Science.gov

Sample records for campbell county wyoming

  1. Selenium in soils of the Lower Wasatch Formation, Campbell County, Wyoming: Geochemistry, distribution, and environmental hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolm, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Seleniferous Shingle series soils and sandstone outcrops of section 27, T 48 N, R 71 W, Wyoming are mapped on aerial photography by their association with Astragalus bisulcatus. Chemical leachate analyses and atomic absorption methods reveal all studied Samsil and Shingle soils to contain acid, base, and water soluble selenium compounds, and that water extractions showed varied concentration behavior due to soil pH. Acid-soluble selenium is found to be associated with smectite. Statistical analyses confirm that A. bisulcatus presence has a weak influence on soil-lens organic selenium concentration, and determine the importance of other geobotanical factors for convertor presence. Environmental procedures of high selenium lens burial, convertor plant eradication, and revegetated site monitoring are recommended. Usage of density analysis and photographic enlargement are used to successfully produce both a control area and a Campbell County, Wyoming regional map of A. bisulcatus supportive soils and outcrops using Skylab photography.

  2. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  3. Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

    1953-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area Campbell and Johnson Counties by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1951 From June to November 1952 an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities with abnormally high radioactivity were found uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation exclusive of sparsely disseminated uranium in the White River sandstone which caps the Pumpkin Buttes and several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where ironstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of formation and are of two types. (1) small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, and manganese minerals in sandstone and (2) irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone The second type is usually larger but lower grade than the first type. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north -trending belt approximately 60 miles long with a maximum width of 18 miles,

  4. Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

    1954-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyo., by the U. S. Geological Survey in October 1951. From June to November 1952, an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities having abnormally high radioactivity were found; uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization in the area is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation, except sparsely disseminated uranium in the sandstone of the White River formation, which caps the Pumpkin Buttes, mid several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where iron-saturated sandstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above-normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of the formation and are of two types: small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, manganese and vanadium minerals in sandstone, and irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone. The second type is usually larger but of lower grade than the first. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north-trending belt about 60 miles long and 18 miles in maximum width.

  5. Western energy related overhead monitoring project. Phase 2: Summary. [Campbell County, Wyoming and coal strip mines in Montana and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. E. (principal investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Assistance by NASA to EPA in the establishment and maintenance of a fully operational energy-related monitoring system included: (1) regional analysis applications based on LANDSAT and auxiliary data; (2) development of techniques for using aircraft MSS data to rapidly monitor site specific surface coal mine activities; and (3) registration of aircraft MSS data to a map base. The coal strip mines used in the site specific task were in Campbell County, Wyoming; Big Horn County, Montana; and the Navajo mine in San Juan County, New Mexico. The procedures and software used to accomplish these tasks are described.

  6. Application of computer graphics to generate coal resources of the Cache coal bed, Recluse geologic model area, Campbell County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, G.B.; Crowley, S.S.; Carey, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Low-sulfur subbituminous coal resources have been calculated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7 1/2 minute quadrangles, Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 275 coal thickness measurements obtained from drill hole data are evenly distributed throughout the area. The Cache coal and associated beds are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth from the surface to the Cache bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The thickness of the coal is as much as 31 feet, but in places the Cache coal bed is absent. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources calculated by computer show the bed to contain 2,316 million short tons or about 6.7 percent more than the hand-calculated figure of 2,160 million short tons.

  7. Geology of the Pumpkin Buttes Area of the Powder River Basin, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, William Neil; White, Amos McNairy

    1956-01-01

    About 200 uranium occurrences have been examined in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Wyoming. Uranium minerals are visible at most of these places and occur in red and buff sandstone lenses in the Wasatch formation of Eocene age. The uranium minerals are disseminated in buff sandstone near red sandstone, and also occur in red sandstone in manganese oxide concretions and uraninite concretions.

  8. 76 FR 78234 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County... System (NFS) land on Thunder Basin National Grassland. The proposal comprises new construction of... Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2250 East Richards Street, Douglas, Wyoming 82633, or...

  9. 76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA... Fish and Wildlife Service James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft... Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Ellis, Project Leader,...

  10. 76 FR 78234 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ...National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY; Mackey Road...NFS) land on Thunder Basin National Grassland. The proposal comprises new construction...National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2250 East Richards Street,...

  11. Hydrologic conditions near Glendo, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

    1965-01-01

    The Glendo area of Platte and Carbon Counties, Wyo., about 250 square miles in extent, is in the Great Plains physiographic province. It is bordered on the west by the Laramie Range and on the east by the Hartville uplift. The North Platte River and Horseshoe and Middle Bear Creeks are the principal streams that drain the area. Gentle to steep hills, which lie between 4,450 and 6,360 feet above sea level, characterize the topography. Approximately 7,600 acres of land is cultivated in the Horseshoe Creek valley and 1,000 or more acres in the Cassa Flats of the North Platte River and Middle Bear Creek valleys. The average annual precipitation of 13.15 inches and the streamflow diverted for irrigation from Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River are usually inadequate to sustain crops during the entire growing season. Sedimentary rocks, which underlie about 99 percent of the Glendo area, range in age from Cambrian(?) to Recent and in thickness from about 3,000 to 4,700 feet. Beds of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age dip steeply away from the Laramie Range and the Hartville uplift to form a large syncline, which is interrupted by the Elkhorn anticline in the central part of the area. Beds of Tertiary and Quaternary age that were deposited over the older structural features and later were partly removed by erosion have dips of less than 6 ? . The 'Converse sand' of local usage at the top of the Hartville Formation of Mississippian(7), Pennsylvanian, and Permian age, the White River Formation of Oligocene age, and the flood-plain deposits of Recent .age are the most important aquifers in the Glendo area. The Hartville Formation consists predominantly of hard limestone and dolomite and of lesser amounts of sandstone and shale ; its thickness ranges from 850 to 1,050 feet throughout most of the area. The 'Converse sand' is an artesian aquifer consisting of fine- to medium-grained porous sandstone having an average thickness of about 80 feet. Recharge to the Hartville Formation is mainly from seepage of surface water from Glendo Reservoir and Spring Creek; ground water is discharged from the formation to the overlying White River Formation and the alluvium in the North Platte River valley near Cassa and to four wells in the Horseshoe Creek valley. Flowing wells yielding from a few gallons per minute to 175 gpm (gallons per minute) or more from the 'Converse sand' can probably be located in an area from ? mile to 1? miles wide and about 4? miles long in the lower Horseshoe Creek valley. The depth to the 'Converse sand' in this area depends upon the topographic relief and distance from the outcrop and ranges from 250 to about 1,000 feet. The discharge induced by pumping a well in the aquifer in the 'Converse sand' would probably amount to about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown. Values of 2,000, 2,100, and 10,300 gpd (gallons per day) per ft for the coefficient of transmissibility of the 'Converse sand' were obtained from aquifer tests at three wells. The chemical analyses of samples from the Hartville Formation ('Converse. sand' included) indicate that the water in the formation is of fairly good quality and adequate for domestic, stock, and irrigation uses, although the fluoride content is low and the water is hard. The White River Formation is composed of as much as 575 feet of fractured siltstone and claystone, and the flood-plain deposits include up to 65 feet of silt, sand, and gravel. Precipitation is the main type of recharge to the rocks of Tertiary age. Recharge to the alluvium in the valleys of Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River occurs mainly by seepage of ground water from. underlying beds, by infiltration of irrigation water, and by infiltration of streamflow as bank storage. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage to streams, by underflow, and by evapotranspiration and artificially by wells. In 1961, the total discharge from 38 wells in the White River and Arikaree Formations and 2

  12. 76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will...

  13. 77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  14. 76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  15. 77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  16. WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2000: A County-by-County Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 23 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) low birth-weight babies; (4) early prenatal care; (5) infants deaths; (6) child deaths; (7)…

  17. WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2002: A County-By-County Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide and county trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7)…

  18. Ground-water resources of Natrona County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crist, Marvin A.; Lowry, Marlin E.

    1972-01-01

    Natrona County covers an area of 5.369 square miles in central Wyoming. The climate is arid except in the mountainous areas. The county includes parts of the Great Plains, Middle Rocky Mountains, Wyoming Basin, and Southern Rocky Mountains physiographic provinces. There is wide variation of topography. More than 30 geologic formations are exposed in the county, 28 of which are known to yield water to wells and springs. The formations range in age from Precambrian to Holocene. Ground water in approximately 40 percent of the county contains more than 1.000 mg/l (milligrams per liter) of dissolved solids. Water chemically suitable for livestock can be developed at depths of less than 1,000 feet throughout most of the area. Many of the geologic formations were deposited under similar conditions and have similar water-bearing properties; also. water from these rocks deposited under similar conditions tends to have similar chemical characteristics. For this report, the stratigraphic section has been arbitrarily divided into six rock units based on similarity of deposition. The igneous and metamorphic rock unit includes rocks of Precambrian age and igneous intrusives and extrusives of Tertiary age. These rocks probably would not yield more than about 5 gpm (gallons per minute) to wells. The water is usually calcium bicarbonate type and contains less than 500 mg/l of dissolved solids. The marine rock unit includes formations of Cambrian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian and Permian age, having a maximum total thickness of about 1,900 feet. The Madison Limestone of Mississippian age and the Tensleep Sandstone and the Casper Formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian age supply the largest yields to wells and springs in the county. In the northeastern part of the county, flow from each of three wells in the Madison reportedly is more than 4.000 gpm. Each of three wells in the Tensleep in the same area flows more than 400 gpm. Yields of springs in the Casper Formation near Casper Mountain range from about 1.0 to 17 cubic feet per second. Ground water from near the outcrop of all these formations usually contains less than 500 rag/l of dissolved solids. The dissolved-solids content increases with distance from the outcrop and in places is more than 3.200 mg/l. Several types of water were found in this unit including sodium sulfate, calcium sodium sulfate, calcium sulfate, sodium calcium sulfate, sodium chloride, and calcium bicarbonate.

  19. Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-11-01

    The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

  20. Library of the Year 2008: Laramie County Library System, Wyoming--The Impact Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article features Laramie County Library System (LCLS) of Cheyenne, Wyoming, which is named as Gale/"Library Journal" 2008 Library of the Year. It is not just strong, effective publicity or the fine new building or even a staff built around its ability to connect with the people, although all of those things add to the impact of Wyoming's…

  1. 78 FR 65420 - Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties, New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and... provide a modern rail crossing at the location of the existing Portageville Bridge (also known as the ``Portage High Bridge'') over the Genesee River in Wyoming and Livingston Counties, New York. FOR...

  2. 78 FR 48461 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Hay Creek II Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered...

  3. 75 FR 41521 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming... from CKT Energy LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164386 for land in Campbell County, Wyoming... terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Julie L. Weaver,...

  4. Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

  5. Ground-water resources of Sheridan County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowry, Marlin E.; Cummings, T. Ray

    1966-01-01

    Sheridan County is in the north-central part of Wyoming and is an area of about 2,500 square miles. The western part of the county is in the Bighorn Mountains, and the eastern part is in the Powder River structural basin. Principal streams are the Powder and Tongue Rivers, which are part of the Yellowstone River system. The climate is semiarid, and the mean annual precipitation at Sheridan is about 16 inches. Rocks of Precambrian age are exposed in the central part of the Bighorn Mountains, and successively younger rocks are exposed eastward. Rocks of Tertiary age, which are the most widespread, are exposed throughout a large part of the Powder River structural basin. Deposits of Quaternary age underlie the flood plains and terraces along the larger streams, particularly in the western part of the basin. Aquifers of pre-Tertiary age are exposed in the western part of the county, but they dip steeply and are deeply buried just a few miles east of their outcrop. Aquifers that might yield large supplies of water include the Bighorn Dolomite, Madison Limestone, Amsden Formation, and Tensleep Sandstone. The Flathead Sandstone, Sundance Formation, Morrison Formation, Cloverly Formation,. Newcastle Sandstone, Frontier Formation, Parkman Sandstone, Bearpaw Shale, .and Lance Formation may yield small or, under favorable conditions, moderate supplies of water. Few wells tap aquifers of pre-Tertiary age, and these are restricted to the outcrop area. The meager data available indicate that the water from the Lance Formation, Bearpaw Shale, Parkman Sandstone, Tensleep Sandstone and Amsden Formation, and Flathead Standstone is of suitable quality for domestic or stock purposes, and that water from the Tensleep Sandstone and Amsden Formation and the Flathead Sandstone is of good quality for irrigation. Samples could not be obtained from other aquifers of pre-Tertiary age; so the quality of water in these aquifers could not be determined. Adequate supplies of ground water for stock or domestic use can be developed throughout much of the report area from the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations of Tertiary age; larger supplies might be obtained from the coarse-grained sandstone facies of the Wasatch Formation near Moncreiffe Ridge. Four aquifer tests were made at wells tapping formations of Tertiary age, and the coefficients of permeability determined ranged from 2.5 to 7.9 gallons per day per square foot. The depths to which wells must be drilled to penetrate an aquifer differ within relatively short distances because of the lenticularity of the aquifers. Water in aquifers of Tertiary age may occur under water-table, artesian, or a combination of artesian and gas-lift conditions. Water from the Fort Union is usable for domestic purposes, but the iron and dissolved-solids content impair the quality at some localities. Water from the Fort Union Formation is not recommended for irrigation because of sodium and bicarbonate content. The water is regarded as good to fair for stock use. Water from the Wasatch Formation generally contains dissolved solids in excess of the suggested domestic standards, but this water is usable in the absence of other supplies. The development of irrigation supplies from the Wasatch Formation may be possible in some areas, but the water quality should be carefully checked. Water of good to very poor quality for stock supplies is obtained, depending upon the location. Hydrogen sulfide, commonly present in water of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations, becomes an objectionable characteristic when the water is used for human consumption. Deposits of Quaternary age generally yield small to moderate supplies of water to wells. Two pumping tests were conducted, and the coefficients of permeability of the aquifers tested were 380 and 1,100 gallons per day per square foot. Usable supplies of ground water can be developed from the deposits of Quaternary age, principally along the valleys of perennial strea

  6. 77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ...LLWY922000-L57000000.BX0000; WYW173408] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  7. 76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW161248] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  8. 77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  9. 77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  10. Airborne radioactivity Survey of part of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 133 square miles of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-073-1804, South Campbell County Middle School, Alexandria, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, F.L.; Lee, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    An evaluation was carried out at the South Campbell County Middle School, in Alexandria, Kentucky to determine possible exposures to stagnant water, excessive mold growth, and imbalances in the ventilation system. Inside the school the relative humidity levels in December ranged from 28 to 32%. Levels of carbon dioxide were determined to be 1500 parts per million, four to six times higher than outdoor levels. Water had seeped under the gymnasium floor, causing cracks in the interior and exterior walls. Problems were identified with the ventilation including poor maintenance, improperly set controls, and improper design. Results of medical questionnaires indicated that the staff at this school was three times as likely to develop respiratory symptoms as the staff at a nearby school. A significant association was found between any exposure to the library lasting at least 1 hour per week, and the development of respiratory illness.

  12. Mineral resources of the Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area is about 20 mi east-southeast of Encampment in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by middle Proterozoic gabbro, granite, and hornblende gneiss, which is locally cut by pegmatite dikes. There are no identified resources and no potential for undiscovered energy resources in this study area. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for industrial mineral is low.

  13. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 266 square miles of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  14. Airborne radioactivity surveys of parts of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 222 square miles of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  15. 77 FR 25735 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW 164386, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW 164386, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from CKT Energy LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164386 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  16. 75 FR 41521 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...from CKT Energy LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164386 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  17. 77 FR 61630 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159617, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159617, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Purchase, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159617 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  18. 77 FR 61630 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159206, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159206, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Purchase, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159206 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  19. 76 FR 41822 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW143519, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW143519, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Production LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW143519 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  20. 76 FR 41822 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW143524, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW143524, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Production LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW143524 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  1. 76 FR 52013 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW178834, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW178834, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Langley Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW178834 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  2. 77 FR 61631 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145583, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145583, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Purchase, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW145583 for land in Campbell County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  3. 78 FR 48461 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW172684] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Hay Creek II Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  4. 77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application... Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau... coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Campbell County, Wyoming. DATES: This notice...

  5. Hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crist, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The area includes about 260 square miles in central Platte County that consists of Wheatland Flats and a border region. Wheatland Flats is an area of about 100 square miles that is bounded by Chugwater Creek on the east, the Laramie River on the north, and Sybille Creek on the west. The southern boundary is approximately the southernmost limit of alluvial terrace deposits. Surface water diverted from the Laramie River along with ground water from wells is used to irrigate about 57,000 acres most of which are on and adjacent to Wheatland Flats. More than 200 wells are used for irrigation, industrial, and municipal supplies. The wells are completed in an upper aquifer consisting primarily of shallow alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and a lower aquifer, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age. Net water-level decline after approximately 20 years (1958-60 to 1979) generally is less than 10 feet in each aquifer , although declines of as much as 13 feet have occurred in the Airkaree Formation at specific locations. A digital model was used to simulate hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area. The model indicated that ground-water discharge to streams decreased by 10 percent from 1971 to 1978. Stream-discharge measurements are not available to verify the loss. However, it is reasonable to assume, on the basis of hydraulic-head decline in the aquifers, that there has been some ground-water contribution to the stream. (USGS)

  6. Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, J.G.; Hettinger, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming are presented.

  7. WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2001: A County-by-County Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7) chronic…

  8. Pumping tests of well Campbell et al. No. 2, Gila Hot Springs, Grant County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, G.E.; Summers, W.K.; Colpitts, R.M. Jr.; Teuten, C.E.; Young, W.K.

    1982-03-01

    Well Campbell et al. No. 2 near Gila Hot Springs in southwestern New Mexico (Section 5, Township 13 South, Range 13 West) was pumped for a five-step test and a 48-hour constant-rate test during October 1981. Measurements included depth to water in the pumping well and two observation wells, and discharge rates at the pumping well and two springs. The water level in the pumping well responded during both tests. However, water-level changes in the observation wells were too small for analytical use and discharge rates from the springs showed no change. Chemical analyses of water samples collected from two springs and the pumping well show very similar water chemistries. Estimates of hydraulic properties show transmissivity from 12,000 to 14,000 gpd/ft and a storativity of 0.05. Combining these parameters with well data gives the first-year optimum discharge rate as 50 gpm with 20 feet of drawdown. Pumping this well at 50 gpm for forty years should produce only small water-level changes in wells a few hundred feet away. It would diminish the flow of the springs, and for planning purposes the combined discharge of the springs and well should be considered constant.

  9. 76 FR 78939 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. In-Person Viewing or Pickup...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  10. 76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. The Draft CCP/ EA will also...

  11. Geologic map of the Sand Creek Pass quadrangle, Larimer County, Colorado, and Albany County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Workman, Jeremiah B.; Braddock, William A.

    2010-01-01

    New geologic mapping within the Sand Creek Pass 7.5 minute quadrangle defines geologic relationships within the northern Front Range of Colorado along the Wyoming border approximately 35 km south of Laramie, Wyo. Previous mapping within the quadrangle was limited to regional reconnaissance mapping; Eaton Reservoir 7.5 minute quadrangle to the east (2008), granite of the Rawah batholith to the south (1983), Laramie River valley to the west (1979), and the Laramie 30' x 60' quadrangle to the north (2007). Fieldwork was completed during 1981 and 1982 and during 2007 and 2008. Mapping was compiled at 1:24,000-scale. Minimal petrographic work was done and no isotope work was done in the quadrangle area, but detailed petrographic and isotope studies were performed on correlative map units in surrounding areas as part of a related regional study of the northern Front Range. Stratigraphy of Proterozoic rocks is primarily based upon field observation of bulk mineral composition, macroscopic textural features, and field relationships that allow for correlation with rocks studied in greater detail outside of the map area. Stratigraphy of Phanerozoic rocks is primarily based upon correlation with similar rocks to the north in the Laramie Basin of Wyoming and to the east in the Front Range of Colorado.

  12. 78 FR 28897 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact...

  13. Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Mineral resources of the Raymond Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln county, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, K.; Evans, J.P.; Hill, R.H.; Bankey, V.; Lane, E.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on the Raymond Mountain Wilderness Study Area which encompasses most of the Sublette Range of western Lincoln County, Wyo. The study area consists of upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that form part of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah overthrust belt. There are no identified mineral or energy resources in the wilderness study area. The study area has moderate energy resource potential for oil and gas. Mineral resource potential for vanadium and phosphate is low because the Phosphoria Formation is deeply buried beneath the wilderness study area and contains unweathered units having low P{sub 2}O{sub 5} values. The mineral resource potential for coal, other metals, including uranium, high-purity limestone or dolostone, and geothermal energy is low.

  15. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 ..mu..R/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 ..mu..R/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically.

  16. Hydrology of the uppermost Cretaceous and the lowermost Paleocene rocks in the Hilight oil field, Campbell County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowry, Marlin E.

    1973-01-01

    The lithologic equivalents of the Fox Hills Sandstone, Lance Formation, and the Tullock member of the Fort Union Formation, as mapped on the east side of the Powder River Basin, can be recognized throughout the basin; however, the formations are in hydraulic connection and cannot be treated as separate aquifers. Recharge to the Lance-Fox Hills aquifer in the Hilight oil field is largely by vertical movement; there is no recharge from the Lance and Fox Hills outcrops on the east side of the basin to the formations in the Hilight area. At the and of the central Hilight water-flood project, the maximum possible drawdown resulting from the pumping of any one well at a distance of l0 miles from the pumped well, would be about 15 feet, if the projected pumping were evenly distributed among the project wells. Within a few years after pumping has ceased, water in the project wells will approach the levels present before pumping began. The only irreversible effect of pumping will be the compaction of shale, with attendant subsidence, because the water derived from the shale probably will not be replaced.

  17. Geologic, geotechnical, and geophysical properties of core from the Acme Fire-Pit-1 drill hole, Sheridan County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Donley S.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary core study from the Acme Fire-Pit-1 drill hole, Sheridan County, Wyoming, revealed that the upper portion of the core had been baked by a fire confined to the underlying Monarch coal bed. The baked (clinkered) sediment above the Monarch coal bed was determined to have higher point-load strength values (greater than 2 MPa) than the sediment under the burned coal

  18. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Sullivan and Wyoming Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Sullivan County and Wyoming County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  19. Pam Campbell

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Drilling Platform exploded and sank, causing the largest oil spill yet recorded. Samples from the oil spill were collected by Louisiana USGS scientists Greg Swayze and Charlie Demas and sent for analysis in Menlo Park, CA. Researcher Pam Campbell performed ma...

  20. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in Wyoming. Especially in the winter, the proportionately large, continuous gain of groundwater into Fish Creek in the perennial section keeps most of the creek free of ice. Because sunlight can still reach the streambed in Fish Creek and the water is still flowing, aquatic plants continue to photosynthesize in the winter, albeit at a lower level of productivity. Additionally, the cobble and large gravel substrate in Fish Creek provides excellent attachment points for aquatic plants, and when combined with Fish Creek’s channel stability allows rapid growth of aquatic plants once conditions allow during the spring. The aquatic plant community of Fish Creek was different than most streams in Wyoming in that it contains many different macrophytes—including macroalgae such as long streamers of Cladophora, aquatic vascular plants, and moss; most other streams in the state contain predominantly algae. From the banks of Fish Creek, the bottom of the stream sometimes appeared to be a solid green carpet. A shift was observed from higher amounts of microalgae in April/May to higher amounts macrophytes in August and October, and differences in the relative abundance of microalgae and macrophytes were statistically significant between seasons. Differences in dissolved-nitrate concentrations and in the nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio were significantly different between seasons, as concentrations of dissolved nitrate decreased from April/May to August and October. It is likely that dissolved-nitrate concentrations in Fish Creek were lower in August and October because macrophytes were quickly utilizing the nutrient, and a negative correlation between macro-phytes and nitrate was found. Macroinvertebrates also were sampled because of their role as indicators of water quality and their documented responses to perturbation such as degradation of water quality and habitat. Statistically significant seasonal differences were noted in the macroinvertebrate community. Taxa richness and relative abundance of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, which tend to be intolerant of water-

  1. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  2. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  3. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  4. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  5. Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  6. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, lower Salt River, Lincoln County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Kirk A.; Mason, John P.

