotamarthi, V. R.; Holdridge, D. J.; Environmental Science Division

2007-12-31

162

77 FR 24176 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and Fish Commission To Use National Forest System Land for Their...Bridger-Teton National Forest received a request from the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission (WGFC) to continue to use facilities...

2012-04-23

163

Effects of herbicide usage on water quality of selected streams in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1977 and 1978 the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, in conjunction with county weed and pest control districts, conducted a noxious-weed-control program in Wyoming. The herbicides primarily used were picloram, 2,4-D, and dicamba. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, sampled and analyzed water from selected streams for these herbicides plus silvex; 2,4,5-T; and 2,4-DP. This report contains data for samples collected during 1977 and 1978. The most commonly detected herbicides in water samples were 2,4-D with 41% nonzero values and picloram with 34.5% nonzero values. Herbicide occurrence in bottom-material samples was uncommon; dicamba was found with 9% nonzero values. The maximum herbicide concentration in water was 1.1 micrograms per liter of 2,4-D, and the maximum herbicide concentration in bottom material was 8.0 micrograms per kilogram of 2,4-D. Based on available toxicity data and water-quality criteria, these herbicide concentrations do not constitute dangerous or harmful concentrations to humans or to the environment. (USGS)

Butler, David L.

1980-01-01

164

Wyoming: The State and Its Educational System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wyoming is a state of great natural beauty with only five people per square mile and a unique way of life that deserves to be preserved. The economy, though, is almost totally dependent on energy extraction, an area that has not done well of late. The state's small population makes "boutique" products and services not very profitable, and efforts…

Hodgkinson, Harold L.

165

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program In the west, water is critical to survival. Data and information concerning this resource are very valuable by the Water Research Program. Basic Project Information Category Data Title Water Resources Data System Water

166

Cretaceous References: Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site supplies a comprehensive list of references relevant to Cretaceous stratigraphy, paleogeography, tectonics and petroleum exploration in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Montana. The references range from the 1930's to the 1990's cover a variety of specific topics. Additional information and references are available on the site's home page under resources.

PetroDynamics Inc.

167

Report to Joint Education Committee, Wyoming Legislature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Wyoming Community College Commission was established in 1951 as a result of a legislative act to extend the offering of higher education beyond the secondary level in qualified school districts. Seven community colleges were created by the Commission, resulting in a system that presently continues to serve thousands of citizens and their…

Henry, Thomas C.; Lovejoy, William H.

168

DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN WYOMING LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report presents the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 14 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Wyoming. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palmer's Organic P...

169

78 FR 43061 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulations under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation...baseline surface water data on acidity. Wyoming subsequently...levels of government.'' Data Quality Act In developing...peer review under the Data Quality Act (Pub. L...Intergovernmental relations, Surface mining, Underground...

2013-07-19

170

Wyoming Deaf/Blind Grant. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Wyoming Deaf-Blind Grant, a 3-year federally supported project to identify children who have deaf-blindness and to provide technical assistance in the development of educational services for these children. Major accomplishments of the project included: identification of more…

Whitson, Joanne B.

171

76 FR 45643 - Wyoming Disaster #WY-00017  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assistance Only for the State of Wyoming (FEMA- 4007-DR), dated 07/22/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Landslides. Incident Period: 05/18/2011 through 07/08/2011. Effective Date: 07/22/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-07-29

172

Wyoming: Open Range for Library Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of library technology and the need for telecommunications in a state with a lack of population density. Topics include the state library's role; shared library resources and library networks; government information; the Wyoming State Home Page on the World Wide Web; Ariel software; network coordinating; and central…

Maul, Helen Meadors

1996-01-01

173

Wyoming Community College Commission Agency Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on outcomes of community college programs monitored by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC). The document covers the following WCCC objectives: (1) Study of tuition rates for the community colleges; (2) Negotiation of contracts and provision of financial support for administrative computing system components and…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

174

Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell  

E-print Network

Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell Peter J, Transformation, Evolution, Edited by W. Schelkle, W.-H. Krauth, M. Kohli, and G. Ewarts. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag cultural evolution was Donald T. Campbell's paper "Variation and Selective Retention in Sociocultural

Richerson, Peter J.

175

On the Fibonacci length of powers of dihedral C. M. Campbell  

E-print Network

On the Fibonacci length of powers of dihedral groups C. M. Campbell , P. P. Campbell , H. Doostie n, xi+n = n j=1 xi+j-1, i 1, is called the Fibonacci orbit of G with respect to the generating set the Fibonacci length of G with respect to A, written LENA(G). In this paper we examine the Fibonacci lengths

St Andrews, University of

176

Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl Jung was…

Thomson, Karen M.

177

Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a…

Armstrong, Michael

2011-01-01

178

Campbell and Rubin: A Primer and Comparison of Their Approaches to Causal Inference in Field Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article compares Donald Campbell's and Donald Rubin's work on causal inference in field settings on issues of epistemology, theories of cause and effect, methodology, statistics, generalization, and terminology. The two approaches are quite different but compatible, differing mostly in matters of bandwidth versus fidelity. Campbell's work…

Shadish, William R.

2010-01-01

179

Phytoliths from subantarctic Campbell Island: plant production and soil surface spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytolith (plant opal) production, and its preservation within the soil surface, is described for the first time in the subantarctic region from Campbell Island, ca. 600 km south of New Zealand, forming the basis for a new modern reference collection for the region. Plant samples (many from species endemic to the island and vegetation community dominants) were sourced from Campbell

Vanessa Clare Thorn

2004-01-01

180

Didymoceras puebloense, a new species of heteromorph ammonite from the Upper Campanian of Colorado and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Didymoceras puebloense nov. sp. is described from the upper Campanian zones of Didymoceras nebrascense and Didymoceras stevensoni in Pueblo and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, and Weston County, Wyoming in the United States Western Interior. The species is characterized by a middle helical growth stage in which the successive whorls are widely separated followed by a terminal pendant U-shaped sector of the adult body chamber. Ornament is of distant, narrow bituberculate ribs usually separated by a nontuberculate rib. Widely separated poorly-defined constrictions with associated collar ribs are occasionally present. The style of coiling in middle and later growth resembles that of those growth stages in upper Campanian Didymoceras, whereas the ornament recalls that of middle Campanian representatives of the genus in the Western Interior.

Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.; Scott, G.R.

1997-01-01

181

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01

182

Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

1993-04-01

183

Campbell's monkeys concatenate vocalizations into context-specific call sequences  

PubMed Central

Primate vocal behavior is often considered irrelevant in modeling human language evolution, mainly because of the caller's limited vocal control and apparent lack of intentional signaling. Here, we present the results of a long-term study on Campbell's monkeys, which has revealed an unrivaled degree of vocal complexity. Adult males produced six different loud call types, which they combined into various sequences in highly context-specific ways. We found stereotyped sequences that were strongly associated with cohesion and travel, falling trees, neighboring groups, nonpredatory animals, unspecific predatory threat, and specific predator classes. Within the responses to predators, we found that crowned eagles triggered four and leopards three different sequences, depending on how the caller learned about their presence. Callers followed a number of principles when concatenating sequences, such as nonrandom transition probabilities of call types, addition of specific calls into an existing sequence to form a different one, or recombination of two sequences to form a third one. We conclude that these primates have overcome some of the constraints of limited vocal control by combinatorial organization. As the different sequences were so tightly linked to specific external events, the Campbell's monkey call system may be the most complex example of ‘proto-syntax’ in animal communication known to date. PMID:20007377

Ouattara, Karim; Lemasson, Alban; Zuberbühler, Klaus

2009-01-01

184

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2010-07-01

185

76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

2011-03-15

186

76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

2011-03-15

187

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2013-07-01

188

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

...2014-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2014-07-01

189

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2012-07-01

190

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2011-07-01

191

Heat flow studies in Wyoming: 1979 to 1981  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow values and updated maps of flux in Wyoming, northern Colorado, and southern Montana are presented. It is concluded that most of the heat flow values in the Wyoming Basin-Southern Rocky Mountains region in Southern Wyoming are low or normal, excluding the Saratoga Valley; that the regional flux in the Owl Creek Mountains area is above normal; and that the Meadow Creek Basin area is in a zone of high flux. (MJF)

Heasler, H.P.; Decker, E.R.; Buelow, K.L.; Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

1982-05-01

192

Alternatives. Alternative Discipline and Suspension Program Handbook, Campbell County Junior High.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet explains a program of discipline and suspension for students who come in conflict with school policy. The Alternative Discipline and Suspension Program (ADSP) operates in an environment of strict adherence to set rules where a student must earn advancement through and eventually out of ADSP back to regular classroom attendance. This…

Campbell County School District 1, Gillette, WY.

193

Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of Wyoming and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Significant results of the Wyoming investigation during the first six months include: (1) successful segregation of Precambrian metasedimentary/metavolcanic rocks from igneous rocks; (2) discovery of iron formation within the metasedimentary sequence; (3) mapping of previously unreported tectonic elements of major significance; (4) successful mapping of large scale fractures of the Wind River Mountains; (5) sucessful distinction of some metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary lithologies by color-additive viewing of ERTS images; (6) mapping and interpretation of glacial features in western Wyoming; and (7) development of techniques for mapping small urban areas.

Marrs, R. W.

1973-01-01

194

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

SciTech Connect

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01

195

75 FR 19886 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wyoming; Revisions to the Wyoming...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disagree; suggest alternatives...concerns, and suggest alternatives...submitted to EPA two formal revisions...Credible evidence--to Chapter...emissions that occurred during malfunctions...Credible Evidence Wyoming has...to limit the types of credible...state may take two...

2010-04-16

196

What Does Energy Development Mean for Wyoming? A Community Study at Hanna, Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The enormous but often overlooked impact of energy resource development on small Western United States communities can be illustrated by the experiences of the traditional coal mining town of Hanna, Wyoming. Coal development doubled the population between 1970 and 1972, and required the addition of a sewer system and a police force, plus the…

Nellis, Lee

197

Seeds and Seedling Establishment of Wyoming Big Sagebrush  

Microsoft Academic Search

Success with Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) depends on good seed vigor, and rapid seedling development. These characteristics are influenced by harvesting, processing, storing, and sowing. In this paper we discuss research findings related to those activities: (1) It appears that Wyoming big sagebrush growing on the western edge of the Great Plains might hold viable seed longer into

D. T. Booth; Y. Bai

198

Observing team from the University of Wyoming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

July 19, 1994An observing team from the University of Wyoming , the University of Rochester, and the University of Minnesota is obtaining infrared images of the recent comet impacts on Jupiter. The observations are being made with the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3-meter telescope near Laramie, using an infrared camera developed at Rochester. The accompanying image of Jupiter, obtained on the evening of Sunday July 17, shows three bright spots near the lower left. These are the impact sites of (from left to right) fragments C, A, and E. The other features visible are the bright polar and equatorial regions, and also the Great Red Spot, located below the equator and somewhat to the right.At this relatively short infrared wavelength (2.2 micrometers) the planet it mostly dark because the methane in the Jupiter atmosphere absorbs any sunlight which passes through a significant depth of that atmosphere. Bright regions usually correspond to high altitude clouds which reflect the sunlight before it can penetrate the deeper atmosphere and be absorbed. The bright nature of the impact spots therefore indicates the presence of high altitude haze or clouds -- material carried up from the lower atmosphere by the fireball and plume from the comet impact. More detailed measurements at a variety of wavelengths should reveal the chemical composition of the haze material. The observing team will be continuing their work throughout the comet impact period and expect to obtain images of the plumes from the other comet fragments which will be striking Jupiter later this week.Co ntact: Robert R. Howell Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Wyoming Laramie, WY 82070 307-766-6150

2002-01-01

199

Healthy Wyoming: Start with Youth Today. Results of the 1991 Wyoming Youth Risk Behavior and School Health Education Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents results of the 1991 Wyoming Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and the 1991 Wyoming School Health Education Survey (SHES). Thirty-five schools participated in the YRBS, with 3,513 students in grades 9-12; 92 public schools with students in grades 7-12 participated in the SHES. Statistical data from the YRBS are provided in the…

Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Health Behavior Lab.

200

In Defense of Campbell's Theorum as a Frame for New Physics  

E-print Network

The Campbell-Magaard theorem is widely seen as a way of embedding Einstein's 4D theory of general relativity in a 5D theory of the Kaluza-Klein type. We give a brief history of theorem, present a short account of it, and show that it provides a geometrical frame for new physics related to the unification of the forces. Anderson's recent vituperative attack on Campbell's theorem (gr-qc/0409122)is errant.

Paul S. Wesson

2005-07-25

201

Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

Nealon, Teresa

2014-06-30

202

Reclamation of the Wahsatch gathering system pipeline in southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Union Pacific Resources Company (UPRC) constructed a 40.4 mile pipeline in 1993 in Summit and Rich Countries, Utah and Uinta County, Wyoming. The pipeline collects and delivers natural gas from six existing wells to the Whitney Canyon Processing Plant north of Evanston, Wyoming. We describe reclamation of the pipeline, the cooperation received from landowners along the right-of-way, and mitigation measures implemented by UPRC to minimize impacts to wildlife. The reclamation procedure combines a 2 step topsoil separation, mulching with natural vegetation, native seed mixes, and measures designed to reduce the visual impacts of the pipeline. Topsoil is separated into the top 4 inches of soil material, when present. The resulting top dressing is rich in native seed and rhizomes allowing a reduced seeding rate. The borders of the right-of-way are mowed in a curvilinear pattern to reduce the straight line effects of landowner cooperation on revegetation. Specifically, following 2 years of monitoring, significant differences in plant cover (0.01

Strickland, D.; Dern, G.; Johnson, G.; Erickson, W.

1996-12-31

203

Untwisting the Campbell diagrams of weakly anisotropic rotor systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A brake can be modeled as an axi-symmetric rotor perturbed by dissipative, conservative, and non-conservative positional forces originated at the frictional contact with the anisotropic stator. The Campbell diagram of the unperturbed system is a mesh-like structure in the frequency-speed plane with double eigenfrequencies at the nodes. The diagram is convenient for the analysis of the traveling waves in the rotating elastic continuum. Computing sensitivities of the doublets we find that at every particular node the untwisting of the mesh into the branches of complex eigenvalues is generically determined by only four 2×2 sub-blocks of the perturbing matrix. Selection of the unstable modes that cause self-excited vibrations in the subcritical speed range, is governed by the exceptional points at the corners of the singular eigenvalue surface-`double coffee-filter'-which is typical also in the problems of electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation in non-rotating anisotropic chiral media. As a mechanical example a model of a rotating shaft is studied in detail.

Kirillov, O. N.

2009-08-01

204

Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

Larry Demick

2012-11-01

205

Gravity interpretation of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

E-print Network

Mtns. Atlantic City, Wyoming Age/Rock Recent Tertiary Cretaceous Jurassic Triassic Permian Carboniferous Devonian Ordovician Cambrian Ordovician biotite gneiss qtz. plag. gneiss amphbl. gneiss amphibolite granodiorite hnbld. qtz...

Parks, Pamela Hennis

1979-01-01

206

76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be submitted to the Cashier, BLM Wyoming State Office, at the address given above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, or Tyson Sackett, Acting Coal Coordinator, [[Page 11259

2011-03-01

207

Reconnaissance examination of selected oil-sand outcrops in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous surface occurrences of oil sands and oil seeps have been reported in the geologic literature for Wyoming. Seventy-eight reported occurrences are listed in Wyoming Geological Survey Open-File Report 82-5. Most of the listed deposits are taken from old references with vague descriptions and locations. Field reconnaissance examinations of selected oil-sand occurrences were conducted to describe them better and to

Ver Ploeg

1986-01-01

208

Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

1981-03-01

209

Glacial Change in the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The upper Green River Basin (GRB) [located in the upper Colorado River Basin] and the upper Wind-Bighorn River Basin (WBRB) [located in the upper Missouri-Mississippi River Basin] are separated by the Wind River Range (WRR) of Wyoming. The WRR is an unbroken 160-kilometer barrier in west central Wyoming that is host to 63 glaciers, the largest concentration of glaciers in

K. Cheesbrough; J. Edmunds; G. Kerr; L. Pochop; G. Tootle

2007-01-01

210

Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

2011-01-01

211

Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

2011-01-01

212

Geologic structure and altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation, northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beginning in 1981, a 3-yr project was conducted to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the sedimentary bedrock aquifers in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. The project was limited to three bedrock units in order of increasing age: the Cretaceous Inyan kara Group, Permian and Pennsylvanian Minnelusa Formation, and Mississippian Madison (or Pahasapa) Limestone. This map shows the altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation in the northern Black Hills, and shows the configuration of the structural features in the northern part of the Black Hills and the eastern part of the Bear Lodge Mountains. In general, the Minnelusa Formation dips away from the Black Hills uplift, either to the northeast and the Williston Basin or, south of the Bear Lodge Mountains, to the southwest and the Powder River basin, which is outside the map area. In the map area, the upper beds of the Minnelusa Formation are an aquifer and the lower beds are a confining or semi-confining unit. The upper part of the Minnelusa Formation has a greater percentage of coarse-grained sandstone beds than the lower part. Furthermore, solution and removal of anhydrite, brecciation, and solution of cement binding the sandstone grains may have increased the permeability of the upper part of the Minnelusa Formation in the Black Hills. Wells completed in the upper part of the Minnelusa have yields that exceed 100 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min. Flowing wells have been completed in the Minnelusa aquifer in most of the study area in South Dakota and in about the northern one-half of Crook County, Wyoming. (Lantz-PTT)

Peter, Kathy D.; Kyllonen, David P.; Mills, K.R.

1987-01-01

213

Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plegchart

2011-08-15

214

Sir Francis Joseph Campbell and His Family: The First Family in Professional Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author discusses the pivotal roles of Sir Francis Campbell (1832-1914) and members of his family, especially his son Charles Campbell, in the evolution of the blindness field to a professional and reason-based service.

Welsh, Richard L.

2008-01-01

215

Petrology of greenstones in southern Wyoming Province  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Archean greenstones occur in South Pass area and southern Wind River Canyon area in central Wyoming State, U.S.A. These two areas are near about 100 km away from each other and belong to the same sub- province named Wyoming greenstone province (WGP, composed of meta-mafic rocks and meta- sedimentary rocks) (Mueller et al., 1998). The South Pass area is one of the greenstone belts in the southern Wyoming Province and is located in the northwestern part of the WGP. The greenstones (15 km long) occur along the later Archean granitic batholith (Louis Lake batholith, 2.63 Ga) and are composed of meta-pillow lavas, meta diabasic rocks, meta-gabbroic rocks, meta basaltic tuffs, and other meta sediments. The meta diabasic rocks occur as dykes. Banded iron formation lies along the contact between these greenstones and the batholith. Several previous studies suggested that these greenstones were metamorphosed under conditions of amphibolite, and locally greenschist (Harper et al., 1985; Wilks and Harper, 1997; Frost et al., 2000). However we found evidence indicating limited distribution of the amphibolite facies zone which is restricted along the batholith. Greenstones in this area were regionally metamorphosed under low-grade and the amphibolite facies greenstones were formed by the thermal effects by the batholith. Many characteristics of the protolith are well preserved. The following textures are preserved; pillow lava structure, relic igneous augite grains in meta basaltic rocks, relic igneous brown hornblende grains in meta diabasic rocks, gabbroic textures, and some sedimentary textures. The pillow lavas (5-10 cm x 15-30 cm) are composed of pale green core and thin dark gray rim (about 0.5 cm wide) and the core domain is rich in carbonate. The southern Wind River Canyon area is located in the northern part of the WGP. Archean greenstones in this area are composed of meta pillow lavas, meta gabbroic rocks, and meta pelites. From south toward north, mafic rocks generally grade into pelitic rocks. All the greenstones were metamorphosed under a condition of amphibolite and no relic of protolith minerals are preserved. Ring structures suggesting pillow lavas (core, 20- 30 cm x 30-50 cm; rim, 1.0-3.0 cm wide) occur in fine-grained mafic greenstones. Skarn (several cm to several tens cm in scale) occurs only near these ring structures and cuts the greenstones. This skarn is cut by granite intrusions. Both the South Pass area and the southern Wind River Canyon area are possibly regarded as upper part of Archean oceanic crust. The South Pass greenstones were regionally metamorphosed under low-grade (lower greenschist facies). Amphibolite facies greenstones were formed by thermal effects by the granitic batholith. The southern Wind River Canyon greenstones were subjected to amphibolite facies regional metamorphism and no thermal effect by the granites was observed. Archean skarn occurs only in the southern Wind River Canyon area. What did make these differences between Archean greenstones in the South Pass area and the southern Wind River Canyon area? Comparisons of greenstones between these two areas are significant for the formation of the Archean greenstones and the formation of Archean skarn in these areas.

