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1

Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyo., by the U. S. Geological Survey in October 1951. From June to November 1952, an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities having abnormally high radioactivity were found; uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization in the area is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation, except sparsely disseminated uranium in the sandstone of the White River formation, which caps the Pumpkin Buttes, mid several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where iron-saturated sandstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above-normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of the formation and are of two types: small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, manganese and vanadium minerals in sandstone, and irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone. The second type is usually larger but of lower grade than the first. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north-trending belt about 60 miles long and 18 miles in maximum width.

Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

1954-01-01

2

Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area Campbell and Johnson Counties by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1951 From June to November 1952 an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities with abnormally high radioactivity were found uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation exclusive of sparsely disseminated uranium in the White River sandstone which caps the Pumpkin Buttes and several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where ironstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of formation and are of two types. (1) small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, and manganese minerals in sandstone and (2) irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone The second type is usually larger but lower grade than the first type. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north -trending belt approximately 60 miles long with a maximum width of 18 miles,

Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

1953-01-01

3

Geology of the Pumpkin Buttes Area of the Powder River Basin, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 200 uranium occurrences have been examined in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Wyoming. Uranium minerals are visible at most of these places and occur in red and buff sandstone lenses in the Wasatch formation of Eocene age. The uranium minerals are disseminated in buff sandstone near red sandstone, and also occur in red sandstone in manganese oxide concretions and uraninite concretions.

Sharp, William Neil; White, Amos McNairy

1956-01-01

4

78 FR 7809 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed (Non-Competitive) Direct Sale of Public Land in Campbell County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Competitive) Direct Sale of Public Land in Campbell County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...sale of 4.15 acres of public land in Campbell County, Wyoming, at not less than the...following-described public land in Campbell County, Wyoming, is proposed for...

2013-02-04

5

Colorectal cancer mortality and incidence in Campbell County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Previous publications have reported an unusually high colon cancer mortality rate for several Kentucky counties. We investigated these high rates by examining incidence of colorectal cancer in one county with a high mortality. The objective was to determine whether the incidence of colorectal cancer was as high as mortality rates indicated and, if so, to look for possible etiologic factors for the high rates. We found the incidence of colon cancer to be significantly higher in Campbell County than expected. While we expected 162 cases of colon cancer, we actually observed 192 (P less than .01). The number of rectal cancers was no higher than expected (52 expected and 62 observed), in agreement with previously reported mortality figures. A geographic plot of cases by home residence showed a significantly higher rate of colon cancer for urban county regions than for rural regions. In fact, the population of rural Campbell County had a colon cancer rate significantly lower than either the county rate or the national rate. Several factors were analyzed to explain these rate differences. The only consistently associated factor was source of residential drinking water.

Richmond, R.E.; Rickabaugh, J.; Huffman, J.; Epperly, N.

1987-08-01

6

78 FR 65420 - Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties, New...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Portageville Bridge Project (Wyoming and Livingston Counties...at the location of the existing Portageville Bridge (also known as the ``Portage High Bridge'') over the Genesee River in Wyoming...

2013-10-31

7

76 FR 78234 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

The Forest Service proposes to authorize Peabody Powder River Mining, LLC to vacate and relocate portions of Campbell County Road 69, Mackey Road, onto National Forest System (NFS) land on Thunder Basin National Grassland. The proposal comprises new construction of approximately 6.56 miles on NFS lands in portions of Sections 6-8, 17, and 21-22 of T. 42 N., R. 69 W. and Sections 29-31 of T. 43......

2011-12-16

8

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2000: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 23 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) low birth-weight babies; (4) early prenatal care; (5) infants deaths; (6) child deaths; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

9

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2000: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 23 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) low birth-weight babies; (4) early prenatal care; (5) infants deaths; (6) child deaths; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

10

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2002: A County-By-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide and county trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7)…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

11

Hydrologic conditions near Glendo, Platte County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glendo area of Platte and Carbon Counties, Wyo., about 250 square miles in extent, is in the Great Plains physiographic province. It is bordered on the west by the Laramie Range and on the east by the Hartville uplift. The North Platte River and Horseshoe and Middle Bear Creeks are the principal streams that drain the area. Gentle to steep hills, which lie between 4,450 and 6,360 feet above sea level, characterize the topography. Approximately 7,600 acres of land is cultivated in the Horseshoe Creek valley and 1,000 or more acres in the Cassa Flats of the North Platte River and Middle Bear Creek valleys. The average annual precipitation of 13.15 inches and the streamflow diverted for irrigation from Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River are usually inadequate to sustain crops during the entire growing season. Sedimentary rocks, which underlie about 99 percent of the Glendo area, range in age from Cambrian(?) to Recent and in thickness from about 3,000 to 4,700 feet. Beds of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age dip steeply away from the Laramie Range and the Hartville uplift to form a large syncline, which is interrupted by the Elkhorn anticline in the central part of the area. Beds of Tertiary and Quaternary age that were deposited over the older structural features and later were partly removed by erosion have dips of less than 6 ? . The 'Converse sand' of local usage at the top of the Hartville Formation of Mississippian(7), Pennsylvanian, and Permian age, the White River Formation of Oligocene age, and the flood-plain deposits of Recent .age are the most important aquifers in the Glendo area. The Hartville Formation consists predominantly of hard limestone and dolomite and of lesser amounts of sandstone and shale ; its thickness ranges from 850 to 1,050 feet throughout most of the area. The 'Converse sand' is an artesian aquifer consisting of fine- to medium-grained porous sandstone having an average thickness of about 80 feet. Recharge to the Hartville Formation is mainly from seepage of surface water from Glendo Reservoir and Spring Creek; ground water is discharged from the formation to the overlying White River Formation and the alluvium in the North Platte River valley near Cassa and to four wells in the Horseshoe Creek valley. Flowing wells yielding from a few gallons per minute to 175 gpm (gallons per minute) or more from the 'Converse sand' can probably be located in an area from ? mile to 1? miles wide and about 4? miles long in the lower Horseshoe Creek valley. The depth to the 'Converse sand' in this area depends upon the topographic relief and distance from the outcrop and ranges from 250 to about 1,000 feet. The discharge induced by pumping a well in the aquifer in the 'Converse sand' would probably amount to about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown. Values of 2,000, 2,100, and 10,300 gpd (gallons per day) per ft for the coefficient of transmissibility of the 'Converse sand' were obtained from aquifer tests at three wells. The chemical analyses of samples from the Hartville Formation ('Converse. sand' included) indicate that the water in the formation is of fairly good quality and adequate for domestic, stock, and irrigation uses, although the fluoride content is low and the water is hard. The White River Formation is composed of as much as 575 feet of fractured siltstone and claystone, and the flood-plain deposits include up to 65 feet of silt, sand, and gravel. Precipitation is the main type of recharge to the rocks of Tertiary age. Recharge to the alluvium in the valleys of Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River occurs mainly by seepage of ground water from. underlying beds, by infiltration of irrigation water, and by infiltration of streamflow as bank storage. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage to streams, by underflow, and by evapotranspiration and artificially by wells. In 1961, the total discharge from 38 wells in the White River and Arikaree Formations and 2

Welder, G. E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

1965-01-01

12

Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-11-01

13

Performance and operation of the Hamm Minnelusa Sand Unit, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Hamm Minnelusa Sand Unit was discovered in 1966 and produced from the Minnelusa B sand. The field was under fluid-expansion primary recovery until water injection began in Dec. 1972. Waterflood response peaked at a higher monthly rate than that of primary recovery. Water production indicated channeling through high-permeability zones. In Oct. 1975, a volumetric-sweep improvement program was initiated into the single-injection wellbore. Anionic polyacrylamide and aluminum citrate were injected to provide in-depth vertical conformance. A second well was converted to injection in April 1976, and sweep improvement started 26 months later. The third well was converted to injection and the chemical-oil-recovery program began in Aug. 1982. The first two injectors were converted to produce water disposal at that date. The polymer-augmented waterflood was terminated in Jan. 1985. Water injection continues. This paper details flood performance up to July, 1985. Cumulative water injection is 76.6% of the total PV. A 39.5% PV chemical slug has been injected. Total recovery to data is 48.7% of the original oil in place (OOIP).

Doll, T.E.; Hanson, M.T.

1987-12-01

14

Air drilling for gas sands: Marianne Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Marianne field is on the northeast flank of the Rock Springs uplift in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, just south of the town of Superior. The field is located where regional east dip averages 300 ft/mi (57 m/km). Numerous east-northeast-trending normal faults are present across the field with displacements ranging from 20 to 400 ft (6 to 120 m). Updip stratigraphic pinch-outs are responsible for gas accumulations in two separate Second Frontier sandstones with entrapment apparently not related to faulting. There are similar traps in various thin sandstone stringers in the Third Frontier and Muddy sandstones. In addition, a combination stratigraphic-fault trap for hydrocarbons appears to have been found in the Dakota and Lakota sandstones in one well; these horizons were abandoned for mechanical reasons before conclusive testing could be completed. All but one of the wells at Marianne field have been drilled either partially or completely with air. Consequently the potential to produce from various pay zones in nearly every well was determined prior to running production casing. This information generally cannot be obtained through drill stem testing in this area due to the formation damage from the drilling mud on the Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs. If an air-drilled gas reservoir was damaged later by drilling mud or cement, the potential was already known and it could be brought back through fracturing. The field consists of 6 gas wells and 5 dry holes.

Wellborn, R.

1983-08-01

15

77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000.BX0000; WYW173408] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-05-25

16

77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-01-25

17

77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW176095] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2012-04-16

18

76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW161248] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2011-05-13

19

Pumping tests of well Campbell et al. No. 2, Gila Hot Springs, Grant County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Well Campbell et al. No. 2 near Gila Hot Springs in southwestern New Mexico (Section 5, Township 13 South, Range 13 West) was pumped for a five-step test and a 48-hour constant-rate test during October 1981. Measurements included depth to water in the pumping well and two observation wells, and discharge rates at the pumping well and two springs. The water level in the pumping well responded during both tests. However, water-level changes in the observation wells were too small for analytical use and discharge rates from the springs showed no change. Chemical analyses of water samples collected from two springs and the pumping well show very similar water chemistries. Estimates of hydraulic properties show transmissivity from 12,000 to 14,000 gpd/ft and a storativity of 0.05. Combining these parameters with well data gives the first-year optimum discharge rate as 50 gpm with 20 feet of drawdown. Pumping this well at 50 gpm for forty years should produce only small water-level changes in wells a few hundred feet away. It would diminish the flow of the springs, and for planning purposes the combined discharge of the springs and well should be considered constant.

Schwab, G.E.; Summers, W.K.; Colpitts, R.M. Jr.; Teuten, C.E.; Young, W.K.

1982-03-01

20

76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. The Draft CCP/ EA will also...

2011-06-30

21

76 FR 78939 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. In-Person Viewing or Pickup...Kamehameha Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

2011-12-20

22

Lithology and well-log study of Campbell E-2, geothermal test well, Humboldt House geothermal prospect, Pershing County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In light of the cuttings and geophysical logs from the Campbell E-2 hole, it seems unlikely that a geothermal reservoir exists in the horst block of the Humboldt House area. All known sinter deposits occur in the graben block in the valley, northwest and southwest of Campbell E-2. The range front fault, which may serve as a conduit for deeply

B. S. Sibbett; W. E. Glenn

1981-01-01

23

Ammonities and Some Characteristic Bivalves from the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation, Natrona County, Wyoming (Chapter B).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Frontier Formation in Natrona County, Wyoming, consists of two or three members of mostly shallow-water marine shale, siltstone, and sandstone. From oldest to youngest, these units are the Belle Fourche Member, the informal member of Emigrant Gap, and...

W. A. Cobban

1990-01-01

24

78 FR 48461 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L57000000-BX0000; WYW172684] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, WYW172684, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Hay Creek II Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

2013-08-08

25

76 FR 41822 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW143519, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a petition for reinstatement from USA Exploration & Production LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW143519 for land in Campbell County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease...

2011-07-15

26

Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environm...

1994-01-01

27

North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the draft environmental impact statement for a proposed exploratory oil drilling operation in Shoshone National Forest in Wyoming describes the drilling equipment and support facilities required for the operation. Marathon Oil Company's purpose is to test the gas and oil potential of underlying geologic structures. Although Marathon plans a reclamation and revegetation program, there would be erosion during the operation. Noise from the drilling and helicopter activity would disrupt wildlife and vacationers in nearby Yellowstone Park. Confrontations with the grizzly bear population would increase. The legal mandate for the assessment was the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920.

Not Available

1984-01-01

28

Geothermal modeling of Jackson Hole, Teton County Wyoming: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the possibility of high-temperature-heat sources (greater than 300/sup 0/C) in the area of Jackson Hole, northwestern Wyoming. Analytical and finite-difference numerical models describing conductive and convective terrestrial heat transport were utilized in an attempt to define the thermal regime of this area. This report presents data which were used as constraints for the analytic and numerical thermal models. These data include a general discussion of geology of the area, thermal spring information, subsurface temperature information, and hydrology of the area. Model results are presented with a discussion of interpretations and implications for the existence of high-temperature heat sources in the Jackson Hole area.

Heasler, H.P.

1987-04-01

29

Lithology and Well-LOG Study of Campbell E-2, Geothermal Test Well, Humboldt House Geothermal Prospect, Pershing County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In light of the cuttings and geophysical logs from the Campbell E-2 hole, it seems unlikely that a geothermal reservoir exists in the horst block of the Humboldt House area. All known sinter deposits occur in the graben block in the valley, northwest and ...

B. S. Sibbett W. E. Glenn

1981-01-01

30

Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming are presented.

Honey, J.G.; Hettinger, R.D.

1989-01-01

31

WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2001: A County-by-County Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators, the factbook documents state trends for 36 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) unintended pregnancy; (4) low birth weight babies; (5) early prenatal care; (6) immunizations; (7) chronic…

Stewart, Shelli, Ed.

32

Hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area, Platte County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The area includes about 260 square miles in central Platte County that consists of Wheatland Flats and a border region. Wheatland Flats is an area of about 100 square miles that is bounded by Chugwater Creek on the east, the Laramie River on the north, and Sybille Creek on the west. The southern boundary is approximately the southernmost limit of alluvial terrace deposits. Surface water diverted from the Laramie River along with ground water from wells is used to irrigate about 57,000 acres most of which are on and adjacent to Wheatland Flats. More than 200 wells are used for irrigation, industrial, and municipal supplies. The wells are completed in an upper aquifer consisting primarily of shallow alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and a lower aquifer, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age. Net water-level decline after approximately 20 years (1958-60 to 1979) generally is less than 10 feet in each aquifer , although declines of as much as 13 feet have occurred in the Airkaree Formation at specific locations. A digital model was used to simulate hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area. The model indicated that ground-water discharge to streams decreased by 10 percent from 1971 to 1978. Stream-discharge measurements are not available to verify the loss. However, it is reasonable to assume, on the basis of hydraulic-head decline in the aquifers, that there has been some ground-water contribution to the stream. (USGS)

Crist, M. A.

1983-01-01

33

Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

34

Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp

Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

2012-01-01

35

Structural relationships of northern and central parts of Emigrant Gap anticline, Natrona County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Emigrant atGrap anticline lies on the east side of the Casper arch and trends north-northwest in east-central Natrona County, Wyoming, from the western end of Casper Mountain to its plunge south of Petrie Siding, a distance of about 20 mi. Outcrops of Cretaceous Frontier sandstones define or outline the structure, especially its northern and central parts. Surface expression of faulting is minor; some beds are repeated by minor thrusting, and some are offset by small mainly north-northeast strike-slip faults. Joint sets include an approximately horizontal set, a high-angle northeastern set, and a high-angle northwestern set. A fourth high-angle approximately east-west set is prominent only in one area where the anticlinal axis is sinistrally offset almost 2 mi. An unexposed strike-slip/wrench fault is probably present at depth and probably offsets one or more major subsurface thrusts. These include the Owl Creek thrust fault, which extends beneath Pine Mountain, and probably one other east-dipping thrust that has possible surface extension adjacent to the anticline. Emigrant Gap anticline appears to be rootless, having been transported westward as part of a thrust sheet during the Laramide orogeny, the principal compressive stress directed east-northeast to west-southwest. Blind strike-slip or wrench faults probably offset the thrust sheet.

Berendson, E.A.; Burford, A.E.

1986-08-01

36

Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in Wyoming. Especially in the winter, the proportionately large, continuous gain of groundwater into Fish Creek in the perennial section keeps most of the creek free of ice. Because sunlight can still reach the streambed in Fish Creek and the water is still flowing, aquatic plants continue to photosynthesize in the winter, albeit at a lower level of productivity. Additionally, the cobble and large gravel substrate in Fish Creek provides excellent attachment points for aquatic plants, and when combined with Fish Creek’s channel stability allows rapid growth of aquatic plants once conditions allow during the spring. The aquatic plant community of Fish Creek was different than most streams in Wyoming in that it contains many different macrophytes—including macroalgae such as long streamers of Cladophora, aquatic vascular plants, and moss; most other streams in the state contain predominantly algae. From the banks of Fish Creek, the bottom of the stream sometimes appeared to be a solid green carpet. A shift was observed from higher amounts of microalgae in April/May to higher amounts macrophytes in August and October, and differences in the relative abundance of microalgae and macrophytes were statistically significant between seasons. Differences in dissolved-nitrate concentrations and in the nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio were significantly different between seasons, as concentrations of dissolved nitrate decreased from April/May to August and October. It is likely that dissolved-nitrate concentrations in Fish Creek were lower in August and October because macrophytes were quickly utilizing the nutrient, and a negative correlation between macro-phytes and nitrate was found. Macroinvertebrates also were sampled because of their role as indicators of water quality and their documented responses to perturbation such as degradation of water quality and habitat. Statistically significant seasonal differences were noted in the macroinvertebrate community. Taxa richness and relative abundance of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, which tend to be intolerant of water-

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

37

4. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February 20, 1934 DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRANCE. - Nichols-Rice-Cherry House, Sam Houston Park (moved from San Jacinto Street), Houston, Harris County, TX

38

2. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February 20, 1934 FRONT PORCH FROM EAST. - Nichols-Rice-Cherry House, Sam Houston Park (moved from San Jacinto Street), Houston, Harris County, TX

39

5. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February 20, 1934 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ENTRANCE. - Nichols-Rice-Cherry House, Sam Houston Park (moved from San Jacinto Street), Houston, Harris County, TX

40

1. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February 20, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. - Nichols-Rice-Cherry House, Sam Houston Park (moved from San Jacinto Street), Houston, Harris County, TX

41

3. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Historic American Buildings Survey, James I. Campbell, Photographer February 20, 1934 SOUTH ELEVATION (FRONT). - Nichols-Rice-Cherry House, Sam Houston Park (moved from San Jacinto Street), Houston, Harris County, TX

42

64 FR 66194 - Pinedale Anticline Natural Gas Exploration and Development Project, Sublette County, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Pinedale Anticline Natural Gas Exploration and Development...and development of, natural gas resources in the Pinedale...Gathering Company, McMurry Oil Company, Questar Exploration...Wyoming, and the Jonah Natural Gas Field located 30...

1999-11-24

43

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

44

Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

45

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

46

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

1953-01-01

47

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly, therefore, may represent either slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet, or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity, and therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

1953-01-01

48

Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer system, commonly called the High Plains aquifer in many publications, is a nationally important water resource that underlies a 111-million-acre area (173,000 square miles) in parts of eight States including Wyoming. Through irrigation of crops with groundwater from the High Plains aquifer system, the area that overlies the aquifer system has become one of the major agricultural regions in the world. In addition, the aquifer system also serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents of the region. The High Plains aquifer system is one of the largest aquifers or aquifer systems in the world. The High Plains aquifer system underlies an area of 8,190 square miles in southeastern Wyoming. Including Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present in parts of five counties in southeastern Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 8 percent of Wyoming, and 5 percent of the aquifer system is located within the State. Based on withdrawals for irrigation, public supply, and industrial use in 2000, the High Plains aquifer system is the most utilized source of groundwater in Wyoming. With the exception of the Laramie Mountains in western Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present throughout Laramie County. In Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is the predominant groundwater resource for agricultural (irrigation), municipal, industrial, and domestic uses. Withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation (primarily in the eastern part of the county) is the largest use of water from the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County and southeastern Wyoming. Continued interest in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County prompted a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office to update the potentiometric-surface map of the aquifer system in Laramie County. Groundwater levels were measured in wells completed in the High Plains aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

2011-01-01

49

Oil springs and flat top anticlines, Carbon County Wyoming: An unusual fold pair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil Springs Anticline, northwest of Medicine Bow, Wyoming, and located at the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin, lies near the junction of the Freezeout Hills Anticline, the Shirley thrust fault and the Flat Top Anticline. The surface fold as defined by the outcrop of the Wall Creek Sandstone Member of the Frontier Formation is disharmonic to deeper structure at

Blackstone; D. L. Jr

1994-01-01

50

Mineral resources of the Bobcat Draw Badlands Wilderness Study Area, Bir Horn and Washakie Counties, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bobcat Draw Wilderness Study Area is in the Bighorn Basin about 45 mi west of Worland, Wyoming, and is underlain by early Tertiary sedimentary rocks. No resources were identified in this study area, which lacks mines or prospects, but is mostly under lease for oil and gas. This study area has a high potential for oil and gas and

A. B. Gibbons; R. R. Carlson; D. M. Kulik; W. Lundby

1989-01-01

51

Mineral resources of the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Park County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area (WY-010-335) located near the western edge of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. There has been neither mining activity nor oil and gas production within the study area. Total identified (sum of measured, indicated, and inferred) and undiscovered (hypothetical) subbituminous coal resources beneath the study area are estimated to be 805 million

D. G. Hadley; R. T. Ryder; R. H. Hill; D. M. Kulik; K. E. McLeod; R. E. Jeske

1990-01-01

52

Structural analysis, south flank of the Sweetwater uplift, Carbon County, south-central Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Seminoe-Bennett Mountain area of south-central Wyoming is located on the south flank of the Sweetwater Uplift, approximately 40 mi northeast of Rawlins, Wyoming. This area typifies the structural style common to the Wyoming Foreland Province. The structures present in the foreland were formed during the Laramide orogeny with slight modifications and regional uplift during the Cenozoic. Hydrocarbon production within and adjacent to the study area is located in anticlinal traps of Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks. Giant oil fields such as Wertz and Lost Soldier are located immediately west of the study area. These anticlinal traps are formed by thrust faults which die out laterally and vertically into folds. Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata dip regionally to the southwest at high angles of dip along the mountain front. Analysis of the subsidiary structures mapped on the south flank of the uplift provide an insight into the geometry of structures indicated in the subsurface. Structural analysis reveals the presence of detachment faulting in the sedimentary section which may serve to obscure subsurface structures from surface observation. These deeply buried structures are areas for potential hydrocarbon accumulation. Eleven of thirteen producing wells within the study area have reservoir rocks of upper Cretaceous age, the other two wells produce from the Pennsylvanian. No production has occurred from the Permian within the study area; however, oil staining was observed in the Permian carbonate unit on the outcrop.

Homan, K.S.

1988-01-01

53

Mineral resources of the Bobcat Draw Badlands Wilderness Study Area, Bir Horn and Washakie Counties, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Bobcat Draw Wilderness Study Area is in the Bighorn Basin about 45 mi west of Worland, Wyoming, and is underlain by early Tertiary sedimentary rocks. No resources were identified in this study area, which lacks mines or prospects, but is mostly under lease for oil and gas. This study area has a high potential for oil and gas and for subeconomic resources of coal and a moderate potential for a deep-seated geothermal energy resource. The resource potential for oil shale and metals, including uranium, is low.

Gibbons, A.B.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

1989-01-01

54

Thin-skinned shortening geometries of the South Fork fault: Bighorn basin, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a new interpretation of the South Fork fault in light of thin-skinned thrust theory. Cross sections and seismic data are presented which indicate that the South Fork fault is an allochthonous salient which was emplaced in the Bighorn basin during the early to middle Eocene. All observed structural geometries can be interpreted as developing under a compressional regime, similar to the Wyoming-Utah-Idaho thrust belt. Faults either follow bedding-plane surfaces, cut up section in the direction of tectonic transport or form backthrusts. A single decollement within the Jurassic Gypsum Spring Formation appears to dominate. Tectonic transport was approximately southeast, parallel to tear faults in the allochthonous plate.

Clarey, T.L. (Chevron USA, Inc., New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-01-01

55

Oil springs and flat top anticlines, Carbon County Wyoming: An unusual fold pair  

SciTech Connect

Oil Springs Anticline, northwest of Medicine Bow, Wyoming, and located at the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin, lies near the junction of the Freezeout Hills Anticline, the Shirley thrust fault and the Flat Top Anticline. The surface fold as defined by the outcrop of the Wall Creek Sandstone Member of the Frontier Formation is disharmonic to deeper structure at the level of the Jurassic Sundance Formation. The fold is wedged between two major folds and is the result of a space problem between larger structural elements. The controlling Flat Top Anticline is an excellent example of a fold controlled by a well constrained fault in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The basement is bowed upward and outward to the northwest in the hanging wall of the Flat Top Anticline. The purpose of this paper is to describe the geologic structure of the Oil Springs and Flat Top anticlines and their relationship to the Freezeout Hills and the Hanna Basin. Commercial production of petroleum and natural gas occurs on the west flank of the Laramie-Cooper Lake Basin as far north as the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin. Stone reviewed the producing formations in the Laramie and eastern Hanna basins and noted that 11 commercial accumulations of petroleum and natural gas are directly related to anticlinal structures. Production derived from the Permian-Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in this region has a special geologic framework. Fields that produce from the Tensleep Sandstone are well defined anticlines bounded by faults or fault systems, a situation also reported by Biggs and Espach, Blackstone and in the Wyoming Geological Association Symposium. The Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in these faulted anticlines are in juxtaposition to potential source rocks of either Jurassic or Cretaceous age in the footwalls of the faults. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Blackstone, D.L. Jr. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States))

1994-04-01

56

Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

Not Available

1994-02-01

57

Structural style of east flank of Bighorn Mountains, Johnson and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The 70 mi-long portion of the east flank of the Bighorn Mountains, between Sheridan and Mayoworth, Wyoming, is structurally divisible into three distinct segments - northern, central, and southern - each distinguished by a dominant sense of vergence and structural style. The northern segment displays southwest-verging reverse faults and associated folds, indicating tectonic transport out of the Powder River basin and onto the mountain flank. The central segment displays northeast and east-northeast-verging reverse faults and associated folds, indicating tectonic transport of the mountain flank over the Powder River basin. Seismic and drill-hole data indicate most of these reverse faults dip to the southwest and west-southwest at angles of 35{degree} or less. The southern segment displays west-southwest-verging reverse faults and associated folds, again indicating tectonic transport out of the Powder River basin and onto the mountain flank. All major structures identified within the area of investigation are basement involved, and the geometry of the rocks supports the concept that the mountain flank deformed under the influence of northeast-southwest-directed horizontal compression rather than vertically oriented block uplift.

Furner, R.B. (Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (USA))

1989-09-01

58

Haybarn field, Fremont County, Wyoming: an upper Fort Union (Paleocene) stratigraphic trap  

SciTech Connect

Haybarn field was discovered in the fall of 1981 and produces stratigraphically trapped 43.7/sup 0/ API gravity oil from shallow reservoir sandstones in the upper member of the Fort Union Formation. The sandstones were deposited in a marginal lacustrine delta front setting in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The interfingering lacustrine Waltman Shale has provided the trapping mechanism for the field. The Waltman Shale also appears to be the petroleum source; this primary source, however, was probably deposited in deeper portions of the basin north of the field rather than immediately adjacent to the reservoir. The reservoir sandstones are arkosic and have excellent porosity averaging about 20%. Clays in the reservoir appear to be entirely secondary suggesting that the sandstones were deposited in a high energy, wave-dominated depositional system. Electrical log evaluation of the Upper Fort Union reservoirs is complicated by variations in formation water resistivities between and within the sandstone tongues. The uppermost section of the Upper Fort Union member tends to be fresh water-bearing, while the producing zones in the lower portion of the member have much lower, more saline R/sub w/'s.

Robertson, R.D.

1984-04-01

59

Mineral resources of the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the McCullough Peaks Wilderness Study Area (WY-010-335) located near the western edge of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. There has been neither mining activity nor oil and gas production within the study area. Total identified (sum of measured, indicated, and inferred) and undiscovered (hypothetical) subbituminous coal resources beneath the study area are estimated to be 805 million tons and 275 tons, respectively. There are no other identified resources within the study area. Mineral resource assessment of this study area defines a low potential for metals, sand and gravel, bentonite and glass sand, a low potential for oil and geothermal sources, a low potential for gas in Paleozoic rocks, lower Mesozoic rocks, and some conventional sandstone reservoirs of Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age, a moderate potential for gas in some conventional sandstone reservoirs of Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age, and a high potential for gas in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs of Cretaceous and early Tertiary age and coal (by subsurface analysis). The study area also has a high potential for undiscovered paleontological resources.

Hadley, D.G.; Ryder, R.T.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; McLeod, K.E. (US Geological Survey (US)); Jeske, R.E. (Bureau of Mines (US))

1990-09-01

60

Mineral resources of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The combined investigations of the US Geological Survey, the US Bureau of Mines, and the Geological Survey of Wyoming have identified gold resources in a lode-type gold vein west of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area in the adjacent Lewiston mining district. Extensions of this vein into the study area may contain 20,000 tons of gold resources; however, subsurface sampling is needed to determine if such resources are present in the study area. A high resource potential for placer-type gold deposits and a low resource potential for placer-type tin and tungsten deposits in the Quaternary gravels along the Sweetwater River and Strawberry Creek exists. In the Precambrian greenstone rocks of the western part of the study area, there is a high mineral resource potential for lode-type gold and a low resource potential for lode-type tin and tungsten deposits. In the Precambrian granitoid rocks of the eastern part of the study area, a low potential for lode-type tin and tungsten exists, and in the entire study area, a low resource potential for uranium exists. There is no resource potential for oil, gas, or geothermal energy in the entire study area.