    2000-01-01

    The water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood were determined for a part of the lower Salt River in Lincoln County, Wyoming. Channel cross-section data were provided by Lincoln County. Cross-section data for bridges and other structures were collected and compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey. Roughness coefficients ranged from 0.034 to 0.100. The 100-year flood was computed using standard methods, ranged from 5,170 to 4,120 cubic feet per second through the study reach, and was adjusted proportional to contributing drainage area. Water-surface elevations were determined by the standard step-backwater method. Flood boundaries were plotted on digital basemaps.

  7. Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer system, commonly called the High Plains aquifer in many publications, is a nationally important water resource that underlies a 111-million-acre area (173,000 square miles) in parts of eight States including Wyoming. Through irrigation of crops with groundwater from the High Plains aquifer system, the area that overlies the aquifer system has become one of the major agricultural regions in the world. In addition, the aquifer system also serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents of the region. The High Plains aquifer system is one of the largest aquifers or aquifer systems in the world. The High Plains aquifer system underlies an area of 8,190 square miles in southeastern Wyoming. Including Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present in parts of five counties in southeastern Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 8 percent of Wyoming, and 5 percent of the aquifer system is located within the State. Based on withdrawals for irrigation, public supply, and industrial use in 2000, the High Plains aquifer system is the most utilized source of groundwater in Wyoming. With the exception of the Laramie Mountains in western Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present throughout Laramie County. In Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is the predominant groundwater resource for agricultural (irrigation), municipal, industrial, and domestic uses. Withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation (primarily in the eastern part of the county) is the largest use of water from the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County and southeastern Wyoming. Continued interest in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County prompted a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office to update the potentiometric-surface map of the aquifer system in Laramie County. Groundwater levels were measured in wells completed in the High Plains aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

  8. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek have been increasing in recent years. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the water quality and biological communities in Fish Creek. Water-quality samples were collected for analyses of physical properties and water chemistry (nutrients, nitrate isotopes, and wastewater chemicals) between March 2007 and October 2008 from seven surface-water sites and three groundwater wells. During this same period, aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate samples were collected and habitat characteristics were measured at the surface-water sites. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate nutrient concentrations (that influence biological indicators of eutrophication) and potential sources of nutrients by using stable isotope analysis and other indicator chemicals (such as caffeine and disinfectants) that could provide evidence of anthropogenic sources, such as wastewater or septic tank contamination in Fish Creek and adjacent groundwater, and (2) characterize the algal, macrophyte, and macroinvertebrate communities and habitat of Fish Creek. Nitrate was the dominant species of dissolved nitrogen present in all samples and was the only bioavailable species detected at concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level in all surface-water samples. Average concentrations of dissolved nitrate in surface water were largest in samples collected from the two sites with seasonal flow near Teton Village and decreased downstream; the smallest concentration was at downstream site A-Wck. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in groundwater were consistently greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. Orthophosphate was the primary dissolved species of phosphorus present in all surface-water and groundwater samples. The average concentration of dissolved orthophosphate in surface water was largest in samples collected from near Teton Village; samples from all other sites had similar average concentrations. Concentrations of dissolved orthophosphate in groundwater also were typically greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event. The aquatic plant communities in Fish Creek typically were composed of a mixture of macrophytes, macroalgae, microalgae, and moss. The composition of the aquatic plant community in Fish Creek appeared to shift in the downstream direction in 2007. On average, the proportion of macrophytes ranged from about 1 percent at site A-R1U, the most upstream site, to 54 percent of the plant community at site A-R6D, the farthest downstream site sampled during 2007. The downstream increase in macrophytes was accompanied by a downstream decrease in microalgae. The average proportion of microalgae ranged from 80 percent at site A-R1U to 24 percent at site A-R6D. The proportion of the macroalgae Cladophora in the aquatic plant community was relatively high at sites A-Wck and A-R3D in both 2007 and 2008.

  9. Mineral resources of the Adobe Town Wilderness Study Area, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loenen, R.E.; Hill, R.H.; Bankey, V.; Bryant, W.A. ); Kness, R.F. )

    1989-01-01

    The Adobe Town Wilderness Study Area is in Southwest Wyoming about 60 miles southeast of Rock Springs. This study area consists of flat-lying sedimentary rock of Eocene age located near the center of the Washakie Basin. There are no identified resources. This study area has a high resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas, in over pressured Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone reservoirs. This study area has a low resource potential for undiscovered oil shale, zeolites, uranium, coal, and metallic minerals.

  10. 78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County...Condition (LC) No. 47 for its Bear Creek Uranium Mill facility...INFORMATION: I. Background The Bear Creek Uranium Mill operated...decommissioning plan, and ground water remediation. In November...

  11. Mineral resources of the Bobcat Draw Badlands Wilderness Study Area, Bir Horn and Washakie Counties, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.B.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

    1989-01-01

    The Bobcat Draw Wilderness Study Area is in the Bighorn Basin about 45 mi west of Worland, Wyoming, and is underlain by early Tertiary sedimentary rocks. No resources were identified in this study area, which lacks mines or prospects, but is mostly under lease for oil and gas. This study area has a high potential for oil and gas and for subeconomic resources of coal and a moderate potential for a deep-seated geothermal energy resource. The resource potential for oil shale and metals, including uranium, is low.

  12. Understanding Joseph Campbell 

    E-print Network

    Ritske, Rensma

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis I will be offering an analysis of C.G. Jung’s influence on the theoretical framework of the American comparative mythologist Joseph Campbell. My first main argument will be that Campbell underwent what I ...

  13. 78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Register Notice (77 FR 24993) requesting comments on the licensee's proposed amendment. No comments were... COMMISSION License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County... issuance of a license amendment to Source Materials License SUA- 1310 issued to Anadarko...

  14. Geology and energy resources of the Sand Butte Rim NW Quadrangle, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roehler, Henry W.

    1979-01-01

    The Sand Butte Rim NW 71-minute quadrangle occupies 56 square miles of an arid, windy, sparsely vegetated area of ridges and valleys on the east flank of the Rock Springs uplift in southwest Wyoming. The area is underlain by a succession of sedimentary rocks, about 20,000 feet thick, that includes 28 formations ranging in age from Cambrian to Tertiary. Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary formations crop out and dip 3?-6? southeast. They are unfaulted and generally homoclinal, but a minor anticlinal nose is present. Older rocks in the subsurface are faulted and folded. Coal resources are estimated to be nearly I billion short tons of subbituminous coal, in beds more than 2.5 feet thick, under less than 3,000 feet of overburden, in the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age and the Lance and Almond Formations of Cretaceous age.

  15. Molluscan record from a Mid-Cretaceous borehole in Weston County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, William Aubrey

    1984-01-01

    A core borehole in the Osage oilfield on the west flank of the Black Hills uplift in eastern Wyoming penetrated, in decending order, most of the Carlile Shale, all of the Greenhorn Formation, and the upper part of the underlying Belle Fourche Shale. Molluscan fossils are abundant in parts of the core and indicate an age span of early Coniacian to the middle Cenomanian. Most of the fossils are bivalves and ammonites; gastropods are scarce. Fossils in the cores indicate the following zones: Lower Coniacian Cremnoceramus? waltersdorfensis Upper Turonian Scaphites coroensis S. nigricollensis S. whiifieldi S. warreni Middle Turonian Collignoniceras woollgari Lower Turonian Mytiloides mytiloides Mytiloides aff. M. duplicostatus Upper Cenomanian Sciponoceras gracile Dunveganoceras albertense D. pondi Middle Cenomanian Acanthoceras amphibolum

  16. Einstein in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

  17. Structural and facies characterization of the Niobrara Formation in Goshen and Laramie counties, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Nicholas Devereux

    The Niobrara Formation is a fine-grained marine rock deposited in the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous. It is composed of fossil-rich interlayered shale, marls, and chalks. Recent interest in the Niobrara has grown due to the advent of lateral drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing. This technology allows operators to economically extract hydrocarbons from chalkier Niobrara facies. Yet two aspects of the Niobrara Formation have remained enigmatic. The first is the occurrence of abundant, randomly oriented, layer-bound, normal faults. The second is the large degree of vertical heterogeneity. This research aimed to increase understanding in both these aspects of the Niobrara Formation. Randomly oriented normal faults have been observed in Niobrara outcrops for nearly a hundred years. Recent high resolution 3D seismic in the Denver Basin has allowed investigators to interpret these faults as part of a polygonal fault system (PFS). PFS are layer bound extensional structures that typically occur in fine-grained marine sediments. Though their genesis and development is still poorly understood, their almost exclusive occurrence in fine-grained rocks indicates their origin is linked to lithology. Interpretation of a 3D seismic cube in Southeast Wyoming found a tier of polygonal faulting within the Greenhorn-Carlile formations and another tier of polygonal faulting within the Niobrara and Pierre formations. This research also found that underlying structural highs influence fault growth and geometries within both these tiers. Core data and thin sections best describe vertical heterogeneity in fine-grained rocks. This investigation interpreted core data and thin sections in a well in Southeast Wyoming and identified 10 different facies. Most of these facies fall within a carbonate/clay spectrum with clay-rich facies deposited during periods of lower sea level and carbonate-rich facies deposited during periods of higher sea level. Because the average operator will typically have little core but abundant well logs, this investigation used three different methods of describing facies variability with logs. Facies interpreted with these methods are referred to as electrofacies. First, a conventional interpretation of Niobrara sub-units was done using gamma ray and resistivity logs. Then a cluster analysis was conducted on an extensive petrophysical log suite. Finally, a neural network was trained with the previous core interpretation so that it learned to identify facies from logs. The research found that when little core is available a cluster analysis method can capture significant amounts of vertical heterogeneity within the Niobrara Formation. But if core is available then a neural network method provides more meaningful and higher resolution interpretations.

  18. Geologic history and palynologic dating of Paleocene deposits, western Rock Springs uplift, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, M.A.; Nelson, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    During the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene, a northwest-southeast trending anticline developed in the area of the present Rock springs uplift in southwestern Wyoming. This ancestral structure was eroded to a surface of fairly low relief on which a paleosol developed. The surface was formed on the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation throughout the study area. In the early middle Paleocene (P3 palynomorph zone), topographic lows on the erosion surface were infilled by alluvial deposits that accumulated in channel, floodplain, and backswamp environments. An organic-rich facies contains numerous coal beds and is middle to late Paleocene in age (P3 to P5 zones). The assemblage of pollen that defines the late middle Paleocene (P4 zone) is absent from the area suggesting a hiatus, although no lithologic break was observed at this boundary. The younger organic-poor facies begins in the late Paleocene (P5 zone) and continues to the top of the studied sequence. This change in facies has been used to map the contact between the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age in this area, and the Wasatch Formation which was though to be of Eocene age. This study demonstrates that, as currently mapped, the lower part of the Wasatch Formation is Paleocene in age. Stratigraphically higher parts of the Wasatch, which presumably contain rocks of latest Paleocene (P6 zone) and earliest Eocene age, were not studied. -Authors

  19. Results of Electrical Resistivity Data Collected near the Town of Guernsey, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougal, Robert R.; Abraham, Jared D.; Bisdorf, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a study to investigate subsurface geologic conditions as they relate to ground-water flow in an abandoned landfill near the town of Guernsey, Wyoming, geophysical direct current (DC) resistivity data were collected. Eight vertical resistivity soundings and eight horizontal resistivity profiles were made using single channel and multi-channel DC instruments. Data collected in the field were converted from apparent resistivity to inverted resistivity with depth using a numerical inversion of the data. Results of the inverted resistivity data are presented as horizontal profiles and as profiles derived from the combined horizontal profile and vertical sounding data. The data sets collected using the single-channel and multi-channel DC systems provided for the resistivity investigation to extend to greater depth. Similarity of the electrical properties of the bedrock formations made interpretation of the resistivity profiles more difficult. High resistivity anomalies seen in the profiles are interpreted as quartzite lenses and as limestone or metadolomite structures in the eastern part of the study area. Terrace gravels were mapped as resistive where dry and less resistive in the saturated zone. The DC resistivity methods used in this study illustrate that multi-electrode DC resistivity surveying and more traditional methodologies can be merged and used to efficiently map anomalies of hydrologic interest in geologically complex terrain.

  20. Mineral resources of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; Scott, D.C.; Hausel, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The combined investigations of the US Geological Survey, the US Bureau of Mines, and the Geological Survey of Wyoming have identified gold resources in a lode-type gold vein west of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area in the adjacent Lewiston mining district. Extensions of this vein into the study area may contain 20,000 tons of gold resources; however, subsurface sampling is needed to determine if such resources are present in the study area. A high resource potential for placer-type gold deposits and a low resource potential for placer-type tin and tungsten deposits in the Quaternary gravels along the Sweetwater River and Strawberry Creek exists. In the Precambrian greenstone rocks of the western part of the study area, there is a high mineral resource potential for lode-type gold and a low resource potential for lode-type tin and tungsten deposits. In the Precambrian granitoid rocks of the eastern part of the study area, a low potential for lode-type tin and tungsten exists, and in the entire study area, a low resource potential for uranium exists. There is no resource potential for oil, gas, or geothermal energy in the entire study area.

  1. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  2. Stratigraphy of mid-Cretaceous formations at drilling sites in Weston and Johnson counties, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age in Weston County, Wyo., on the east flank of the Powder River Basin, are assigned, in ascending order, to the Belle Fourche Shale, Greenhorn Formation, and Carlile Shale. In Johnson County, on the west flank of the basin, the lower Upper Cretaceous strata are included in the Frontier Formation and the overlying Cody Shale. The Frontier Formation and some of the laterally equivalent strata in the Rocky Mountain region contain major resources of oil and gas. These rocks also include commercial deposits of bentonite. Outcrop sections, borehole logs, and core studies of the lower Upper Cretaceous rocks near Osage, in Weston County, and Kaycee, in Johnson County, supplement comparative studies of the fossils in the formations. Fossils of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian Age are abundant at these localities and form sequences of species which can be used for the zonation and correlation of strata throughout the region. The Belle Fourche Shale near Osage is about 115 m (meters) thick and consists mainly of noncalcareous shale, which was deposited in offshore-marine environments during Cenomanian time. These strata are overlain by calcareous shale and limestone of the Greenhorn Formation. In this area, the Greenhorn is about 85 m thick and accumulated in offshore, open-marine environments during the Cenomanian and early Turonian. The Carlile Shale overlies the Greenhorn and is composed of, from oldest to youngest, the Pool Creek Member, Turner Sandy Member, and Sage Breaks Member. In boreholes, the Pool Creek Member is about 23 m thick and consists largely of shale. The member was deposited in offshoremarine environments in Turonian time. These rocks are disconformably overlain by the Turner Sandy Member, a sequence about 50 m thick of interstratified shale, siltstone, and sandstone. The Turner accumulated during the Turonian in several shallow-marine environments. Conformably overlying the Turner is the slightly calcareous shale of the Sage Breaks Member, which is about 91 m thick. The Sage Breaks was deposited mostly during Coniacian time in offshore-marine environments. In Johnson County, the Frontier Formation consists of the Belle Fourche Member and the overlying Wall Creek Member, and is overlain by the Sage Breaks Member of the Cody Shale. Near Kaycee, the Belle Fourche Member is about 225 m thick and is composed mostly of interstratified shale, siltstone, and sandstone. These strata are mainly of Cenomanian age and were deposited largely in shallow-marine environments. In this area, the Belle Fourche Member is disconformably overlain by the Wall Creek Member, which is about 30 m thick and grades from interlaminated shale and siltstone at the base of the member to sandstone at the top. The Wall Creek accumulated during Turonian time in shallowmarine environments. These beds are overlain by the Sage Breaks Member of the Cody. Near Kaycee, the Sage Breaks is about 65 m thick and consists mainly of shale which was deposited in offshoremarine environments during Turonian and Coniacian time. Lower Upper Cretaceous formations on the east side of the Powder River Basin can be compared with strata of the same age on the west side of the basin. The Belle Fourche Shale at Osage is represented near Kaycee by most of the Belle Fourche Member of the Frontier. The Greenhorn at Osage contrasts with beds of similar age in the Belle Fourche at Kaycee. An upper part of the Greenhorn Formation, the Pool Creek Member of the Carlile Shale, and the basal beds of the Turner Sandy Member of the Carlile, in Weston County, are represented by a disconformity at the base of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier in southern Johnson County. A middle part of the Turner in the vicinity of Osage is the same age as the Wall Creek Member near Kaycee. A sequence of beds in the upper part of the Turner and in the overlying Sage Breaks in Weston County is the same age as most of the Sage Breaks M

  3. Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

  4. Coal resource occurrence and coal development potential maps of the southwest quarter of North Star School 15-minute quadrangle, Campbell County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    IntraSearch Inc.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the water resources of the Port Gamble Indian Reservation, Wash., has shown that there is probably a substantial quantity of good quality ground and surface water available to provide for further development of the reservation. Groundwater supplies are available from an artesian aquifer underlying the reservation near sea level. This aquifer is estimated to be capable of supplying at least 90 gallons per minute, continuously, without greatly increasing chances for seawater intrusion. This quantity of water is enough to supply about 800 to 900 additional residents on the reservation. Another artesian aquifer, relatively unexplored, was noted underlying the previously mentioned artesian aquifer. This lower aquifer may be capable of supplying additional groundwater for use on the reservation. Groundwater quality was found to be good for most uses, being moderately hard and having moderately high iron concentrations. No evidence of pollution of the groundwater was found during this study from either seawater intrusion or contamination from a nearby solid-waste disposal site. Surface-water resources studied on the reservation included two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, whose 7-day low flows were estimated to be 0.4 and 0.2 cubic foot per second, respectively, for a 20-year estimated recurrence interval. The surface-water quality was also found to be good for most uses and was within the limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for untreated drinking water. Thus, the water from these two streams, Middle and Little Boston Creeks, could be used as domestic supplies to supplement the groundwater withdrawals. (USGS)

  5. Wyoming Kids Count in Wyoming Factbook, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Children's Action Alliance, Cheyenne.

    This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 20 indicators, including the following: (1) poverty and population; (2) welfare reform; (3) certified day care facilities; (4) births; (5) infant deaths;…

  6. A new Wyoming phytosaur

    E-print Network

    Eaton, T. H., Jr.

    1965-08-01

    PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August, 1965 Paper 2 A NEW WYOMING PHYTOSAUR By THEODORE H. EATON, JR. [Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas I ABSTRACT The skull of a new species of Angistorhinus, family Phytosauridae, is described from the Popo Agie... Member of the Chugwater Formation, Upper Triassic, Fremont County, Wyoming. It is large but not maximum for the genus, rostrum slender and slightly concave in dorsal outline, septomaxillaries slender, antorbital fenestrae long and spindle-shaped, skull...

  7. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  8. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 125 square miles of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of nine radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  9. 77 FR 24978 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Washakie County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ..., Wyoming, by non- competitive (direct) sale to the town of Ten Sleep under the provisions of the Federal... United States. 3. A reservation of a right-of-way for a Federal-aid Highway (Ten Sleep-Big Trails Road.... This land is being offered by direct sale to the Town of Ten Sleep pursuant to 43 CFR 2711.3-3....

  10. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  11. John Campbell Begg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  12. Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

  13. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by 'The Campbell Studios', ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by 'The Campbell Studios', 1122 North 3rd Avenue, Tucson, Arizona. c. 1881 Copied for Survey through courtesy of Harry Drachman. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST, SHOWING PRINCIPAL STRUCTURE - Mission San Cosme del Tucson, Menlo Park, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  14. Availability of Diagnostic and Treatment Services for Acute Stroke in Frontier Counties in Montana and Northern Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okon, Nicholas J.; Rodriguez, Daniel V.; Dietrich, Dennis W.; Oser, Carrie S.; Blades, Lynda L.; Burnett, Anne M.; Russell, Joseph A.; Allen, Martha J.; Chasson, Linda; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Rapid diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke can lead to improved patient outcomes. Hospitals in rural and frontier counties, however, face unique challenges in providing diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke. Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the availability of key diagnostic technology and programs for acute…

  15. Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, J.F.; Frost, C.D.; Sharma, S.

    2011-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

    This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming

  17. Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2002-June 30, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

    This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming

  18. Chloride concentrations and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and groundwater in and near Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2005-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer long tributary to the Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to determine the interaction of local surface water and groundwater in and near Fish Creek. In conjunction with the surface water and groundwater interaction study, samples were collected for analysis of chloride and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water. Chloride concentrations ranged from 2.9 to 26.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) near Teton Village, 1.2 to 4.9 mg/L near Resor's Bridge, and 1.8 to 5.0 mg/L near Wilson. Stable isotope data for hydrogen and oxygen in water samples collected in and near the three cross sections on Fish Creek are shown in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line and the Local Meteoric Water Line.

  19. 76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II North Coal Tract described below in Campbell...

  20. Geology and ground-water resources of Laramie County, Wyoming; with a section on Chemical quality of ground water and of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowry, Marlin E.; Crist, Marvin A.; Tilstra, John R.