Takeuchi, Y.; Yuasa, T.; Ogasawara, Y.

2006-12-01

216

Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.  

SciTech Connect

Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyomingâ??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyomingâ??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

2010-03-26

217

77 FR 15387 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180710, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and BLM, Wyoming State Office, Branch of Solid Minerals, Attn: Mavis Love, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, at 307- 775-6258. Persons who use a...

2012-03-15

218

77 FR 32665 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and BLM, Wyoming State Office, Branch of Solid Minerals, Attn: Mavis Love, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, at 307- 775-6258. Persons who use a...

2012-06-01

219

78 FR 55694 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-HQ-ORD-2011-0895] Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY: Environmental...draft research report titled, ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming.'' The...

2013-09-11

220

Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

1982-01-01

221

Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

Carr, Natasha B.; Garman, Steven L.; Walters, Annika; Ray, Andrea; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wesner, Jeff S.; O’Donnell, Michael S.; Sherrill, Kirk R.; Babel, Nils C.; Bowen, Zachary H.

2013-01-01

222

Multidisciplinary study on Wyoming test sites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Ten EREP data passes over the Wyoming test site provided excellent S190A and S190B coverage and some useful S192 imagery. These data were employed in an evaluation of the EREP imaging sensors in several earth resources applications. Boysen Reservoir and Hyattsville were test areas for band to band comparison of the S190 and S192 sensors and for evaluation of the image data for geologic mapping. Contrast measurements were made from the S192 image data for typical sequence of sedimentary rocks. Histograms compiled from these measurements show that near infrared S192 bands provide the greatest amount of contrast between geologic units. Comparison was also made between LANDSAT imagery and S190B and aerial photography for regional land use mapping. The S190B photography was found far superior to the color composite LANDSAT imagery and was almost as effective as the 1:120,000 scale aerial photography. A map of linear elements prepared from LANDSAT and EREP imagery of the southwestern Bighorn Mountains provided an important aid in defining the relationship between fracture and ground water movement through the Madison aquifer.

Houston, R. S. (principal investigator); Marrs, R. W.; Borgman, L. E.

1975-01-01

223

Small mammal faunal stasis in Natural Trap Cave (Pleistocene-Holocene), Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming  

E-print Network

of dentary and maxilla occlusal length measurements 32 from Natural Trap Cave Tamias and from three modern Tamias species from NW Wyoming. Figure 6. p4 analysis of Natural Trap Cave Urocitellus. 36... classification parallel Long's (1965) Wyoming mammal faunal divisions. Common mammals of the western Wyoming basins are: White-tailed Jackrabbit (Lepus townsendii), Wyoming Ground Squirrel (Urocitellus elegans), White-tailed Prairie Dog (Cynomys leucurus...

Williams, Daniel Ryan

2009-01-01

224

ALLISON A. CAMPBELL 1991 Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, State University of New York at  

E-print Network

ALLISON A. CAMPBELL EDUCATION 1991 Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, State University of New York Interfacial control of crystallization ­ promotion and inhibition of mineral formation Interfacial control of protein adsorption ­ effects of surface parameters on protein conformation, structure/function, adsorption

225

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford Kirsten Morris  

E-print Network

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford of friction on the design and performance of feedback controllers that aim to stabilize the pendulum in the upright position. We show that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor

Morris, Kirsten

226

Sediment discharge data for the lower reach of Campbell Creek, Anchorage, Alaska; May to October 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and suspended sediment data were collected at two sites in Anchorage, Alaska, one upstream and one downstream from the proposed bridge construction site. Immediately downstream from the study reach, the creek enters Campbell Lake, an artificial impoundment in which sedimentation is becoming of concern to recreational users and lakeside residents. (USGS)

Lipscomb, S.W.

1987-01-01

227

Gemini: A Non-Invasive, Energy-Harvesting True Power Meter Bradford Campbell and Prabal Dutta  

E-print Network

Gemini: A Non-Invasive, Energy-Harvesting True Power Meter Bradford Campbell and Prabal Dutta,prabal}@umich.edu Abstract--Power meters are critical for submetering loads in residential and commercial settings, but high by proposing non-invasive meters that easily clip onto a wire, or stick onto a circuit breaker, to perform

Dutta, Prabal

228

Racism in African Children's Literature: A Critique of Eric Campbell's "The Year of the Leopard Song."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eric Campbell, an English teacher, spent most of his working life in New Guinea and in East Africa, where he lived in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. He now lives in England and writes about Africa. People could expect an objective, and perhaps, a dispassionate account or depiction of African children and adults--their individual lives and…

Osa, Osayimwense

229

Relationships Between Environmental Factors and Fecal Indicator Bacteria Contamination at Campbell Cove Beach  

E-print Network

contaminated with sewage. (Largier & Taggart 2006). filling sample bottles from ankle deep beach water of most animals, and are used to indicate fecal contamination in water and sediment (R T Noble el alRelationships Between Environmental Factors and Fecal Indicator Bacteria Contamination at Campbell

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

230

Dysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell  

E-print Network

tibial muscles [9]. Recent work has shown that loss of dysferlin compromises Ca2+ -dependent meDysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell The ability to repair membrane for dysferlin in this repair process in muscle, possibly as a Ca2+ sensor that triggers vesicle fusion

Campbell, Kevin P.

231

Creativity and Discovery as Blind Variation: Campbell's (1960) BVSR Model After the Half-Century Mark  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article assesses and extends Campbell's (1960) classic theory that creativity and discovery depend on blind variation and selective retention (BVSR), with special attention given to blind variations (BVs). The treatment begins by defining creativity and discovery, variant blindness versus sightedness, variant utility and selection, and ideational variants versus creative products. These definitions lead to BV identification criteria: (a) intended

Dean Keith Simonton

2011-01-01

232

Toward Societal Scale Sensing using Mobile Phones Andrew T. Campbell and Tanzeem Choudhury Dartmouth College  

E-print Network

Toward Societal Scale Sensing using Mobile Phones Andrew T. Campbell and Tanzeem Choudhury. His group developed a number of early sensing systems and applications for sensorenabled mobile phones trend of incorporating an increasing number of sensors into mobile phones opens up a new research

Campbell, Andrew T.

233

EyePhone: Activating Mobile Phones With Your Eyes Emiliano Miluzzo, Tianyu Wang, Andrew T. Campbell  

E-print Network

EyePhone: Activating Mobile Phones With Your Eyes Emiliano Miluzzo, Tianyu Wang, Andrew T. Campbell are studying new tech- niques to ease the human-mobile interaction. We propose EyePhone, a novel "hand and actions (e.g., wink). EyePhone tracks the user's eye movement across the phone's display using the camera

Campbell, Andrew T.

234

Compositions of Group IVB Iron Meteorites and Their Parent ANDREW J. CAMPBELL*,1  

E-print Network

Compositions of Group IVB Iron Meteorites and Their Parent Melt ANDREW J. CAMPBELL*,1 AND MUNIR IVB iron meteorites Cape of Good Hope, Hoba, Skookum, Santa Clara, Tawallah Valley, Tlacotepec. INTRODUCTION It is believed that the magmatic iron meteorite groups represent fractionally crystallized cores

Campbell, Andrew

235

The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell  

E-print Network

The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments use only one relatively large, and organisms behave differently when different concentrations of free amino acids are present. In soil

Vallino, Joseph J.

236

Conserving Transmission Power in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Javier Gomez, Andrew T. Campbell  

E-print Network

Conserving Transmission Power in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Javier Gomez, Andrew T. Campbell Dept the transmission power needed to forward packets between wireless devices in ad hoc networks. Using PARO, one to a number of networking environments includ- ing sensor networks, home networks and mobile ad hoc net- works

Sirer, Emin Gun

237

EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTROL OF ARSENIC EMISSIONS AT THE CAMPBELL RED LAKE GOLD SMELTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The Campbell Red Lake Mines Gold Smelter at Balmerton, Ontario, Canada, has developed and implemented a successful control strategy for arsenic emissions from a nonferrous smelting operation. The Red Lake smelter uses cyclones and a hot electrostatic precipitator to recover metal...

238

Plasma channel flows: Electro-fluid dynamic jets Nicholas S. Campbell and Subrata Roy  

E-print Network

Plasma channel flows: Electro-fluid dynamic jets Nicholas S. Campbell and Subrata Roy Applied channel by exploring an electrode configuration that directly actuates the bulk fluid minimizing jet channel configuration allows greater versatility for applications in boundary layer flow control

Roy, Subrata

239

Reliability of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory with High School Seniors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Test-retest correlations were determined on all scales of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory for 208 high school seniors. The interval between testings was three months. Correlations are reported separately for males, females, and for the combined group. (Author)

Blake, Richard; Fabry, Julian

1979-01-01

240

Learn to Read and Write Systematic Reviews: The Belgian Campbell Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Practitioners working in social welfare, education, judicial circuits, psychology, and many other domains of human sciences daily decide on best treatments for their clients. The authors expect those practitioners to base their decisions on evidence from scientific research. The Campbell collaboration is an international nonprofit organization…

Hannes, Karin; Claes, Laurence

2007-01-01

241

Model-Based Methods for Textile Fault Detection J. G. Campbell,1  

E-print Network

Model-Based Methods for Textile Fault Detection J. G. Campbell,1 C. Fraley,2,3 D. Stanford,2 F for woven textiles in discriminating subtle flaw patterns from the pronounced background of repetitive. Int J Imaging Syst Technol, 10, 339­346, 1999 I. FLAW DETECTION IN TEXTILE FABRIC Obstacles to machine

Raftery, Adrian

242

The Awakening of the Social Conscience: Jane Maud Campbell, 1869-1947  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jane Maud Campbell's career demonstrated her commitment and passion for library services with immigrants and minorities as one of the first advocates for multiculturalism in librarianship. She began her career working in the Newark Public Library and soon was employed as the librarian of the Passaic Public Library. She was the first woman employed…

Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

2012-01-01

243

Coal conversion at Picatinny Arsenal and Forts Campbell, Bragg, and Gordon: A feasibility study. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public Law 99-190 requires the Department of Defense to increase the use of coal at its facilities in the United States. This study investigated the feasibility of converting oil- and gas-fired heating plants to coal firing at four Army installations: Fort Bragg, NC; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Gordon, GA; and Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. Information on the energy systems at the

M. C. Lin; L. Thurber; T. Durbin; R. Tarvin

1993-01-01

244

An SNMP Gateway for Delay/Disruption Tolerant Network Management GREGORY L. CAMPBELL  

E-print Network

An SNMP Gateway for Delay/Disruption Tolerant Network Management by GREGORY L. CAMPBELL McClure School of Information and Telecommunication Systems Ohio University 08/22/10 #12;2 2 ABSTRACT The SNMP/IP network. At the threshold of the two, the SNMP Gateway provides a proxy service for terrestrial SNMP get

Kruse, Hans

245

The Physical Education Standards Movement in Wyoming: An Effort in Partnership.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how Wyoming developed and implemented content standards, benchmarks, and performance standards (state standards) in health and physical education. The effort involved Wyoming's health/physical education coalition member plus three University of Wyoming faculty members with expertise in health, physical education, physical education…

Deal, Tami Benham; Byra, Mark; Jenkins, Jayne; Gates, Ward E.

2002-01-01

246

The Spirit and Influence of the Wyoming Resolution: Looking Back to Look Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the 1986 Wyoming Conference on English, a group of graduate students and part-time and tenure-line faculty formulated a statement known as the Wyoming Resolution, a rallying cry to improve composition teachers' pay, benefits, and working conditions. Adopted by the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in 1987, the Wyoming

McDonald, James C.; Schell, Eileen E.

2011-01-01

247

Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills Samuel J. Cahoy  

E-print Network

Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills BY Samuel J. Cahoy A thesis submitted South Dakota State University 2009 #12;11 Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills possible without financial support from the following agencies: National Wild Turkey Federation, Wyoming

248

Canopy Growth and Density of Wyoming Big Sagebrush Sown with Cool-Season Perennial Grasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-mining revegetation efforts often require grass seeding and mulch applications to stabilize the soils at the same time as shrub seeding, creating intraspecific competition between seeded shrubs and grasses that is not well understood. Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle and Young) (Wyoming big sagebrush) is the dominant premining shrub on many Wyoming mines. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality,

Ann L. Hild; Gerald E. Schuman; Laurel E. Vicklund; Mary I. Williams

2006-01-01

249

Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Wyoming, 1952  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation of Permian age at many localities in Wyoming and adjacent states. These data will not be fully synthesized for many years, but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of the sections measured in western Wyoming (fig. 1), during 1952, is the fourth Wyoming report of this series. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a previous report (McKelvey and others, 1953a). Many people have taken part in this investigation. T. M. Cheney participated in the description of strata and the collection of samples referred to in this report and T. K. Rigby assisted in the collection of samples. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

Sheldon, R.P.; Cressman, E.R.; Carswell, L.D.; Smart, R.A.

1953-01-01

250

An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

Yang, D.; Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.Y.T.; Leavesley, G.H.; Emerson, D.G.; Hanson, C.L.

2000-01-01

251

An evaluation of the Wyoming Gauge System for snowfall measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project

Daqing Yang; Douglas L. Kane; Larry D. Hinzman; Barry E. Goodison; John R. Metcalfe; Paul Y. T. Louie; George H. Leavesley; Douglas G. Emerson; Clayton L. Hanson

2000-01-01

252

Petroleum exploration in Absaroka basin of northwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new, virtually unexplored petroleum province with large potential resources can be defined in northwestern Wyoming. Structurally, the Absaroka basin is bounded on the north by the Beartooth uplift, to the west by the Gallatin and Washakie uplifts, to the south by the Washakie and Owl Creek uplifts, and to the east by the Cody arch. The Cody arch connects

Sundell

1986-01-01

253

76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW177903] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

2011-04-01

254

76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW174596] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Hilight Field...

2011-10-17

255

76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L51100000-GA0000-LVEMK09CK36; WYW172657] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal...

2011-06-17

256

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL AND VEGETATION CHARACTERISTICS: WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ALLIANCE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp. wyomingenis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West and is characterized by a wide range of environments and vegetation heterogeneity. However, the influence of environ...

257

Archaeological trash: Geomorphology and early human occupation in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The waste products of stone tool making and isolated artifacts found on land surfaces can illuminate aspects of human culture and of landscape evolution even though they lack stratigraphic context. Quartzite artifacts and debris occurring on pediments near Pinedale (Wyoming) include cobbles from which multiple flakes have been removed by percussion. Some of the specimens have been polished and abraded

Luna B. Leopold; Claudio Vita-Finzi

2005-01-01

258

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative data management and integration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six Federal agencies, two State agencies, and two local entities formally support the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) and work together on a landscape scale to manage fragile habitats and wildlife resources amidst growing energy development in southwest Wyoming. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was tasked with implementing targeted research and providing scientific information about southwest Wyoming to inform the development of WLCI habitat enhancement and restoration projects conducted by land management agencies. Many WLCI researchers and decisionmakers representing the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of Wyoming, and others have overwhelmingly expressed the need for a stable, robust infrastructure to promote sharing of data resources produced by multiple entities, including metadata adequately describing the datasets. Descriptive metadata facilitates use of the datasets by users unfamiliar with the data. Agency representatives advocate development of common data handling and distribution practices among WLCI partners to enhance availability of comprehensive and diverse data resources for use in scientific analyses and resource management. The USGS Core Science Informatics (CSI) team is developing and promoting data integration tools and techniques across USGS and partner entity endeavors, including a data management infrastructure to aid WLCI researchers and decisionmakers.

Latysh, Natalie; Bristol, Sky

2011-01-01

259

Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Wyoming's Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wyoming is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

2011-01-01

260

Geology Fieldnotes: Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Montana/Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area information, including geology, maps, photographs, visitor information, and links for additional facts about this area of Wyoming and Montana. Included are details about the geologic history of the area, formations, the Pryar and Bighorn Mountains, and the exploration history of the land.

261

INVESTIGATION OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION NEAR PAVILLION, WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

In response to complaints by domestic well owners regarding objectionable taste and odor problems in well water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated a ground water investigation near the town of Pavillion, Wyoming under authority of the Comprehensive Environmental ...

262

Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation  

E-print Network

Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation Bob Budd, Chairman Governor of Endangered Species Act · Broad distribution of Sage-grouse #12;History of the Issue · Petitioning under: "Not Warranted" · 2007: Sage Grouse Summit led to establishment of SGIT · 2007: December decision

Wyoming, University of

263

U.S. in the World: Wyoming/Algeria  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wyoming and Algeria help power the world as major providers of energy. Although energy production forms the backbone of both regions, agricultural production --both farming and livestock--dominates the landscape. Read about how energy development and agriculture challenge both places' environmental quality.

Population Reference Bureau

264

LEVEL IV ECOREGION DELINEATION FOR THE STATE OF WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

Level III ecoregions were refined and subdivided into level IV for the state of Wyoming in a manner consistent with ecoregion revision and subdivision that has been completed or is on-going in 37 of the conterminous United States. The project was collaborative, involving the scie...

265

Body Measuremenls of Western Jumping Mice from Northwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ecology of tlrc western jumping mouse (Z.tpn( priniept aabeufu) was investigated by Clark (1971) in Grand Teton Narional Park, \\\\Fyoming. In conjunction with rhar study, body measure- ments were made on 115 mice. This paper reports those data (Table 1). The only previously published morphological data on Z. p. utdhensir from Wyoming were by Iong (1965). He listed average

Tim W. Clark

266

SAVANNAH SPARROWS NESTING IN ALPINE HABITAT IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) nests were found in alpine willow habitat at 3150 m elevation in the Beartooth Mountains of northern Wyoming, USA during July 1988. These are the first documented alpine nests for this species south of Canada. The nesting conditions are described and discussed in terms of a recent colonization of alpine habitat by a small, expanding

PAUL HENDRICKS; COLEEN PIDGEON

267

Wyoming Water Resources Research Centter Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Changes Project Number: B-01 Start Date: 3/1/2000 End Date: 2/28/2001 Research Category: Climate of this magnitude should also influence groundwater recharge and, as part of on going work, changes in groundwaterWyoming Water Resources Research Centter Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction None Research

268

FURTHER STUDIES ON TRYPANOSOMES IN GAME ANIMALS IN WYOMING 1100  

Microsoft Academic Search

Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American bison (Bison bison) being brought

NEWTON KINGSTON; E. TOM; GEORGE M. THOMAS; B LINDA McHOLLANDand; MALCOLM S. TRUEBLOOD

269

Enhancing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Establishment with Cultural Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) has proven difficult to re- establish by direct seeding on mined lands in the western U.S. This paper reviews research accomplishments over the last decade that address ecological and cultural practices to enhance big sagebrush establishment. Direct-placed topsoil, mulching and arbuscular mycorrhizae have been shown to positively influence seedling establishment of this species

G. E. Schuman; D. T. Booth; R. A. Olson

270

Browsing Effects on Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plants and Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of likely yearlong browsing by several wild ungulate species on individual Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) plants and communities was studied. The investigation was conducted near Gardiner, MT, in the ungu- late-rich boundary line area of the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range. Plant level responses were measured in this study and related to reported community responses. Individual

Carl L. Wambolt; Trista Hoffman

271

Seeded Native Shrub Establishment on Disturbed Sites in Southwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical wildlife habitat supporting mule deer, antelope, and sage grouse in high elevation rangeland and sagebrush ecosystems of southwest Wyoming is threatened by an expanding population and energy exploration and development. Our objective was to evaluate native shrub species establishment for restoration after disturbance. In October 2005, on a well-pad disturbance, 16 accessions of 13 native shrub species were drill-seeded

James S. Jacobs; MT Bozeman; R. Winslow; Karen J. Clause; Pinedale WY; Roger Hybner

272

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-print Network

distribution in the Wyodak- Anderson coal zone in the Powder River Basin. PQ-3. Ash yield in the WyodakChapter PQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA By G.D. Stricker Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey

273

Irrigated acreage in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season. [Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The irrigated cropland in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season was inventoried from satellite imagery. LANDSAT color infrared images (scale 1:125,000) were examined for early, mid, and late summer dates, and acreage was estimated by use of township/section overlays. The total basin acreage was estimated to be 573,435 acres, with individual state totals as follows: Idaho 234,370 acres; Utah 265,505 acres; and Wyoming 73,560 acres. As anticipated, wetland areas intermingled among cropland appears to have produced an over-estimation of irrigated acreage. According to a 2% random sample of test sites evaluated by personnel from the Soil Conservation Service such basin-wide over-estimation is 7.5%; individual counties deviate significantly from the basin-wide figure, depending on the relative amount of wetland areas intermingled with cropland.