Day, W.C.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; Scott, D.C.; Hausel, W.D.

1988-01-01

61

Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos,, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas...

M. J. Bennett T. E. Noce T. L. Holzer

2008-01-01

62

Nesting Ecology of Golden Eagles and Other Raptors in Southeastern Montana and Northern Wyoming. Distribution and Abundance of Golden Eagles and Other Raptors in Campbell and Converse Counties, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data on the distribution and abundance of 19 species of raptors are presented in the combined reports. Studies on the Sheridan-Decker area and on the Eagle Research Area emphasized long-term reproductive performance of golden eagles, while the much larger...

R. L. Phillips A. H. Wheeler J. M. Lockhart T. P. McEneaney N. C. Forrester

1990-01-01

63

Campbell's and Rubin's Perspectives on Causal Inference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Donald Campbell's approach to causal inference (D. T. Campbell, 1957; W. R. Shadish, T. D. Cook, & D. T. Campbell, 2002) is widely used in psychology and education, whereas Donald Rubin's causal model (P. W. Holland, 1986; D. B. Rubin, 1974, 2005) is widely used in economics, statistics, medicine, and public health. Campbell's approach focuses on…

West, Stephen G.; Thoemmes, Felix

2010-01-01

64

Ground Water Conditions and the Relation to Uranium Deposits in the Gas Hills Area, Fremont and Natrona Counties, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As ground water apparently leaches, transports, and deposits uranium in the Gas Hills area, central Wyoming, it is important to understand its distribution, movement, and relation to geology and ore bodies. Water table maps were prepared of the Wind River...

L. Y. Marks

1978-01-01

65

Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

Not Available

1982-01-01

66

Wyoming Kids Count in Wyoming Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 20 indicators, including the following: (1) poverty and population; (2) welfare reform; (3) certified day care facilities; (4) births; (5) infant deaths;…

Wyoming Children's Action Alliance, Cheyenne.

67

Applied Research Staff: Melba Campbell  

Cancer.gov

Melba J. Campbell is a Program Specialist in the Applied Research Program. She provides administrative support to the Health Services and Economics Branch. Prior to joining ARP, Ms. Campbell was in the Office of Cancer Survivorship (OCS) where she served as a Program Support Specialist. Her roles in OCS included serving as the liaison for Communication, Lead Computer User Group and the Division of Extramural Activities Support (DEAS).

68

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. Any particular anomaly may represent slightly greater-than-average radioactivity over an area of a few thousand square feet or high radioactivity over an area of a few hundred square feet. Thus radioactivity anomalies indicate localities of more-than-average radioactivity and, therefore, suggest areas in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Henderson, J. R.

1954-01-01

69

Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2002-June 30, 2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

70

Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

71

Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2002-June 30, 2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

72

Wyoming Community Colleges Partnership Report, July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document offers individual institution reports for partnership programs in Wyoming's seven community colleges. The colleges are: (1) Casper College; (2) Central Wyoming College; (3) Eastern Wyoming College; (4) Laramie County Community College; (5) Northwest College; (6) Sheridan College; and (7) Western Wyoming Community College. Wyoming…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

73

Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

2012-03-27

74

Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

1993-07-01

75

Jonah field, Sublette County, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 pd (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 in) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W. [Synder Oil Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

1997-07-01

76

Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File (ARF) (for Microcomputers): Demographic State by County--South Dakota, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the diskette version of the Area Resource File (ARF), which is a county-unit database with over 6,000 data elements. The purpose of ARF is to summarize data from many sources into a single file to facilitate health analysis. ARF on diskette is com...

R. B. Cole M. Morris

1986-01-01

77

Availability of Diagnostic and Treatment Services for Acute Stroke in Frontier Counties in Montana and Northern Wyoming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Rapid diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke can lead to improved patient outcomes. Hospitals in rural and frontier counties, however, face unique challenges in providing diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke. Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the availability of key diagnostic technology and programs for acute…

Okon, Nicholas J.; Rodriguez, Daniel V.; Dietrich, Dennis W.; Oser, Carrie S.; Blades, Lynda L.; Burnett, Anne M.; Russell, Joseph A.; Allen, Martha J.; Chasson, Linda; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

2006-01-01

78

WyCoalGas development feasibility study: site evaluations. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project; Converse County, Wyoming; employee housing possibilities  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a preliminary assessment of the land development opportunities available to WyCoalGas, Inc. which arise as a consequence of the construction of its proposed Coal Gasification Facility near Douglas, Wyoming. Present thinking indicates that the facility's construction labor force will peak at approximately 3400 workers and permanent work force at approximately 1000 workers, an influx of personnel which will generate significant demands for housing and related support services within Converse County. As part of the permitting process a number of studies are being prepared which identify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts likely to occur as a consequence of the development. The purpose of the following analysis is to recognize that these probable impacts - and the steps necessary to mitigate them - constitute important real estate investment opportunities for WyCoalGas, Inc. In effect, the successful planning and management of these forces represents, at a minimum, the possibility for reduction of total investment costs for the facility; at a maximum, the opportunity for the generation of significant profits from a well-conceived land development program. Several sites are considered from the point of view of planning, ease of development, acquisition possibilities, etc.

Not Available

1981-10-01

79

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Campbell, Janis, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Campbell, Janis, Ph.D.  Back to CRCHD Ongoing Research CNP Project Listing Janis Campbell, Ph.D. CNP Project Listing CNP Pilot Projects Project Investigator Biography Campbell, Janis, Ph.D. University of

80

Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

McLaughlin, J. F.; Frost, C. D.; Sharma, S.

2011-01-01

81

Sedimentary facies and reservoir characteristics of Cretaceous J Sandstone at Torrington field (North), Goshen County, Wyoming, exploration and development implications  

SciTech Connect

Torrington field (North) is productive from the Lower Cretaceous J sandstone in the Wyoming portion of the Denver basin. The trapping mechanism is stratigraphic, with reservoir sandstones enveloped laterally and updip by shale-dominated lithofacies. The field has produced 13,000 bbl of oil from two wells since its discovery in late 1981. Three major sedimentary environments and their associated facies, characteristic of a meandered fluvial system, occur within the J interval in the area: abandoned channel, point bar(s), and interfluvial plain. Production at both Torrington (North) and Torrington is from reservoir development within point bar deposits. Cores of the J point bar at Torrington (North) show that it is comprised primarily of very fine to fine-grained quartzarenites and sublitharenites. Sedimentary structures observed in the cores include burrowing and bioturbation, high-angle plane-parallel cross-bedding, discontinuous wavy shale laminae, climbing ripples, and truncated laminae. Although excellent hydrocarbon shows occur from the base to the top of the point bar, production appears to be confined to thin intervals of medium-grained quartzarenite found near the middle of the vertical sequence. Petrophysical reservoir characteristics of the J sandstone were established through examination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thin-section petrography, and conventional core analysis data. Microporosity development and geometry also affect production. Field extension locations and an exploratory drill site have been established as a result of this study.

Mikesh, D.L.; Lafollette, R.F.

1983-08-01

82

Campbell's Rule for Estimating Entropy Changes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Campbell's rule for estimating entropy changes is discussed in relation to an earlier article by Norman Craig, where it was proposed that the approximate value of the entropy of reaction was related to net moles of gas consumed or generated. It was seen that the average for Campbell's data set was lower than that for Craig's data set and…

Jensen, William B.

2004-01-01

83

Geology and ground-water resources of Platte County, Wyoming, with a section on Chemical quality of the water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Platte County, Wyo., has an area of 2,114 square miles and, in 1950, had a population of 7,925; it lies within parts of two major physiographic provinces, the northern extension of the Southern Rocky Mountains and the northwestern part of the Great Plains. The Laramie Range and related structures lie along the western margin of the county and constitute the eastern limit of the Rocky Mountain Front Range. The High Plains section of the Great Plains province extends eastward from the Laramie Range over the remainder of the county. The original surface of the High Plains has been deeply eroded, and in the northeastern part of the county it is broken by the broad uplifted structural platform of the Hartville Hills. The North Platte River and its tributaries have entrenched their channels as much as 1,000 feet into the plains, leaving wide, very flat intervalley areas that are interrupted by a few isolated buttes and outlying ridges. Well-defined terraces, locally called the Wheatland Flats, have been formed in central Platte County. The climate is semiarid, the average annual precipitation being about 15 inches. Farming and stockraising are the principal occupations in the county. Most of the rocks exposed in the county are of Tertiary and Quaternary age, although rocks as old as Precambrian crop out locally. The Arikaree and Brule formations and younger deposits, including Tertiary ( ?) deposits (undifferentiated) and terrace, flood-plain, and other alluvial deposits, underlie more than two-thirds of the county. Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian rocks crop out in the other third and underlie the younger rocks at great depths elsewhere. Small supplies of ground water adequate for domestic and stock use can be obtained from shallow wells in the Casper, Hartville, Cloverly, Brule, and Arikaree formations and in the terrace and flood-plain deposits. Small to moderate amounts of ground water can be obtained from the 'Converse sand' of the Hartville formation. Several flowing wells obtain water from this sand near Glendo. Moderate to large supplies of ground water adequate for small-scale irrigation or industrial uses or for public supply can be obtained from properly constructed wells penetrating thick saturated sections of the Arikaree formation and from the terrace and flood-plain deposits. Large supplies of ground water can be obtained from the flood-plain deposits of the North Platte River near Guernsey, where wells commonly yield more than 1,000 gpm (gallons per minute). The aquifers with greatest potential for additional groundwater development in Platte County, in decreasing order of importance, are the flood-plain deposits along the North Platte River and its tributaries, the Arikaree formation and terrace deposits in parts of the Wheatland Flats, and the 'Converse sand' in the general vicinity of Glendo.

Morris, D. A.; Babcock, H. M.; Langford, R. H.

1960-01-01

84

Stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis of aquifer systems, Atlantic Rim, Carbon County, Wyoming: Implications for production of coalbed natural gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production requires the extraction of considerable volumes of water from target formations. This process can dynamically alter local aquifers and affect the larger hydrologic systems of a producing area. An analytical method that provides immediate, cost-effective quantitative information on both resource (methane) and habitat (coalbed aquifer) would help to optimize gas production. This study used a combination of field measurements, water chemistry analysis, and isotopic analysis, both stable (delta13C DIC, deltaO, deltaD) and radiometric (87Sr/ 86Sr), to analyze and characterize the CBNG aquifers and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Waters were sampled and analyzed from streams, springs, and CBNG wells across the Atlantic Rim. Samples were first grouped on the basis of geologic location, and then additionally defined by isotopic and water chemistry analysis into Mesaverde Group springs, Lewis Shale springs, Steele Shale springs, Sand Hill springs, enriched delta 13CDIC springs, methane springs, and subsurface samples (monitoring and CBNG wells). Two distinct water chemistry types are evident in Atlantic Rim samples, Ca-Mg-SO4-type and Na-HCO3-type waters. Atlantic Rim samples also had distinct radiogenic isotopic signatures. Stream water sourced from the Sierra Madre and waters associated with the Mesaverde Group have the highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios, whereas spring samples from the Lewis Shale have the lowest 87Sr/ 86Sr. delta13CDIC, which is enriched by bacterial methanogenesis, was used to identify coalbed waters from other natural waters. Positive delta13CDIC identified spring waters that originated from Mesaverde coalbed aquifers, including methane springs. Strongly positive delta13CDIC of Atlantic Rim CBNG samples identified those coalbed aquifers that are hydraulically isolated, whereas lower delta13CDIC identified wells within open aquifer systems and wells with inefficient casing. This study demonstrated that delta13C DIC was able to help identify hydraulic aquifer isolation, well casing integrity, springs associated with methanogenic coalbed aquifers, and areas of peak methanogenic activity, all of which can be utilized to assess gas potential and promote efficient CBNG production. This abstract supports a supplementary file.

McLaughlin, J. Fred

85

Wyoming Kids Count Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The 1997 report has been expanded to include detailed information on the status of children by categories of welfare, health, and education. The first part of the factbook documents trends by county for 15 indicators: (1) poverty and population; (2)…

Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

86

Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

2008-01-01

87

Coal Mine Safety and Health Report of Investigation: Surface Coal Mine Machinery, September 1, 2011, Weston Engineering, Inc. (WT9) at North Antelope Rochelle Mine, Peabody Powder River Mining LLC, Wright, Campbell County, Wyoming. MSHA ID No. 48-01353.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On Thursday, September 1, 2011, at approximately 10:36 a.m., Cody A. Brown (victim), a contract well driller with approximately 17 months of drilling experience, was killed when a restraining wrench, commonly called a tong wrench, struck him in the upper ...

2011-01-01

88

Alfred Walter Campbell and the visual functions of the occipital cortex.  

PubMed

In his pioneering cytoarchitectonic studies of the human brain, Alfred Walter Campbell identified two structurally different areas in the occipital lobes and assigned two different kinds of visual functions to them. The first area, the visuosensory, was essentially on the mesial surface of the calcarine fissure. It was the terminus of nervous impulses generated in the retina and was where simple visual sensations arose. The second area, the visuopsychic, which surrounded or invested the first, was where sensations were interpreted and elaborated into visual perceptions. I argue that Campbell's distinction between the two areas was the starting point for the eventual differentiation of areas V1-V5. After a brief outline of Campbell's early life and education in Australia and of his Scottish medical education and early work as a pathologist at the Lancashire County Lunatic Asylum at Rainhill near Liverpool, I summarise his work on the human brain. In describing the structures he identified in the occipital lobes, I analyse the similarities and differences between them and the related structures identified by Joseph Shaw Bolton. I conclude by proposing some reasons for how that work came to be overshadowed by the later studies of Brodmann and for the more general lack of recognition given Campbell and his work. Those reasons include the effect of the controversies precipitated by Campbell's alliance with Charles Sherrington over the functions of the sensory and motor cortices. PMID:23218905

Macmillan, Malcolm

2012-11-01

89

Science Nation: Wind Powers Careers in Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As the federal government began to incorporate wind into the country's energy portfolio, educators in Wyoming started planning to train technicians who will maintain the turbines that capture this clean, consistent energy. Students entering the wind energy program at Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne, Wyoming, range from environmentally minded young people right out of high school to individuals in the middle of their careers.

90

1. Main elevation (Campbell Ave.) of Municipal Building HABS VA, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Main elevation (Campbell Ave.) of Municipal Building HABS VA, 81-ROAN, 1A - Roanoke Municipal Building & Annex, 216 Campbell Avenue Southwest & 215 Church Avenue Southwest, Roanoke, Roanoke City, VA

91

Health Assessment for Mystery Bridge Road/U.S. Highway 20 Site, Brookhurst Subdivision, Evansville, Natrona County, Wyoming, Region 8. CERCLIS No. WYD981546005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Mystery Bridge Road, U.S. Highway 20 site, also known as the Brookhurst Subdivision (BSD), is located adjacent to industrial sites in Wyoming. The sites include a natural gas processing facility, an oil and gas well servicing company, and a railroad s...

1990-01-01

92

Prof. John Campbell's ten rules for making reliable castings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

John Campbell’s “Casting Rules” were developed over a lifetime of work in the foundry industry and later research at the University of Birmingham. Much of the research work focused on the effect of melt handling at the various transfer stages on the number of defects created and the effect on the reliability of the castings subsequently made. This article provides the author’s analysis of Campbell’s ten rules for metal casting.

Jolly, Mark

2005-05-01

93

Speaking Personally--With Chere Campbell Gibson  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents an interview with Chere Campbell Gibson, a professor emerita in the School of Human Ecology and graduate program in Continuing and Vocational Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Gibson shares her years of experience in distance education, discusses her book titled "Distance Learners in Higher Education:…

Olgren, Christine

2008-01-01

94

Coals and coal-bearing rocks of the Hanna Coal Field, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renewed interest in Wyoming's vast coal deposits began in the late 1960's as power plant demands for inexpensive, low sulfur coals increased. Because of this demand, Wyoming's coal companies have set new production records every year since 1972. Table 1 summarizes annual production for the last 19 years on a county basis. Wyoming's 1978 tonnage set yet another record at

G. B. Glass; J. T. Roberts

1980-01-01

95

Preliminary technical data report: WyCoalGas project water system. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The WyCoalGas, Inc. Proposed coal gasification plant site is approximately 16 miles north of Douglas, Wyoming, located generally in Sections 27 and 34, T35N, R70W of the sixth prinicpal meridian. The plant site is located in typical high plateau plains of central Wyoming. Climate in the area is typical of semi-arid central Wyoming and is subject to wide variations in temperature. Precipitation in the area averages about 14 inches per year, of which about 10 inches fall during the April-September irrigation season. Projected water requirements at the plant site are 6020 acre-feet per year. Since the proposed plant site is not near any major streams or rivers, water must be transported to it. Water will be supplied from four sources - two surface water and two groundwater. The two surface water sources are LaPrele Reservoir and flood flows from the North Platte River with a 1974 appropriations date. LaPrele Reservoir is located approximately 14 miles west of Douglas, Wyoming, and is shown on Figure A-1. Water will be released from LaPrele Reservoir and flow down LaPrele Creek to the North Platte River. Water from the North Platte River will be diverted at a point in Section 7 of T33N, R71W. The LaPrele water and excess water from the North Platte will be pumped from the river and stored in Panhandle Reservoir No. 1, which is also referred to as Combs Reservoir. A pipeline will convey water from Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 to the coal gasification plant site. The two groundwater sources are located north of Douglas and west of Douglas.

None

1982-01-01

96

Characterization of Interactions between Surface Water and Near-Stream Groundwater along Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, by Using Heat as a Tracer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish Creek, a tributary of the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Local residents began observing an increase in the growth of algae and aquatic plants in the stream during the last decade. Due to the known importance of groundwater to surface water in the area, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to characterize the interactions between surface water and near-stream groundwater along Fish Creek. The study has two main objectives: (1) develop an improved spatial and temporal understanding of water flow (fluxes) between surface water and groundwater, and (2) use a two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport model to interpret observed temperature and hydraulic-head distributions and to describe groundwater flow near Fish Creek. The study is intended to augment hydrologic information derived from previously published results of a seepage investigation on Fish Creek. Seepage measurements provide spatially averaged gains and losses over an entire reach for one point in time, whereas continuous temperature and water-level measurements provide continuous estimates of gain and loss at a specific location. Stage, water-level, and temperature data were collected from surface water and from piezometers completed in an alluvial aquifer at three cross sections on Fish Creek at Teton Village, Resor's Bridge, and Wilson from October 2004 to October 2006. The flow and energy (heat) transport model VS2DH was used to simulate flow through the streambed of Fish Creek at the Teton Village cross section from April 15 to October 14, 2006, (183 recharge periods) and at the Resor's Bridge and Wilson cross sections from June 6, 2005, to October 14, 2006 (496 recharge periods). A trial-and-error technique was used to determine the best match between simulated and measured data. These results were then used to calibrate the cross-sectional models and determine horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities. The fluxes of groundwater into the stream or fluxes of stream water into the alluvial aquifer were estimated by using the calibrated VS2DH model for each cross section. Results of the simulations indicated that surface water/groundwater interaction and hydraulic properties were different at the three cross sections. At the most upstream cross section, Teton Village, Fish Creek flowed intermittently and continually gained relatively large quantities of water from April through September. During other times of the year, the stream was dry near the cross section. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in both the horizontal and vertical directions resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Resor's Bridge cross section, about midway between the other two cross sections, was near the point where perennial flow begins. At this cross section, the stream gained water from groundwater during high flow in late spring and summer, was near equilibrium with groundwater during August and September, and lost water to groundwater during the remainder of the year. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity set at 5x10-5 m/s and vertical hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-5 m/s resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. The Wilson cross section, the most downstream site, was at USGS streamflow-gaging station 13016450. This part of the stream is perennial and was almost always gaining a small volume of water from groundwater. Saturated hydraulic conductivity set at 1x10-4 m/s in the horizontal direction and at 5x10-6 m/s in the vertical direction resulted in the best match between simulated and measured temperatures. Quantitative values of the flux from groundwater into surface water were estimated by using VS2DH and ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 cubic meters per day (m3/d) at the Teton Village cross section, from -3.8 to 7.4 m3/d at t

Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Essaid, Hedeff I.

2009-01-01

97

Candy Draw: significant new Minnelusa field, Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Candy Draw field is located in T53N, R69W, Campbell County, Wyoming. It was discovered by Santa Fe Energy Company in June 1985. Production is from a stratigraphic trap in the lower B sandstone of the Permian Minnelusa Formation. Nine wells are capable of production, and further development is underway. Proven reserves are 9 million bbl of oil. Primary recoverable reserves are calculated at 1 million bbl, or 11% of oil in place. An additional 2 million bbl are estimated to be recoverable from secondary waterflood. Gross ultimate reserves from the nine producing wells are 3 million bbl, or 33% of oil in place. Candy Draw field was discovered by utilizing seismic stratigraphy to confirm regional geologic mapping of the lower B sandstone and overlying Opeche Shale. A lower B sandstone buildup was projected on trend and modeled after Wagonspoke field. Sonic logs were used to construct synthetic seismic models, which indicated that a lower B sandstone buildup could be seen on seismic data. Two seismic lines were acquired with data in the 55 to 65-Hz frequency range. A strike line showed a strong-amplitude anomaly present over the field which matched models that indicated 35 ft of lower B sandstone was present with 25% porosity. Computer modeling indicated that less than 20 ft of sandstone with porosity values of 10 to 12% could not be resolved due to the similar velocity of the Opeche Shale. This was confirmed by development drilling. Modeling from existing well control is critical due to the complex lithology of the Minnelusa Formation. Pitfalls exist, but seismic data have become a valuable tool for Minnelusa exploration.

Gallivan, L.B.; Bjorlie, S.C.

1986-08-01

98

SCREECHOWL DISTRIBUTION IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

information. Authors writing about Wyoming's bird life have mentioned Screech-Owls sparingly. Cary (1901) reported seeing a single Eastern Screech-Owl (Otus asio maxwelliae) in the Black Hills, part of which extends into northeastern Wyoming. Knight (1902:82) lamented, in the first popular treatment of birds of the state, that after 18 years of extensive travel throughout Wyoming he had \\

SAM FITTON

1993-01-01

99

Health assessment for Mystery Bridge Road/US Highway 20 Site, Brookhurst Subdivision, Evansville, Natrona County, Wyoming, Region 8. CERCLIS No. WYD981546005. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Mystery Bridge Road, U.S. Highway 20 site, also known as the Brookhurst Subdivision (BSD), is located adjacent to industrial sites in Wyoming. The sites include a natural gas processing facility, an oil and gas well servicing company, and a railroad siding. Organic chemicals from the industrial sites have contaminated the underlying aquifer and resulted in contamination of downgradient drinking water wells in the BSD. The list of organic contaminants detected on-site include toluene, xylene, benzene, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. An estimated 414 persons in the subdivision rely on groundwater wells for potable water. An alternative supply of potable water has been provided for these residents.

Not Available

1990-04-04

100

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69...93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall...

2010-01-01

101

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69...93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall...

2009-01-01

102

Wyoming Bioinformation Node (WBN) Species Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A collaborative project of the University of Wyoming's Spatial Data and Visualization Center and the Biological Resources Division (BRD) of the US Geological Survey, the Wyoming Bioinformation Node (WBN) Species Atlas contains distribution maps for 445 terrestrial vertebrate species. The Species Atlas database may be browsed by taxonomic group (amphibians, reptiles, mammals, or birds) or searched by species name, habitat type, or reference (author). Each species map shows Wyoming county boundaries overlaid by the species' predicted distribution; distributions are selected based on primary (shown in green) and secondary (brown) land cover type. Maps (Arc/Info export files) and species distribution information may be downloaded in .zip format; instructions for download are provided on-site.

1999-01-01

103

Law in Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is intended to give students an overview of laws in Wyoming. Subjects covered include civil and criminal law; courts in Wyoming; juvenile law, juvenile court procedure; rights of children; family law; employment law; automobile-related law; laws affecting the schools; and citizenship rights and responsibilities. The laws and courts…

Wyoming Law-Related Education Advisory Council, Cheyenne.

104

Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

Larry Demick

2012-11-01

105

76 FR 13431 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW160470, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from O'Brien Energy Resources Corporation for competitive oil and gas lease WYW160470 for land in Niobrara County, Wyoming. The...

2011-03-11

106

78 FR 2428 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164926, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Wildfire Partners, Inc., for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164926 for lands in Converse County, Wyoming. The petition was...

2013-01-11

107

Campbell, William Wallace (1862-1938)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomer, born in Hancock County, OH. Trained as an engineer, became director of Lick Observatory, measured stellar radial velocities with the Mills photographic spectrograph (which he designed) and published them (with Joseph Moore) in a catalog (1928). From studies of the Martian atmosphere, he deduced that it could not support life. Founded the Lick southern station in Chile, discovered nume...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

108

Campbell, William Wallace (1862-1938)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Astronomer, born in Hancock County, OH. Trained as an engineer, became director of Lick Observatory, measured stellar radial velocities with the Mills photographic spectrograph (which he designed) and published them (with Joseph Moore) in a catalog (1928). From studies of the Martian atmosphere, he deduced that it could not support life. Founded the Lick southern station in Chile, discovered nume...

P. Murdin

2000-01-01

109

Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

110

Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

111

Bitter bonanza in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Mineral and energy-related exploration, such as the drilling activity in the Overthrust Belt for petroleum, has made Wyoming a leading energy supplier in the U.S. The energy boom has had many unfortunate effects on the state's environment. Environmental degradation caused by exploration and production in Wyoming includes loss of habitat, poaching of wildlife, water pollution from oil dumping and erosion, and impacts from squatter's camps.

Randall, D.

1980-12-01

112

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Lincoln County Natrona County Niobrara County Park County Platte County...County Lincoln County Natrona County Niobrara County Park County Platte County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Niobrara County...

2010-07-01

113

40 CFR 81.351 - Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Lincoln County Natrona County Niobrara County Park County Platte County...County Lincoln County Natrona County Niobrara County Park County Platte County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Niobrara County...

2009-07-01

114

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31

115

14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics...Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each...

2013-01-01

116

77 FR 40147 - Boston and Maine Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-in Worcester County, MA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Heywood Branch, between mileposts 27.29 and 27.43, in Gardner, Worcester County, Mass.\\1\\ The line traverses United...Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A. Gardner, Clearance Clerk. [FR Doc. 2012-16577 Filed...

2012-07-06

117

Health performance of individuals within the Campbell paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we developed a comprehensive health performance measure that formally links individual health attitudes with the likelihood of engaging in a wide variety of health-related behaviours from various domains such as sustenance, hygiene, and physical exercise. Within what Kaiser, Byrka, and Hartig (2010) call the Campbell paradigm, we equated general health attitude with what a person does to

Katarzyna Byrka; Florian G. Kaiser

2012-01-01

118

Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode  

SciTech Connect

Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

2011-06-01

119

The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

Armstrong, Michael

2010-01-01

120

Wyoming State Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

121

76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land...SUMMARY: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered...The following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been...

2011-03-25

122

75 FR 19592 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Wyoming...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...vegetation in rights-of-way from precipitation run-off. As described above, roads...tectorum can be locally abundant, but precipitation and elevation differences influence...southern Wyoming counties, the fall precipitation prior to cold weather needed for...

2010-04-15

123

75 FR 4059 - Wyoming Interstate Company, Ltd.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Assessment for the Proposed WIC 2010 System Enhancement Project and Request...discuss the environmental impacts of the WIC 2010 System Enhancement Project (Project...facilities by Wyoming Interstate Company (WIC) in Weld and Sweetwater Counties, in...

2010-01-26

124

Wyoming Government, Unit VII.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

Robinson, Terry

125

Surrogate motherhood, rights and duties: a reply to Campbell.  

PubMed

In a recent article in Health Care Analysis (Vol. 8, No. 1), Campbell misrepresents our specific arguments about commercial surrogate motherhood (C.S.M.) and our general philosophical and political views by saying or suggesting that we are 'Millsian' liberals and consequentialists. He gives too the false impression that we do not oppose, in principle, slavery and child purchase. Here our position on C.S.M. is re-expressed and elaborated upon in order to eliminate possible confusion. Our general ethical and philosophical framework is also outlined and shown to be other than Campbell says that it is. In particular, a moral philosophy that is based on neither consequentialism nor Kantianism is presented. C.S.M., it is argued, is not child purchase. It is like it in some respects and unlike it in others. It is unlike it in the respects which, relative to the present discussion, matter. PMID:11372572

McLachlan, H V; Swales, J K

2001-01-01

126

Surrogate Motherhood, Rights and Duties: A Reply to Campbell  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a recent article in Health Care Analysis (Vol. 8, No. 1),Campbell misrepresents our specific arguments about commercialsurrogate motherhood (C.S.M.) and our general philosophical andpolitical views by saying or suggesting that we are `Millsian'liberals and consequentialists. He gives too the false impressionthat we do not oppose, in principle, slavery and child purchase.Here our position on C.S.M. is re-expressed and elaborated

Hugh V. McLachlan; J. K. Swales

2001-01-01

127

Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

Callen, John; And Others

128

Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

Callen, John; And Others

129

79. Conoco Gas Station (1927) at the intersection of Wyoming ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

79. Conoco Gas Station (1927) at the intersection of Wyoming and Granite Streets. This was one of the first gas stations in Butte, and has a wooden canopy supported on steel beams on brick piers, with a pressed metal ceiling. The roof turns upwards on the north side, and the east and west ends have jerkin-headed gables. The pumps date from the 1950s. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

130

Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These specific data are being used for assessing the effect of disturbance resulting from wind energy development within Wyoming on sage-grouse populations.