    1967-01-01

    Laramie County, an area of 2,709 square miles, is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. Rocks exposed there range in age from Precambrian to Recent. The most extensive aquifers in the county are the White River Formation of Oligocene age, which is as much as 500 feet thick and consists predominantly of siltstone ; the Arikaree Formation of Miocene age, which consists of as much as 450 feet of very fine grained to fine-grained sandstone; and the Ogallala Formation of Miocene and Pliocene age, which consists ,of as much as 330 feet of gravel, sand, silt, and some cobbles and boulders. These formations are capable of yielding large ,supplies of water locally. Terrace deposits of Quaternary age yield moderate .to large supplies of water in the southeastern and northeastern parts of the county. In the Federal well field, large yields of water from the White River Formation are obtained from gravel lenses. In the eastern part of the county near Pine Bluffs, large yields are obtained from openings in .the siltstone of the White River. Previous investigators reported that the large yields were obtained in areas where the formation is fractured and fissured. The authors of this report believe that .the large yields from siltstone in the White River Formation are from pipes, sometimes called natural tunnels, rather than from fractures ,or fissures. Little is known about the water-bearing properties of the pro-Tertiary aquifers in the county, but water derived from the pro-Tertiary formations would probably be of poor quality, except in the vicinity of the outcrop near the western edge of the county. Precipitation is the principal source of recharge to the ground-water reservoirs. About 5 percent of the annual precipitation, or about 108,400 acre-feet per year, is estimated to be recharged. Only a small amount of additional recharge is from streams. The general movement of ground water is eastward, and the average gradient of the water table is about 40 feet per mile. The total amount ,of ground water pumped from wells in Laramie County during 1964 is estimated to be 28,000 acre-feet; about 6,000 acre-feet was used for municipal and industrial supplies, about 17,000 acre-feet was used for irrigation in the Pine Bluffs-Carpenter area, and about 5,000 acre-feet was used for other purposes. The balance of the recharge (80,400 acre-feet) is estimated to be discharged by the following means: 20 percent by underflow, 20 percent by streamflow, and 60 percent by evapotranspiration. The coefficient of transmissibility of the Ogallala Formation, determined by averaging data from 28 pumping tests made in the Cheyenne municipal well field, is about 16,000 gallons per day per foot. However, this figure is an average of the more permeable zones, and the average coefficient of transmissibility of the Ogallala in the county is probably much less because of the heterogeneous character of the formation. A coefficient of transmissibility of 3,800 gallons per day per foot was calculated for the Ogallala, in the same vicinity that the pumping tests were made, by using a regional method of analysis. Although the average transmissibility of the Ogallala is considered to be low, large yields are obtained from gravel stringers and lenses in the formation. The maximum perennial yield from the Cheyenne well field is estimated to be about 1.6 billion gallons per year. Moderate to large yields of water can be obtained in the north-central part of the county where the saturated thickness of the Arikaree Formation, or combined Arikaree and Ogallala Formations, is 200 feet or more. Ground water has been developed throughout the county, but development has been intensive only in the Cheyenne municipal well fields near Cheyenne and Federal and in the Pine Bluffs lowland. The water level has been lowered as much as 40 feet in the Cheyenne well field and somewhat less in the Federal well field. Interference between wells occurs in the Pine Bluffs

  1. Water quality of Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen, Albany County, and Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs, Laramie County, Wyoming, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, Kathy Muller; Peterson, D.A.; Spillman, Bud; Padilla, Rosie

    1999-01-01

    The water quality of four reservoirs was assessed during 1997 and 1998 as a cooperative project between the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities and the U. S. Geological Survey. The four reservoirs, Rob Roy, Lake Owen, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake, provide approximately 75 percent of the public water supply for Cheyenne, Wyoming. Samples of water and bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for selected physical, chemical, and biological characteristics to provide data about the reservoirs. Water flows between the reservoirs through a series of pipelines and stream channels. The reservoirs differ in physical characteristics such as elevation, volume, and depth.Profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and pH were examined. Three of the four reservoirs exhibited stratification during the summer. The profiles indicate that stratification develops in all reservoirs except Lake Owen. Stratification developed in Rob Roy, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake Reservoirs by mid-July in 1998 and continued until September, with the thickness of the epilimnion increasing during that time. Secchi disk readings indicated Rob Roy Reservoir had the clearest water of the four reservoirs studied.The composition of the phytoplankton community was different in the upper two reservoirs from that in the lower two reservoirs. Many of the species found in Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen are associated with oligotrophic, nutrient-poor conditions. In contrast, many of the species found in Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs are associated with mesotrophic or eutrophic conditions. The total number of taxa identified also increased downstream.The chemical water type in the reservoirs was similar, but dissolved-solids concentrations were greater in the downstream reservoirs. Water in all four reservoirs was a calcium-bicarbonate type. In the fall of 1997, Rob Roy Reservoir had the lowest dissolved-solids concentration (19 milligrams per liter), whereas Crystal Lake Reservoir had the highest concentration (63 milligrams per liter). Relatively little differences in the concentrations of major-ion species were noted between samples collected near the surface and near the bottom of the same reservoir. In contrast, iron and manganese concentrations generally were higher in samples collected near the bottom of a reservoir than in near-surface samples collected from the same reservoir.Composite bottom-sediment samples from all four reservoirs contained similar concentrations of bulk constituents such as aluminum, iron, phosphorus and titanium, but varied in concentrations of trace elements. Trace-element concentrations in Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen were similar to the crustal average, whereas in Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs the concentrations were similar to granitic rocks.

  2. Preliminary reconnaissance survey for thorium, uranium, and rare-earth oxides, Bear Lodge Mountains, Crook County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, V.R.; Johnson, D.H.

    1953-01-01

    An area about 6 miles north of Sundance, in the Bear Lodge Mountains, in Crook County, Wyo., was examined during August 1950 for thorium, uranium, and rare-earth oxides and samples were collected. Uranium is known to occur in fluorite veins and iron-manganese veins and in the igneous rocks of Tertiary age that compose the core of the Bear Lodge Mountains. The uranium content of the samples ranges from 0.001 to 0.015 percent in those from the fluorite veins, from 0.005 to 0.018 percent in those from the iron-manganese veins, and from 0.001 to 0.017 percent in those from the igneous rocks. The radioactivity of the samples is more than that expected from the uranium content. Thorium accounts for most of this discrepancy. The thorium oxide content of samples ranges from 0.07 to 0.25 percent in those from the iron-manganese veins and from 0.07 to 0.39 percent in those from the sedimentary rocks, and from0.04 to 0.30 in those from the igneous rocks. Rare-earth oxides occur in iron-manganese veins and in zones of altered igneous rocks. The veins contain from 0.16 to 12.99 percent rare-earth oxides, and the igneous rocks, except for two localities, contain from 0.01 to 0.42 percent rare-earth oxides. Inclusions of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks in the intrusive rocks contain from 0.07 to 2.01 percent rare-earth oxides.

  3. Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical sampling survey of molybdenum mineralization near Schiestler Peak, Temple Peak Quadrangle, Sublette County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, G.K.; Antweiler, J.C.; Love, J.D.; Benedict, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    A brief geologic reconnaissance and geochemical survey of molybdenum mineralization near Schiestler Peak, Sublette County, Wyo., indicates that molybdenite occurs in this area as disseminations and blebs in granitic or quartz monzonitic rocks intruded by felsic dikes of similar composition. Samples of stream sediments, panned concentrates from stream sediments, soils, rocks, and water were collected in the geochemical survey. Analytical results show that in reconnaissance, panned concentrates are the best of the sample types used in this study to detect molybdenum mineralization. More detailed analysis of the distribution of the molybdenum is best achieved through the collection of rock samples. Hydrothermal alteration is generally not conspicuous in the study area; however, rock samples that contain molybdenite are usually slightly enriched in silver, copper, lead, and in several instances, gold. Conversely, there appear to be negative associations between molybdenum and zinc and between molybdenum and several of the rare-earth elements. Mo concentrations in the rock samples with no visible molybdenite range from undetectable at a sensitivity of 5 parts per million (ppm) to 700 ppm. Mo content in rock samples containing visible molybdenite ranges from 10 ppm to greater than 2,000 ppm. Stream-sediment values range from undetected to 15 ppm; panned concentrates from undetected to 15 ppm; soils from undetected to 20 ppm. Analyses of the water samples indicate Mo concentrations from 0.8 parts per billion (ppb) to 4.8 ppb. As currently understood, this deposit is not extensive or continuous, but drilling to provide information on the vertical extent of mineralization may alter this opinion.

  4. Wyoming Kids Count Factbook, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

    This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The 1997 report has been expanded to include detailed information on the status of children by categories of welfare, health, and education. The first part of the factbook documents trends by county for 15 indicators: (1) poverty and population; (2)…

  5. Workforce: Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    From 2002 to 2012, the economy in Wyoming and the nation will continue generating jobs for workers at all levels of education and training, but there will be an increasing demand for employees with at least some postsecondary education, preferably a bachelor's degree. Nationwide, during a decade that will witness large numbers of baby boomers…

  6. Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

  7. Comparison of computer-based and manual coal resource estimation methods for the Cache coal bed, Recluse Geologic Model Area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Gary B.; Crowley, Sharon S.; Carey, Mary Alice

    1984-01-01

    Coal resources have been estimated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Geologic Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7?-minute quadrangles in Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 300 coal thickness measurements from drill-hole logs are distributed throughout the area The Cache coal bed and associated strata are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth to the Cache coal bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The coal bed is as much as 31 feet thick but is absent in places. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources estimated by hand show the bed to contain 2,228 million short tons or about 2.6 percent more than the computer-calculated figure of 2,169 million short tons.

  8. 75 FR 28818 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed Sale of Public Land, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...found the following public lands located in Teton County, Wyoming, suitable for direct...The following-described public land in Teton County, Wyoming, is being considered...contains 0.95 acres, more or less, in Teton County. The proposed direct sale is...

  9. Property description and fact-finding report for NPR-3 Natrona County, Wyoming. Addendum to 22 August 1996 study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase I fact-finding and property description for that study. The United States of America owns 100 percent of the mineral rights and surface rights in 9,321-acre NPR-3. This property comprises the Teapot Dome oil field and related production, processing and other facilities. Discovered in 1914, this field has 632 wells producing 1,807 barrels of oil per day. Production revenues are about $9.5 million per year. Remaining recoverable reserves are approximately 1.3 million barrels of oil. Significant plugging and abandonment (P&A) and environmental liabilities are present.

  10. Characterization of Interactions between Surface Water and Near-Stream Groundwater along Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, by Using Heat as a Tracer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Essaid, Hedeff I.

    2009-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary of the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Local residents began observing an increase in the growth of algae and aquatic plants in the stream during the last decade. Due to the known importance of groundwater to surface water in the area, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to characterize the interactions between surface water and near-stream groundwater along Fish Creek. The study has two main objectives: (1) develop an improved spatial and temporal understanding of water flow (fluxes) between surface water and groundwater, and (2) use a two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport model to interpret observed temperature and hydraulic-head distributions and to describe groundwater flow near Fish Creek. The study is intended to augment hydrologic information derived from previously published results of a seepage investigation on Fish Creek. Seepage measurements provide spatially averaged gains and losses over an entire reach for one point in time, whereas continuous temperature and water-level measurements provide continuous estimates of gain and loss at a specific location. Stage, water-level, and temperature data were collected from surface water and from piezometers completed in an alluvial aquifer at three cross sections on Fish Creek at Teton Village, Resor's Bridge, and Wilson from October 2004 to October 2006. The flow and energy (heat) transport model VS2DH was used to simulate flow through the streambed of Fish Creek at the Teton Village cross section from April 15 to October 14, 2006, (183 recharge periods) and at the Resor's Bridge and Wilson cross sections from June 6, 2005, to October 14, 2006 (496 recharge periods). A trial-and-error technique was used to determine the best match between simulated and measured data. These results were then used to calibrate the cross-sectional models and determine horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities. The fluxes of groundwater into the stream or fluxes of stream water into the alluvial aquifer were estimated by using the calibrated VS2DH model for each cross section. Results of the simulations indicated that surface water/groundwater interaction and hydraulic properties were different at the three cross sections. At the most upstream cross section, Teton Village, Fish Creek flowed intermittently and continually gained relatively large quantities of water from April through September. During other times of the year, the stream was dry near the cross section. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in both the horizontal and vertical directions resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Resor's Bridge cross section, about midway between the other two cross sections, was near the point where perennial flow begins. At this cross section, the stream gained water from groundwater during high flow in late spring and summer, was near equilibrium with groundwater during August and September, and lost water to groundwater during the remainder of the year. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity set at 5x10-5 m/s and vertical hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-5 m/s resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Wilson cross section, the most downstream site, was at USGS streamflow-gaging station 13016450. This part of the stream is perennial and was almost always gaining a small volume of water from groundwater. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in the horizontal direction and at 5x10-6 m/s in the vertical direction resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. Quantitative values of the flux from groundwater into surface water were estimated by using VS2DH and ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 cubic meters per day (m3/d) at the Teton Village cross section, from -3.8 to 7.4 m3/d at t

  11. Campbell Creek Research Houses: A Transformational Impact

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    require occupancy simulation. Using home automation equipment the lighting, clothes washer and dryer easily do. Manufacturers and Suppliers The following partners have contributed to the Campbell Creek

  12. 15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Wyoming Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  13. Bob Campbell Geology Museum Mission Statement

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Bob Campbell Geology Museum Mission Statement: To foster a greater awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the complex and dynamic nature of geology. The Museum's collection focuses on rocks, minerals and fossils of Southeastern US, but includes specimens from around the world. Bob Campbell Geology Museum

  14. Campbell's Rule for Estimating Entropy Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    Campbell's rule for estimating entropy changes is discussed in relation to an earlier article by Norman Craig, where it was proposed that the approximate value of the entropy of reaction was related to net moles of gas consumed or generated. It was seen that the average for Campbell's data set was lower than that for Craig's data set and…

  15. Alfred Walter Campbell and the visual functions of the occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2014-07-01

    In his pioneering cytoarchitectonic studies of the human brain, Alfred Walter Campbell identified two structurally different areas in the occipital lobes and assigned two different kinds of visual functions to them. The first area, the visuosensory, was essentially on the mesial surface of the calcarine fissure. It was the terminus of nervous impulses generated in the retina and was where simple visual sensations arose. The second area, the visuopsychic, which surrounded or invested the first, was where sensations were interpreted and elaborated into visual perceptions. I argue that Campbell's distinction between the two areas was the starting point for the eventual differentiation of areas V1-V5. After a brief outline of Campbell's early life and education in Australia and of his Scottish medical education and early work as a pathologist at the Lancashire County Lunatic Asylum at Rainhill near Liverpool, I summarise his work on the human brain. In describing the structures he identified in the occipital lobes, I analyse the similarities and differences between them and the related structures identified by Joseph Shaw Bolton. I conclude by proposing some reasons for how that work came to be overshadowed by the later studies of Brodmann and for the more general lack of recognition given Campbell and his work. Those reasons include the effect of the controversies precipitated by Campbell's alliance with Charles Sherrington over the functions of the sensory and motor cortices. PMID:23218905

  16. Basin-margin depositional environments of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations (Tertiary) in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Johnson County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obernyer, Stanley L.

    1979-01-01

    The Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations along the east flank of the Bighorn Mountains in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Wyoming, consist of continental alluvial fan, braided stream, and poorly drained alluvial plain deposits. The Fort Union conformably overlies the Cretaceous Lance Formation, which is marine in its lower units and nonmarine in its upper part. The formations dip steeply along the western margin of the study area and are nearly horizontal in the central and eastern portions. This structural configuration permits the reconstruction of depositional environments as an aid to understanding: (1) the evolution of the Bighorn uplift and its effects on the depositional patterns marginal to the uplift during Paleocene and Eocene time and (2) the changing depositional environments basinward from the margin of the uplift during a relatively small period of time in the Eocene.

  17. Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

  18. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Unclassifiable/Attainment. Hot Springs County...

  19. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Unclassifiable/Attainment. Hot Springs County...

  20. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Fremont County Goshen County Hot Springs County Johnson County Laramie County... Unclassifiable/Attainment. Hot Springs County...

  1. A Geophysical Study in Grand Teton National Park and Vicinity, Teton County, Wyoming: With Sections on Stratigraphy and Structure and Precambrian Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John Charles; Tibbetts, Benton L.; Bonini, William E.; Lavin, Peter M.; Love, J.D.; Reed, John C.

    1968-01-01

    An integrated geophysical study - comprising gravity, seismic refraction, and aeromagnetic surveys - was made of a 4,600-km2 area in Grand Teton National Park and vicinity, Wyoming, for the purpose of obtaining a better understanding of the structural relationships in the region. The Teton range is largely comprised of Precambrian crystalline rocks and layered metasedimentary gneiss, but it also includes granitic gneiss, hornblende-plagioclase gneiss, granodiorite, and pegmatite and diabase dikes. Elsewhere, the sedimentary section is thick. The presence of each system except Silurian provides a chronological history of most structures. Uplift of the Teton-Gros Ventre area began in the Late Cretaceous; most of the uplift occurred after middle Eocene time. Additional uplift of the Teton Range and downfaulting of Jackson Hole began in the late Pliocene and continues to the present. Bouguer anomalies range from -185 mgal over Precambrian rocks of the Teton Range to -240 mgal over low-density Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of Jackson Hole. The Teton fault (at the west edge of Jackson Hole), as shown by steep gravity gradients and seismic-refraction data, trends north-northeast away from the front of the Teton Range in the area of Jackson Lake. The Teton fault either is shallowly inclined in the Jenny Lake area, or it consists of a series of fault steps in the fault zone; it is approximately vertical in the Arizona Creek area. Seismic-refraction data can be fitted well by a three-layer gravity model with velocities of 2.45 km per sec for the Tertiary and Cretaceous rocks above the Cloverly Formation, 3.9 km per sec for the lower Mesozoic rocks, and 6.1 km per sec for the Paleozoic (limestone and dolomite) and Precambrian rocks. Gravity models computed along two seismic profiles are in good agreement (sigma=+- 2 mgal) if density contrasts with the assumed 2.67 g per cm2 Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks are assumed to be -0.35 and -0.10 g per cm2 for the 2.45 and 3.9 km per sec velocity layers, respectively. The Teton Range has a maximum vertical uplift of about 7 km, as inferred from the maximum depth to basement of about 5 km. Aeromagnetic data show a 400gamma positive anomaly in the Gros Ventre Range, which trends out of the surveyed area at the east edge. Exposed Precambrian rocks contain concentrations of magnetite and hematite. A prominent anomaly of about 100gamma is associated with the Gros Ventre Range, and 100gamma anomalies are associated with the layered gneiss of the Teton Range. On this basis the unmapped Precambrian rocks of the Gross Ventre Range are interpreted as layered gneiss. The sources of the magnetic anomalies, as indicated by depth determination, are at the surface of the Precambrian rocks. A model fitted to a profile across the Gros Ventre Range gives a depth to the Precambrian surface and a susceptibility of 0.0004 emu (electromagnetic units) for the source, which is consistent with modal analyses of the layered gneisses. A residual magnetic map shows that the granitic rocks and layered gneiss probably continue beneath the floor of Jackson Hole east of the Teton fault. The location of aeromagnetic anomalies is consistent with the interpretation that the Teton fault diverges from the front of the Teton Range.

  2. Law in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Law-Related Education Advisory Council, Cheyenne.

    This document is intended to give students an overview of laws in Wyoming. Subjects covered include civil and criminal law; courts in Wyoming; juvenile law, juvenile court procedure; rights of children; family law; employment law; automobile-related law; laws affecting the schools; and citizenship rights and responsibilities. The laws and courts…

  3. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sublette County Sweetwater County Teton County Uinta County Washakie County... Sublette County Sweetwater County Teton County Uinta County Washakie County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Teton County Unclassifiable/Attainment...

  4. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sublette County Sweetwater County Teton County Uinta County Washakie County... Sublette County Sweetwater County Teton County Uinta County Washakie County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Teton County Unclassifiable/Attainment...

  5. 76 FR 52013 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW178834, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW178834... reinstatement from Langley Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW178834 for land in Campbell County... lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: BLM, Julie L. Weaver, Chief,...

  6. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  7. Bio113 Lab A. Malcolm Campbell 1

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Bio113 Lab A. Malcolm Campbell 1 Semester-long Learning Objectives For Bio113 Laboratory. · Describe each of the five big ideas (evolution, information, cells, emergent properties, and homeostasis resistant bacteria appear in a matter of days. · Discuss how slime mold functions as a cell at two different

  8. Speaking Personally--With Chere Campbell Gibson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olgren, Christine

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Chere Campbell Gibson, a professor emerita in the School of Human Ecology and graduate program in Continuing and Vocational Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Gibson shares her years of experience in distance education, discusses her book titled "Distance Learners in Higher Education:…

  9. Bitter bonanza in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.

    1980-12-01

    Mineral and energy-related exploration, such as the drilling activity in the Overthrust Belt for petroleum, has made Wyoming a leading energy supplier in the U.S. The energy boom has had many unfortunate effects on the state's environment. Environmental degradation caused by exploration and production in Wyoming includes loss of habitat, poaching of wildlife, water pollution from oil dumping and erosion, and impacts from squatter's camps.

  10. 78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164393, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164393, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Wyoming), Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164393 for land in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  11. 77 FR 37706 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW177129, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW177129, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Wyoming Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW177129 for land in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  12. 77 FR 43612 - Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW179184, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW179184, Wyoming... from Legacy Energy, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW179184 for land in Park County, Wyoming... terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Julie L. Weaver,...

  13. 75 FR 22840 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Federal law, the Bureau... Company for non-competitive oil and gas lease WYW136450 in Natrona County, Wyoming. The petition was...

  14. 78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164393, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Linc Energy (Wyoming), Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164393 for land in Converse County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  15. 76 FR 23333 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... ] Interior's Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management extend PLO No. 6886 (56 FR 50661 (1991... Caribou Counties, Wyoming, from location and entry under the United States mining laws (30 U.S.C. ch....

  16. Wyoming Community College System Fall 2006 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report includes Fall 2006 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a 10-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For the Fall 2005 edition of this report, see ED502745.

  17. Wyoming Community College System Summer 2005 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report includes Summer 2005 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 11 tables.) [For Spring 2005 enrollment report, see ED502747.

  18. Wyoming Community College System Summer 2007 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report includes Summer 2007 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For the Spring 2007 enrollment report, see ED502750.

  19. Wyoming Community College System Spring 2007 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report includes Spring 2007 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For the Fall 2006 enrollment report, see ED502749.

  20. Wyoming Community College System Fall 2005 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report includes Fall 2005 semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a ten-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For Summer 2005 enrollment report, see ED502746.

  1. Wyoming Community College System Spring 2005 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report includes Spring semester enrollment information for Wyoming's seven comprehensive community colleges. Selected data includes student counts by credit hours, county, full-time students (FTE), program or study, ethnicity and a 10-year history. (Contains 12 tables.) [For the Spring 2004 edition of this report, see ED483292.

  2. Wyoming big sagebrush associations of eastern Oregon; vegetation attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides a synopsis of several vegetative characteristics for the Wyoming big sagebrush complex in eastern Oregon covering the High Desert , Snake River, and Owyhee Ecological Provinces in Harney, Lake, and Malheur Counties. The complex has been grouped into six associations defined by t...

  3. The Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae)of Wyoming, USA, Revisited.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This survey of the earthworms from 22 of the 23 counties of Wyoming recorded 13 species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, all members of the family Lumbricidae. One of these species, Aporrectodea limicola, is reported for the first time from the state. Current nomenclature is applied to historical records...

  4. The bats of Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogan, Michael A.; Cryan, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

    We examined 1280 bats of 12 species submitted to the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory (WSVL) for ra­bies testing between 1981 and 1992. The most abundant species in the sample was Myotis lucifugus, followed by Epte­sicus fuscus, Lasionycteris noetivagans, M. ciliolabrum, and M. volans. Using the WSVL sample and additional museum specimens, we summarized available records and knowledge for 17 species of bats in Wyoming, Records of the WSVL show that, between 1981 and 1992, 113 bats actually tested positive for rabies. We examined 45 of those rabies­ positive bats; E. fuscus had the highest incidence (60%) in the sample, followed by L. noctivagans (11 %) and L. cinereus (9%).

  5. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  6. Pitchfork Ranch, Wyoming

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Over 30 organizations and agencies are testing a USGS-developed oral sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) at sites such as the Pitchfork Ranch in Wyoming, pictured here. If successful, the SPV could help protect endangered black-footed ferret populations in the western U.S. be...

  7. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  8. Minerals outlook for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Wyoming drilling activity was down. The rig count was at a seven year low in February. Crude oil prices also affect Wyoming's gas production. Fuel oil prices are already low enough to compete with higher priced gas, and may edge out part of the market for natural gas. This year's coal production is still forecast at 112 million tons - a 3.7 percent increase over the 108 million tons produced in 1982. Average coal prices are currently forecast at $13.20 in 1982 and $13.86 in 1983. In 1983, demand for soda ash (trona), iron ore, limestone, and gypsum should reflect any improvements in the national economy. Bentonite is dependent enough on oil and gas drilling activity that significant improvements will probably mirror the status of the petroleum industry. Aggregate (sand, gravel, ballast, clinker, etc.) production will primarily depend on the levels of highway construction and railroad maintenance. Uranium production will remain at low levels, and may even decline with the closure of the Sweetwater mine. There will be some exploration for metals and diamonds in Wyoming this year, however, unless gold and silver prices improve, exploration will fall short of earlier expectations. (DP)

  9. Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  10. 77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Kiewit Mining Properties, Inc., on a pro rata cost- sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Campbell County,......

  11. 76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ...Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land...SUMMARY: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered...The following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been...

  12. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B: oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled Part B of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). Part B consists of oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar energy resource information in support of the WLCI. The WLCI represents the USGS partnership with other Department of the Interior Bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners, all of whom collaborate to maintain healthy landscapes, sustain wildlife, and preserve recreational and grazing uses while developing energy resources in southwestern Wyoming. This product is the second and final part of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming series (also see USGS Data Series 683, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/683/), and encompasses all of Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties, as well as areas in Fremont County that are in the Great Divide and Green River Basins.