Ridd, M. K.; Jaynes, R. A.; Landgraf, K. F.; Clark, L. D., Jr. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

274

Speed of call delivery is related to context and caller identity in Campbell's monkey males  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Call rate can be a salient feature in animal communication. Depending on the species, different psychological variables appear to influence call rates but the exact nature of these relationships remains poorly explored. Here, we demonstrate for free-ranging Campbell’s monkeys that the call rates of four different alarm series (termed H, K, K+, and B series) vary systematically as a function of context, associated behaviour, and identity of the caller. K+ series were given more rapidly to predation than non-predation events, K+ and K series more rapidly to visual than auditory predator detection, and H series more rapidly while counterattacking an eagle than staying put. Finally, there were individual differences in B series, suggesting that call rate potentially provides listeners with cues about the caller’s anti-predator behaviour, event type experienced, and his identity.

Lemasson, Alban; Ouattara, Karim; Bouchet, Hélčne; Zuberbühler, Klaus

2010-11-01

275

Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2010-10-01

276

Identification of buried sinkholes using refraction tomography at Ft. Campbell Army Airfield, Kentucky  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karst aquifers are highly susceptible to contamination, with numerous points of entry for contaminants through recharge features\\u000a such as sinkholes, swallow holes and solutionally enlarged fractures. These recharge features may be filled or obscured at\\u000a the surface, requiring the use of geophysical or remote sensing techniques for their identification. This study uses seismic\\u000a refraction data collected at the Ft. Campbell

I. Camilo Higuera-Díaz; Philip J. Carpenter; Michael D. Thompson

2007-01-01

277

Land resource information needs of county government : a case study in Larimer County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

My two colleagues on the study team, Rex Burns of the Larimer County Planning Department, and Glenn McCarty of the Fort Collins office of the Soil Conservation Service, contributed substantially to this report; many of their written words have found their way directly into the text. Jill O'Gara later replaced Rex Burns as the Larimer County coordinator in the study's final stages. John Rold, Colorado State Geologist, assisted in coordinating our efforts at the beginning of this study. Lou Campbell, State Cartographer, gave valuable advice and assistance throughout the effort. Wallace Hansen and James Blakey of the USGS Geologic and Water Resources Divisions, respectively, read the final manuscript and helped in many other ways. Joanna Trolinger served as research assistant and manuscript typist. Many others in the USGS, SCS, and other organizations helped in supplying information and advice. Tom Bates, then Chairman of the USGS Central Region Earth Science Applications Task Force, was the originator of the study, leader of the USGS participation effort, and guiding inspiration throughout. The study was carried out in association with the Program on Environment and Behavior, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Alexander, Robert H.

1983-01-01

278

Leroy storage facility, Uinta County, Wyoming: A case history of attempted gas-migration control  

SciTech Connect

The case history of Leroy storage is unique because it involved definite migration away from the originally intended storage horizon as evidenced by seepage of gas to the surface. Several techniques were coordinated in an effort to understand, monitor, control, and reduce the leak. These included various logging, surveying, sampling, and testing techniques, tracer work, computer simulation, and engineering analysis. Among these, the computer simulation proved practical and effective in establishing a correlation between the leak rate and the extent of ''overpressure'' in the reservoir. The final evidence totally eliminating all appearance of leak to the surface is not yet on hand. There remains some work to be done before a collector zone is found and other measures to be taken such as recompletion, recycling, venting, pressure control, or whatever may be indicated. A computer program developed to simulate a unique

Araktingi, R.E.; Benefield, M.E.; Bessenyie, Z.; Coats, K.H.; Tek, M.R.

1984-01-01

279

The South Fork detachment fault, Park County, Wyoming: discussion and reply ( USA).  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Blackstone (1985) published an interpretation of South form detachment fault and related features. His interpretation of the area between Castle and Hardpan transverse faults is identical to mine of 1941. Subsequent detailed mapping has shown that the structure between the transverse faults is more complicated than originally envisioned and resurrected by Blackstone. The present paper describes and discusses geologic features that are the basis for my interpretations; also discussed are differences between my interpretations and those of Blackstone. Most data are shown on the geologic map of the Wapiti Quadrangle (Pierce and Nelson, 1969). Blackstone's 'allochthonous' masses are part of the South Form fault. Occurrences of Sundance Formation, which he interpreted as the upper plate of his 'North Fork fault', are related to Heart Mountain fault. Volcaniclastic rocks south of Jim Mountain mapped as Aycross Formation by Torres and Gingerich may be Cathedral Cliffs Formation, emplaced by movement of the Heart Mountain fault. - Author

Pierce, W.G.

1986-01-01

280

Natural fracture characterization: A key to success in an exploration play, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Numerous vertical wells drilled in the southern Powder River basin have encountered fractured, tight, overpressured, Cretaceous hydrocarbon reservoirs. These reservoirs demonstrate enhanced productivity and ultimate recovery with little to no water production. Effective exploration and development of these reservoirs includes a systematic approach to characterization and prediction of the fracture system. Surface mapping within Cretaceous units along the southern and western margins of the basin revealed multiple fracture sets related to both regional and local tectonic events. A pre-Laramide regional fracture set oriented at approximately N70{degrees}E is dominant over the mapped 500 square mile area. This set displays a consistent frequency, direction, height. and morphology both in the surface and subsurface. Fractures in early Tertiary rocks within the basin are unidirectionally oriented along a WNW azimuth, a direction also found in the Cretaceous units. Vaster Resources, Inc. is actively exploring fractured reservoirs in the Powder River basin with horizontal wells targeting the Niobrara and Frontier formations. Integration of the detailed surface outcrop studies with regional cross-sections, Landsat lineament analysis, FMS log data, 2D multicomponent/multisource shear wave seismic, and borehole breakouts (to determine present day stress) have been used to successfully predict the orientation, frequency, and degree of openness of the subsurface fracture system. The consistency of the fracture system and its positive impact on reservoir productivity significantly enhance the prospectiveness of Cretaceous plays throughout the southern Powder River basin.

Parks, S.L.; Gale, M.S.; Bradley, P.J. [Vastar Resources, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Mount, V.S. [ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, TX (United States)

1996-06-01

281

Platinum and associated elements at the New Rambler mine and vicinity, Albany and Carbon Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Platinum-group metals in the Medicine Bow Mountains were first identified by W. C. Knight in 1901. In the Medicine Bow Mountains, these metals are commonly associated with copper, silver, or gold in shear zones that cut a series of mafic igneous and metamorphic rocks. At the New Rambler mine, where the initial discovery was made, about 50,000 tons of mine and mill waste contain an average of 0.3 percent copper, 7 ppm (parts per million) silver, 1 ppm platinum plus palladium, and 0.7 ppm gold. This material is believed to be from a low-grade envelope around the high-grade pod of complex ore that was mined selectively in the old workings. Soil samples in the vicinity of the New Rambler mine exhibit a wide range of content of several elements associated with the ore. Most of the variation can be attributed to contamination, from the mine workings. Even though soil samples identify a low-level copper anomaly that persists to the limit of the area sampled, soils do not offer a promising medium for tracing mineralization owing to the blanket of transported overburden. Stream sediments, if preconcentrated for analysis, do reveal anomalies not only in the contaminated stream below the New Rambler mine, but in adjacent drainage and on Dave Creek. Examination of a spectrum of elements in heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediment may contribute to knowledge of the nature of the mineralization and of the basic geology of the environment. The sampling of bedrock exposures is not particularly fruitful because outcrops are sparse and the exposed rocks are the least altered and mineralized. Bedrock sampling does, however, provide information on the large size and provincial nature of the platinum-rich area. We feel that a properly integrated program of geological, geophysical, and geochemical exploration in the Medicine Bow Mountains and probably in the Sierra Madre to the west has a reasonable probability of successfully locating a complex ore body.

Theobald, P.K.; Thompson, Charles Emmet

1968-01-01

282

Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

1986-08-01

283

78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...site-wide reclamation plan elements through separate licensing actions, including mill demolition, relocation of lined evaporation pond sediments, soil decommissioning plan, and ground water remediation. In November 2010, the NRC staff notified...

2013-05-01

284

Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Doty Mountain quadrangle, eastern Washakie basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides a geologic map of the Doty Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. Detailed measured sections are provided for the type sections of the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The data set was collected as part of a larger effort to acquire data on Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin. Regions in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin have potential for coal development and were considered previously for coal leasing by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

2006-01-01

285

Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Blue Gap quadrangle, eastern Washakie Basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides a geologic map of the Blue Gap 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface.

Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

2005-01-01

286

Foreland structure - Beartooth Mountains, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of public drilling records from the AMOCO Beartooth Number 1 and 1 A sidetrack boreholes (SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 19, T.8 S., R.20 E., Carbon County, Montana) continues. Several additional inferences are made about this large foreland structure, and subsequent interpretation of the structural model of the northeast corner of the Beartooth Mountain Block and structural relationship with the Big Horn Basin. The structure is described as a large recumbent to sub-horizontal, synclinal fold with the overturned upper limb out diagonally by the Beartooth Thrust or Thrust Zone and a complex thrust fault zone below the Beartooth Thrust. The single recorded dip angle and direction of the Beartooth Thrust at depth was 19 degrees to the northwest(?). The dipmeter dip angle on the Beartooth Thrust, 19 degrees, validates foreland structural theory of decreasing dip angles at a vertical depth of 8,232 feet (2,509 m), in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The northwest dip direction may be attributable to secondary structural folding. The record of northwest, southeast, and southwest dip of bedding surfaces and faults in sections of the overturned upper limb, in both boreholes, suggests possible, less intense secondary folding, after thrust fault deformation. Given the overall geometry of this large foreland structure, there is little doubt that the average direction of maximum principal stress (sigma 1) was oriented in a northeast - southwest direction.

Clark, D.M. [Exodus - Exploration, Inc., Billings, MT (United States)

1996-06-01

287

78 FR 7809 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed (Non-Competitive) Direct Sale of Public Land in Campbell County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...less than the appraised fair market value to the Craig G. and Peggy S. Means Revocable Trust...non-competitive) direct sale to the Craig G. and Peggy S. Means Revocable Trust...a)(5). In addition, the Craig G. and Peggy S. Means Revocable...

2013-02-04

288

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

Not Available

2011-05-01

289

Land and federal mineral ownership coverage for southern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Arc/Info coverage contains land status and Federal mineral ownership for approximately 37,800 square miles in southern Wyoming. The polygon coverage (which is also provided here as a shapefile) contains two attributes of ownership information for each polygon. One attribute indicates where the surface is State owned, privately owned, or, if Federally owned, which Federal agency manages the land surface. The other attribute indicates which minerals, if any, are owned by the Federal govenment. This coverage is based on land status and Federal mineral ownership data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming State Bureau of Land Management (BLM) at a scale of 1:24,000. This coverage was compiled primarily to serve the USGS National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment and National Coal Resource Assessment Projects in the Northern Rocky Mountains/Great Plains Region.

Biewick, L.H.; Mercier, T.J.; Saber, T.T.; Urbanowski, S.R.; Neasloney, Larry

1999-01-01

290

Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow indicates areas of canopy burn and mixed burn with a biomass of between 12 to 20 tons per hectare; light green is mixed burn and on-burn forest with a biomass of 20 to 35 tons per hectare; and green is non-burned forest with a biomass of greater than 35 tons per hectare. Forest recovery from the fire seems to depend on fire intensity and soil conditions. In areas of severe canopy burn and poor soil conditions, crown biomass was still low in 1994 (indicated by the brown areas at the center left), whereas in areas of mixed burn with nutrient-rich soils, seen west of Yellowstone Lake, crown biomass has increased significantly in six years (indicated by the yellow and light green areas). Imaging fire-affected regions with spaceborne radar illustrates SIR-C/X-SAR's keen abilities to monitor regrowth after a fire. Knowing the amount of carbon accumulated in the atmosphere by regenerating forest in the 20 to 50 years following a fire disturbance is also a significant factor in understanding the global carbon cycle. Measuring crown biomass is necessary to evaluate the effects of past and future fires in specific regions. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) are part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm), and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes that are caused by nature and those changes that are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italian

1994-01-01

291

U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2012 annual report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Southwest Wyoming contains abundant energy resources, wildlife, habitat, open spaces, and outdoor recreational opportunities. Although energy exploration and development have been taking place in the region since the late 1800s, the pace of development for fossil fuels and renewable energy increased significantly in the early 2000s. This and the associated urban and exurban development are leading to landscape-level environmental and socioeconomic changes that have the potential to diminish wildlife habitat and other natural resources, and the quality of human lives, in Southwest Wyoming. The potential for negative effects of these changes prompted Federal, State, and local agencies to undertake the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative for Southwest Wyoming.

Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bern, Carleton R.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Fedy, Bradford C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Homer, Collin; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Sweat, Michael J.; Wilson, Anna B.

2014-01-01

292

Response of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) to defoliation of understory grasses and drought.  

E-print Network

??Water potential, leaf conductance, growth, nitrogen content, and seedling survival of Wyoming Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) following defoliation of the herbaceous understory were… (more)

Purrington, Teal Mackenzie

1992-01-01

293

Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy  

E-print Network

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

2007-01-01

294

[DOE/EPSCoR traineeship program for Wyoming: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of the traineeship program supported by the Department of Energy EPSCoR funding, the University of Wyoming has made outstanding progress toward the objective of increasing the supply of highly trained engineers and scientists with interests in energy related disciplines. The scope of the traineeship program has already broadened to encompass both more departments than originally expected and nearly twice as many graduate students as expected. Further, since the primary emphasis was on new students, most of those recruited have developed ties to the DOE labs that would not have otherwise existed. This portion of this Progress Report gives an overall summary of the University of Wyoming`s approach to the DOE Traineeship Program implementation. It also provides an overview of the results so far and vision of how this program fits with the broader objectives for development of the University and its academic programs. Subsequent sections describe very briefly the impact of the traineeship students in each department that was successful in obtaining funds through the competitive process that was adopted. Finally, the report ends with a summary of both the academic status of the participants and the budget expenditures to date.

Not Available

1992-08-01

295

Further studies on trypanosomes in game animals in Wyoming II.  

PubMed

Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American Bison (Bison bison) being brought into Wyoming from Nebraska. Nineteen additional bison were negative for trypanosomes by blood cultures. Identification of species was not possible due to the failure to obtain bloodstream trypomastigotes from this host. Trypanosomes were recovered from 8 of 57 pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana). This is the first report of Trypanosoma sp. from bison and from pronghorn; the trypanosome from moose was identified as Trypanosoma cervi from bloodstream trypomastigotes. In 1978, natural transplacental transmission of trypanosomes was found to occur in 1 of 15 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) fetuses, examined near term by blood culture. No trypanosomes were found in 18 male deer fetuses examined in 1979. Of 100 free-ranging elk from western Wyoming examined by blood culture in 1979, 71 were infected. These data are compared with data from 1973-74. PMID:7338978

Kingston, N; Thorne, E T; Thomas, G M; McHolland, L; Trueblood, M S

1981-10-01

296

Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part A - Coal and wind  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To further advance the objectives of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming State Geological Survey (WSGS) have compiled Part A of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming. Focusing primarily on electrical power sources, Part A of the energy map is a compilation of both published and previously unpublished coal (including coalbed gas) and wind energy resources data, presented in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data package. Energy maps, data, documentation and spatial data processing capabilities are available in a geodatabase, published map file (pmf), ArcMap document (mxd), Adobe Acrobat PDF map (plate 1) and other digital formats that can be downloaded at the USGS website. Accompanying the map (plate 1) and the geospatial data are four additional plates that describe the geology, energy resources, and related infrastructure. These tabular plates include coal mine (plate 2), coal field (plate 3), coalbed gas assessment unit (plate 4), and wind farm (plate 5) information with hyperlinks to source publications and data on the internet. The plates can be printed and examined in hardcopy, or accessed digitally. The data represent decades of research by the USGS, WSGS, BLM and others, and can facilitate landscape-level science assessments, and resource management decisionmaking.

Biewick, Laura R.H.; Jones, Nicholas R.

2012-01-01

297

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

298

U.S. Geological Survey science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2011 annual report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the fourth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. In FY2011, there were 37 ongoing, completed, or new projects conducted under the five major multi-disciplinary science and technical-assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis, (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research, (3) Data and Information Management, (4) Integration and Coordination, and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. The four new work activities were (1) development of the Western Energy Citation Clearinghouse, a Web-based energy-resource database of references for literature and on-line resources focused on energy development and its effects on natural resources; (2) a study to support the Sublette County Conservation District in ascertaining potential water-quality impacts to the New Fork River from energy development in the Pinedale Anticline Project Area; (3) a study to test the efficacy of blending high-frequency temporal data provided by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors and high-resolution Landsat data for providing the fine-resolution data required to evaluate habitat responses to management activities at the landscape level; and (4) a study to examine the seasonal water chemistry of Muddy Creek, including documenting salinity patterns and providing a baseline for assessing potential effects of energy and other development on water quality in the Muddy Creek watershed. Two work activities were completed in FY2011: (1) the assessment of rancher perceptions of energy development in Southwest Wyoming and (2) mapping aspen stands and conifer encroachment using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis for effectiveness monitoring. The USGS continued to compile data, develop geospatial products, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts, including (1) ranking and prioritizing proposed conservation projects, (2) developing the WLCI integrated assessment, (3) developing the WLCI 5-year Conservation Action Plan, and (4) continuing to upgrade the content and improve the functionality of the WLCI Web site. For the WLCI FY2012 annual report, a decision was made to greatly reduce the overall length of the annual report, which will be accomplished by simplifying the report format and focusing on the take-home messages of each work activity for WLCI partners.

Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Blecker, Steven W.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephanie; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Holloway, JoAnn; Homer, Collin; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Olexa, Edward M.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Sweat, Michael J.; Tuttle, Michele L.; Wilson, Anna B.

2013-01-01

299

77 FR 25664 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...would not apply in these areas (Chapter 47, section 4(a)). Although some hunting is currently allowed in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway under the Parkway's enabling legislation and Wyoming law, Wyoming's hunting...

2012-05-01

300

Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

1989-01-01

301

Basewide energy systems plan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky; executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Included in this summary are the results of the Basewide Energy Systems Plan for Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This plan includes an analysis and recommendation of energy conservation projects for the reduction of the installation`s present energy consumption. The savings figures presented in this summary can only be realized after all projects have been implemented. Black Veatch has developed projects that would meet the funding requirements for the energy conservation program. Futher more, the recommended projects provide partial compliance with the energy conservation requirement for the installation as outlined in the Army Facilities Energy Plan.

NONE

1983-03-01

302

Mechanical models of fracture reactivation and slip on bedding surfaces during folding of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming  

E-print Network

of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming Pablo F. Sanz a,*, David D. Pollard b , Patricia F. Allwardt parallel slip FEM modeling Frictional contact Sheep Mountain, Wyoming a b s t r a c t We use finite element-surface slip during the deformation of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming. A series

Borja, Ronaldo I.

303

Are there benefits to mowing intact Wyoming big sagebrush communities? An evaluation from southeastern Oregon  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrus...

304

DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html  

E-print Network

1 DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html [Johnson, 2005] Steven Johnson, "Derailments, congestion on tracks in Wyoming present problems for G&Ts", Electric Co-op Today, July 2005. "A damage caused by two major derailments earlier this year has produced congestion along a 100-mile stretch

Tesfatsion, Leigh

305

Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: natural resource goals, management practices and information sources  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Spanning 60 million acres, Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services. However, the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. In cooperation with the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA)—a predominant agricul...

306

Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: Natural resource goals, management practices and information sources  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services, but the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. What are the characteristics of Wyoming ranches, and how do ranchers manage natural resources? In cooperation with the...

307

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2010-07-01

308

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

... 2014-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2014-07-01

309

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2011-07-01

310

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2012-07-01

311

33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. 110.127b Section...Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line...