O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

2010-01-01

131

Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

None

1982-01-01

132

The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group: Early Development and Progress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group was inaugurated in 2000 to prepare, update, and disseminate systematic reviews on what works to reduce crime or improve justice. After providing a brief description of a systematic review and the origins of the Campbell Collaboration, this paper provides an overview of the first 36 months of the…

Petrosino, Anthony; Farrington, David P.; Sherman, Lawrence W.

2003-01-01

133

Campbell and Rubin: A Primer and Comparison of Their Approaches to Causal Inference in Field Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article compares Donald Campbell's and Donald Rubin's work on causal inference in field settings on issues of epistemology, theories of cause and effect, methodology, statistics, generalization, and terminology. The two approaches are quite different but compatible, differing mostly in matters of bandwidth versus fidelity. Campbell's work…

Shadish, William R.

2010-01-01

134

Three-region Campbell Model for Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Undisturbed Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

region is often better described using multimodal-distri- bution functions. A three-region Campbell (TRC) type model for predicting undis- A limited number of models for predicting the unsatu- turbed soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from water retention rated hydraulic conductivity (K) in soils with multimodal is presented. The model assumes that hydraulic conductivity follows separate Campbell functions within the macropore (matric head

T. G. Poulsen; P. Moldrup; B. V. Iversen; O. H. Jacobsen

2002-01-01

135

Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a…

Armstrong, Michael

2011-01-01

136

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

SciTech Connect

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01

137

75 FR 60477 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW146099, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from U.S. Ore Corp. for the renewal of oil and gas lease WYW146099 for land in Fremont County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time...

2010-09-30

138

75 FR 62140 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW159733, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Sun Cal Energy Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW159733 for land in Sublette County, Wyoming. The petition was filed...

2010-10-07

139

76 FR 14986 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW160429, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Rock Well Petroleum (US) Inc. for oil and gas lease WYW160429 for land in Natrona County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

2011-03-18

140

75 FR 53981 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Royal Oil, LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW174414 for land in Niobrara County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease...

2010-09-02

141

Campbell penetration depth in iron-based superconductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A "true" critical current density, jc, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, jB, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, lambda C(T, H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba (Fe0.954Ni 0.046)2As2 (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is non-parabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter alpha. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), alpha( H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j c (2 K) ? 1:22 x106 A/cm² provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe2As2 based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, jc(2 K) ? 3.3 x 106 A/cm². The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe0.53Se0.47 and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba0.6K 0.4Fe2As2 (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnictide superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plengchart

142

New frontiers in old areas - Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first producing oil well in Wyoming was drilled in 1883 on Dallas dome in the central part of the state; in 1983 it was still capable of production. The first geologic map of Wyoming, published by W.C. Knight in 1900, showed 14 oil fields and oil seeps. The next map, Map of the Wyoming Oil fields, was published anonymously

J. D. Love; A. C. Christiansen

1986-01-01

143

Wyoming Wolf Recovery Annual Report, 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The total gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in Wyoming increased approximately 23% from 252 wolves in 2005 to 311 wolves in 2006.The wolf population in Wyoming included Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and the entire state of Wyoming; however, wolf recove...

D. S. Guernsey D. W. Smith M. D. Jimenez R. F. Krischke

2007-01-01

144

Relative risk site evaluation for buildings 7740 and 7741 Fort Campbell, Kentucky.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Buildings 7740 and 7741 are a part of a former nuclear weapon's storage and maintenance facility located in the southeastern portion of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This underground tunnel complex was originally used as a classified storage area beginning in ...

G. V. Last T. J. Gilmore F. J. Bronson

1998-01-01

145

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2000-0356-2851, Campbell Hausfeld, Harrison, Ohio. Region 5.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In July 2000, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a management request for a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at Campbell Hausfeld in Harrison, Ohio, a producer of air compressors. The HHE request concerned several emp...

2001-01-01

146

77 FR 61657 - Indiana Northeastern Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-In Branch and St. Joseph Counties, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Abandonment Exemption--In Branch and St. Joseph Counties, MI Indiana Northeastern Railroad...milepost 100.69 near Sturgis in St. Joseph County, Mich. (the Line). The Line...October 2, 2012. By the Board, Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings....

2012-10-10

147

High Noon on the Western Range: A Property Rights Analysis of the Johnson County War  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming s Johnson County War of 1892 is the historical basis of later popular depictions of the West as violent, and it influenced the development of Wyoming. Many see this era as the end of the open range system and the ascendancy of stock ranching and farming. Popular depiction argues that the event was an act of vigilantism of large

Randy McFerrin; Douglas Wills

2007-01-01

148

Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

149

Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

150

Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

151

Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

152

Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

153

Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

154

Elkhorn Creek, McDowell County Watershed Assessment (Hydrologic Unit No. 0507020120).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Elkhorn Creek flows east to west along U.S. Rt. 52 in McDowell County, West Virginia. Two forks come together at the town of North Fork. One of the forks begins near the Mercer County line and the other begins at the Wyoming county line near Crumpler and ...

2000-01-01

155

Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plegchart

2011-08-15

156

Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

157

MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF WYOMING  

EPA Science Inventory

The ecoregions of Wyoming have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecore...

158

Meeteetse field, Bighorn basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lower Cretaceous Muddy and Upper Cretaceous Frontier sandstone reservoirs remain popular objectives for new energy reserves in the Bighorn basin of northwestern Wyoming. Predominantly structural reserves approximate 1 million bbl of oil and 20 bcf of gas from six Muddy fields, and 210 million bbl of oil and 100 bcf of gas from 16 Frontier fields. Newly established structural-stratigraphic gas

R. Wolff; R. Roy

1984-01-01

159

“The Aquinas of the Rednecks”: reconciliation, the southern character, and the bootleg ministry of Will D. Campbell  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white activist and celebrated author Will D. Campbell was a Mississippi-born Southern Baptist minister who worked in the South during the civil rights movement, formally for the National Council of Churches, but informally in support of civil rights organizations and as a mediator in southern communities. This article examines both Campbell’s career arc and his semi-autobiographical fiction to understand

Benjamin Houston

2012-01-01

160

76 FR 50213 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Fuels, Walla Walla Ranger District, Umatilla National Forest, Wallowa and Union...Transportation Management Activities, Eagle River-Florence Ranger District, Vilas...Application WYW-172684, Wyoming Powder River Basin, Campbell County, WY, Review...

2011-08-12

161

Wyoming DOE EPSCoR  

SciTech Connect

All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

Gern, W.A.

2004-01-15

162

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Chem-Central Site, Wyoming, MI. (First Remedial Action), September 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2-acre Chem-Central site is a bulk chemical storage facility in Wyoming, Kent County, Michigan. Land use in the area is a mixture of residential and commercial. An estimated 10,000 people live within 1 mile of the site and receive their water supply v...

1991-01-01

163

Proposed Lyman-Torrington 115-KV Transmission Line and Torrington Substation, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program. Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project entails constructing, from the Lyman Substation in the vicinity of Yoder to Torrington (Goshen County), Wyoming, a 115-kv transmission line with 12.5 miles of wood pole and 0.7 of a mile of aesthetically designed steel structures; and construc...

1972-01-01

164

Jim Bridger Thermal-Electric Generation Project, Wyoming. Proposed by the Pacific Power and Light Company and Idaho Power Company.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Jim Bridger Thermal- Electric Complex including a 1500 MW coal-fired steam electric plant, a strip mine nearby, a 42-mile long water delivery system, and rail and highway access, is situated in central Sweetwater County in southwest Wyoming. The distr...

1971-01-01

165

78 FR 49603 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Marengo County, Ala  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Warrior River) and milepost 242.1 N (near the intersection of Nash Ave. and E. Franklin St., in Demopolis), in Marengo County...Decided: August 9, 2013. By the Board, Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A. Gardner,...

2013-08-14

166

The "Unsavory Researches" of Helen Campbell: A 19th-Century Journalist's Investigation of Urban Women's Poverty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 1886, the New York "Tribune" ran a series of articles by Helen Campbell, "The Prisoners of Poverty," which investigated the sufferings of working women in New York's slums. Initially a fiction and housekeeping writer, Helen Campbell's home economics orientation first pointed her toward the problems of the poor. In the late 1870s, she wrote a…

Henry, Susan

167

Thermal isolation of Campbell Plateau, New Zealand, by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current over the past 130 kyr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Campbell Plateau occupies a key position in the southwest Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The plateau confines and steers the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) along its flanks, isolating the Subantarctic plateau from cold polar waters. Oxygen and carbon isotope records from Campbell Plateau cores provide new records of water mass stratification for the past 130 kyr. During glacial climes,

Helen L. Neil; Lionel Carter; Michele Y. Morris

2004-01-01

168

Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyonming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

EDP Renewables (formerly Horizon Wind Energy) has proposed a wind-energy facility in Carbon County, Wyoming. The Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) provides habitat for greater sage-grouse, a federal candidate species considered warranted but preclu...

C. W. LeBeau G. D. Johnson J. Eddy M. Hollaran R. Nielsen T. Rintz

2012-01-01

169

Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

2003-12-17

170

Evaluation of the Campbell test and the influence of age, sex, breed, and coat color on puppy behavioral responses  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the Campbell test and discover if there is a link between a puppy’s scores and factors such as age, breed, sex, sex-breed interaction, size, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) groups, and coat color. The Campbell test was performed on 342 puppies (191 males and 151 females) of different breeds. The results show that the criteria used by Campbell to classify puppies are incomplete, and that it is more appropriate to use numerical values for each type of answer. In general, the mean value obtained, regardless of sex and breed, corresponded to the Campbell’s submissive stable category. The mean value was higher in male dogs than in females.

Perez-Guisado, Joaquin; Munoz-Serrano, Andres; Lopez-Rodriguez, Rocio

2008-01-01

171

76 FR 61381 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163278, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163278 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

2011-10-04

172

76 FR 61380 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW163268, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from Pogo Producing Company LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW163268 for land in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the...

2011-10-04

173

Gravity measurements in Wyoming and central Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gravity surveys made by personnel from the University of Wyoming include the Laramie Mountains, the Medicine Bow Mountains, the Hanna Basin, and the South Pass area in Wyoming and the mountainous area west of Aspen in Colorado. These surveys are made with a Worden Master model gravimeter and are tied into gravity base stations established by the U.S. Air Force;

Scott B. Smithson

1969-01-01

174

Wyoming Geology and Geography, Unit I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This unit on the geology and geography of Wyoming for elementary school students provides activities for map and globe skills. Goals include reading and interpreting maps and globes, interpreting map symbols, comparing maps and drawing inferences, and understanding time and chronology. Outlines and charts are provided for Wyoming geology and…

Robinson, Terry

175

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Annual Partnership Report is a collection of all established partnerships that Wyoming community colleges cultivated and maintained for fiscal year 2004. Serving as transfer preparation institutions, vocational educators, providers of workforce training and personal development education, and cultural centers, Wyoming comprehensive community…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2005

2005-01-01

176

Supervision and Evaluation: The Wyoming Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The intent of this study was to assess the perceptions and actions of Wyoming principals concerning their role in supervising and evaluating teachers. A survey was sent to all 286 principals in the state of Wyoming, of which, 143 returned surveys, a response rate of 50%. Findings suggested that principals utilized supervisory behaviors more often…

Range, Bret G.; Scherz, Susan; Holt, Carleton R.; Young, Suzanne

2011-01-01

177

Wyoming Geology and Geography, Unit I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit on the geology and geography of Wyoming for elementary school students provides activities for map and globe skills. Goals include reading and interpreting maps and globes, interpreting map symbols, comparing maps and drawing inferences, and understanding time and chronology. Outlines and charts are provided for Wyoming geology and…

Robinson, Terry

178

Racism in African Children's Literature: A Critique of Eric Campbell's "The Year of the Leopard Song."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eric Campbell, an English teacher, spent most of his working life in New Guinea and in East Africa, where he lived in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. He now lives in England and writes about Africa. People could expect an objective, and perhaps, a dispassionate account or depiction of African children and adults--their individual lives and…

Osa, Osayimwense

179

The Awakening of the Social Conscience: Jane Maud Campbell, 1869-1947  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Jane Maud Campbell's career demonstrated her commitment and passion for library services with immigrants and minorities as one of the first advocates for multiculturalism in librarianship. She began her career working in the Newark Public Library and soon was employed as the librarian of the Passaic Public Library. She was the first woman…

Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

2012-01-01

180

Creativity and Discovery as Blind Variation: Campbell's (1960) BVSR Model After the Half-Century Mark  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article assesses and extends Campbell's (1960) classic theory that creativity and discovery depend on blind variation and selective retention (BVSR), with special attention given to blind variations (BVs). The treatment begins by defining creativity and discovery, variant blindness versus sightedness, variant utility and selection, and ideational variants versus creative products. These definitions lead to BV identification criteria: (a) intended

Dean Keith Simonton

2011-01-01

181

Learn to Read and Write Systematic Reviews: The Belgian Campbell Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Practitioners working in social welfare, education, judicial circuits, psychology, and many other domains of human sciences daily decide on best treatments for their clients. The authors expect those practitioners to base their decisions on evidence from scientific research. The Campbell collaboration is an international nonprofit organization…

Hannes, Karin; Claes, Laurence

2007-01-01

182

Racism in African Children's Literature: A Critique of Eric Campbell's "The Year of the Leopard Song."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eric Campbell, an English teacher, spent most of his working life in New Guinea and in East Africa, where he lived in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. He now lives in England and writes about Africa. People could expect an objective, and perhaps, a dispassionate account or depiction of African children and adults--their individual lives and…

Osa, Osayimwense

183

Crossroads at Salerno: Eldridge Campbell and the writings of Theodorico Borgognoni on wound healing.  

PubMed

During Eldridge Campbell's tour of duty as the neurosurgical consultant to the Mediterranean theater of World War II operations, he was introduced to a then-revolutionary method of wound treatment. Ironically, Campbell's diligent research efforts later revealed that this method of wound treatment had first been advocated seven centuries earlier--in the same geographical location--by the Italian surgeon Theodoric. Although controversial, this method of wound care was subsequently applied and supported by Theodoric's outspoken pupil, Henri de Mondeville, despite intense opposition from the prevailing medical authorities who supported the doctrine of "laudable pus" for wound management. With Mondeville's death, Theodoric's technique lapsed into obscurity, relegated to a historical footnote until modern biology and the discoveries of Lister and Pasteur would again bring to light the benefits of nonsuppurative wound treatment. In this article the author discusses the work of Theodoric, Mondeville, and Campbell in light of the medical climate of their times and explores the contemporary parallels noted by Campbell in terms of the neglect of other, more recent medical discoveries. These examples encourage us to accept or reject medical treatments based on a thorough examination of their efficacy and not on the stature of their advocates within the medical community. PMID:7782839

Popp, A J

1995-07-01

184

Burke, Campbell, Johnson, and Priestley: A rhetorical analysis of four British pamphlets of the American Revolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to increase knowledge of an important but largely unexamined genre of public discourse in the late eighteenth century: the political pamphlet. The four texts selected were Edmund Burke's A Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol, George Campbell's The Nature, Extent, and Importance of the Duty of Allegiance, Samuel Johnson's Taxation No Tyranny, and Joseph Priestley's An

Mark Gellis

1993-01-01

185

Independent developer plans Wyoming project  

SciTech Connect

Little Horn Energy Wyoming, Inc. is proposing a project on the Dry Fork of the Little Big Horn River. The lower reservoir would be impounded by a roller-compacted concrete dam and an outlet tower on the upstream face of the dam would have multilevel intakes to allow selective temperature discharges into the Dry Fork. The asphalt-lined upper reservoir on an adjacent ridge would be contained by a 100 foot high rockfill embankment. Maximum planned daily drawdown is 45 ft. Preliminary plans call for water to drop through a 21 ft. diameter shaft to a manifold. Then ft. diameter penstocks would feed a four unit underground power house.

Not Available

1993-01-25

186

Geology and petroleum potential of Hanna basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanna basin is one of the world's deeper intracratonic depressions. It contains exceptionally thick sequences of mature, hydrocarbon-rich Eocene through Paleozoic sediments, and has the requisite structural and depositional history to become a major petroleum province. Stratigraphic traps exist within the deeper central parts of the basin in low permeability, possibly overpressured Eocene, Paleocene, and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The

Matson

1984-01-01

187

Thermal infrared survey of Sunlight Basin, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Thermal infrared surveys were flown over the Sunlight mining region and Sulphur Camp area of the Sunlight Basin to substantiate whether reported fumaroles are indicative of contemporary geothermal activity in the area. Thermal infrared imagery shows areas of warm ground along and warm water discharge into Sunlight Creek and Sulphur Lake. Sulphur deposits are found on north- and south-facing hill slopes associated with a second warm ground anomaly adjacent to Gas Creek. Warming is also manifested in the thermal characteristics of vegetation, and several fumaroles are identifiable. Aeromagnetic data show a 200 gamma low at Sulphur Camp which cannot be explained topographically. Major northeast-trending lineaments provide potential conduits for thermal fluids from the magma plume in Yellowstone National Park, 50 km (30 mi) to the southwest. The floor of the Yellowstone caldera is topographically higher and could provide the necessary hydraulic head to move the fluids outward. Other geothermal resources may exhibit the same characteristics. This example suggests that geothermal resources may occur at considerable distances from a heat source.

Vice, D.H.; Crowley, J.P.; Vice, M.A.

1983-08-01

188

Strict liability for oil spills in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The multi-tiered legal action that followed the April 8, 1980 crude oil spill into a Wyoming river, contaminating sixty-eight river miles and causing considerable damage to the river's ecosystem, terminated in the finding by the Wyoming Supreme Court that pipeline operators were strictly liable for any unpermitted discharge of pollution into waters of the state. The background of the federal and state water-pollution legislation is compared and contrasted. The Court's decision of strict liability is analyzed and guidelines are presented for assessing liability for oil spills in the state of Wyoming. 111 references.

Ellerbe, J.M.

1983-01-01

189

Carson-Washoe County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Carson-Washoe County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

190

Carson-Washoe County Health Manpower and Education Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Carson-Washoe County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

Callen, John; And Others

191

Speed of call delivery is related to context and caller identity in Campbell's monkey males  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Call rate can be a salient feature in animal communication. Depending on the species, different psychological variables appear to influence call rates but the exact nature of these relationships remains poorly explored. Here, we demonstrate for free-ranging Campbell’s monkeys that the call rates of four different alarm series (termed H, K, K+, and B series) vary systematically as a function of context, associated behaviour, and identity of the caller. K+ series were given more rapidly to predation than non-predation events, K+ and K series more rapidly to visual than auditory predator detection, and H series more rapidly while counterattacking an eagle than staying put. Finally, there were individual differences in B series, suggesting that call rate potentially provides listeners with cues about the caller’s anti-predator behaviour, event type experienced, and his identity.

Lemasson, Alban; Ouattara, Karim; Bouchet, Hélène; Zuberbühler, Klaus

2010-11-01

192

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming, was evaluated for areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Examination of surface exposures of known uranium occurrences, reconnaissance geochemical sampling, and ground radiometric surveys were conducted. An...

E. J. Milton J. R. Griffin

1982-01-01

193

Wyoming Wolf Recovery Annual Report, 2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The wolf (Canis lupus) population increased statewide by approximately 7 percent, making 2010 the ninth consecutive year that Wyoming (WY) has exceeded the numerical, distributional, and temporal recovery goals established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Se...

2010-01-01

194

Occupational Injuries and Illnesses-Wyoming, 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains 54 tabulations of characteristics of occupational injuries and illnesses related to industry, occupation, and age of the injured or ill worker. Data were compiled by the Wyoming Department of Labor and Statistics from records of wor...

1980-01-01

195

Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, Wyoming, 1976.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document contains 36 tabulations of characteristics of occupational injuries or illnesses related to industry, and occupation of the injured related to age. The data were compiled by the Wyoming Department of Labor from records of workers' compensatio...

1978-01-01

196

Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, Wyoming, 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains 54 tabulations of characteristics of occupational injuries and illnesses related to industry, and occupation of the injured or ill worker related to age. Data were compiled by the Wyoming Department of Labor from records of workers'...

1980-01-01

197

Supervision and evaluation: The Wyoming perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this study was to assess the perceptions and actions of Wyoming principals concerning their role in supervising\\u000a and evaluating teachers. A survey was sent to all 286 principals in the state of Wyoming, of which, 143 returned surveys,\\u000a a response rate of 50%. Findings suggested that principals utilized supervisory behaviors more often than evaluative behaviors.\\u000a Elementary principals

Bret G. Range; Susan Scherz; Carleton R. Holt; Suzanne Young

2011-01-01

198

Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Appraiser under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study.

NONE

1996-12-01

199

Meeteetse field, Bighorn basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Lower Cretaceous Muddy and Upper Cretaceous Frontier sandstone reservoirs remain popular objectives for new energy reserves in the Bighorn basin of northwestern Wyoming. Predominantly structural reserves approximate 1 million bbl of oil and 20 bcf of gas from six Muddy fields, and 210 million bbl of oil and 100 bcf of gas from 16 Frontier fields. Newly established structural-stratigraphic gas production from these reservoirs is at Meeteetse field (T48-49N, R99W) on the west flank of the basin where Muddy Frontier bar sandstones trend across a long, narrow, horst-associated anticline. Terra Resources 1-33 Federal (Sec. 33, T49N, R99W) established the shallower pool discovery in 1979. Ten wells are now drilled along or near the axis of the structure. Production history is only now beginning because wells were shut in during field development due to absence of a gas line. The Frontier is productive in the middle two of its four units. Most initial production rates are between 1 and 2 MMCFGD; small amounts of oil, condensate, and water have been produced from some wells. The Muddy is a discrete sandstone unit with thin shale interbeds. Most initial production rates are between 1 and 3 MMCFGD; small amounts of oil, condensate, and water are also produced. Some production is from commingled Frontier zones and from commingled Frontier and Muddy.

Wolff, R.; Roy, R.

1984-07-01

200

Suckers in headwater tributaries, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus) and flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis) populations are declining throughout these species' native ranges in the Upper Colorado River Basin. In order to conserve these populations, an understanding of population dynamics is needed. Using age estimates from pectoral fin rays, we describe age and growth of these 2 species in 3 Wyoming stream systems: Muddy Creek, the Little Sandy River, and the Big Sandy River. Within all 3 stream systems, flannelmouth suckers were longer-lived than bluehead suckers, with maximum estimated ages of 16 years in Muddy Creek, 18 years in Little Sandy Creek, and 26 years in the Big Sandy River. Bluehead suckers had maximum estimated ages of 8 years in Muddy Creek, 10 years in Little Sandy Creek, and 18 years in the Big Sandy River. These maximum estimated ages were substantially greater than in other systems where scales have been used to estimate ages. Mean lengths at estimated ages were greater for flannelmouth suckers than for bluehead suckers in all 3 streams and generally less than values published from other systems where scales were used to estimate ages. Our observations of long life spans and slow growth rates among bluehead suckers and flannelmouth suckers were probably associated with our use of fin rays to estimate ages as well as the populations being in headwater tributaries near the northern edges of these species' ranges.

Sweet, D. E.; Compton, R. I.; Hubert, W. A.

2009-01-01

201

Annual Performance Report. 2002-2003. Wyoming Department of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Wyoming's Department of Education (WDE?s) Special Programs Unit conducts compliance monitoring for all IDEA procedural requirements on a five-year cycle. The current process began for Wyoming?s school districts in 1999-2000 and will be completed in 2004-05. The special education monitoring process is a comprehensive program review. The process…

Wyoming State Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

202

77 FR 24176 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and Fish Commission To Use National Forest System Land for Their...Bridger-Teton National Forest received a request from the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission (WGFC) to continue to use facilities...

2012-04-23

203

Ground-water levels in Wyoming, 1976  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water levels are measured periodically in a network of about 280 observation wells in Wyoming to record changes in ground-water storage. The areas of water-level observation are mostly where ground water is used in large quantities for irrigation or municipal purposes. This report contains maps showing location of observation wells and water-level changes from 1976 to 1977. Well history, highest and lowest water levels , and hydrographs for most wells also are included. The program of groundwater observation is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer and the city of Cheyenne. (Woodard-USGS)

Ballance, W. C.; Freudenthal, Pamela B.

1977-01-01

204

Effects of herbicide usage on water quality of selected streams in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1977 and 1978 the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, in conjunction with county weed and pest control districts, conducted a noxious-weed-control program in Wyoming. The herbicides primarily used were picloram, 2,4-D, and dicamba. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, sampled and analyzed water from selected streams for these herbicides plus silvex; 2,4,5-T; and 2,4-DP. This report contains data for samples collected during 1977 and 1978. The most commonly detected herbicides in water samples were 2,4-D with 41% nonzero values and picloram with 34.5% nonzero values. Herbicide occurrence in bottom-material samples was uncommon; dicamba was found with 9% nonzero values. The maximum herbicide concentration in water was 1.1 micrograms per liter of 2,4-D, and the maximum herbicide concentration in bottom material was 8.0 micrograms per kilogram of 2,4-D. Based on available toxicity data and water-quality criteria, these herbicide concentrations do not constitute dangerous or harmful concentrations to humans or to the environment. (USGS)

Butler, David L.

1980-01-01

205

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

206

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

207

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

208

Geophysical surveys of Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflection, refraction, and paleomagnetic data from Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, were used to evaluate the Quaternary, tectonic, volcanic, and glacial history of this high mountain lake. Reflection data revealed a paleobasin beneath the main body of the lake containing up to 190 m of lake sediments deposited on intrusive or volcanic bedrock. Prominent reflectors are interpreted to correspond to glaciated layers,

Robert M. Otis; Robert B. Smith; Richard J. Wold

1977-01-01

209

Wyoming: The State and Its Educational System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wyoming is a state of great natural beauty with only five people per square mile and a unique way of life that deserves to be preserved. The economy, though, is almost totally dependent on energy extraction, an area that has not done well of late. The state's small population makes "boutique" products and services not very profitable, and efforts…

Hodgkinson, Harold L.

210

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming, was evaluated for areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Examination of surface exposures of known uranium occurrences, reconnaissance geochemical sampling, and ground radiometric surveys were conducted. Anomalous areas recognized from airborne radiometric surveys were ground checked. Electric and gamma logs were used to determine subsurface structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and areas of anomalous radioactivity. Fourteen

J. R. Griffin; E. J. Milton

1982-01-01

211

Wyoming Wolf Recovery Annual Report, 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For the sixth consecutive year, the overall gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in Wyoming (WY) exceeded the numerical, distributional, and temporal recovery goals established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). In 2008, more than 302 wolves in ...

D. R. Stahler D. W. Smith E. Albers M. D. Jimenez S. P. Woodruff

2008-01-01

212

78 FR 10512 - Wyoming Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the date of SMCRA's enactment). The 732 letter stated that Wyoming's definition of VER at former Chapter 1, Sec. 2(df)(iv)(A) incorporates the exception for existing operations as though it is stated as a type of VER rather than an...

2013-02-14

213

Wyoming Community College Commission Agency Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on outcomes of community college programs monitored by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC). The document covers the following WCCC objectives: (1) Study of tuition rates for the community colleges; (2) Negotiation of contracts and provision of financial support for administrative computing system components and…

Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

214

Wyoming Wolf Recovery Annual Report, 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The total gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in Wyoming (WY) increased approximately 15% from 311 wolves in 2006 to 359 wolves in 2007. The number of wolves in WY w as derived from the entire State of WY i ncluding Yellowstone National Park (YNP); however...

D. R. Stahler D. S. Guernsey D. W. Smith M. D. Jimenez S. P. Woodruff

2007-01-01

215

Wyoming: The State and Its Educational System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Wyoming is a state of great natural beauty with only five people per square mile and a unique way of life that deserves to be preserved. The economy, though, is almost totally dependent on energy extraction, an area that has not done well of late. The state's small population makes "boutique" products and services not very profitable, and efforts…

Hodgkinson, Harold L.

216

Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

2007-01-01

217

Cretaceous References: Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site supplies a comprehensive list of references relevant to Cretaceous stratigraphy, paleogeography, tectonics and petroleum exploration in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Montana. The references range from the 1930's to the 1990's cover a variety of specific topics. Additional information and references are available on the site's home page under resources.

Inc., Petrodynamics

218

76 FR 45643 - Wyoming Disaster #WY-00017  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assistance Only for the State of Wyoming (FEMA- 4007-DR), dated 07/22/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Landslides. Incident Period: 05/18/2011 through 07/08/2011. Effective Date: 07/22/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-07-29

219

Determining Economic Effects of Wyoming's Loop Tours.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Wyoming loop tour program, as evaluated in the study, involved two components. One component dealt with the location criteria and an evaluation of the existing loop tours which is contained in a companion MPC report (MPC 94-29). Included herein is a d...