  13. Baseline channel morphology and bank erosion inventory of South Fork Campbell Creek at Campbell Tract, Anchorage, Alaska, 1999 and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2001-01-01

    South Fork Campbell Creek drains largely undeveloped land in Anchorage, Alaska, but supports heavy use near the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Campbell Tract facility for recreation and environmental education. To help assess the impacts of human activities in the basin on biological communities, particularly aquatic and terrestrial biota, morphological changes to the channel bed and banks were monitored for 2 years. Erosion conditions and rates of change were measured and 11 transects were surveyed in three reaches of Campbell Creek near the BLM Campbell Creek Science Center in 1999. Repeat measurements at these 33 transects in 2000 documented noticeable differences between horizontal or vertical channel position at eight transects. Repeat measurements of 51 erosion pins at the survey transects provided details of bank erosion between the 2 years. Annual erosion rates at the erosion pins ranged from 0.81 foot per year of erosion to 0.16 foot per year of deposition.

  14. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  15. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  16. Agricultural land-use classification using landsat imagery data, and estimates of irrigation water use in Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka counties, 1992 water year, Upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the upper Snake River Basin study unit, land- and water-use data were used to describe activities that have potential effects on water quality, including biological conditions, in the basin. Land-use maps and estimates of water use by irrigated agriculture were needed for Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka Counties (south-central Idaho), four of the most intensively irrigated counties in the study unit. Land use in the four counties was mapped from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data for the 1992 water year using the SPECTRUM computer program. Land-use data were field verified in 108 randomly selected sections (640 acres each); results compared favorably with land-use maps from other sources. Water used for irrigation during the 1992 water year was estimated using land-use and ancillary data. In 1992, a drought year, estimated irrigation withdrawals in the four counties were about 2.9 million acre-feet of water. Of the 2.9 million acre-feet, an estimated 2.12 million acre-feet of water was withdrawn from surface water, mainly the Snake River, and nearly 776,000 acre-feet was withdrawn from ground water. One-half of the 2.9 million acre-feet of water withdrawn for irrigation was considered to be lost during conveyance or was returned to the Snake River; the remainder was consumptively used by crops during the growing season.

  17. 76 FR 36040 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Wyoming program in the November 26, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 950 Wyoming Regulatory Program AGENCY... proposed amendment to the Wyoming regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Wyoming program'') under...

  18. 78 FR 13004 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... approval of the Wyoming program in the November 26, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 950 Wyoming Regulatory Program AGENCY... proposed amendment to the Wyoming regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Wyoming program'') under...

  19. 76 FR 80310 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Wyoming program in the November 26, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 950 Wyoming Regulatory Program AGENCY... proposed amendment to the Wyoming regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Wyoming program'') under...

  20. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2010-01-01

    This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These specific data are being used for assessing the effect of disturbance resulting from wind energy development within Wyoming on sage-grouse populations.

  1. Campbell, William Wallace (1862-1938)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Hancock County, OH. Trained as an engineer, became director of Lick Observatory, measured stellar radial velocities with the Mills photographic spectrograph (which he designed) and published them (with Joseph Moore) in a catalog (1928). From studies of the Martian atmosphere, he deduced that it could not support life. Founded the Lick southern station in Chile, discovered nume...

  2. Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

  3. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - 05 Marci Campbell.ppt

    Cancer.gov

    Marci Marci Kramish Kramish Campbell, PhD, RD, Principal Investigator Campbell, PhD, RD, Principal Investigator Robert Robert Sandler Sandler , MD, MPH, Co , MD, MPH, Co - - Principal Investigator Principal Investigator Brenda Brenda DeVellis DeVellis , PhD, Co , PhD, Co - - Investigator Investigator Andrea Biddle, PhD , Co Andrea Biddle, PhD , Co - - Investigator Investigator Boyd Switzer PhD , Co Boyd Switzer PhD , Co - - Investigator Investigator David Farrell, MPH, President, People Designs, Inc.

  5. 75 FR 17125 - Foreign-Trade Zone 157-Casper, Wyoming, Application for Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 157--Casper, Wyoming, Application for Expansion An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Casper/Natrona County...

  6. 77 FR 49019 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW175075, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Nova Leasing, LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW175075 for land in Converse County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on...

  7. 75 FR 5074 - Wyoming Interstate Company, Ltd.; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Diamond Mountain Compressor Station Project January 25, 2010. The... assessment (EA) for the Diamond Mountain Compressor Station Project proposed by Wyoming Interstate Company... maintain the Diamond Mountain Compressor Station in Uintah County, Utah. The EA assesses the...

  8. 77 FR 49018 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173254, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173254, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW173254 for land in Park County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  9. 77 FR 48528 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173253, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173253, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW173253 for land in Park County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  10. 77 FR 17500 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163161, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163161, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Patricia J. Smith for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163161 for land in Niobrara County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  11. 75 FR 56136 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW149954, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW149954, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Minerals Company for competitive oil and gas lease WYW149954 for land in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  12. 75 FR 69124 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW 160109 Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW 160109 Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from Craig Settle for competitive oil and gas lease WYW160109 for land in Fremont County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  13. 75 FR 23295 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...Resources, Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164359 for land in Goshen County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  14. 77 FR 55226 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164771, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164771, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Source Energy, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164771 for land in Park County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  15. 77 FR 49017 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173223, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173223, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW173223 for land in Washakie County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  16. 76 FR 61380 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163275, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163275, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163275 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  17. 77 FR 49019 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164511, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164511, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164511 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  18. 76 FR 18244 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164400, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164400, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Exploration, Ltd. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164400 for land in Natrona County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  19. 77 FR 49019 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164508, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164508, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164508 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  20. 77 FR 49018 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164514, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164514, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164514 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  1. 77 FR 43611 - Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW154148, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW154148, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Winston, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW154148 for land in Carbon County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  2. 77 FR 20413 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164675, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164675, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Energy Corporation for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164675 for land in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  3. 78 FR 759 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145615, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145615, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Properties, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW145615 for land in Johnson County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  4. 75 FR 57496 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...Resources, Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW174006 for land in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  5. 78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164452, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164452, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Hunt Oil Company for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164452 for land in Natrona County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  6. 77 FR 49020 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164747, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164747, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164747 for land in Washakie County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  7. 75 FR 28649 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...Fossil Energy, Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW175940 for land in Natrona County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  8. 75 FR 62140 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159733, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159733, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Cal Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159733 for land in Sublette County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  9. 75 FR 22840 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...SUMMARY: Pursuant to Federal law, the Bureau of Land Management...for non-competitive oil and gas lease WYW136450 in Natrona County...the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  10. 77 FR 55226 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW179119, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW179119, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Exploration, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW179119 for land in Niobraba County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  11. 77 FR 49018 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164510, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164510, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164510 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  12. 77 FR 49017 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173224, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173224, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW173224 for land in Washakie County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  13. 77 FR 48528 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164513, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164513, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164513 for land in Big Horn County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  14. 77 FR 49020 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173225, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW173225, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...from WYNR, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW173225 for land in Washakie County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  15. 76 FR 62830 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW174755, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW174755, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Springs Resources LTD for renewal of oil and gas lease WYW174755 for land in Natrona County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  16. 78 FR 2428 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164926, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164926, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...Partners, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164926 for lands in Converse County...the date the lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  17. 75 FR 80839 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW 163285, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Energy West Corporation for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163285 for land in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on-time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  18. 77 FR 43611 - Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW154148, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW154148, Wyoming... from Marshall & Winston, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW154148 for land in Carbon County... lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Julie...

  19. 78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164452, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Hunt Oil Company for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164452 for land in Natrona County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  20. 77 FR 43611 - Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW156551, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW156551, Wyoming... from EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) for competitive oil and gas lease WYW156551 for land in Natrona County... lease terminated under the law. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Julie...

  1. 78 FR 759 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW161782, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Carpenter & Sons, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW161782 for land in Carbon County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  2. 75 FR 6332 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ..., Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions concerning Wyoming's program and program... resources, prime farmland, siltation structures and impoundments, and operator information. Wyoming intends... regarding cultural and historic resources, prime farmland, siltation structures and impoundments,...

  3. Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

    2011-06-01

    Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

  4. Algebras with operator and Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudaverdian, O. M.

    1995-09-01

    We introduce some new classes of algebras and establish within these algebras Campbell-Hausdorff-like formulae. We describe the application of these constructions to the problem of the connectivity of the Feynman graphs corresponding to Green functions in quantum fields theory.

  5. Algebras with operator and Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    E-print Network

    Khudaverdian, O M

    1994-01-01

    We introduce some new classes of algebras and estabilish in these algebras Campbell--Hausdorff like formula. We describe the application of these constructions to the problem of the connectivity of the Feynman graphs corresponding to the Green functions in Quantum Fields Theory.

  6. Algebras with Operator and Campbell--Hausdorff Formula

    E-print Network

    O. M. Khudaverdian

    1994-08-12

    We introduce some new classes of algebras and estabilish in these algebras Campbell--Hausdorff like formula. We describe the application of these constructions to the problem of the connectivity of the Feynman graphs corresponding to the Green functions in Quantum Fields Theory.

  7. Avoidable Ignorance and the Role of Cochrane and Campbell Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The Campbell and Cochrane Collaborations were created to reveal the evidentiary status of claims focusing especially on the effectiveness of specific interventions. Such reviews are constrained by the population of studies available and biases that may influence this availability such as preferred framing of problems. This highlights the…

  8. Shirley Campbell's Ideology of Historiographic Legitimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, Paulette A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a number of poems in which Shirley Campbell challenges the myth of historical objectivity by suggesting that the history of African diasporic peoples and societies has been obliterated in Europe's agenda to relegate them to positions of subservience and deny even their very existence. The poetic voice declares that…

  9. Bioinformatics is Like A Band-aid A. Malcolm Campbell

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Bioinformatics is Like A Band-aid A. Malcolm Campbell University of Georgia January 11, 2013 1 pull 4Thursday, January 24, 2013 #12;1. My Definition of Bioinformatics 2. Jump Right In (rip it off) 3, January 24, 2013 #12;Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics mostly juniors and seniors majority biology

  10. Interfacing the Internet of a Trillion Things Bradford Campbell

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabal

    Interfacing the Internet of a Trillion Things Bradford Campbell , Pat Pannuto , and Prabal Dutta for the Internet of Things. We borrow both the name, accessor, and several key design concepts from a recent are standardized, higher-level exploration pros- pers. This standardization process for the Internet of Things

  11. of Learning and Development Mark H. Bickhard Robert L. Campbell

    E-print Network

    Bickhard, Mark H.

    Artificial Intelligence researchers encounter the constraints that yield the necessity for such topologiesTopologies of Learning and Development Mark H. Bickhard Robert L. Campbell Mark H. Bickhard Foundation for support to Mark Bickhard during the preparation of this paper. #12;Topologies of Learning

  12. BBS -Neuroscience 800 W. Campbell Rd, GR 41

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    BBS - Neuroscience 800 W. Campbell Rd, GR 41 Richardson, TX 75080 neuroscience@utdallas.edu Neuroscience Student Travel Award Application Form Name (presenter): Cognitive ScienceNeuroscience undergraduate neuroscience or cognitive science student, presenting work from a BBS Neuroscience faculty member

  13. Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Sue Ann

    Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell Department of Applied can move in one dimension. We study the effect of friction on the design and performance of a feedback that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor performance - small amplitude oscillations

  14. The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

  15. Geology and Mineral Resources of the North Absaroka Wilderness and Vicinity, Park County, Wyoming, with Sections on Mineralization of the Sunlight Mining Region and Geology and Mineralization of the Cooke City Mining District, and a Section on Aeromagnetic Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Willis H.; Prostka, Harold J.; Williams, Frank E.; Elliott, James E.; Peterson, Donald L.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY The North Absaroka Wilderness is approximately 560 square miles (1,450 km 2 ) of rugged scenic mountainous terrain that adjoins the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National Park in northwestern Wyoming. The area was studied during 1970, 1971, and 1972 by personnel of the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Bureau of Mines to evaluate its mineral-resource potential as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964. This evaluation is based on a search of the literature courthouse and production records, geologic field mapping, field inspection of claims and prospects, analyses of bedrock and stream-sediment samples, and an aeromagnetic survey. The North Absaroka Wilderness is underlain almost entirely by andesitic and basaltic volcanic rocks of Eocene age. These volcanics rest on deformed sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic and, locally, of Mesozoic age that are exposed at places along the northern and eastern edges of the wilderness. Dikes and other igneous intrusive bodies cut both the volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A nearly flat detachment fault, the Heart Mountain fault, and a related steep break-away fault have displaced middle and upper Paleozoic rocks and some of the older part of the volcanic sequence to the southeast. A much greater thickness of volcanic rocks was found to be involved in Heart Mountain faulting than had previously been recognized; however, most of the volcanic rocks and many of the intrusives were emplaced after Heart Mountain faulting. Local folding and high-angle faulting in mid-Eocene time have deformed all but the youngest part of the volcanic sequence in the southeastern part of the wilderness. This deformation is interpreted as the last pulse of Laramide orogeny. The results of this study indicate that the mineral-resource potential of the wilderness is minimal. Bentonite, petroleum, low-quality coal, and localized deposits of uranium and chromite have been produced in the surrounding region from rocks that underlie the volcanic rocks; but such deposits, if present in the wilderness, would be too deeply buried, too small, or too sporadically distributed to be profitably located and exploited. Copper and gold mines and prospects are present on the fringes of the wilderness, but otherwise the area seems to be devoid of economically valuable concentrations of metallic minerals. No surface evidence of geothermal-energy potential was found. Known mineral deposits in the vicinity of the North Absaroka Wilderness are associated with intrusive rocks. From the Cooke City mining district, just north of the wilderness, replacement deposits in Upper Cambrian carbonate rocks may extend a short distance into the north edge of the wilderness, In the Sunlight mining region, an enclave nearly surrounded by the wilderness, mineralization occurs in veins and is disseminated in volcanic and plutonic rocks. Richer concentrations of metallic minerals may occur in carbonate rocks adjacent to intrusive bodies at depth beneath the volcanic rocks in the Sunlight region. A few small intrusive bodies occur in the wilderness, but no significant associated mineralization was detected. Aeromagnetic data indicate that other intrusives not exposed by erosion may occur in the wilderness; however, no significant metamorphism or alteration is evident at the surface to indicate their presence. Although most of the rocks of the wilderness are of igneous origin, they are all so old (Eocene) that it is unlikely that they retain any original heat. The Pleistocene rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs in the southwestern part of the wilderness were erupted from sources in Yellowstone National Park just to the west; however, in the wilderness these tuffs are too thin to contain any residual heat.

  16. 76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot...: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered for non... following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been examined and found suitable for...

  17. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Wyoming have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecore...

  18. Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

  19. Original Article Burning and Mowing Wyoming Big

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Original Article Burning and Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush: Do Treated Sites Meet Minimum Guidelines, WY 82071, USA ABSTRACT Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis) treatments are often, USA. We compared minimum guidelines for canopy cover and height of Wyoming big sagebrush and perennial

  20. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wyoming. 81.351 Section 81.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.351 Wyoming. Wyoming—SO2 Designated area Does not...

  1. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wyoming. 81.351 Section 81.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.351 Wyoming. Wyoming—1971 Sulfur Dioxide NAAQS (Primary...

  2. Habitat use and movements of repatriated Wyoming toads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.M.; Anderson, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We studied habitat use and movements of a repatriated population of federally endangered Wyoming toads (Bufo baxteri) after the breeding season at Mortenson Lake, Albany County, Wyoming, USA. We followed 8 adult toads using telemetry (n = 68 relocations) during periods of activity and observed 59 post-metamorphic juvenile toads (n = 59 locations). Adult toads used habitat with a greater mean vegetation canopy cover (mean = 52.6%) than juveniles (mean = 39.20%). We found adults farther from the shoreline (mean = 1.32 m) than juveniles (mean = 1.04 m). Substrates used by toads had a mean surface temperature of 20.31??C for adults and 23.05??C for juveniles. We found most adult and juvenile toads on saturated substrates. All adult toads sampled did not move outside of a 30 x 500 m area along the east-to-south shore where they were captured. Toads were active diurnally through the end of October. We found toads torpid at night. We compared our results to a similar study of the historic population and found that adult toads of the current population used denser vegetation than those of the historic population. Unlike many bufonids, terrestrial stages of the Wyoming toad appear to depend on saturated substrates. The best logistic regression predictors of adult and juvenile toad presence were surface temperature and distance to shore. Survey transects within the moist margin of the lake (???10 m from water) and after substrates have reached temperatures ???20??C will likely yield more detections.

  3. Smoke over Montana and Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    California was not the only western state affected by fire during the last weekend of July. Parts of Montana and Wyoming were covered by a thick pall of smoke on July 30, 2000. This true-color image was captured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). It is much easier to distinguish smoke from cloud in the color SeaWiFS imagery than the black and white Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery. However, GOES provides almost continuous coverage (animation of Sequoia National Forest fire) and has thermal infrared bands (Extensive Fires in the Western U.S.) which detect the heat from fires. On Monday July 31, 2000, eight fires covering 105,000 acres were burning in Montana, and three fires covering 12,000 acres were burning in Wyoming. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  4. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    SciTech Connect

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  5. Commercial, or usable, size Campbell Chinese type windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    An adequately large, home-use size, model of the Campbell Chinese type windmill has been designed, built, debugged and partially tested. Two basic windmills, operating side by side and assembled on one supporting structure, constitute the complete windmill. This complete windmill can be readily tilted down to a horizontal position to provide protection from destructive winds or to make upper parts accessible for maintenance. 5 refs.

  6. Wyoming mineral development monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The monitoring system covers, or will cover, all segments of the mineral industry except oil and gas exploration under one of eight main sections: coal uranium, bentonite, power plants, refineries, gas plants, synthetic fuels, trona, and others. Projects are grouped alphabetically by county and indexed by county, commodity, and company. Index maps all the location of projects within the state. A notebook format allows easy updating of information on ownership, production, numbers of employees, contracts, etc.

  7. 76 FR 32225 - Notice of Public Meeting; Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... Yellowstone, Cheyenne, Wyoming. FOR FURTHER INFORMATON CONTACT: Cindy Wertz, Wyoming Resource Advisory Council Coordinator, Wyoming State Office, 5353 Yellowstone, Cheyenne, Wyoming, 82009, telephone 307-775-6014....

  8. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  9. Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  10. Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  11. MAJOR SOURCES OF NITROGEN INPUT AND LOSS IN THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING, 1990.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total nitrogen input and loss from cattle manure, fertilizer, legume crops, precipitation, and domestic septic systems in the upper Snake River Basin, Idaho and western Wyoming (1704), were estimated by county for water year 1990. The purpose of these estimations was to rank inp...

  12. Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell

    E-print Network

    Richerson, Peter J.

    Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, An Homage to Donald T. Campbell Peter J, Transformation, Evolution, Edited by W. Schelkle, W.-H. Krauth, M. Kohli, and G. Ewarts. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag cultural evolution was Donald T. Campbell's paper "Variation and Selective Retention in Sociocultural

  13. Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Karen M.

    Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl Jung was…

  14. The Campbell Collaboration's Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Online Training Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are techniques for synthesizing primary empirical studies to produce a summary of effects. To facilitate this goal, the Campbell Collaboration (C2) supports reviews within the disciplines of crime and justice, education, international development, and social welfare. At the annual Campbell Colloquium, experts…

  15. The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group: Early Development and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony; Farrington, David P.; Sherman, Lawrence W.

    2003-01-01

    The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group was inaugurated in 2000 to prepare, update, and disseminate systematic reviews on what works to reduce crime or improve justice. After providing a brief description of a systematic review and the origins of the Campbell Collaboration, this paper provides an overview of the first 36 months of the…

  16. Campbell and Rubin: A Primer and Comparison of Their Approaches to Causal Inference in Field Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R.

    2010-01-01

    This article compares Donald Campbell's and Donald Rubin's work on causal inference in field settings on issues of epistemology, theories of cause and effect, methodology, statistics, generalization, and terminology. The two approaches are quite different but compatible, differing mostly in matters of bandwidth versus fidelity. Campbell's work…

  17. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

  18. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Wyoming, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Wyoming for 2010. Wyoming's demographic profile is such that achievement trends could only be determined for white, Latino, male and female, and low-income student subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), the white,…

  19. 75 FR 44951 - Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ...Project, Applications for Leasing Six Tracts of Federal Coal Reserves Adjacent to the Black Thunder, Jacob Ranch, and North Antelope Rochelle Mines, Wyoming Powder River Basin, Campbell County, WY, Wait Period Ends: 08/ 30/2010,...

  20. 76 FR 61380 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163275, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163275 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  1. 76 FR 61381 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163278, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163278 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  2. 76 FR 61382 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163280, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163280 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  3. 76 FR 61381 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163276, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163276 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  4. 76 FR 61380 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163268, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163268 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  5. 78 FR 759 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172987, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Tyler Rockies Exploration, Ltd., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW172987 for lands in Converse and Natrona County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the......

  6. 78 FR 759 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145615, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Meagher O&G Properties, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW145615 for land in Johnson County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  7. 78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172559, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Nautilus Oil & Gas Company, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW172559 for land in Uinta County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  8. 76 FR 61381 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163277, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163277 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  9. 76 FR 61380 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163269, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163269 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

  10. Angler survey contributes to socially acceptable modification of harvest regulations to preserve cutthroat trout fishery in Snake River, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Wayne A.; Gipson, Robert D.

    1996-09-01

    This is a case study that describes a survey of anglers that was used to assist in modifying fishing regulations for indigenous trout in the Snake River, Wyoming. A mail survey of anglers who purchased 1991 Wyoming fishing licenses in the two counties adjacent to the Snake River was conducted during fall 1992. Differences in angler preferences were noted between anglers who purchased licenses in two adjacent counties with different socioeconomic structures, as well as between residents and nonresidents in each county. Anglers who purchased licenses in Teton County, where there is extensive tourism and immigration by relatively wealthy residents, tended to be more specialized and less harvest oriented. Anglers in Lincoln County, which is largely agricultural and has substantially less tourism and immigration of residents, tended to fish in many different ways and indicated more desire to harvest fish. Anglers from the two counties segregated themselves; those from Teton County primarily used the upstream portion of the study reach, and those from Lincoln County primarily used a short downstream portion of the reach. Modification of fishing regulations to reduce harvest of spawning-size cutthroat trout in the Snake River probably was acceptable to most anglers due to spatial segregation and their attitudes toward harvest.

  11. Campbell's monkeys concatenate vocalizations into context-specific call sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Karim; Lemasson, Alban; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Primate vocal behavior is often considered irrelevant in modeling human language evolution, mainly because of the caller's limited vocal control and apparent lack of intentional signaling. Here, we present the results of a long-term study on Campbell's monkeys, which has revealed an unrivaled degree of vocal complexity. Adult males produced six different loud call types, which they combined into various sequences in highly context-specific ways. We found stereotyped sequences that were strongly associated with cohesion and travel, falling trees, neighboring groups, nonpredatory animals, unspecific predatory threat, and specific predator classes. Within the responses to predators, we found that crowned eagles triggered four and leopards three different sequences, depending on how the caller learned about their presence. Callers followed a number of principles when concatenating sequences, such as nonrandom transition probabilities of call types, addition of specific calls into an existing sequence to form a different one, or recombination of two sequences to form a third one. We conclude that these primates have overcome some of the constraints of limited vocal control by combinatorial organization. As the different sequences were so tightly linked to specific external events, the Campbell's monkey call system may be the most complex example of ‘proto-syntax’ in animal communication known to date. PMID:20007377

  12. Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, Anthony C; Munk, Jeffrey D; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R; Khowailed, Gannate A

    2013-01-01

    The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

  13. 77 FR 34894 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Fleischman, Director, Casper Field Office, Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Dick Cheney Federal Building, POB 11018, 150 East B Street, Casper, Wyoming 82601-1018; Telephone: 307-261-6550,...

  14. 78 FR 10512 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part...Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior...Wyoming program'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of...

  15. 78 FR 43061 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...regulations under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act...B)(I), which is revised text from Chapter IV, section 2...B)(I), which is revised text from Chapter IV, section 2...surface and underground coal mining operations. Wyoming...

