Sample records for canada geological survey

  1. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7037

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Timothy

    GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7037 Total arsenic concentrations of lake sediments near. Hadlari, and H. Falck 2012 #12;GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7037 Total arsenic concentrations of lake sediments near the City of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories J.M. Galloway1 , H. Sanei1 , R

  2. ASTRONAUT'S GUIDE TO TERRESTRIAL IMPACT CRATERS R. A. F. Grieve, Geological Survey of Canada

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;#12;ASTRONAUT'S GUIDE TO TERRESTRIAL IMPACT CRATERS R. A. F. Grieve, Geological Survey Impact Craters in North America 10 Meteor Crater Upheaval Dome Sierra Madera Middlesboro Pilot Lake Carswell Gow Lake Deep Bay Nicholson Lake West Hawk Lake Haughton Sudbury Wanapitei Brent Lac Couture New

  3. Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan G.

    PP 10.2 Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada Summary Significant electrical resistivity anisotropy, up to 1 to understand the electrical mechanisms involved in such anisotropic processes in order to provide information

  4. REVIEW OF LAKE AGASSIZ HISTORY L. H. Thorleifson, Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa ON K1 A 0E8

    E-print Network

    55 REVIEW OF LAKE AGASSIZ HISTORY L. H. Thorleifson, Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa ON K1 A 0E8 ABSTRACT Lake Agassiz research has been influenced over the past century by the consequences of the fact that Warren Upham did not recognize a major transgression of the lake. Johnston

  5. Vermont Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Vermont Geological Survey, also known as the Division of Geology and Mineral Resources in the Department of Environmental Conservation, conducts surveys and research relating to the geology, mineral resources and topography of the State. This site provides details about the states geology with a downloadable state geologic map and key, state rock information, gold in Vermont, fossils found in the state, bedrock mapping details, stream geomorphology, the Champlain thrust fault, earthquakes, radioactive waste and links for additional information.

  6. Illinois State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) homepage provides information on geologic mapping, earthquakes, fossils, groundwater, wetlands, glacial geology, bedrock geology, and Lake Michigan geology. Educational materials include field trip guides, short publications on Illinois geology for students and teachers, online tours, single-page maps, and a geologic column. Other materials include databases and collections of GIS data, well records, drill cores, and mining information; a bibliography of Illinois geology; online maps and data; and information on water and land use, resource development, and geologic hazards.

  7. Colorado Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) is an agency of state government within the Department of Natural Resources whose mission is to help reduce the impact of geologic hazards on the citizens of Colorado, to promote the responsible economic development of mineral and mineral fuel resources, to provide geologic insight into water resources, and to provide geologic advice and information to a variety of constituencies. This site contains extensive information about Colorado geology such as maps, a geologic time scale for the state, program information, and state field trip information. This site hosts the Avalanche Information Center which contains avalanche forecasting and education center details. Publications report on geologic hazards, land use, environmental geology, mineral resources, oil, gas, coal, geologic mapping and earthquake information for the state. There are online editions of RockTalk, which is a quarterly newsletter published by the Colorado Geological Survey dealing with all aspects of geology throughout the state of Colorado. Links are provided for more resources.

  8. Louisiana Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Louisiana Geological Survey, located at Louisiana State University, developed this website to promote its goal to provide geological and environmental data that will allow for environmentally sound natural resource development and economic decisions. Users can find general information about the Survey's mission, staff, plan, and history. The website features the research and publications of the Basin Research, Cartographic, Coastal, Geologic Mapping, and Water and Environmental sections. Researchers can discover stratigraphic charts of Louisiana, information on lignite resources, and other geologic data.

  9. Geological Survey Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    If your research or interests lie in the geology of South Dakota, then the state's Geological Survey Program Web site is for you. Offered are online publications and maps, a geologic reference database, a lithologic logs database, digital base maps, a water quality database, and several other quality information sources worth checking out.

  10. South Dakota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the geological survey is to conduct geologic studies, hydrologic studies, and research, and to collect, correlate, preserve, interpret, and disseminate information, leading to a better understanding of the geology and hydrology of South Dakota. Information includes maps of relief, geology, ground water, and earthquakes; projects such as well testing, hydrology, and aquifers; and searchable databases, such as lithologic logs, digital base, and water quality. Links are provided for more information.

  11. South Carolina Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The South Carolina Geological Survey (SCGS) homepage contains information about state mapping, education and outreach programs, and recent news. For educators, there is the Earth Science education series of publications which includes presentations and page-size graphics on such topics as earthquakes, plate tectonics, geologic time, fossils, and others. Other materials include information on mineral resources, links to organizations in and about South Carolina geology, the South Carolina core repository, the Geologic Map of South Carolina, and others.

  12. Iowa Geological Survey Bureau

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Iowa Geological Survey Bureau (GSB) homepage contains: general information about the geology of Iowa; the Natural Resources Geographic Information System, which is a collection of databases on geology and water wells; and information about GSB staff, geologic studies, water monitoring programs, and services. There are maps, photographs, general interest articles, technical abstracts, lists of available publications, and an on-line book about the natural resource history of Iowa.

  13. Ohio Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the Ohio Geological Survey. Materials available through the site include a variety of publications, particularly the Survey's reports, bulletins, information circulars, guidebooks, and many others. There is an extensive selection of maps, including topographic maps in several scales, and downloadable geologic maps of several themes (drift thickness, bedrock geology, karst areas, glacial geology, and many others), as well as digital maps and data. The interactive maps section features online map viewers of abandoned mines, earthquake epicenters, surficial geology, geology of Lake Erie, and others. The educational resources page has links to the 'Hands On Earth' series of activities, GeoFacts (short bulletins on Ohio geological topics), nontechnical educational leaflets, field guides, and links to other publications, rock and mineral clubs, educational associations, and related websites. There is also a link to the Ohio Seismic Network, a network of seismograph stations located at colleges, universities, and other institutions that collects and disseminates information about earthquakes in Ohio.

  14. Arkansas Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Arkansas Geological Survey (AGS) homepage aims to develop and provide knowledge of the geology and hydrogeology of the State, and to stimulate development and effective management and utilization of the mineral, fossil-fuel, and water resources of Arkansas while protecting the environment. The AGC collects and disperses geologic data consisting of geologic maps, historical data concerning resources, and various datasets concerning water, fossil-fuel, and mineral resources of Arkansas. The site contains publications that can be ordered, sections about Arkansas geology, a list of mineral producers of Arkansas, and reports on mineral resources.

  15. California Geological Survey - Landslides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    California Geological Survey

    This page from the CA Geological Survey (CGS) presents information on landslides as well as maps and products of various past and present CGS programs to map and respond to landslides in the state of California, including the Forest and Watershed Geology Program, the Seismic Hazards Zonation Program, the Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping project, and the Landslide Map Index.

  16. North Dakota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the North Dakota Geological Survey. Site materials include information on the state's oil, gas and coal resources, maps, publications, and regulations. The paleontology page features educational articles, information on fossil collecting, articles about fossil exhibits, and information on the state fossil collection. The state GIS hub creates and distributes digital spatial data that conforms to national mapping standards. The teaching tools page includes illustrations and descriptions of rocks and minerals found in the state, as well as information on meteorites and newsletter articles about teaching North Dakota geology. There are also links to landslide maps, surficial geology maps, and links to other survey publications such as reports, bulletins, field studies, other geological and topographic maps, and information on groundwater resources.

  17. British Geological Survey: Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has a wealth of information about the earth sciences, and they are quite willing to share it with others. This page contains information and resources for anyone interested in geology for educational or leisure purposes, and it is contained with four sections. First up is "Popular geology", which includes "Britain beneath our feet", an interactive atlas of geology, resources, and land quality. This section also contains graphics about climate change and earthquakes. The second section is titled "Educational resources". Here visitors can ask scientists at the BGS specific questions and they can also download several free posters. The third section is called "Educational news and events" and it features upcoming events at the BGS and links to their free magazine, "Earthwise". The site is rounded out by the fourth section titled "From the BGS Archives". Here visitors can view historic geological photographs and also view field sketches and watercolors by Alexander Henry Green, the celebrated Victorian geologist.

  18. Minnesota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1872 by the State of Minnesota as part of the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) serves the people of Minnesota by providing systematic geoscience information to support the stewardship of water, land, and mineral resources. This rather lovely digital collection brings together a record of all items published by the MGS since its creation. Here, visitors will find documents, reports, maps, and GIS data for online viewing or downloading as well. The thematic collections here include the Aeromagnetic Map Series, the annual reports of the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, and the wonderful county atlas series. Visitors with a penchant for geology, natural history, and geography will find much to enjoy here.

  19. Maryland Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Maryland Geological Survey (MGS) provides excellent information about the geology of the Old Line State, along with public reports and updates on various ongoing projects. The homepage features live earthquake data and maps that deal with oyster habitat restoration projects, fact sheets, and new reports on lead concentrations in well water across the state. The Publications area contains dozens of maps (such as that of the "Maryland Gold District") and links to Popular Publications such as "Caves of Maryland" and "Baltimore Building Stones Tour." The Data section is also quite useful, offering a number of informative data sets on sediment distribution in the Chesapeake Bay and Baltimore Harbor. Finally, the Education area contains an "Ask a Geologist" link that's quite useful for getting answers to Earth-based queries.

  20. Utah Geological Survey: Teaching Geology Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Arches National Park to the towering cliffs at Castle Rock Campground, Utah has some remarkable geology on display. The Utah Geological Survey decided to draw on these fantastic "outdoor laboratories" and create a set of resources designed for science educators. While some of the resources are geared towards users in Utah, many of the sections contain helpful overviews that will help all educators remain on a steady foundation of geologic knowledge. One key area on the site is the "Earthquakes & Geologic Hazards" section. Here, visitors can find well-composed and straight forward summaries on topics like liquefaction, ground cracks, and fault lines. Moving on to the "Teacher Resources" area, visitors will find the delightful "Glad You Asked" articles and the very useful "Teacher's Corner" column which provides information on reading a stone wall and geologic stretching.

  1. An Interactive Map Viewer for the Urban Geology of Ottawa (Canada): an Example of Web Publishing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Giroux; R. Bélanger

    2003-01-01

    Developed by the Terrain Sciences Division (TSD) of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), an interactive map viewer, called GEOSERV (www.geoserv.org), is now available on the Internet. The purpose of this viewer is to provide engineers, planners, decision makers, and the general public with the geoscience information required for sound regional planning in densely populated areas, such as Canada's national

  2. Wyoming State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

  3. Manitoba Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers materials on Manitoba geology and minerals, mining and mineral exploration, a Digital Elevation Model of Southern Manitoba (DEMSM) landforms including oblique views, an interactive GIS map gallery of minerals and geology, a study of paleofloods in the Red River Basin including photographs illustrating how scientists delineated the paleofloods, and information on the Manitoba Protected Areas Initiative. Some maps and reports are available to download.

  4. Geological Surveys Bureau Browse Area

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Offered by the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau, the Browse Area page is a great collection of articles, photos, and maps about the state's geology geared especially to the public. Topics include Age of Dinosaurs in Iowa, Landscape Features, Satellite Image, Field Travels of Early Iowa Geologists, Meteorites in Iowa's History, Oil Exploration, and much more. This is a wonderful example of how government can provide informative and fun sites to the public without going overboard with high-end and complicated Web design.

  5. Integration of Multibeam Bathymetry and LiDAR Surveys of the Bay of Fundy, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Russell Parrott; Brian J. Todd; John Shaw; John E. Hughes Clarke; Jonathan Griffin; Bruce MacGowan; Michael Lamplugh; Timothy Webster

    Canadian vessels equipped with multibeam bathymetry systems are in high demand by the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) and by researchers from the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). For several years, survey time for geological mapping was allocated in relatively small blocks of 10-20 days to provide as many applicants as possible the opportunity to collect multibeam bathymetry data. The resulting

  6. US Geological Survey World Energy Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    Released on March 24, 2000, the US Geological Survey's World Energy Project Preliminary Report "estimates the volume of oil and gas, exclusive of the U.S., that may be added to the world's reserve in the next 30 years." The preliminary report contains a world assessment showing there is more oil and gas in the Middle East and in offshore areas of western Africa and eastern South America than figured in previous assessments, and less oil and gas in Canada and Mexico, and significantly less natural gas in the Former Soviet Union. "The USGS World Petroleum Assessment 2000 is the first of its kind to provide a rigorous geologic foundation for estimating undiscovered energy resources for the world."

  7. Geological Survey of Tanzania

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United Republic of Tanzania was formed in 1964 by the merger of Tanganyika and Zanzibar and is located on the eastern coast of Africa between the Great Lakes of the Rift Valley. Tanzania has a diverse mineral resource base that includes gold and base metals, diamond-bearing kimberlites, nickel, cobalt, copper, coal resources, and a variety of industrial minerals and rocks such as kaolin, graphite, and dimension stone. This web site was created by the Mineral Resources Department (MRD), a subsidiary of the Ministry of Energy and Minerals, and contains basic information about the country's logistical environment, mineral sector policy, geological database, and more.

  8. US Geological Survey Fact Sheets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheets Web site summarizes research and investigations done by the agency and provides details about particular activities. The sheets are organized by theme, including resources, hazards, environment, information management, by individual state, and by scientific discipline. The fact sheets give basic summations of the research and provide links to more detailed pages for those seeking further information.