2013-07-01

312

78 FR 63243 - Notice of Public Meeting; Wyoming Resource Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...November 12 meeting will be at the Holiday Inn, 204 South 30th Street, Laramie, Wyoming...13 meeting will be at the Hilton Garden Inn, 229 Grand Avenue, Laramie, Wyoming...will begin at 1:00 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Laramie. On Wednesday, November...

2013-10-23

313

Cooperative Project in Adult Basic Education for Wyoming, 1968-69.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major elements of this cooperative training project by the University of Wyoming will be a Federally funded 1969 summer institute (the third in a series) for 35 administrators of adult basic education (ABE) in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Montana, and Idaho; a year-round demonstration library and center for ABE materials and equipment; a regional…

Jensen, Glenn; And Others

314

Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

Naeser, Nancy D.

1984-01-01

315

EFFECTS OF WILDLIFE UTILIZATION ON WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH GROWTH AND SURVIVAL ON RECLAIMED MINE LANDS1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ensuring Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) survival remains a challenge on many mines even years after initial establishment. Wildlife utilization may be a major influence on its survival. A wildlife exclosure was erected in June 2001 on a portion of a study initiated in 1990 at the North Antelope\\/Rochelle Mine in northeastern Wyoming. Investigations

Kristene A. Partlow; Gerald E. Schuman; Richard A. Olson; Scott E. Belden

316

Growth Response of Wyoming Big Sagebrush to Heavy Browsing by Wild Ungulates  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exclosure in a Wyoming big sagebrush Wyoming big sagebrush plants that were not subjected to 35 years of winter browsing by elk, mule deer, and

Trista L. Hoffman; Carl L. Wambolt

317

SUMMER FOOD HABITS AND TROPHIC OVERLAP OF ROUNDTAIL CHUB AND CREEK CHUB IN MUDDY CREEK, WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin have experienced substantial de- clines in abundance and distribution, and are extirpated from most of Wyoming. Muddy Creek, in south-central Wyoming (Little Snake River watershed), contains sympatric populations of native roundtail chub (Gila robusta), bluehead sucker, (Catostomus discobolus), and flannelmouth sucker (C. latipinnis), and represents an area of high conservation concern because

Michael C. Quist; Michael R. Bower; Wayne A. Hubert; Kevin Bestgen

2006-01-01

318

Coal conversion at Picatinny Arsenal and Forts Campbell, Bragg, and Gordon: A feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Public Law 99-190 requires the Department of Defense to increase the use of coal at its facilities in the United States. This study investigated the feasibility of converting oil- and gas-fired heating plants to coal firing at four Army installations: Fort Bragg, NC; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Gordon, GA; and Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. Information on the energy systems at the selected sites was gathered by site visit and survey, and project life cycle cost (LCC) was computationally estimated. The study concluded that, for the four installations, there would be a lower life-cycle cost (LCC) in maintaining the status quo than in building new plants. However, where new plant construction is planned, the larger the plants, the better its potential for cost-effectively using coal as a plant fuel. The use of coal at a new plant at Fort Bragg was found to be more cost effective than gas or oil, and may result in significant cost savings. For the other three installations studied, significant price increases in alternate fuels would be required before coal would become economically feasible (31 to 73 percent for gas, and 50 to 84 percent for 6 fuel oil). Ft. Bragg, NC, Army coal conversion program, Ft. Campbell, KY, Coal-fixed technologies, Ft. Gordon, GA, Cost-effectiveness.

Lin, M.C.; Thurber, L.; Durbin, T.; Tarvin, R.

1993-12-01

319

Redescription of Bellerophon bittneri (Gastropoda: Triassic) from Wyoming.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bellerophon bittneri Newell and Kummel is an Early Triassic bellerophontacean from the Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River Mountains. The available type material consists of one fair, but incomplete, external mold, which resembles a Bellerophon but is actually a Retispira. After repeated search, additional specimens were found at one locality in the southern Wind River Range of Wyoming; Retispira bittneri is redescribed from this new material. Like other Triassic bellerophontaceans, there is nothing unusual about the species apart from occurrence in the Mesozoic; it is clearly congeneric with Permian Retispira from underlying rocks. -Authors

Yochelson, E.L.; Boyd, D.W.; Wardlaw, B.

1985-01-01

320

Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

Andrews, E.D.

1982-01-01

321

Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a comparison of results from both Slave and Superior cratons throughout the Archean and Proterozoic. The data will test the prior connections, or lack thereof, among the Archean cratons in Laurentia, and help assess whether there was a supercontinent during the Archean-Proterozoic transition.

Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

2010-12-01

322

Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming  

PubMed Central

On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9°C. PMID:16592797

Leopold, Luna B.

1980-01-01

323

New vitrinite reflectance data for the Wind River Basin, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range and Owl Creek and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, and the Granite Mountains on the south, and Wind River Range on the west. The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data collected mainly from Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin to better characterize their thermal maturity and hydrocarbon potential.

Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Finn, Thomas M.

2013-01-01

324

Monjolo: An Energy-Harvesting Energy Meter Architecture Samuel DeBruin, Bradford Campbell, and Prabal Dutta  

E-print Network

Monjolo: An Energy-Harvesting Energy Meter Architecture Samuel DeBruin, Bradford Campbell 48109 {sdebruin,bradjc,prabal}@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT Conventional AC power meters perform at least two distinct func- tions: power conversion, to supply the meter itself, and energy me- tering, to measure

Dutta, Prabal

325

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #3 BioEnergetics ANSWER KEY  

E-print Network

to complete within 3 hours, except for typing. There are three pages for this test, including this cover sheet pts. #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2003 3 2) Using your own body as an example, provide or physical energy was acceptable. 10 pts. 3) Diagram the flow of energy in the light reactions

Campbell, A. Malcolm

326

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering  

E-print Network

may find the cure for cancer." 6 pts. 4) List all the molecules carried by HIV inside its capsid. #12Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Spring 2007 1 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 ­ Cancer, HIV, & Genetic

Campbell, A. Malcolm

327

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take-Home Exam #2 Classical Genetics  

E-print Network

. Staple all your pages (INCLUDING THE TEST PAGES) together when finished with the exam. Name (please print to navel piercings that puncture kidneys and lead to rapid death). #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 dilemmas associated with real humans ­ this is not a real case.) Your answer should NOT be in written words

Campbell, A. Malcolm

328

Sedimentology, geochemistry and palaeogeographic implications of volcanic rocks in the Upper Archaean Campbell Group, western Kaapvaal craton, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tuffs and lava interbedded in Campbell Group carbonates and shales are investigated for their sedimentological and geochemical properties. The most proximal tuffs occur at the southwestern margin of the Kaapvaal craton, in Griqualand West. They were deposited in a shallow-marine to tidal carbonate environment from hydroclastic eruptions. The tuffs along this margin are subdivided into two main facies types: (1)

Wladyslaw Altermann

1996-01-01

329

Slime-U-Lator (slime mold simulation) by Victoria G. Rinker, Pooja Potharaju, Laurie J. Heyer and A. Malcolm Campbell  

E-print Network

1 Slime-U-Lator (slime mold simulation) by Victoria G. Rinker, Pooja Potharaju, Laurie J. Heyer and A. Malcolm Campbell Davidson College, 2011 Students' Protocol A Quick Background: Slime mold cells the emergent property of slime mold aggregation. Aggregation: In order to understand what is happening

Campbell, A. Malcolm

330

Integrated Debugging of Large Modular Robot Ensembles Benjamin D. Rister, Jason Campbell, Padmanabhan Pillai, and Todd C. Mowry  

E-print Network

Integrated Debugging of Large Modular Robot Ensembles Benjamin D. Rister, Jason Campbell software on simulated ensembles of tens of thousands of modular robots, we have developed a new debugging itself. Software development for modular and metamorphic robotic systems compounds these issues

Goldstein, Seth Copen

331

Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

2008-01-01

332

Potential for deep basin-centered gas accumulation in Hanna Basin, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The potential for a continuous-type basin-centered gas accumulation in the Hanna Basin in Carbon County, Wyoming, is evaluated using geologic and production data including mud-weight, hydrocarbon-show, formation-test, bottom-hole-temperature, and vitrinite reflectance data from 29 exploratory wells. This limited data set supports the presence of a hypothetical basin-centered gas play in the Hanna Basin. Two generalized structural cross sections illustrate our interpretations of possible abnormally pressured compartments. Data indicate that a gas-charged, overpressured interval may occur within the Cretaceous Mowry, Frontier, and Niobrara Formations at depths below 10,000 ft along the southern and western margins of the basin. Overpressuring may also occur near the basin center within the Steele Shale and lower Mesaverde Group section at depths below 18,000 to 20,000 ft. However, the deepest wells drilled to date (12,000 to 15,300 ft) have not encountered over-pressure in the basin center. This overpressured zone is likely to be relatively small (probably 20 to 25 miles in diameter) and is probably depleted of gas near major basement reverse faults and outcrops where gas may have escaped. Water may have invaded reservoirs through outcrops and fracture zones along the basin margins, creating an extensive normally pressured zone. A zone of subnormal pressure also may exist below the water-saturated, normal-pressure zone and above the central zone of overpressure. Subnormal pressures have been interpreted in the center of the Hanna Basin at depths ranging from 10,000 to 25,000 ft based on indirect evidence including lost-circulation zones. Three wells on the south side of the basin, where the top of the subnormally pressured zone is interpreted to cut across stratigraphic boundaries, tested the Niobrara Formation and recovered gas and oil shows with very low shut-in pressures.

Wilson, Michael S.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Nuccio, Vito F.

2001-01-01

333

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

Not Available

1994-03-01

334

POPULATION ESTIMATES AND ASPECTS OF HIBERNATION IN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MICE (ZAPUS HUDSONIUS PREBLEI) ALONG SOUTH BOULDER CREEK, BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius prebler) occurs along the Front Range of Colorado and in south-central Wyoming. The present study uses PIT-tagging to mark individual jumping mice and mark-recapture analyses for population estimates and survival rates along South Boulder Creek and a ditch fed by it in Boulder County, Colorado. There was total of 256 individuals and 586 captures

Carron A. Meaney; Norman W. Clippinger; Bruce Lubow

335

Pontotoc County Government Summer  

E-print Network

Pontotoc County Government Summer Youth Internship Program June 17 - 21, 2013 Sponsored By Government Summer Youth Internship Program June 17-21, 2013 Who: Youth ages 14-19 who attend a Pontotoc 24, 2013. What: Learn About YOUR Pontotoc County Government. Youth will spend time in each

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

336

Allegheny County Economic Trends  

E-print Network

. In 2005, economic activity in Allegheny County is estimated to produce over $77 billion in value added product. This value added production, called Gross Regional Product, accounts for over 72% of whatAllegheny County Economic Trends Prepared by: University Center for Social and Urban Research

Sibille, Etienne

337

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), limited energy study - lighting, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 95 representative buildings at Fort Campbell, categorized as Korean War Barracks, Airfield Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior lighting, and indoor lighting controls. Cost estimates were prepared using MeansData for Windows Spreadsheets, Version 2.Oa. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for four Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The total of the four projects that were developed represent $385,283 in annual savings with a simple payback of 6.37 years and a saving to investment ratio (SIR) of 1.89.

NONE

1994-09-23

338

The campbell paradigm as a conceptual alternative to the expectation of hypocrisy in contemporary attitude research.  

PubMed

Hypocrisy-professing a general attitude without implementing corresponding attitude-relevant behavior-is, according to Ajzen and Fishbein (2005), commonly found in attitude research that aims to explain individual behavior. We conducted two studies that adopted the Campbell paradigm, an alternative to the traditional understanding of attitudes. In a laboratory experiment, we found that specific attitude-relevant cooperation in a social dilemma was a function of people's pre-existing general environmental attitude. In a quasi-experiment, we corroborated the reverse as well; engagement in attitude-relevant dietary practices was indicative of environmental attitude. When using Campbellian attitude measures, there is no room for hypocrisy: People put their general attitudes into specific attitude-relevant practices, and differences in people's general attitudes can be derived from their attitude-relevant behavior. PMID:25185705

Kaiser, Florian G; Byrka, Katarzyna

2015-01-01

339

Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government  

E-print Network

Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government, the V.G. Young Institute of County Government provides continuing education programs for local government officials, including county judges and commissioners, county treasurers, county and district

340

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

341

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

342

National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana  

SciTech Connect

The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated.

Damp, J N; Jennings, M D

1982-04-01

343

California-Wyoming Grid Integration Study: Phase 1 -- Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a comparative analysis of two different renewable energy options for the California energy market between 2017 and 2020: 12,000 GWh per year from new California in-state renewable energy resources; and 12,000 GWh per year from Wyoming wind delivered to the California marketplace. Either option would add to the California resources already existing or under construction, theoretically providing the last measure of power needed to meet (or to slightly exceed) the state's 33% renewable portfolio standard. Both options have discretely measurable differences in transmission costs, capital costs (due to the enabling of different generation portfolios), capacity values, and production costs. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the two different options to provide additional insight for future planning.

Corbus, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Schwabe, P.; Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.; Brinkman, G.; Paduru, A.; Diakov, V.; Hand, M.

2014-03-01

344

Ratio maps of iron ore deposits Atlantic City district, Wyoming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary results of a spectral rationing technique are shown for a region at the southern end of the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Digital ratio graymaps and analog ratio images have been produced for the test site, but ground truth is not yet available for thorough interpretation of these products. ERTS analog ratio images were found generally better than either ERTS single-channel images or high altitude aerial photos for the discrimination of vegetation from non-vegetation in the test site region. Some linear geological features smaller than the ERTS spatial resolution are seen as well in ERTS ratio and single-channel images as in high altitude aerial photography. Geochemical information appears to be extractable from ERTS data. Good preliminary quantitative agreement between ERTS-derived ratios and laboratory-derived reflectance ratios of rocks and minerals encourage plans to use lab data as training sets for a simple ratio gating logic approach to automatic recognition maps.

Vincent, R. K.

1973-01-01

345

Outplanting Wyoming big sagebrush following wldfire: stock performance and economics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

mycorrhizal amendments. Most mortality occurred during the first year after planting; this period is the greatest barrier to establishment of sagebrush stock. The proportion of healthy stock in Year 1 was positively related to subsequent survival to Year 3. Costs were minimized, and survival maximized, by planting container stock or bare-root stock with a hydrogel dip. Our results indicate that outplanting is an ecologically and economically effective way of establishing Wyoming big sagebrush. However, statistical analyses were limited by the fact that data about initial variables (stock quality, site conditions, weather) were often unrecorded and by the lack of a replicated experimental design. Sharing consistent data and using an experimental approach would help land managers and restoration practitioners maximize the success of outplanting efforts.

Dettweiler-Robinson, Eva; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Evans, James R.; Newsome, Heidi; Davies, G. Matt; Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.; Easterly, Richard T.; Salstrom, Debra; Dunwiddle, Peter W.

2013-01-01

346

Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

Lantz, E.

2011-05-23

347

Attempting to restore herbaceous understories in Wyoming big sagebrush communities with mowing and seeding  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Shrub steppe communities with depleted perennial herbaceous understories need to be restored to increase resilience, provide quality wildlife habitat, and improve ecosystem function. Mowing has been applied to Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle &Young) steppe...

348

Thermal and Structural Constraints on the Tectonic Evolution of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah Thrust Belt  

E-print Network

The timing of motion on thrust faults in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah (IWU) thrust belt comes from synorogenic sediments, apatite thermochronology and direct dating of fault rocks coupled with good geometrical constraints of the subsurface structure...

Chapman, Shay Michael

2013-08-09

349

78 FR 21565 - Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 73 [MB Docket No. 13-73; RM-11695; DA 13-450] Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington...801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A....

2013-04-11

350

77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming...sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United...party electing to participate in this exploration program must send written notice...

2012-07-10

351

Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

Not Available

1981-10-01

352

75 FR 21035 - Notice of Rescheduled Meetings of the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...BLM) Pinedale Anticline Working Group (PAWG) will meet in Pinedale, Wyoming. These...have been combined and rescheduled. The PAWG will meet on the following date beginning...gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The PAWG was authorized and established by the...

2010-04-22

353

75 FR 28057 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW179009, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Management, Wyoming State Office, Branch of Solid Minerals, Attn: Mavis Love, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, WY 82003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, at 307- 775-6258. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

2010-05-19

354

Tailings basin reclamation: Atlantic City Iron Mine, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

An 81 ha (200 ac) tailings impoundment at a taconite operation in Wyoming abandoned in 1985 has been a source of blowing dust. The site qualified for reclamation under Wyoming's Abandoned Mine Land program. The reclamation design included: incorporating commercially available organic amendments and fertilizers into a 300 mm (12 in.) thick cap of a sterile gravelly clay loam cover material, planting trees in the protective wind/snow shadows of rock beams and rock snow fences, lowering the water level n a flooded mine pit that was feeding uncontrolled seeps, and constructing a wide tailings pond spillway that allows flood control while minimizing seasonal water level fluctuations in the pond. The construction of the earthwork aspects of the design were completed over two construction seasons, including work during the winter at this high-altitude (2,470 m [8,100 ft.]) site. This occurred because snow from an early winter storm that collected behind the rock beams and rock snow fences was slow to melt. Furthermore, the increased snow catch made the site too wet the following spring to allow seeding during the normal seeding window; a fall planting was necessary. The rocky nature of the cover material prompted the development of innovative reclamation approaches, including fabricating a rock rake bulldozer blade and applying organic soil amendments by aerial spraying. A randomly-configured two-acre test plot was installed to evaluate the benefits of various soil amendments as the site matures. Future work on the site will include tree seedling planting and plugging of a decant pipeline.

Gusek, J.J.; Richmond, T.C.

1999-07-01

355

Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

1993-01-01

356

Seed weight variation of Wyoming sagebrush in northern Nevada.  

PubMed

Seed size is a crucial plant trait that may potentially affect not only immediate seedling success but also the subsequent generation. We examined variation in seed weight of Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young), an excellent candidate species for rangeland restoration. The working hypothesis was that a major fraction of spatial and temporal variability in seed size (weight) of Wyoming sagebrush could be explained by variations in mean monthly temperatures and precipitation. Seed collection was conducted at Battle Mountain and Eden Valley sites in northern Nevada, USA, during November of 2002 and 2003. Frequency distributions of seed weight varied from leptokurtic to platykurtic, and from symmetry to skewness to the right for both sites and years. Mean seed weight varied by a factor of 1.4 between locations and years. Mean seed weight was greater (P < 0.05) in 2003 than in 2002 at both sites. This can partially be attributed to 55% greater precipitation in 2003 than 2002, since mean monthly temperatures were similar (P > 0.05) in all study situations. Simple linear regression showed that monthly precipitation (March to November) explained 85% of the total variation in mean seed weight (P = 0.079). Since the relationship between mean monthly temperature (June-November) and mean seed weight was not significant (r2 = 0.00, P = 0.431), this emphasizes the importance of precipitation as an important determinant of mean seed weight. Our results suggest that the precipitation regime to which the mother plant is exposed can have a significant effect on sizes of seeds produced. Hence, seasonal changes in water availability would tend to alter size distributions of produced offspring. PMID:16524249

Busso, Carlos A; Perryman, Barry L

2005-12-01

357

Wisconsin County Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether you're interested in Reedsburg, Rhinelander, or Rubicon, the Wisconsin County Histories website will not fail those keen on the history of the Badger State. Created by the Wisconsin Historical Society, this archive provides access to more than 80 standard histories of Wisconsin counties, most of which were published between 1850 and 1920. The majority of the volumes are over several hundred pages long, and they include detailed passages on cities within their respective counties, along with sketches of prominent leaders. Visitors can use the drop-down menu available on the homepage to find specific volumes, or they can also perform a full text search across all of the histories.

358

Recovery of Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Features in Wyoming Big Sagebrush following Prescribed Fire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of prescribed fire to enhance habitat features for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus )i n Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomin- gensis) in western North America is poorly understood. We evaluated recovery of habitat features important to wintering, nesting, and early brood-rearing Sage-Grouse in Wyoming big sagebrush following prescribed fire. Our case study included 1 year of preburn (1989)

Jeffrey L. Beck; John W. Connelly; Kerry P. Reese

2009-01-01

359

Scale dependencies in structural analysis as illustrated by chevron folds along the Beartooth Front, Wyoming  

E-print Network

SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis ROBERT ANNAN COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement..., for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Ma)or Sub)oct: Geology SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis by ROBERT ANNAN COOK Approved as to style and content by...