  16. Wyoming Snowmelt 2013 - Duration: 14 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Images from NASA/USGS Landsat satellites show the snow cover in Wyoming's Fremont Lake Basin throughout 2013. NASA scientists have used Landsat data from 1972-2013 to determine that the snow is mel...

  17. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the flow of traffic for the Lake operations that are depicted on the appropriate aeronautical...

  18. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the flow of traffic for the Lake operations that are depicted on the appropriate aeronautical...

  19. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the flow of traffic for the Lake operations that are depicted on the appropriate aeronautical...

  20. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the flow of traffic for the Lake operations that are depicted on the appropriate aeronautical...

  1. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the flow of traffic for the Lake operations that are depicted on the appropriate aeronautical...

  2. 40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...County Butte CountyCampbell County Charles Mix CountyClark County Clay County...County Butte CountyCampbell County Charles Mix CountyClark County Clay County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment.Charles Mix County...

  3. 40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...County Butte County Campbell County Charles Mix County Clark County Clay County...County Butte County Campbell County Charles Mix County Clark County Clay County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Charles Mix County...

  4. 40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...County Butte County Campbell County Charles Mix County Clark County Clay County...County Butte County Campbell County Charles Mix County Clark County Clay County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Charles Mix County...

  5. Surveillance for Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Wyoming, USA.

    PubMed

    Pipas, Michael J; Page, L Kristen; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2014-10-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a common roundworm of raccoons that causes severe clinical disease in many vertebrates, including humans. The distribution of B. procyonis in the US is poorly documented in portions of its range and has not been reported from Wyoming. Our objectives were to determine the statewide distribution and prevalence of this parasite in raccoons in Wyoming, using intestinal and fecal examinations. We examined 363 raccoons from 23 Wyoming counties in 2009-11, testing the reliability of two methods (intestinal extrusion and incision) to determine worm burdens. We found 163 raccoons (45%) positive for B. procyonis. The two methods of examination did not differ, although extrusion missed some infections. Neither age nor sex affected apparent prevalence or worm burdens. Prevalence did not differ with land use, yet burden was highest among rural raccoons. Fecal examination revealed that juvenile raccoons had a higher proportion of patent infections than adults, but neither sex nor location were indicators of prevalence. Egg density (eggs per gram of feces) did not differ by sex or age; however, rural raccoons had higher egg densities than urban/suburban animals. Understanding the distribution and prevalence of B. procyonis in Wyoming, especially in and around highly populated areas, is an important step in educating the general public and medical community on the potential risks of raccoon roundworm infection. PMID:25014908

  6. 76 FR 78939 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... process through a notice of intent in the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (73 FR 72826). We released... Federal Register (76 FR 38414; June 30, 2011). We announce our CCP decision and the availability of a... from June 30, 2011, to August 1, 2011 (76 FR 38414; June 30, 2011). We received comment letters,...

  7. Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Appraiser under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study.

  8. Process-scale modeling of elevated wintertime ozone in Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Holdridge, D. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-31

    Measurements of meteorological variables and trace gas concentrations, provided by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality for Daniel, Jonah, and Boulder Counties in the state of Wyoming, were analyzed for this project. The data indicate that highest ozone concentrations were observed at temperatures of -10 C to 0 C, at low wind speeds of about 5 mph. The median values for nitrogen oxides (NOx) during these episodes ranged between 10 ppbv and 20 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during these periods were insufficient for quantitative analysis. The few available VOCs measurements indicated unusually high levels of alkanes and aromatics and low levels of alkenes. In addition, the column ozone concentration during one of the high-ozone episodes was low, on the order of 250 DU (Dobson unit) as compared to a normal column ozone concentration of approximately 300-325 DU during spring for this region. Analysis of this observation was outside the scope of this project. The data analysis reported here was used to establish criteria for making a large number of sensitivity calculations through use of a box photochemical model. Two different VOCs lumping schemes, RACM and SAPRC-98, were used for the calculations. Calculations based on this data analysis indicated that the ozone mixing ratios are sensitive to (a) surface albedo, (b) column ozone, (c) NOx mixing ratios, and (d) available terminal olefins. The RACM model showed a large response to an increase in lumped species containing propane that was not reproduced by the SAPRC scheme, which models propane as a nearly independent species. The rest of the VOCs produced similar changes in ozone in both schemes. In general, if one assumes that measured VOCs are fairly representative of the conditions at these locations, sufficient precursors might be available to produce ozone in the range of 60-80 ppbv under the conditions modeled.

  9. Carson-Washoe County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Carson-Washoe County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  10. 77 FR 11566 - Public Meeting; Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... Management (BLM) Wyoming Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The meetings... be at the Hilton Garden Inn and University of Wyoming Conference Center, 2229 Grand Avenue,...

  11. Sir Francis Joseph Campbell and His Family: The First Family in Professional Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the pivotal roles of Sir Francis Campbell (1832-1914) and members of his family, especially his son Charles Campbell, in the evolution of the blindness field to a professional and reason-based service.

  12. 76 FR 34815 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ..., Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions concerning Wyoming's program and program... Register (75 FR 6332). In the same document, we opened the public comment period and provided an... Rules and Regulations and was approved by OSMRE in a November 24, 1986, Federal Register notice (51...

  13. Wyoming: The State and Its Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold L.

    Wyoming is a state of great natural beauty with only five people per square mile and a unique way of life that deserves to be preserved. The economy, though, is almost totally dependent on energy extraction, an area that has not done well of late. The state's small population makes "boutique" products and services not very profitable, and efforts…

  14. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-print Network

    SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development · Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA ·Location ·Project Scope·Project Scope ·Mining Milli·Milling 4 #12;Sheep Mountain Project Location 5 #12

  15. 78 FR 16204 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... the November 26, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions concerning... existing rights (VER) and a Federal Register notice (78 FR 10512) that disapproved several proposed VER... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 950 Wyoming Regulatory Program...

  16. 77 FR 34894 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... 76 FR 80310, is withdrawn June 12, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Fleischman..., Federal Register (45 FR 78637). You can also find later actions concerning Wyoming's program and program... receipt of the proposed amendment in the December 23, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 80310). In the...

  17. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  18. Ranch in the Green River Valley, Wyoming

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A section of the Upper Green River Valley in western Wyoming, just south of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, showing different ecosystems (such as forests, wetlands, and aquatic habitats) whose capacities for carbon storage and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be assessed by the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.436 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wyoming. 81.436 Section 81.436 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.436...

  20. The Emergence of Civil Rights in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Cheyenne.

    Local, state, and federal government representatives and private citizens participated in a two-day consultation on civil rights in Wyoming. Panel discussions focused on the difficulties of civil rights enforcement in the areas of housing and economic opportunity, medical care, education, the handicapped, employment discrimination, and women's…

  1. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program In the west, water is critical to survival. Data and information concerning this resource are very valuable by the Water Research Program. Basic Project Information Category Data Title Water Resources Data System Water

  2. Paleotectonics of Frontier Formation in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, W.H. III

    1983-08-01

    The most intense and widespread pre-Laramide structural deformation of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in Wyoming is associated with the Wall Creek sandstone of the Frontier Formation. Most of the evidence of structural deformation is found immediately below the regional unconformity at the base of this sandstone. Regionally, an isopach map from the top of the Frontier Formation to the top of the Mowry Formation shows strong and persistent thinning onto a north-trending arch in western Wyoming and thickening into a northwest trending basin in eastern Wyoming. Part of the thinning onto the western arch is caused by progressively deeper erosion of a regional unconformity at the base of the Wall Creek sandstone, and regional onlap of the Wall Creek sandstone above the unconformity. There is also some westward thinning of the lower Frontier interval, however, which is not related to the Wall Creek unconformity. Of the more specific paleostructures discussed, the north-trending anticlines in the vicinity of the Moxa arch in southwestern Wyoming are particularly well developed. An east-west anticline in the Bison basin area appears to have been faulted on the south flank, and a broad arch on the west side of the Powder River basin may have influenced paleocurrents and sandstone depositional trends of the productive First Frontier Sandstone of that area.

  3. 76 FR 45643 - Wyoming Disaster #WY-00017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...Assistance Only for the State of Wyoming (FEMA- 4007-DR), dated 07/22/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Landslides. Incident Period: 05/18/2011 through 07/08/2011. Effective Date: 07/22/2011. Physical Loan Application...

  4. 75 FR 6332 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...Field Office, Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations on...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in...Wyoming's own initiative. The full text of the program amendment...

  5. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Wyoming edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  6. Extensional and magmatic nature of the Campbell Plateau and Great South Basin from deep crustal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobys, J. W. G.; Gohl, K.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Davy, B.; Barker, D.

    2009-07-01

    The Campbell Plateau is one of the largest submarine parts of the microcontinent of New Zealand. Although the opening of the Great South Basin played an important role in the late Gondwana break-up, the crustal structure of the basins and plateaus southeast of New Zealand are unknown to a large extent. Here we present results from a combined gravity, magnetic, multichannel seismic and seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction transect across the Great South Basin and parts of the Campbell Plateau and interpret this on the basis of velocity distribution and crustal thickness. The lower crust exhibits a zone of southeastward increasing P-wave velocities ( vp ? 7.1-7.4 km/s) beneath the central Campbell Plateau. In this area, crustal thickness averages to ˜ 27 km. We interpret this high-velocity zone as underplating beneath a previously extended crust. Our results hint that the extension of the Great South Basin was not accompanied by widespread magmatic activity, although signs of younger magmatism have been found across the Pukaki Rise and within the Great South Basin. Based on comparisons with nearby plateaus like the Lord Howe Rise and the Challenger Plateau, as well as probable paleo-positions of the magnetic anomaly systems of New Zealand and the Campbell Plateau, we suggest that an early phase of extension of the Campbell Plateau predated the opening of the Great South Basin.

  7. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2014 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Chapters 8 -11

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2014 1 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 ­ Chapters 8 of the Honor Code by others. How long did this exam take you to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 site to analyze the data I recorded on my cell phone: http

  8. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #3 BioEnergetics ANSWER KEY

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2003 1 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #3 ­ BioEnergetics ANSWER long did this exam take you to complete (excluding typing)? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall-type Drug 1 Drug 2 Drug 3 Lab Question: 10 pts. 1) Interpret these data for the four cell populations

  9. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 Classical Genetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 ­ Classical;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Spring 2008 2 Lab Question: 3 pts. 1) List the steps a PCR machine) Draw a picture of metaphase I. Your diagram must be for a diploid cell with chromosomes numbered 1, 2

  10. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 ­ Bio;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2007 2 Lab Question: 6 pts. 1) Interpret these data for the 3 cell populations shown in the graph. This was a normal flagella regeneration experiment except one

  11. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 ­ Bio;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 2 Lab Question: 6 pts. 1) control A B Length of Flagella in the graph above. The two cell populations were deflagellated at exactly the same time but given two

  12. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2010 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 Evolution & Cells

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2010 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 ­ Evolution & Cells There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able this exam take you to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2010 2 Lab Questions: You must show

  13. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2013 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Evolution

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2013 1 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 ­ Evolution by others. How long did this exam take you to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2013 2 Lab evolution experiment, cell growth was inhibited by the antibiotic. How do cell populations become resistant

  14. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take-Home Exam #4 Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Spring 2007 1 Biology 111 Take-Home Exam #4 ­ Cancer, HIV to complete (excluding typing)? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Spring 2007 2 Lab Questions: 7 pts. 1 staining of wild-type molecules affected in the patient; only one cell is pictured here. 6 pts. 5) Once

  15. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2003 1 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #3 ­ Bio;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2003 2 Flagella Regeneration -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 these data for the four cell populations as shown in the graph. This was a normal flagella regeneration

  16. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 Classical Genetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #2 ­ Classical;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Spring 2008 2 Lab Question: 3 pts. 1) List the steps a PCR machine for each amino acid): 10 pts. 3) Draw a picture of metaphase I. Your diagram must be for a diploid cell

  17. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2011 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #1 Information

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2011 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #1 ­ Information to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2011 2 Lab Questions: 6 pts. 1) List the four major and transform into E. coli D. measure cell density and fluorescence (fluor/density) and graph 4 pts. 2) Describe

  18. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2010 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 Evolution & Cells

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2010 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #2 ­ Evolution & Cells There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able of the Honor Code by others. How long did this exam take you to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2

  19. Fort Campbell, KY A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is

    E-print Network

    Forester Fort Campbell, KY POSITION A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION;The successful candidate must be able to walk over uneven terrain in inclement weather. The position

  20. Defining American Heroes: Analyzing the Metamorphosis of the War Hero in Twentieth Century War Films Using Joseph Campbell's, "Hero's Journey."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Luci A.

    In "The Hero's Journey" Joseph Campbell identifies the patterns that inform the myths of the "hero" throughout recorded history. By using Campbell's template, this paper examines how the American war hero is portrayed and has been portrayed in film. The paper states that Americans not only define their war heroes in films but also use these film…

  1. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  2. Evaluation of the Campbell test and the influence of age, sex, breed, and coat color on puppy behavioral responses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; López-Rodríguez, Rocío

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Campbell test and discover if there is a link between a puppy’s scores and factors such as age, breed, sex, sex-breed interaction, size, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) groups, and coat color. The Campbell test was performed on 342 puppies (191 males and 151 females) of different breeds. The results show that the criteria used by Campbell to classify puppies are incomplete, and that it is more appropriate to use numerical values for each type of answer. In general, the mean value obtained, regardless of sex and breed, corresponded to the Campbell’s submissive stable category. The mean value was higher in male dogs than in females. PMID:18505191

  3. Didymoceras puebloense, a new species of heteromorph ammonite from the Upper Campanian of Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.; Scott, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Didymoceras puebloense nov. sp. is described from the upper Campanian zones of Didymoceras nebrascense and Didymoceras stevensoni in Pueblo and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, and Weston County, Wyoming in the United States Western Interior. The species is characterized by a middle helical growth stage in which the successive whorls are widely separated followed by a terminal pendant U-shaped sector of the adult body chamber. Ornament is of distant, narrow bituberculate ribs usually separated by a nontuberculate rib. Widely separated poorly-defined constrictions with associated collar ribs are occasionally present. The style of coiling in middle and later growth resembles that of those growth stages in upper Campanian Didymoceras, whereas the ornament recalls that of middle Campanian representatives of the genus in the Western Interior.

  4. 40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Date 1 Type Classification Date 1 Type Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Albany County Big Horn... Designated area Designation Date 1 Type Classification Date 1 Type Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Albany... Designation Date Type Classification Date Type Sheridan County: City of Sheridan 11/15/90 Nonattainment...

  5. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2014-01-01

    These data represent locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 2012. We assigned each wind turbine to a wind farm and, in these data, provide information about each turbine’s potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, the status of the land ownership where the turbine exists, the county each turbine is located in, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with each wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some of the attributes are estimates based on the information we found via the American Wind Energy Association and other on-line reports. The locations are derived from National Agriculture Imagery Program (2009 and 2012) true color aerial photographs and have a positional accuracy of approximately +/-5 meters. These data will provide a planning tool for wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Fort Collins Science Center and other government and non-government organizations. Specifically, we will use these data to support quantifying disturbances of the landscape as related to wind energy as well as to quantify indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set represents an update to a previous version by O’Donnell and Fancher (2010).

  6. Effects of herbicide usage on water quality of selected streams in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.

    1980-01-01

    During 1977 and 1978 the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, in conjunction with county weed and pest control districts, conducted a noxious-weed-control program in Wyoming. The herbicides primarily used were picloram, 2,4-D, and dicamba. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, sampled and analyzed water from selected streams for these herbicides plus silvex; 2,4,5-T; and 2,4-DP. This report contains data for samples collected during 1977 and 1978. The most commonly detected herbicides in water samples were 2,4-D with 41% nonzero values and picloram with 34.5% nonzero values. Herbicide occurrence in bottom-material samples was uncommon; dicamba was found with 9% nonzero values. The maximum herbicide concentration in water was 1.1 micrograms per liter of 2,4-D, and the maximum herbicide concentration in bottom material was 8.0 micrograms per kilogram of 2,4-D. Based on available toxicity data and water-quality criteria, these herbicide concentrations do not constitute dangerous or harmful concentrations to humans or to the environment. (USGS)

  7. 40 CFR 81.436 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manager Bridger Wild 392,160 88-577 USDA-FS Fitzpatrick Wild 191,103 94-567 USDA-FS Grand Teton NP 305,504... Wild 686,584 92-476 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 1 2,020,625 (2) USDI-NPS 1 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737 acres overall, of which 2,020,625 acres are in Wyoming, 167,624 acres are in Montana, and...

  8. 40 CFR 81.436 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... manager Bridger Wild 392,160 88-577 USDA-FS Fitzpatrick Wild 191,103 94-567 USDA-FS Grand Teton NP 305,504... Wild 686,584 92-476 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 1 2,020,625 (2) USDI-NPS 1 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737 acres overall, of which 2,020,625 acres are in Wyoming, 167,624 acres are in Montana, and...

  9. 40 CFR 81.436 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... manager Bridger Wild 392,160 88-577 USDA-FS Fitzpatrick Wild 191,103 94-567 USDA-FS Grand Teton NP 305,504... Wild 686,584 92-476 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 1 2,020,625 (2) USDI-NPS 1 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737 acres overall, of which 2,020,625 acres are in Wyoming, 167,624 acres are in Montana, and...

  10. 40 CFR 81.436 - Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manager Bridger Wild 392,160 88-577 USDA-FS Fitzpatrick Wild 191,103 94-567 USDA-FS Grand Teton NP 305,504... Wild 686,584 92-476 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 1 2,020,625 (2) USDI-NPS 1 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737 acres overall, of which 2,020,625 acres are in Wyoming, 167,624 acres are in Montana, and...

  11. Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

  12. Upper Almond and Lewis reservoir geometries, southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, M.L.

    1996-06-01

    Upper Almond marine sandstones are major petroleum reservoirs in southwestern Wyoming. These sandstones were deposited as part of a transgressive systems tract which capped fluvial and coastal plain sediments of the upper Ericson and lower Almond formations. Marine sandstone reservoirs were deposited in shoreface and tidal channel environments. Shoreface environments in the Echo Springs-Standard Draw trend are extensive and constitute major gas reserves in Carbon County. Shoreface and tidal channel deposits are major oil and gas reservoirs at Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County. Major gas resources in upper Almond marine sandstones are yet to be exploited in the deeper portions of the Great Divide, Washakie, and Sand Wash basins. Tapping this basin centered gas resource will require careful reservoir modeling and fracture treatments that significantly increase permeability and reservoir flow. Lewis sandstones are also petroleum reservoirs in the Great Divide, Washakie, and Sand Wash basins. The sandstones are part of the final Cretaceous regressive systems tract in southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado. Well developed clinoforms accompany Lewis and Fox Hills progradation and basin fill. Associated with these progradational systems are correlative density flow and turbidite deposits that locally form reservoirs. These reservoirs commonly occur near the toe of prograding clinoforms and are trapped by rapid facies changes to impermeable siltstones and basinal shales.

  13. Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

  14. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Parameters of Enzyme Activity John H. Williamson and A. Malcolm Campbell

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Chapter 7 Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Parameters of Enzyme Activity John H. Williamson and A. Malcolm a battery of NADP+- dependent enzymes in Drosophila and Chlamydomonas. Malcolm Campbell is Assistant Introductory Biology laboratory meetings are devoted to student research on properties of a model enzyme

  15. The Awakening of the Social Conscience: Jane Maud Campbell, 1869-1947

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Jane Maud Campbell's career demonstrated her commitment and passion for library services with immigrants and minorities as one of the first advocates for multiculturalism in librarianship. She began her career working in the Newark Public Library and soon was employed as the librarian of the Passaic Public Library. She was the first woman employed…

  16. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2001 Fall 2001 Biology 111 Exam #2 Classical Genetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    boy. The boy and the middle girl have retinitis pigmentosa. Neither Brumhilda nor Bubba had mother had retinitis pigmentosa as did Brumhilda's father. Finally, the mother in the P generation also had retinitis pigmentosa. Brumhilda Bubba #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2001 3 8 pts. 4

  17. 2006 The Outcrop 33http://www.geology.wisc.edu Professor Emeritus John Campbell ("Cam")

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Clark M.

    2006 The Outcrop 33http://www.geology.wisc.edu Professor Emeritus John Campbell ("Cam") Craddock. At DePauw University he discovered geology with a minor in mathemat- ics and received a B.A. in 1951. He of that university's summer geology field camp in the Black Hills. Craddock came to the Univer- sity of Wisconsin

  18. EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTROL OF ARSENIC EMISSIONS AT THE CAMPBELL RED LAKE GOLD SMELTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Campbell Red Lake Mines Gold Smelter at Balmerton, Ontario, Canada, has developed and implemented a successful control strategy for arsenic emissions from a nonferrous smelting operation. The Red Lake smelter uses cyclones and a hot electrostatic precipitator to recover metal...

  19. Dysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    to contraction-induced injury, and the accumulation of muscle membrane damage ulti- mately leads to muscle physiological function and long-term survival of muscle cells. Several additional forms of mus- cular dystrophyDysferlin and muscle membrane repair Renzhi Han and Kevin P Campbell The ability to repair membrane

  20. Model-Based Methods for Textile Fault Detection J. G. Campbell,1

    E-print Network

    Raftery, Adrian

    Model-Based Methods for Textile Fault Detection J. G. Campbell,1 C. Fraley,2,3 D. Stanford,2 F for woven textiles in discriminating subtle flaw patterns from the pronounced background of repetitive. Int J Imaging Syst Technol, 10, 339­346, 1999 I. FLAW DETECTION IN TEXTILE FABRIC Obstacles to machine

  1. ON WINDING DUCK SOLUTIONS IN R 4 Kiyoyuki Tchizawa* and Sue Ann Campbell**

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Sue Ann

    ON WINDING DUCK SOLUTIONS IN R 4 Kiyoyuki Tchizawa* and Sue Ann Campbell** *Dept of Maths, Musashi will prove the existence of duck solutions with winding in the coupled Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation. As the system is described by the slow -fast one in R 4 , we will #12;nd the ducks in R 4 . Let consider

  2. Modeling Energy Use and Technological Change for Policy Makers: Campbell Watkins'

    E-print Network

    ­ notably those models used for simulating climate policies ­ the empirical estimation of their key31 Modeling Energy Use and Technological Change for Policy Makers: Campbell Watkins' Contribution as a Researcher-Practitioner Mark Jaccard* As an energy-economics modeler, who collaborated with academics while

  3. Racism in African Children's Literature: A Critique of Eric Campbell's "The Year of the Leopard Song."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osa, Osayimwense

    Eric Campbell, an English teacher, spent most of his working life in New Guinea and in East Africa, where he lived in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. He now lives in England and writes about Africa. People could expect an objective, and perhaps, a dispassionate account or depiction of African children and adults--their individual lives and…

  4. The Internet of Things Has a Gateway Problem Thomas Zachariah, Noah Klugman, Bradford Campbell,

    E-print Network

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    The Internet of Things Has a Gateway Problem Thomas Zachariah, Noah Klugman, Bradford Campbell,nklugman,bradjc,adkinsjd,nealjack,prabal}@umich.edu ABSTRACT The vision of an Internet of Things (IoT) has captured the imag- ination of the world and raised, Management, Performance, Standardiza- tion Keywords Internet of Things, Gateway, Mobile Phones, Bluetooth Low

  5. Perspectives and opportunities for Renewable Energy and National Security Mike Campbell

    E-print Network

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    2.30pm Perspectives and opportunities for Renewable Energy and National Security Mike Campbell% of its energy use supplied by renewable fuels by 2025. The presentation will highlight some recent (fission and fusion), plasma physics, hydrogen production and energy including biofuels. He is the winner

  6. FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford Kirsten Morris

    E-print Network

    Morris, Kirsten

    FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford of friction on the design and performance of feedback controllers that aim to stabilize the pendulum in the upright position. We show that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor

  7. SUITOR: An Attentive Information System Paul P. Maglio Rob Barrett Christopher S. Campbell Ted Selker

    E-print Network

    SUITOR: An Attentive Information System Paul P. Maglio Rob Barrett Christopher S. Campbell Ted sites that profile users -- we have focused specifically on attentive information systems, which observe-disruptive to the users' ongoing activities. Keywords Attentive systems, intelligent agents, peripheral information

  8. Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of Wyoming and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant results of the Wyoming investigation during the first six months include: (1) successful segregation of Precambrian metasedimentary/metavolcanic rocks from igneous rocks; (2) discovery of iron formation within the metasedimentary sequence; (3) mapping of previously unreported tectonic elements of major significance; (4) successful mapping of large scale fractures of the Wind River Mountains; (5) sucessful distinction of some metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary lithologies by color-additive viewing of ERTS images; (6) mapping and interpretation of glacial features in western Wyoming; and (7) development of techniques for mapping small urban areas.