  9. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response is comprised of numerous components within the United States Geological Survey (USGS requirements and deactivation process in supporting natural hazards events. 1.2 Scope

  10. OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Canada weathered the global economic crisis well, mainly reflecting sustained growth in domestic pending, and the economy is continuing to grow despite the persistence of international turbulence, most recently stemming from the euro zone sovereign debt crisis. In Canada's case, several factors are acting in its favour. Federal fiscal plans are…

  11. Title: Surficial Materials of Canada (Map 1880A) Data Creator /

    E-print Network

    Title: Surficial Materials of Canada (Map 1880A) Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Geological Survey of Canada Publisher: Geological Survey of Canada Edition: N/A Versions: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage on the web via http://gsc.nrcan.gc.ca/map/1880a/index_e.php Citation: Canada. Geological Survey of Canada

  12. Small animal dentistry in Canada: 1994 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Haws, I J; Anthony, J M

    1996-01-01

    Small animal dentistry is a rapidly growing area of interest and specialization internationally, offering tremendous benefits to patients, clients, and practitioners. To date, no studies have been done to determine the standard of small animal dental care in Canada. A national mail survey was designed to document the prevalence of dental disease in small animal patients, the types of veterinary dental procedures being provided by practitioners, as well as home care recommendations and compliance for 1994. PMID:8746422

  13. California Geological Survey-Educational Resources Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-01-01

    How do we understand the Earth and its complexity? It's a crucial question in our age. Fortunately, the California Geological Survey is interested in these matters. The Survey's Educational Resources Center site features California geology maps, teachers' aids, and "California Geology 101." This last resource is an interactive index of online geologic field trip guides and related sites. The resources include an exploration of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, replies to questions posed by the "Earthquake DOC," and a glossary of rock and mineral terminology. The maps should not be missed either, as they include a fault activity map of California and a detailed map of the Golden State's geomorphic provinces.

  14. Christopher U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    desalinization loop in Chula Vista, California. Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tucson, Arizona. May 2000-controlled rivers. · Analyzed debris flows and debris-flow processes in arid and mountainous regions from convective

  15. Matching magnetic trends and patterns across the Tintina fault, Alaska and Canada--evidence for offset of about 490 kilometers: Chapter C in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly patterns on opposite sides of the mapped Tintina fault in eastern Alaska and western Canada show an apparent offset of about 490 kilometers (km), probably of Eocene age. This estimate is compared with previous geologically based estimates of 400 to 430 km and paleomagnetically based estimates of more than 1,100 km. The apparent geophysical alignments have geologic implications that deserve further study.

  16. Maine Geological Survey: Online Educational Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-12-08

    The Maine Geological Survey (MGS) has crafted a fine set of materials for those interested in learning more about the state's natural history via virtual tours, lesson plans, and maps. First up is the Virtual Tour of Maine Geology, which includes photographs of bedrock geology, geologic hazards, mineral collecting, and surficial geology. The Lesson Plans area contains 51 lessons, including "Igneous Rock Identification" and "Composition of Topsoil." A number of MGS maps are available online in the Maps and Publications area. The site includes a Bibliography of Maine Geology, which contains over 12,000 references. Additionally, the site contains a link to the MGS publications page, which has official state of Maine wall maps available for purchase.

  17. Maine Geological Survey: Online Educational Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Maine Geological Survey (MGS) has crafted a fine set of materials for those interested in learning more about the state's natural history via virtual tours, lesson plans, and maps. First up is the Virtual Tour of Maine Geology, which includes photographs of bedrock geology, geologic hazards, mineral collecting, and surficial geology. The Lesson Plans area contains 51 lessons, including "Igneous Rock Identification" and "Composition of Topsoil." A number of MGS maps are available online in the Maps and Publications area. The site includes a Bibliography of Maine Geology, which contains over 12,000 references. Additionally, the site contains a link to the MGS publications page, which has official state of Maine wall maps available for purchase.

  18. A survey of telehealth coordinators in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jay; Gay, Shirley

    2012-06-01

    Telehealth coordinators practising in Canada were invited to respond to an online survey and participate in a telephone interview. For the present study, the definition of 'telehealth' was limited to the use of videoconferencing. The coordinators were recruited with the assistance of the Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) and the Canadian Telehealth Forum (CTF). The response rate to the online survey from the OTN cohort was 4% (n = 13) and from the CTF cohort was 36% (n = 34). Of the 47 people who completed the survey, 16 also participated in a telephone interview. Most respondents were female; their mean age was 40 years. Most telehealth coordinators had some form of post-secondary education. Most, 66% (n = 31) coordinated both clinical and educational videoconferences. About half of the telehealth coordinators (55%, n = 26) indicated that their job was dedicated solely to telehealth, although 32% (n = 15) reported that their jobs involved responsibilities outside telehealth. About half of the respondents worked full-time (51%, n = 24). Most respondents either strongly agreed or agreed with the statement that 'If a telehealth coordinator's role involves patient care then that individual should be a member of a regulated health profession'. The need for organizations to more clearly define the role, better recognize and support telehealth coordinators and develop mechanisms for continuing professional education and certification were recurrent themes in the interviews. PMID:22604279

  19. Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of Alaska's geological and geophysical survey, the agency responsible for collecting and distributing information about the state's geologic resources and hazards. Materials include numerous downloadable geologic publications, geophysical, geochemical, and GIS datasets, maps, photos, and news articles. The 'Guide to Alaska Geologic and Mineral Information', a document available at the site, is a source for basic and specialized research into the geology of Alaska, and the resources and issues involved in exploration for metallic mineral deposits in Alaska. It is designed to give users a broad overview of the many resources available to them from library facilities and holdings to State and Federal agencies that publish research and oversee mining and exploration activities to online databases, publications, and catalogs.

  20. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

  1. US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WELL WATERLEVEL DATA, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    USGS well waterlevel data for NC wells, as provided by North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NC-DENR). The zipped file contains 2 FoxPro databases: usgs.dbf - This database contains the well construction information for the US Geological Survey's moni...

  2. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION--1996 1 By Joseph Gambogi

    E-print Network

    in ceramics, chemicals, welding rod coatings, heavy aggregate, and DuPont's titanium pigment operations. RGCU.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION--1996 1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Titanium occurs primarily in the minerals anatase, brookite, titanium slag, and synthetic rutile. Australia, Canada, Norway

  3. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, as part of the University of Wisconsin-Extension, is "an interdisciplinary organization that conducts natural resources surveys and research to produce information used for decision making, problem solving, planning, management, development, and education". The site offers downloadable online publications such as annual groundwater level summaries and understanding Wisconsin township, range, and section land descriptions. It also contains lists of other publications and various maps of Wisconsin, all of which can be ordered by mail. Information on the history of the survey and an interesting section that includes pictures and descriptions of karst (limestone) development and features is also available.

  4. The Marine Geology Program of the US Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, N. T.

    The U.S. Geological Survey and charged it with the responsibility for the classification of public lands and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources and products of the national domain. The national domain for seabed resources was extended to 200 nautical miles offshore. This United States Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a marine domain surrounding the continental U.S., Hawaii, and U.S. related islands, constitutes an area about one and two thirds larger than the size of the onshore area. In this vast domain lie resources of immense importance to the Nation: an estimated 35 percent of the economically recoverable oil and gas yet to be found in the United States; major resources of strategic metals like cobalt, manganese, and nickel in seafloor crusts, pavements, and modules; massive sulfide deposits actively forming today; and major concentrations of heavy minerals in nearshore sand bodies.

  5. Canada's Deep Geological Repository For Used Nuclear Fuel -The Geoscientific Site Evaluation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S.; Ben Belfadhel, M.; Blyth, A.; DesRoches, A. J.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Parmenter, A.; Sanchez-Rico Castejon, M.; Urrutia-Bustos, A.; Vorauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. In May 2010, the NWMO published and initiated a nine-step site selection process to find an informed and willing community to host a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel. The site selection process is designed to address a broad range of technical and social, economic and cultural factors. The suitability of candidate areas will be assessed in a stepwise manner over a period of many years and include three main steps: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Characterizations. The Preliminary Assessment is conducted in two phases. NWMO has completed Phase 1 preliminary assessments for the first eight communities that entered into this step. While the Phase 1 desktop geoscientific assessments showed that each of the eight communities contains general areas that have the potential to satisfy the geoscientific safety requirements for hosting a deep geological repository, the assessment identified varying degrees of geoscientific complexity and uncertainty between communities, reflecting their different geological settings and structural histories. Phase 2 activities will include a sequence of high-resolution airborne geophysical surveys and focused geological field mapping to ground-truth lithology and structural features, followed by limited deep borehole drilling and testing. These activities will further evaluate the site's ability to meet the safety functions that a site would need to ultimately satisfy in order to be considered suitable. This paper provides an update on the site evaluation process and describes the approach, methods and criteria that are being used to conduct the geoscientific Preliminary Assessments.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Over its long history, the U.S. Geological Survey has taken many, many, photographs. In the course of their various geological studies and explorations, persons in their employ have documented volcanic explosions, mining projects, and dams. This website contains 30,000 photographs from 1868 to the present, and many of these images have never been published in any form. New users can get started by clicking one of the subject areas on the left-hand side of the homepage. These areas include "Earthquakes", "Mines, Mills, Quarries", and "Mount St. Helens". Visitors can also perform basic keyword searches, and they might wish to try out words like "dolomite", "karst", or "Colorado". Also, the site has an excellent "Portrait Gallery", which contains images of famed geological pioneers, such as Chares Van Hise.

  7. United States Geological Survey: Contaminant Biology Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Contaminant Biology Program, whose mission is to investigate the effects and exposure of environmental contaminants (for example, mercury) on the living resources of the United States. The site features links to information on the program's projects, grouped under chemistry and toxicology; contaminated habitats; and monitoring and assessment. There are also links to news items and events, publications, links to biology science centers and cooperative research units, and links to related websites.

  8. Widespread Occurrence of Aquifers Currently Undetectable With the MRS Technique in the Grenville Geological Province, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Roy; A. Rouleau; M. Chouteau; M. Bureau

    2004-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a field test was made over aquifers within or next to the Grenville geological province, Canada, to evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) technology in such environments. This contribution reports on these MRS tests in Eastern Canada and their outcome, stresses the importance of an MRS applicability assessment prior to embarking on a wide scale

  9. New York State Geological Survey crystalline rock project. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Presented is a preliminary geologic map of the West-Central Adirondack Region, based on mapping by members of the New York State Geological Survey and participants from several universities during the 1984 field season. The area mapped comprises portions of the West Canada Lakes, Old Forge, McKeever, Number Four, Big Moose and Raquette Lake 15 minute quadrangles. The geology of the area is dominated by two major groups of hornblende-granulite facies rocks: (a) a supracrustal sequence locally showing internal stratigraphy, including quartzofeldspathic leucogneiss, kinzigite, marble, calcsilicate granulite and amphibolite, and (b) granitic and charnockitic gneisses of both plutonic and supracrustal origin, which are widespread and often occur as elliptical domes and lenses, as well as being interstratified with the metasedimentary sequence. Clear intrusive relationships are few. In addition to these rocks, minor intrusions of meta-anorthosite and metagabbro are locally present. At least three phases of folding are present. The first is expressed by regional foliation development. The second generation is tight to isoclinal and overturned with axial trends ranging from east to northeast. The third generation is open folds with north to northwest axial trends. Good correlation exists between photogeology, aeromagnetics, and field observations.

  10. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Katherine M., (Edited By); Bartsch-Winkler, Susan

    1984-01-01

    This circular contains short topical and summary articles about the results of 1982 geologic studies on a wide range of subjects of economic and scientific interest. Included are lists of references cited for each article and a compilation of reports about Alaska written by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and published by the Geological Survey and other organizations.

  11. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S., (Edited By); Reed, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1983. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

  12. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S., (Edited By)

    1985-01-01

    This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1984. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

  13. US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website presents its objectives "to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes and to lessen the harmful impacts of volcanic activity." The public can explore information on volcano monitoring, warning schemes, and emergency planning. Students and educators can find out about the types, effects, location, and history of volcano hazards. The website offers recent online volcano reports and maps, volcano factsheets, videos, and a photo glossary. Teachers can find online versions of many educational volcano-related books and videos. The website features the volcanic observatories in Alaska, the Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley, and Yellowstone.

  14. State geological surveys: Their growing national role in policy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhard, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    State geological surveys vary in organizational structure, but are political powers in the field of geology by virtue of their intimate knowledge of and involvement in legislative and political processes. Origins of state geological surveys lie in the recognition of society that settlement and prosperity depended on access to a variety of natural resources, resources that are most familiar to geologists. As the surveys adapt to modern societal pressures, making geology serve the public has become the new mission for many state geological surveys. Geologic mapping was the foundation of most early surveys, and the state surveys have brought mapping back into the public realm to meet today's challenges of growing population density, living environment desires, and resource access.