E. Wilson K. Ksaibati D. Warder G. Bryan

1994-01-01

220

A Geographic Information System to Identify Areas for Alternative Crops in Northwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agriculture is the third largest industry in Wyoming after mining and tourism (R. Micheli, Wyoming Department of Agriculture Director, pers. commun. ). The Bighorn Basin, located in northwestern Wyoming, is one of the largest agricultural production areas of the state. This area accounts for 27% of the value of crops produced in Wyoming (Wyoming Agricultural Statistics Service 1998). The Bighorn

J. A. Young; B. M. Christensen; M. S. Schaad; M. E. Herdendorf; G. F. Vance; L. C. Munn

1999-01-01

221

Didymoceras puebloense, a new species of heteromorph ammonite from the Upper Campanian of Colorado and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Didymoceras puebloense nov. sp. is described from the upper Campanian zones of Didymoceras nebrascense and Didymoceras stevensoni in Pueblo and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, and Weston County, Wyoming in the United States Western Interior. The species is characterized by a middle helical growth stage in which the successive whorls are widely separated followed by a terminal pendant U-shaped sector of the adult body chamber. Ornament is of distant, narrow bituberculate ribs usually separated by a nontuberculate rib. Widely separated poorly-defined constrictions with associated collar ribs are occasionally present. The style of coiling in middle and later growth resembles that of those growth stages in upper Campanian Didymoceras, whereas the ornament recalls that of middle Campanian representatives of the genus in the Western Interior.

Cobban, W. A.; Kennedy, W. J.; Scott, G. R.

1997-01-01

222

30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 950.30 Section 950.30...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned...

2013-07-01

223

76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

2011-03-15

224

30 CFR 825.2 - Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. 825.2 Section 825...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SPECIAL BITUMINOUS COAL MINES IN WYOMING § 825.2 Special bituminous coal mines in Wyoming. Special bituminous...

2013-07-01

225

Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode  

SciTech Connect

The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

Vermeeren, L. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Legrand, A. [CEA/DEN/DRSN/SIREN/LASPI Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Barbot, L. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2011-07-01

226

Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

1993-04-01

227

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01

228

Ground-water levels in Wyoming, 1975  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water levels are measured periodically in a network of about 260 observation wells in Wyoming to record changes in ground-water storage. The areas of water-level observation are mostly where ground water is used in large quantities for irrigation or municipal purposes. This report contains maps showing location of observation wells and water-level changes from 1975 to 1976. Well history, highest and lowest water levels , and hydrographs for most wells also are included. (Woodard-USGS)

Ballance, W. C.; Freudenthal, Pamela B.

1976-01-01

229

Environmental audit: Fossil energy sites in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit completed for Selected Fossil Energy Sites in Wyoming. During this Audit, facilities, field sites, and activities were investigated and inspected in several areas of Wyoming that are considered to be representative of offsite work falling under the purview of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. Department of Energy (DOE) personnel at METC and at the Liquid Fuels Technology Branch (LFTB) in Laramie, Wyoming were interviewed as were DOE contractors and Federal and state regulators. Extensive document review was also a key part of this Audit. The on-site portion of the Audit occurred in Morgantown from May 18 to 22, 1992, and throughout Wyoming from May 26 through June 10, 1992. EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and DOE-funded off-site activities as part of the Assistant Secretary`s Environmental Audit Program. That program is designed to evaluate the status of facilities and activities regarding compliance with environmental laws, regulations, DOE Directives, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Audit stresses the fact that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The scope of this Environmental Audit was comprehensive, covering all areas of environmental activities and waste management operations with the exception of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is beyond the purview of EH-24. Specifically included within this Audit were Air, Soils/Sediment/Biota, Surface Water/Drinking Water, Groundwater, Waste Management, Toxic and Chemical Materials, Quality Assurance, Radiation, Inactive Waste Sites, and Environmental Management.

Not Available

1992-08-01

230

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins have been defined through analysis of over 14,000 oil well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logging of 380 wells, measurement of rock thermal conductivities, calculation of 60 heat-flow values, drilling of 9 geothermal exploratory wells, conductive thermal modeling, and the study of existing geologic, hydrologic, and thermal spring data. All data have been integrated into interpretations

Heasler

1983-01-01

231

Extracting uranium from a Wyoming granite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bureau of Mines is examining a variety of low-grade uranium ores because projections indicate that an appreciable percentage of future U.S. uranium production will be derived from resources containing 0.01 to 0.1 percent UâOâ. One possible source is represented by a granitic material from Wyoming; the available samples contained 0.06 and 0.12 percent UâOâ. Tests were conducted to explore

J. H. Maysilles; I. L. Nichols; D. C. Seidel

1977-01-01

232

Wyoming operator solves mercury exposure problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gas-processing industry is often faced with the need to remove mercury from natural gas to protect downstream equipment. Mercury exists naturally in many gas-producing reservoirs and can accumulate in low-temperature equipment. Experience at Amoco Exploration and Production Co.`s Anschutz Ranch East plant in southwestern Wyoming has indicated that proper monitoring and maintenance of mercury-removal material can yield excellent removal

1996-01-01

233

Wyoming Toad Monitoring on Safe Harbor Reintroduction Sites: 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2009, the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database (WYNDD) continued survey and monitoring efforts for the Wyoming toad at 3 reintroduction sites (Buford, Lindzey, and Shaffer). We analyzed data from these sites as well as data collected in 2008 and 2009 at ...

D. Keinath W. Estes-Zumpf

2010-01-01

234

Wyoming State Conference (Casper, Wyoming, March 17-19, 1983). Proceedings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Thirteen papers presented at a 1983 Wyoming comference on special education are included. The first two papers describe approaches for controlling children's serious behavior problems. Approaches focus on generalized compliance training, a direct instruction program that seeks to extinguish inappropriate behavior. Additional topics include the…

Mensendick, Frosyne, Ed.

235

What Does Energy Development Mean for Wyoming? A Community Study at Hanna, Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The enormous but often overlooked impact of energy resource development on small Western United States communities can be illustrated by the experiences of the traditional coal mining town of Hanna, Wyoming. Coal development doubled the population between 1970 and 1972, and required the addition of a sewer system and a police force, plus the…

Nellis, Lee

236

Formation of the Campbell-Red Lake gold deposit by H 2 O-poor, CO 2 -dominated fluids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Campbell-Red Lake gold deposit in the Red Lake greenstone belt, with a total of approximately 840 t of gold (past production + reserves) and an average grade of 21 g\\/t Au, is one of the largest and richest Archean gold deposits in Canada. Gold mineralization is mainly associated with silicification and arsenopyrite that replace carbonate veins, breccias and wallrock selvages. The carbonate veins

Guoxiang Chi; Benoît Dubé; Kenneth Williamson; Anthony E. Williams-Jones

2006-01-01

237

Generating and using evidence to guide public policy and practice: Lessons from the Campbell Test-bed Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper offers lessons from a three-year Test-bed project that tested systematic review practices developed by the Campbell Collaboration and the Cochrane Collaboration. Under the Test-bed project 14 systematic reviews were completed of interventions in crime prevention, social welfare, and education. (References to the products of these test-bed reviews are included in the reference list, preceded by an asterisk). Building

Phoebe Cottingham; Rebecca Maynard; Matthew Stagner

2005-01-01

238

Self-Efficacy as a Mediator of Investigative and Realistic General Occupational Themes on the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studied the role of self-efficacy in mediating gender differences on Investigative and Realistic General Occupational Themes of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory. Ss were 77 male and 71 female entering university freshmen. Canonical correlations identified a science\\/technical factor relating high Investigative and Realistic theme standard scores to high Investigative and Realistic theme efficacy ratings. Path analyses suggested a correlational structure wherein

Richard T. Lapan; Kathleen R. Boggs; Weston H. Morrill

1989-01-01

239

Thermal regimes of the Southern Rocky Mountains and Wyoming Basin in Colorado and Wyoming in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heat flow in the eastern ranges of the Southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado substantially exceeds that in the Wyoming Basin-Southern Rocky Mountains area in southeastern Wyoming. The transitions between these areas are narrow (? 60 km wide), estimated near-surface crustal radiogenic heat productions are different, and there is no evidence for young magmatism in the easternmost mountains in northern Colorado

Edward R Decker

1995-01-01

240

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal resources of Wyoming sedimentary basins have been defined through analysis of over 14,000 oil well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logging of 380 wells, measurement of rock thermal conductivities, calculation of 60 heat-flow values, drilling of 9 geothermal exploratory wells, conductive thermal modeling, and the study of existing geologic, hydrologic, and thermal spring data. All data have been integrated into interpretations of the thermal structure of the Big Horn, Wind River, Washakie, Great Divide, Green River, Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley basins of Wyoming. Controlling factors for the formation of geothermal resources in these basins are regional heat flow, rock thermal conductivity values, depths to regional aquifers, and hydrologic flow directions. Regional basin heat-flow values range from about 40 to 80 milliwatts/m/sub 2/; measured thermal conductivities are in the general range of 1.5 to 4.0 watts/m/sup 0/K; and depths to aquifers are up to 11,000 m (36,000 ft). This results in regional geothermal gradients for Wyoming basins in the range of 15/sup 0/ to 40/sup 0/C/km (44/sup 0/ to 116/sup 0/F/mi) with predicted maximum aquifer temperatures near 300/sup 0/C (570/sup 0/F). Anomalous geothermal areas within the basins contain measured thermal gradients as high as 400/sup 0/C/km (1,160/sup 0/F/mi) over shallow depth intervals. These anomalous areas are the combined result of local geologic structures and hydrologic flow. A simplified model for such areas requires water movement through a syncline with subsequent heating due to regional heat flow and thermal conductivities of overlying rock units. Consequent flow of the heated water up over an anticline produces a localized area of anomalous geothermal gradients.

Heasler, H.P.

1983-08-01

241

Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt  

SciTech Connect

Biostratigraphy is essential to exploration for oil and gas in the Wyoming thrust belt because fossils provide a temporal framework for interpretation of events of faulting, erosion, sedimentation, and the development of hydrocarbon traps and migration pathways. In the Cretaceous section, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites), which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonities are restricted to rocks of margin origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in investigations of stratigraphy and structures in the subsurface of the thrust belt because palynomorphs can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. In this paper, stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming, are correlated with the occurrence of ammonities and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

Nichols, D.J. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO); Jacobson, S.R.

1982-07-01

242

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Mystery Bridge at Highway 20, Natrona County, WY. (First Remedial Action), September 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Mystery Bridge at Highway 20 site is an industrial area with two onsite residential subdivisions, in Natrona County, one mile east of Evansville, Wyoming. A portion of the site lies within the 100- and 500-year floodplains of the North Platte River an...

1990-01-01

243

Relative risk site evaluation for buildings 7740 and 7741 Fort Campbell, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Buildings 7740 and 7741 are a part of a former nuclear weapon`s storage and maintenance facility located in the southeastern portion of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This underground tunnel complex was originally used as a classified storage area beginning in 1949 and continuing until 1969. Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently completed a detailed Relative Risk Site Evaluation of the facility. This evaluation included (1) obtaining engineering drawings of the facility and associated structures, (2) conducting detailed radiological surveys, (3) air sampling, (4) sampling drainage systems, and (5) sampling the underground wastewater storage tank. Ten samples were submitted for laboratory analysis of radionuclides and priority pollutant metals, and two samples submitted for analysis of volatile organic compounds. No volatile organic contaminants were detected using field instruments or laboratory analyses. However, several radionuclides and metals were detected in water and/or soil/sediment samples collected from this facility. Of the radionuclides detected, only {sup 226}Ra may have come from facility operations; however, its concentration is at least one order of magnitude below the relative-risk comparison value. Several metals (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and antimony) were found to exceed the relative-risk comparison values for water, while only arsenic, cadmium, and lead were found to exceed the relative risk comparison values for soil. Of these constituents, it is believed that only arsenic, beryllium, mercury, and lead may have come from facility operations. Other significant hazards posed by the tunnel complex include radon exposure and potentially low oxygen concentrations (<19.5% in atmosphere) if the tunnel complex is not allowed to vent to the outside air. Asbestos-wrapped pipes, lead-based paint, rat poison, and possibly a selenium rectifier are also present within the tunnel complex.

Last, G.V.; Gilmore, T.J.; Bronson, F.J.

1998-01-01

244

Patient-Nurse Interrater Reliability and Agreement of the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) is a simple, validated survey instrument for measuring sleep quality in intensive care patients. Although both patients and nurses can complete the RCSQ, interrater reliability and agreement have not been fully evaluated. Objectives To evaluate patient-nurse interrater reliability and agreement of the RCSQ in a medical intensive care unit. Methods The instrument included 5 RCSQ items plus a rating of nighttime noise, each scored by using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The mean of the 5 RCSQ items comprised a total score. For 24 days, the night-shift nurses in the medical intensive care unit completed the RCSQ regarding their patients’ overnight sleep quality. Upon awakening, all conscious, nondelirious patients completed the RCSQ. Neither nurses nor patients knew the others’ ratings. Patient-nurse agreement was evaluated by using mean differences and Bland-Altman plots. Reliability was evaluated by using intraclass correlation coefficients. Results Thirty-three patients had a total of 92 paired patient-nurse assessments. For all RCSQ items, nurses’ scores were higher (indicating “better” sleep) than patients’ scores, with significantly higher ratings for sleep depth (mean [SD], 67 [21] vs 48 [35], P = .001), awakenings (68 [21] vs 60 [33], P = .03), and total score (68 [19] vs 57 [28], P = .01). The Bland-Altman plots also showed that nurses’ ratings were generally higher than patients’ ratings. Intraclass correlation coefficients of patient-nurse pairs ranged from 0.13 to 0.49 across the survey questions. Conclusions Patient-nurse interrater reliability on the RCSQ was “slight” to “moderate,” with nurses tending to overestimate patients’ perceived sleep quality.

Kamdar, Biren B.; Shah, Pooja A.; King, Lauren M.; Kho, Michelle E.; Zhou, Xiaowei; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Collop, Nancy A.; Needham, Dale M.

2012-01-01

245

Hydrologic evaluation of proposed ground-water withdrawals in Muleshoe Flat near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrologic effects of proposed irrigation with groundwater of 8,320 acres of land in Muleshoe Flat, a 34 sq mi area in west-central Platte County, Wyoming, were assessed. Results generated by a digital groundwater flow model indicate that, at the end of a 40-yr period, groundwater level declines of more than 50 ft can be expected in an area of 12.5 sq mi and of more than 200 ft in an area of 7 sq mi. In addition, streamflow depletions of 4,300 acre-ft/yr can be expected in the Laramie River and 4,700 acre-ft/yr in Sybille Creek. Additional hydrologic field data collection prior to initiation of the proposed irrigation development would improve these assessments. Applications for the proposed irrigation wells were denied subsequent to the data collection and analysis described in this report. (Author 's abstract)

Hoxie, D. T.

1983-01-01

246

Geothermal Resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A general discussion of how geothermal resources occur; a discussion of the temperatures, distribution, and possible applications of geothermal resources in Wyoming and a general description of the State's thermal setting; and a discussion of the methods ...

B. S. Hinckley H. P. Heasler

1984-01-01

247

National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Rawlins Quadrangle, Wyoming and Colorado.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Rawlins Quadrangle (2 exp 0 ), Wyoming and Colorado, was evaluated to identify areas that contain environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Data from reconnaissance and detailed surface studies, aerial radiometric surveys, hydroge...

J. R. Dribus R. F. Nanna

1982-01-01

248

Geothermal Resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This introduction contains (1) a general discussion of how geothermal resources occur, (2) a discussion of the temperatures, distribution, and possible applications of geothermal resources in Wyoming and a general description of the state's thermal settin...

B. S. Hinckley H. P. Heasler

1984-01-01

249

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment...

J. N. Damp M. D. Jennings

1982-01-01

250

Wyoming's Performance and Highway Safety Plan, Federal Fiscal Year 2013.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Wyoming's Highway Safety related problem identification process is done annually based on the most current calendar year data available. Data utilized for analysis of highway safety problem areas are primarily taken from two documents which involve inform...

2013-01-01

251

Consumptive use by Irrigated High Mountain Meadows in Southern Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An area along the Medicine Bow River in south central Wyoming was instrumented to obtain estimates of consumptive use (evapotranspiration) from irrigated high mountain meadows. Four basic methods were employed: non-weighing tank lysimeters, the hydrologic...

T. J. Swartz R. D. Burman P. A. Rechard

1972-01-01

252

US hydropower resource assessment for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Wyoming.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01

253

Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

1981-03-01

254

Remote Observing Capabilities of the Wyoming InfraRed Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wyoming Infra-Red Observatory (WIRO) is currently upgrading its facilities to allow remote operation of the telescope and instruments over the Internet. WIRO is a 2.3 meter, f\\/27 telescope located 40km southwest of the University of Wyoming campus at an elevation of 2900 meters. A 10.5Mbps microwave link from the summit of Jelm Mountain to a control room on the

R. Martin; P. Johnson; J. Cash

2000-01-01

255

Modal correlation approaches for general second-order systems: Matching mode pairs and an application to Campbell diagrams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modal correlation is well developed for undamped and proportionally damped vibrating systems. It is less well defined for generally damped linear systems. This paper addresses the fundamental problem of comparing two general second-order linear systems through modal information. It considers precisely the problem of how to achieve matching of modes (mode pairs).There are several possible motivations for modal correlation of which the most important is probably the model updating application. In that application, one set of modes derives from a numerical model and the other from measured data. This paper focuses mainly on a different application—constructing Campbell diagrams for rotating machines. There are two significant differences here: (a) the two sets of modes being compared at any one time are from the same numerical model but for different spin speeds and (b) there is generally a strong distinction between the left and right modes of the system. Without some modal correlation approach, the Campbell diagram is constructed simply as a set of points on the frequency-speed graph. With modal correlation, the eigenvalue problem can be solved at far fewer speeds and the points can be joined meaningfully. A dimensionless ( n × n ) modal-matching array is produced whose entries indicate which pairs of modes from the first system best correlate with any particular pair of modes from the second system. The presented work is motivated mainly by the application of developing Campbell diagrams for rotating machines by means which are more effective than simply plotting a large set of discrete points. Wider applications of this paper include model updating procedures where mode pairs must be matched initially to ensure convergence towards the exact system.

Alkhfaji, Saad S.; Garvey, Seamus D.

2011-11-01

256

Qualification Plan for Phase One of True-MidPacific Geothermal Venture: James Campbell - Kahaualea Project, Island of Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop the geothermal resources of the James Campbell Estate, comprising acres in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The geothermal resource is assumed to exist in the vicinity of the East Rift of the Kilauea volcano. The location of the proposed geothermal well field and the geothermal-electric power plant are shown on Dwg. No. E-04-001. Access to the project area will be provided by a new road extension from the boundary road south from Glenwood on Highway 11.

None

1981-06-01

257

Oil and Gas Development in Southwestern Wyoming - Energy Data and Services for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to explore current oil and gas energy development in the area encompassing the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative. The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to ensure southwestern Wyoming's wildlife and habitat remain viable in areas facing development pressure. Wyoming encompasses some of the highest quality wildlife habitats in the Intermountain West. At the same time, this region is an important source of natural gas. Using Geographic Information System technology, energy data pertinent to the conservation decision-making process have been assembled to show historical oil and gas exploration and production in southwestern Wyoming. In addition to historical data, estimates of undiscovered oil and gas are included from the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey National Assessment of Oil and Gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province. This report is meant to facilitate the integration of existing data with new knowledge and technologies to analyze energy resources development and to assist in habitat conservation planning. The well and assessment data can be accessed and shared among many different clients including, but not limited to, an online web-service for scientists and resource managers engaged in the Initiative.

Biewick, Laura R. H.

2009-01-01

258

Estimation of Growing Season ET using Wyoming ET Calculator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate estimations of Evapotranspiration (ET) and Consumptive Irrigation Requirement (CIR) are essential for water resources planning and management. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office currently determines monthly reference evapotranspiration (ET) with an Excel Spreadsheet ET model using average monthly data from a nearby weather station (usually an airport weather station) for the irrigated area of interest, and interpolates them into daily reference ET using either linear or cubic functions. The purpose of this project is to replace the current Excel model with a GIS-based ET calculator. Our approach uses daily weather data to calculate daily reference and actual ET, and then aggregate actual ET into monthly and seasonal ET. Among many reference ET equations available, the ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration Equation (ASCE-ET) and the Hargreaves-Samani equations were selected to calculate daily reference ET. Wyoming ET Calculator, a GIS-based ET tool, was developed to calculate daily potential ET, CIR, and actual ET, using daily reference ET, crop coefficients, effective precipitation ratios, and water stress factors. Total monthly and growing season ET and CIR were determined over the Upper Green River Basin in Wyoming. The long term trends of these totals from 1960-2009 were analyzed and compared to trends in weather data (minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, and dew point temperature). We also evaluated the total monthly and growing season ET from Wyoming ET Calculator against satellite-based ET (METRIC ET) estimations for June, July, and August of 2009 around an irrigated area near the Wind River Mountain Range in Wyoming. The total monthly ET from Wyoming ET Calculator agrees very well with total monthly ET from METRIC for well-watered crop areas. For other areas, the Wyoming ET Calculator tends to overestimate total monthly ET values than METRIC, because the tool assumes all NLCD crop area are being irrigated.

Rasmussen, R. W.; Park, G.

2011-12-01

259

77 FR 32665 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and BLM, Wyoming State Office, Branch of Solid Minerals, Attn: Mavis Love, P.O. Box 1828, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mavis Love, Land Law Examiner, at 307- 775-6258. Persons who use a...

2012-06-01

260

78 FR 55694 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-HQ-ORD-2011-0895] Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY: Environmental...draft research report titled, ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming.'' The...

2013-09-11

261

Geochemical, Biogeochemical, and Sedimentological Studies of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Introduction; Sulfur geochemistry and isotopy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; A preliminary study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic biogeochemistry of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Green River Formation, Wyom...

M. L. Tuttle

1991-01-01

262

78 FR 51753 - AUC, LLC Reno Creek, In Situ Project, New Source Material License Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...restoration of the aquifer from which the uranium would be extracted. The proposed facility will be located near the town of Wright, Wyoming in Campbell County. The application was accepted for review by NRC on June 18, 2013. A notice of receipt and...

2013-08-21

263

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming, was evaluated for areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Examination of surface exposures of known uranium occurrences, reconnaissance geochemical sampling, and ground radiometric surveys were conducted. Anomalous areas recognized from airborne radiometric surveys were ground checked. Electric and gamma logs were used to determine subsurface structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and areas of anomalous radioactivity. Fourteen areas were found to be favorable for uranium deposits. Nine of these are in sandstone: Wind River Formation of the Wind River and Shirley Basins; Battle Spring and Fort Union Formations of the Red Desert; Hanna Formation of the Hanna Basin; Arikaree Formation of the Granite Mountain area; and Mesaverde Formation at the Nine Mile Lake, North Platte-Clarkson Hill, and Lost Soldier areas. Two areas favorable for vein deposits are along the South Granite Mountain Fault and in the Shirley Mountains. The Wasatach Formation of the Red Desert is favorable for carbonaceous shale deposits, the Heath Peak area for orthomagmatic deposits, and the Moonstone Formation within the Granite Mountains for hydroallogenic deposits. Precambrian conglomerates, granites, and pegmatites, Paleozoic formations, pre-Mesaverde Mesozoic formations, and post-Wind River (Lower Eocene) formations are generally unfavorable.

Griffin, J.R.; Milton, E.J.

1982-09-01

264

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Arminto Quadrangle, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Arminto Quadrangle in central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability in accordance with specific criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveying, rock and water sampling, studying well logs, and reviewing literature. Nine favorable environments were identified. Favorable environments include Cretaceous, Paleocene and Eocene sandstones of the Powder River Basin; Eocene sandstones of the Wind River Basin; the Cretaceous Cloverly Formation of the Casper Arch and Big Horn Basin; and Jurassic, Triassic, and Pennsylvanian sandstones of the Mayoworth area. Additional favorable environments include solution-breccia zones in the Madison Limestone at Mayoworth; Precambrian granites at Copper Mountain for authigenic deposits; and syngenetic uraniferous phosphates in lacustrine deposits at Lysite Mountain. Unfavorable environments include most Precambrian rocks; most lithologies of the Bighorn Basin; impermeable shales, silts, and carbonates; all strata of the Casper Arch, excluding the Cloverly Formation; and the Flathead Formation. Several Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine sands and the Madison limestone, excluding the Madison of the Mayoworth area, are unevaluated.

Damp, J.; Brown, L.

1982-06-01

265

Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

Nichols, D. J.; Jacobson, S. R.

1982-01-01

266

Geochemical, biogeochemical, and sedimentological studies of the Green River Formation. Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report contains the following sections: Introduction; Sulfur geochemistry and isotopy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; A preliminary study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic biogeochemistry of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Trace elements in pyrites of the Green River Formation oil shales, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; An experimental

Tuttle

1991-01-01

267

Wyoming Community Colleges Workforce Development Activities: Overview of Workforce Development Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Wyoming Community Colleges are responsive to training and workforce development needs of the state. In February 2004, community college staff began working with the Wyoming Workforce Alliance and Community College Commission staff to address the need for a unified and automatic process that will enable Wyoming's community colleges to track and…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2005

2005-01-01

268

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2008-2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission in 2002. These indicators, while providing…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2010

2010-01-01

269

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2007-2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission. These indicators, while providing some…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

2009-01-01

270

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2009-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission in 2002. These indicators, while providing…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2011

2011-01-01

271

Wyoming Community Colleges. Annual Performance Report: Core Indicators of Effectiveness 2006-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Core Indicators of Effectiveness Report" delineates the performance of Wyoming's community colleges as measured by the 14 indicators set forth by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and adopted by the seven Wyoming community colleges and the Wyoming Community College Commission. These indicators, while providing some…

Wyoming Community College Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

272

An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

Yang, D.; Kane, D. L.; Hinzman, L. D.; Goodison, B. E.; Metcalfe, J. R.; Louie, P. Y. T.; Leavesley, G. H.; Emerson, D. G.; Hanson, C. L.

2000-01-01

273

An evaluation of the Wyoming Gauge System for snowfall measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this Intercomparison experiment. The Intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

Yang, Daqing; Kane, Douglas L.; Hinzman, Larry D.; Goodison, Barry E.; Metcalfe, John R.; Louie, Paul Y. T.; Leavesley, George H.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Hanson, Clayton L.

2000-09-01

274

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979December 10, 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance

J. I. Kull; W. N. Niemeyer; S. B. Youngblood

1980-01-01

275

Geochemical, biogeochemical, and sedimentological studies of the Green River Formation. Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The report contains the following sections: Introduction; Sulfur geochemistry and isotopy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; A preliminary study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic biogeochemistry of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Trace elements in pyrites of the Green River Formation oil shales, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; An experimental study of goethite sulfidization--Relationships to the diagenesis of iron and sulfur; Effects of source, depositional environment, and diagenesis on characteristics of organic matter in oil shale from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Petrography of iron sulfide minerals in the Green River Formation of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado.

Tuttle, M.L.

1991-01-01

276

Geologic map of the Ennis 30' x 60' quadrangle, Madison and Gallatin Counties, Montana, and Park County, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ennis 1:100,000 quadrangle lies within both the Laramide (Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary) foreland province of southwestern Montana and the northeastern margin of the middle to late Tertiary Basin and Range province. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle are Archean high-grade gneiss, and granitic to ultramafic intrusive rocks that are as old as about 3.0 Ga. The gneiss includes a supracrustal assemblage of quartz-feldspar gneiss, amphibolite, quartzite, and biotite schist and gneiss. The basement rocks are overlain by a platform sequence of sedimentary rocks as old as Cambrian Flathead Quartzite and as young as Upper Cretaceous Livingston Group sandstones, shales, and volcanic rocks. The Archean crystalline rocks crop out in the cores of large basement uplifts, most notably the 'Madison-Gravelly arch' that includes parts of the present Tobacco Root Mountains and the Gravelly, Madison, and Gallatin Ranges. These basement uplifts or blocks were thrust westward during the Laramide orogeny over rocks as young as Upper Cretaceous. The thrusts are now exposed in the quadrangle along the western flanks of the Gravelly and Madison Ranges (the Greenhorn thrust and the Hilgard fault system, respectively). Simultaneous with the west-directed thrusting, northwest-striking, northeast-side-up reverse faults formed a parallel set across southwestern Montana; the largest of these is the Spanish Peaks fault, which cuts prominently across the Ennis quadrangle. Beginning in late Eocene time, extensive volcanism of the Absorka Volcanic Supergroup covered large parts of the area; large remnants of the volcanic field remain in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The volcanism was concurrent with, and followed by, middle Tertiary extension. During this time, the axial zone of the 'Madison-Gravelly arch,' a large Laramide uplift, collapsed, forming the Madison Valley, structurally a complex down-to-the-east half graben. Basin deposits as thick as 4,500 m filled the graben. Pleistocene glaciers sculpted the high peaks of the mountain ranges and formed the present rugged topography.

Kellogg, Karl S.; Williams, Van S.

2000-01-01

277

examples from the Gros Ventre Range, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment transport rates (dissolved, suspended, and bedload) measured over the course of several years are reported for two streams in the Gros Ventre Mountain range in western Wyoming, USA: Little Granite and Cache Creeks. Both streams drain watersheds that are in relatively pristine environments. The sites are about 20 km apart, have runoff dominated by snowmelt and are underlain by

Sandra E. Ryan; Mark K. Dixon

278

Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

279

Tectonic loading and subsidence of intermontane basins: Wyoming foreland province  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of two-dimensional flexural modeling of the northern Bighorn and northern Green River basins in the Wyoming foreland province suggest that these basins formed as flexures in response to loading by basin-margin uplifts and basin sedimentary sequences. The northern Bighorn Basin subsided due to loading by the Beartooth uplift along its western margin. The northern Green River Basin developed as

E. Sven Hagen; Mark W. Shuster; Kevin P. Furlong

1985-01-01

280

76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW177903] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

2011-04-01

281

76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW174596] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Hilight Field...