  9. Campbelling-type theory of fission chamber signals generated by neutron chains in a multiplying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, L.; Pázsit, I.

    2015-09-01

    The signals of fission chambers are usually evaluated with the help of the co-called Campbelling techniques. These are based on the Campbell theorem, which states that if the primary incoming events, generating the detector pulses, are independent, then relationships exist between the moments of various orders of the signal in the current mode. This gives the possibility to determine the mean value of the intensity of the detection events, which is proportional to the static flux, from the higher moments of the detector current, which has certain advantages. However, the main application area of fission chambers is measurements in power reactors where, as is well known, the individual detection events are not independent, due to the branching character of the neutron chains (neutron multiplication). Therefore it is of interest to extend the Campbelling-type theory for the case of correlated neutron events. Such a theory could address two questions: partly, to investigate the bias when the traditional Campbell techniques are used for correlated incoming events; and partly, to see whether the correlation properties of the detection events, which carry information on the multiplying medium, could be extracted from the measurements. This paper is devoted to the investigation of these questions. The results show that there is a potential possibility to extract the same information from fission chamber signals in the current mode as with the Rossi- or Feynman-alpha methods, or from coincidence and multiplicity measurements, which so far have required detectors working in the pulse mode. It is also shown that application of the standard Campbelling techniques to neutron detection in multiplying systems does not lead to an error for estimating the stationary flux as long as the detector is calibrated in in situ measurements.

  10. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  11. Wyoming Community College Commission Statewide Strategic Plan: Planning for the Future of Wyoming's Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Amanda; Sipes, Laurel; Studier, Carol; Staklis, Sandra; Farr, Beverly; Horn, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    With the national spotlight on community colleges, Wyoming is poised to become a leader through its efforts to align the programs of its seven community colleges with defined state interests. As local economies become more globally focused and knowledge-based, community colleges are a critical way for learners to gain access to postsecondary…

  12. What Does Energy Development Mean for Wyoming? A Community Study at Hanna, Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nellis, Lee

    The enormous but often overlooked impact of energy resource development on small Western United States communities can be illustrated by the experiences of the traditional coal mining town of Hanna, Wyoming. Coal development doubled the population between 1970 and 1972, and required the addition of a sewer system and a police force, plus the…

  13. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Fall 2001 Fall 2001 Biology 111 Exam #4 Genetic Engineering and Final Roundup

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Fall 2001 1 Fall 2001 Biology 111 Exam #4 ­ Genetic Engineering of genetic changes must be present in these genes in order for cancer to arise? 6 pts. 6) How does the long

  14. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Spring 2007 1 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #4 ­ Cancer, HIV, & Genetic Engineering There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able

  15. Evaluation of the Campbell test and the influence of age, sex, breed, and coat color on puppy behavioral responses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; López-Rodríguez, Rocío

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Campbell test and discover if there is a link between a puppy's scores and factors such as age, breed, sex, sex-breed interaction, size, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) groups, and coat color. The Campbell test was performed on 342 puppies (191 males and 151 females) of different breeds. The results show that the criteria used by Campbell to classify puppies are incomplete, and that it is more appropriate to use numerical values for each type of answer. In general, the mean value obtained, regardless of sex and breed, corresponded to the Campbell's submissive stable category. The mean value was higher in male dogs than in females. PMID:18505191

  16. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds934.

  17. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-07-01

    Biostratigraphy is essential to exploration for oil and gas in the Wyoming thrust belt because fossils provide a temporal framework for interpretation of events of faulting, erosion, sedimentation, and the development of hydrocarbon traps and migration pathways. In the Cretaceous section, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites), which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonities are restricted to rocks of margin origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in investigations of stratigraphy and structures in the subsurface of the thrust belt because palynomorphs can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. In this paper, stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming, are correlated with the occurrence of ammonities and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

  18. 75 FR 5108 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

  19. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

  20. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

  1. 75 FR 5108 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Wyoming,...

  2. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  3. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  4. Wyoming's Early Settlement and Ethnic Groups, Unit IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming's early settlement and ethnic groups provides concepts, activities, stories, charts, and graphs for elementary school students. Concepts include the attraction Wyoming held for trappers; the major social, economic, and religious event called "The Rendezvous"; the different ethnic and religious groups that presently inhabit…

  5. NO-TILL GRAIN PRODUCTION IN WYOMING: STATUS AND POTENTIAL

    E-print Network

    Norton, Jay B.

    with supplies, so more intensive management is required. As soil organic matter lost during decades of frequent programs, both on-farm and at Wyoming's research & extension centers, have potential to increase the number-till farming, focusing on wheat production, and adoption rates in Wyoming and surrounding states

  6. Campbell Response in Type-II Superconductors under Strong Pinning Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willa, R.; Geshkenbein, V. B.; Prozorov, R.; Blatter, G.

    2015-11-01

    Measuring the ac magnetic response of a type II superconductor provides valuable information on the pinning landscape (pinscape) of the material. We use strong pinning theory to derive a microscopic expression for the Campbell length ?C , the penetration depth of the ac signal. We show that ?C is determined by the jump in the pinning force, in contrast to the critical current jc, which involves the jump in pinning energy. We demonstrate that the Campbell lengths generically differ for zero-field-cooled and field-cooled samples and predict that hysteretic behavior can appear in the latter situation. We compare our findings with new experimental data and show the potential of this technique in providing information on the material's pinscape.

  7. Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Boudreaux, Philip R; New, Joshua Ryan

    2010-10-01

    This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

  8. Gender, culture, and astrophysical fieldwork: Elizabeth Campbell and the Lick Observatory-Crocker eclipse expeditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, A. S.-K.

    The article is organized as follows. It begins with an overview of women in nineteenth-century American science. It then describes the culture of mountaintop observatories and life on Mount Hamilton. Elizabeth Campbell's unique role in the Crocker-Lick expeditions drew upon her equally unique role in the observatory, and also on the meaning given to women's work in general on the mountain. The bulk of the article focuses on the Campbells and their expeditions to India in 1898, Spain in 1905, and the South Pacific in 1908. The third section compares the Lick Observatory expeditions to those conducted by David Todd of Amherst College. Todd's wife, Mabel Loomis Todd, went into the field several times with her husband, but her place in the field was radically different from Elizabeth Campbell's, a difference that can be ascribed to a combination of local culture and personality. Finally, it compares American expeditions to British expeditions of the period, to see what the absence of British women on expeditions can tell us about the way national scientific styles and cultures affected gender roles in science.

  9. US hydropower resource assessment for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Wyoming.

  10. Wyoming operator solves mercury exposure problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.L.

    1996-05-13

    The gas-processing industry is often faced with the need to remove mercury from natural gas to protect downstream equipment. Mercury exists naturally in many gas-producing reservoirs and can accumulate in low-temperature equipment. Experience at Amoco Exploration and Production Co.`s Anschutz Ranch East plant in southwestern Wyoming has indicated that proper monitoring and maintenance of mercury-removal material can yield excellent removal performance. Surrounding-seal welding of backing rings, manways, and N{sub 2} connections on cold-boxes can be employed during initial design as prevention and contingency measures. Improved operation of gas pretreatment and cold-box equipment has led to sustained performance of the NGL/nitrogen-rejection unit (NRU) plant.

  11. Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

  12. UPR, DOE team to find gas deposits in Wyoming`s Green River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, C.L.; Guennewig, V.B.

    1996-04-01

    Union Pacific and the U.S. Department of Energy have entered into a project in an effort to find a more economic and technologically efficient method of drilling for and producing the exceptionally large gas resources trapped in tight sands in the Greater Green River Basin. The project will be conducted in the Frontier Formation in Southwestern Wyoming. A vertical well will be drilled and tested to evaluate the economic benefit of various technologies.

  13. Recent craton growth by slab stacking beneath Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Eugene D.; Schmandt, Brandon; Bezada, Maximiliano J.; Perry-Houts, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Seismic tomography images high-velocity mantle beneath the Wyoming craton extending to >250 km depth. Although xenoliths and isostatic arguments suggest that this mantle is depleted of basaltic component, it is not typical craton: its NE elongate shape extends SW of the Wyoming craton; xenoliths suggest that the base of Archean mantle was truncated from ?180-200 to ?140-150 km depth since the Devonian, and that the deeper mantle is younger than ?200 Ma. The Sevier-Laramide orogeny is the only significant Phanerozoic tectonic event to have affected the region, and presumably caused the truncation. Apparently, the base of the Wyoming craton was removed and young, depleted mantle was emplaced beneath the Wyoming craton during the Sevier-Laramide orogeny. We suggest that the Wyoming craton experienced a ?75 Ma phase of growth through a three-stage process. First, flat-slab subduction removed 40-50 km off the base of the Archean Wyoming craton. This was followed by emplacement of basalt-depleted ocean plateau mantle lithosphere of the Shatsky Rise conjugate, which arrived in the early Laramide. The geologic recorded of vertical motion in the Wyoming region suggests that the plateau's crust escaped into the Earth's interior at 70-75 Ma. Initiation of Colorado Mineral Belt magmatism at this time may represent a slab rupture through which the ocean crust escaped.

  14. Reclamation of the Wahsatch gathering system pipeline in southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, D.; Dern, G.; Johnson, G.; Erickson, W.

    1996-12-31

    The Union Pacific Resources Company (UPRC) constructed a 40.4 mile pipeline in 1993 in Summit and Rich Countries, Utah and Uinta County, Wyoming. The pipeline collects and delivers natural gas from six existing wells to the Whitney Canyon Processing Plant north of Evanston, Wyoming. We describe reclamation of the pipeline, the cooperation received from landowners along the right-of-way, and mitigation measures implemented by UPRC to minimize impacts to wildlife. The reclamation procedure combines a 2 step topsoil separation, mulching with natural vegetation, native seed mixes, and measures designed to reduce the visual impacts of the pipeline. Topsoil is separated into the top 4 inches of soil material, when present. The resulting top dressing is rich in native seed and rhizomes allowing a reduced seeding rate. The borders of the right-of-way are mowed in a curvilinear pattern to reduce the straight line effects of landowner cooperation on revegetation. Specifically, following 2 years of monitoring, significant differences in plant cover (0.01

  15. Hydrologic evaluation of proposed ground-water withdrawals in Muleshoe Flat near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoxie, D.T.

    1983-01-01

    The hydrologic effects of proposed irrigation with groundwater of 8,320 acres of land in Muleshoe Flat, a 34 sq mi area in west-central Platte County, Wyoming, were assessed. Results generated by a digital groundwater flow model indicate that, at the end of a 40-yr period, groundwater level declines of more than 50 ft can be expected in an area of 12.5 sq mi and of more than 200 ft in an area of 7 sq mi. In addition, streamflow depletions of 4,300 acre-ft/yr can be expected in the Laramie River and 4,700 acre-ft/yr in Sybille Creek. Additional hydrologic field data collection prior to initiation of the proposed irrigation development would improve these assessments. Applications for the proposed irrigation wells were denied subsequent to the data collection and analysis described in this report. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Geology of photo linear elements, Great Divide Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackstone, D. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground examination of photo linear elements in the Great Divide Basin, Wyoming indicates little if any tectonic control. Aeolian aspects are more widespread and pervasive than previously considered.

  17. Geologic structure and altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation, northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peter, Kathy D.; Kyllonen, David P.; Mills, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1981, a 3-yr project was conducted to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the sedimentary bedrock aquifers in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. The project was limited to three bedrock units in order of increasing age: the Cretaceous Inyan kara Group, Permian and Pennsylvanian Minnelusa Formation, and Mississippian Madison (or Pahasapa) Limestone. This map shows the altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation in the northern Black Hills, and shows the configuration of the structural features in the northern part of the Black Hills and the eastern part of the Bear Lodge Mountains. In general, the Minnelusa Formation dips away from the Black Hills uplift, either to the northeast and the Williston Basin or, south of the Bear Lodge Mountains, to the southwest and the Powder River basin, which is outside the map area. In the map area, the upper beds of the Minnelusa Formation are an aquifer and the lower beds are a confining or semi-confining unit. The upper part of the Minnelusa Formation has a greater percentage of coarse-grained sandstone beds than the lower part. Furthermore, solution and removal of anhydrite, brecciation, and solution of cement binding the sandstone grains may have increased the permeability of the upper part of the Minnelusa Formation in the Black Hills. Wells completed in the upper part of the Minnelusa have yields that exceed 100 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min. Flowing wells have been completed in the Minnelusa aquifer in most of the study area in South Dakota and in about the northern one-half of Crook County, Wyoming. (Lantz-PTT)

  18. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Garman, Steven L.; Walters, Annika; Ray, Andrea; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wesner, Jeff S.; O’Donnell, Michael S.; Sherrill, Kirk R.; Babel, Nils C.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

  19. Multidisciplinary study on Wyoming test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (principal investigator); Marrs, R. W.; Borgman, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ten EREP data passes over the Wyoming test site provided excellent S190A and S190B coverage and some useful S192 imagery. These data were employed in an evaluation of the EREP imaging sensors in several earth resources applications. Boysen Reservoir and Hyattsville were test areas for band to band comparison of the S190 and S192 sensors and for evaluation of the image data for geologic mapping. Contrast measurements were made from the S192 image data for typical sequence of sedimentary rocks. Histograms compiled from these measurements show that near infrared S192 bands provide the greatest amount of contrast between geologic units. Comparison was also made between LANDSAT imagery and S190B and aerial photography for regional land use mapping. The S190B photography was found far superior to the color composite LANDSAT imagery and was almost as effective as the 1:120,000 scale aerial photography. A map of linear elements prepared from LANDSAT and EREP imagery of the southwestern Bighorn Mountains provided an important aid in defining the relationship between fracture and ground water movement through the Madison aquifer.

  20. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

  1. Deformational stress fields of Casper Mountain, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Burfod, A.E.; Gable, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Casper Mountain is an east-west-trending Laramide feature located immediately west of the north termination of the Laramie Mountains in central Wyoming. Precambrian rocks are exposed as its core; off-dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata characterize the flanks and ends. The north side is abruptly downthrown along a major east-west fault or faults. A complex of stress fields of Precambrian and younger ages is indicated by high-angle shears and shear zones, steep-dip foliations, and multiple joint systems. One or more of the indicated Precambrian stress fields may be equivalent to that of the Cheyenne belt of the southern Laramie Mountains. In addition, at least two well-developed Laramide stress fields were active during the formation of the mountain structure. The principal maximum compressive stress of each was oriented north-south; the mean compressive axis of one was vertical whereas in the other the minimum compressive axis was vertical. Some structural features of Precambrian age, faulting in particular, appear to have influenced structures of younger ages. Prominent east-northeast-trending, high-angle faults lie approximately parallel to the Precambrian structural grain; they offset structural features of Laramide age and may be of late Laramide and/or post-Laramide age.

  2. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

  3. 78 FR 40425 - Draft Environmental Assessment for the J. Phil Campbell, Senior, Natural Resource Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ...College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES). This notice is announcing the...Georgia 30677 Oconee County Public Library, 1080 Experiment Station Road, Watkinsville...30677 Athens-Clarke County Public Library, 2025 Baxter Street, Athens,...

  4. Oil and Gas Development in Southwestern Wyoming - Energy Data and Services for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore current oil and gas energy development in the area encompassing the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative. The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to ensure southwestern Wyoming's wildlife and habitat remain viable in areas facing development pressure. Wyoming encompasses some of the highest quality wildlife habitats in the Intermountain West. At the same time, this region is an important source of natural gas. Using Geographic Information System technology, energy data pertinent to the conservation decision-making process have been assembled to show historical oil and gas exploration and production in southwestern Wyoming. In addition to historical data, estimates of undiscovered oil and gas are included from the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey National Assessment of Oil and Gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province. This report is meant to facilitate the integration of existing data with new knowledge and technologies to analyze energy resources development and to assist in habitat conservation planning. The well and assessment data can be accessed and shared among many different clients including, but not limited to, an online web-service for scientists and resource managers engaged in the Initiative.

  5. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  6. Land resource information needs of county government : a case study in Larimer County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    My two colleagues on the study team, Rex Burns of the Larimer County Planning Department, and Glenn McCarty of the Fort Collins office of the Soil Conservation Service, contributed substantially to this report; many of their written words have found their way directly into the text. Jill O'Gara later replaced Rex Burns as the Larimer County coordinator in the study's final stages. John Rold, Colorado State Geologist, assisted in coordinating our efforts at the beginning of this study. Lou Campbell, State Cartographer, gave valuable advice and assistance throughout the effort. Wallace Hansen and James Blakey of the USGS Geologic and Water Resources Divisions, respectively, read the final manuscript and helped in many other ways. Joanna Trolinger served as research assistant and manuscript typist. Many others in the USGS, SCS, and other organizations helped in supplying information and advice. Tom Bates, then Chairman of the USGS Central Region Earth Science Applications Task Force, was the originator of the study, leader of the USGS participation effort, and guiding inspiration throughout. The study was carried out in association with the Program on Environment and Behavior, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder.

  7. 78 FR 7809 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed (Non-Competitive) Direct Sale of Public Land in Campbell County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... written comments concerning this Notice to Field Manager, the BLM, Buffalo Field Office, 1425 Fort Street, Buffalo, WY 82834. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Claire Oliverius, Realty Specialist, at the above... Buffalo Resource Management Plan (RMP) approved on October 4, 1985. The parcel is identified for...

  8. 78 FR 76855 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Campbell County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... Realty Action (NORA) in the Federal Register (78 FR 7809) to segregate the parcel from appropriation... Field Manager, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Buffalo Field Office, 1425 Fort Street, Buffalo, WY 82834, or by email to buffalo_wymail@blm.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Claire Oliverius,...

  9. Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

    2010-03-26

    Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyomingâ??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyomingâ??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

  10. Appendix A - County Codes

    Cancer.gov

    January 1998 SEER Program Code Manual, 3 rd Edition A-1 APPENDIX A COUNTY CODES APPENDIX A COUNTY CODES A-2 SEER Program Code Manual, 3rd Edition January 1998 The following are the valid county codes for coding county of residence at diagnosis: Reference:

  11. Sudden Expansion of a One-Dimensional Bose Gas from Power-Law Traps A. S. Campbell,1

    E-print Network

    Kheruntsyan, Karen

    Sudden Expansion of a One-Dimensional Bose Gas from Power-Law Traps A. S. Campbell,1 D. M. Gangardt expansion of a trapped one-dimensional Bose gas after a sudden release from the confining trap potential equations in the thermodynamic limit. For expansion from a harmonic trap, and in the limits of very weak

  12. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2013 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Evolution

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2013 1 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 ­ Evolution started your bacterial evolution experiment, cell growth was inhibited by the antibiotic. How do cell hypothesis for global coral bleaching is increased water temperature. Use one example of correlational data

  13. USER-MANAGED END-TO-END LIGHTPATH PROVISIONING OVER Jing Wu, Scott Campbell, J. Michel Savoie, Hanxi Zhang

    E-print Network

    von Bochmann, Gregor

    USER-MANAGED END-TO-END LIGHTPATH PROVISIONING OVER CA*NET 4 Jing Wu, Scott Campbell, J. Michel dark fibre networks and long-haul wavelength networks. Schools, hospitals and government departments are acquiring their own metro dark fibres. They participate in so-called "condominium" dark fibre networks

  14. Nicole Campbell WSU Vancouver Library 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686 360-546-9687

    E-print Network

    of the Library's website, managing the authentication system, and maintaining access to databases, electronic as part of the Library's systems team. · Teach instruction sessions and workshops on libraryNicole Campbell WSU Vancouver Library 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686 360

  15. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 Fall 2002 Fall 2002 Biology 111 Exam #4 Cancer, HIV and Final Roundup

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #4 ­ Fall 2002 1 Fall 2002 Biology 111 Exam #4 ­ Cancer, HIV and Final for cancer to arise? 5 pts. 8) Based on the mode of HIV transmission, explain to someone with little biology knowledge why HIV is not a punishment from God against homosexuals. 8 pts. 9) There are two arms

  16. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2011 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Emergent Properties

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2011 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 ­ Emergent) In the figure to the right, How many mL of oxygen would be delivered to muscles by hemoglobin if it were: A complete hemoglobin saturation carries 25 mL of oxygen. Support your answer numerically. Limit your answer

  17. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2011 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Emergent Properties

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2011 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 ­ EmergentL of oxygen would be delivered to muscles by hemoglobin if it were: A) high affinity binding protein; B) lowL of oxygen. Support your answer numerically. Limit your answer to 1 sentence each. (type your answer below) A

  18. Equivalence of Computer-Based and Paper-Pencil Administrations of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vansickle, Timothy R.; Kapes, Jerome T.

    First-, second-, and third-year students enrolled in an introductory educational psychology class at Texas A&M University in College Station were administered either a pencil-and-paper or computerized version of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory. The same or other version of the test was administered after 2 weeks. Focus is on equivalence of…

  19. Purchasing in Texas Counties

    E-print Network

    Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

    1944-01-01

    were carefully studied. Following this detailed examination in four counties, purchasing pro- cedures were studied in considerably less detail in the following counties: Wharton, Waller, Liberty, Milam, Anderson, Harrison, Kaufman, Dallas, Tarrant... (After the program) 7,667 If the program had included a larger portion of the county road system, the saving would undoubtedly have been larger.' Harrison County In Harrison County in 1941, second grade (regular) gasoline was pur- chased in lots...

  20. An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, D.; Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.Y.T.; Leavesley, G.H.; Emerson, D.G.; Hanson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

  1. Bison basin, central Wyoming - geologic overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnell, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    The northeastern part of the Great Divide basin is a separate, unique, and until recently, little-explored subbasin sometimes called the Bison basin. It is bounded by the Wind River Mountains, Sweetwater-Granite Mountain foreland uplift, Lost Soldier-Wertz structure, and a little-studied very positive east-west structural arch approximately coincident with the Sweetwater-Fremont county line. A comprehensive seismic, Landsat, and subsurface geologic examination or, better, dissection of the Bison basin was initiated in 1978. Numerous oil and gas prospects were delineated by this study. Since this small, 12 by 40 mi (19 by 64 km) basin is bordered by known reserves of 260 million bbl of oil and 90 million bcf of gas, these prospects proved to be a popular target of the drill bit. At least one of these prospects appears to be productive; others are currently being drilled. The presence of major east-west wrench faults, a well-documented foreland uplift, until recently undrilled surface and subsurface structures, faults with throw measured in tens of thousands of feet, and an oil seep indicate possible additional hydrocarbon potential in the Bison basin that could exceed presently known reserves. Currently drilling wells and abundant already acquired reflection seismic data are the beginning step in an ongoing exploration program of an interesting, complex, and rewarding small basin with a lot of promise.

  2. 78 FR 55694 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...EPA-HQ-ORD-2011-0895] Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY: Environmental...draft research report titled, ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming.'' The...

  3. Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

  4. 77 FR 33235 - Public Land Order No. 7791; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6928; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ..., 43 U.S.C. 1714, it is ordered as follows: Public Land Order No. 6928 (57 FR 22659, (1992)), which... Schurman, Bureau Land Management, Wyoming State Office, 5353 Yellowstone Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009,...