  15. Geocomputing with Geological Field Data: Is there a 'ghost in the machine'?

    E-print Network

    Klippel, Alexander

    State University, USA 2 Geological Survey of Canada, Canada 3 Queen's University, Canada Email: bmb184-based geological surveying and cannot be wholly replicated by computational analogues. This highlights some the raw data for geologic interpretation." Emphasis is placed on the interpretive element in geological

  16. CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP?

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    1 CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP? SAMP is the Southern African in that country. Which countries form part of `Southern Africa'? Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe Is any research being done in Southern Africa? Yes

  17. John F. Walker, US Geological Survey Friday, November 18 , 2011

    E-print Network

    John F. Walker, US Geological Survey Friday, November 18 , 2011 3:30 p.m. RAWLS Hall, room 1011 P U T E R Estimating climate change impacts on streamflow in the Lake Michigan basin using the USGS PRMS watershed model The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into an interagency agreement with the U

  18. US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter Revised December 15, 2010 This charter outlines the purpose, responsibility and structure of the U.S. Geological Survey Geospatial information for effective response to hazards and other major events by emergency responders, land

  19. State Geological Surveys and Related Agencies in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page is part of the California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology Web site. It provides a list of state geological surveys and related organizations in the United States (and Puerto Rico). For all of these agencies, mail addresses as well as known e-mail and Internet links are provided. Links are also provided to pages on geologic mapping, geologic hazards, earthquake engineering, mineral resources, and technical information and publications.

  20. Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey during 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S., (Edited By); Reed, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies in 1985. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest. Separate bibliographic listings of published reports are included. These listings are: (1) data releases and folio components derived from the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program, (2) reports on Alaska released in U.S. Geological Survey publications in 1985, and (3) reports about Alaska by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various scientific journals in 1985.

  1. Stability Zone of Natural Gas Hydrates in a Permafrost-Bearing Region of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin: Study of a Feasible Energy Source (Geological Survey of Canada Contribution No.1999275)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Majorowicz; P. K. Hannigan

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of geological and geophysical data from 150 wells in the Beaufort-Mackenzie region(study area between 68 deg. 30'-70 deg. 00'N and 131 deg. -39 deg. W) led to reinterpretation of the depth of methane hydrate stability and construction of the first contour maps displaying thickness of hydrate stability zones as well as hydrate stability zone thicknesses below permafrost. Calculations were

  2. U.S. Geological Survey technology transfer opportunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is interested in entering into a partnership with private industry for commercialization of the Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS)-Common Software Platform (CSP) software.

  3. HLY0602: An integrated geophysical and geological study of the western Canada Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L.; Davis, M.; van Avendonk, H.; Hornbach, M.; Vermeesch, P.; Henkart, M.; Henkart, P.

    2006-12-01

    The USCGC Healy cruise, HLY0602, departed Barrow on 19 July 2006 and ended prematurely on the 22nd of August in Nome, Alaska. HLY0602 was an integrated geophysical and geological study of the western Canada Basin including Northwind Ridge, Chukchi Cap and the Mendeleev Ridge. The IBCAO chart of Arctic bathymetry (Jakobsson, et al., 2000) gives the impression that there is comprehensive bathymetric coverage of the western Canada Basin. While in general, the IBCAO coverage is accurate, there are a number of places where multibeam data indicate significant discrepancies. For instance, the large north-south trough on the eastern margin of Chukchi Cap at 163°W appears on the IBCAO map to have a possible seamount on the eastern edge of the trough at 77.9°N. We surveyed that region and found an extremely flat-floored trough with a depth of 2708 ± 5 m with no sign of a seamount within 10 km of where it is shown on the IBCAO map. On Chukchi Cap there is an apparent ~ 900 m deep trough in the center that is in fact no deeper than ~ 700 m. Multibeam bathymetric surveying of Mendeleev Ridge confirmed the numerous pockmarks found by HLY0504 with even greater concentrations of the pockmarks found to the south along Mendeleev Ridge. A number of major slump features were found on the northern margin of Arlis Plateau at the southern end of Mendeleev Ridge. If the pockmarks are associated with high gas content, then the level of organic rich sediments may be similar to those found on the Lomonosov Ridge by IODP drilling (Backman et al., 2006). Backman, J., Moran, K., McInroy, D.B., Mayer, L.A., and the Expedition 302 Scientists, 2006. Proc. IODP, 302: Edinburgh (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International, Inc.). doi:10.2204/iodp.proc.302.2006 Jakobsson, M., Cherkis, N.Z., Woodward, J., Coakley, B., Macnab, R., 2000. A new grid of Arctic bathymetry: a significant resorce for scientists and mapmakers. EOS Transactions 81(9), 89, 93, 96.

  4. US Geological Survey World Energy Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The World Energy Project's Website holds a wide collection of data including province assessment reports and maps showing geology, oil and gas fields, and geologic provinces (Africa, Arabian Peninsula, South Asia, South America, Former Soviet Union, Asia Pacific Region, and Iran). Finally, a report ranks the world's oil and gas provinces by known petroleum volumes.

  5. Can the Balmy Pliocene Predict Geologic timeline spiral courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Can the Balmy Pliocene Predict Geologic timeline spiral courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey 20.AthanasiosKoutavas,CUNYCollegeofStatenIsland the past appears to be the only way we can see how climate responded over a long enough time span

  6. Geological Storage of CO2 from Power Niels Peter Christensen, Geological Survey of Denmark and

    E-print Network

    Geological Storage of CO2 from Power Generation Niels Peter Christensen, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) Abstract Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is capable of contributing in new coal- and gas-fired power plants, along with renewable energy infrastructure. There is also a need

  7. National Interagency Canada Lynx Detection Survey in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    detected included black bears (Ursus americanus), bobcats (Lynx rufus), coyotes (Canis latrans), ungulatesNational Interagency Canada Lynx Detection Survey in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan Chris Interagency Canada Lynx Detection Survey (NLDS) was a survey designed to detect lynx with a hair

  8. Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology: Calendar Year 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mons-Wengler, Margaret C.; Oldale, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    This [summary of] U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 92-585 contains a listing of publications authored or co-authored by members of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology during 1991. Results of Branch investigations are distributed in a variety of ways, including maps, journal articles, abstracts and U.S.G.S. publications. Copies of U.S.G.S. Open File Reports may generally be obtained from the author. Book publications can be obtained from U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Reports Sales, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225. Copies of U.S.G.S. Maps may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey, Map Sales, Federal Center, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225

  9. Investigating Atmospheric Mercury with the U.S. Geological Survey Mobile Mercury Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury is thought to be an important source of mercury present in fish, resulting in numerous local, statewide, tribal, and province-wide fish consumption advisories in the United States and Canada (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). To understand how mercury occurs in the atmosphere and its potential to be transferred from the atmosphere to the biosphere, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating sources and forms of atmospheric mercury, especially in locations where the amount of mercury deposited from precipitation is above average.

  10. Natural Resources Canada

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website is home to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), a government agency dealing with natural resource issues important to Canadians. It covers energy, climate change, earthquakes, geography, geology, floods, landslides, minerals and metals, forest fires, mining, remote sensing, and forestry. This site links to numerous government agencies, including the Geological Survey of Canada, Canadian Forest Service, and the Office of Energy. Also offered are a Kid's page with activities, information for teachers, and links to maps, databases, publications, and library resources.

  11. Geological Survey data as a support for EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, Francois; Harrison, Matthew; Bogaard, Paul; Pedersen, Mikael

    2015-04-01

    The National Geological Surveys of Europe have through many years collaborated on making their large possessions of geological data available for researchers, the general public and decision makers at all levels. Numerous projects have been carried out with the aim of harmonizing data across national boundaries and making data interoperable by delivering them according to international standards like those defined by INSPIRE, OGC, CGI and others. In 2012 - 2014 an EU co-funded study was carried out with the title of EGDI-Scope. The study showed how an integrated European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI) can be established so that all sorts of geological data form the Geological Surveys can be accessed in a common way by the relevant stakeholders. The establishment of such an EGDI is a cornerstone of the strategy of the organization of the Geological Surveys of Europe, EuroGeoSurveys, and the organization has decided to start implementing the infrastructure and establishing an organization which will ensure that this will be sustained. One of the most obvious user groups for the geological information is EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, which will be implemented in the coming years. The EPOS implementation project therefore contains a specific workpackage to establish the connection between the Geological Survey data and the rest of EPOS. A Thematic Core Service (TCS) for geological data and modeling will be built for making the data available for the Integrated Core Services of EPOS. The TCS will deal with borehole data, digital geological maps, geophysical data like seismics and borehole logs, archived physical geological material like samples and cores, geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soil and minerals as well as with 3D and 4D geological models of the subsurface. Great emphasis will be put on making the system sustainable and with easy access and the idea is also to further develop and promote the international standards for data exchange. This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  12. U.S. Geological Survey Research Centers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Website of USGS' Coastal and Marine Geology Program. Site features an easy to use interactive resource locator with pull down menus. Resources are broken down by topic, region, and resource type. Information includes tsunamis, earthquakes, erosion, hurricanes, and much more. Information available for many different science disciplines. Access SoundWaves, USGS's monthly newsletter, and read impact studies from past hurricanes.

  13. The Corossol structure: A possible impact crater on the seafloor of the northwestern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada

    E-print Network

    de geographie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada 2 Canada Research Chair City, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada 4 Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada, Quebec City, Rimouski, Quebec G5L 3A1, Canada 3 Departement de geologie et de genie geologique, Universite Laval, Quebec

  14. United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Earthquake Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes the research activities of the Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The activities include: borehole geophysics and rock mechanics, crustal deformation, earthquake information, earthquake geology and paleoseismology, hazards, seismology and earth structure, and strong motion seismology, site response, and ground motion. Other links include: earthquake activity, earthquake facts and education, earthquake products, hazards and preparedness, regional websites, and seismic networks.

  15. Widespread Occurrence of Aquifers Currently Undetectable With the MRS Technique in the Grenville Geological Province, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J.; Rouleau, A.; Chouteau, M.; Bureau, M.

    2004-05-01

    In the summer of 2003, a field test was made over aquifers within or next to the Grenville geological province, Canada, to evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) technology in such environments. This contribution reports on these MRS tests in Eastern Canada and their outcome, stresses the importance of an MRS applicability assessment prior to embarking on a wide scale survey and encourages the development of MRS technology adapted to conditions similar to the Grenville province. MRS has a track record of non-invasive, groundwater selective aquifer characterization in about 20 countries. MRS is a field scale implementation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). An inversion of MRS data sets yields free water content and the NMR signal decay rate as a function of depth. The latter is linked to the pore-size and therefore to hydraulic conductivity. Once integrated with respect to depth or thickness, an estimate of transmissivity is supplied. Such depth-wise information allows estimating vertical boundaries for aquifer and aquitards. Using a NUMIS-PLUS MRS system from Iris Instruments, twelve MRS soundings were executed over aquifers from three areas. A TDEM sounding was also performed at each site. The areas, each with 4 sites, included sand, sand and gravel and fractured bedrock aquifers: (1) the Laurentides NW of Montréal, (2) the Saguenay area, both within the Grenville province, and (3) the St-Lawrence Lowlands on the South East side of the St-Lawrence River. Some of the aquifers included discrete horizons with higher clay content. Of all these sites, one was found unsuitable due to a high level of magnetic noise, even though the site was away from industrialized sector or power line. At these sites, the depth to the water table was in the range 2 - 10 m below surface while porosity was in excess of 20% for the water bearing layers. Except for the noisy site, the expected MRS response is above the ambient noise after data stacking yet at each site no recognizable MRS response was observed. Detailed magnetic survey, samples collection, magnetic susceptibility readings on the samples and mineralogical examination were added, showing the presence of fine-grained magnetite at most sites where results are available. A shallow MRS sounding directly over a pond yielded a recognizable MRS response. The sites are hydraulically and structurally characterized through various techniques including, according to each site: boreholes & pump tests, GPR, TDEM etc. Other sites have been observed with lack of MRS response in the past; these were restricted to small areas. In this case no MRS response was observed over any of the aquifers selected within an area ~ 250 x 300 km. The lack of MRS response is attributed to internal magnetic field gradient due to disseminated fine grain magnetite. This is a widespread condition in the selected areas for which results are available. Recommendations are made to: (1) go through an MRS applicability assessment prior to embarking on a wide scale MRS survey (2) allocate some of the MRS development efforts to the adaptation of the MRS technology for sites with significant internal magnetic field gradient.

  16. Volcanic and geologic database projects of the Geological Survey of Japan (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Takarada; H. Hoshizumi; J. Itoh; M. Urai; K. Nishiki

    2009-01-01

    Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) is presently implementing the GEO-DB project, which aims to integrate all kinds of geological information in GSJ. GSJ published more than 50 CD-ROM series and established more than 20 databases at the Research Information Database (RIO-DB) of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Presently, four volcanic databases are open to the

  17. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-print Network

    Survey (http://www.geo.umn.edu/mgs/) as PDF files readable with Acrobat Reader. Date of release: 28 without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability

  18. The British Geological Survey and the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Chesher, J.A. [Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    The British Geological Survey is the UK`s national centre for earth science information with a parallel remit to operate internationally. The Survey`s work covers the full geoscience spectrum in energy, mineral and groundwater resources and associated implications for land use, geological hazards and environmental impact. Much of the work is conducted in collaboration with industry and academia, including joint funding opportunities. Activities relating directly to hydrocarbons include basin analysis, offshore geoscience mapping, hazard assessment, fracture characterization, biostratigraphy, sedimentology, seismology, geomagnetism and frontier data acquisition techniques, offshore. The BGS poster presentation illustrates the value of the collaborative approach through consortia support for regional offshore surveys, geotechnical hazard assessments and state-of-the-art R & D into multicomponent seismic imaging techniques, among others.