2011-10-17

282

76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L51100000-GA0000-LVEMK09CK36; WYW172657] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal...

2011-06-17

283

76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...LLWY922000-L13200000-EL0000; WYW163340] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale...SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II...

2011-03-01

284

Geothermal resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general discussion of how geothermal resources occur; a discussion of the temperatures, distribution, and possible applications of geothermal resources in Wyoming and a general description of the State's thermal setting; and a discussion of the methods used in assessing the geothermal resources are presented. The discussion of the geothermal resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins includes material

B. S. Hinckley; H. P. Heasler

1984-01-01

285

U.S. in the World: Wyoming/Algeria  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wyoming and Algeria help power the world as major providers of energy. Although energy production forms the backbone of both regions, agricultural production --both farming and livestock--dominates the landscape. Read about how energy development and agriculture challenge both places' environmental quality.

Bureau, Population R.

286

Role of site characteristics in coal gasification. [Hanna, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field test data for a series of four underground coal gasification tests (UCG) at a site near Hanna, Wyoming are presented. Results of these field tests were combined with modeling efforts to identify site selective parameters broadly identified as the flow and mechanical properties of a coal seam that can help determine the degree to which any UCG test would

B. E. Bader; R. E. Glass

1981-01-01

287

77 FR 60719 - Filing of Plats of Survey, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...dependent resurvey of a portion of the west boundary of the Wind River Indian Reservation and the subdivisional lines, and the metes-and-bounds survey of Tract 37, Township 5 North, Range 6 West, Wind River Meridian, Wyoming, Group No. 846, was...

2012-10-04

288

Effectiveness of Habitat Manipulation for Wild Salmonids in Wyoming Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habitat manipulation is commonly used to enhance habitat and stocks of fluvial trout of the genera Oncorhynchus, Salmo, and Salvelinus, but questions have been raised about the effectiveness of such work. Consequently, I analyzed wild trout abundance, biomass, and habitat before and after habitat manipulations among 30 projects done by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Abundance and biomass of

N. Allen Binns

2004-01-01

289

American Exploration: North-western Wyoming and Yellowstone Park  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE letter from Capt. W. A. Jones in NATURE, vol. xviii. p. 667, seems to show a feeling of irritation on his part at the notice of his Report upon a reconnaissance in North-western Wyoming, which appeared in your columns some months ago. There was not in that notice any expression which could be interpreted into a want of recognition

Arch. Geikie

1878-01-01

290

The university of wyoming's small scientific balloon program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over 500 small scientific balloons have been launched by the University of Wyoming's Atmospheric Physics Group from 26 locations over the globe in a study of stratospheric aerosol physics and chemistry which began in 1971. These flights have led to a basic understanding of the evolution of sulfurous gases, injected into the stratosphere by major volcanic eruptions, into sulfuric acid

D. J. Hofmann; J. M. Rosen; N. T. Kjome; G. L. Olson; D. W. Martell

1985-01-01

291

Post-Laramide history of North Central Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the assumptions on which the history of North Center Wyoming was based and developed a new set of assumptions in keeping with recent advances. Assumptions previously used include: (1) physiolographic and orogenic mountains originate at the same time and from the same processes; (2) all significant deformation occurred during the Laramide Orogeny; (3) all streams transverse to

J. J. Piegat

1984-01-01

292

Soil catenas of calcareous tills, Whiskey Basin, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe catenas developed on calcareous moraines of Pinedale (?21–15 ka) and Bull Lake (>130–100 ka) ages at Whiskey Basin on the eastern flank of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA. We sampled one catena of each age from each of two separate moraine fields: the Jakey's Fork and Torrey Creek valleys. Soils of the Bull Lake catena at Jakey's

Michael T Applegarth; Dennis E Dahms

2001-01-01

293

Fluvial systems in the Siwalik Miocene and Wyoming Paleogene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 3 km thick Miocene Siwalik Group (Himalayan foredeep in northern Pakistan) and the 2 km thick Paleogene Fort Union\\/Willwood formations (Bighorn Basin in Wyoming) both preserve long records of fluvial deposition adjacent to rising mountain belts. Depositional environments and associated habitats change across large basins along with changing physiography and with the location of different river systems that may

B. J. Willis; A. K. Behrensmeyer

1995-01-01

294

New Vitrinite Reflectance Data for the Wind River Basin, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range and Owl Creek and southern Bighorn Mountain...

M. J. Pawlewicz T. M. Finn

2013-01-01

295

Petroleum exploration in Absaroka basin of northwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new, virtually unexplored petroleum province with large potential resources can be defined in northwestern Wyoming. Structurally, the Absaroka basin is bounded on the north by the Beartooth uplift, to the west by the Gallatin and Washakie uplifts, to the south by the Washakie and Owl Creek uplifts, and to the east by the Cody arch. The Cody arch connects

Sundell

1986-01-01

296

Northeast-southwest structural transect: Rocky Mountain foreland, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A northeast-southwest structural transect has been constructed across the Rocky Mountain foreland in Wyoming, a distance of about 400 mi. The line of transect begins in the northern Black Hills and traverses the northern Powder River basin, the Bighorn Mountains from Buffalo to Bonanza, the Big Horn basin from Worland to Hamilton dome, the Owl Creek Mountains, the northern Wind

1987-01-01

297

A New Concept for the Gasification of Wyoming Coal  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Background of the original proposal Wyoming produces 36% of US coal, most of which is burned in pulverized coal boilers to produce electricity. This coal is sold at fuel value, minus transportation cost, resulting in a relatively low economic value because the majority of the coal is shipped out of state. Higher value products from the coal could be

Stefan Heinz; Michael Stoellinger

2009-01-01

298

Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project, a 4-year federally supported project to identify children who have deaf-blindness and to provide technical assistance in the development of educational services for these children. Major accomplishments of the project included:…

Whitson, Joanne B.

299

Recommended Organization for Wyoming Public Elementary and Secondary School Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report of a management consultant firm details 11 major recommendations to improve the public elementary and secondary school system in Wyoming. (1) The State should articulate objectives to serve as guidelines for public school education. (2) The State Department of Education (SDE) should be administered through a…

Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Chicago, IL.

300

Status of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in Wyoming Waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most subspecies of interior cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki have suffered dramatic declines in range and number. We assessed the status of genetically pure Yellowstone cutthroat trout O. clarki bouvieri on predominantly public lands in three major watersheds of northwestern Wyoming (Greybull River and North and South Forks of the Shoshone River) between 1994 and 1997. These river basins encompass the

Carter G. Kruse; Wayne A. Hubert; Frank J. Rahel

2000-01-01

301

An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project

Daqing Yang; Douglas L. Kane; Larry D. Hinzman; Barry E. Goodison; John R. Metcalfe; Paul Y. T. Louie; George H. Leavesley; Douglas G. Emerson; Clayton L. Hanson

2000-01-01

302

An evaluation of the Wyoming Gauge System for snowfall measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project

Daqing Yang; Douglas L. Kane; Larry D. Hinzman; Barry E. Goodison; John R. Metcalfe; Paul Y. T. Louie; George H. Leavesley; Douglas G. Emerson; Clayton L. Hanson

2000-01-01

303

BIG GAME DEPREDATIONS AND DAMAGE COMPENSATION IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is responsible for controlling depredations by big game, trophy game, and game birds. Under certain guidelines landowners can submit a claim to the department for compensation from wildlife depredations. Measures used by department personnel to prevent wildlife damage are the use of scare devices, harassment techniques, repellents, fencing, trapping, issuing of kill permits, and

John R. Demaree

1985-01-01

304

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Wyoming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Wyoming. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

305

Enhancing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Establishment with Cultural Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) has proven difficult to re- establish by direct seeding on mined lands in the western U.S. This paper reviews research accomplishments over the last decade that address ecological and cultural practices to enhance big sagebrush establishment. Direct-placed topsoil, mulching and arbuscular mycorrhizae have been shown to positively influence seedling establishment of this species

G. E. Schuman; D. T. Booth; R. A. Olson

306

Preliminary heat flow and radioactivity studies in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Twelve new heat flow values in Wyoming are in the range 0.6--2.1 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (25--88 mW/m/sup 2/). Radioactive heat productions at eight localities range from approx.0 to approx.1.3 ..mu mu..cal/cm/sup 3/ s (approx.0--5.4 ..mu..W/m/sup 3/). These data are consistent with the following interpretations: (1) The Laramie Mountains--eastern Wyoming Basin area is a zone of normal heat flow (0.6--1.6 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (25--67 mW/m/sup 2/) that is characterized by low flux (approx.0.6 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (approx.25 mW/m/sup 2/) from the lower crust and upper mantle. (2) The eastern boundary of the Yellowstone caldera heat flow high (> or =2.5 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (> or =105 mW/m/sup 2/)) is narrow. (3) The heat flow is high (1.9--2.1 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (79--88 mW/m/sup 2/)) in parts of the Black Hills in northeastern Wyoming and western South Dakota. From the data presented, a major heat flow transition occurs between the Medicine Bow and Laramie mountains in Wyoming (0.6--1.3 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (25Pxn54 mW/m/sup 2/)) and the Rocky Mountains in northern Colorado (2.2--3.0 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ s (92--125 mW/m/sup 2/)). The high flux in this part of the Southern Rockies may mean that the zone of high heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift extends to the Colorado-Wyoming Border. The normal heat flow in the Laramie Mountains--eastern Wyoming Basin area implies submelting temperatures in the upper mantle. In contrast, the very hgih flux in northern Colorado may be related to high-temperature, nonradiogenic heat sources in the lower crust and upper mantle because the width of the transition to normal flux in the Laramie Mountains in southern Wyoming is narrow (< or =70 km).

Decker, E.R.; Baker, K.R.; Bucher, G.J.; Heasler, H.P.

1980-01-10

307

One State's Response to the Collaborative Imperative: Voluntary Articulation Between the University of Wyoming and Wyoming's Community Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents the statewide articulation agreements developed by Wyoming higher education institutions, resulting in a common name and numbering system for lower-division courses, as well as dual admission agreements; 2+2, 2+3, and 3+1 articulation agreements; joint delivery of degree programs; and shared data on student performance. These agreements…

Powell, Judith A.; Gillum, Forrest E.; Murdock, Maggi; Winter, Jerry; Muto, Jan

1998-01-01

308

County Home Rule.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: The home rule concept; What can home rule do for counties; Criticisms of home rule; The ideals of county government; Legislative benefits of home rule; Home rule answers Arizona's problems; If home rule fails to be adopted.

1973-01-01

309

Thin-skinned shortening geometries of the South Fork fault: Bighorn basin, Park County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new interpretation of the South Fork fault in light of thin-skinned thrust theory. Cross sections and seismic data are presented which indicate that the South Fork fault is an allochthonous salient which was emplaced in the Bighorn basin during the early to middle Eocene. All observed structural geometries can be interpreted as developing under a compressional

Clarey

1990-01-01

310

Selected upper Cretaceous and Paleocene reservoirs in Hanna basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The central Hanna basin offers multiple hydrocarbon targets in the Mesaverde Group (Campanian Stage), Lewis, Medicine Bow, and Ferris formations (Upper Campanian, Maestrichtian, and Danian Stages). Reservoirs within these formations are found in siltstone, sandstone, coal, an lignitic facies. Permeability is associated with intergranular porosity, microporosity in clays, cleating in coal and lignite, and fracture fields which may be independent of stratigraphic boundaries. The quality of reservoirs, as determined by logs, is similar to known gas and condensate producing areas of the Red Desert, Washakie, and Wind River basins, in Mesaverde, Lewis, and Medicine Bow (Lance) formations. Mature oil source is indicated in Medicine Bow and Ferris transitional marine and lacustrine facies (Lance and Fort Union time equivalents). Oil source and sandstone depositional style may be similar to oil productive Fort Union strata in the Wind River and southern Powder River basins. Source rock studies and time vs. temperature relationships of the Upper Cretaceous lithologic package suggest an area of over 250 mi/sup 2/ (650 km/sup 2/) prospective for tight sands gas in Mesaverde and Lewis formations to 15,000 ft (4570 m) and deeper. Lithologic studies of clay and matrix chemistry suggest that specific drilling and treatment fluids are necessary to minimize damage and achieve commercial recovery of gas and condensate. Recent drilling and modern logging in the Seminoe Unit, T24N, R83-84W, have revealed anomalous gas saturation in Lewis and Mesaverde reservoirs. Numerous reservoirs containing hydrocarbons in the Upper Cretaceous section remain to be evaluated, and the volume of hydrocarbons to be recovered provides reason to proceed.

Pritchett, R.W.

1984-04-01

311

Selected upper Cretaceous and Paleocene reservoirs in Hanna basin, Carbon County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central Hanna basin offers multiple hydrocarbon targets in the Mesaverde Group (Campanian Stage), Lewis, Medicine Bow, and Ferris formations (Upper Campanian, Maestrichtian, and Danian Stages). Reservoirs within these formations are found in siltstone, sandstone, coal, an lignitic facies. Permeability is associated with intergranular porosity, microporosity in clays, cleating in coal and lignite, and fracture fields which may be independent

Ronald W. Pritchett

1984-01-01

312

Archeological Investigations of the Deer Creek Site 48BH18, Big Horn County, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Archeological testing conducted at the Deer Creek Site, 48BH18, investigated four areas of the canyon bottom. Based on the results from this testing, it is believed that the site contains at least two bison kills, an open habitation area, and an occupied ...

T. K. Larson P. H. Sanders W. L. Tibesar M. McFaul

1984-01-01

313

Back-thrusting along the western flank of the Bighorn Mountain, Bighorn County,Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Field evidence of westward back-thrusting, compartmentalized faulting, and tectonically-thinned fault wedges supports a thrust-generated model of uplift for the Bighorn Mountains. Encompassed within the Leavitt Reservoir Quadrangle are structures suggestive of westward basement-involved thrusting antithetic to the main eastward thrust direction of the Bighorn uplift. The mountain-flank region in this area is characterized by reverse-faulted blocks of Precambrian basement which are draped by a deformed Paleozoic cover. A reentrant along the mountain front coincides with an east-west compartmental boundary separating two distinct areas of structural discordance. North of this fault boundary, compression appears to have been accommodated by folding of the hanging wall block. To the south, Precambrian rocks exposed at the mountain-front overlie, and are in fault-contact with a tectonically-thinned, overturned wedge of Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. Structures i the basinal portion of the Leavitt Reservoir Quadrangle include small-scale folds and a thrust-faulted anticline paralleling the NW-SE trend of the larger mountain-flank structures. Decollement may have occurred parallel to bedding planes within multiple stratigraphic horizons. This deformation probably represents concomitant basinward ramping of the sedimentary sequence in response to westward back-thrusting of Precambrian blocks during the Laramide Orogeny.

Noggle, K.S.

1985-01-01

314

Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the

M. H. Bailey; K. A. Sundell

1986-01-01

315

Mineral resources of the Oregon Buttes Wilderness Study Area, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the study area, about 40 miles south of Lander, Wyo., includes about 5,700 acres. It has minor occurrences of placer gold and possible deeply buried coal. Its energy resource potential is moderate for oil and gas, and low for coal, oil shale, geothermal energy, and uranium. Its mineral resource potential is low for placer gold and for all other metals, including uranium.

Gibbons, A.B.; Barton, H.N.; Kulik, D.M. (US Geological Survey (US)); Lane, M.E. (Bureau of Mines (US))

1990-09-01

316

Prevalence of Dictyocaulus viviparus infection in Rocky Mountain elk in Teton County, Wyoming.  

PubMed

Dictyocaulus viviparus infections in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus canadensis of Teton Countywere surveyed by fecal analyses during spring, summer and winter and by fecal analyses and necropsies during fall hunting seasons, 1968-1973. Prevalance of the lungworms was relatively high: 32-70% during the spring; slightly lower, 30-47%, during the summer; 21-39% in the fall; and declined to the annual low of 8-19% during the winter. Conversely, elk summering on Big Game Ridge showed an increase in prevalance of D. viviparus from 1969 to 1973. Decreases in prevalance of lungworms were noted on the National Elk Refuge at Jackson after management changes were effected in 1971. PMID:123012

Bergstrom, R C

1975-01-01

317

Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

1986-08-01

318

Outbreak of vertigo in Wyoming: possible role of an enterovirus infection.  

PubMed

An epidemiologic investigation was conducted to characterize and evaluate the possibility of a viral aetiology of an outbreak of acute vertigo in Hot Springs Country, Wyoming, during autumn 1992. Case-finding identified Hot Springs County residents who sought medical attention for new onset vertigo during 1 August, 1992-31 January 1993. Thirty-five case-patients and 61 matched controls were interviewed and serum specimens were obtained during January 1993. Case-patients were more likely than controls to report symptoms (e.g. fatigue, sore throat, fever, diarrhoea) of antecedent acute illness. Case-patients did not have a significantly greater prevalence or mean titre of IgG antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus than controls. Serologic evidence of recent enterovirus infection (IgM antibodies) was found for 74% of case-patients compared with 54% of controls (P < 0.05), suggesting a possible association between vertigo and enterovirus infection. Future studies are needed to define the role of enteroviruses in innerear diseases. PMID:8760963

Simonsen, L; Khan, A S; Gary, H E; Hanson, C; Pallansch, M A; Music, S; Holman, R C; Stewart, J A; Erdman, D D; Arden, N H; Arenberg, I K; Schonberger, L B

1996-08-01

319

Geological setting of retrogressed eclogite and jade in the southern Campbell Range: Preliminary structure and stratigraphy, Frances Lake area (NTS 105H), southeastern Yukon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The southern Campbell Range is underlain by greenschist facies volcaniclastic, epiclastic and sedimentary units of the Tuchitua River and Money Creek formations. Stratigraphy is deformed by at least three syn- to post-Early Permian folding events. Northwest-striking, high-angle faults imbricate the folded metasedimentary package with sheets of serpentinite. These rocks are juxtaposed against basinal rocks of the Fortin Creek group, to

Sharon D. Carr

320

Chemical and quality traits of ‘Olinda’ and ‘Campbell’ oranges after heat treatment at 44 or 46 °C for fruit fly disinfestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chemical and quality characteristics of ‘Olinda’ and ‘Campbell’ oranges (nucellar budlines from Valencia late cultivar) were evaluated after exposure to a fruit core temperature of 44°C and held at 44°C for 100min or 46°C and held at 46°C for 50min, subsequent storage at 6°C for 2 weeks and an additional week of simulated marketing period (SMP) at 20°C. Exposure

Mario Schirra; Maurizio Mulas; Angela Fadda; Ilaria Mignani; Susan Lurie

2005-01-01

321

The Andean hog-nosed skunk Conepatus chinga Molina, 1782 as a new definitive host for Spirometra erinacei Faust, Campbell & Kellog, 1929.  

PubMed

This report describes the finding of Spirometra erinacei Faust, Campbell & Kellog, 1929 (Cestoda, Diphyllobothridae) infecting the small intestine of two Andean hog-nosed skunks (Conepatus chinga Molina, 1782), collected from the locality "Abra La Raya", at Cusco, Peru. Four cestodes were studied and identified as S. erinacei. This is the first report showing that the Andean hog-nosed skunk is one of the natural hosts for this parasite. PMID:19254648

Gómez-Puerta, Luis A; Ticona, Daniel S; López-Urbina, María T; González, Armando E

2008-12-07

322

The Wyoming carbon underground storage project: Geologic characterization of the Moxa Arch and Rock Springs Uplift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state of Wyoming, in the northwestern United States, produces 40% of the nation’s coal, most of which is transported out of the state. The remainder is used at power plants within Wyoming to generate approximately 7% of U.S. electricity. Carbon capture and storage from these power stations could significantly reduce U.S. carbon emissions. Wyoming statutes and rules proposed by

Erin Campbell-Stone; Ranie Lynds; Carol Frost; Thomas P. Becker; Bridget Diem

2011-01-01

323

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

Not Available

2011-05-01

324

Foreland structure - Beartooth Mountains, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of public drilling records from the AMOCO Beartooth Number 1 and 1 A sidetrack boreholes (SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 19, T.8 S., R.20 E., Carbon County, Montana) continues. Several additional inferences are made about this large foreland structure, and subsequent interpretation of the structural model of the northeast corner of the Beartooth Mountain Block and structural relationship with the Big Horn Basin. The structure is described as a large recumbent to sub-horizontal, synclinal fold with the overturned upper limb out diagonally by the Beartooth Thrust or Thrust Zone and a complex thrust fault zone below the Beartooth Thrust. The single recorded dip angle and direction of the Beartooth Thrust at depth was 19 degrees to the northwest(?). The dipmeter dip angle on the Beartooth Thrust, 19 degrees, validates foreland structural theory of decreasing dip angles at a vertical depth of 8,232 feet (2,509 m), in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The northwest dip direction may be attributable to secondary structural folding. The record of northwest, southeast, and southwest dip of bedding surfaces and faults in sections of the overturned upper limb, in both boreholes, suggests possible, less intense secondary folding, after thrust fault deformation. Given the overall geometry of this large foreland structure, there is little doubt that the average direction of maximum principal stress (sigma 1) was oriented in a northeast - southwest direction.

Clark, D.M. [Exodus - Exploration, Inc., Billings, MT (United States)

1996-06-01

325

Depositional mechanisms and organic matter in Mowry shale (Cretaceous), Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Four lithofacies, which accumulated under different depositional conditions, can be distinguished in the Lower Cretaceous Mowry Shale of Wyoming. Type and amount of organic matter in these lithofacies are governed largely by sediment transport mechanisms. Nearshore silt and mud containing terrestrial organic matter were deposited in a prodelta environment by tractive processes and from suspension. These sediments, along with terrestrial organic matter, were redistributed by waning bottom flows over a dysaerobic slope; pelagically deposited muds containing marine-derived organic matter accumulated between flow events. Muds farthest offshore accumulated in dysaerobic and anaerobic water by pelagic settling in a region unaffected by bottom currents; these muds contain predominantly marine-derived organic matter. Petroleum source potential increases in a southeastward direction across west and central Wyoming. This trend results from differential input of marine and terrestrial organic matter, clastic dilution, and postdepositional biodegradation. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Davis, H.R.; Byers, C.W.; Pratt, L.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

1989-09-01

326

Tectonic loading and subsidence of intermontane basins: Wyoming foreland province  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of two-dimensional flexural modeling of the northern Bighorn and northern Green River basins in the Wyoming foreland province suggest that these basins formed as flexures in response to loading by basin-margin uplifts and basin sedimentary sequences. The northern Bighorn Basin subsided due to loading by the Beartooth uplift along its western margin. The northern Green River Basin developed as a result of concurrent loading by the Wyoming thrust belt to the west and the Wind River uplift to the east. Tectonic loading from basement-involved uplifts played a major role in subsidence and sedimentation, as evidenced by isopach patterns within each basin. Lithospheric flexural rigidities of 1021 to 1022 newton metres (N·m) can adequately explain subsidence in both basins.

Sven Hagen, E.; Shuster, Mark W.; Furlong, Kevin P.

1985-08-01

327

Map and Data for Quaternary Faults and Folds in Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The primary objective of this U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report is to improve seismic-hazard assessments in regions of Wyoming with low to moderate levels of historic seismicity. A map and pamphlet are available for download in PDF format. The map shows faults and folds with evidence of Quaternary movement including data on timing of the most recent movement, sense of movement, slip rate, and continuity of surface expression.

Michael, Machette; Survey, U. S.

328

Early Archean crust in the northern Wyoming province  

Microsoft Academic Search

U–Pb ages of individual detrital and metamorphic zircons from 12 Archean metasedimentary rocks, including quartzites, from the Beartooth, Ruby, and Tobacco Root uplifts of the northern Wyoming province indicate that they were deposited between 2.7 and 3.2Ga. Younger, metamorphic zircons are found as overgrowths and new grains in some samples, and yield ages between 2.7 and 1.9Ga. They are, however,

Paul A Mueller; Joseph L Wooden; Allen P Nutman; David W Mogk

1998-01-01

329

Late Cretaceous subsidence in Wyoming: Quantifying the dynamic component  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Late Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of North America is generally considered to have been a retroarc foreland basin. Flexural backstripping of the stratigraphic record from 97.2 Ma to 73.4 Ma, along a section perpendicular to the Wyoming-Idaho salient of the Sevier belt, clearly demonstrates that there were components of subsidence in addition to those driven by the thrust and

Shaofeng Liu; Dag Nummedal

2004-01-01

330

Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well

T. Kilian; K. Chamberlain; R. N. Mitchell; D. A. Evans; W. Bleeker; A. N. Lecheminant

2010-01-01

331

77 FR 38884 - Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35640] Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC (WCR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified...

2012-06-29

332

Specific Conductance and Dissolved-Solids Characteristics for the Green River and Muddy Creek, Wyoming, Water Year 1999-2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to describe specific conductance and dissolved-solids characteristics for two streams in the WLCI study area in Wyoming. Specifically, this report presents characteristics for the Green River near Green River, Wyoming, and fo...

M. L. Clark S. L. Davidson

2009-01-01

333

Determination of Impacts on the Endangered Wyoming Toad ('Bufo baxteri') at Mortenson National Wildlife Refuge from Ammonium Nitrate Concentrations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is found only as a reintroduced population at Mortenson National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in the Laramie Plains of southeast Wyoming. Reasons for the decline of this amphibian are unknown. Data on predation, habitat...

E. E. Little R. D. Calfee K. Dickerson

2002-01-01

334

Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

1989-01-01

335

Tongue River in Wyoming: A Baseline Fisheries Assessment, Monarch to the State Line.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A baseline study of fish populations was conducted in northeastern Wyoming's Tongue River and Goose Creek as part of a research project on the ecological effects of a large surface coal mine near Sheridan, Wyoming. The study area is a transition zone betw...

L. S. Johnson T. A. Wesche

1981-01-01

336

Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: natural resource goals, management practices and information sources  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Spanning 60 million acres, Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services. However, the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. In cooperation with the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA)—a predominant agricul...

337

Characterizing Wyoming ranching operations: Natural resource goals, management practices and information sources  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wyoming rangelands produce food and provide other vital ecosystem services, but the decision-making process of the ranchers who steward these lands is complex and poorly understood. What are the characteristics of Wyoming ranches, and how do ranchers manage natural resources? In cooperation with the...

338

A WATERBORNE OUTBREAK OF NORWALK-LIKE VIRUS AMONG SNOWMOBILERS - WYOMING, 2001  

EPA Science Inventory

In February 2001, episodes of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health from persons who had recently vacationed at a snowmobile lodge in Wyoming. A retrospective cohort study found a significant association between water consumption and illness, a...

339

Dissolution of Permian salt and Mesozoic depositional trends, Powder River basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salt deposits in the Powder River basin of Wyoming occur in the Late Permian Ervay Member of the Goose Egg Formation which was deposited in a redbed-evaporite trend extending from the Williston basin of North Dakota to the Alliance basin of Nebraska and Wyoming. However, only remnants of the once extensive Ervay salt remain in the Powder River basin, with

D. L. Rasmussen; D. W. Bean

1983-01-01

340

Evaluation of the Flash (Flashing Light Animal Sensing Host) System in Nugget Canyon, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

U.S. Highway 30 between Kemmerer and Cokville, Wyoming bisects the migratory route of the Wyoming Range mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), herd and is the site of hundreds of deer vehicle collisions each year. The system consisted of infrared detectors that...

K. M. Gordon S. H. Anderson B. Gribble M. Johnson

2001-01-01

341

WyomingView: No-Cost Remotely Sensed Data for Geographic Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning enhanced by visual examples and remotely sensed imagery is a valuable classroom resource for teaching students geographic concepts in a meaningful context. Barriers to the use of imagery include difficulty finding appropriate imagery and the cost of moderate resolution satellite imagery. A program in Wyoming called WyomingView and…

Sivanpillai, Ramesh; Driese, Kenneth L.

2008-01-01

342

Geomorphic Effects of Wood in 2003 Jokulhlaup in Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A jökulhlaup burst from an ice-dammed lake at the head of Grasshopper Glacier in Wyoming`s Wind River Mountains during early September 2003. Five reaches with distinct sedimentation patterns were delineated along the Dinwoody Creek drainage based on field reconnaissance surveys conducted during summer 2004. The jökulhlaup produced primarily longitudinal bars of cobbles and boulders in the first 6 km (reach

E. B. Oswald

2006-01-01

343

Assessment of existing water quality in the Tongue River, Wyoming, and effects of coal mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report discusses the results and conclusions of a comprehensive water quality investigation carried out during the period 1975 to 1978 to determine the existing and potential water quality impacts of coal mining along the Tongue River in Wyoming. The study included one-time-only water quality surveys throughout the Wyoming portion of the watershed to determine existing spatial trends in quality,

E. H. Dettmann; R. D. Olsen

1985-01-01

344

Josephine County Preliminary Comprehensive Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: General characteristics; Forest lands; Cleared land; Planning area analysis; Forecast of employment for Josephine County (1985); Forecasts of population for Josephine County (1985); Distribution of employment within the County (1985); Distributi...

1969-01-01

345

Mono County update  

Microsoft Academic Search

On February 9, 1988, the Mono County Board of Supervisors voted to approve Bonneville Pacific Corporation's Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project. The project is an air-cooled, binary, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The Mono County Board of Supervisors issued a project use-permit with vigorous and stringent conditions. Specific emphasis was placed on the establishment of a monitoring program designed to

Lyster

1987-01-01

346

Penobscot County Health Inquiry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A community profile is presented for Penobscot County, Maine. The county is the fourth largest in Maine and is part of the service area of the Northeast Health Planning Council. The profile opens with a description of the geographic characteristics of the...