  5. 77 FR 32665 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...and BLM, Wyoming State Office, Branch of Solid Minerals, Attn: Mavis Love, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, at 307- 775-6258. Persons who use a...

  6. Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Doty Mountain quadrangle, eastern Washakie basin, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Doty Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. Detailed measured sections are provided for the type sections of the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The data set was collected as part of a larger effort to acquire data on Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin. Regions in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin have potential for coal development and were considered previously for coal leasing by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

  7. Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Blue Gap quadrangle, eastern Washakie Basin, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Blue Gap 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface.

  8. 78 FR 65420 - Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties, New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...for the proposed project to provide a modern rail crossing at the location of the existing...NEPA) on a proposal to construct a modern rail crossing of the Genesee River between...Portage High Bridge'') by providing a modern rail crossing of the Genesee River...

  9. The South Fork detachment fault, Park County, Wyoming: discussion and reply ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    Blackstone (1985) published an interpretation of South form detachment fault and related features. His interpretation of the area between Castle and Hardpan transverse faults is identical to mine of 1941. Subsequent detailed mapping has shown that the structure between the transverse faults is more complicated than originally envisioned and resurrected by Blackstone. The present paper describes and discusses geologic features that are the basis for my interpretations; also discussed are differences between my interpretations and those of Blackstone. Most data are shown on the geologic map of the Wapiti Quadrangle (Pierce and Nelson, 1969). Blackstone's 'allochthonous' masses are part of the South Form fault. Occurrences of Sundance Formation, which he interpreted as the upper plate of his 'North Fork fault', are related to Heart Mountain fault. Volcaniclastic rocks south of Jim Mountain mapped as Aycross Formation by Torres and Gingerich may be Cathedral Cliffs Formation, emplaced by movement of the Heart Mountain fault. - Author

  10. Platinum and associated elements at the New Rambler mine and vicinity, Albany and Carbon Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Thompson, Charles Emmet

    1968-01-01

    Platinum-group metals in the Medicine Bow Mountains were first identified by W. C. Knight in 1901. In the Medicine Bow Mountains, these metals are commonly associated with copper, silver, or gold in shear zones that cut a series of mafic igneous and metamorphic rocks. At the New Rambler mine, where the initial discovery was made, about 50,000 tons of mine and mill waste contain an average of 0.3 percent copper, 7 ppm (parts per million) silver, 1 ppm platinum plus palladium, and 0.7 ppm gold. This material is believed to be from a low-grade envelope around the high-grade pod of complex ore that was mined selectively in the old workings. Soil samples in the vicinity of the New Rambler mine exhibit a wide range of content of several elements associated with the ore. Most of the variation can be attributed to contamination, from the mine workings. Even though soil samples identify a low-level copper anomaly that persists to the limit of the area sampled, soils do not offer a promising medium for tracing mineralization owing to the blanket of transported overburden. Stream sediments, if preconcentrated for analysis, do reveal anomalies not only in the contaminated stream below the New Rambler mine, but in adjacent drainage and on Dave Creek. Examination of a spectrum of elements in heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediment may contribute to knowledge of the nature of the mineralization and of the basic geology of the environment. The sampling of bedrock exposures is not particularly fruitful because outcrops are sparse and the exposed rocks are the least altered and mineralized. Bedrock sampling does, however, provide information on the large size and provincial nature of the platinum-rich area. We feel that a properly integrated program of geological, geophysical, and geochemical exploration in the Medicine Bow Mountains and probably in the Sierra Madre to the west has a reasonable probability of successfully locating a complex ore body.

  11. Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

    1986-08-01

    Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

  12. Geologic map of the Phosphate Reserve in the Lander area, Fremont County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohrer, Willis L.

    1973-01-01

    The area was mapped as part of the U.S. Geological Survey program of classifying and evaluating lands in the public domain. Resources of economic interest in the map area include oil, gas, water, phosphate rock, gypsum, and analcime. The area mapped includes the rocks between the Tensleep Sandstone and the Morrison Formation and Tertiary and Quaternary deposits.

  13. Back-thrusting along the western flank of the Bighorn Mountain, Bighorn County,Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Noggle, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    Field evidence of westward back-thrusting, compartmentalized faulting, and tectonically-thinned fault wedges supports a thrust-generated model of uplift for the Bighorn Mountains. Encompassed within the Leavitt Reservoir Quadrangle are structures suggestive of westward basement-involved thrusting antithetic to the main eastward thrust direction of the Bighorn uplift. The mountain-flank region in this area is characterized by reverse-faulted blocks of Precambrian basement which are draped by a deformed Paleozoic cover. A reentrant along the mountain front coincides with an east-west compartmental boundary separating two distinct areas of structural discordance. North of this fault boundary, compression appears to have been accommodated by folding of the hanging wall block. To the south, Precambrian rocks exposed at the mountain-front overlie, and are in fault-contact with a tectonically-thinned, overturned wedge of Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. Structures i the basinal portion of the Leavitt Reservoir Quadrangle include small-scale folds and a thrust-faulted anticline paralleling the NW-SE trend of the larger mountain-flank structures. Decollement may have occurred parallel to bedding planes within multiple stratigraphic horizons. This deformation probably represents concomitant basinward ramping of the sedimentary sequence in response to westward back-thrusting of Precambrian blocks during the Laramide Orogeny.

  14. Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeeren, L.; Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.

    2011-07-01

    The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

  15. An efficient algorithm for computing the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series and some of its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Fernando; Murua, Ander

    2009-03-01

    We provide a new algorithm for generating the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) series Z =log(eXeY) in an arbitrary generalized Hall basis of the free Lie algebra L(X,Y) generated by X and Y. It is based on the close relationship of L(X,Y) with a Lie algebraic structure of labeled rooted trees. With this algorithm, the computation of the BCH series up to degree of 20 [111 013 independent elements in L(X,Y)] takes less than 15min on a personal computer and requires 1.5Gbytes of memory. We also address the issue of the convergence of the series, providing an optimal convergence domain when X and Y are real or complex matrices.

  16. Closed Form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff Formula for Semisimple Complex Lie Algebras

    E-print Network

    Marco Matone

    2015-04-20

    In arXiv:1502.06589 it has been introduced an algorithm extending the Van-Brunt and Visser result, leading to new closed forms of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. In particular, there are closed forms even when the commutator $[X,Y]$ also contains elements of the algebra different from $X$ and $Y$. In arXiv:1503.08198 it has been shown that there are {\\it 13 types} of such commutator algebras. We show, by providing the explicit solutions, that these include the semisimple complex Lie algebras. In particular, if $X$, $Y$ and $Z$ are three generators of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find, for a wide class of cases, $W$, linear combination of $X$, $Y$ and $Z$, such that $$ e^X e^Y e^Z=e^W $$ It turns out that the relevant commutator algebras are {\\it type 1c-i}, {\\it type 4} and {\\it type 5}.

  17. Closed Form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff Formula for Semisimple Complex Lie Algebras

    E-print Network

    Matone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In arXiv:1502.06589 it has been introduced an algorithm extending the Van-Brunt and Visser result, leading to new closed forms of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. In particular, there are closed forms even when the commutator $[X,Y]$ also contains elements of the algebra different from $X$ and $Y$. In arXiv:1503.08198 it has been shown that there are {\\it 13 types} of such commutator algebras. We show, by providing the explicit solutions, that these include the semisimple complex Lie algebras. In particular, if $X$, $Y$ and $Z$ are three generators of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find, for a wide class of cases, $W$, linear combination of $X$, $Y$ and $Z$, such that $$ e^X e^Y e^Z=e^W $$ It turns out that the relevant commutator algebras are {\\it type 1c-i}, {\\it type 4} and {\\it type 5}.

  18. VEGETATION CHARACTERISTICS ACROSS PART OF THE WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ALLIANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. This alliance provides critical habitat for many sagebrush obligate and facultative wildlife species and serves as...

  19. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL AND VEGETATION CHARACTERISTICS: WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ALLIANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp. wyomingenis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West and is characterized by a wide range of environments and vegetation heterogeneity. However, the influence of environ...

  20. Contribution to CCN Workshop report from University of Wyoming group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Politovich, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    The group's CCN counter is described. It is a static, horizontal, parallel plate thermal gradient diffusion chamber. Examples of the application of the CCN are presented and include the CCN spectra measured during the winter of 1978-79 near Elk Mountain, Wyoming. Comparisons of droplet concentrations derived from upwind CCN spectra are covered.

  1. Wyoming Tombstone Symbolism: A Reflection of Western Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochenour, John; Rezabek, Landra L.

    Eleven cemeteries in Wyoming are examined for visuals pertaining to life in the West. The purpose is to demonstrate the importance of Western culture tradition evidenced through tombstone symbolism--representations of the activities and environments of the living through the memory provided by the deceased. The visual symbols found on the…

  2. Woody fuels reduction in Wyoming big sagebrush communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) ecosystems historically have been subject to disturbances that reduce or remove shrubs primarily by fire, although insect outbreaks and disease have also been important. Depending on site productivity, fire return in...

  3. Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative data management and integration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, Natalie; Bristol, R. Sky

    2011-01-01

    Six Federal agencies, two State agencies, and two local entities formally support the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) and work together on a landscape scale to manage fragile habitats and wildlife resources amidst growing energy development in southwest Wyoming. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was tasked with implementing targeted research and providing scientific information about southwest Wyoming to inform the development of WLCI habitat enhancement and restoration projects conducted by land management agencies. Many WLCI researchers and decisionmakers representing the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of Wyoming, and others have overwhelmingly expressed the need for a stable, robust infrastructure to promote sharing of data resources produced by multiple entities, including metadata adequately describing the datasets. Descriptive metadata facilitates use of the datasets by users unfamiliar with the data. Agency representatives advocate development of common data handling and distribution practices among WLCI partners to enhance availability of comprehensive and diverse data resources for use in scientific analyses and resource management. The USGS Core Science Informatics (CSI) team is developing and promoting data integration tools and techniques across USGS and partner entity endeavors, including a data management infrastructure to aid WLCI researchers and decisionmakers.

  4. Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

  5. Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation

    E-print Network

    Wyoming, University of

    Sage Grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Case Study in Cooperation Bob Budd, Chairman Governor of Endangered Species Act · Broad distribution of Sage-grouse #12;History of the Issue · Petitioning under: "Not Warranted" · 2007: Sage Grouse Summit led to establishment of SGIT · 2007: December decision

  6. 76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... delivered. The BLM Wyoming State Office Cashier will issue a receipt for each hand-delivered bid. Bids... payment of an annual rental of $3 per acre, or fraction thereof, and a royalty payment to the United... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. 76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW174596] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Hilight Field...

  8. 76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ...LLWY922000-L51100000-GA0000-LVEMK09CK36; WYW172657] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal...

  9. 76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW163340] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

  10. 76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW177903] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

  11. The Casper Star-Tribune Casper, Wyoming -[date

    E-print Network

    Wilf, Peter

    impact did not kill off the dinosaurs or cause other mass extinctions, as some scientists believe, a Penn | Wyoming | National Report: Climate change didn't kill dinosaurs ddlfonpnasrlsjp By DAN LEWERENZ Associated of light and, in turn, starving dinosaurs and other animals of the plants they needed to survive

  12. Ethnic Medicine on the Frontier: A Case Study in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, John D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilizing both quantitative and qualitative approaches, the study assessed the strengths of selected components of the Mexican American ethnic medical system within the local community of Casper, Wyoming. Findings indicated that few local Hispanics adhered to much of the system, except in the realm of some easily available home remedies.…

  13. RECOVERY AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MECHANICALLY TREATED WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) steppe plant communities are common across the Intermountain West. These plant communities provide critical wildlife habitat and serve as a forage base for livestock production. Sagebrush is frequently me...

  14. 77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land... amended. DATES: The lease sale will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Sealed bids must...

  15. A Bibliography of Materials: Adult Basic Education: Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne. Adult Basic Education Div.

    The document is an annotated bibliography of curriculum materials, machines, and equipment produced prior to 1966 and available to assist adult basic education students, developed for the State of Wyoming Department of Education. The materials are arranged alphabetically by author under 38 subject headings: adult education and teaching methods;…

  16. Precision fertilization of Wyoming sugar beets: A case study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field Studies were conducted on a farm in northwest Wyoming to compare variable-rate fertilization (VRF) with uniform-rate fertilization (URF) of sugar beets. Results from this study failed to show an economic advantage from VRF compared to URF, implying producers should be very cautious to adopt VR...

  17. A HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS OF MIGRANT CHILDREN IN WYOMING, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENITENDI, WILMA LEE; AND OTHERS

    A SURVEY MADE DURING THE SUMMER OF 1967 SHOWED THAT ALMOST ONE THOUSAND SCHOOL-AGE MIGRANT CHILDREN WERE IN THE STATE OF WYOMING FOR 6 TO 8 WEEKS DURING THE SUGAR BEET SEASON. THIS HANDBOOK, PREPARED FOR THE USE OF THOSE TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS WHO WORK IN SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAMS, IS DIVIDED INTO FIVE CHAPTERS. CHAPTERS 1 AND 2 DEAL WITH THE…

  18. LEVEL IV ECOREGION DELINEATION FOR THE STATE OF WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Level III ecoregions were refined and subdivided into level IV for the state of Wyoming in a manner consistent with ecoregion revision and subdivision that has been completed or is on-going in 37 of the conterminous United States. The project was collaborative, involving the scie...

  19. 76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II South Coal Tract described below in Converse...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION NEAR PAVILLION, WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to complaints by domestic well owners regarding objectionable taste and odor problems in well water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated a ground water investigation near the town of Pavillion, Wyoming under authority of the Comprehensive Environmental ...

  1. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  2. Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills Samuel J. Cahoy

    E-print Network

    Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills BY Samuel J. Cahoy A thesis submitted South Dakota State University 2009 #12;11 Survival of Male Merriam's Turkeys in the Wyoming Black Hills possible without financial support from the following agencies: National Wild Turkey Federation, Wyoming

  3. The Spirit and Influence of the Wyoming Resolution: Looking Back to Look Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, James C.; Schell, Eileen E.

    2011-01-01

    At the 1986 Wyoming Conference on English, a group of graduate students and part-time and tenure-line faculty formulated a statement known as the Wyoming Resolution, a rallying cry to improve composition teachers' pay, benefits, and working conditions. Adopted by the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in 1987, the Wyoming

  4. 76 FR 77829 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... AGENCY Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY... of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming.'' The draft research report was prepared by... Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming'' is available via the Internet on the EPA Region 8 home page under...

  5. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  6. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  7. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  8. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  9. 30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

  10. 2014 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

    E-print Network

    2014 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey: CSU Extension Services in Colorado Survey Results Summary Report April 2015 #12;Colorado State University Extension 2014 County Commissioner Survey Results Introduction: 2014 County Commissioner Survey The seventh annual County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

  11. Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow indicates areas of canopy burn and mixed burn with a biomass of between 12 to 20 tons per hectare; light green is mixed burn and on-burn forest with a biomass of 20 to 35 tons per hectare; and green is non-burned forest with a biomass of greater than 35 tons per hectare. Forest recovery from the fire seems to depend on fire intensity and soil conditions. In areas of severe canopy burn and poor soil conditions, crown biomass was still low in 1994 (indicated by the brown areas at the center left), whereas in areas of mixed burn with nutrient-rich soils, seen west of Yellowstone Lake, crown biomass has increased significantly in six years (indicated by the yellow and light green areas). Imaging fire-affected regions with spaceborne radar illustrates SIR-C/X-SAR's keen abilities to monitor regrowth after a fire. Knowing the amount of carbon accumulated in the atmosphere by regenerating forest in the 20 to 50 years following a fire disturbance is also a significant factor in understanding the global carbon cycle. Measuring crown biomass is necessary to evaluate the effects of past and future fires in specific regions. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) are part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm), and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes that are caused by nature and those changes that are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italian

  12. 78 FR 41946 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale Maysdorf II North, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale Maysdorf II North, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Maysdorf II North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered...

  13. Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy

    E-print Network

    Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

    2007-01-01

    Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

  14. Irrigated acreage in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season. [Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridd, M. K.; Jaynes, R. A.; Landgraf, K. F.; Clark, L. D., Jr. (principal investigators)

    1982-01-01

    The irrigated cropland in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season was inventoried from satellite imagery. LANDSAT color infrared images (scale 1:125,000) were examined for early, mid, and late summer dates, and acreage was estimated by use of township/section overlays. The total basin acreage was estimated to be 573,435 acres, with individual state totals as follows: Idaho 234,370 acres; Utah 265,505 acres; and Wyoming 73,560 acres. As anticipated, wetland areas intermingled among cropland appears to have produced an over-estimation of irrigated acreage. According to a 2% random sample of test sites evaluated by personnel from the Soil Conservation Service such basin-wide over-estimation is 7.5%; individual counties deviate significantly from the basin-wide figure, depending on the relative amount of wetland areas intermingled with cropland.

  15. Dona Ana County Experimental

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Reservoir Luna County Sierra County Otero County Lincoln National Forest 25 10 10 54 70 54 54 54 82 70 NM 1: Revisions to the National Landscape Conservation System included in Public Law 111-11 are not yet San Andres National Wildlife Refuge White Sands National Monument Caballo Reservoir Elephant Butte

  16. A review of "Literary Circles and Gender in Early Modern Europe: A Cross-Cultural Approach" by Julie Campbell 

    E-print Network

    Desroches, Lissa Beauchamp

    2007-01-01

    (albeit in a somewhat more domestic and private sense of ?court? in the noble houses) suggests interesting connections between the concerns of intellectual and public communities. The Sidney circle?s Senecan-style tragedies, for instance, like Othello..., or quarrel, by its very nature requires an oppositional or antagonistic dynamic. Especially where Campbell pairs male- and female-authored works, this dynamic is clearly beneficial for the female writers to make use of?and the pairings work as well...

  17. Performance investigation of the pulse and Campbelling modes of a fission chamber using a Poisson pulse train simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Zs.; Jammes, C.; Pázsit, I.; Pál, L.; Filliatre, P.

    2015-02-01

    The detectors of the neutron flux monitoring system of the foreseen French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) will be high temperature fission chambers placed in the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the core. The operation of a fission chamber over a wide-range neutron flux will be feasible provided that the overlap of the applicability of its pulse and Campbelling operational modes is ensured. This paper addresses the question of the linearity of these two modes and it also presents our recent efforts to develop a specific code for the simulation of fission chamber pulse trains. Our developed simulation code is described and its overall verification is shown. An extensive quantitative investigation was performed to explore the applicability limits of these two standard modes. It was found that for short pulses the overlap between the pulse and Campbelling modes can be guaranteed if the standard deviation of the background noise is not higher than 5% of the pulse amplitude. It was also shown that the Campbelling mode is sensitive to parasitic noise, while the performance of the pulse mode is affected by the stochastic amplitude distributions.

  18. Microfossils from the Neoarchean Campbell Group, Griqualand West Sequence of the Transvaal Supergroup, and their paleoenvironmental and evolutionary implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altermann, W.; Schopf, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The oldest filament- and colonial coccoid-containing microbial fossil assemblage now known is described here from drill core samples of stromatolitic cherty limestones of the Neoarchean, approximately 2600-Ma-old Campbell Group (Ghaap Plateau Dolomite, Lime Acres Member) obtained at Lime Acres, northern Cape Province, South Africa. The assemblage is biologically diverse, including entophysalidacean (Eoentophysalis sp.), probable chroococcacean (unnamed colonial coccoids), and oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria (Eomycetopsis cf. filiformis, and Siphonophycus transvaalensis), as well as filamentous fossil bacteria (Archaeotrichion sp.); filamentous possible microfossils (unnamed hematitic filaments) also occur. The Campbell Group microorganisms contributed to the formation of stratiform and domical to columnar stromatolitic reefs in shallow subtidal to intertidal environments of the Transvaal intracratonic sea. Although only moderately to poorly preserved, they provide new evidence regarding the paleoenvironmental setting of the Campbell Group sediments, extend the known time-range of entophysalidacean cyanobacteria by more than 400 million years, substantiate the antiquity and role in stromatolite formation of Archean oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria, and document the exceedingly slow (hypobradytelic) evolutionary rate characteristic of this early evolving prokaryotic lineage.

  19. [DOE/EPSCoR traineeship program for Wyoming: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    In the first year of the traineeship program supported by the Department of Energy EPSCoR funding, the University of Wyoming has made outstanding progress toward the objective of increasing the supply of highly trained engineers and scientists with interests in energy related disciplines. The scope of the traineeship program has already broadened to encompass both more departments than originally expected and nearly twice as many graduate students as expected. Further, since the primary emphasis was on new students, most of those recruited have developed ties to the DOE labs that would not have otherwise existed. This portion of this Progress Report gives an overall summary of the University of Wyoming`s approach to the DOE Traineeship Program implementation. It also provides an overview of the results so far and vision of how this program fits with the broader objectives for development of the University and its academic programs. Subsequent sections describe very briefly the impact of the traineeship students in each department that was successful in obtaining funds through the competitive process that was adopted. Finally, the report ends with a summary of both the academic status of the participants and the budget expenditures to date.

  20. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part A - Coal and wind

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Jones, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    To further advance the objectives of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming State Geological Survey (WSGS) have compiled Part A of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming. Focusing primarily on electrical power sources, Part A of the energy map is a compilation of both published and previously unpublished coal (including coalbed gas) and wind energy resources data, presented in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data package. Energy maps, data, documentation and spatial data processing capabilities are available in a geodatabase, published map file (pmf), ArcMap document (mxd), Adobe Acrobat PDF map (plate 1) and other digital formats that can be downloaded at the USGS website. Accompanying the map (plate 1) and the geospatial data are four additional plates that describe the geology, energy resources, and related infrastructure. These tabular plates include coal mine (plate 2), coal field (plate 3), coalbed gas assessment unit (plate 4), and wind farm (plate 5) information with hyperlinks to source publications and data on the internet. The plates can be printed and examined in hardcopy, or accessed digitally. The data represent decades of research by the USGS, WSGS, BLM and others, and can facilitate landscape-level science assessments, and resource management decisionmaking.

  1. Identification of buried sinkholes using refraction tomography at Ft. Campbell Army Airfield, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera-Díaz, I. Camilo; Carpenter, Philip J.; Thompson, Michael D.

    2007-12-01

    Karst aquifers are highly susceptible to contamination, with numerous points of entry for contaminants through recharge features such as sinkholes, swallow holes and solutionally enlarged fractures. These recharge features may be filled or obscured at the surface, requiring the use of geophysical or remote sensing techniques for their identification. This study uses seismic refraction data collected at the Ft. Campbell Army Airfield (CAAF), Kentucky, USA, to test the hypothesis that refraction tomography is a useful tool for imaging bedrock depressions beneath thick overburden (greater than 20 m of unconsolidated sediment). Southeast of the main taxiway of CAAF seismic velocity tomograms imaged a bedrock low, possibly a closed depression, at a depth of 25 m that had been earlier identified through delay-time analysis of the same refraction data. Tomography suggests the bedrock low is about 250-m wide by 10-m deep at its widest point. High rates of contaminant vapor extraction over the western extension of this feature suggest a high concentration of contaminants above, and within, this filled bedrock low, the base of which may contain solutionally enlarged fractures (i.e. karst conduits) that could funnel these contaminants to the upper or lower bedrock aquifers. This study thus demonstrates the viability of seismic refraction tomography as a tool for identification of filled sinkholes and bedrock depressions in karst areas.

  2. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at DSDP Site 277, Campbell Plateau, southern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, C. J.; Hines, B. R.; Littler, K.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Strong, C. P.; Zachos, J. C.; Eggins, S. M.; Northcote, L.; Phillips, A.