  19. A survey of population-based drug databases in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, E; Blatman, B; Einarson, T R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the population-based drug databases in Canada and to determine their comprehensiveness and accessibility for performing pharmacoepidemiologic and outcomes research. DESIGN: Survey (four-part mailed questionnaire). SETTING: Public and private third-party drug plans across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All provincial and territorial drug plan or pharmacare managers as well as selected private plan managers including health benefit consultants, group insurers and claims adjudicators/pharmacy benefit managers (CA/PBMs). OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient, drug and pharmacy information; potential for electronic linkages to other provincial databases (e.g., physician, hospital, vital statistics); accessibility of information; population profile. RESULTS: Of the 32 recipients of the questionnaire 29 (91%) responded and 18 (56%) completed the survey. Most databases were reported to contain patient information (e.g., patient identification number, age, sex and medication history) and prescription drug information (e.g., drug identification number, strength, quantity and cost). Six provinces and one territory reported the capability to link to other databases (e.g., hospital and physician databases). One CA/PBM reported some links to selected long-term disability data. All of the government databases except those in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory allowed use of the data for research purposes. Manitoba and Saskatchewan included all residents of the province in their database; the others included selected groups (e.g., residents 65 years of age or older, people on social assistance or people covered by private group insurance). CONCLUSION: A number of public and private population-based databases are available for use in pharmacoepidemiologic and outcomes research. PMID:8653645

  20. Geologic Survey of the Ewing Bank, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Daniel M

    2014-04-04

    of the distribution and structure of the seafloor sediments that comprise the bank and the surrounding area. Two research vessels were utilized to accomplish the survey: the RV Gyre collected geologic cores and sub-bottom profiler lines courtesy of TDI...

  1. U. S. Geological Survey Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    U. S. Geological Survey Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Biennial Report for 2012-2013 Amherst, Massachusetts June 2013 #12;MassUnit Biennial Report 2012-2013 2 Massachusetts, Assistant Leader­Wildlife Dr. Allison H. Roy, Assistant Leader­Fisheries University of Massachusetts

  2. LAND USE LAND COVER (LULC) - US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Mapping Program, a component of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), produces and distributes land use and land cover maps and digitized data for the conterminous U.S. and Hawaii. Land use refers to the human activities that are directly related to the land. The int...

  3. United States Geological Survey: Research on Invasive Species

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Invasive Species Program. Materials include information about the program, news articles, and information on research projects arranged by species, project, or region. There is also contact information for researchers and experts, as well as links to publications, events, and other sites with related information.

  4. Abbreviations used in publications of the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1953-01-01

    The use of abbreviations in publications of the Geological Survey is determined by several forces working in different directions. Pulling in the direction of greater condensation and the freer use of abbreviations and symbols is the desire to achieve greater economy in publications. Working in the opposite direction is the desire to have the publications used more conveniently by an increasingly heterogeneous public.

  5. A Survey of Geologic Resources. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonson, Jennifer; Rickman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the resources available from the Moon itself: regolith, geologically concentrated materials, and lunar physical features that will enable habitation and generation of power on the surface. This chapter briefly covers the formation of the Moon and thus the formation of the crust of the Moon, as well as the evolution of the regolith. The characteristics of the regolith are provided in some detail, including its mineralogy and lithology. The location of high concentrations of specific minerals or rocks is noted. Other ideal locations for in situ resource utilization technology and lunar habitation are presented. This chapter is intended to be a brief review of current knowledge, and to serve as a foundational source for further study. Each concept presented here has a wealth of literature associated with it; the reader is therefore directed to that literature with each discussion. With great interest in possible manned lunar landings and continued study of the Moon by multiple satellites, the available information changes regularly.

  6. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    SciTech Connect

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)] [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  7. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    .S. Geological Survey Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program: 2004­2009 #12;In Memoriam In memory. #12;Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program, Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program: 2004

  8. Publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The USGS has recently released this searchable database of bibliographic information on USGS publications dating back to the Survey's inception in 1785. Users have a number of search options, each of which can be further modified in many ways. Searches can be made by subject, keyword, author, and specific journal. Search returns do not include full text, but some have abstracts and all offer citation information, keywords, publisher and price. A Citation Manager allows users to download one or all of the selected items in a variety of formats, including HTML, EndNote, and ASCII. An additional feature at the site is a Query Track, which logs each user's most recent queries from the current browser session. The logs will be saved only as long as you remain connected to the Internet and do not close your browser. Users can opt to save the logs on their computer or diskette to rerun searches at a later date.

  9. Snowtrack surveys for Canada lynx presence in Minnesota west of Highway 53 2005 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Snowtrack surveys for Canada lynx presence in Minnesota west of Highway 53 2005 Annual Report on this topic #12;ii Summary Historical and recent Canada lynx sighting reports have been concentrated in northeastern Minnesota, with scattered reports from other parts of the state. Lynx that have been radiocollared

  10. Digital photogrammetry at the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greve, Clifford W.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is converting its primary map production and revision operations to use digital photogrammetric techniques. The primary source of data for these operations is the digital orthophoto quadrangle derived from National Aerial Photography Program images. These digital orthophotos are used on workstations that permit comparison of existing vector and raster data with the orthophoto and interactive collection and revision of the vector data.

  11. North American Central Plains conductivity anomaly within the Trans-Hudson orogen in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan G.

    Saskatchewan, Canada Alan G. Jones } James A. Craven Geological Survey of Canada, 1 Observatory Crescent Magnetotelluric data acquired across the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson orogen, north- ern Saskatchewan, image one

  12. USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Survey Data in Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, C.; Steele, C.; Ma, A.; Chin, J.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) program has a rich data catalog of geologic field activities and metadata called InfoBank, which has been a standard tool for researchers within and outside of the agency. Along with traditional web maps, the data are now accessible in Google Earth, which greatly expands the possible user audience. The Google Earth interface provides geographic orientation and panning/zooming capabilities to locate data relative to topography, bathymetry, and coastal areas. Viewing navigation with Google Earth's background imagery allows queries such as, why areas were not surveyed (answer presence of islands, shorelines, cliffs, etc.). Detailed box core subsample photos from selected sampling activities, published geotechnical data, and sample descriptions are now viewable on Google Earth, (for example, M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB, and P-1-97- MB box core samples). One example of the use of Google Earth is CMG's surveys of San Francisco's Ocean Beach since 2004. The surveys are conducted with an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) and shallow-water personal watercraft (PWC) equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS), and elevation and echo sounder data collectors. 3D topographic models with centimeter accuracy have been produced from these surveys to monitor beach and nearshore processes, including sand transport, sedimentation patterns, and seasonal trends. Using Google Earth, multiple track line data (examples: OB-1-05-CA and OB-2-05-CA) can be overlaid on beach imagery. The images also help explain the shape of track lines as objects are encountered.

  13. 50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey...SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL...General Administration § 37.45 Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey....

  14. 50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey...SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL...General Administration § 37.45 Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey....

  15. 50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey...SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL...General Administration § 37.45 Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey....

  16. 50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey...SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL...General Administration § 37.45 Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey....

  17. 50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey...SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL...General Administration § 37.45 Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey....

  18. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey A Computer Program for Predicting Recharge.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 2 Currently at : Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences and infiltration, and ground-water discharge to streams between storm events. Ground-water recharge can

  19. U. S. Geological Survey investigation of Mississippi Embayment area

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, E.E.

    1983-09-01

    Prior to about 1974, most of the work in the Mississippi embayment area by members of the U.S. Geological Survey was motivated by interest in the embayment's paleontologic aspects, stratigraphy, and economic resources, especially ground water. However, an excellent description of the effects of the New Madrid earthquake series was published on the centennial of that 1811-1812 seismicity. During World War II, combined efforts of the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines produced a wealth of information about the Little Rock pluton and the process of laterizing exposed nepheline syenite to form bauxite. That project, in a search for additional intrusive bodies at shallow depth, sponsored a reconnaissance aeromagnetic survey along the embayment edge from Little Rock, Arkansas, to Cairo, Illinois. Magnetic anomalies that were identified then are now known to be related to the series of buried plutons aligned along the northwestern margin of the upper Mississippi embayment graben. Later investigations assessed the geochemistry of the more mafic parts of the Little Rock pluton. In 1974, U.S. Geological survey effort, along with that of other federal agencies, state agencies, and academic institutions, was directed toward finding the cause of ongoing seismicity in the upper embayment and toward assessing the related potential effects on persons and property. The purpose of this poster display is to summarize the more significant findings in this area related to (a) the rock sequence, lower crust to surface; (b) the major structural features, including a rift system; (c) the current state of stress; and (d) the present-day seismicity.

  20. United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Products and Publications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to products and publications of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP). Links are provided to fact sheets arranged by region in the U.S and by global and national areas. There are also links to general information such as bibliographies and publications on general geology, plate tectonics, and tsunamis. A section on information services includes links to email notification services for earthquakes, moment tensors, and seismicity reports; and RSS feeds on the latest earthquakes. There is also an extensive selection of maps, including earthquake maps, fault and landform maps, and seismic hazard and site response maps. Other materials include multimedia items (CD-ROMs and videos); open-file reports, bulletins, and circulars; and a selection of software for earthquake analysis, mapping, and data distribution. Some items are free; others are available for purchase.

  1. Aufeis accumulations in stream bottoms in arctic and subarctic environments as a possible indicator of geologic structure: Chapter F in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, Richard B.; Wang, Bronwen; Vohden, Jim; Day, Warren C.; Gough, Larry P.

    2007-01-01

    The thickest (>3 meters) and most extensive aufeis (100’s of meters to kilometers along valleys) coincided with locations of laterally extensive (>5 kilometers) mapped high-angle brittle fault zones, suggesting that the fault zones are hydraulically conductive. Additional evidence of water flow is provided by observed changes in stream-water chemistry in reaches in which aufeis forms, despite a lack of surface tributaries. Minor or no aufeis was observed in many other drainage valleys where no laterally extensive structures have been mapped, implying that aufeis formation results from more than a topographic effect or discharge from bank storage. Thus, the presence of thick, laterally extensive aufeis in highgradient streams may be a useful aid to geologic structural mapping in arctic and subarctic climates.

  2. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    .F., Woodruff, L.G., Solano, Federico, Kilburn, J.E., and Fey, D.L., 2013, Geochemical and mineralogical data of project; photograph by Harley King, U.S. Geological Survey. Lower right, Helen Folger (U.S. Geological

  3. Coal quality activities at the new US Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelman, R.B. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The recently issued Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) calls for many changes including increased emphasis on the quality of natural resources, applied research, technology transfer, and issue-driven studies. To achieve these objectives the USGS will have to rely on partnerships with other Federal agencies, academia, State and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private industry. The coal quality activities at the USGS are briefly described and examples of the practical, team-oriented research being pursued are given.

  4. Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Our Nation faces the simultaneous challenges of increasing demand for energy, declining domestic production from existing oil and gas fields, and increasing expectations for environmental protection. The Energy Information Administration (2000) forecasts that worldwide energy consumption will increase 32 percent between 1999 and 2020 because of growth of the world economy. Forecasts indicate that in the same time period, U.S. natural gas consumption will increase 62 percent, petroleum consumption will increase 33 percent, and coal consumption will increase 22 percent. The U.S. Geological Survey provides the objective scientific information our society needs for sound decisions regarding land management, environmental quality, and economic, energy, and strategic policy.

  5. Appraising U.S. Geological Survey science records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faundeen, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has legislative charters to preserve and make accessible land remote sensing records important to the United States. This essay explains the appraisal process developed by EROS to ensure the science records it holds and those offered to it align with those charters. The justifications behind the questions employed to weed and to complement the EROS archive are explained along with the literature reviewed supporting their inclusion. Appraisal results are listed by individual collection and include the recommendations accepted by EROS management. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

  6. Survey of Research Resources in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, John M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of research resources in 24 veterinary colleges in the US and Canada reports information on university-wide research facilities, college-wide research facilities, personnel, and instrumentation resources. Corporate research resource management was compared with university research resource management. The survey form is outlined.…

  7. Survey of the Teaching of Pronunciation in Adult ESL Programs in Canada, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Jennifer A.; Holtby, Amy K.; Derwing, Tracey M.

    2011-01-01

    This follow-up study reexamines the state of the teaching of pronunciation in ESL classes across Canada. The purpose of the survey was twofold: to gain a snapshot of current practices and to compare this with the picture of 10 years ago. We based the current work on Breitkreutz, Derwing, and Rossiter's (2001) survey asking teachers about…

  8. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey China's Rare-Earth Industry By Pui-Kwan Tse and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements Survey Marcia K. McNutt, Director U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia: 2011 For more information

  9. Topographic and hydrographic GIS dataset for the Afghanistan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2010 Minerals Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, P.G.; Moran, T.W.

    2011-01-01

    This dataset contains a collection of 24 folders, each representing a specific U.S. Geological Survey area of interest (AOI; fig. 1), as well as datasets for AOI subsets. Each folder includes the extent, contours, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and hydrography of the corresponding AOI, which are organized into feature vector and raster datasets. The dataset comprises a geographic information system (GIS), which is available upon request from the USGS Afghanistan programs Web site (http://afghanistan.cr.usgs.gov/minerals.php), and the maps of the 24 areas of interest of the USGS AOIs.