Cook, Robert Annan

1972-01-01

360

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2011-03-01

361

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there\\u000a is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities\\u000a with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference\\u000a plots

Kirk W. Davies; Jon D. Bates; Aleta M. Nafus

2011-01-01

362

McFadden, Wyoming: A case study in narrating our changing energy landscapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis uses McFadden, Wyoming, and the Rock Creek Valley to discuss Wyoming's changing energy landscapes and argues that a cultural landscape approach to documenting our historic and cultural resources can contribute to properly siting energy developments. Though Wyoming stands to gain from the construction of wind farms, they should be carefully sited in order to balance environmental and cultural resource preservation with energy needs. Wyoming has a long history as an energy hinterland and provides a significant portion of energy to the U.S. However, the nation's demand for energy should not take precedence over preserving the cultural resources and vast open landscapes that represent Wyoming's heritage. A history of the Rock Creek Valley as a home to Native Americans, a transportation corridor, oil field, and wind farm site is presented along with a discussion of energy consumption and Wyoming's role in the energy market. The thesis also considers the importance of education, public discourse, and narrative as tools for planning a sustainable future with regard to energy, the environment, and cultural resources.

Anderson, Carly-Ann Marie

363

Are there benefits to mowing Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities? An evaluation in southeastern Oregon.  

PubMed

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production (P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment (P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated. PMID:21755343

Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jon D; Nafus, Aleta M

2011-09-01

364

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wyoming big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production ( P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment ( P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated.

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

2011-09-01

365

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

366

Microfossils from the Neoarchean Campbell Group, Griqualand West Sequence of the Transvaal Supergroup, and their paleoenvironmental and evolutionary implications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The oldest filament- and colonial coccoid-containing microbial fossil assemblage now known is described here from drill core samples of stromatolitic cherty limestones of the Neoarchean, approximately 2600-Ma-old Campbell Group (Ghaap Plateau Dolomite, Lime Acres Member) obtained at Lime Acres, northern Cape Province, South Africa. The assemblage is biologically diverse, including entophysalidacean (Eoentophysalis sp.), probable chroococcacean (unnamed colonial coccoids), and oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria (Eomycetopsis cf. filiformis, and Siphonophycus transvaalensis), as well as filamentous fossil bacteria (Archaeotrichion sp.); filamentous possible microfossils (unnamed hematitic filaments) also occur. The Campbell Group microorganisms contributed to the formation of stratiform and domical to columnar stromatolitic reefs in shallow subtidal to intertidal environments of the Transvaal intracratonic sea. Although only moderately to poorly preserved, they provide new evidence regarding the paleoenvironmental setting of the Campbell Group sediments, extend the known time-range of entophysalidacean cyanobacteria by more than 400 million years, substantiate the antiquity and role in stromatolite formation of Archean oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria, and document the exceedingly slow (hypobradytelic) evolutionary rate characteristic of this early evolving prokaryotic lineage.

Altermann, W.; Schopf, J. W.

1995-01-01

367

School Principal Evaluation in Wyoming: Alignment between Instruments Used to Evaluate School Principals in Wyoming and the ISLLC 2008 Standards for School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is premised on the discrepancy that exists in the standards used to train and credential school principals and the elements of principal evaluation found on evaluation instruments used to evaluate the performance of school principals in Wyoming school districts. The purpose of this study was to explore the alignment between the ISLLC…

Woodford, Rick

2012-01-01

368

Snohomish County Biodiesel Project  

SciTech Connect

Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to ���¢��������grow���¢������� this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

2010-02-01

369

Brucellosis in elk I. Serologic and bacteriologic survey in Wyoming.  

PubMed

Incidence of brucellosis in elk (Cervus canadensis) on two winter feedgrounds in Wyoming was examined over a 5-year period by testing serum samples using the standard plate agglutination (SPT) buffered Brucella antigen (BBA), rivanol (Riv) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. Thirty-one percent of 1,165 elk were positive by defined criteria. Considering each test individually, only 29% (106) of 370 positive sera would have been classified as reactors by the SPT, 83% (307) by the BBA test and 86% (314) by the Riv test. The CFT would have identified 85% (267) of 332 positive samples on which it was used. Brucella abortus, type 1, was isolated from 17 of 45 elk necropsied. The SPT identified 59% (10) of these as reactors, the BBA test 94% (16) and the Riv test 88% (15). The CFT identified nine of nine (100%) on which it was used. Prevalence of sero-positive animals increased with age. Brucellosis has been present in one of the two elk herds since at least 1930, and the incidence of infection among mature females in both herds was approximately 50% during this study. No single serologic test should be relied upon to diagnose brucellosis in elk. PMID:416232

Thorne, E T; Morton, J K; Thomas, G M

1978-01-01

370

Paleoecology of Early eocene strata near Buffalo, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Palynological investigation has helped illustrate the paleoecology of a vertical section of strata from the Wasatch Formation between the Healy and Walters coal burns near Buffalo, Wyoming. Numerous silicified logs and stumps of cypress and sequoia have been preserved at the site and drew initial attention to it. Flood-basin deposits enclose the trees and include sandstones, siltstones, shale, and coal beds that accumulated as channel, levee, crevasse-splay, and swamp/marsh sediments. Detrital sediments were probably derived from the Bighorn Mountains and accumulated as they were carried into the Powder River basin fluvial system. One hundred five polynomorph taxa have been distinguished, as well as 10 types of fungal spores. Platycarya, Tilia, Sparganium, and Platanus pollen indicate an early Eocene age for the strata. Other pollen, as well as the genera of trees and megafossil remains from a clinker bed several miles from the study area, reinforce the interpretation of a warm-temperature or subtropical climate at the time of deposition. The megafossil assemblage includes pinnae of the aquatic fern Marsilea, never before described from the fossil record. Variations in the species composition of the polynomorph assemblages show that several plant communities existed in succession at the site. These varied from pond or marsh types to mature forests.

Durkin, T.V.; Rich, F.J.

1986-08-01

371

Oil and gas seeps within Absaroka volcanics of northwestern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Three new occurrences of asphaltic, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons have been discovered in the southeastern Absaroka Range. These petroleum seeps are 40 to 110 mi southeast of previously known seeps within Eocene volcaniclastic rocks at Calcite Springs, Tower Junction, and Sweetwater Mineral Springs, Wyoming. The Middle Fork seep and Castle Rocks seep are near the headwaters of the Middle and North Forks of Owl Creek, respectively. The Chimney Rock asphalt locality is along the South Fork of the Wood River. Water samples from the Middle Fork seep fluoresce greenish-orange and contain 6 to 8 mg/L of extractable bituminous hydrocarbons. An iridescent oily film forms on the water surface and on abundant gas bubbles trapped within moss. The Castle Rocks seep, in Quaternary gravels along the bed of the North Fork of Owl Creek, shows iridescent oily bubbles in emerging spring water and black, sooty lenses of carbon-coated gravels in overlying dry deposits. The Middle Fork and Castle Rocks seeps rise through thin Quaternary deposits overlying the Aycross Formation (Eocene). The Chimney Rock asphalt locality is in a northwest-trending paleovalley fill consisting of highly deformed masses of volcanic strata in the Tepee Trail and Wiggins Formations. Thin (< 1 in. thick), discontinuous, subvertical veins of asphaltum cut through these rocks. These petroleum seeps demonstrate migration of hydrocarbons after the volcaniclastic strata were emplaced and suggest that significant petroleum resources may occur elsewhere within Eocene volcaniclastic rocks and/or within Mesozoic and Paleozoic reservoirs beneath the volcanics.

Sundell, K.A.; Love, J.D.

1986-08-01

372

Reclamation planning for sensitive species in southwest Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Surface coal mine land reclamation can be enhanced to improve its attractiveness and usability for sensitive wildlife species. Enhancements for sensitive wildlife have been incorporated into reclamation at the Jim Bridger Coal mine, located in southwest Wyoming. A diverse wildlife population occupies various habitats within the mine`s study area and includes several species listed as sensitive by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The defined postmine land use is wildlife habitat and livestock grazing. The potential for postmine land use by sensitive species is assessed by documenting the species present during premining baseline studies and monitoring their use of habitat on the permit during mining. The collected wildlife information allows the company to adjust and fine-tune the reclamation plan to create and place habitat where it will attract and accommodate indigenous sensitive species, since extensive lead time is often needed to develop enhanced habitats. Examples would be placement of special vegetative mixes to reestablish historic sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) leks or construction of physical entities such as rock structures within current nesting territories for permanent ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) nest sites. Analysis of the species present, and their habitat requirements during the mining process, also allows time to request variances or modifications in the permitted reclamation plan for enhancements not originally accepted by the regulatory authorities.

Harshbarger, R.M. [Bridger Coal Company, Rock Springs, WY (United States)

1997-12-31

373

Mule deer and pronghorn migration in western Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Migratory mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) populations rely on seasonal ranges to meet their annual nutritional and energetic requirements. Because seasonal ranges often occur great distances apart and across a mix of vegetation types and land ownership, maintaining migration corridors to and from these ranges can be difficult, especially if managers do not have detailed information on mule deer and pronghorn seasonal movements. We captured, radiomarked, and monitored mule deer (n = 171) and pronghorn (n = 34) in western Wyoming to document seasonal distribution patterns and migration routes. Mule deer and pronghorn migrated 20-158 km and 116-258 km, respectively, between seasonal ranges. These distances represented the longest recorded migrations for either species. We identified a number of bottlenecks along the migration routes of mule deer and pronghorn, but the most critical appeared to be the 1.6-km-wide Trapper's Point bottleneck, which was used by both mule deer and pronghorn during their spring and autumn migrations. Housing developments and roadways apparently have reduced the effective width of this bottleneck to <0.8 km. We estimate 2,500-3,500 mule deer and 1,500-2,000 pronghorn move through the bottleneck twice a year during spring and autumn migrations. Identification and protection of migration corridors and bottlenecks will be necessary to maintain mule deer and pronghorn populations throughout their range.

Sawyer, H.; Lindzey, F.; McWhirter, D.

2005-01-01

374

An analysis of stream temperatures, Green River Basin, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A method for estimating temperatures of streams in the Green River basin, Wyoming, utilizes a regional model for estimating mean daily temperatures of streams at unmeasured sites. The regional model was developed by describing annual temperature patterns at 43 measured sites and by applying the harmonic function T = M + A -sin (0.0172 t + C)- where: T is mean daily temperature; M, A, and C are harmonic coefficients calculated from data for each stream-temperature station; and t is the day of the water year. Application of the equation for estimating temperatures at unmeasured sites requires regionalized estimates of M, A, and C. Regional estimates were developed with the aid of multiple-regression techniques, whereby the calculated harmonic coefficients were regressed against physical and climatic characteristics of the stream-temperature stations. Stream elevation was a significant factor affecting water temperature. Analysis of areal and temporal variations in temperature showed that springs, irrigation return flows, and reservoir storage were affecting reaches of several major streams. (Woodard-USGS)

Lowham, H.W.

1978-01-01

375

BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

376

Jasper County Comprehensive Plan Adoption Draft  

E-print Network

Jasper County Comprehensive Plan Adoption Draft Comprehensive Plan Jasper County, IN #12;#12;Table Mandate.......................................vii Jasper County's Fulfillment of the Mandate of Major Needs for Jasper County ...............5 Additional Opportunities

377

Economics and a novel voltage conversion technique associated with exporting Wyoming's energy by HVDC transmission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wyoming is by far the largest coal producing state in the US, but local utilization is extremely low. As much as 92% of Wyoming's coal is shipped to the other states and is mainly consumed by their electricity producers. Coal accounts for more than 50% of the US electricity generation and is one of the least expensive energy sources. Wyoming could utilize its coal better by exporting electricity instead of exporting the coal only in its raw form. Natural gas is another important energy resource in Wyoming but local utilization is even lower. As a result of the development in coalbed methane fields, natural gas production in Wyoming is almost in pace with its coal production. In addition to constructing more new pipelines, new transmission lines should be considered as an alternative way of exporting this energy. Because of their enormous electricity market sizes and high electricity prices, California, Texas and Illinois are chosen to be the target markets for Wyoming's electricity. The proposed transmission schemes use High Voltage DC (HVDC) lines, which are suitable for long distance and cross-system power transmission. Technical and economic feasibilities are studied in details. The Wyoming-California scheme has a better return of investment than both the Wyoming-Texas and the Wyoming-Illinois schemes. A major drawback of HVDC transmission is the high level of harmonics generated by the converters. Elaborate filtering is required at both the AC and the DC sides. A novel pulse-multiplication method is proposed in the thesis to reduce the harmonics from the converter source. By introducing an averaging inductor, the proposed method uses less thyristors to achieve the same high-pulse operation as the existing series scheme. The reduction of thyristors makes the switching circuit more reliable and easier to control and maintain. Harmonic analysis shows that the harmonic level can be reduced to about one third of the original system. The proposed method is also simulated by using the Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS) with a few assumptions. Simulation results of various operating conditions confirm the theoretical analysis results.

Xu, Kaili

378

Annotated bibliography of selected publications, through 1996, Cheyenne municipal well field areas, Cheyenne, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annotated bibliographies for 55 hydrology and geology manuscripts pertaining to the Cheyenne municipal wells fields are listed in this report. For each manuscript, a citation is provided, a summaryparagraph is presented, key words are listed, and a location of the report is given. The report lists manuscripts, conference proceedings, and guidebooks published by the U. S. Geological Survey, State of Wyoming, Geological Society of America, Wyoming State Geological Survey,private consultants, and University of Wyoming.Information on geological formations, structural geology, aquifer characteristics, water levels, well- field production, water-demand projections, and water quality is included in the manuscripts. The Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities, the University of Wyoming, and the U. S. Geological Surveycooperatively produced this annotated bibliography to allow easy access and efficient utilization of existing data. The manuscripts were authored between 1910 and 1996, reflecting work completed over a long period of development in the Cheyenne, Wyoming area. Some manuscripts did not receive broad distribution and indexing, thus they have been difficult to locate in the past. By having the references and summaries within one report, time and effort to gather previous study results will be minimized.

Ogle, K.M.; Jordan, B.J.

1997-01-01

379

Is it topsoil or overburden? Case study of a small mine in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent disputes over the classification of topsoil as overburden have reached the Wyoming Supreme Court. The high court upheld an earlier decision by the Environmental Quality Council that topsoil is overburden according to Wyoming statutes. During the 1999 Wyoming legislative session, bills with amendments to the current statutes failed to reach the floor of the house and senate bodies. The statute amendments would have enhanced the importance of topsoil as a separate material that must be handled in a manner to preserve its integrity for reclamation efforts. Topsoil and subsoil materials from a small gravel mine that was the focus of concerned citizens, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Environmental Quality Council, and the Wyoming Supreme Court were examined to evaluate their suitability o reclamation/revegetation efforts. Soil chemical/physical properties suggested the topsoil and subsoil were suitable as a plant growth media. A greenhouse study using a cool-season and a warm-season grass was conducted to determine the potential for revegetation using the topsoil and subsoil materials as reclamation surface cover. Except for specific materials collected from the gravel/subsoil interface in the native area, revegetation efforts using seed mixtures with the grasses studied would probably be successful.

Vance, G.F.; Spackman, L.K.

1999-07-01

380

Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 1 Community Health Data, MT Dept American Diabetes Association (2012) Region 3 (South Central) ­ Judith Basin, Fergus, Petroleum* #12; Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2 Socioeconomic Measures1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

381

VViirrggiinniiaa 44--HH FFaasshhiioonn RReevvuuee//CCllootthhiinngg RReeccoorrdd Specialist: Kathleen Jamison, Authors: Pat Bathe, & Betsy Campbell*  

E-print Network

date Age as of September 30 of the current 4-H year Phone County/City Extension District Years in 4-H Years in Clothing Projects Years in Fashion Revue 4-H Clothing and Textile Project currently enrolled in PUBLICATION 346-1472003 18 USC 707 *Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development, Virginia Tech; 4-H Volunteer

Liskiewicz, Maciej

382

75 FR 19592 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Wyoming...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 12-month finding on a petition to list the Wyoming pocket gopher (Thomomys clusius) as endangered or threatened and to designate critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. After review of all available scientific and commercial information, we find that listing the Wyoming pocket gopher as either endangered......

2010-04-15

383

Effects of Hunting Opportunity Change on Survival of Male Merriam's Wild Turkeys in the Black Hills of Wyoming  

E-print Network

Effects of Hunting Opportunity Change on Survival of Male Merriam's Wild Turkeys in the Black Hills: National Wild Turkey Federation, Wyoming Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Wyoming Game those friends that helped me trap and track the wild turkeys for this project: S. Schloredt, "Squeege

384

Wasp Watchers Albany County  

E-print Network

{ Wasp Watchers Albany County Finding the Wasp that hunts the Emerald Ash Borer #12;Cerceris fumipennis is a solitary ground nesting wasp. The female wasp stocks her nest with Buprestid beetles ,this as 80% of the Cerceris fumipennis colonies daily catch. · This wasp is very wide spread in the United

Walter, M.Todd

385

Meigu County Yi Tone.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One dialect of Yi spoken in Meigu County in the southern part of China's Sichuan Province is analyzed for its tone patterns, based on data provided by a bilingual native speaker. Consonant and vowel inventories are provided. Three contrastive tones are found. One has three allophones, which are conditioned by the preceding tone. Tonal allophony is…

Eatough, Andy

386

STATE/COUNTY BORDERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This data is available for the entire region. The level of detail is primarily suited for region/state/county/basin sized maps. The borders are not accurate enough for small areas like sub-basins and site areas. We use this coverage for general backgrounds and borders only. T...

387

Large scale Wyoming transportation data: a resource planning tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center created statewide roads data for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office using 2009 aerial photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program. The updated roads data resolves known concerns of omission, commission, and inconsistent representation of map scale, attribution, and ground reference dates which were present in the original source data. To ensure a systematic and repeatable approach of capturing roads on the landscape using on-screen digitizing from true color National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery, we developed a photogrammetry key and quality assurance/quality control protocols. Therefore, the updated statewide roads data will support the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management requirements with a standardized map product representing 2009 ground conditions. The updated Geographic Information System roads data set product, represented at 1:4,000 and +/- 10 meters spatial accuracy, contains 425,275 kilometers within eight attribute classes. The quality control of these products indicated a 97.7 percent accuracy of aspatial information and 98.0 percent accuracy of spatial locations. Approximately 48 percent of the updated roads data was corrected for spatial errors of greater than 1 meter relative to the pre-existing road data. Twenty-six percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 5 meters and 17 percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 9 meters. The Bureau of Land Management, other land managers, and researchers can use these new statewide roads data set products to support important studies and management decisions regarding land use changes, transportation and planning needs, transportation safety, wildlife applications, and other studies.

O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Freeman, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Abra E.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

2014-01-01

388

Abundance of adult saugers across the Wind River watershed, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The abundance of adult saugers Sander canadensis was estimated over 179 km of continuous lotic habitat across a watershed on the western periphery of their natural distribution in Wyoming. Three-pass depletions with raft-mounted electrofishing gear were conducted in 283 pools and runs among 19 representative reaches totaling 51 km during the late summer and fall of 2002. From 2 to 239 saugers were estimated to occur among the 19 reaches of 1.6-3.8 km in length. The estimates were extrapolated to a total population estimate (mean ?? 95% confidence interval) of 4,115 ?? 308 adult saugers over 179 km of lotie habitat. Substantial variation in mean density (range = 1.0-32.5 fish/ha) and mean biomass (range = 0.5-16.8 kg/ha) of adult saugers in pools and runs was observed among the study reaches. Mean density and biomass were highest in river reaches with pools and runs that had maximum depths of more than 1 m, mean daily summer water temperatures exceeding 20??C, and alkalinity exceeding 130 mg/L. No saugers were captured in the 39 pools or runs with maximum water depths of 0.6 m or less. Multiple-regression analysis and the information-theoretic approach were used to identify watershed-scale and instream habitat features accounting for the variation in biomass among the 244 pools and runs across the watershed with maximum depths greater than 0.6 m. Sauger biomass was greater in pools than in runs and increased as mean daily summer water temperature, maximum depth, and mean summer alkalinity increased and as dominant substrate size decreased. This study provides an estimate of adult sauger abundance and identifies habitat features associated with variation in their density and biomass across a watershed, factors important to the management of both populations and habitat. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

Amadio, C.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Johnson, K.; Oberlie, D.; Dufek, D.