S. Fulton T. Ramsey J. M. Cauble

1974-01-01

347

Role of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in Korean wines produced from Campbell Early grapes: potential use of Hanseniaspora uvarum as a starter culture.  

PubMed

Several yeasts were isolated from Campbell Early grapes (Vitis labrusca cultivar Campbell Early), the major grape cultivar in Korea, grown in two different regions. PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS I-5.8S-ITS II region showed that 34 isolates out of a total of 40 were in the same group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the major strain belonged to one species, Hanseniaspora uvarum, although they displayed some nucleotide mismatches between them. During spontaneous alcohol fermentation at 20 °C, the two grape musts containing 24 °Brix sugar exhibited similar fermentation patterns with differences in final alcohol production and yeast viable counts. PCR analysis of the yeasts randomly isolated during the fermentation using an intron splice site primer showed changes in yeast flora between 8 and 10 days of fermentation. We found that the dominant yeasts displaying various PCR patterns using the primer remained the same throughout the early stages of fermentation, as determined by molecular typing of their ITS regions using PCR-RFLP, and these yeasts were identical to those isolated from grape berries. Among the isolates, the strain designated SS6 was selected based on its potassium metabisulfite resistance, alcohol production (distillation method), and flavor (by sniffing test) of grape juice. When Campbell Early grape must was inoculated with H. uvarum SS6 cells, no differences in fermentation pattern were observed compared with that inoculated with cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W-3, an industrial wine yeast strain. However, SS6 wine showed higher levels of organic acid (especially lactic acid), aldehydes, and minor alcohols (except n-propyl alcohol), as well as a higher score in sensory evaluation, compared to those of W-3 wine. PMID:23498200

Hong, Young-Ah; Park, Heui-Dong

2013-01-05

348

Development of Lower Mississippian cyclic carbonates, Montana and Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lower Mississippian Lodgepole\\/Madison formations of Wyoming and Montana consist of a 20 to 300-m upward-shallowing sequence of cyclic slope\\/basin, deep-ramp to shallow-ramp carbonate deposits. Shallow-ramp cycles (1-3 m) are composed of cross-bedded oolitic grainstone and pellet grainstone, overlain by rare algal laminite caps. Deep-ramp cycles (1-10 m) are characterized by thin-bedded, substorm-wave-base limestone\\/shale, nodular limestone\\/shale, and storm-deposited limestone overlain

M. Elrich; J. F. Read

1989-01-01

349

Geothermal resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A general discussion of how geothermal resources occur; a discussion of the temperatures, distribution, and possible applications of geothermal resources in Wyoming and a general description of the State's thermal setting; and a discussion of the methods used in assessing the geothermal resources are presented. The discussion of the geothermal resources of the Laramie, Hanna, and Shirley Basins includes material on heat flow and conductive gradients, stratigraphy and hydrology, structure and water movement, measured temperatures and gradients, areas of anomalous gradient (including discussion of the warm spring systems at Alcova and Saratoga), temperatures of the Cloverly Formation, and summary and conclusions. 23 references, 9 figures, 5 tables. (MHR)

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

1984-01-01

350

Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a comparison of results from both Slave and Superior cratons throughout the Archean and Proterozoic. The data will test the prior connections, or lack thereof, among the Archean cratons in Laurentia, and help assess whether there was a supercontinent during the Archean-Proterozoic transition.

Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

2010-12-01

351

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report consists of a map (scale 1:500,000) that shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in Wyoming. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through the rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 miles, 30 to 200 miles, 200 to 500 miles, and more than 500 miles. (USGS)

Cooley, M. E.

1983-01-01

352

Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming  

PubMed Central

On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9°C.

Leopold, Luna B.

1980-01-01

353

GLACIER VARIABILITY IN WYOMING’S WIND RIVER RANGE AND TETON RANGE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wind River Range (WRR) in west central Wyoming is host to 63 glaciers, while the Teton Range (TR) is host to 10 named glaciers. These glaciers serve as natural water reservoirs, and the continued recession of glaciers will impact agricultural water supply in the region. Glacier area changes in the WRR were estimated for 44 glaciers using un-rectified high resolution (1 m) aerial photography from 1966 to 2006. Additionally, glacier area was also developed for ten of the 44 glaciers using resampled aerial photography at 10 m (SPOT), 15 m (ASTER), 22.5 m (IRS-LISS) and 30 m (Landsat) resolutions for 1966 and 2006. The total surface area of the 44 glaciers was calculated to be 45.9 ± 0.13 km2 in 1966 and 28.5 ± 0.11 km2 in 2006, an average decrease of 38% over the 40 year period. Small glaciers experienced noticeably more area reduction than large glaciers. Of the 44 glaciers analyzed, 22 had an area of greater than 0.5 km2 in 1966, while 22 were less than 0.5 km2 in 1966. The glaciers with a surface area less than 0.5 km2 experienced an average surface area loss (fraction of 1966 surface area) of 47%, while the larger glaciers (greater than 0.5 km2) experienced an average surface area loss of 36% in 2006. Of the ten glaciers analyzed by resampling, the total surface area (fraction of 1966 surface area) decreased by 36.8% using aerial photographs, 36.5% using SPOT images, 36.6% using ASTER images, 36.0% using IRS-LISS images and 37.1% using Landsat images. Glacier area changes in the TR were estimated for three glaciers using un-rectified aerial photography from 1967 to 2006. The total surface area of the three glaciers was calculated to be 0.53 ± 0.13 km2 in 1967 and 0.40 ± 0.10 km2 in 2006, an average decrease of 34% over the 39 year period. The smallest glacier Teepe experienced the most noticeable lost, losing 60% while the Teton glacier lost 17%. Applying area-volume scaling relationships for Teton, Middle Teton, and Teepe glaciers, volume loss was estimated to be 3.2 million cubic meters (MCM) over the 35 year period, which results in an estimated 4 to 10% contribution to warm season (July - September) streamflow. Accompanied with the calculation of glacier area loss, the amount of glacial volume lost was also determined for selected glaciers in the WRR from 1966 to 1989. A subset of 29 glaciers throughout two basins were analyzed as part of a paired watershed (glaciated vs. non-glaciated) analysis. Through the use of photogrammetric techniques, volume loss in the 17 glaciers of the Upper Green River sub-basin was estimated to be 319 x 106 m3 (14% area loss), while 12 glaciers in the Bull Lake sub-basin lost 369 x 106 m3 (16% area loss) over the 23 year period. The pure glacial ice melt contribution to late summer (Jul., Aug. and Sep.) downstream flow was 8% and 14%, respectively, for the basins above. Also, the paired watershed analysis indicated glaciers delayed spring snowmelt runoff to an extent where, in combination with glacial ice melt, the flow resulting from the glacial terminus was approximated as 40% of the late summer downstream flows.

Thompson, D.; Bell, J. E.; Edmunds, J.; Tootle, G. A.; Kerr, G.

2009-12-01

354

Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

Brezinski, D. K.; Kollar, A. D.

2008-01-01

355

Late Cretaceous subsidence in Wyoming: Quantifying the dynamic component  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Late Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of North America is generally considered to have been a retroarc foreland basin. Flexural backstripping of the stratigraphic record from 97.2 Ma to 73.4 Ma, along a section perpendicular to the Wyoming-Idaho salient of the Sevier belt, clearly demonstrates that there were components of subsidence in addition to those driven by the thrust and associated sediment loads. The simulation demonstrates that the flexural foredeep is only ˜180 120 km wide and shows a forebulge located near the subsequent Laramide Rock Springs uplift. Foredeep strata between the Rock Springs uplift on the east and the thrust front to the west were mostly involved in the eastward- overlapping thrust belt or deeply truncated by inferred rebound after 78.5 Ma. The difference between the observed, decompacted, cumulative subsidence and the amount of subsidence that can be explained by simple flexural loading, the “residual” subsidence, increases from ˜800 m in eastern Wyoming to ˜1.8 km near the thrust belt. The westward-thickening Upper Cretaceous sediment wedge filled the accommodation space generated by downward tilting to the west of the North American cratonic margin by underplating and mantle flow associated with the shallowly subducted Farallon plate.

Liu, Shaofeng; Nummedal, Dag

2004-05-01

356

Uranium, thorium, and lead systematics in Granite Mountains, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Uranium, thorium and lead concentrations and isotopic compositions were determined on total rocks and a feldspar sample from widely separated parts of the Granite Mountains in central Wyoming. Linear relations defined by 206Pb/204Pb - 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb - 232Th/204Pb for the total rock samples define 2.8 billion-year isochrons. In contrast, 238U/206Pb ages are anomalously old by a factor of at least four. The low 238U/204Pb values, coupled with the radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb and radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb ratios, indicate that contents of uranium in near-surface rocks would have had to have been considerably greater than those presently observed to have generated the radiogenic lead. It is possible that more than 1011 kg of uranium has been removed from the Granite Mountains, and the most feasible interpretation is that most of this uranium was leached from near-surface rocks at some time during the Cenozoic, thus providing a major source for the uranium deposits in the central Wyoming basins. ?? 1969.

Rosholt, J. N.; Bartel, A. J.

1969-01-01

357

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01

358

County Amenities and Net Migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

U.S. county-level net migration data and a general spatial model are used to examine the effects of various amenities on migration decisions. Results suggest that higher county cancer risks and the presence of superfund sites in a county, or a higher ranking on the Environmental Protection Agency's hazard ranking system, reduce the relative attractiveness of a county to prospective migrants,

Anil Rupasingha; Stephan J. Goetz

2004-01-01

359

Formation of the Campbell-Red Lake gold deposit by H2O-poor, CO2-dominated fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Campbell-Red Lake gold deposit in the Red Lake greenstone belt, with a total of approximately 840 t of gold (past production + reserves) and an average grade of 21 g/t Au, is one of the largest and richest Archean gold deposits in Canada. Gold mineralization is mainly associated with silicification and arsenopyrite that replace carbonate veins, breccias and wallrock selvages. The carbonate veins and breccias, which are composed of ankerite ± quartz and characterized by crustiform-cockade textures, were formed before and/or in the early stage of penetrative ductile deformation, whereas silicification, arsenopyrite replacement and gold mineralization were coeval with deformation. Microthermometry and laser Raman spectroscopy indicate that fluid inclusions in ankerite and associated quartz (Q1) and main ore-stage quartz (Q2) are predominantly carbonic, composed mainly of CO2, with minor CH4 and N2. Aqueous and aqueous-carbonic inclusions are extremely rare in both ankerite and quartz. H2O was not detected by laser Raman spectroscopic analyses of individual carbonic inclusions and by gas chromatographic analyses of bulk samples of ankerite and main ore-stage quartz (Q2). Fluid inclusions in post-mineralization quartz (Q3) are also mainly carbonic, but proportions of aqueous and aqueous-carbonic inclusions are present. Trace amounts of H2S were detected by laser Raman spectroscopy in some carbonic inclusions in Q2 and Q3, and by gas chromatographic analyses of bulk samples of ankerite and Q2. 3He/4He ratios of bulk fluid inclusions range from 0.008 to 0.016 Ra in samples of arsenopyrite and gold. Homogenization temperatures ( T h-CO2) of carbonic inclusions are highly variable (from -4.1 to +30.4°C; mostly to liquid, some to vapor), but the spreads within individual fluid inclusion assemblages (FIAs) are relatively small (within 0.5 to 10.3°C). Carbonic inclusions occur both in FIAs with narrow T h-CO2 ranges and in those with relatively large T h-CO2 variations. The predominance of carbonic fluid inclusions has been previously reported in a few other gold deposits, and its significance for gold metallogeny has been debated. Some authors have proposed that formation of the carbonic fluid inclusions and their predominance is due to post-trapping leakage of water from aqueous-carbonic inclusions (H2O leakage model), whereas others have proposed that they reflect preferential trapping of the CO2-dominated vapor in an immiscible aqueous-carbonic mixture (fluid unmixing model), or represent an unusually H2O-poor, CO2-dominated fluid (single carbonic fluid model). Based on the FIA analysis reported in this study, we argue that although post-trapping modifications and host mineral deformation may have altered the fluid inclusions in varying degrees, these processes were not solely responsible for the formation of the carbonic inclusions. The single carbonic fluid model best explains the extreme rarity of aqueous inclusions but lacks the support of experimental data that might indicate the viability of significant transport of silica and gold in a carbonic fluid. In contrast, the weakness of the unmixing model is that it lacks unequivocal petrographic evidence of phase separation. If the unmixing model were to be applied, the fluid prior to unmixing would have to be much more enriched in carbonic species and poorer in water than in most orogenic gold deposits in order to explain the predominance of carbonic inclusions. The H2O-poor, CO2-dominated fluid may have been the product of high-grade metamorphism or early degassing of magmatic intrusions, or could have resulted from the accumulation of vapor produced by phase separation external to the site of mineralization.

Chi, Guoxiang; Dubé, Benoît; Williamson, Kenneth; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

2006-01-01

360

Hydrology and Water and Sediment Quality at James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge near Kahuku, Island of Oahu, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge occupies two lowland marsh and pond complexes on the northern coastal plain of Oahu: the mostly natural ponds and wetlands of the Punamano Unit and the constructed ponds of the Kii Unit. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the Refuge primarily to protect and enhance habitat for four endangered species of Hawaiian waterbirds. Kii Unit is fed by artesian wells and rainfall, whereas Punamano Unit is fed naturally by rainfall, runoff, and ground-water seepage. Streams drain from the uplands into lowland ditches that pass through Kii Unit on their way to the ocean. A high-capacity pump transfers water from the inner ditch terminus at Kii to the ocean outlet channel. Stormwaters also exit the inner ditch system over flood-relief swales near the outlet pump and through a culvert with a one-way valve. A hydrologic investigation was done from November 1996 through February 1998 to identify and quantify principal inflows and outflows of water to and from the Refuge, identify hydraulic factors affecting flooding, document ground-water/surface-water interactions, determine the adequacy of the current freshwater supply, and determine water and sediment quality. These goals were accomplished by installing and operating a network of stream-gaging stations, meteorology stations, and shallow ground-water piezometers, by computing water budgets for the two Refuge units, and by sampling and analyzing water and pond-bottom sediments for major ions, trace metals, and organic compounds. Streamflow during the study was dominated by winter stormflows, followed by a gradual recession of flow into summer 1997, as water that had been stored in alluvial fans drained to lowland ditches. Outflow at the ditch terminus in 1997 was 125 million gallons greater than measured inflow to the coastal plain, mainly reflecting gains from ground water along the ditches between outlying gages and the ditch terminus. Of the measured 1997 outflow, 98 percent was through the Kii outlet pump, with the outlet culvert valve only opening for brief periods during storms. Large volumes of stormflow overflowed the flood-relief swales unmeasured. The largest storm of the study, in November 1996, was estimated to have a flood frequency of about 3 to 4 years. Streamflow exceeded culvert capacity and overtopped Kamehameha Highway at Kalaeokahipa Stream and Hospital ditch. Slight overbank flooding in Kii ditch resulted strictly from high discharge. Minor overbank flooding farther out on the coastal plain probably was caused mainly by the small hydraulic gradients available to convey stormflows along the lowland ditches. Stormwaters flooded Kii ponds and flowed back upstream along Punamano ditch into Punamano marsh, introducing suspended sediment and possibly other contaminants to the Refuge. Two smaller storms in January 1997 resulted in smaller flows and no overbank flooding. The Kii outlet pump ran continuously for 7 days during the November 1996 storm and for 1 to 2 days during the January 1997 storms. During all three storms, the outlet culvert valve opened and the inner ditches overtopped the flood-relief swales, allowing free outflow of water from the inner ditch. Backwater effects hindered drainage during the January 1997 storms at Hospital ditch at Kamehameha Highway, and at Punamano ditch at Nudist Camp Road (where the backflow into Punamano marsh in November 1996 constituted an extreme backwater effect). A probable marine backwater effect was imposed at the ocean outlet ditch during the November 1996 storm through a combination of high spring tides and wave setup from large surf. Whether this backwater effect propagated upstream in the ditches to affect inland sites could not be determined conclusively. A sand plug may have built up in the ocean outlet channel before the November 1996 storm, but if so, it probably washed out prior to, or early in the storm, and was not present at the time of peak stage at inlan

Hunt, Charles D., Jr.; De Carlo, Eric H.

2000-01-01

361

78 FR 21565 - Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 73 [MB Docket No. 13-73; RM-11695; DA 13-450] Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington...801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A....

2013-04-11

362

Public Administration Field Service Program for Energy-Impacted Communities-Colorado, Utah, Wyoming. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The pamphlet summarizes a comprehensive report published separately on 41 projects carried out by the Field Service Program in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah, where small, energy-impacted communities were facing problems resulting from the pressures of inten...

1979-01-01

363

Public Administration Field Service Program for Energy-Impacted Communities-Colorado, Utah, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The volume is the comprehensive final report on 41 projects carried out by the Field Service Program in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah, where small energy-impacted communities are facing problems resulting from the pressures of intensive industrial growth. G...

1979-01-01

364

75 FR 38538 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations: Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Solicit Nominations: Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land...two positions on the Pinedale Anticline Working Group (PAWG) that will become open on...Business address and phone number; 4. Home address and phone number; 5. Email...

2010-07-02

365

Hoe Creek Experiments: LLNL'S Underground Coal-Gasification Project in Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and predecessor organizations, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carried out a laboratory program and three field, underground coal gasification tests near Gillette, Wyoming. This report summar...

D. R. Stephens

1981-01-01

366

Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

Not Available

1981-10-01

367

75 FR 12740 - Wyoming Interstate Company, Inc.; Notice of Technical Conference  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...arising from Wyoming Interstate Company's (WIC's) January 28, 2010 tariff filing...the gas quality allocation procedures that WIC may implement when differing carbon dioxide...enforce their own gas quality specifications. WIC should be prepared to address all...

2010-03-17

368

Health Hazard Evaluation Determination Report No. HE 80-37-725, Texaco, Incorporated, Casper, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Environmental sampling was conducted and a medical questionnaire was administered on April 30 and May 1, 1980, at Texaco (SIC-2911), Casper, Wyoming, to determine employee exposure to toxic concentration of iron oxide (1309371), manganese (7439965), alumi...

B. J. Gunter

1980-01-01

369

Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

Lantz, E.

2011-05-23

370

Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming (Biologically Active Elements Study).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify contaminant problems that may warrant further study. This report also will assist in developing ...

P. Ramirez J. Armstrong

1992-01-01

371

Tar Sand Occurrences in the Bush Butte Quadrangle, Wyoming, with Emphasis on the Trapper Canyon Deposit.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Trapper Canyon Tar Sand Deposit is located in the eastern Bighorn Basin, approximately 25 miles east of Greybull, Wyoming. This project not only involved detailed geologic mapping of the Trapper Canyon Tar Sand Deposit, but also sampling and describin...

A. J. VerPloeg R. H. DeBruin

1983-01-01

372

Justice in the Seventies: Wyoming's Comprehensive Law Enforcement Plan, 1972. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Wyoming's comprehensive plan for 1972 is a continuation, consolidation and expansion of programs begun in past years combined with several new efforts to implement substantial improvement in the State's criminal justice system. The main divisions of this ...

1972-01-01

373

High Resolution Seismic Survey of the Hanna, Wyoming Underground Coal Gasification Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In June 1983 a high resolution seismic survey was conducted at the Department of Energy, Laramie Energy Technology Center's underground coal gasification test site near Hanna, Wyoming. The objectives of the survey were to locate and characterize undergrou...

1983-01-01

374

High Resolution Seismic Survey (Of the) Rawlins, Wyoming Underground Coal Gasification Area. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In October 1982, a high resolution seismic survey was conducted at the Gulf Research and Development Company's underground coal gasification test site near Rawlins, Wyoming. The objectives of the survey were to utilize high resolution seismic technology t...

A. D. Youngberg A. S. Orange E. Berkman

1983-01-01

375

Input Turbulence Features at a Megawatt-Size Wind Turbine, Medicine Bow, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to recent observations that wind turbulence has a strong effect on wind turbine fatigue life, measurements of turbulent wind velocity profiles have been made at the Medicine Bow, Wyoming, WTS-4 wind turbine site. These measurements were taken ...

J. R. Connell V. R. Morris M. E. Hinchee

1986-01-01

376

78 FR 758 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172559, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW172559, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...a petition for reinstatement from Nautilus Oil & Gas Company, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW172559 for land in Uinta...

2013-01-04

377

75 FR 35082 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, WYW175014, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, WYW175014, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...received a petition for reinstatement from Trident Oil & Gas LLC for competitive oil and gas lease WYW175014 for land in Niobrara...

2010-06-21

378

76 FR 24513 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164232, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW164232, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of...received a petition for reinstatement from Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for competitive oil and gas lease WYW164232 for land in Sweetwater...

2011-05-02

379

The Biology of Salt Wells Creek and Its Tributaries, Southwestern Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A description of biological communities in Salt Wells Creek, a plains stream in the Green River Basin of Wyoming, is presented. The description includes population distribution patterns, community edge effects, the food pyramid, and nutrition (trophic) le...

M. J. Engelke

1978-01-01

380

Characteristics of Endemic-Level Mountain Pine Beetle Populations in South-Central Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was conducted to evaluate the dynamics of endemic populations of mountain pine bettle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins). In addition, we extended the geographical range of an existing data base recorded in Utah with similar data from Wyoming. T...

D. L. Bartos R. F. Schmitz

1998-01-01

381

BRIDGER WILDERNESS AND GREEN-SWEETWATER ROADLESS AREA, WYOMING.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource appraisal of the Bridger Wilderness and contiguous Green-Sweetwater Roadless Area in Wyoming was made. This rugged and remote region is mostly Precambrian crystalline granitic rocks that contain only small and discontinuous areas of mineralization. The area is considered to have little promise for metallic mineral deposits. Sedimentary rocks in the area have minor coal seams and beds of phosphate rock, but the coal beds are thin and of limited extent, and the phosphate rock is low-grade compared to similar rocks elsewhere in the region. A probable potential for oil and gas at depth, assigned to part of the area, is based on the assumption that oil- and gas-bearing rocks exist at depth below a low-angle thrust fault and a wedge of Precambrian crystalline rock.

Worl, Ronald, G.; Ryan, George, S.

1984-01-01

382

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Ashton Quadrangle, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Ashton Quadrangle, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas containing environments favorable for uranium deposits, using criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. General surface reconnaissance, radiometric traverses, and geochemical sampling were carried out in all geologic environments within the quadrangle. Aerial radiometric data were evaluated, and anomalies were examined in the field. Fourteen uranium occurrences were noted in the study area. Only one environment, the phosphorites of the Permian Phosphoria Formation, is considered favorable for uranium deposition. The unfavorable environments include: limestones, sandstones, coal and carbonaceous shales, volcanics, Precambrian metamorphics, and Tertiary basins. Unevaluated areas include the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway and Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, where park service regulations prohibit detailed investigations.

Suekawa, H.S.; Merrick, D.; Clayton, J.; Rumba, S.

1982-07-01

383

National uranium resource evaluation, Rawlins quadrangle, Wyoming and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Rawlins Quadrangle (2/sup 0/), Wyoming and Colorado, was evaluated to identify areas that contain environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Data from reconnaissance and detailed surface studies, aerial radiometric surveys, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance surveys, and subsurface drill-hole log studies were collected and compared to favorability criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The authors delineated 15 areas containing 10 favorable environments as the result of the evaluation. Sandstone uranium environments occur in 11 areas. Two areas contain favorable carbonate uranium environments, and one is favorable for uraniferous lignites. Favorable plutonic environments occur in two areas, and favorable quartz-pebble conglomerates occur in two areas. Unevaluated environments include the Baggot Rocks Granite, the Frontier Formation, the Hanna Formation east of Elk Mountain, and the Medicine Bow and Mesaverde Formations in the Laramie Basin. All remaining areas in the quadrangle are considered unfavorable.

Dribus, J.R.; Nanna, R.F.

1982-06-01

384

Swift fox survival and production in southeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We estimated annual survival rates of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) and documented number of young per pair in a transition zone between shortgrass prairie and sagebrush steppe plant communities in southeastern Wyoming during 1996-2000. Annual adult survival ranged from 40% to 69%, with predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) the primary cause of deaths. Two foxes died of canine distemper virus. Annual survival rates did not differ among years (P>0.12). Nineteen of 24 (79%) swift fox pairs were observed with young over 3 years. Mean minimum litter size was 4.6 based on these 19 litters and 6 others not associated with our radiocollared foxes. Adult survival was similar and litter size slightly larger than observed elsewhere in the species range, suggesting that viable swift fox populations can be supported by sagebrush steppe and shortgrass prairie transition habitat.

Olson, T. L.; Lindzey, F. G.

2002-01-01

385

Seismic expression of Buffalo deep fault, Buffalo, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A concealed, west-dipping, high-angle reverse fault, one of a pair first reported by N.H. Foster, P.E. Goodwin, and R.E. Fisher in 1969, has been interpreted from seismic profiles in the area south and west of Buffalo, Wyoming. The fault, named the Buffalo deep fault (BDF) by D.L. Blackstone, Jr., in 1981, trends generally north-northwest and dips westward along the deepest part of the Powder River basin near the western margin. The projected surface trace lies as much as 14 mi east of the nearest outcrop of Precambrian rocks on the eastern flank of the Bighorn Mountains. Offset on the BDF decreases upward through the Paleozoic section into younger rocks that have been folded into the synclinal bend of an east-facing monocline. The monocline, the BDF, and another reverse fault appear clearly on a high-quality seismic profile that trends east-west about 8 mi southwest of Buffalo, Wyoming. This profile is one of many that have been surveyed across the mountain front. Maximum throw across the BDF is about 4500 ft from the base of the Phanerozoic section. This throw, plus the steepened dips on the upthrown western block, account for only part of the large uplift on the Bighorn Mountains. The remainder of the uplift probably is the consequence of movement on younger thrust faults, strike-slip faults, and normal faults, many of which are exposed. The BDF, monocline, thrust faults, and strike-slip faults were formed by horizontal compression, a dominantly eastward component of movement for the Bighorn Mountain block with respect to the Powder River basin.

Hinrichs, E.N.; Grow, J.A.; Miller, J.J.; Lee, M.W.

1986-08-01

386

Analysis of runoff from small drainage basins in Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A flood-hydrograph study has defined the magnitude and frequency of flood volumes and flood peaks that can be expected from drainage basins smaller than 11 square miles in the plains and valley areas of Wyoming. Rainfall and runoff data, collected for 9 years on a seasonal basis (April through September), were used to calibrate a rainfall-runoff model on each of 22 small basins. Long-term records of runoff volume and peak discharge were synthesized for these 22 basins. Flood volumes and flood peaks of specific recurrence intervals (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years) were then related to basin characteristics with a high degree of correlation. Flood volumes were related to drainage area, maximum relief, and basin slope. Flood peaks were related to drainage area, maximum relief, basin slope, and channel slope. An investigation of ponding behind a highway embankment, with available storage capacity and with a culvert to allow outflow, has shown that the single fast-rising peak is most important in culvert design. Consequently, a dimensionless hydrograph defines the characteristic shape of flood hydrographs to be expected from small drainage basins in Wyoming. For design purposes, a peak and volume can be estimated from basin characteristics and used with the dimensionless hydrograph to produce a synthetic single-peak hydrograph. Incremental discharges of the hydrograph can be routed along a channel, where a highway fill and culvert are to be placed, to help determine the most economical size of culvert if embankment storage is to be considered. (Woodard-USGS)

Craig, Gordon S.; Rankl, James G.

1977-01-01

387

Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

1993-01-01

388

Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1\\/4 of Section 29 and the E1\\/2SE1\\/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in southeast Wyoming. The structure of the site is characterized by beds dipping gently to the northeast. An

R. L. Oliver; A. D. Youngberg

1984-01-01

389

SCHOOL?TO?WORK PLANNING: CAREER GUIDANCE AND DEVELOPMENT FUNCTIONS AT WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student affairs professionals at 7 Wyoming community colleges and at 3 outreach campuses were interviewed regarding the career guidance and development functions at their institutions. This inventory was performed for the Wyoming School?to?Work Management Team to be used in the development of the state's school?to?work plan. Based on a taxonomy of increasing quantity of services, 2 of the campuses provide

Janet L. de Vries

1998-01-01

390

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wyoming big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production ( P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment ( P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated.

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

2011-09-01

391

Projected effects of intermittent changes in withdrawal of water from the Arikaree Aquifer near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Effects on streamflows and ground-water levels attributable to a proposed intermittent change in use and sites of withdrawal of 3 ,146 acre-feet of water from the Arikaree aquifer in central Platte County, WY, are assessed with a previously developed ground-water flow model. This water has been permitted for agricultural use by the State of Wyoming, and under the proposal would supplement, when needed, existing industrial surface- and ground-water supplies for the Laramie River Station of the Missouri Basin Power Project. Under a scenario wherein the supplemental industrial usage occurs in every 10th year commencing in 1980, the model predicts a cumulative streamflow-depletion rate in the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers of 7.7 cubic feet per second in the year 2020 compared to a rate of 6.9 cubic feet per second that is predicted if the intermittent industrial usage does not occur. Areas in which drawdowns relative to the simulated 1973 head configuration exceed 5, 10, 25, and 50 feet are predicted to be 107, 78, 38, and 2 square miles, respectively, in 2020 under the intermittent-usage scenario compared to corresponding areas of 104, 76, 36, and 2 square miles that are predicted if the intermittent industrial usage does not occur. (USGS).