  10. U.S. Geological Survey library classification system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasscer, R. Scott

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system has been designed for earth science libraries. It is a tool for assigning call numbers to earth science and allied pure science materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. The classification can be used as a retrieval system to access materials through the subject and geographic numbers. The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and the development of new areas of research in the earth sciences. The system contains seven schedules: * Subject schedule * Geological survey schedule * Earth science periodical schedule * Government document periodical schedule * General science periodical schedule * Earth science map schedule * Geographic schedule Introduction provides detailed instructions on the construction of call numbers for works falling into the framework of the classification schedules. The tables following the introduction can be quickly accessed through the use of the newly expanded subject index. The purpose of this publication is to provide the earth science community with a classification and retrieval system for earth science materials, to offer sufficient explanation of its structure and use, and to enable library staff and clientele to classify or access research materials in a library collection.

  11. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey data used in a U.S. Geological Survey regional geologic framework study along the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Brothers, Laura L.; Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.; Parker, Castle E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey obtained raw Reson multibeam data files from Science Applications International Corporation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for 20 hydrographic surveys and extracted backscatter data using the Fledermaus Geocoder Toolbox from Quality Positioning Service. The backscatter mosaics produced by the U.S. Geological Survey for the inner continental shelf of the Delmarva Peninsula using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data increased regional geophysical surveying efficiency, collaboration among government agencies, and the area over which geologic data can be interpreted by the U.S. Geological Survey. This report describes the methods by which the backscatter data were extracted and processed and includes backscatter mosaics and interpolated bathymetric surfaces.

  12. The STRATAFORM Project: U.S. Geological Survey geotechnical studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minasian, Diane L.; Lee, Homa J.; Locat, Jaques; Orzech, Kevin M.; Martz, Gregory R.; Israel, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    This report presents physical property logs of core samples from an offshore area near Eureka, CA. The cores were obtained as part of the STRATAFORM Program (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1995, 1996), a study investigating how present sedimentation and sediment transport processes influence long-term stratigraphic sequences preserved in the geologic record. The core samples were collected during four separate research cruises to the northern California study area, and data shown in the logs of the cores were collected using a multi-sensor whole core logger. The physical properties collected are useful in identifying stratigraphic units, ground-truthing acoustic imagery and sub-bottom profiles, and in understanding mass movement processes. STRATA FORmation on Margins was initiated in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research, Marine Geology and Geophysics Department as a coordinated multi-investigator study of continental-margin sediment transport processes and stratigraphy (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1996). The program is investigating the stratigraphic signature of the shelf and slope parts of the continental margins, and is designed to provide a better understanding of the sedimentary record and a better prediction of strata. Specifically, the goals of the STRATAFORM Program are to (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1995): - determine the geological relevance of short-term physical processes that erode, transport, and deposit particles and those processes that subsequently rework the seabed over time scales - improve capabilities for identifying the processes that form the strata observed within the upper ~100 m of the seabed commonly representing 104-106 years of sedimentation. - synthesize this knowledge and bridge the gap between time scales of sedimentary processes and those of sequence stratigraphy. The STRATAFORM Program is divided into studies of the continental shelf and the continental slope; the geotechnical group within the U.S. Geological Survey provides support to both parts of the project.

  13. Surveying Cross Sections of the Kootenai River Between Libby Dam, Montana, and Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Moran, Edward H.; Berenbrock, Charles

    2004-01-01

    The declining population of Kootenai River white sturgeon, which was listed as an Endangered Species in 1994, has prompted a recovery team to assess the feasibility of various habitat enhancement scenarios to reestablish white sturgeon populations. As the first phase in this assessment, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section and longitudinal data during 2002—03 at about 400 locations along the Kootenai River from Libby Dam near Libby, Montana, to where the river empties into Kootenay Lake near Creston, British Columbia, Canada. Survey control stations with a horizontal and vertical accuracy of less than 0.1 foot were established using a global positioning system (GPS) prior to collection of stream channel cross-section data along the Kootenai River. A total of 245 cross sections were surveyed. Six cross sections upstream from Kootenai Falls were surveyed using a total station where the river was too shallow or dangerous to navigate by vessel. The remaining 239 cross sections were surveyed by interfacing real-time GPS equipment with an echo sounder to obtain bathymetric data and with a laser range- finder to obtain streambank data. These data were merged, straightened, ordered, and reduced in size to be useful. Spacing between these cross sections ranged from about 600 feet in the valley flat near Deep Creek and Shorty Island and near bridges to as much as several miles in other areas. These stream channel cross sections will provide information that can be used to develop hydraulic flow models of the Kootenai River from Libby Dam, Montana, to Queens Bay on Kootenay Lake in British Columbia, Canada.

  14. National Geothermal Data System: State Geological Survey Contributions to Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, K.; Allison, M. L.; Richard, S. M.; Clark, R.; Love, D.; Coleman, C.; Caudill, C.; Matti, J.; Musil, L.; Day, J.; Chen, G.

    2012-12-01

    In collaboration with the Association of American State Geologists the Arizona Geological Survey is leading the effort to bring legacy geothermal data to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). NGDS is a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of data and service (application) providers entering its final stages of development. Once completed the geothermal industry, the public, and policy makers will have access to consistent and reliable data, which in turn, reduces the amount of staff time devoted to finding, retrieving, integrating, and verifying information. With easier access to information, the high cost and risk of geothermal power projects (especially exploration drilling) is reduced. This presentation focuses on the scientific and data integration methodology as well as State Geological Survey contributions to date. The NGDS is built using the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community and with other emerging data integration and networking efforts. Core to the USGIN concept is that of data provenance; by allowing data providers to maintain and house their data. After concluding the second year of the project, we have nearly 800 datasets representing over 2 million data points from the state geological surveys. A new AASG specific search catalog based on popular internet search formats enables end users to more easily find and identify geothermal resources in a specific region. Sixteen states, including a consortium of Great Basin states, have initiated new field data collection for submission to the NGDS. The new field data includes data from at least 21 newly drilled thermal gradient holes in previously unexplored areas. Most of the datasets provided to the NGDS are being portrayed as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), meaning that the data is compatible with a variety of visualization software. Web services are ideal for the NGDS data for a number of reasons including that they preserve data ownership in that they are read only and new services can be deployed to meet new requirements without modifying existing applications.

  15. Survey of bisphenol A in bottled water products in Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu-Liang Cao; Jeannette Corriveau

    2008-01-01

    A method based on isotope dilution headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry was used to assess levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in 56 samples of bottled water products sold in Canada. Levels of BPA in samples of all 51 non-polycarbonate (PC) bottled water products were lower than the method detection limit (0.50 µg l). Levels of BPA in most

  16. Geomorphology in North American Geology Departments, 1971

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sidney E.; Malcolm, Marshall D.

    1972-01-01

    Presents results of a 1970-71 survey of 350 geomorphologists and geology departments to determine what sort of geomorphology is being taught in the colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. (PR)

  17. Geotherm: the U.S. geological survey geothermal information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.; Rapport, A.

    1983-01-01

    GEOTHERM is a comprehensive system of public databases and software used to store, locate, and evaluate information on the geology, geochemistry, and hydrology of geothermal systems. Three main databases address the general characteristics of geothermal wells and fields, and the chemical properties of geothermal fluids; the last database is currently the most active. System tasks are divided into four areas: (1) data acquisition and entry, involving data entry via word processors and magnetic tape; (2) quality assurance, including the criteria and standards handbook and front-end data-screening programs; (3) operation, involving database backups and information extraction; and (4) user assistance, preparation of such items as application programs, and a quarterly newsletter. The principal task of GEOTHERM is to provide information and research support for the conduct of national geothermal-resource assessments. The principal users of GEOTHERM are those involved with the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Information in the system is available to the public on request. ?? 1983.

  18. United States Geological Survey (USGS) Natural Hazards Response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Rynn; Jones, Brenda K.

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Natural Hazards Response is to ensure that the disaster response community has access to timely, accurate, and relevant geospatial products, imagery, and services during and after an emergency event. To accomplish this goal, products and services provided by the National Geospatial Program (NGP) and Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program serve as a geospatial framework for mapping activities of the emergency response community. Post-event imagery and analysis can provide important and timely information about the extent and severity of an event. USGS Natural Hazards Response will also support the coordination of remotely sensed data acquisitions, image distribution, and authoritative geospatial information production as required for use in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery operations.

  19. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    . ............................26 National Water-Quality Assessment Database.S. Geological Survey Data on Domestic Well Water Quality for the Centers for Disease Control's National.S. Geological Survey Data on Domestic Well Water Quality for the Centers for Disease Control's National

  20. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OPEN-FILE REPORT 98-188

    E-print Network

    domain (see Figure 16). The Graphical-User Interface for Argus Open Numerical Environments facilitates Addition of MOC3D Solute-Transport Model Capability to the U.S. Geological Survey MODFLOW-96 Graphical-User;Addition of MOC3D Solute-Transport Model Capability to the U.S. Geological Survey MODFLOW-96 Graphical-User

  1. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    (Denali National Park, Alaska). Dennis G. Dye, U.S. Geological Survey p. 140: "Another Day at the Office National Park, Alaska). Dennis G. Dye, U.S. Geological Survey Back cover: (Prince William Sound, Alaska--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  2. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    and quality in Shawnee Mission Lake, Johnson County, Kansas, 2006: U.S. Geological Survey ScientificU.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2007-Sediment Accumulation and Quality in Shawnee Mission Lake, Johnson County, Kansas, 2006 Shawnee Mission Lake Shawnee

  3. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2013­3012 June 2013 Prepared Alexandria Saline Bayou near Clarence Red River at Grand Ecore Bayou Pierre near Lake End Na-474 Na-487 10) Well for which hydrograph is shown and identifier (see fig. 4) U.S. Geological Survey surface

  4. 3D geological property modelling at TNO - Geological Survey of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljers, Denise; Schokker, Jeroen; Stafleu, Jan; Gunnink, Jan L.

    2013-04-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) defines digital geological models as predictions of both geometry and properties of the subsurface. In contrast to singular observations in boreholes and the projected information of traditional maps, models provide continuous representations of the subsurface built with all geological expertise available. The GSN systematically produces 3D models of the upper 500 m of the Netherlands. To date, we build and maintain two different types of nation-wide models: (1) layer-based models in which the subsurface is represented as a series of tops and bases of geological or hydrogeological units, and (2) voxel models in which the subsurface is subdivided in a regular grid of voxels. The models are quantitative and user-oriented, i.e. they are applicable for non-geologists in their own area of expertise. They are also stochastic in nature, which implies that model uncertainty can be quantified. GeoTOP is the latest generation of Dutch subsurface models at TNO - Geological Survey of the Netherlands. GeoTOP schematises the shallow subsurface in millions of voxels of 100 by 100 by 0.5 m up to a depth of 30-50 m, which is the main zone of current subsurface activity. The model provides estimates of lithostratigraphy and lithology (including grain-size classes), as well as physical and chemical parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity and chemical element concentrations. Modelling is performed per province using all available digital borehole descriptions, components of the layer-based DGM model and a context of geological maps created during the last few decades (e.g. 1:50,000 map sheets and channel belt mapping). An important component of the GeoTOP model workflow is that all digital borehole descriptions are stratigraphically interpreted using automated procedures. These procedures deliver a set of uniformly and consistently interpreted boreholes that are used in the subsequent modelling stages. GeoTOP provides a base for answering subsurface-related questions about, amongst others, groundwater management and infrastructural issues. Current applications include: • Modelling groundwater flow, using the architecture and sediment composition of glacially deformed sediments to assign hydraulic parameters. • Modelling solute transport, using the distribution of lithology and sand grain-size classes to assign hydraulic parameters. • Forecasting long-term (up to 200 y) land subsidence in the western part of the country, using the distribution of soft sediments (peat and clay) to model subsidence rates. • Constructing risk maps for surface water-groundwater interaction in a river-deepening project, based on the architecture and sediment composition of fluvial channel belts. Our models are disseminated free-of-charge through the DINO web portal (www.dinoloket.nl) in a number of ways, including in an on-line map viewer with the option to create vertical cross-sections through the models, and as a series of downloadable GIS products. In co-operation with INSIGHT Geologische Softwaresysteme GmbH, the freely downloadable Subsurface Viewer was recently added to the portal, allowing users to download and visualise the layer-based models as well as GeoTOP on their desktop computers.