2006-01-01

389

Energy map of southwestern Wyoming - Energy data archived, organized, integrated, and accessible  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) focuses on conserving world-class wildlife resources while facilitating responsible energy development in southwestern Wyoming. To further advance the objectives of the WLCI long-term, science-based effort, a comprehensive inventory of energy resource and production data is being published in two parts. Energy maps, data, documentation and spatial data processing capabilities are available in geodatabase, published map file (pmf), ArcMap document (mxd), Adobe Acrobat PDF map, and other digital formats that can be downloaded at the USGS website.

Biewick, Laura R.H.; Jones, Nicholas R.; Wilson, Anna B.

2013-01-01

390

Bankfull-channel geometry and discharge curves for the Rocky Mountains Hydrologic Region in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional curves relate bankfull-channel geometry and bankfull discharge to drainage area in regions with similar runoff characteristics and are used to estimate the bankfull discharge and bankfull-channel geometry when the drainage area of a stream is known. One-variable, ordinary least-squares regressions relating bankfull discharge, cross-sectional area, bankfull width, and bankfull mean depth to drainage area were developed from data collected at 35 streamgages in or near Wyoming. Watersheds draining to these streamgages are within the Rocky Mountains Hydrologic Region of Wyoming and neighboring states.

Foster, Katharine

2012-01-01

391

40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...In the State of Kentucky: Boone County, Campbell County, Carroll County, Gallatin County, Grant County, Kenton County, Owen County, Pendleton County. In the State of Indiana: Dearborn County, Ohio County. In the State of Ohio: Butler...

2011-07-01

392

Copyright 2008 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. Wunder, S., B. Campbell, P. G. H. Frost, J. A. Sayer, R. Iwan, and L. Wollenberg. 2008. When donors get  

E-print Network

, S., B. Campbell, P. G. H. Frost, J. A. Sayer, R. Iwan, and L. Wollenberg. 2008. When donors get cold) that Never Happened Sven Wunder 1 , Bruce Campbell 2,3 , Peter GH Frost 1 , Jeffrey A. Sayer 4 , Ramses Iwan

Vermont, University of

393

Zircon geochronology of the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite, Teton Range, Wyoming: Significance to dating late Archean metamorphism in the Wyoming craton  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Webb Canyon Gneiss is a strongly foliated and lineated orthogneiss intercalated with layered Archean gneisses in the northern part of the Teton Range in northwestern Wyoming. The Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite is a non-foliated or weakly flow foliated rock which forms a discordant pluton exposed in the central part of the range and that cuts the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the associated layered gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronology reported here indicates that euhedral pink zircon grew in the Webb Canyon Gneiss at about 2680 Ma, probably during the peak of regional metamorphism and that the Mount Owen was emplaced at 2547??3 Ma. These dates provide the best constraints so far reported on the age of Late Archean regional metamorphism in the western part of the Wyoming craton.

Zartman, R.E.; Reed, J.C., Jr.

1998-01-01

394

A fossil flora from the Frontier formation of southwestern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper deals with a small but important fossil flora, now known to be of Colorado age, from the vicinity of Cumberland, Lincoln County, Wyo. It was for many years thought to be of Jurassic age, and only within the last decade has its stratigraphic position been established. Although small in number of species, this flora offers information bearing on the physical and climatic conditions that prevailed during early Upper Cretaceous time in this region, and, moreover, it furnishes a series of stratigraphic marks that may be used in the recognition of this horizon elsewhere.

Knowlton, F.H.

1917-01-01

395

Stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis of aquifer systems, Atlantic Rim, Carbon County, Wyoming: Implications for production of coalbed natural gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production requires the extraction of considerable volumes of water from target formations. This process can dynamically alter local aquifers and affect the larger hydrologic systems of a producing area. An analytical method that provides immediate, cost-effective quantitative information on both resource (methane) and habitat (coalbed aquifer) would help to optimize gas production. This study used a

J. Fred McLaughlin

2009-01-01

396

Environment of deposition and reservoir properties of Teapot sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming  

E-print Network

measurements was converted to phi scale and used to express sorting (Folk, 1974). Sedimentary structures are important to interpre- tation of physical processes active during deposition. In cores of Teapot sandstones, megascopic structures are of two types...

Sullivan, John Joseph

2012-06-07

397

Technical data. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume includes a description of the railway to transport the coal; possible unbalance in the electrical power supply is considered in detail, as well as communications, signalling, etc. The railway will also be used to transport ashes and sludges for waste disposal. Coal fines in the coal supply will be burned to generate power. A very brief description of the coal gasification plant and its components is accompanied by a printout of the dates final engineering is to be completed. Permit applications are listed and socio-economic factors are discussed. The financing plan is discussed in some detail: basically, a loan guarantee from the Synthetic Fuels Corporation; equity provided by investment tax credit, deferred taxes, AFUDC and the sponsors; price support; and gas purchase agreement (this whole section includes several legal details.). (LTN)

None

1982-01-01

398

78 FR 20146 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2008-0391] Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater...Materials License SUA-1598 for continued uranium production operations and in-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium at the Lost Creek Project in...

2013-04-03

399

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

2013-07-22

400

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

delivery in the most economical manner. Perhaps the manner in which delivery is taken deserves addi- tional attention. For example, this study indicates that all counties taking delivery of gasoline in tank wagon lots, can secure approximately the same... recog- nizes that some one person or board should he responsible for a high per- centage of the purchasing. Otherwise each employee must become an ex- pert in order to secure good prices. Further, such a system recognizes that bids must be secured...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

401

Gas desorption and adsorption isotherm studies of coals in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG), of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper (Wyoming), investigated the coalbed methane resources (CBM) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, from 1999 to the present. Beginning in late 1999, the study also included the Williston Basin in Montana and North and South Dakota and Green River Basin and Big Horn Basin in Wyoming. The rapid development of CBM (referred to as coalbed natural gas by the BLM) during the early 1990s, and the lack of sufficient data for the BLM to fully assess and manage the resource in the Powder River Basin, in particular, gave impetus to the cooperative program. An integral part of the joint USGS-BLM project was the participation of 25 gas operators that entered individually into confidential agreements with the USGS, and whose cooperation was essential to the study. The arrangements were for the gas operators to drill and core coal-bed reservoirs at their cost, and for the USGS and BLM personnel to then desorb, analyze, and interpret the coal data with joint funding by the two agencies. Upon completion of analyses by the USGS, the data were to be shared with both the BLM and the gas operator that supplied the core, and then to be released or published 1 yr after the report was submitted to the operator.

Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; McGarry, Dwain E.; Stillwell, Dean P.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Stillwell, Cathy R.; Ochs, Alan M.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Osvald, Karl S.; Taylor, Sharon L.; Thorvaldson, Marjorie C.; Trippi, Michael H.; Grose, Sherry D.; Crockett, Fred J.; Shariff, Asghar J.

2006-01-01

402

Megascopic lithologic studies of coals in the Powder River basin in Wyoming and in adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between 1999 and 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated coalbed methane (CBM) resources in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin. The study also included the CBM resources in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin of North Dakota and the Wyoming portion of the Green River Basin of Wyoming. This project involved the cooperation of the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper, Wyo., and 16 independent gas operators in the Powder River, Williston, and Green River Basins. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with these CBM operators to supply samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, timely results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data. This program resulted in the collection of 963 cored coal samples from 37 core holes. This report presents megascopic lithologic descriptive data collected from canister samples extracted from the 37 wells cored for this project.

Trippi, Michael H.; Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stanton, Ronald W.; Chiehowsky, Lora A.; Moore, Timothy A.

2010-01-01

403

Campbell Plateau, New Zealand: Seismic Analysis and Models From a Rifted Submarine Plateau of Continental Origin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rift systems give important insights into the processes that control the beginning extension and subsequent break-up of continents. Quantifying the amount of crustal stretching and the position of the continent-ocean boundary helps refining plate-kinematic reconstructions, as this will overcome problems in previous models which were based on rigid plate assumptions. The submarine continental plateaux off southeastern New Zealand (NZ), Chatham Rise (CR) and Campbell Plateau (CP), were adjacent to Marie Byrd Land (MBL) of Antarctica until extension and subsequent seafloor spreading formed the Southern Ocean in the Late Cretaceous. While the timing of the BT opening between CR and CP is indirectly derived from plate-tectonic evidence, the processes of extension of the Bounty Trough (BT) and the development of the fragments forming CR and CP are not yet understood. Models suggest either a rift system of the Southern Pacific's early opening or a subsequent opening of an already existing back-arc basin, a proto-BT. To investigate the evolutionary processes of these submarine plateaux, a geophysical and geological survey was conducted across CP and BT in early 2003 with the German R/V SONNE during cruise SO-169 (project CAMP). The survey carried out two deep crustal seismic transects and a series of multichannel seismic reflection lines across GSB and across BT. Velocity-depth and gravity models infer an extremely thinned crust beneath the Bounty Trough and the Great South Basin (GSB). The thickness of the crystalline crust is reduced from 20-23 km under the CR and the CP to some 12 km under the BT. Beneath the GSB, the crystalline crust thins to some 14 km from about 26 km towards CP and the South Island of NZ. P- and S-velocities are significantly increased directly beneath the Bounty Channel. We interpret a high-velocity, high-density body in the BT as a magmatic intrusion into thinned continental crust. Crustal thinning ceased shortly prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. The modelled magnitude and style of rifting along BT and GSB places constraints on reconstructing the Cretaceous break-up process between NZ and MBL.

Grobys, J.; Gohl, K.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Davy, B.; Barker, D.; Deen, T.

2005-12-01

404

Campbell-Stokes sunshine duration measurements: An analysis of the possible effect of aerosol loading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the end of the 19th century, the Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder (CSSR) has been the instrument used to measure the sunshine duration (SD), i.e, the length of time that the ground surface is irradiated by direct solar radiation. Due to the large number of records that exist worldwide (some of them extending over more than 100 years), valuable climatic information can be extracted from them. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) defines the SD as the time during which the direct solar irradiance (DSI) exceeds the level of 120 W/m2. The burn is typically wider (narrower) when the direct insolation is stronger (weaker). The aim of this research is to test the impact of aerosols on the SD measurements, and to obtain a new and valuable method to extract information of the temporal evolution of aerosols. The research was carried out in Girona (NE Spain), using cloudless days since February 2011. Two CSSR with two different types of bands and a pyrheliometer from Kipp&Zonen were used to measure the SD and the DSI, respectively. Other meteorological and radiometric variables were also stored for the study. To select the cloudless days, direct and global solar irradiance measurements were considered, with the support of the whole sky camera. For each band of these days, we have measured the burned area in intervals of 30 minutes, after applying a digital image processing that increases the contrast of the burn. We assume that, if SD is indeed affected by the aerosol loading, the effect would not be punctual and the narrowing in the burning will be extended over a certain period of time. That is the reason why we are more interested in measuring areas and not widths of burning. Moreover, only cloudless days were selected in order to assure that a decrease of the burn is not due to thin clouds. We have considered that characteristics of band burns could also depend on other meteorological variables (temperature, humidity, etc.). This method has been applied to a limited series of bands, so the results and conclusions are preliminary, but could offer a practical way to exploit the worldwide sets of long-term CSSR data to create long time series of atmospheric aerosol content. For further research we need to increase the number of burned sunshine bands and describe with more accuracy the limitations of the CSSR.

Sanchez-Romero, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Josep-Abel; Calbó, Josep

2013-04-01

405

Effects of coal mine subsidence in the Sheridan, Wyoming, area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analyses of the surface effects of past underground coal mining in the Sheridan, Wyoming, area suggest that underground mining of strippable coal deposits may damage the environment more over long periods of time than would modern surface mining, provided proper restoration procedures are followed after surface mining. Subsidence depressions and pits are a continuing hazard to the environment and to man's activities in the Sheridan, Wyo., area above abandoned underground mines in weak overburden less than about 60 m thick and where the overburden is less than about 10-15 times the thickness of coal mined. In addition, fires commonly start by spontaneous ignition when water and air enter the abandoned mine workings via subsidence cracks and pits. The fires can then spread to unmined coal as they create more cavities, more subsidence, and more cracks and pits through which air can circulate. In modern surface mining operations the total land surface underlain by minable coal is removed to expose the coal. The coal is removed, the overburden and topsoil are replaced, and the land is regraded and revegetated. The land, although disturbed, can be more easily restored and put back into use than can land underlain by abandoned underground mine workings in areas where the overburden is less than about 60 m thick or less than about 10-15 times the thickness of coal mined. The resource recovery of modern surface mining commonly is much greater than that of underground mining procedures. Although present-day underground mining technology is advanced as compared to that of 25-80 years ago, subsidence resulting from underground mining of thick coal beds beneath overburden less than about 60 m thick can still cause greater damage to surface drainage, ground water, and vegetation than can properly designed surface mining operations. This report discusses (11 the geology and surface and underground effects of former large-scale underground coal mining in a 50-km 2 area 5-20 km north of Sheridan, Wyo., (2) a ground and aerial reconnaissance study of a 5-km^2 coal mining area 8-10 km west of Sheridan, and (31 some environmental consequences and problems caused by coal mining.

Dunrud, C. Richard; Osterwald, Frank W.

1980-01-01

406

Spatial Variability of Snow Water Isotopes in Montane Southeastern Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prediction of snowmelt runoff from Rocky Mountain annual snowpack remains highly uncertain. Progress is limited by our understanding of how widespread vegetation disturbances from beetle kill and fire, coupled with regional climate changes, influence spatial patterns of snowpack development and evolution. We examined spatial patterns of snow water isotope content, snow depth and density and snow water equivalence in the Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming at peak snowpack in April 2013. The stable isotope composition of snowpack integrates patterns of accumulation, redistribution, sublimation, melt and condensation. Yet the relative importance of these processes and their isotope effects across highly heterogeneous terrain are poorly documented. Physical processes affecting isotopic exchange and fractionation in snowpack, including temperature, relative humidity, turbulent versus laminar flow, and radiation vary at local and catchment scales. Fifteen 150-m snow transects were completed over a variety of cover types and disturbance areas across 2400 to 3200 m elevation. ?2H and ?18O ratios were determined on snow water from the four positions along each transect and from individual snowfall events collected February through April at a single site at 2743 m elevation near the transect locations. ?2H and ?18O values of snowpack all fell on the local meteoric water line, indicating very limited kinetic isotope effects during snow-atmosphere vapor exchange. A decrease of 4 and 0.5 per mil per 100 m increase in elevation was observed in ?2H and ?18O, respectively, across all transect locations. Variance (standard deviation) among the four samples within each transect increased with elevation, ranging up to 46 per mil for ?2H and 13.0 per mil for ?18O at the highest elevation sites. Such local-scale heterogeneity in isotopic composition may reflect varying patterns and magnitudes of accumulation and/or redistribution. Relationships between hydrometeorological forcings and isotope effects on snow water, specifically sublimation, equilibrium vapor exchange, and redistribution, will be investigated further to better understand catchment-level heterogeneity in snowpack evolution. This future research will allow for better characterization of how snowmelt runoff changes in Rocky Mountain watersheds.

Kipnis, E. L.; Chapple, W. D.; Traver, E.; Frank, J. M.; Ewers, B. E.; Miller, S. N.; Williams, D. G.

2013-12-01

407

An assessment of low flows in streams in northeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low flows were assessed and summarized in the following basins in northeastern Wyoming: Little Bighorn, Tongue, Powder, Little Missouri, Belle Fourche, Cheyenne, and Niobrara River, and about 200 river miles of the North Platte River and its tributaries. Only existing data from streamflow stations and miscellaneous observation sites during the period, 1930-80, were used. Data for a few stations in Montana and South Dakota were used in the analysis. Data were available for 56 perennial streams, 38 intermittent streams, and 34 ephemeral streams. The distribution of minimum observed flows of record at all stations and sites and the 7-day, 10-year low flows at mountain stations and main-stem plains stations are shown on a map. Seven day low flows were determined by fitting the log Pearsons Type III distribution to the data; results are tabulated only for the stations with at least 10 years of record that included at least one major drought. Most streams that originate in the foothills and plains have no flow during part of every year, and are typical of much of the study area. For stations on these streams , the frequency of the annual maximum number of consecutive days of no flow was determined, as an indicator of the likelihood of extended periods of no flow or drought. For estimates at ungaged sites on streams in the Bighorn Mountains only, a simple regression of 7-day, 10-year low flow on drainage area has a standard error of 64%, based on 19 stations with drainage areas of 2 to 200 sq mi. The 7-day, 10-year low flow in main-stem streams can be interpolated from graphs of 7-day, 10-year low flow versus distance along the main channel. Additional studies of low flow are needed. The data base, particularly synoptic baseflow information, needs considerable expansion. Also, the use of storage-analysis procedures should be considered as a means of assessing the availability of water in streams that otherwise are fully appropriated or that are ephemeral. (Author 's abstract)

Armentrout, G.W.; Wilson, J.F.

1987-01-01

408

CASE STUDY: WILDFIRE EFFECTS AND SUCCESSION ON WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ASSOCIATIONS IN SOUTHEAST OREGON.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Southeastern Oregon harbors extensive blocks of Wyoming big sagebrush steppe in mid to late seral ecological stages. These areas are co-dominated by sagebrush and perennial bunchgrasses with a limited presence of cheatgrass. However, cheatgrass has the potential to alter these systems after fire by ...

409

BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE GREAT GRAY OWL IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO AND NORTHWESTERN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, I documented the existence of a breeding population of Great Gray Owls (Strix nebulosa) in southeastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming and recorded aspects of this species' breeding biology between 1980 and 1983. Thirty-eight pairs were found; 25 fledged young at least once. Fifteen nests were documented; 40% in old stick nests and 60% on tops of broken-top

ALAN B. FRANKLIN

410

The 2012 Drought in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming A July 2012 update from the  

E-print Network

The 2012 Drought in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming A July 2012 update from the Western Water Assessment and the National Integrated Drought Information System For an expanded version of this overview, including Climate Summary at wwa.colorado.edu/IWCS/2012_July.html Drought Conditions as of early July For the water

Neff, Jason

411

SAGEBRUSH STEPPE HABITATS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED BIRD SPECIES IN SOUTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA, AND WYOMING  

E-print Network

SAGEBRUSH STEPPE HABITATS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED BIRD SPECIES IN SOUTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA IN SOUTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA, AND WYOMING: LIFE ON THE EDGE OF THE SAGEBRUSH ECOSYSTEM This dissertation Dakota State University 2004 , I #12;11 SAGEBRUSH STEPPE HABITATS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED BIRD SPECIES

412

OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado,  

E-print Network

26-1 OMAHA, NE, DISTRICT This district comprises portions of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri, all embraced in the drainage basin-8 Environmental Page 24. Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Lowe Brule Sioux Tribe and State of South Dakota Terrestrial

US Army Corps of Engineers

413

Mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with degraded herbaceous understories: has a threshold been crossed?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) plant communities with degraded native herbaceous understories occupy vast expanses of the western United States. Restoring the native herbaceous understory in these communities is needed to provide higher...

414

The influence of plant removal on succession in wyoming big sagebrush  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Predicting plant community response following disturbance is a major hurdle facing ecologists. The objective of our study was to identify the rate of short-term (<10 years) floristic changes following removal of plant functional groups in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensi...

415

75 FR 5944 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Wyoming Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee Act (FACA), that a meeting of the Wyoming Advisory Committee will convene at 10 a.m. and adjourn at 12 p.m. (MST) on Saturday, February 27, 2010, at Holland Hart LLP, 2515 Warren Avenue, Suite 450, Cheyenne, WY 82003. The...

2010-02-05

416

76 FR 2883 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Wyoming Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee Act (FACA), that a meeting of the Wyoming Advisory Committee will convene at 10 a.m. and adjourn at 12 p.m. (MST) on Saturday, February 5, 2011, at Holland Hart LLP, 2515 Warren Avenue, Suite 450, Cheyenne, WY 82003. The...

2011-01-18

417

POOLING OUR RESOURCES: A WATERSHED APPROACH FOR EDUCATING THE STUDENTS AND CITIZENS OF WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

The overall project goal is to provide support in three principal areas: 1) Foster expansion of volunteer monitoring and offer technical assistance and feedback to volunteers. A.) Maintain and support the educators involved in the current Wyoming DEQ educational monitoring pr...