Hoxie, Dwight T.

1979-01-01

392

Snohomish County Biodiesel Project  

SciTech Connect

Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to ���¢��������grow���¢������� this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

2010-02-01

393

County Waterford Image Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using volunteer help and a locally written image management system, the Waterford County Museum in Ireland has created this collection of close to 3,000 historical images that document Waterford County and its parishes from the late 1890s to the present. The Web interface to the collection includes a number of helpful features - for those familiar with Waterford county and its place and family names, there is a search box, but for those less familiar there are several ways to browse the collection, by selecting photographer, location, image format, or subjects from drop down lists, as well as selecting parishes from a map to see the pictures associated with each. A photo of the week is posted on the site, and visitors can sign up to receive an RSS feed or, alternatively, an email message when new images are added. There are also easy ways to submit photographs for inclusion in the archive, and for locals to contribute identifying information.

394

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

395

Closed solution to the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff problem: exact effective Hamiltonian theory for analysis of nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiments.  

PubMed

A closed solution to the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff problem is described. The solution, which is based on the Cayley-Hamilton theorem, allows the entanglement between exponential operators to be described by an exact finite series expansion. Addressing specifically the special unitary Lie groups SU(2), SU(3), and SU(4), we derive expansion formulas for the entangled exponential operator as well as for the effective Hamiltonian describing the net evolution of the quantum system. The capability of our so-called exact effective Hamiltonian theory for analytical and numerical analysis is demonstrated by evaluation of multiple-pulse methods within liquid- and solid-state nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. The examples include composite pulses for inversion, decoupling, and dipolar recoupling, as well as coherence-order- and spin-state-selective double- to single-quantum conversion, homonuclear dipolar decoupling, finite rf excitation for quadrupolar nuclei, heteronuclear coherence transfer, and gates for quantum computation. PMID:11863504

Untidt, Thomas S; Nielsen, Niels Chr

2002-01-23

396

Imperial County geothermal development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The progress of geothermal development during the past 3 years, county activities in support of geothermal development, and current challenges and future needs of the geothermal industry and the county are summarized. Three additional Known Geothermal Resources Areas (KGRAs) were identified: the Westmorland KGRA, the East Brawley KGRA, and the South Brawley KGRA. Three 10 megawatt power plants began operations during the grant period. Three commercial power plants are scheduled to begin construction during late 1982 or early 1983. Site work was begun for the Heber Flash Power Plant. Two commercial power plants are in planning stages.

1982-10-01

397

Monroe County Urban Accessibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of this study were to survey primary ambulatory health services in Monroe County, N.Y., and to estimate the accessibility of these services to the county's population. Community group meetings were used to collect information on organizatio...

1975-01-01

398

Board of County Commissioners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis: In an effort to more effectively respond to, investigate and where needed arrest child abuse offenders, the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office is requesting the funding of a Persons Crime Unit. The Persons Crime Investigator is a certified law enforcement officer who is trained in handling domestic violence cases, sex crimes on children and child abuse cases. The Persons Crime

Sheriff David Harvey

2008-01-01

399

Dade County: Paradise Lost?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Dade county commissioner discusses problems that the greater Miami, Florida, area is facing due to the recent influx of Cuban and Haitian refugees. Calls for federal action in the areas of immigration policy, aid for the unemployed, and increased social services. (GC)

Shack, Ruth

1980-01-01

400

STATE/COUNTY BORDERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This data is available for the entire region. The level of detail is primarily suited for region/state/county/basin sized maps. The borders are not accurate enough for small areas like sub-basins and site areas. We use this coverage for general backgrounds and borders only. T...

401

The University of Wyoming GRB Afterglow Follow-Up Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the Swift era approaches, the University of Wyoming in Laramie has been preparing its two observatories for a robust GRB afterglow follow-up program. The 2.3-m Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) - first of its kind in collecting power and mid-infrared optimization - is located on Jelm Mt. (2944-m elevation) in a semi-arid atmosphere, 40 km southwest of Laramie. On dry, cold winter nights, our estimates show that WIRO's sensitivity in the K-band is comparable to that of a 4-m telescope at Mauna Kea observatory in Hawaii. Three instruments are currently in use at the observatory: WIRO-Prime, WIRO-Spec, and the Goddard IR camera. WIRO-Prime is a 20482 prime-focus camera with a 20 arcmin diameter FOV (f/2.1). Its sensitivity for a 300-s exposure will reach as faint as 24th (23rd) magnitude in V (R). WIRO-Spec is an integral field, holographic spectrometer which utilizes Volume-Phase-Holographic gratings with a 20482 detector. A bundle of 293 fiber optical cables (1 fiber ~ 1 arcsec) connects the Cassegrain platform to the stationary spectrometer, optimizing the image by reduction from f/27 to f/9. At 20th magnitude, a 700-s exposure yields a S/N ratio of ~ 10 at a resolution of ~ 1 Angstrom, sufficient for resolving the MgII doublet [279.8 nm] in GRB host galaxies to determine a 0.4 < z < 2.5 for an operational wavelength range of ~ 400-1000 nm (WIRO-Prime and WIRO-Spec). The Goddard IR Camera is a 2562 InSb camera (FOV ~ 108 arcsec) mounted at Cassegrain and operated at 15K. Available filters for GRB observations include R, I, J, H, and K'. WIRO slew timescale (~ 120 s) is comparable to that of Swift. Red Buttes Observatory (RBO) is located 19 km south of Laramie in a dark site and houses a 0.6-m f/8 Cassegrain DFM reflector. RBO's Apogee AP8p 10242 camera (18 arcmin FOV, sufficiently large for BAT localizations) is available for use with filters U, B, V, R and I. We are in the final stages of implementing fully automated response to Swift BAT alerts at RBO, and expect an average acquisition timescale to random sky positions of ~ 25 s. Thus, rapid GRB detections by RBO can be forwarded to WIRO even while Swift's pointed instruments are performing first integrations.

Savage, S. L.; Norris, J. P.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Pierce, M.; Canterna, R.

2004-09-01

402

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the

F. C. Ethridge; L. K. Burns; W. G. Alexander; G. N. II Craig; A. D. Youngberg

1983-01-01

403

Conservation Opportunities for Securing In-Stream Flows in the Platte River Basin: A Case Study Drawing on Casper, Wyoming’s MunicipalWater Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Platte River Basin consists of tributaries largely in Wyoming, Colorado and Western Nebraska, with the main stem in Central Nebraska. Critical wildlife habitat on the main stem requires additional in-stream flows. The watershed is one hosting multiple resources, a variety of users, and managed by an array of state and federal agencies. This study proposes a basis for securing

Aaron Waller; Donald McLeod; David Taylor

2004-01-01

404

Economics and a novel voltage conversion technique associated with exporting Wyoming's energy by HVDC transmission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wyoming is by far the largest coal producing state in the US, but local utilization is extremely low. As much as 92% of Wyoming's coal is shipped to the other states and is mainly consumed by their electricity producers. Coal accounts for more than 50% of the US electricity generation and is one of the least expensive energy sources. Wyoming could utilize its coal better by exporting electricity instead of exporting the coal only in its raw form. Natural gas is another important energy resource in Wyoming but local utilization is even lower. As a result of the development in coalbed methane fields, natural gas production in Wyoming is almost in pace with its coal production. In addition to constructing more new pipelines, new transmission lines should be considered as an alternative way of exporting this energy. Because of their enormous electricity market sizes and high electricity prices, California, Texas and Illinois are chosen to be the target markets for Wyoming's electricity. The proposed transmission schemes use High Voltage DC (HVDC) lines, which are suitable for long distance and cross-system power transmission. Technical and economic feasibilities are studied in details. The Wyoming-California scheme has a better return of investment than both the Wyoming-Texas and the Wyoming-Illinois schemes. A major drawback of HVDC transmission is the high level of harmonics generated by the converters. Elaborate filtering is required at both the AC and the DC sides. A novel pulse-multiplication method is proposed in the thesis to reduce the harmonics from the converter source. By introducing an averaging inductor, the proposed method uses less thyristors to achieve the same high-pulse operation as the existing series scheme. The reduction of thyristors makes the switching circuit more reliable and easier to control and maintain. Harmonic analysis shows that the harmonic level can be reduced to about one third of the original system. The proposed method is also simulated by using the Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS) with a few assumptions. Simulation results of various operating conditions confirm the theoretical analysis results.

Xu, Kaili

405

Thermal analysis of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and geologic data from over 3,000 oil and gas wells within a 180 km x 30 km area that transect across the southern Powder River Basin in Wyoming, U.S.A., were used to determine the present thermal regime of the basin. Three-dimensional temperature fields within the transect, based on corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and other geologic information, were assessed using: (1) A laterally constant temperature gradient model in conjunction with an L{sub 1} norm inversion method, and (2) a laterally variable temperature gradient model in conjunction with a stochastic inversion technique. The mean geothermal gradient in the transect is 29 C/km, but important lateral variations in the geothermal gradient exist. The average heat flow for the southern Powder River Basin is 52 mW/m{sup 2} with systematic variations between 40 mW/m{sup 2} and 60 mW/m{sup 2} along the transect. Extremely high local heat flow (values up to 225 mW/m{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the Teapot Dome and the Salt Creek Anticline and low heat flow of 25 mW/m{sup 2} occurring locally near the northeast end of the transect are likely caused by groundwater movement.

McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Chapman, D.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1996-11-01

406

Controls on thrust belt curvature, Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt  

SciTech Connect

Structural curvature in the northern part of the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt (WITB) may be the result of either along-strike variations in pre-thrust stratigraphy or a buttress which physically concentrated shortening, or possibly both. Most thrust sheets of the WITB strike northward and were translated eastward, but in the Snake River Range (SRR) (the northernmost range in the WITB), structural strike curves from northward to nearly westward. Structural cross sections of the SRR are generally drawn in a radial pattern creating a volumetric imbalance in regional palinspastic restorations. Stratigraphic separation diagrams of major, through-going thrust faults in the SRR show extensive cut off in upper Paleozoic strata. New measured sections of upper Paleozoic stratigraphy at locations in several major thrust sheets of the WITB and in the foreland, new structural cross sections and mapping, and existing paleomagnetic data are used in a new interpretation of the origin of structural curvature in the WITB. Published paleomagnetic data require counterclockwise rotation of frontal thrust sheets along the northern boundary of the WITB, but no rotation of eastward-translated thrust sheets farther south along most of the WITB. Evidence for both a pre-existing west-trending depositional margin and rotation of frontal thrust sheets suggests that buttressing and modification of structural strike occurred along an oblique ramp where differences in stratigraphic thickness and possible pre-existing fault partitioning of the Paleozoic strata are localized.

Montgomery, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-04-01

407

Paleomagnetism of the Leucite Hills volcanic field, Southwestern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Paleomagnetic results have been determined for 41 sites, in lava flows and plug domes, in the 300 km/sup 2/ Leucite Hills volcanic field (1.1 +- .4 mybp), southwest Wyoming. Rock mangetic and petrographic studies show that magnetite is the important remanence carrier. Primary spinel and rhombohedral phases are both present. Analysis of VGP positions from 35 of these sites yields a paleomagnetic pole at 113.13 /sup 0/E, 87.4 /sup 0/N (..cap alpha../sub 95/=7.2 /sup 0/, delta=23.0 /sup 0/) which, as expected, is coincident with the present day rotation axis. Generally, the ultrapotassic rocks of the Leucite Hills are magnetically stable; both polarities are recorded in the field along with a few directions which may be transitional. About 90% of the sites are reversely magnetized. Due to a lack in precision of the age determination for the Leucite Hills, the normal flows cannot be constrained to the Brunhes epoch or either the Cobb Mountain or Jaramillo events.

Sheriff, S.D.; Shive, P.N.

1980-12-01

408

Digital model of the Arikaree Aquifer near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A digital model that mathematically simulates the flow of ground water, approximating the flow system as two-dimensional, has been applied to predict the long-term effects of irrigation and proposed industrial pumping from the unconfined Arikaree aquifer in a 400 square-mile area in southeastern Wyoming. Three cases that represent projected maximum, mean, and minimum combined irrigation and industrial ground-water withdrawals at annual rates of 16,176, 11,168, and 6,749 acre-feet, respectively, were considered. Water-level declines of more than 5 feet over areas of 124, 120, and 98 square miles and depletions in streamflow of 14.4, 8.9, and 7.2 cfs from the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers were predicted to occur at the end of a 40-year simulation period for these maximum, mean, and minimum withdrawal rates, respectively. A tenfold incrase in the vertical hydraulic conductivity that was assumed for the streambeds results in smaller predicted drawdowns near the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers and a 36 percent increase in the predicted depletion in streamflow for the North Laramie River. (Woodard-USGS)

Hoxie, Dwight T.

1977-01-01

409

Eolian sandstone unit of Morrison Formation, central Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The fine-grained quartzarenite that overlies the Sundance Formation in the southwestern Powder River basin, Wind River basin, and southern Bighorn basin is interpreted as being primarily the result of eolian deposition. This unit, often more than 20 m (65.6 ft) thick, is the probable correlative of the Unkpapa Sandstone member of the Morrison Formation of the southeastern Black Hills region. An eolian interpretation is based on the presence of large-scale sets of high-angle, planar cross-stratification. Observed considerable variation in the thickness of the unit is likely to be an expression of the depositional (dune-form) topography rather than the result of later erosion. Discrete dunes are exposed near Thermopolis along the northern margin of the unit: the transitional marine deposits of the uppermost Sundance formation are the most likely source of the wind-transported sand. Stratigraphic and facies relationships and lithologic similarity support correlation of the eolian unit with the Unkpapa Sandstone. Together, the units represent regions of significant eolian deposition within the predominantly fluvial Morrison depositional environment. The properties of the eolian sandstone, its thickness, its superposition above the marine Sundance Formation, and the possibility of its persistence in the subsurface of the southern Powder River basin give it potential as a petroleum reservoir. These anomalous eolian deposits may record the positions of gentle structures developed in central Wyoming and western South Dakota at the onset of, and in association with, Sevier compression.

Uhlir, D.M.

1986-08-01

410

Role of site characteristics in coal gasification. [Hanna, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Field test data for a series of four underground coal gasification tests (UCG) at a site near Hanna, Wyoming are presented. Results of these field tests were combined with modeling efforts to identify site selective parameters broadly identified as the flow and mechanical properties of a coal seam that can help determine the degree to which any UCG test would be successful. Specifically, the characteristics shown to be important are concluded to be: (1) permeability structure and mobile water, which play a crucial role in determining air flow paths; (2) high permeability zones at midstream and above to act as the primary air flow path; (3) spacing of injection and production wells can be varied to enhance the chance of keeping the air flow paths low in the coal seam; (4) completion of the process wells in a manner that minimizes neighboring permeability inhibits the chance of override; (5) the orthotropic permeability of coal improve UCG results; (6) thermochemical properties of coal are important with respect to the manner of combustion front propogation; and (7) heating will result in stress dependent anisotropic strength characteristics of the coal. Other properties characteristic of a given coal, petrographic constitutents of a coal, chemistry of combustion and the in situ stress distribution are also pointed out as significant factors to be considered in the most efficient use of UCG technique. 14 references, (BLM)

Bader, B.E.; Glass, R.E.

1981-12-01

411

Northeast-southwest structural transect: Rocky Mountain foreland, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A northeast-southwest structural transect has been constructed across the Rocky Mountain foreland in Wyoming, a distance of about 400 mi. The line of transect begins in the northern Black Hills and traverses the northern Powder River basin, the Bighorn Mountains from Buffalo to Bonanza, the Big Horn basin from Worland to Hamilton dome, the Owl Creek Mountains, the northern Wind River basin at Maverick Springs, the Wind River Mountains to Pinedale in the Green River basin, the Moxa Arch at Big Piney and Riley Ridge, and into the thrust belt, ending at the Idaho border. In terms of a vertical and horizontal scale of 1 in. = 2000 ft, the section is about 90 ft long (i.e., the section is approximately 409 mi long). The data base for the transect includes published geologic maps, commercial photogeologic mapping, well data, and modern seismic data through critical parts of the basin areas. The data base provides an excellent found for analyzing structural relationships on both a regional and a local scale. Regional horizontal shortening of the foreland has occurred primarily through basement-involved displacements on basin-boundary megathrusts, which separate the mountain ranges from sedimentary basins, and on the smaller, intrabasin thrusts, which produced the anticlinal traps for Paleozoic oil accumulations.

Stone, D.S.

1987-08-01

412

Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compiled a geographic information system (GIS) of Wyoming statewide historical oil and gas drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). The WLCI is representative of the partnerships being formed by the USGS with other Department of the Interior bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners that are committed to maintaining healthy landscapes, sustaining wildlife, and preserving recreational and grazing uses as energy resources development progresses in southwestern Wyoming. This product complements the 2009 USGS publication on oil and gas development in southwestern Wyoming http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/437/) by approximating, based on database attributes, the time frame of drilling activity for each well (start and stop dates). This GIS product also adds current oil and gas drilling activity not only in the area encompassing the WLCI, but also statewide. Oil and gas data, documentation, and spatial data processing capabilities are available and can be downloaded from the USGS website. These data originated from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC), represent decades of oil and gas drilling (1900 to 2010), and will facilitate a landscape-level approach to integrated science-based assessments, resource management and land-use decision making.

Biewick, Laura R.H.

2011-01-01

413

Annotated bibliography of selected publications, through 1996, Cheyenne municipal well field areas, Cheyenne, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annotated bibliographies for 55 hydrology and geology manuscripts pertaining to the Cheyenne municipal wells fields are listed in this report. For each manuscript, a citation is provided, a summaryparagraph is presented, key words are listed, and a location of the report is given. The report lists manuscripts, conference proceedings, and guidebooks published by the U. S. Geological Survey, State of Wyoming, Geological Society of America, Wyoming State Geological Survey,private consultants, and University of Wyoming.Information on geological formations, structural geology, aquifer characteristics, water levels, well- field production, water-demand projections, and water quality is included in the manuscripts. The Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities, the University of Wyoming, and the U. S. Geological Surveycooperatively produced this annotated bibliography to allow easy access and efficient utilization of existing data. The manuscripts were authored between 1910 and 1996, reflecting work completed over a long period of development in the Cheyenne, Wyoming area. Some manuscripts did not receive broad distribution and indexing, thus they have been difficult to locate in the past. By having the references and summaries within one report, time and effort to gather previous study results will be minimized.

Ogle, K. M.; Jordan, B. J.

1997-01-01

414

MODELING THE HYPERREAL DIMENSION WITH THE GAP-BURDEN METHOD™: SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE LARAMIE RANGE, WYOMING AND THE ASYMMETRY OF TIME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fieldwork in the Laramie Range, Wyoming demonstrated that state structure supports productivity within a discourse that perpetuates stable Wyoming environments. These notions are supported by neo- Hegelian interpretations of space and time, in which time is dominant, continuous and bears a heavy weight in space. Thus, the natural process that describes Wyoming's history describes a competitive economic space in which

Neil M. Manspeizer

2007-01-01

415

Magnetostratigraphy of the Willwood Formation, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming: New constraints on the location of Paleocene\\/Eocene boundary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lower Eocene Willwood Formation in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming preserves a rich and diverse mammalian and floral record. The paleomagnetic behavior of the sequence of floodplain paleosols of varying degrees of maturation ranges from excellent to poor. We present a magnetostratigraphic section for a composite section near Worland, Wyoming, by using a set of strict criteria for interpreting

L. Tauxe; J. Gee; Y. Gallet; T. Pick; T. Bown

1994-01-01

416

62 FR 27169 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...rate as issued herein will be applicable to all assessable potatoes beginning July 1,...

1997-05-19

417

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

2013-07-22

418

Ground-water levels in Wyoming, 1971 through part of 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water levels are measured periodically in a network of about 280 observation wells in Wyoming, mostly in areas where ground water is used in large quantities for irrigation or municipal purposes. The program is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer and the city of Cheyenne. This report contains maps showing the locations of selected wells, tables listing well histories and highest and lowest water levels for the period of record, and hydrographs for most of the wells. (USGS)

Ragsdale, Jess O.

1982-01-01

419

Water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey in Wyoming; fiscal year 1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains lists of streamflow and reservoir stations, peak-flow partial-record stations, chemical-quality stations, sediment stations, and observation wells where water levels are measured in Wyoming. The locations of the basic-data sites are shown on maps. Thirty-two water-resources appraisal projects in Wyoming are also described, including many that are related to the development of energy resources. The general locations of the projects are shown on maps. The report serves as an annual progress report to cooperators and the public. (Woodard-USGS)

Boner, F. C.

1978-01-01

420

Quantitative model of overpressured gas resources of Pinedale anticline, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Pinedale anticline, located southwest of the Wind River Mountains in the northern Green River basin, Wyoming, is a large structure with a thick sequence of Upper Cretaceous overpressured, low-permeability gas reservoirs. A quantitative three-dimensional model of the anticline and its gas reservoirs defines the occurrence and amount of this large, unconventional resource and identifies a geological rationale applicable to similar conditions. The geologic model consists of multiple cells, generally 1 mi/sup 2/ by 1000 ft thick. For each cell, geologic parameters such as lithology, porosity, temperature, and pressure are calculated. Geologic relationships, most determined by previous studies, also are incorporated in the model. These include (1) the relationship between structure and the top of overpressuring, (2) the coincidence of gas occurrence and overpressuring, (3) the relationships among overpressuring, temperature, and organic richness, (4) porosity-depth relationships, and (5) the coincidence of irreducible water saturation and overpressuring. Incorporating these geologic relationships into the evaluation of this type of unconventional gas accumulation results in a more accurate and geologically acceptable model. Most of the data for the model are from the 19,000-ft deep El Paso 1 Wagon Wheel well. Although 20 wells have been drilled on the anticline, the Wagon Wheel well is the only one that has penetrated the entire geologic section of interest. Additional stratigraphic, pressure, and temperature data from the other wells are used in the model. Structural information from a seismic line also was incorporated. This approach allows both a more precise estimation of gas resources and an understanding of the spatial distribution of resources within the anticline.

Charpentier, R.R.; Law, B.E.; Prensky, S.E.

1986-08-01

421

Glacial-topographic interactions in the Teton Range, Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding interactions among tectonics, topography, climate, and erosion is fundamental to studies of mountainous landscapes. Here, we combine topographic analyses with modeled distributions of precipitation, insolation, and flexural isostasy to present a conceptual model of topographic evolution in the Teton Range, Wyoming, and test whether efficient glacial relief production has contributed to summit elevations. The conceptual model reveals a high degree of complexity inherent in even a relatively small, glaciated, mountain range. Back tilting has caused topographic asymmetry, with the greatest relief characterizing eastern catchments in the center of the range. Two high summits, Grand Teton and Mount Moran, rise hundreds of meters above the surrounding landscape; their elevations set by the threshold hillslope angle and the spacing between valleys hosting large, erosionally efficient glaciers. Only basins >20 km2 held glaciers capable of eroding sufficiently rapidly to incise deeply and maintain shallow downvalley gradients on the eastern range flank. Glacial erosion here was promoted by (1) prevailing westerly winds transporting snow to high-relief eastern basins, leading to cross-range precipitation asymmetry; (2) the wind-blown redistribution of snow from open western headwaters into sheltered eastern cirques, with the associated erosion-driven migration of the drainage divide increasing eastern accumulation areas; and (3) tall, steep hillslopes providing shading, snow influx from avalanching, and insulating debris cover from rockfalls to valley floor glaciers. In comparison, the topographic enhancement of glacial erosion was less pronounced in western, and smaller eastern, basins. Despite dramatic relief production, insufficient rock mass is removed from the Teton Range to isostatically raise summit elevations.

Foster, David; Brocklehurst, Simon H.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.

2010-03-01

422

Petroleum exploration in Absaroka basin of northwestern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A new, virtually unexplored petroleum province with large potential resources can be defined in northwestern Wyoming. Structurally, the Absaroka basin is bounded on the north by the Beartooth uplift, to the west by the Gallatin and Washakie uplifts, to the south by the Washakie and Owl Creek uplifts, and to the east by the Cody arch. The Cody arch connects the southern Beartooth uplift with the northwesternmost Owl Creek uplift and separates the Bighorn basin to the east from the Absaroka basin to the west. The eastern flank of the cody arch is bounded by a major west-dipping thrust fault. The western flank is locally a subhorizontal shelf but overall gently dips to the west-southwest into deeper parts of the Absaroka basin. In contrast to most petroleum basins, the Absaroka basin is topographically a rugged mountain range, created by erosion of a thick sequence of Eocene volcanic rocks that fill the center of the basin and lap onto the adjacent uplifts. Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks that have produced several billion barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind River basins are probably present within the Absaroka basin and should have similar production capabilities. The Absaroka basin may have greater potential than adjacent basins because the volcanics provide additional traps and reservoirs. Domes in Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks beneath the volcanics and stratigraphic traps at the angular unconformity between the volcanics and underlying reservoirs are primary exploration targets. Unique geologic, geophysical, permitting, access, and drilling problems are encountered in all aspects of exploration.

Sundell, K.A.

1986-08-01

423

Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs.

NONE

1995-07-01

424

Heritage Awareness in County Wicklow  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research project investigated the community’s current level of heritage awareness in County Wicklow. The study was initiated by Wicklow County Council and the Heritage Council in response to objective 1, action 1.2 of the County Wicklow heritage plan 2004-2008, which pointed to the need to undertake a study to determine public attitudes towards heritage and to gauge the current

Anne Dagg

2008-01-01

425

76 FR 33401 - Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County, IN  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County, IN AGENCY: Federal...Project in Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County, Indiana. FOR FURTHER...Executive Park Drive, Springfield, Illinois 62703, Phone: (217)...

2011-06-08

426

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

427

Zircon geochronology of the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite, Teton Range, Wyoming: Significance to dating late Archean metamorphism in the Wyoming craton  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Webb Canyon Gneiss is a strongly foliated and lineated orthogneiss intercalated with layered Archean gneisses in the northern part of the Teton Range in northwestern Wyoming. The Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite is a non-foliated or weakly flow foliated rock which forms a discordant pluton exposed in the central part of the range and that cuts the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the associated layered gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronology reported here indicates that euhedral pink zircon grew in the Webb Canyon Gneiss at about 2680 Ma, probably during the peak of regional metamorphism and that the Mount Owen was emplaced at 2547??3 Ma. These dates provide the best constraints so far reported on the age of Late Archean regional metamorphism in the western part of the Wyoming craton.

Zartman, R. E.; Reed, Jr. , J. C.

1998-01-01

428

75 FR 42815 - Fulton County, LLC-Abandonment Exemption-in Fulton County, IN  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...site at http://www.stb.dot.gov. Decided: July 16, 2010. By the Board. Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Jeffrey Herzig, Clearance Clerk. [FR Doc. 2010-17972 Filed 7-21-10; 8:45 am] BILLING...

2010-07-22

429

A fossil flora from the Frontier formation of southwestern Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper deals with a small but important fossil flora, now known to be of Colorado age, from the vicinity of Cumberland, Lincoln County, Wyo. It was for many years thought to be of Jurassic age, and only within the last decade has its stratigraphic position been established. Although small in number of species, this flora offers information bearing on the physical and climatic conditions that prevailed during early Upper Cretaceous time in this region, and, moreover, it furnishes a series of stratigraphic marks that may be used in the recognition of this horizon elsewhere.

Knowlton, F. H.

1917-01-01

430

Gas desorption and adsorption isotherm studies of coals in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG), of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper (Wyoming), investigated the coalbed methane resources (CBM) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, from 1999 to the present. Beginning in late 1999, the study also included the Williston Basin in Montana and North and South Dakota and Green River Basin and Big Horn Basin in Wyoming. The rapid development of CBM (referred to as coalbed natural gas by the BLM) during the early 1990s, and the lack of sufficient data for the BLM to fully assess and manage the resource in the Powder River Basin, in particular, gave impetus to the cooperative program. An integral part of the joint USGS-BLM project was the participation of 25 gas operators that entered individually into confidential agreements with the USGS, and whose cooperation was essential to the study. The arrangements were for the gas operators to drill and core coal-bed reservoirs at their cost, and for the USGS and BLM personnel to then desorb, analyze, and interpret the coal data with joint funding by the two agencies. Upon completion of analyses by the USGS, the data were to be shared with both the BLM and the gas operator that supplied the core, and then to be released or published 1 yr after the report was submitted to the operator.

Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; McGarry, Dwain E.; Stillwell, Dean P.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Stillwell, Cathy R.; Ochs, Alan M.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Osvald, Karl S.; Taylor, Sharon L.; Thorvaldson, Marjorie C.; Trippi, Michael H.; Grose, Sherry D.; Crockett, Fred J.; Shariff, Asghar J.

2006-01-01

431

Water-quality data for the Hanna and Carbon basins, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data for the Hanna and Carbon Basins, south-central Wyoming, are presented in tables with no interpretation. Common-constituent, trace-element, and radiochemical data for ground and surface water and sediment concentrations for surface water are included. Ground water at 53 sites and surface water at 3 gaging stations were sampled. (Kosco-USGS)

Freudenthal, Pamela B.