  5. Survey of bottled drinking water available in Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Pip, E

    2000-01-01

    Forty domestic and imported brands of bottled water were purchased in Manitoba, Canada and examined for total dissolved solids (TDS), chloride, sulfate, nitrate-nitrogen, cadmium, lead, copper, and radioactivity. The samples showed great variation in quality, and some exceeded the Canadian Water Quality Guidelines for drinking water for TDS, chloride, and lead. Carbonation, ozonation, and type of packaging were not associated with differences in metal levels, although carbonated samples tended to show higher TDS values. A number of deficiencies were found with respect to product labeling. PMID:11017891

  6. Survey of chronic pain practice by anesthesiologists in Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip W. H. Peng; Elkin D. Castano

    2005-01-01

    Purpose  To describe the pattern of chronic pain practice (CPP) among anesthesiologists in Canada.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Following hospital Ethics Committee approval, a detailed postal questionnaire was sent to all active members of the Canadian\\u000a Anesthesiologists’ Society. A second mailing was conducted two months later.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  The overall response rate was 53%. While 38% of responding anesthesiologists were involved in CPP, in the majority of

  7. Aerial surveys vs hunting statistics to monitor deer density: the example of Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    Aerial surveys vs hunting statistics to monitor deer density: the example of Anticosti Island, Que to monitor deer density: the example of An- ticosti Island, Que´bec, Canada. - Wildl. Biol. 13: 321 harvesting strategies, a good under- standing of deer population dynamics and reliable estimates of popula

  8. Serologic Survey for Viral and Bacterial Infections in Western Populations of Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roman Biek; Randall L. Zarnke; Colin Gillin; Margaret Wild; John R. Squires; Mary Poss

    2002-01-01

    A serologic survey for exposure to pathogens in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis )i n western North America was conducted. Sam- ples from 215 lynx from six study areas were tested for antibodies to feline parvovirus (FPV), feline coronavirus, canine distemper virus, fe- line calicivirus, feline herpesvirus, Yersinia pes- tis, and Francisella tularensis. A subset of sam- ples was tested for

  9. A MORBILLIVIRUS ANTIBODY SURVEY OF ATLANTIC WALRUS, NARWHAL AND BELUGA IN CANADA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ole Nielsen; Robert E. A. Stewart; Lena Measures; Padraig Duignan; Carol House

    2000-01-01

    A longitudinal serologic survey was conducted for morbillivirus antibodies in Atlantic walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus), narwhal (Monodon monoceros), and beluga (Delphi- napterus leucas) from the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the St. Lawrence estuary (Canada). Sixty-five of 131 (50%) walruses sampled between 1984 and 1993 had detectable morbillivirus neutralizing antibodies. Positive walrus were identified from four of five Arctic sampling sites,

  10. Instructions to rain-fall observers of U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1889-01-01

    In the prosecution of the general "survey of the arid lands for purposes of irrigation," authorized by Congress to be undertaken by the U. S. Geological Survey, a determination of the amount of water supplied by the natural rain and snow fall in different localities is of fundamental importance. To obtain this knowledge the Geological Survey must depend in large measure upon the residents, to whom the benefit of the work will accrue, for their voluntary cooperation in making; the necessary observations.

  11. A Survey of Secondary Pupils: Their Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Canada = Sondage Portant Sur Les Connaissances et les Attitudes Des Eleves du Scondaire Relativement au Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Kristian J.; And Others

    This survey examines the level of general knowledge and attitudes of 12th grade students toward Canada. A sample of 3,230 English- and French-speaking students drawn from a selection of Canadian public schools were administered a two-part survey. The first part, containing statements designed to elicit student opinions and feelings about issues…

  12. SGA, the Geological Survey of Sweden and the Nordic mining industry invite you to the 12th SGA Biennial Meeting

    E-print Network

    Flener, Pierre

    ­ the Department of Earth Sciences at Uppsala University and at the Geological Survey of Sweden. The officialSGA, the Geological Survey of Sweden and the Nordic mining industry invite you to the 12th SGA organizing committee, Head of department, Geological Survey of Sweden. Invitation The Grängesberg mining

  13. A Survey of Educational Acceleration Practices in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanevsky, Lannie

    2011-01-01

    A nationwide survey of Canadian school districts was undertaken to determine the extent to which 18 forms of acceleration were permitted and practiced. Of the high enrollment provinces, BC school districts' participation rates were highest in the most types of acceleration. A surprising number of districts did not allow some forms of acceleration.…

  14. The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site includes materials on geology, coal and petroleum resources, industrial minerals, geologic hazards, ground water, topographic and geologic maps, education, and earth science. Teacher education materials include rock camps and telecourses. Special features include popular geology pages and frequently-asked-questions about geology and resources; updates about new museum specimens, flood and landslide information for homeowners, documents on mountaintop removal mining materials, and coal resource and mapping project information. Consultations, maps, publications, selected database items, and copies of documents are available at modest cost.

  15. Survey of bisphenol A in bottled water products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Corriveau, Jeannette

    2008-01-01

    A method based on isotope dilution headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to assess levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in 56 samples of bottled water products sold in Canada. Levels of BPA in samples of all 51 non-polycarbonate (PC) bottled water products were lower than the method detection limit (0.50 µg l(-1)). Levels of BPA in most bottled water products in PC carboys were low, ranging from <0.50 to 1.4 µg l(-1) with an average of 0.75 µg l(-1). However, BPA was detected at levels of 8.8 and 6.5 µg l(-1) in two bottles of the bottled water products in PC carboys from the same product analysed over a 5-week period, likely due to accidental or careless exposure of the products to heat (e.g. under the sun) during storage and/or transportation for extended periods of time. PMID:24784814

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STREAMGAGING NETWORK.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Arthur G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the first 3 years of a 5-year cost-effectiveness study of the U. S. Geological Survey streamgaging network. The objective of the study is to define and document the most cost-effective means of furnishing streamflow information. In the first step of this study, data uses were identified for 3,493 continuous-record stations currently being operated in 32 States. In the second step, evaluation of alternative methods of providing streamflow information, flow-routing models, and regression models were developed for estimating daily flows at 251 stations of the 3,493 stations analyzed. In the third step of the analysis, relationships were developed between the accuracy of the streamflow records and the operating budget. The existing streamgaging networks in four Districts were further analyzed to determine the impacts that satellite telemetry would have on the cost effectiveness. Satellite telemetry was not found to be cost effective on the basis of hydrologic-data collection alone, given present cost of equipment and operation.

  17. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    by David L. Nelms, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Ground-Water Resources Program National Cooperative Geologic M. Yager, Scott Southworth, and Clifford I. Voss Scientific Investigations Report 2008­5002 U this report. Suggested citation: Yager, R.M., Southworth, Scott, and Voss, C.I., 2008, Simulation of ground

  18. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Prepared in Cooperation with the NATIONAL Prepared in cooperation with the NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Scientific Investigations Report 2004­5146 U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Field logistics

  19. Chapter 6: the US Geological Survey program and plans in the EEZ

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peck

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogeology programs of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the United States are reviewed. Mineral deposits in the sea floor and offshore energy sources such as oil and natural gas are discussed.

  20. The Canada-UK Deep Submillimetre Survey - VIII. Source identifications in the 3-hour field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dave Clements; Steve Eales; Kris Wojciechowski; Tracy Webb; Simon Lilly; Loretta Dunne; Rob Ivison; Henry McCracken; Min Yun; Ashley James; Mark Brodwin; Olivier Le Fèvre; Walter Gear

    2004-01-01

    We present optical, near-infrared (IR) and radio observations of the 3-hour field of the Canada-UK Deep Submillimetre Survey (CUDSS). Of the 27 submillimetre sources in the field, nine have secure identifications with either a radio source or a near-IR source. We show that the percentage of sources with secure identifications in the CUDSS is consistent with that found for the

  1. The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Imaging Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. II. Clustering Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ron Wurtz; John T. Stocke; E. Ellingson; H. K. C. Yee

    1997-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging survey of BL Lac objects conducted at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6 m Telescope (CFHT) are presented. This paper details the results pertinent to the clustering environments of BL Lacs; a companion paper (Wurtz, Stocke, & Yee) presented results on the host galaxies of BL Lacs obtained from the same Gunn r-band images. The clustering environments

  2. Oilspill risk analysis model of the US Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Slack, J.R.; Wyant, T.; Lanfear, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed an oilspill risk analysis model to aid in estimating the environmetal hazards of developing oil resources in Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease areas. The large, computerized model analyzes the probability of spill occurrence, as well as the likely paths or trajectories of spills in relation to the locations of recreational and biological resources which may be vulnerable. The analytical methodology can easily incorporate estimates of weathering rates, slick dispersion, and possible mitigating effects of cleanup. The probability of spill occurrence is estimated from information on the anticipated level of oil production and method and route of transport. Spill movement is modeled in Monte Carlo fashion with a sample of 500 spills per season, each transported by monthly surface-current vectors and wind velocities sampled from 3-hour wind-transition matrices. Transition matrices are baesd on historic wind records grouped in 41 wind velocity classes, and are constructed seasonally for up to six wind stations. Locations and monthly vulnerabilities of up to 31 categories of environmental resources are digitized within an 800,000 km/sup 2/ study area. Model output includes tables of conditional impact probabilities as well as probability distributions for oilspills occurring and contacting environmental resources within preselected vulnerability time horizons. The model provides the US Department of the Interior with a method for realistically assessing oilspill risks associated with OCS development. To date, it has been used in oilspill risk assessments for eight OCS lease sales with the results reported in Federal environmental impact statements. A sumary of results is presented herein. A real time version was also used to forecast the movement of oil from the 1976-1977 Argo Merchant oilspill. Additional model runs are planned for future OCS lease sales in frontier areas. 35 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

  3. The U.S. Geological Survey's Global Visualization Viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanter, K. M.

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) AmericaView program was created to advance the availability, timely distribution, and widespread use of land remote sensing data, especially in the university community. One of the obstacles that researchers encountered in the past was the difficulty of identifying and acquiring the most appropriate data for their particular application and study area. The AmericaView program funded the development of the Global Visualization (GloVis) Viewer to overcome this barrier. GloVis provides a browse image-based search capability for mining the data inventories held at the USGS Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The holdings include land remote sensing data from the Landsat, Earth Observing-1 (EO-1), Terra, and Aqua satellites. GloVis is updated daily with browse images and metadata. A global locator map is used to navigate through a mosaic of browse images that are available for the selected sensor and acquisition period. Users can readily view current or historical browse images at global or regional scales, or zoom in and view single images. The ability to visually browse image content and extent enables interested users to geographically and temporally scroll through the image archives. GloVis fulfilled the goal of providing a visual data selection tool that allows a user to quickly and accurately be able to locate and order the optimum data for their research needs. In addition, the software code for the system is freely available, and other organizations have adapted it to create similar visual web-based tools to access their own remote sensing data archives.

  4. Geological assessing of urban environments with a systematic mapping survey: The 1:5000 urban geological map of Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilà, Miquel; Pi, Roser; Cirés, Jordi; de Paz, Ana; Berástegui, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    The ground features of urban areas and the geologic processes that operate on them are, in general, strongly altered from their natural original condition as a result of anthropogenic activities. Assessing the stability of the ground, the flooding areas, and, the health risk as a consequence of soil pollution, are, among others, fundamental topics of urban areas that require a better understanding. The development of systematic urban geological mapping projects provides valuable resources to address these issues. Since 2007, the Institut Geologic de Catalunya (IGC) runs an urban geological mapping project, to provide accurate geologic information of county capitals and towns of more than 10000 inhabitants of Catalonia. The urban zones of 131 towns will be surveyed for this project, totalizing an area of about 2200 km2 to be mapped in 15 years. According to the 2008 census, the 82 % of the population of Catalonia (7.242.458 inhabitants) lives in the areas to be mapped in this project. The mapping project integrates in a GIS environment the following subjects: - Data from pre-existing geotechnical reports, historical geological and topographical maps and, from historical aerial photographs. - Data from available borehole databases. - Geological characterization of outcrops inside the urban network and neighbouring areas. - Geological, chemical and physical characterisation of representative rocks, sediments and soils. - Ortophotographs (0.5 m pixel size) and digital elevation models (5 meter grid size) made from historical aerial photographs, to depict land use changes, artificial deposits and geomorphological elements that are either hidden or destroyed by urban sprawl. - Detailed geological mapping of quaternary sediments, subsurface bedrock and artificial deposits. - Data from subsurface prospection in areas with insufficient or confuse data. - 3D modelling of the main geological surfaces such as the top of the pre-quaternary basement. All the gathered data is harmonised and stored it in a database. The analysis of the database allows to compile and print the 1:5000 scale urban geological map according to the 1:5000 topographic grid of Catalonia. The map is composed by a principal map, geologic cross sections and several complementary maps, charts and tables. Regardless of the geological map units, the principal map also includes the main artificial deposits (such as infilled river valleys and road embankments), very recent or current superficial deposits, contours of outcropping areas, structural data and other relevant information gathered in stations, sampling points, boreholes indicating the thickness of artificial deposits and the depth of the pre-quaternary basement, contour lines of the top of the pre-quaternary basement surface and, water level data. The complementary maps and charts may change depending on the gathered data, the geological features of the area and the urban typology. However, the most representative complementary maps that includes the printed urban map are the quaternary subsurface bedrock map and the isopach map of thickness of quaternary and anthropogenic deposits. The map also includes charts and tables of relevant physical and chemical parameters of the geological materials, harmonised downhole lithological columns from selected boreholes, and, photographs and figures illustrating the geology of the mapped area and how urbanisation has changed the natural environment. The object of this systematic urban mapping survey is to provide a robust database to be used in targeted studies related to urban planning, geoengineering works, soil pollution and other important environmental issues that society should deal in the future.