418

A PLAGUE EPIZOOTIC IN THE WHITE-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LEUCURUS) OF MEETEETSE, WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveillance for sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) was conducted near Meeteetse, Wyoming (USA) from 24 May to 14 june 1985. Ten species of fleas were collected from white- tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus), and from their burrows and associated rodents. Five of these flea species and two adult prairie dogs were positive for plague. The progression of this plague epizootic appeared

Sonya R. Ubico; Kathleen A. Fagerstone; Robert G. McLean

419

USING AVIRIS IMAGERY TO MAP INVASIVE PLANTS ON RANGELANDS: LEAFY SPURGE IN NORTHEASTERN WYOMING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Leafy spurge is an adventive, perennial weed that infests approximaely 1.2 million hectares of land and causes severe environmental and economic impacts on rangelands. During 1999, AVIRIS imagery was acquired in northeastern Wyoming near Devils Tower National Monument. Mixed tuned matched filterin...

420

Geochemical modeling of the Madison aquifer in parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaciton models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. All reaction models reproduce the observed chemical and carbon and sulfur isotopic composition of the final waters and are partially validated by predicting the

L. Niel Plummer; B. B. Hanshaw; J. F. Busby; R. W. Lee

1990-01-01

421

Where does Strip Tillage Fit in Montana and Wyoming Sugarbeet Production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sugarbeet in Montana and Wyoming is often grown in a two year rotation alternating with spring grains. Normally, a sugarbeet grower will make five or more passes across a field for fertilizer application, disking, plowing or ripping, leveling, mulching and hilling. The high price of diesel fuel is m...

422

The history of dinosaur footprint discoveries in Wyoming with emphasis on the Bighorn basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dinosaur traces are well known from the western United States in the Colorado Plateau region (Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona). Utah contains the greatest abundance of known and documented dinosaur footprints and trackways. Far less well known, however, is the occurrence and distribution of dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons in Wyoming. Scientific studies over the past 10 years have shown that three of the four Middle and Upper Jurassic formations in northern Wyoming contain dinosaur footprints. Two of the footprint-bearing horizons are located in geologic intervals that were once thought to have been deposited in offshore to nearshore marine settings and represent rare North American examples of Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur remains. Some of these new Wyoming sites can be correlated to known dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons or intervals in Utah. Wyoming has a great potential for additional discoveries of new dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons, and further prospecting and study is warranted and will ultimately lead to a much better understanding of the geographic distribution and behavior of the potential footprint-makers. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

Kvale, E.P.; Mickelson, D.L.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Johnson, G.D.

2003-01-01

423

Wyoming Community College Commission Strategic Plan, July 1, 2002-June 30, 2006.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document outlines the Wyoming Community College Commission Strategic Plan for 2002-2006. The organization's mission, vision, and philosophy statements are presented, along with an analysis of the internal and external factors affecting the agency. External factors include workforce issues, economic conditions, population shifts, and statute…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

424

VEGETATION COVER POTENTIALS OF THE WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ALLIANCE AND SAGE-GROUSE HABITAT REQUIREMENTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Wyoming big sagebrush alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. This cover type provides important habitat for many sagebrush obligate and facultative wildlife species as well as an important forage base for livestock production. Lack of information...

425

ARE GUIDELINES FOR SAGE GROUSE HABITAT REALISTIC IN WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH COMMUNITIES IN EASTERN OREGON?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, ARTRW8) cover type is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. Sage grouse habitat guidelines, based on plant cover, have recently been developed for sagebrush communities. Plant ecologists have qu...

426

56 The Wildlife Professional, Spring 2013 The Wildlife Society Greater Sage-Grouse in Wyoming  

E-print Network

56 The Wildlife Professional, Spring 2013 © The Wildlife Society Greater Sage-Grouse in Wyoming that the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse) could be the perfect surrogate and determined that although sage-grouse face "imminent" threat from factors such as habi- tat fragmentation

Beck, Jeffrey L.

427

s the sage grouse gather on the Wyoming prairie to find mates this  

E-print Network

A s the sage grouse gather on the Wyoming prairie to find mates this spring, a few of the strutting been retired to a card- boardboxwhilePatricelliworksonthemore sophisticated grouse-bot. This radio and audio recorders to catchthemales'responses. Thepointof theexperimentistomonitor the grouse's mating

Patricelli, Gail

428

Fall frosts effects on the essential oil of “Native” spearmint in Wyoming  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

“Native” spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) is a widely grown essential oil crop worldwide, and in the Midwest in the United States. There is interest in expanding spearmint production to Wyoming and other states. However, there is no information to determine if spearmints would perform well under the Wy...

429

PALEOMAGNETIC STUDY OF THRUST SHEET ROTATION DURING FORELAND IMPINGEMENT IN THE WYOMING-IDAHO OVERTHRUST BELT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous strata in the Darby and Absaroka thrust sheets were sampled in order to paleomagnetically evaluate thrust sheet rotation in the Wyoming-Idaho overthrust belt. No significant rotations were found. Lack of rotation in these thrust sheets suggests that previously reported rotation of the Prospect thrust sheet was not transmit- ted to the older Darby and Absaroka

Susan Y. Schwartz; Rob Van der Voo

1984-01-01

430

Timing of deformation in overthrust belt and foreland of Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the timing and displacement evidence of the major structures of the western Wyoming Overthrust belt and foreland shows there is a progression in thrust displacement, apparent duration of motion, and palinspastic position of thrust traces from west to east. Those toward the west moved farther for an apparently longer period of time and are more widely spaced

D. V. Wiltschko; J. A. Jr. Dorr

1983-01-01

431

Assessment of Vaccine Exemptions among Wyoming School Children, 2009 and 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 2010-2011, varicella vaccination was an added requirement for school entrance in Wyoming. Vaccination exemption rates were compared during the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 school years, and impacts of implementing a new childhood vaccine requirement were evaluated. All public schools, grades K-12, were required to report vaccination status of…

Pride, Kerry R.; Geissler, Aimee L.; Kolasa, Maureen S.; Robinson, Byron; Van Houten, Clay; McClinton, Reginald; Bryan, Katie; Murphy, Tracy

2014-01-01

432

Geology of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents an overview of the general geology, the structure, and the glaciation of the Teton Range in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming U.S.A. Examples of cirques, glacial horns, terraces and glacial outwash plains are presented. A link to a personal account of an Avalanche Canyon loop hike is also available.

433

Instructional Design of Entrepreneurship Courses: Interview Research of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneurs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study investigated the opportunity recognition process of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneur (WBE) Award winners or nominees, in order to better inform the learner analysis and organizational strategy components of instructional design, specifically with respect to entrepreneurship courses. This study may be of significance to post…

Kolb, Belinda J.

2010-01-01

434

DNA FROM ANCIENT STONE TOOLS AND BONES EXCAVATED AT BUGAS-HOLDING, WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

DNA residues may preserve on ancient stone tools used to process animals. We studied 24 stone tools recovered from the Bugas-Holding site in northwestern Wyoming. Nine tools that yielded DNA included five bifaces, two side scrapers, one end scraper, and one utilized flake. The...

435

WILDLIFE MITIGATION TECHNIQUES AT SURFACE COAL MINES IN NORTHEAST WYOMING1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wildlife issues at surface coal mines in the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming have been a topic of discussion since operations first began in the early 1970s. Since then, wildlife monitoring and mitigation programs have evolved to address changing concerns, and incorporate new information and techniques. Over the last 26 years, biologists with Thunderbird - Jones & Stokes (J&S)

Gwyn McKee

436

Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data

A. D. Youngberg; D. J. Sinks; G. N. II Craig; F. G. Ethridge; L. K. Burns

1983-01-01

437

Learning from Distance Faculty: A Faculty Needs Assessment at the University of Wyoming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Distance educators have special library needs. This article discusses the results of a library needs assessment of distance instructors at the University of Wyoming. Access to resources, use of library instructional services, barriers to distance library use, and perceived gaps in service are all addressed. Follow-up actions, based on survey…

Kvenild, Cassandra; Bowles-Terry, Melissa

2011-01-01

438

The United State of Wyoming: Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative Boosts Reading Scores Statewide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When teachers collaborate in schools, taking collective responsibility to improve instruction and achieve goals, student performance improves and good results happen. Wyoming is one example of a state that uses peer-to-peer professional learning with notable results. Teachers joined together to form a statewide professional community and saw the…

Lain, Sheryl

2014-01-01

439

Improved Grazing Management Increases Terrestrial Invertebrate Inputs that Feed Trout in Wyoming Rangeland Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in forest and grassland ecosystems worldwide indicates that terrestrial invertebrates can be a significant source of prey for fish, providing about 50% of their annual energy. We examined whether input of terrestrial invertebrates to rangeland streams in western Wyoming provides an important prey resource for brown trout Salmo trutta and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and how it is modified

W. Carl Saunders; Kurt D. Fausch

2007-01-01

440

Trapper Canyon Deposit, eastern Big Horn Basin, Wyoming: tar sand or heavy oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Trapper Canyon Deposit (Battle Creek Deposit in US Bureau of Mines Monograph 12) is located on the western flank of the Bighorn Mountains approximately 30 mi (48 km) east of Greybull, Wyoming. The petroleum occurs in the upper eolian sequence of the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone which dips from 5° to 8° to the southwest. The deposit was initially reported

A. J. Verploeg; R. H. Debruin

1983-01-01

441

Wake Characteristics of the MOD-2 Wind Turbine at Medicine Bow, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The present paper summarizes results obtained from profile measurements of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake at Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature, and turbulence at 3 and 7 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine, taken under near neutral or slightly stable atmospheric conditions, are presented.

Jacobs, E. W.; Kelley, N. D.; McKenna, H. E.; Birkenheuer, N. B.

1984-11-01

442

Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is an exotic, invasive shrub of riparian corridors in the western United States that can promote soil salinization via leaf exudates as Tamarix litter accumulates on the soil surface. Tamarix stands occur in association with big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides) in northern Wyoming, depending on topographic position. Revegetation of Tamarix-invaded sites

C. G. Ladenburger; A. L. Hild; D. J. Kazmer; L. C. Munn

2006-01-01

443

Aerodynamic roughness parameters for semi-arid natural shrub communities of Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimates of aerodynamic roughness length (z0) were calculated at nine sites for natural sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp.), saltbush (Atriplex nuttallii) and greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) plant communities in two semi-arid basins in Wyoming, USA. Estimates were based on wind and temperature profiles measured above the plant canopies during summer (August) of 1994 and fall (September and October) of 1995. Values of

Kenneth L. Driese; William A. Reiners

1997-01-01

444

A 4000YEAR RECORD OF WOODLAND VEGETATION FROM WIND RIVER CANYON, CENTRAL WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant macrofossil analyses of 16 radiocarbon-dated woodrat middens spanning the past 4000 years from the Wind River Canyon region in central Wyoming provide information concerning late Holocene development of juniper woodlands. The study sites are currently dominated by Juniperus osteosperma, with J. scopulorum present locally. Woodlands in the region were dominated by J. scopulorum from ca 4000 yr BP until

Stephen T. Jackson; Mark E. Lyford; Julio L. Betancourt

445

Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Wyoming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Wyoming related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

2013-01-01

446

Wyoming Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) Seedling Growth and Maternal Plant Stand Position  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known of maternal plant influence upon seed- ling characteristics of native shrubs. This study examined influence of maternal Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) stand position on emergence and growth of seed- lings. Seedlings from maternal plants in upslope, core, and downslope positions were grown in a common greenhouse setting. Percent germination, height, and canopy volume of

A. L. Hild; B. Christensen; A. Maier

1999-01-01

447

A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO IDENTIFY THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF TWO WATERBORNE OUTBREAKS OF GASTROENTERITIS IN WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

Two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health in 2001. The first was reported in February from recent vacationers of a snowmobile lodge. The second was in October among diners of a tourist saloon. The duration and type of symptoms exhibi...

448

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

449

Neogene-Quaternary Tectonics and Volcanism of Southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Southeastern Idaho  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This geology field trip guide focuses on the region south of the Snake River Plain between Pocatello, Idaho and Jackson, Wyoming. The intent was to synthesize regional tectonic relations and present new information relative to the magmatic and structural history of the region. It contains a two-day itinerary, commentary by experts, maps, and satellite images.

Lageson David

450

78 FR 29202 - Environmental Impact Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota AGENCY...project in Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota. FOR...Federal Highway Administration, North Dakota Division Office, 1471...

2013-05-17

451

77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

452

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

453

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

454

Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Laramie anorthosite complex, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geochemical investigation of the Laramie anorthosite complex determined that monsonite associated with the complex are characterized by positive Eu anomalies and display a regular variation in composition with distance from the monzonite/county rock contact. Anorthositic rocks have major and trace element abundance typical of similar complexes. The internal variations in the monzonite were produced by in situ fractionation and contamination. The data indicate that anorthosite and monzonite cannot be comagmatic. It is proposed that the anorthosite and monzonite of the complex evolved from two distinct magmas, and that two stages of anatectic melting contributed to the evolution of the monzonite. An initial stage of partial melting was induced by intrusion of a gabbroic anorthosite magma into the lower crust; a second partial melting event occurred after emplacement where heat from the intrusions melted country rocks resulting in extensive contamination ofthe monzonite. ?? 1981.

Fountain, J.C.; Hodge, D.S.; Allan, Hills F.

1981-01-01

455

PROPERTY A AND CAT(0) CUBE COMPLEXES J. BRODZKI, S.J. CAMPBELL, E. GUENTNER, G.A. NIBLO, AND N.J. WRIGHT  

E-print Network

PROPERTY A AND CAT(0) CUBE COMPLEXES J. BRODZKI, S.J. CAMPBELL, E. GUENTNER, G.A. NIBLO, AND N. Euclidean spaces and trees are examples of spaces with Property A. Simultaneously generalizing these facts, we show that finite dimensional CAT(0) cube complexes have Prop- erty A. We do not assume

Campbell, Sarah J.

456

NOAA Beach Water Quality Experimental Forecasts David Rockwell1, Kent Campbell1, Greg Mann2, Richard Wagenmaker2, and David Schwab3  

E-print Network

NOAA Beach Water Quality Experimental Forecasts David Rockwell1, Kent Campbell1, Greg Mann2., Ann Arbor, MI 48108 Abstract Timely accurate forecasts of beach water quality is critical to protect are developing and testing beach management forecast decision support systems (FDSS) at five beaches in Michigan

457

Kenneth J. Turner, Liam S. Docherty, Feng Wang and Gavin A. Campbell. Managing Home Care Networks, in Robert Bestak, Laurent George,  

E-print Network

Kenneth J. Turner, Liam S. Docherty, Feng Wang and Gavin A. Campbell. Managing Home Care Networks. on Networks, pp. 354-359, IEEE Computer Society, March 2009. Managing Home Care Networks Kenneth J. Turner Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA, UK {kjt,lsd,fw,gca}@cs.stir.ac.uk Abstract Home care networks are a new

Turner, Ken

458

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), limited energy study-lighting Fort Campbell, Kentucky: Volume 1-sections 1-5. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 95 representative buildings at Fort Campbell, categorized as Korean War Barracks, Airfield Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior lighting, and indoor lighting controls. Cost estimates were prepared.

NONE

1994-09-23

459

Pathfinder: Oklahoma's Advanced Traveler Information System Patrick A. Campbell, John R. Junger, Joseph P. Havlicek, Alan R. Stevenson, and Ronald D. Barnes  

E-print Network

Pathfinder: Oklahoma's Advanced Traveler Information System Patrick A. Campbell, John R. Junger and transportation budgets. This paper presents the design of the Oklahoma Pathfinder ATIS, addressing the state, the state of Oklahoma has faced several distinguishing challenges. First, the state has the 20th largest

Havlicek, Joebob

460

UNH Cooperative Extension Educators, Forest Resources County Offices Belknap County  

E-print Network

.nute@unh.edu 603-641-6060 FAX: 603-645-5252 Hillsborough County Mary Tebo Davis Community Forestry Field Specialist 329 Mast Rd., Suite 101 Goffstown, NH 03045 mary.tebo@unh.edu 641-6060 FAX: 645-5252 Merrimack County

New Hampshire, University of

461

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake  

E-print Network

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

462

72 FR 11323 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder...Supervisor, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2468...

2007-03-13

463

72 FR 9302 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Bow-Routt National Forest and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin Analysis Area Vegetation...Management AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA...on the National Forest Service (NSF) lands within the Thunder Basin National...

2007-03-01

464

75 FR 66719 - Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho and Wyoming; Revision of the Notice of Intent To Prepare a...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho and Wyoming; Revision of the Notice...Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Revision of the...

2010-10-29

465

77 FR 55529 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...that incorporate detection probabilities...minimum management targets, this increasing...minimum population target. Response 20...minimal because detection in Wyoming will...minimum management targets. While we recognize...and Montana are moving toward higher...

2012-09-10

466

Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 1 1 Community Health Data, MT Dept, Wheatland, Golden Valley, Musselshell, Sweet Grass, Stillwater, Yellowstone, Big Horn, and Carbon. CLRD* #12; Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2 Socioeconomic Measures1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

467

Frederick County Community Perception Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1997, Frederick Community College (FCC) in Maryland conducted a telephone survey of a random sample of 466 Frederick County residents to identify their perceptions of the college. In particular, the survey examined Frederick County residents' image of FCC, level of awareness of services and programs offered by FCC, and the types of services…

Frederick Community Coll., MD.

468

Ravalli County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,914 Unemployment Rate 7 8.1% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level 1 14.0% 14.0% 13.8% Uninsured Adults (Age (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12;Ravalli County Secondary Data.7 Not relevant Age 1 Gender 1 Male Female

Maxwell, Bruce D.

469

Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,000 $51,914 Unemployment Rate7 14.5% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level1 19.0% 14.0% 13 (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12; Lincoln County Secondary+ Gender1 Male Female Male Female Male Female

Maxwell, Bruce D.

470

Lake County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,914 Unemployment Rate 7 8.9% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level 1 18.0% 14.0% 13.8% Uninsured Adults (Age (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12;Lake County Secondary Data-64 65+ Gender 1 Male Female Male Female Male Female 49

Maxwell, Bruce D.

471

Pollination biology of a disjunct population of the endangered sandhills endemic Penstemon haydenii S. Wats. (Scrophulariaceae) in Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the breeding system and flower visitors of the endangered plant, Penstemon haydenii, at several south-central Wyoming, USA occurrences. In agreement with earlier studies of the species 300 km to the east in\\u000a Nebraska, we found Wyoming plants to be self-incompatible and pollinator-dependent for sexual reproduction. Flower visitors\\u000a were several species of native bees in the families Apidae (particularly bumblebees),

Vincent J. Tepedino; Trent R. Toler; Brosi A. Bradley; Jessica L. Hawk; Terry L. Griswold

2007-01-01

472

An examination of development of Wyoming's alternative assessment system, the Body of Evidence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The overarching purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the patterns of development and implementation of Body of Evidence (BOE) science systems throughout the state of Wyoming, using an emerging and relatively open mixed methods design. BOEs were first launched throughout Wyoming a decade ago, and are ongoing today. Through interviews with teachers and curriculum coordinators and analysis of BOE science plans, the following research questions were explored: (1) What design elements and implementation processes characterize BOE science assessment plans across Wyoming school districts? (2) What support do teachers receive to develop a BOE science plan, to align the plan to the state science education standards, and to implement the intended science plan? And (3) How do districts handle this opportunity to design and implement a locally useful assessment? Methods of data collection used in this mixed methods study began with a survey, conducted in Spring 2010, to investigate characteristics of the BOE systems being implemented within and across Wyoming school districts, followed by district case studies, implemented in Fall 2010, that included an interview with the curriculum coordinator and a science teacher in each district and a review of the BOE plan for that district. A total of 110 survey responses were received and analyzed. The six schools that participated in the interview component of the study represent a range of Wyoming school districts. The first set of themes reveals the ways BOE assessments and curriculums are aligned to state science teaching standards. The second set of themes depicts the nature of district support that is provided for the BOE development and implementation. Finally, because BOE is an ongoing process, a third theme was identified that discovered factors that affect the communication and support needed to sustain BOE implementation. The results presented from both the survey and case study interviews indicated that there is a great variation in how this state-mandated assessment requirement is implemented and sustained across school districts in Wyoming. It was obvious that the perceived levels and categories of support are different both from district to district and within districts.

Dowding, Sharla Kay

2011-12-01

473

Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined for seven coal beds with a stripping ratio of 10:1 or less. After mining and processing losses were subtracted, a total of 50 billion short tons of recoverable coal was calculated. Coal reserves are the portion of the recoverable coal that can be mined, processed, and marketed at a profit at the time of the economic evaluation. With a discounted cash flow at 8 percent rate of return, the coal reserves estimate for the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area is 1.5 billion short tons of coal (1 percent of the original resource total) for the seven coal beds evaluated.

Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

2010-01-01

474

An analysis of the weather research and forecasting model for wind energy applications in Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Determination of wind speeds at the hub height of wind turbines is an important focus of wind energy studies. Standard extrapolation methods are unable to accurately estimate 50-m winds from standard 10-m winds under stable conditions. Modeling of winds is an alternative. Daily numerical simulations from December 2011-November 2012 have been conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) to evaluate its potential for determining wind speeds at hub height. Model simulations have been validated with data collected at the University of Wyoming Wind Tower (UWT). WRF was superior to operational models in predicting 10-m wind speeds at surface stations and at the UWT. Results from WRF also showed that biases are present; WRF tends to overestimate winds during low-wind events and underestimate winds during high-wind events. WRF has demonstrated skill in hub height wind forecasts for Wyoming that can be of use for wind farm planning and operation.

Siuta, David

475

Ground-water data for the Hanna and Carbon basins, south-central Wyoming, through 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater resources in the Hanna and Carbon Basins of Wyoming were assessed in a study from 1974 through 1980 because of the development of coal mining in the area. Data collected from 105 wells during that study, including well-completion records, lithologic logs, and water levels, are presented. The data are from stock wells, coal-test holes completed as observation wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data are mostly from mined coal-bearing formations: the Tertiary Hanna Formation and the Tertiary and Cretaceous Ferris Formation. Well-completion data and lithologic logs were collected on-site during drilling of the wells or from U.S. Geological Survey files, company records, Wyoming State Engineer well-permit files, and published reports. (USGS)

Daddow, P.B.

1986-01-01

476

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 92-0361-2343, M-I Drilling Fluids, Greybull, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the state epidemiologist in Wyoming, an investigation was begun of two cases of acute, febrile hepatitis in employees of M-I Drilling Fluids (SIC-1459), Greybull, Wyoming. The two cases of hepatitis were caused by Coxiella-burnetii, the rickettsia which causes Q-fever. A survey of 39 workers using a self-administered questionnaire and a blood test revealed seven workers with serologic evidence of infection. Three showed evidence of recent infection and four showed evidence of past infection. The major risk factor identified through the questionnaire data was sheep ownership. Risk factors suggestive of either recent or past infection included working outdoors, operating heavy equipment, and hunting.

Van Gilder, T.J.; Robinson, L.

1993-08-01

477

Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts of the project, water from domestic use is obtained chiefly from the sandstone beds of the Wind River formation although some is obtained from the alluvium underlying the bottom land and from the unconsolidated deposits underlying the lower terraces along the Wind River. Although adequate quantities if water for domestic use are available from the Wind River formation, there quantities are not considered to be large enough to warrant pumping of ground water for irrigation. Only a few wells are in the nonirrigated part of the area. When this new land is irrigated, a body of ground water will gradually form in the terrace deposits and the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits. Eventually, the terrace deposits may yield adequate quantities of water for domestic and stock use, but only locally are the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits likely to become suitable aquifers. In the Riverton irrigation project area, ground water occurs under water-table conditions near the surface and under artesian conditions in certain strata at both shallow and greater depths. Irrigation is the principal source of recharge to the shallow aquifers; the water level in wells that tap these aquifers fluctuates with irrigation. The depth to water in the shallow wells ranges from less than 1 foot to about 30 feet below the land surface, depending on the season of the year and on the length of time the land has been irrigated. The water level in the wells that tap the deep confined aquifers , which receive recharge indirectly from surface sources, fluctuates only slightly because the recharge and discharge are more constant. In most places the depth to water in wells penetrating the deep confined aquifers is mush greater than that in shallow wells. but in certain low areas water from the deep aquifers flows at the surface from wells. Ground water moves from the area of recharge in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and is discharges either by evapotranspiration; by inflow into streams, drains, or lakes; by pumping or flow of wells; or by flow of springs. Waterlogging and the a

Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

1959-01-01

478

AUTUMN AND WINTER DIET OF THE SWIFT FOX (VULPES VELOX) IN SOUTH-EASTERN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the Swift fox (Vulpes velox) food habits during an autumn (October) and winter month (December and January) in a sagebrush-grassland habitat in south-eastem Wyoming in 1996 and 1997. The percentage of occurrence of various food items was determined from 63 scat samples of 6 radio-collared foxes (3 pairs). Mammals, especially rodents, and insects were the most common prey

PETER PECHACEK; FREDERICK G. LINDZEY; STANLEY H. ANDERSON

479

Variation within the Sagebrush Vegetalion of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution, slrcies composition, and physical soil characteristics are described for four differenr sagebrush codDunities in Grand Teron Narional Park, Wyoming. The communities are chamcrerizeJ, respecrively, by Aiemhia arbuula; A. tidewata; A. tridewata and A. afta:rzla; atd A. tridentati and Pirshia ttidentzta.l'he community dominated by A. atbucala is restricteil to the west side of the Snake River, close to the

Dennis H. Knight

480

Aggregation of Rhodamine 3B Adsorbed in Wyoming Montmorillonite Aqueous Suspensions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The adsorption of Rhodamine 3B (R3B) molecules in Wyoming Montmorillonite (Mont) particles suspended in water was studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Several adsorbed R3B species in the Mont tactoids were characterized from the observed changes in the absorption spectra by increasing the relative dye\\/clay concentration and the stirring time of the samples. R3B molecules can be adsorbed as monomeric units

F. López Arbeloa; R. Chaudhuri; T. Arbeloa López; I. López Arbeloa

2002-01-01

481

Use of dye tracing in water-resources investigations in Wyoming, 1967-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1967-94, the U.S. Geological Survey made numerous applications of dye tracing for water-resources investigations in Wyoming. Many of the dye tests were done in cooperation with other agencies. Results of all applications, including some previously unpublished, are described. A chronology of past applications in Wyoming and a discussion of potential future applications are included. Time-of-travel and dispersion measurements were made in a 113-mile reach of the Wind/Bighorn River below Boysen Dam; a 117-mile reach of the Green River upstream from Fontenelle Reservoir and a 70-mile reach downstream; parts of four tributaries to the Green (East Fork River, 39 miles; Big Sandy River, 112 miles; Horse Creek, 14 miles; and Blacks Fork, 14 miles); a 75-mile reach of the Little Snake River along the Wyoming-Colorado State line; and a 95-mile reach of the North Platte River downstream from Casper. Reaeration measurements were made during one of the time-of-travel measurements in the North Platte River. Sixty-eight dye-dilution measurements of stream discharge were made at 22 different sites. These included 17 measurements for verifying the stage-discharge relations for streamflow-gaging stations on North and South Brush Creeks near Saratoga, and total of 29 discharge measurements at 12 new stations at remote sites on steep, rough mountain streams crossing limestone outcrops in northeastern Wyoming. The largest discharge measured by dye tracing was 2,300 cubic feet per second. In karst terrane, four losing streams-North Fork Powder River, North Fork Crazy Woman Creek, Little Tongue River, and Smith Creek-were dye-tested. In the Middle Popo Agie River, a sinking stream in Sinks Canyon State Park, a dye test verified the connection of the sink (Sinks of Lander Cave) to the rise, where flow in the stream resumes.

Wilson, J.F., Jr.; Rankl, J.G.

1996-01-01

482

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 1. General information and executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation. This report covers: (1) history of underground coal gasification leading to the Hanna tests; (2) area characteristics (basic meteorological and socioeconomic data); (3) site selection history; (4) site characteristics; (5) permitting; and (6) executive summary. 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01

483

Native perennial forb variation between mountain big sagebrush and Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities.  

PubMed

Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) occupies large portions of the western United States and provides valuable wildlife habitat. However, information is lacking quantifying differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain big sagebrush [A. tridentata spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle] and Wyoming big sagebrush [A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh] plant communities. This information is critical to accurately evaluate the quality of habitat and forage that these communities can produce because many wildlife species consume large quantities of native perennial forbs and depend on them for hiding cover. To compare native perennial forb characteristics on sites dominated by these two subspecies of big sagebrush, we sampled 106 intact big sagebrush plant communities. Mountain big sagebrush plant communities produced almost 4.5-fold more native perennial forb biomass and had greater native perennial forb species richness and diversity compared to Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities (P < 0.001). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and the multiple-response permutation procedure (MRPP) demonstrated that native perennial forb composition varied between these plant communities (P < 0.001). Native perennial forb composition was more similar within plant communities grouped by big sagebrush subspecies than expected by chance (A = 0.112) and composition varied between community groups (P < 0.001). Indicator analysis did not identify any perennial forbs that were completely exclusive and faithful, but did identify several perennial forbs that were relatively good indicators of either mountain big sagebrush or Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Our results suggest that management plans and habitat guidelines should recognize differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain and Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. PMID:20652808

Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jon D

2010-09-01

484

Native Perennial Forb Variation Between Mountain Big Sagebrush and Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) occupies large portions of the western United States and provides valuable wildlife habitat. However, information is lacking quantifying differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain big sagebrush [ A. tridentata spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle] and Wyoming big sagebrush [ A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh] plant communities. This information is critical to accurately evaluate the quality of habitat and forage that these communities can produce because many wildlife species consume large quantities of native perennial forbs and depend on them for hiding cover. To compare native perennial forb characteristics on sites dominated by these two subspecies of big sagebrush, we sampled 106 intact big sagebrush plant communities. Mountain big sagebrush plant communities produced almost 4.5-fold more native perennial forb biomass and had greater native perennial forb species richness and diversity compared to Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities ( P < 0.001). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and the multiple-response permutation procedure (MRPP) demonstrated that native perennial forb composition varied between these plant communities ( P < 0.001). Native perennial forb composition was more similar within plant communities grouped by big sagebrush subspecies than expected by chance ( A = 0.112) and composition varied between community groups ( P < 0.001). Indicator analysis did not identify any perennial forbs that were completely exclusive and faithful, but did identify several perennial forbs that were relatively good indicators of either mountain big sagebrush or Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Our results suggest that management plans and habitat guidelines should recognize differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain and Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities.

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.

2010-09-01

485

AERIAL SIGHTABILITY AND CLASSIFICATION OF GRIZZLY BEARS AT MOTH AGGREGATION SITES IN THE ABSAROKA MOUNTAINS, WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1991-92, we simultaneously observed grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) from the ground and air at moth aggregation sites east of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, to determine the ability of aerial observers to sight and classify bears. The Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) uses aerial surveys to count and monitor the reproductive success of unduplicated females with cubs (0.5-year

SEAN L. O'BRIEN; FREDERICK G. LINDZEY

486

LANDSLIDE SOILS AND GEOMORPHOLOGY IN CAMP DAVIS QUADRANGLE, BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST, WYOMING  

E-print Network

River and creating Lower Slide Lake (Figure 14, USDA 2007). Two years later the dam failed and destroyed the town of Kelly, WY. This event, known as the Gros Ventre slide, is the largest natural landslide in the recorded history of the United States... ? Horse Creek landslides, Camp Davis Quadrangle???????.. 42 Figure 16 ? Earthquakes in Wyoming, 1897-2001????????????. 44 Figure 17 ? Visible landslide scarps, Camp Davis Quadrangle???????. 45 Figure 18 ? Hummocky topography, Camp Davis Quadrangle...

Zung, Ashley B.

2008-07-31

487

Late Quaternary Vegetation and Climate of the Wind River Range, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediments from Rapid Lake document glacial and vegetation history in the Temple Lake valley of the Wind River Range, Wyoming over the past 11,000 to 12,000 yr. Radiocarbon age determinations on basal detrital organic matter from Rapid Lake (11,770 ± 710 yr B.P.) and Temple Lake (11,400 ± 630 yr B.P.) bracket the age of the Temple Lake moraine, suggesting

Patricia L. Fall; P. Thompson Davis; Gregory A. Zielinski

1995-01-01

488

POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENT ON MULE DEER AND PRONGHORN POPULATIONS IN WESTERN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

We documented distribution and seasonal movement patterns of radio-collared mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) that used winter ranges in and adjacent to the Pinedale Anticline Project Area (PAPA). The PAPA is a 308 square-mile (798 km2) area located in western Wyoming proposed for extensive natural gas development. Both mule deer and pronghorn exhibited seasonal migrations that were

Hall Sawyer; Fred Lindzey; Doug McWhirter; Keith Andrews

489

Diamonds in an upper mantle peridotite nodule from kimberlite in southern wyoming.  

PubMed

Diamonds in a serpentinized garnet peridotite nodule from a diatreme in southern Wyoming are the first known occurrence in an upper mantle peridotite xenolith from a kimberlite intrusion in North America as well as the second authenticated occurrence of diamonds from kimberlite pipes in North America. The nodule is believed to have come from a section of depleted (partially melted) lherzolite at a depth of 130 to 180 kilometers. PMID:17831161

McCallum, M E; Eggler, D H

1976-04-16

490

Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Wyoming, 1949-50  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a comprehensive investigation of the phosphate deposits of the western field begun in 1947, the U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation of Permian age at many localities in Wyoming and adjacent states. These data will not be fully synthesized for many years, but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of the sections measured in western Wyoming (figs 1 and 2) in 1949 and 1950, is the second Wyoming report of this series. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a previous report (McKelvey and others, 1953a). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey and most of the field program was supervised by R. W. Swanson. F. J. Anderson, D. F. Davidson, A. M. Gutstadt, J. W. Hill, H. W. Peirce, W. R. Record and M. E. Thompson participated in the description of strata and the collection of samples referred to in this report. T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of exposures and the crushing and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

Sheldon, R.P.; Waring, R.G.; Warner, M.A.; Smart, R.A.

1953-01-01

491

Canopy growth and density of Wyoming big sagebrush sown with cool-season perennial grasses  

SciTech Connect

Post-mining revegetation efforts often require grass seeding and mulch applications to stabilize the soils at the same time as shrub seeding, creating intraspecific competition between seeded shrubs and grasses that is not well understood. In 1999, we initiated a study at the Belle Ayr Coal Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, to evaluate the influence of grass competition on establishment and growth of Wyoming big sagebrush. Combinations of three sagebrush seeding rates (1, 2, and 4 kg pls ha{sup -1}) and seven cool-season perennial grass mixture seeding rates (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14 kg pls ha{sup -1}) were seeded during winter 1998-1999. Shrub density and grass cover were assessed from 1999 to 2004. We monitored sagebrush canopy size in 2001, 2002, and 2004. All sagebrush seeding rates provided shrub densities (>=) 1 shrub m {sup -1} after six growing seasons. Grass production (>=) 75 g m{sup -2} was achieved by seeding grasses at 6 to 8 kg pls ha{sup -1}). Canopy growth of individual sagebrush plants was least in the heaviest grass seeding rate. Reduced grass seeding rates can aid in achieving Wyoming big sagebrush density standards and enhance shrub canopy growth.

Hild, A.L.; Schuman, G.E.; Vicklund, L.E.; Williams, M.I. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2006-07-15

492

Heat flow, radioactivity, gravity, and geothermal resources in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The surface heat flow values in the Sierra Madre-Medicine Bow-Laramie Mountains region are in the range 0.6 to 1.5 HFU. When the heat from local bedrock radioactivity is considered, the reduced flux in these mountains is low to normal (0.6 to 1.2 HFU). These data and the low to normal gradients (10 to 25/sup 0/C/km) in the studied drill holes strongly suggest that the resource potential of the Southern Rockies in Wyoming is low. The geothermal resource potential of the sedimentary basins in Wyoming that border these mountains also appears to be low because preliminary estimates for the flux in these areas are less than or equal to 1.5 HFU and the average gradients in analyzed drill holes are generally less than or equal to 30/sup 0/C/km. In contrast to southern Wyoming, the high surface and reduced heat flows strongly suggest that the Park areas and other parts of the Southern Rockies in northern Colorado are potentially valuable geothermal resource areas. The narrow northerly borders (less than or equal to 50 km) of these positive anomalies suggest that some of the resources could be shallow, as does the evidence for regional igneous and tectonic activity in the late Cenozoic. The small number of combined heat flow and radioactivity stations precludes detailed site-specific evaluations in these regions, but a few generalizations are made.

Decker, E.R.; Buelow, K.L.

1981-12-01

493

The Cretaceous record in a northeast-trending transect, northern Utah to east-central Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the Laramide basins of the middle Rocky Mountains include 16,600 ft (5060 m) of predominantly siliciclastic strata in the thrust-belt of northern Utah and 7800 ft (2380 m) of mainly siliciclastic and calcareous strata near the craton in east central Wyoming. Regional changes in the thickness of the strata indicate that crustal subsidence during the Cretaceous was generally greatest in northern Utah and western Wyoming where it was associated with tectonic and sediment loading. However, the considerable thickness of uppermost Cretaceous nonmarine beds in several other areas reflects pronounced basin subsidence during early stages of the Laramide orogeny. In a transect from northern Utah to east-central Wyoming, based on outcrop sections, borehole logs, and chronostratigraphic data, Cretaceous rocks grade northeastward from mainly fluvial and nearshore marine synorogenic conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone, coal, and bentonite to mostly nearshore and offshore marine sandstone, mudstone, calcareous shale, and bentonite. Lateral changes in the lithofacies and in the extent of enclosed unconformities indicate marine transgressions and regressions that were effected by structural deformation, sedimentation, and eustatic events. Significant unconformities have been found at the base of the Cretaceous strata, at two horizons within beds of Albian age, at two horizons within rocks of Cenomanian and Turonian ages, at one horizon within Coniacian strata, and at two horizons within Campanian beds. Most of these unconformities are either flooding surfaces or sequence boundaries.

Merewether, E.A. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

494

Thermochronology of lower Cretaceous source rocks in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt  

SciTech Connect

Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks that are thermally mature to postmature crop out on the Absaroka, Darby, and Prospect plates in linear belts that run parallel to the trace of the thrusts in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt. Although the common assumption is that burial by thrust plates and the synorogenic sediments derived from them have been responsible for thermal maturation of the organic-rich strata, commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in structural traps in this portion of the thrust belt. In a companion paper, Burtner and Nigrini demonstrated that gravity-driven fluid flow in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the thrust belt was responsible for moving large amounts of heat from the depths of the Early Cretaceous foreland basin eastward toward the stable platform. In this paper we demonstrate, through the application of organic maturation indicators and a new refinement of the apatite fission track technique, that this process heated Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks to temperatures sufficient to generate hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon generation and migration occurred prior to the development of the thrusts that are often assumed to have played a major role in the generation and entrapment of hydrocarbons in this portion of the thrust belt.

Burtner, R.L. [TerraSpec Associates, Fullerton, CA (United States); Nigrini, A. [TerraSpec Associates, La Habra Heights, CA (United States); Donelick, R.A. [Donelick Analytical, Katy, TX (United States)

1994-10-01

495

Tennessee Higher Education County Profiles, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents a localized perspective on Tennessee higher education, including: (1) county demographic and economic data; (2) information on public and private colleges and universities located in the county; (3) number of county residents enrolled in Tennessee public institutions; and (4) number of county residents participating in the…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

496

Fault Trace: Marin County, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph shows the trace of a fault (in trench phase) as it passes beneath a barn. The trace developed during the April 18, 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. The location is the Skinner Ranch, near Olema, Marin County, California.

497

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

SciTech Connect

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01

498

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

1980-12-01

499

San Bernardino County Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The San Bernardino County Museum is a regional museum with exhibits and collections in cultural and natural history. Special exhibits, the Exploration Station live animal discovery center, extensive research collections, and public programs for adults, families, students, and children are all part of the museum experience. The Museum is surrounded by citrus groves, and orange blossoms perfume the air. The Zimmerman Citrus Kiosk explores citrus agricultural history in Southern California. Death Valley Alive! is a new traveling exhibit, available for rent, where visitors can explore the natural history and culture of the Death Valley region from its geologic beginnings 1.3 billion years ago. Online exhibits include The Importance of Museum Collections, The Barstow Fossil Beds, Motherlode of the Miocene, The Etiwanda Fan, and for kids, Mimicry, a study in camouflage and adaptation. Teacher Resources include professional development and workshops, and Trading Places, where 21 hours of time spent volunteering in the Museum earns a free program for your class. Sample opportunities include writing activities for study kits, developing post-visit activities, creating a museum gallery guide, translating student materials into Spanish, or developing an independent idea. There are programs for youth, Scouts, and adults, as well as various publications available in anthropology, archeology, biology, geology and history.

500

75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

2010-05-07