1979-01-01

432

Depositional environments and petrology of the Felix coal interval (Eocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of a 250 ft. stratigraphic interval that includes the Eocene-age Felix coal of the Wasatch Formation was undertaken in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to establish a depositional model based on the interrelations of coal-seam geometry, coal maceral composition, and spatial distribution of adjoining rocks. Regional cross sections and maps of major rock bodies were prepared from

1985-01-01

433

Learning from Distance Faculty: A Faculty Needs Assessment at the University of Wyoming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Distance educators have special library needs. This article discusses the results of a library needs assessment of distance instructors at the University of Wyoming. Access to resources, use of library instructional services, barriers to distance library use, and perceived gaps in service are all addressed. Follow-up actions, based on survey…

Kvenild, Cassandra; Bowles-Terry, Melissa

2011-01-01

434

Stratigraphy and uranium potential of early proterozoic metasedimentary rocks in the Medicine Bow Mountains, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain an eight mile (13 km) thick section of Early Proterozoic (2500 to 1700 My b.p.) metasedimentary rocks which is subdivided into three successions: the Phantom Lake Metamorphic Suite (oldest), Deep Lake Group, and Libby Creek Group. The most promising units are the basal conglomerate of the upper Phantom Lake Suite, which appears

K. E. Karlstrom; R. S. Houston

1979-01-01

435

The influence of plant removal on succession in wyoming big sagebrush  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Predicting plant community response following disturbance is a major hurdle facing ecologists. The objective of our study was to identify the rate of short-term (<10 years) floristic changes following removal of plant functional groups in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensi...

436

Wind Energy Resources in Wyoming and Simulation for Existing Grid Connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many wind turbines are connected to power systems in the U.S. in recent years in order to reduce the negative environmental impacts of conventional electricity generation and promote the green energy initiative. This paper presents potential wind energy resources in Wyoming and the simulation for an existing grid connection. The wind data and the potential wind power were analyzed and

Kala Meah; Yi Zhang; Sadrul Ula

2006-01-01

437

Strippable coal reserves of Wyoming. Location, tonnage, and characteristics of coal and overburden  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal resource data from published sources and company files were used by the Bureau of Mines to determine the location and extent of strippable coal reserves in Wyoming. Total strippable reserves of 23 billion tons were estimated in seven major coal areas. Seven large strip mining operations were active in 1969, and their production totaled 4¹\\/â million tons of coal.

J. B. Smith; M. F. Ayler; C. C. Knox; B. C. Pollard

1972-01-01

438

ISOLATION OF BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS FROM A FREE RANGING MULE DEER IN WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

A noncytopathic type 1a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was isolated from a free- ranging yearling female mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from northwestern Wyoming (USA). The mule deer was emaciated, weak, and salivating, and Arcanobacterium pyogenes was cultured from lung abscesses. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from lung, however, BVDV antigen was not detected by immunohistochemistry. The BVDV genotype

Hana Van Campen; Julia Ridpath; Elizabeth Williams; Jacqueline Cavender; Joan Edwards; Scott Smith; Hall Sawyer

439

Depositional and tectonic setting of Quadrant and Tensleep Sandstone, Montana and Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Quadrant Sandstone in southwestern Montana and the equivalent Tensleep Sandstone in northwestern Wyoming reflect transition from marine to nonmarine depositional settings. Thickness and facies relationships were influenced by tectonic events that preceded and followed deposition. Three important tectonic events are indicated in the Carboniferous strata: (1) separation of the Big Snowy Group and older Mississippian rocks from the overlying

H. I. Saperstone; E. K. Maughan

1986-01-01

440

Post-Laramide (Oligocene) uplift in the Wind River Range, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late Oligocene time, the crest of the Wind River Range was uplifted from an erosion surface that formed during Laramide (Late Cretaceous-early Eocene) deformation. This uplift created the highest peaks in the Wyoming foreland and is indicated by rejuvenation of the range as a sediment source and by the physiography of the peaks. Differential movement of basement blocks in

James R. Steidtmann; Larry T. Middleton; Mark W. Shuster

1989-01-01

441

Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced

S. W. Mead; F. T. Wang; D. H. Stuermer

1981-01-01

442

Laramide basin subsidence and basement uplift in Rocky Mountain foreland of Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the end of the Cretaceous through at least the early Eocene, the western US foreland basin in Wyoming evolved into discrete nonmarine basins separated by basement-involved uplifts. Their studies of basin subsidence and basement uplift indicate that major basins flanked by large Precambrian overhangs can be explained by tectonic loading of the basin margins. Specifically, their studies of tectogenic

J. R. Steidtmann; M. W. Shuster; G. B. Lefebre

1986-01-01

443

Paleotectonic controls on reservoir distribution in Phosphoria formation and related strata, Bighorn basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Porosity development and reservoir distribution in the Permian rocks of the Bighorn basin were strongly controlled by the first- and second-order paleotectonic elements active in the Wyoming shelf. First-order elements, including the Greybull arch, Bighorn high, and an extension of the Yellowstone high, defined the basin geometry and regional paleogeography, influenced the distribution of clastic vs. carbonate lithofacies, and controlled

J. S. Dean; R. F. Inden; S. D. Sturm

1986-01-01

444

The Cretaceous record in a northeast-trending transect, northern Utah to east-central Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the Laramide basins of the middle Rocky Mountains include 16,600 ft (5060 m) of predominantly siliciclastic strata in the thrust-belt of northern Utah and 7800 ft (2380 m) of mainly siliciclastic and calcareous strata near the craton in east central Wyoming. Regional changes in the thickness of the strata indicate that crustal subsidence during the Cretaceous

1991-01-01

445

Eocene sediment dispersal pattern records asymmetry of Laramide Green River basin, southwestern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provenance and paleocurrent data from synorogenic fluvial sandstones can be used to constrain theories about the timing and structural style of Laramide foreland uplifts and associated basins. The Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming is a large ellipsoidal basin bounded by uplifts with diverse orientations and basement rock compositions. Sandstone from the main body of the Eocene Wasatch Formation in

R. J. Baldwin; D. W. Andersen

1987-01-01

446

Time of initial thrusting in the Sevier orogenic belt, Idaho-Wyoming and Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reexamination of the distribution of fossils found in the earliest preserved synorogenic conglomerates within the Sevier thrust belt suggests that initial thrust movement may be no older than Aptian age. This interpretation is corroborated by subsidence analyses of sedimentary sequences lying within and east of the Idaho-Wyoming and Utah thrust belts. A major episode of middle Cretaceous (Aptian Cenomanian) subsidence

P. L. Heller; S. S. Bowdler; H. P. Chambers; J. C. Coogan; E. S. Hagen; M. W. Shuster; N. S. Winslow; T. F. Lawton

1986-01-01

447

Basin-wide architecture of sandstone reservoirs in the Fort Union Formation, Wind River basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Architecture of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Wind River basin, Wyoming, was studied using lithofacies, grain size, bounding surfaces, sedimentary structures, internal organization, and geometry. Two principal groups of reservoirs, both erosionally based and fining upward, consist of either conglomeratic sandstone or sandstone lithofacies. Two types of architecture were recognized in conglomeratic sandstone reservoirs:

R. M. Flores; C. W. Keighin; W. R. Keefer

1991-01-01

448

Tectogenic sedimentary fill and subsidence history of Hanna Basin, southeastern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanna basin in southeastern Wyoming if unique because of its small size, and great depth, and extremely thick upper Cretaceous through Tertiary tectogenic sedimentary fill. The basin filled from the north, where proximal conglomeratic sediments were shed by the rising Sweetwater arch, and from the southwest, where more distal sandy sediments prograded into the basin. At the same time,

G. B. Lefebre; J. R. Steidtmann; D. A. McElhaney

1986-01-01

449

Status of the Fourth Underground Coal Gasification Experiment at Hanna, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fourth underground coal gasification experiment conducted by the Laramie Energy Technology Center is currently underway at a site near Hanna, Wyoming. The Hanna IV experiment, as originally conceived, was significantly larger than the three previous experiments. The experiment was designed to meet the following objectives: determination of the interrelationships of well spacing, air injection rate, and areal sweep efficiency;

Theodore Bartke; Leroy Dockter; Thomas Sterner; Joseph Virgona

1978-01-01

450

Macro and micromorphology of superimposed paleo-spodosols, Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), central Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interfluvial overbank deposits of the Paleocene Fort Union Fm. near Bison Basin, Wyoming, contain a series of superimposed paleo-spodosols. Soil horizon differentiation took place during periods of quiescence between flood events. Paleosols developed under a broad-leafed, deciduous forest cover and their mineralogy supports evidence of a humid, warm temperature climate with marked seasonality. Former land surfaces are defined by

E. H. Southwell; J. R. Steidtmann; L. C. Munn

1985-01-01

451

Mesaverde Group (Upper Cretaceous), southeastern Wyoming: Allostratigraphy versus sequence stratigraphy in a tectonically active area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanna basin of south-central Wyoming is one of several Cretaceous and Tertiary Rocky Mountain basins originally part of the broad foreland crustal flexure cratonward of the Sevier thrust belt and later subject to Laramide deformation. In the Campanian (Late Cretaceous), the Mesaverde Group filled the basin by two depositional sequences separated by an unconformity at the base of the

O. J. Martinsen; R. S. Martinsen; J. R. Steidtmann

1993-01-01

452

Laramide basin subsidence and basement uplift in Rocky Mountain foreland of Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wind River Range in western Wyoming is an excellent natural laboratory for studying a Laramide uplift. A COCORP seismic profile provides geometric control, and tectogenic sediments record the history of uplift and erosion. The stratigraphy and provenance of these sediments indicate a complex Laramide and later tectonic history for the range and identify the timing and position of individual

Steidtmann

1988-01-01

453

Time of initial thrusting in the Sevier orogenic belt, Idaho-Wyoming and Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reexamination of the distribution of fossils found in the earliest preserved synorogenic conglomerates within the Sevier thrust belt suggests that initial thrust movement may be no older than Aptian age. This interpretation is corroborated by subsidence analyses of sedimentary sequences lying within and east of the Idaho-Wyoming and Utah thrust belts. A major episode of middle Cretaceous (Aptian-Cenomanian) subsidence is

P. L. Heller; S. S. Bowdler; H. P. Chambers; J. C. Coogan; E. S. Hagen; M. W. Shuster; N. S. Winslow; T. F. Lawton

1986-01-01

454

Irrigation Canals as Sink Habitat for Trout and Other Fishes in a Wyoming Drainage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Irrigation canals can be a major source of mortality for fish in the Rocky Mountain region. Our study looked at how fish were affected by the irrigation canal system in the Smiths Fork, a tributary to the Bear River in western Wyoming. There are two native species of conservation concern in the Smiths Fork drainage: Bonneville cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii

James J. Roberts; Frank J. Rahel

2008-01-01

455

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Southwestern Wyoming Province, 2002  

SciTech Connect

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean 84.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 131 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 2.6 billion barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Southwestern Wyoming Province. Coal bed methane resources are noted. 1 tab.

NONE

2002-11-15

456

PALEOMAGNETIC STUDY OF THRUST SHEET ROTATION DURING FORELAND IMPINGEMENT IN THE WYOMING-IDAHO OVERTHRUST BELT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous strata in the Darby and Absaroka thrust sheets were sampled in order to paleomagnetically evaluate thrust sheet rotation in the Wyoming-Idaho overthrust belt. No significant rotations were found. Lack of rotation in these thrust sheets suggests that previously reported rotation of the Prospect thrust sheet was not transmit- ted to the older Darby and Absaroka

Susan Y. Schwartz; Rob Van der Voo

1984-01-01

457

Persistence of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Populations in Isolated Headwater Streams of Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

For populations of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, isolation in headwater streams may provide protection from invasion by nonnative species but also may enhance a population's vulnerability to extirpation. We assessed the risk of extirpation for eight Colorado River cutthroat trout O. clarkii pleuriticus populations isolated above water diversion structures in the North Fork Little Snake River drainage, Wyoming. The populations

Nathan Cook; Frank J. Rahel; Wayne A. Hubert

2010-01-01

458

The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Siting Synfuels Plants in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive study has been completed to determine the feasibility of constructing and operating gasification and reforming plants which convert Wyoming fossil resources (coal and natural gas) into the higher value products of power, transportation fuels, and chemical feedstocks, such as ammonia and methanol. Detailed plant designs, simulation models, economic models and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas models were developed, validated by

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood; David Bell; William Schaffers; Thomas Foulke; Richard D Boardman

2011-01-01

459

CANINE DISTEMPER IN BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) FROM WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

In September and October 1985, six black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) were captured from the only known population, located near Meeteetse, Wyoming for captive prop- agation. Two days following capture an adult male showed signs of canine distemper and an adult female displayed similar signs 7 days postcapture; these infections were undoubtedly acquired prior to capture. Subsequently the four remaining captive

E. S. Williams; E. T. Thome; M. J. G. Appel; D. W. Belitsky

460

A PLAGUE EPIZOOTIC IN THE WHITE-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LEUCURUS) OF MEETEETSE, WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveillance for sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) was conducted near Meeteetse, Wyoming (USA) from 24 May to 14 june 1985. Ten species of fleas were collected from white- tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus), and from their burrows and associated rodents. Five of these flea species and two adult prairie dogs were positive for plague. The progression of this plague epizootic appeared

Sonya R. Ubico; Kathleen A. Fagerstone; Robert G. McLean

461

Holocene artiodactyl population histories and large game hunting in the Wyoming Basin, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional paleoenvironmental reconstructions and data on artiodactyl response to climate change suggest that large game densities would have expanded during the late Holocene in the Wyoming Basin. Within this context, we use the prey model of foraging theory to predict a late Holocene increase in the hunting of artiodactyls, relative to lagomorphs and rodents. This prediction is then tested against

David A. Byers; Craig S. Smith; Jack M. Broughton

2005-01-01

462

Environmental evaluation and restoration plan of the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site, Wyoming: Topical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments were conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Hoe Creek Site, Wyoming; the Hoe Creek I experiment was conducted in 1976, the Hoe Creek II experiment in 1977, and the Hoe Creek III experiment in 1979. These experiments have had an impact on the land and groundwater quality at the site, and

W. L. Barteaux; G. L. Berdan; J. Lawrence

1986-01-01

463

Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data

A. D. Youngberg; D. J. Sinks; G. N. II Craig; F. G. Ethridge; L. K. Burns

1983-01-01

464

Spectral stratigraphy: multispectral remote sensing as a stratigraphic tool, Wind River\\/Big Horn basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stratigraphic and structural analyses of the Wind River and Big Horn basins areas of central Wyoming are in progress. One result has been the development of a new approach to stratigraphic and structural analysis that uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral image data to remotely characterize the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata. New multispectral systems that have only

H. R. Lang; E. D. Paylor

1987-01-01

465

Geochemical Modeling of the Madison Aquifer in Parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaction models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. The sulfur isotope data are treated as an isotope dilution problem, whereas the carbon isotope data are treated as Rayleigh distillations. All reaction models

L. Niel Plummer; John F. Busby; Roger W. Lee; Bruce B. Hanshaw

1990-01-01

466

Quality and petrographic characteristics of Paleocene coals from the Hanna basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal beds from the Ferris and Hanna Formations, in the Hanna basin, south-central Wyoming, exhibit distinct differences in ash yield, sulfur content, and petrographic and palynologic constituents. These differences are interpreted to be controlled by tectonic changes of the Hanna basin and adjoining uplifts during evolutionary development, which, in turn, controlled mire chemistry and sedimentation. These conditions created two very

Brenda S. Pierce

1996-01-01

467

Tectonic setting and depositional environments of Hanna Formation, south-central Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Paleocene Hanna Formation was deposited during tectonic events that lead ultimately to the development of the Hanna and Carbon structural basins of south-central Wyoming. Early Paleocene uplift prior to deposition of the Hanna Formation resulted in a regional unconformity as observed in the Carbon basin, on the east side of the Hanna basin, and in the area south of

Dan E. Hansen

1983-01-01

468

Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1/4 of Section 29 and the E1/2SE1/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in...

R. L. Oliver A. D. Youngberg

1984-01-01

469

Paleoenvironments of upper Cretaceous Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation, south-central Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Maestrichtian Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation in south-central Wyoming were deposited during the final major transgression and regression of the North American epicontinental sea. Outcrops of these formations were examined along the margins of the Great Divide, Washakie, Hanna, and Carbon basins. Bore-hole logs from approximately 200 wells within these basins were studied and correlated with outcrops. Lists

Roseanne C. Perman

1988-01-01

470

The History of Dinosaur Footprint Discoveries in Wyoming with Emphasis on the Bighorn Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dinosaur traces are well known from the western United States in the Colorado Plateau region (Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona). Utah contains the greatest abundance of known and documented dinosaur footprints and trackways. Far less well known, however, is the occurrence and distribution of dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons in Wyoming. Scientific studies over the past 10 years have shown that

Erik P. Kvale; Debra L. Mickelson; Stephen T. Hasiotis; Gary D. Johnson

2004-01-01

471

Glacial Geology of the West Tensleep Drainage Basin, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The glacial deposits of the West Tensleep Basin in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming are mapped and a relative chromology established. The deposits are correlated with the regional model as defined in the Wind River Mountains. A statistical analysis is per...

G. B. Burggraf

1980-01-01

472

Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is an exotic, invasive shrub of riparian corridors in the western United States that can promote soil salinization via leaf exudates as Tamarix litter accumulates on the soil surface. Tamarix stands occur in association with big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides) in northern Wyoming, depending on topographic position. Revegetation of Tamarix-invaded sites

C. G. Ladenburger; A. L. Hild; D. J. Kazmer; L. C. Munn

2006-01-01

473

A gravity study of the thermopolis anticline, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately three hundred gravity stations were measured in the area of the Thermopolis anticline along the southern margin of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Three broad anomaly patterns dominate the isostatic residual gravity map: a 10 mgal negative anomaly associated with sedimentary fill in the Bighorn Basin, a 20 mgal positive anomaly associated with the uplift of Precambrian basement in the

R. B. Grannell; P. K. Showalter

2008-01-01

474

Geochronology and Mammalian Biostratigraphy of Middle and Upper Paleocene Continental Strata, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bighorn Basin of northwestern Wyoming preserves one of the most complete records of middle Paleocene to lower Eocene continental biota. The geochronology of this important interval depends partly on numerical calibration of the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS), but the middle and late Paleocene parts of the GPTS have been poorly constrained radioisotopically. A new volcanic ash from the

ROSS SECORD; PHILIP D. GINGERICH; M. ELLIOT SMITH; WILLIAM C. CLYDE; PETER WILF; BRAD S. SINGER

2006-01-01

475

Testing some models of foreland deformation at the Thermopolis anticline, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Thermopolis anticline is a typical structure in the Rocky Mountain foreland, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Photogeologic interpretation of Landsat Thematic Mapper data, in combination with the evaluation of topographic, bore hole, seismic reflection, and field data were used to analyze structure and constrain tectonic models. The anticline is near-concentric, asymmetric with a southwest sense of vergence, and plunges to

E. D. Paylor; H. R. Lang; J. E. Conel; S. L. Adams; H. L. Muncy

1989-01-01

476

Rocky Mountain 1: Underground Coal Gasification Test, Hanna, Wyoming. Volume 1. Groundwater Evaluation. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted at the Rocky Mountain 1 site near Hanna, Wyoming in late 1987 and early 1988. Groundwater sampling and analyses were performed to provide information on the effects of the test on the aquifer and t...

S. R. Lindblom V. E. Smith

1993-01-01

477

Site qualification studies of the UCG-SDB at North Knobs, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The site qualification program for the North Knobs UCG site near Rawlins, Wyoming has been completed. This site will be the location for the field tests of Underground Coal Gasification of Steeply Dipping Beds undertaken by Gulf Research and Development Company for DOE in a cost shared contract. Site characterization included a comprehensive geotechnical analysis along with vegetation, historical, and

B. E. Davis; S. A. Krajewski; P. F. Ahner; J. M. Avasthi; M. E. Dolde; C. A. Greenman; J. E. Miranda

1979-01-01

478

Results of the groundwater restoration project, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Test Site, Wyoming: Topical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments conducted during the 1970s at the Department of Energy (DOE) site near Hanna, Wyoming, formed six underground cavities in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam, an aquifer of low permeability. When the first Hanna UCG experiment began in March 1973, researchers had little information about what effects the geologic or hydrologic characteristics of the area

1988-01-01

479

Hoe Creek experiments: LLNL's underground coal-gasification project in Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and predecessor organizations, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carried out a laboratory program and three field, underground coal gasification tests near Gillette, Wyoming. This report summarizes that work. Three methods of linking or connecting injection and production wells were used for the UCG field tests: Hoe Creek No. 1 employed explosive

Stephens

1981-01-01

480

Site qualification studies of the UCG\\/SDB site, North Knobs, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The site qualification program for the North Knobs UCG site near Rawlins, Wyoming has been completed. This site will be the location for the field tests of Underground Coal Gasification of Steeply Dipping Beds undertaken by Gulf Research and Development Company for DOE in a cost shared contract. Site characterization included a comprehensive geotechnical analysis along with vegetation, historical, and

B. E. Davis; S. A. Krajewski; P. F. Ahner; J. M. Avasthi; M. E. Dolde; C. A. Greenman; J. E. Miranda

1979-01-01

481

Geochemical modeling of the Madison aquifer in parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaciton models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. All reaction models reproduce the observed chemical and carbon and sulfur isotopic composition of the final waters and are partially validated by predicting the

L. Niel Plummer; B. B. Hanshaw; J. F. Busby; R. W. Lee

1990-01-01

482

Neogene-Quaternary Tectonics and Volcanism of Southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Southeastern Idaho  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This geology field trip guide focuses on the region south of the Snake River Plain between Pocatello, Idaho and Jackson, Wyoming. The intent was to synthesize regional tectonic relations and present new information relative to the magmatic and structural history of the region. It contains a two-day itinerary, commentary by experts, maps, and satellite images.

David, Lageson; University, Montana S.

483

Two new species of Solenostelopteris from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in Wyoming and Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Permineralized rhizomes of two new species of Solenostelopteris Kershaw, S. leithii, and S. medlynii, are described from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation from the Steiner and Scott's localities north of Greybull, Wyoming, and from Fremont Junction, east of Mt. Ellen, and Mussentuchit Wash sites in Utah. The species are characterized by having a heterogeneous (S. leithii) to homogeneous (S. medlynii)

William D. Tidwell; Judith E. Skog

1999-01-01

484

Wake Characteristics of the MOD-2 Wind Turbine at Medicine Bow, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The present paper summarizes results obtained from profile measurements of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake at Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature, and turbulence at 3 and 7 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine, taken under near neutral or slightly stable atmospheric conditions, are presented.

Jacobs, E. W.; Kelley, N. D.; McKenna, H. E.; Birkenheuer, N. B.

1984-11-01

485

The history of dinosaur footprint discoveries in Wyoming with emphasis on the Bighorn basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dinosaur traces are well known from the western United States in the Colorado Plateau region (Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona). Utah contains the greatest abundance of known and documented dinosaur footprints and trackways. Far less well known, however, is the occurrence and distribution of dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons in Wyoming. Scientific studies over the past 10 years have shown that three of the four Middle and Upper Jurassic formations in northern Wyoming contain dinosaur footprints. Two of the footprint-bearing horizons are located in geologic intervals that were once thought to have been deposited in offshore to nearshore marine settings and represent rare North American examples of Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur remains. Some of these new Wyoming sites can be correlated to known dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons or intervals in Utah. Wyoming has a great potential for additional discoveries of new dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons, and further prospecting and study is warranted and will ultimately lead to a much better understanding of the geographic distribution and behavior of the potential footprint-makers. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

Kvale, E. P.; Mickelson, D. L.; Hasiotis, S. T.; Johnson, G. D.

2003-01-01

486

Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyoming: 1874 Cavalry Barracks, Architectural Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1872, the arrival of Company K, 2nd Cavalry at Fort Laramie, Wyoming, to join in the Indian campaigns forced construction of more barracks. The resulting building, 272 feet long, 26 feet wide, and two stories high, was really two buildings combined in ...

F. Gerner

1975-01-01

487

Postcranial anatomy of Platypterygius americanus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria) from the Cretaceous of Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ichthyosaurs remains from the Albian and Cenomanian of Wyoming have been assigned to Platypterygius americanus, but apart from structures of the distal humerus, few other unequivocal character states have been proposed to differentiate this species from its congeners. The purpose of this study was to reevaluate the postcranial morphology of Platypterygius americanus, in order to assess the validity of this

Erin E. Maxwell; Benjamin P. Kear

2010-01-01

488

EPlZOOTlOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN FREE RANGING CERVIDS IN COLORADO AND WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveillance and epidemic modeling were used to study chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that occurs naturally among sympatric, free- ranging deer (Oa!oco&us spp.) and Rocky M ountain elk (Cetvus elaphus nelsoni) populations in contiguous portions of northeastern Colorado and southeastern Wyoming (USA). We used clinical case submissions to identify endemic areas, then used immunohistochemistry to detect CWD-

Michael W. Miller; Elizabeth S. Williams; Craig W. McCarty; Terry R. Spraker; Terry J. Kreeger; Catherine T. Larsen; E. Tom Thorne

2000-01-01

489

75 FR 66787 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Twelfth Auxiliary Meridian West, through Township 52 North, between Ranges 100 and 101 West, a portion of Lot No. 43 and the metes and bounds survey of Lot 43-C, Township 52 North, Range 100 West, Sixth Principal Meridian, Wyoming, Group No....

2010-10-29

490

76 FR 12131 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey, Wyoming  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and the survey of the subdivision of section 21 and meander of the present left bank of North Fork Popo Agie River, and the metes and bounds survey of Lots 5 and 6, section 21, Township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wind River Meridian, Wyoming, Group...

2011-03-04

491

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

492

Improved Grazing Management Increases Terrestrial Invertebrate Inputs that Feed Trout in Wyoming Rangeland Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in forest and grassland ecosystems worldwide indicates that terrestrial invertebrates can be a significant source of prey for fish, providing about 50% of their annual energy. We examined whether input of terrestrial invertebrates to rangeland streams in western Wyoming provides an important prey resource for brown trout Salmo trutta and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and how it is modified

W. Carl Saunders; Kurt D. Fausch

2007-01-01

493

Geology of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents an overview of the general geology, the structure, and the glaciation of the Teton Range in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming U.S.A. Examples of cirques, glacial horns, terraces and glacial outwash plains are presented. A link to a personal account of an Avalanche Canyon loop hike is also available.

494

Characterization and fluid flow simulation of naturally fractured Frontier sandstone, Green River Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant gas reserves are present in low-permeability sandstones of the Frontier Formation in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming. Successful exploitation of these reservoirs requires an understanding of the characteristics and fluid-flow response of the regional natural fracture system that controls reservoir productivity. Fracture characteristics were obtained from outcrop studies of Frontier sandstones at locations in the basin. The fracture

H. Harstad; L. W. Teufel; J. C. Lorenz; S. R. Brown

1996-01-01

495

WINTER MOVEMENTS OF ADULT NORTHERN GOSHAWKS THAT NESTED IN SOUTHCENTRAL WYOMING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Winter movements of four adult northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) that nest in south- central Wyoming were monitored during the winter of 1992-93. Goshawks initiated fall migrations in early fall (primarily mid-September) while weather conditions are moderate. Female 1 migrated 185 km sodth of her nest. She wintered in a mountainous area in Colorado at a higher elevation (2774 m) than

JOHN R. SQUIRES; LEONARD F. RUGGIERO

496

Carbon isotope ratios and crop analyses of Arphia (Orthoptera: Acrididae) species in southeastern Wyoming Grassland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food habits of Arphia conspersa Scudder and Arphia pseudonietana (Thomas) were studied along an altitudinal transect in southeastern Wyoming shortgrass mixed prairie. Stable carbon isotope ratios indicated that diets were significantly different between study sites, between species, and between sexes. These differences were found to be primarily related to the availability of different food plants along the transect, although species

Thomas W. Boutton; Bruce N. Smith; A. Tyrone Harrison

1980-01-01

497

Isotopic identification of natural vs. anthropogenic sources of Pb in Laramie basin groundwaters, Wyoming, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water well samples, precipitation, and leachates of aquifer rock samples from the Laramie basin, Wyoming, were analyzed to test the suitability of Pb isotopes for tracing hydrologic processes in a basin where Sr isotopes had proven effective. Leachable Pb from host rocks to aquifers in this basin have isotopically distinct compositions and isotopic tracing would be effective in differentiating natural

R. N. Toner; C. D. Frost; K. R. Chamberlain

2003-01-01

498

Laramide tectonics and humid alluvial fan sedimentation, Ne Uinta uplift, Utah and Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and interprets a sequence of syntectonic conglomerates and sandstones shed from the northeast flank of the Uinta Mountains during an early Eocene phase of the Laramide orogeny. The study area centers around a cuesta 10 km long known as Richards Mountain located on the Utah-Wyoming border about 3 km north of the Uinta fault zone. Conglomerates and

S. G. Crews; F. G. Ethridge

1993-01-01

499

Peopling the High Plains: Wyoming's European Heritage. Curriculum Ideas and Guides for Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The teacher's guide contains 25 K-12 lessons which illustrate the activities of all ethnic groups in Wyoming. The Basque, British, Eastern European, German-speaking, Greek, and Italian immigrants are highlighted. Titles include "Costumes by Flannelboard,""National Basque Week,""Dolls From Our Heritage,""Cook-In/Dance-In Ethnic…

Willems, Arnold L.

500

Depositional environments of the Middle Jurassic lower Sundance Formation, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contrary to historical interpretations, the Middle Jurassic lower Sundance Formation in the Bighorn Basin of north---central Wyoming was not the product of solely an open marine environment. This work integrated the influences of tectonics, paleogeography, paleoclimate, rapid sea level fluctuations, and periods of erosion. Nine distinct and laterally extensive facies were recognized through fieldwork and petrography, including shelf, nearshore, lagoon,

James Leonard Strasen

2008-01-01