  5. Beowulf Distributed Processing and the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddox, Brian G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Discipline (NMD) has expanded its scientific and research activities. Work is being conducted in areas such as emergency response research, scientific visualization, urban prediction, and other simulation activities. Custom-produced digital data have become essential for these types of activities. High-resolution, remotely sensed datasets are also seeing increased use. Unfortunately, the NMD is also finding that it lacks the resources required to perform some of these activities. Many of these projects require large amounts of computer processing resources. Complex urban-prediction simulations, for example, involve large amounts of processor-intensive calculations on large amounts of input data. This project was undertaken to learn and understand the concepts of distributed processing. Experience was needed in developing these types of applications. The idea was that this type of technology could significantly aid the needs of the NMD scientific and research programs. Porting a numerically intensive application currently being used by an NMD science program to run in a distributed fashion would demonstrate the usefulness of this technology. There are several benefits that this type of technology can bring to the USGS's research programs. Projects can be performed that were previously impossible due to a lack of computing resources. Other projects can be performed on a larger scale than previously possible. For example, distributed processing can enable urban dynamics research to perform simulations on larger areas without making huge sacrifices in resolution. The processing can also be done in a more reasonable amount of time than with traditional single-threaded methods (a scaled version of Chester County, Pennsylvania, took about fifty days to finish its first calibration phase with a single-threaded program). This paper has several goals regarding distributed processing technology. It will describe the benefits of the technology. Real data about a distributed application will be presented as an example of the benefits that this technology can bring to USGS scientific programs. Finally, some of the issues with distributed processing that relate to USGS work will be discussed.

  6. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-B: Geology, Information Systems and Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A symposium was conducted on the practical applications of earth resources survey technology including utilization and results of data from programs involving LANDSAT, the Skylab earth resources experiment package, and aircraft. Topics discussed include geological structure, landform surveys, energy and extractive resources, and information systems and services.

  7. The use of U.S. Geological Survey CD-ROM-based petroleum assessments in undergraduate geology laboratories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eves, R.L.; Davis, L.E.; Dyman, T.S.; Takahashi, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    Domestic oil production is declining and United States reliance on imported oil is increasing. America will be faced with difficult decisions that address the strategic, economic, and political consequences of its energy resources shortage. The geologically literate under-graduate student needs to be aware of current and future United States energy issues. The U.S. Geological Survey periodically provides energy assessment data via digitally-formatted CD-ROM publications. These publications are free to the public, and are well suited for use in undergraduate geology curricula. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources (Digital Data Series or DDS-30) (Gautier and others, 1996) is an excellent resource for introducing students to the strategies of hydrocarbon exploration and for developing skills in problem-solving and evaluating real data. This paper introduces the reader to DDS-30, summarizes the essential terminology and methodology of hydrocarbon assessment, and offers examples of exercises or questions that might be used in the introductory classroom. The USGS contact point for obtaining DDS-30 and other digital assessment volumes is also provided. Completing the sample exercises in this report requires a copy of DDS-30.

  8. Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, L.G.; Brackett, R.D.; Floyd, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the survey was to investigate mining methods, equipment requirements, operating costs, reclamation procedures and costs, and other aspects of current surface mining practices in order to acquire basic data for a study comparing conventional and terrace pit mining methods, particularly in deeper overburdens. The survey was conducted as part of a project under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023 titled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  9. Yellowstone in Yukon: The Late Cretaceous Carmacks Group Stephen T. Johnston* Canada/Yukon Geoscience Office, Box 2703 (F-3), Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6, Canada

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    mineralization. The lavas are shoshonites, enriched in large ion lithophile and light rare earth elements/Yukon Geoscience Office, Box 2703 (F-3), Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6, Canada P. Jane Wynne Geological Survey of Canada, 9860 West Saanich Road, P.O. Box 6000, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada Don Francis Earth

  10. Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms in the context of the region’s geologic history. This chapter is based on the information in the geology data package for the SST waste management areas and SST RFI Appendix E, which builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  11. Quaternary geologic map of the Ottawa 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Gadd, N. R., (compiler); Veillette, J.J.; Wagner, P.W.; Chapman, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Ottawa 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  12. 37 New T-type Brown Dwarfs in the Canada-France Brown Dwarfs Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Loïc; Artigau, Étienne; Delorme, Philippe; Reylé, Céline; Forveille, Thierry; Delfosse, Xavier; Willott, Chris J.

    2011-06-01

    The Canada-France Brown Dwarfs Survey is an i'- and z'-band survey realized with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope that covers a surface area of 780 deg2. Image analysis is now completed while J-band follow-up campaigns are ~90% done. The survey identified about 70 T dwarf candidates, of which 43 now have near-infrared spectra obtained with NIRI and GNIRS at Gemini and ISAAC at the Very Large Telescope. Six of these were previously published and we present here the 37 new discoveries, all T dwarfs. They range from T0 to T8.5 with four being of type T7 or later. Both newly identified T8 dwarfs are possibly high log (g) massive brown dwarfs of thin disk age. One T4.5 dwarf shows signs of sub-metallicity. We present proper motions and near-infrared photometry, and discuss about the most peculiar/interesting objects in some details.

  13. Resolution versus Speckle Relative to Geologic Interpretability of Spaceborne Radar Images: A Survey of User Preference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Ford

    1982-01-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate user preference for resolution versus speckle relative to the geologic interpretability of spaceborne radar images. Thirteen different resolution\\/looks combinations were simulated from Seasat synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data of each of three test sites. The SAR images were distributed with questionnarires for analysis by eighty-five earth scientists. The relative discriminability of geologic targets at each

  14. Integration of 3D geological modeling and gravity surveys for geothermal prospection in an Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmetti, L.; Comina, C.; Abdelfettah, Y.; Schill, E.; Mandrone, G.

    2013-11-01

    Thermal sources are common manifestations of geothermal energy resources in Alpine regions. The up-flow of the fluid is well-known to be often linked to cross-cutting fault zones providing a significant volume of fractures. Since conventional exploration methods are challenging in such areas of high topography and complicated logistics, 3D geological modeling based on structural investigation becomes a useful tool for assessing the overall geology of the investigated sites. Geological modeling alone is, however, less effective if not integrated with deep subsurface investigations that could provide a first order information on geological boundaries and an imaging of geological structures. With this aim, in the present paper the combined use of 3D geological modeling and gravity surveys for geothermal prospection of a hydrothermal area in the western Alps was carried out on two sites located in the Argentera Massif (NW Italy). The geothermal activity of the area is revealed by thermal anomalies with surface evidences, such as hot springs, at temperatures up to 70 °C. Integration of gravity measurements and 3D modeling investigates the potential of this approach in the context of geothermal exploration in Alpine regions where a very complex geological and structural setting is expected. The approach used in the present work is based on the comparison between the observed gravity and the gravity effect of the 3D geological models, in order to enhance local effects related to the geothermal system. It is shown that a correct integration of 3D modeling and detailed geophysical survey could allow a better characterization of geological structures involved in geothermal fluids circulation. Particularly, gravity inversions have successfully delineated the continuity in depth of low density structures, such as faults and fractured bands observed at the surface, and have been of great help in improving the overall geological model.

  15. Uncertainty in mapped geological boundaries held by a national geological survey:eliciting the geologists' tacit error model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, R. M.; Lawley, R. S.; Barron, A. J. M.; Aldiss, D. T.; Ambrose, K.; Cooper, A. H.; Lee, J. R.; Waters, C. N.

    2015-06-01

    It is generally accepted that geological line work, such as mapped boundaries, are uncertain for various reasons. It is difficult to quantify this uncertainty directly, because the investigation of error in a boundary at a single location may be costly and time consuming, and many such observations are needed to estimate an uncertainty model with confidence. However, it is recognized across many disciplines that experts generally have a tacit model of the uncertainty of information that they produce (interpretations, diagnoses, etc.) and formal methods exist to extract this model in usable form by elicitation. In this paper we report a trial in which uncertainty models for geological boundaries mapped by geologists of the British Geological Survey (BGS) in six geological scenarios were elicited from a group of five experienced BGS geologists. In five cases a consensus distribution was obtained, which reflected both the initial individually elicited distribution and a structured process of group discussion in which individuals revised their opinions. In a sixth case a consensus was not reached. This concerned a boundary between superficial deposits where the geometry of the contact is hard to visualize. The trial showed that the geologists' tacit model of uncertainty in mapped boundaries reflects factors in addition to the cartographic error usually treated by buffering line work or in written guidance on its application. It suggests that further application of elicitation, to scenarios at an appropriate level of generalization, could be useful to provide working error models for the application and interpretation of line work.

  16. The Geologic Story of Canyonlands National Park. Geological Survey Bulletin 1327.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, S. W.

    In 1964, Canyonlands was established as the 32nd U.S. national park, covering 400 square miles at the junction of the Green and Colorado Rivers in Utah. This booklet gives the early history of the area, a summary of the geologic history of the park, and a description of the high mesas, benchlands, and canyons. There are 81 illustrations including…

  17. U.S. Geological Survey reports on the water resources of Florida, 1886-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, N.D.; Simmons, James D.; Claiborne, Maude

    1981-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has released a listing of its reports on water resources in Florida for the period 1886-1980. Most of the reports contained in the listing were prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with numerous public agencies in Florida. The compilation has a full bibliographic list of reports, arranged alphabetically by senior author. In addition, the reports are indexed by geographic areas and by subject. Only two lines are used for each entry in the indexed portions, the complete reference being given only in the bibliographic list. (USGS)

  18. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL REAL-TIME HYDROLOGIC INFORMATION SYSTEM USING GOES SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shope, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey maintains the basic hydrologic data collection system for the United States. The Survey is upgrading the collection system with electronic communications technologies that acquire, telemeter, process, and disseminate hydrologic data in near real-time. These technologies include satellite communications via the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Data Collection Platforms in operation at over 1400 Survey gaging stations, Direct-Readout Ground Stations at nine Survey District Offices and a network of powerful minicomputers that allows data to be processed and disseminate quickly.

  19. Geologic Survey of the Ewing Bank, Northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Daniel M

    2014-04-04

    basic knowledge about the geology of this bank and to help other scientists better understand its role as a biological habitat due to a high number of whale sharks that have been observed in the area (Hoffmayer, 2011). It is through the collection... at the seafloor along edge of the continental shelf and upper continental slope are the surface expression of the movement of allochthonous salt within the seabed. The salt features have over time pushed up through over laying sediments and created dome...

  20. U.S. Geological Survey: Science in Your State

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to a variety of scientific reference materials for the 50 states and some territories in the U.S. For each state, there is a section of real-time data that includes current stream flow conditions, drought and flood watches, ground water data, and current natural hazards information. A facts section provides basic geographic and demographic information such as land area, highest and lowest points, population, capital, and others. There is also a selection of links to maps and tools, and additional information on each state's geology, ecology, natural resources, and natural hazards.

  1. THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  2. The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey: Stacked Images and Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J.

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg2, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 × 106 sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg2 split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 × 107 sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a "Google Sky" interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  3. U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Science Quality and Integrity U.S. Geological Survey May 2011

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Science Quality and Integrity U.S. Geological Survey May, the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cooperative Summer Field number of these individuals becoming full-time employees of the USGS. The cooperative program

  4. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  5. The Global Seismographic Network The U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center reports on more than

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    The Global Seismographic Network The U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information, and characterizing events, providing alerts, maps of strong ground shaking, and impact estimates of potential was formed in 1986 as a partnership involving the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Science

  6. AFFILIATIONS: MCCABE AND HAY--U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado; CLARK--National Institute for Water and

    E-print Network

    AFFILIATIONS: MCCABE AND HAY--U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado; CLARK--National Institute.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, 412, Denver, CO 80225 E-mail: gmccabe@usgs.gov The abstract on a number of factors, and an overall decrease in these events appears to be driven, in part, by changes

  7. In Bangladesh, approximately 3040 million people (British Geological Survey 2001) have

    E-print Network

    van Geen, Alexander

    chronically exposed to high concentra- tions of naturally occurring arsenic in drinking water, supplied As standard of 10 µg/L and 53% exceed the Bangladesh standard of 50 µg/L; water As con- centrations rangedIn Bangladesh, approximately 30­40 million people (British Geological Survey 2001) have been

  8. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAMS AND INVESTIGATIONS RELATED TO SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. OSTERKAMP; J. R. GRAY

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics

  9. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-print Network

    in 1996. The recycling rate for aluminum UBC's increased slightly to 63.5%. TransportationU.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic primary aluminum production increased slightly in Logistics Agency to sell the entire inventory of aluminum metal

  10. U.S. Department of the Interior March 2014 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    . (Houston, TX). Nichols produced aluminum sheet products from recycled scrap for the building For information, contact: E. Lee Bray, Aluminum Commodity Specialist U.S. Geological Survey 989 National Center://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals ALUMINUM IN DECEMBER 2013 Domestic primary aluminum production in December 2013 was 154,000 metric tons (t

  11. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    in Interdisciplinary Ground-Water Science in the U.S. Geological Survey #12;Cover. Four images of different sections of the San Pedro River basin from a thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) used to calculate and Reflection Radiometer Science Team) #12;Research Opportunities in Interdisciplinary Ground-Water Science

  12. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    -- DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Assessment Team Go to Table of Contents Go......................................................................................................... AM-10 Figures Figure AM-1. Two-dimensional depiction of a petroleum resource pyramid. A given resource-assessment forecast span can be visualized as a slice through the resource pyramid at some quality

  13. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Fleskes, Joe

    on recycled paper White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that has killed millions of hibernating_ syndrome/index.jsp. National Wildlife Health Center White-Nose Syndrome in Bats: U.S. Geological Survey on hibernating bats (Lorch and others, 2011). To determine if bats are affected by white-nose syndrome

  14. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    .S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY and the U.S. FOREST SERVICE--OUR VOLCANIC PUBLIC LANDS Mount St. Helens, 1980 to Now The spectacular 1980 eruption at Mount St. Helens opened a new episode in the volcano's history that began more the volcano. Scientists are keeping a close watch on Mount St. Helens and the other Cascade volcanoes

  15. Fish Health, Fungal Infections, and Pfiesteria: The Role of the U.S. Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Blazer, Vicki

    This United States Geological Survey article describes the work currently being done to understand the relation between Pfiesteria and other pathogens to fish and human health in the Chesapeake Bay and other Mid-Atlantic estuaries. It also discusses natural and man-induced factors (such as nutrients and sediment), as well as future issues and management implications.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Aids Federal Agencies in ObtainingCommercial Satellite and Aerial Imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a leading U.S. Federal civil agency in the implementation of the civil aspects of the Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy (CRSSP). The USGS is responsible for collecting inter-agency near-term requirements, establishing an operational infrastructure, and supporting the policy and other Federal agencies.