    2015-07-01

    Re-examination of sediment cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 277 on the western margin of the Campbell Plateau (paleolatitude of ~65° S) has identified an intact Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary overlain by a 34 cm thick record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) within nannofossil chalk. The upper part of the PETM is truncated, either due to drilling disturbance or a sedimentary hiatus. An intact record of the onset of the PETM is indicated by a gradual decrease in ?13C values over 20 cm, followed by a 14 cm interval in which ?13C is 2 ‰ lighter than uppermost Paleocene values. After accounting for effects of diagenetic alteration, we use ?18O and Mg/Ca values from foraminiferal tests to determine that intermediate and surface waters warmed by ~5-6° at the onset of the PETM prior to the full development of the negative ?13C excursion. After this initial warming, sea temperatures were relatively stable through the PETM but declined abruptly across the horizon that truncates the event at this site. Mg/Ca analysis of foraminiferal tests indicates peak intermediate and surface water temperatures of ~19 and ~32 °C, respectively. These temperatures may be influenced by residual diagenetic factors and changes in ocean circulation, and surface water values may also be biased towards warm-season temperatures.

  3. U.S. Geological Survey science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2011 annual report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Blecker, Steven W.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephanie; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Holloway, JoAnn; Homer, Collin G.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Olexa, Edward M.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Sweat, Michael J.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2013-01-01

    This is the fourth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. In FY2011, there were 37 ongoing, completed, or new projects conducted under the five major multi-disciplinary science and technical-assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis, (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research, (3) Data and Information Management, (4) Integration and Coordination, and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. The four new work activities were (1) development of the Western Energy Citation Clearinghouse, a Web-based energy-resource database of references for literature and on-line resources focused on energy development and its effects on natural resources; (2) a study to support the Sublette County Conservation District in ascertaining potential water-quality impacts to the New Fork River from energy development in the Pinedale Anticline Project Area; (3) a study to test the efficacy of blending high-frequency temporal data provided by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors and high-resolution Landsat data for providing the fine-resolution data required to evaluate habitat responses to management activities at the landscape level; and (4) a study to examine the seasonal water chemistry of Muddy Creek, including documenting salinity patterns and providing a baseline for assessing potential effects of energy and other development on water quality in the Muddy Creek watershed. Two work activities were completed in FY2011: (1) the assessment of rancher perceptions of energy development in Southwest Wyoming and (2) mapping aspen stands and conifer encroachment using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis for effectiveness monitoring. The USGS continued to compile data, develop geospatial products, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts, including (1) ranking and prioritizing proposed conservation projects, (2) developing the WLCI integrated assessment, (3) developing the WLCI 5-year Conservation Action Plan, and (4) continuing to upgrade the content and improve the functionality of the WLCI Web site. For the WLCI FY2012 annual report, a decision was made to greatly reduce the overall length of the annual report, which will be accomplished by simplifying the report format and focusing on the take-home messages of each work activity for WLCI partners.

  4. Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

    1989-01-01

    Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Overriding of the Indian-Antarctic ridge: Origin of emerald basin and migration of late cenozoic volcanism in Southern New zealand and Campbell Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, E.; Dixon, J. M.

    1984-05-01

    Examination of plate reconstructions of the Neogene interactions among the Indian, Antarctic and Pacific plates suggests that the New Zealand and Campbell Plateau portion of the Pacific plate has overridden the site of mantle upwelling formerly associated with the southeastern end of the Indian-Antarctic ridge. The site of mantle upwelling can be projected to have migrated in a fan-shaped pattern from a NNE-SSW trend across South Island, New Zealand and along the western edge of the Campbell Plateau in Oligocene time to its present position along the southeast continental slope of the Campbell Plateau. This migration has been closely followed by the eruption of alkaline basaltic volcanic rocks which display a similar fan-shaped age distribution and which we interpret as evidence of the persistence of the mantle upwelling process for tens of millions of years after its overriding by continental lithosphere. The Emerald Basin and Macquarie Ridge complex, which formed in post-Eocene time at the western margin of the Campbell Plateau, resulted by "secondary spreading" when overriding of the Indian-Antarctic ridge by the Campbell Plateau juxtaposed the Indian and Pacific plates.

  6. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

    2013-03-01

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  7. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

  8. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-10

    Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

  9. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2012 annual report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bern, Carleton R.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Fedy, Bradford C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Homer, Collin G.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Sweat, Michael J.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    Southwest Wyoming contains abundant energy resources, wildlife, habitat, open spaces, and outdoor recreational opportunities. Although energy exploration and development have been taking place in the region since the late 1800s, the pace of development for fossil fuels and renewable energy increased significantly in the early 2000s. This and the associated urban and exurban development are leading to landscape-level environmental and socioeconomic changes that have the potential to diminish wildlife habitat and other natural resources, and the quality of human lives, in Southwest Wyoming. The potential for negative effects of these changes prompted Federal, State, and local agencies to undertake the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative for Southwest Wyoming.

  11. Biotoxicity characterization of a produced-water discharge in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.R.; Stilwell, C.T. )

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this paper are to document the physicochemical and aquatic toxicological quality of a beneficial-use produced-water discharge and its effect on a receiving stream in Wyoming. Fish and water-flea survival, growth, and reproduction tests indicated that the discharge and all other sampling stations passed the state effluent biomonitoring acute toxicity testing endpoints. while benthic macroinvertebrates were absent at the discharge point designated by the Natl. Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), productive and reproducing populations were present at all other downstream and mixing-zone stations. This investigation confirmed the validity of the beneficial-use subcategory for this oilfield discharge.

  12. Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Luna B.

    1980-01-01

    On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9°C. PMID:16592797

  13. Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Leopold, L B

    1980-04-01

    On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9 degrees C. PMID:16592797

  14. Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a comparison of results from both Slave and Superior cratons throughout the Archean and Proterozoic. The data will test the prior connections, or lack thereof, among the Archean cratons in Laurentia, and help assess whether there was a supercontinent during the Archean-Proterozoic transition.

  15. Redescription of Bellerophon bittneri (Gastropoda: Triassic) from Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochelson, E.L.; Boyd, D.W.; Wardlaw, B.

    1985-01-01

    Bellerophon bittneri Newell and Kummel is an Early Triassic bellerophontacean from the Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River Mountains. The available type material consists of one fair, but incomplete, external mold, which resembles a Bellerophon but is actually a Retispira. After repeated search, additional specimens were found at one locality in the southern Wind River Range of Wyoming; Retispira bittneri is redescribed from this new material. Like other Triassic bellerophontaceans, there is nothing unusual about the species apart from occurrence in the Mesozoic; it is clearly congeneric with Permian Retispira from underlying rocks. -Authors

  16. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  17. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  18. New vitrinite reflectance data for the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range and Owl Creek and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, and the Granite Mountains on the south, and Wind River Range on the west. The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data collected mainly from Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin to better characterize their thermal maturity and hydrocarbon potential.

  19. 78 FR 40425 - Draft Environmental Assessment for the J. Phil Campbell, Senior, Natural Resource Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Watkinsville, Georgia, to the University of Georgia (UGA...: Email: cal.mather@ars.usda.gov , Fax: 309-681-6683. Mail: USDA-ARS-SHEMB, NCAUR, 1815 North University... Headquarters, 1420 Experiment Station Road, Watkinsville, Georgia 30677 Oconee County Public Library,...

  20. Relative risk site evaluation for buildings 7740 and 7741 Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Gilmore, T.J.; Bronson, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    Buildings 7740 and 7741 are a part of a former nuclear weapon`s storage and maintenance facility located in the southeastern portion of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This underground tunnel complex was originally used as a classified storage area beginning in 1949 and continuing until 1969. Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently completed a detailed Relative Risk Site Evaluation of the facility. This evaluation included (1) obtaining engineering drawings of the facility and associated structures, (2) conducting detailed radiological surveys, (3) air sampling, (4) sampling drainage systems, and (5) sampling the underground wastewater storage tank. Ten samples were submitted for laboratory analysis of radionuclides and priority pollutant metals, and two samples submitted for analysis of volatile organic compounds. No volatile organic contaminants were detected using field instruments or laboratory analyses. However, several radionuclides and metals were detected in water and/or soil/sediment samples collected from this facility. Of the radionuclides detected, only {sup 226}Ra may have come from facility operations; however, its concentration is at least one order of magnitude below the relative-risk comparison value. Several metals (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and antimony) were found to exceed the relative-risk comparison values for water, while only arsenic, cadmium, and lead were found to exceed the relative risk comparison values for soil. Of these constituents, it is believed that only arsenic, beryllium, mercury, and lead may have come from facility operations. Other significant hazards posed by the tunnel complex include radon exposure and potentially low oxygen concentrations (<19.5% in atmosphere) if the tunnel complex is not allowed to vent to the outside air. Asbestos-wrapped pipes, lead-based paint, rat poison, and possibly a selenium rectifier are also present within the tunnel complex.

  1. San Diego County Reservation

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Corps Base Yuma Marine CorpsAir Station Yuma Proving Ground Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Imperial National Wildlife Refuge Kofa National Wildlife Refuge Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Yuma County Imperial County Mohave

  2. 76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

  3. 76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

  4. (DOE/EPSCoR traineeship program for Wyoming: Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In the first year of the traineeship program supported by the Department of Energy EPSCoR funding, the University of Wyoming has made outstanding progress toward the objective of increasing the supply of highly trained engineers and scientists with interests in energy related disciplines. The scope of the traineeship program has already broadened to encompass both more departments than originally expected and nearly twice as many graduate students as expected. Further, since the primary emphasis was on new students, most of those recruited have developed ties to the DOE labs that would not have otherwise existed. This portion of this Progress Report gives an overall summary of the University of Wyoming's approach to the DOE Traineeship Program implementation. It also provides an overview of the results so far and vision of how this program fits with the broader objectives for development of the University and its academic programs. Subsequent sections describe very briefly the impact of the traineeship students in each department that was successful in obtaining funds through the competitive process that was adopted. Finally, the report ends with a summary of both the academic status of the participants and the budget expenditures to date.

  5. Reconnaissance examination of selected oil-sand outcrops in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Ver Ploeg, A.

    1986-08-01

    Numerous surface occurrences of oil sands and oil seeps have been reported in the geologic literature for Wyoming. Seventy-eight reported occurrences are listed in Wyoming Geological Survey Open-File Report 82-5. Most of the listed deposits are taken from old references with vague descriptions and locations. Field reconnaissance examinations of selected oil-sand occurrences were conducted to describe them better and to assess their potential economic importance. A reconnaissance geologic map of each examined deposit was constructed, and the deposits were sampled and described. Ten occurrences were described during the 1984 and 1985 field seasons. The oil-sand occurrences were all sandstone reservoirs ranging from Pennsylvanian to Tertiary. Based on these reconnaissance examinations, only three occurrences appeared to be potentially significant. The Rattlesnake Hills occurrence, west of Casper, is an asymmetrical anticline with oil-impregnated sands in the Mesaverde Formation, Frontier Formation, and, most extensively, the Muddy Sandstone. Other formations in the structure contain minor amounts of oil staining. The Muddy Creek occurrence, southwest of Rawlins, contains oil-impregnated sandstones in the lower Wasatch Formation. This stratigraphically controlled trap dips to the west into the Washakie basin. The Conant Creek occurrence, southeast of Riverton, includes stratigraphically controlled oil sands in the relatively flat Wagon Bed Formation.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  7. Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

  8. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  9. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    USGS Southwest Wyoming Province Assessment Team

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Southwestern Wyoming Province of southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado, and northeastern Utah (fig. 1). The USGS Southwestern Wyoming Province for this assessment included the Green River Basin, Moxa arch, Hoback Basin, Sandy Bend arch, Rock Springs uplift, Great Divide Basin, Wamsutter arch, Washakie Basin, Cherokee ridge, and the Sand Wash Basin. The assessment of the Southwestern Wyoming Province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap types, formation, and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined 9 total petroleum systems (TPS) and 23 assessment units (AU) within these TPSs, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered oil and gas resources within 21 of the 23 AUs.

  10. A WATERBORNE OUTBREAK OF NORWALK-LIKE VIRUS AMONG SNOWMOBILERS - WYOMING, 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February 2001, episodes of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health from persons who had recently vacationed at a snowmobile lodge in Wyoming. A retrospective cohort study found a significant association between water consumption and illness, a...

  11. Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: natural resource goals, management practices and information sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    What are the characteristics of Wyoming ranches, and how do they manage natural resources on 29 million acres of rangelands? In cooperation with the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA)—a predominant agricultural organization in the state—we asked WSGA producer members about their goals, ranchi...

  12. An Examination of Development of Wyoming's Alternative Assessment System, the Body of Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowding, Sharla Kay

    2011-01-01

    The overarching purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the patterns of development and implementation of Body of Evidence (BOE) science systems throughout the state of Wyoming, using an emerging and relatively open mixed methods design. BOEs were first launched throughout Wyoming a decade ago, and are ongoing today. Through interviews…

  13. 33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a.... (c) Antelope Flat, Utah. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a...

  14. Are there benefits to mowing intact Wyoming big sagebrush communities? An evaluation from southeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrus...

  15. Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.

    1984-01-01

    The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  16. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted on August 16, 1982, and as subsequently revised, is approved effective...

  17. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted on August 16, 1982, and as subsequently revised, is approved effective...

  18. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted on August 16, 1982, and as subsequently revised, is approved effective...

  19. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted on August 16, 1982, and as subsequently revised, is approved effective...

  20. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted on August 16, 1982, and as subsequently revised, is approved effective...

  1. Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: Natural resource goals, management practices and information sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services, but the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. What are the characteristics of Wyoming ranches, and how do ranchers manage natural resources? In cooperation with the...

  2. Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: natural resource goals, management practices and information sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spanning 60 million acres, Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services. However, the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. In cooperation with the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA)—a predominant agricul...

  3. Thinning Treatments of Big Sagebrush in Western Wyoming: Shrub and Grass Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young)-dominated rangelands of western Wyoming are under increasing pressure to provide a diversity of ecosystem goods and services for the public. For example, management practices that alter vegetation structure and cover...

  4. WyomingView: No-Cost Remotely Sensed Data for Geographic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivanpillai, Ramesh; Driese, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Learning enhanced by visual examples and remotely sensed imagery is a valuable classroom resource for teaching students geographic concepts in a meaningful context. Barriers to the use of imagery include difficulty finding appropriate imagery and the cost of moderate resolution satellite imagery. A program in Wyoming called WyomingView and…

  5. 76 FR 5607 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Rock Springs Field Office, Wyoming...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ...Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Rock Springs Field Office, Wyoming and Associated Environmental...amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Rock Springs Field Office (RSFO), Rock Springs, Wyoming, intends to prepare a...

  6. Mechanical models of fracture reactivation and slip on bedding surfaces during folding of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming Pablo F. Sanz a,*, David D. Pollard b , Patricia F. Allwardt parallel slip FEM modeling Frictional contact Sheep Mountain, Wyoming a b s t r a c t We use finite element-surface slip during the deformation of the asymmetric anticline at Sheep Mountain, Wyoming. A series

  7. Forecasting and evaluating patterns of energy development in southwestern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of future oil and natural gas development in southwestern Wyoming on wildlife populations are topical to conservation of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. To aid in understanding these potential effects, the U.S. Geological Survey developed an Energy Footprint simulation model that forecasts the amount and pattern of energy development under different assumptions of development rates and well-drilling methods. The simulated disturbance patterns produced by the footprint model are used to assess the potential effects on wildlife habitat and populations. A goal of this modeling effort is to use measures of energy production (number of simulated wells), well-pad and road-surface disturbance, and potential effects on wildlife to identify build-out designs that minimize the physical and ecological footprint of energy development for different levels of energy production and development costs.

  8. BEARTOOTH PRIMITIVE AREA AND VICINITY, MONTANA AND WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Van Noy, Ronald M.

    1984-01-01

    The Beartooth area comprises about 600 sq mi in the central part of the Beartooth Mountains in South-central Montana and northwestern Wyoming just northeast of Yellowstone National Park. A mineral-resource survey concluded that one area of probable and one of substantiated mineral-resource potential are present in the Beartooth area. Three small mining districts (Red Lodge, Stillwater, and Independence) and one possibly major district (Cooke City) adjoin the Beartooth area but lie almost entirely outside it; the northern part of the Cooke City mining district, around Goose Lake, is within the area. This area has substantiated resource potential for copper, silver, gold, and platinum-group elements. The Red Lodge mining district extends into the eastern part of the area and has a probable chrome resource potential. There is little promise for the discovery of energy resources in the area.

  9. The Rattlesnake Hills of central Wyoming revisited: Further paleomagnetic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheriff, Steven D.; Shive, Peter N.

    1980-08-01

    Paleomagnetic results from the Eocene igneous rocks of the Rattlesnake Hills in central Wyoming have added 9 reliable virtual geomagnetic pole positions to previous paleomagnetic data from the area. These new data when combined with corrected results from the previous study yield a paleomagnetic pole located at 146.2° E, 79.4° N; ?95 = 9.6°. This pole position, at about 44 mybp, agrees very well with other Eocene paleopole determinations for stable North America. The proximity of these pole positions to the present rotation axis shows that most of the angular distance between the apparent pole position for the Late Cretaceous and the present was closed in the Paleocene and/or early Eocene.

  10. Outplanting Wyoming big sagebrush following wldfire: stock performance and economics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettweiler-Robinson, Eva; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Evans, James R.; Newsome, Heidi; Davies, G. Matt; Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.; Easterly, Richard T.; Salstrom, Debra; Dunwiddle, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    mycorrhizal amendments. Most mortality occurred during the first year after planting; this period is the greatest barrier to establishment of sagebrush stock. The proportion of healthy stock in Year 1 was positively related to subsequent survival to Year 3. Costs were minimized, and survival maximized, by planting container stock or bare-root stock with a hydrogel dip. Our results indicate that outplanting is an ecologically and economically effective way of establishing Wyoming big sagebrush. However, statistical analyses were limited by the fact that data about initial variables (stock quality, site conditions, weather) were often unrecorded and by the lack of a replicated experimental design. Sharing consistent data and using an experimental approach would help land managers and restoration practitioners maximize the success of outplanting efforts.

  11. Swift fox survival and production in southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, T.L.; Lindzey, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    We estimated annual survival rates of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) and documented number of young per pair in a transition zone between shortgrass prairie and sagebrush steppe plant communities in southeastern Wyoming during 1996-2000. Annual adult survival ranged from 40% to 69%, with predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) the primary cause of deaths. Two foxes died of canine distemper virus. Annual survival rates did not differ among years (P>0.12). Nineteen of 24 (79%) swift fox pairs were observed with young over 3 years. Mean minimum litter size was 4.6 based on these 19 litters and 6 others not associated with our radiocollared foxes. Adult survival was similar and litter size slightly larger than observed elsewhere in the species range, suggesting that viable swift fox populations can be supported by sagebrush steppe and shortgrass prairie transition habitat.

  12. Ratio maps of iron ore deposits Atlantic City district, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary results of a spectral rationing technique are shown for a region at the southern end of the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Digital ratio graymaps and analog ratio images have been produced for the test site, but ground truth is not yet available for thorough interpretation of these products. ERTS analog ratio images were found generally better than either ERTS single-channel images or high altitude aerial photos for the discrimination of vegetation from non-vegetation in the test site region. Some linear geological features smaller than the ERTS spatial resolution are seen as well in ERTS ratio and single-channel images as in high altitude aerial photography. Geochemical information appears to be extractable from ERTS data. Good preliminary quantitative agreement between ERTS-derived ratios and laboratory-derived reflectance ratios of rocks and minerals encourage plans to use lab data as training sets for a simple ratio gating logic approach to automatic recognition maps.

  13. BRIDGER WILDERNESS AND GREEN-SWEETWATER ROADLESS AREA, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, Ronald G.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource appraisal of the Bridger Wilderness and contiguous Green-Sweetwater Roadless Area in Wyoming was made. This rugged and remote region is mostly Precambrian crystalline granitic rocks that contain only small and discontinuous areas of mineralization. The area is considered to have little promise for metallic mineral deposits. Sedimentary rocks in the area have minor coal seams and beds of phosphate rock, but the coal beds are thin and of limited extent, and the phosphate rock is low-grade compared to similar rocks elsewhere in the region. A probable potential for oil and gas at depth, assigned to part of the area, is based on the assumption that oil- and gas-bearing rocks exist at depth below a low-angle thrust fault and a wedge of Precambrian crystalline rock.

  14. Bridger Wilderness and Green-Sweetwater Roadless Area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, R.G.; Ryan, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource appraisal of the Bridger Wilderness and contiguous Green-Sweetwater Roadless Area was made by the USGS and USBM in 1980-1982. This rugged and remote region along the west slope of the Wind River Range, Wyoming is mostly Precambrian crystalline granitic rocks that contain only small and discontinuous areas of mineralization. The area is considered to have little promise for metallic mineral deposits. Sedimentary rocks in the area have minor coal seams and beds of phosphate rock, but the coal beds are thin and of limited extent, and the phosphate rock is low-grade compared to similar rocks elsewhere in the region. A probable potential for oil and gas at depth, assigned to part of the area, is based on the assumption that oil- and gas-bearing rocks exist at depth below a low-angle thrust fault and a wedge of Precambrian crystalline rock.

  15. Leopard frog and wood frog reproduction in Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Livo, Lauren J.

    1989-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1988, we recorded reproductive information from populations of ranid frogs in Colorado and Wyoming. Egg masses from five plains and montane populations of northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) contained 645-6272 eggs (x? = 3045, N = 68 egg masses). In two montane populations of wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) numbers of eggs per egg mass varied from 711-1248 (x? = 876, N = 15) and probably were equal to total clutch size. Mean hatching success was 90% in egg masses from one R. sylvatica population and ranged from 70% to 99% in R. pipiens egg masses. Rana pipiens egg masses from one location were assigned to three overlapping size distributions, which we believe reflects the underlying age structure of female frogs.

  16. California-Wyoming Grid Integration Study: Phase 1 -- Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Schwabe, P.; Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.; Brinkman, G.; Paduru, A.; Diakov, V.; Hand, M.

    2014-03-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of two different renewable energy options for the California energy market between 2017 and 2020: 12,000 GWh per year from new California in-state renewable energy resources; and 12,000 GWh per year from Wyoming wind delivered to the California marketplace. Either option would add to the California resources already existing or under construction, theoretically providing the last measure of power needed to meet (or to slightly exceed) the state's 33% renewable portfolio standard. Both options have discretely measurable differences in transmission costs, capital costs (due to the enabling of different generation portfolios), capacity values, and production costs. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the two different options to provide additional insight for future planning.

  17. Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B.

    1993-01-01

    The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

  18. "The Campbell Collaboration Social, Psychological, Educational and Criminological Trials Register (C2-SPECTR)" To Facilitate the Preparation and Maintenance of Systematic Reviews of Social and Educational Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony; Boruch, Robert F.; Rounding Cath; McDonald, Steve; Chalmers, Iain,

    2000-01-01

    Describes the early stages of development of the Campbell Collaboration Social, Psychological, Educational & Criminological Trials Register (C2-SPECTR) to help those preparing and maintaining systematic reviews of experiments in these fields. The register currently contains more than 10,000 records, including more than 300 references to existing…

  19. Service Engagement in Interventions for Street-Connected Children and Young People: A Summary of Evidence Supplementing a Recent Cochrane-Campbell Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Rosa; Coren, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper builds on a Cochrane-Campbell systematic review of interventions that reduce harms and promote reintegration in street-connected children and young people focusing on intervention outcomes. The aim of the present analysis is to explore questions raised in the systematic review over the potential role of service engagement in…

  20. INVARIANTS OF THE DIAGONAL Cp-ACTION ON V3 H.E.A. CAMPBELL, B. FODDEN, AND DAVID L. WEHLAU

    E-print Network

    Wehlau, David

    INVARIANTS OF THE DIAGONAL Cp-ACTION ON V3 H.E.A. CAMPBELL, B. FODDEN, AND DAVID L. WEHLAU Abstract. Let Cp denote the cyclic group of order p where p 3 is prime. We denote by V3 the indecomposable three dimensional representation of Cp over a field F of characteristic p. We com- pute a set