  17. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    ­5128 Submarine Ground-Water Discharge and Fate Along the Coast of Kaloko-Honoko¯hau National Historical Park. #12;Submarine Ground-Water Discharge and Fate Along the Coast of Kaloko-Honoko¯hau National Historical Mark D. Myers, Director U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia: 2008 This report and any updates

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 20072017 Facing Tomorrow's Challenges--

    E-print Network

    ..............................................................13 Energy and Minerals for America's Future: Providing a Scientific Foundation for Resource Security For sale by U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services Box 25286, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 For more information about the USGS and its products: Telephone: 1-888-ASK-USGS World Wide Web: http

  19. Activities of the Alaska District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Elisabeth F.

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen projects of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resource Division active in Alaska in 1990 are described. Each description includes information on period of project, chief, funding sources, location, purpose, current status, and published or planned reports. The compilation also contains a bibliography of reports published by the Alaska District from 1987 through January 1990. (USGS)

  20. Activities of the Alaska District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, E. F., (compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic data collection activities by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska are described. Seventeen projects were active in 1987. Each description includes information on period of project, project chief, funding sources, location, purpose, current status, and published or planned reports. The compilation also contains a bibliography of reports published by the Alaska District from 1984 through 1986. (USGS)

  1. U.S. Geological Survey New Hampshire-Vermont Water Science Center

    E-print Network

    . The Science Plan was prepared by the management staff of the WSC and was based on the mission of the USGS Hampshire-Vermont Water Science Center offices. The Mission of the USGS is to serve the Nation by providingU.S. Geological Survey New Hampshire-Vermont Water Science Center Strategic Science Plan, 2007

  2. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    Science Systems--Mission OverviewCore Science Systems--Mission Overview The Core Science Systems Mission research and data that underpins all Mission Areas of the USGS, the USGS Science Strategy, and Presidential.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Core Science Systems (CSS) Mission Area spans the Earth's "Critical Zone" (National

  3. A U.S. Geological Survey marker embedded in the northeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A U.S. Geological Survey marker embedded in the northeast corner of concrete abutment. This view also shows the basic abutment and tower footing arrangement. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  4. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia #12;#12;Effects of Including Surface Depressions in the Application of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia By Roland J. Viger, Lauren E. Hay-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations

  5. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    .S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations. USGS computers convert the water-level data into informa- tion about to 4 hours. During high water or other emergency situations, data will be sent to the satellite every Publishing Service Center For additional information, contact Director, USGS Texas Water Science Center World

  6. Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1975. Geological Survey Circular 765.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, C. Richard; Reeves, E. Bodette

    The United States Geological Survey has compiled data on water use in this country every fifth year since 1950. This document is the most recent of this series and presents data on water withdrawn for use in the United States in 1975. In the introduction, recent and present water use studies are discussed along with a description of the…

  7. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    the Endangered Species Act since 1999. The USGS partnered with western state wildlife agencies to produce U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Photo byTerry Steele Fact Sheet 2005 species · Wetland ecology · Landscape ecology · Wildlife biology the habitat use and migratory patterns

  8. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    of U.S. Forest and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon Sequestration Capacity #12 and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon Sequestration Capacity By Eric T. Sundquist,1 carbon sequestration capacity: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2009­1283, 15 p., available

  9. US Geological Survey, Great Smokies Field Station, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Gatlinburg, TN 37738. 2

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    1 US Geological Survey, Great Smokies Field Station, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Gatlinburg, TN, Washington, DC 20013-7012. 3 Department of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47904. 4). In addition, much of the south side of GSMNP borders Fontana Lake, a large Tennessee 159 The Great Smoky

  10. EVALUATION OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LABORATORY, DENVER, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    An onsite evaluation was made of the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory at Denver, Colorado. Particular emphasis was placed on determining their ability to meet the monitoring requirements connected with their contractual efforts with the U.S. Environmental Pro...

  11. Maps published of Antarctica by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1977-01-01

    The Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Science Foundation prepares and publishes topographic maps of selected areas of Antarctica needed to support the U.S. Antarctic Research Program (USARP) efforts. These maps are prepared from aerial photography flown by U.S. Navy Air Development Squadron Six (VXE-6) in accordance with USGS specifications.

  12. UNITED STATES STREAMFLOW DATA FROM US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STREAM-GAGING STATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stream-gaging program provides streamflow data for a variety of purposes that range from current needs, such as flood forecasting, to future or long-term needs, such as detection of changes in streamflow due to human activities or global warming....

  13. The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units as Online and Linked Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, T.

    2012-12-01

    The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units provides freely accessible definitions and supplementary information about geological units of Great Britain, Northern Ireland, and their associated continental shelf. It is an online database that can be searched at www.bgs.ac.uk/Lexicon/. It has existed since 1990 (under different names) but the database and user interface have recently been completely redesigned to improve their semantic capabilities and suitability for describing different styles of geology. The data are also now freely available as linked data from data.bgs.ac.uk/. The Lexicon of Named Rock Units serves two purposes. First, it is a dictionary, defining and constraining the geological units that are referenced in the Survey's data sets, workflows, products and services. These can include printed and digital geological maps at a variety of scales, reports, books and memoirs, and 3- and 4-dimensional geological models. All geological units referenced in any of these must first be present and defined, at least to a basic level of completeness, in the Lexicon database. Only then do they become available for use. The second purpose of the Lexicon is as a repository of knowledge about the geology of the UK and its continental shelf, providing authoritative descriptions written and checked by BGS geoscientists. Geological units are assigned to one of four themes: bedrock, superficial, mass movement and artificial. They are further assigned to one of nine classes: lithostratigraphical, lithodemic intrusive, lithodemic tectono-metamorphic, lithodemic mixed, litho-morpho-genetic, man-made, age-based, composite, and miscellaneous. The combination of theme and class controls the fields that are available to describe each geological unit, so that appropriate fields are offered for each, whether it is a Precambrian tectono-metamorphic complex, a Devonian sandstone formation, or a Devensian river terrace deposit. Information that may be recorded about each unit includes its rank, parentage, previous and alternative names and usage, geochronological age, lithology, environment of deposition / mode of origin, thickness, boundaries, type and reference localities and sections, geographical distribution, associated landforms, and literature references. BGS geoscientists use a web-based 'sandbox' system to write and revise definitions. The Lexicon currently stores information on approximately 13,400 geological units that BGS considers to be 'current', with cross references to some 6,000 other names that are considered to be obsolete or alternative names. The entries span the entire preserved geological history of the UK from Archaean to Recent, onshore and offshore.

  14. Boundary|Time|Surface: Art and Geology Meet in Gros Morne National Park, NL, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Sydney; Waldron, John

    2015-04-01

    Environmental Art works range in scope from major permanent interventions in the landscape to less intrusive, more ephemeral site-specific installations constructed of materials from the local environment. Despite this range of intervention, however, these works all share in a tradition of art making that situates the artwork in direct response to the surrounding landscape. Andy Goldsworthy and Richard Long, for example, both favour methods that combine elements of both sculpture and performance in the creation of non-permanent interventions in the landscape, and both rely upon photographic, text-based, or video documentation as the only lasting indication of the works' existence. Similarly, Earth Scientists are responsible for interventions in the landscape, both physical and conceptual. For example, in Earth science, the periods of the geologic timescale - Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, etc. - were established by 19th century pioneers of geology at a time when they were believed to represent natural chapters in Earth history. Since the mid-20th century, stratigraphers have attempted to resolve ambiguities in the original definitions by defining stratotypes: sections of continuously deposited strata where a single horizon is chosen as a boundary. One such international stratotype, marking the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary, is defined at Green Point in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland. Boundary|Time|Surface was an ephemeral sculptural installation work constructed in June 2014. The main installation work was a fence of 52 vertical driftwood poles, 2-3 m tall, positioned precisely along the boundary stratotype horizon at Green Point in Newfoundland. The fence extended across a 150 m wave-cut platform from sea cliffs to the low-water mark, separating Ordovician from Cambrian strata. The installation was constructed by hand (with volunteer assistance) on June 22, as the wave-cut platform was exposed by the falling tide. During the remainder of the tidal cycle, and the following days, we allowed the fence to be dismantled by wave action and the incoming flood tide. The cycle of construction and destruction was documented in video and with time-lapse still photography. This project provided an opportunity for viewers to contemplate the brevity of human experience relative to the enormity of time, and the fragile and arbitrary nature of human-defined boundaries of all types. Future exhibitions of the documentation of this work are envisaged, which will provide opportunities for the public to interact with still and video images of the work directly, both as aesthetic objects and as sources of information regarding the geological and socio-political history of the site.

  15. The Black Mountain tectonic zone--a reactivated northeast-trending crustal shear zone in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska: Chapter D in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Day, Warren C.; Alienikoff, John N.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The Black Mountain tectonic zone in the YukonTanana terrane of east-central Alaska is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can been traced across Black Mountain in the southeast corner of the Big Delta 1°×3° degree quadrangle. Geologic mapping in the larger scale B1 quadrangle of the Big Delta quadrangle, in which Black Mountain is the principal physiographic feature, has revealed a continuous zone of normal and left-lateral strikeslip high-angle faults and shear zones, some of which have late Tertiary to Quaternary displacement histories. The tectonic zone includes complexly intruded wall rocks and intermingled apophyses of the contiguous mid-Cretaceous Goodpaster and Mount Harper granodioritic plutons, mafic to intermediate composite dike swarms, precious metal mineralization, early Tertiary volcanic activity and Quaternary fault scarps. These structures define a zone as much as 6 to 13 kilometers (km) wide and more than 40 km long that can be traced diagonally across the B1 quadrangle into the adjacent Eagle 1°×3° quadrangle to the east. Recurrent activity along the tectonic zone, from at least mid-Cretaceous to Quaternary, suggests the presence of a buried, fundamental tectonic feature beneath the zone that has influenced the tectonic development of this part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The tectonic zone, centered on Black Mountain, lies directly above a profound northeast-trending aeromagnetic anomaly between the Denali and Tintina fault systems. The anomaly separates moderate to strongly magnetic terrane on the northwest from a huge, weakly magnetic terrane on the southeast. The tectonic zone is parallel to the similarly oriented left-lateral, strike-slip Shaw Creek fault zone 85 km to the west.

  16. Simulation models in petroleum geology: Applications to abnormally pressured basins in Indonesia and Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Maubeuge, F.

    1992-01-01

    Interpolation algorithms have been developed in order to visualize the evolution of the dynamic parameters in fluid-flow/compaction models (one and two dimensional), created by the Basin Analysis Group at USC. One of the major features of these graphics codes is the treatment of instantaneous faults, whether vertical or slant, in the two dimensional code. Both one dimensional and two dimensional fluid-flow/compaction codes have been applied in the study of two abnormally pressured basins: (1) a 5 million year old basin in Indonesia, which developed in a deltaic environment, and currently has an overpressured profile in strongly undercompacted shaly layers. Furthermore, the basin is controlled by a major growth fault system, whose behavior through time is examined and highlighted, according to the pressure data available, and (2) the Elmworth field, which is part of the Deep Basin in Western Canada, characterized by fluid pressure lower than hydrostatic in some of the Lower Cretaceous sandy formations. The two dimensional model (GEOPETII) succeeded in trapping gas in the deepest part of the basin, as appears to be the case in Elmworth thus simulating an unconventional hydrocarbon trap, which, in turn, is the cause of subnormal pressure occurrences.

  17. Topographic and hydrographic GIS datasets for the Afghan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2013 mineral areas of interest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casey, Brittany N.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Afghanistan is endowed with a vast amount of mineral resources, and it is believed that the current economic state of the country could be greatly improved through investment in the extraction and production of these resources. In 2007, the “Preliminary Non-Fuel Resource Assessment of Afghanistan 2007” was completed by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and Afghan Geological Survey (Peters and others, 2007). The assessment delineated 20 mineralized areas for further study using a geologic-based methodology. In 2011, a follow-on data product, “Summaries and Data Packages of Important Areas for Mineral Investment and Production Opportunities of Nonfuel Minerals in Afghanistan,” was released (Peters and others, 2011). As part of this more recent work, geologic, geohydrologic, and hyperspectral studies were carried out in the areas of interest (AOIs) to assess the location and characteristics of the mineral resources. The 2011 publication included a dataset of 24 identified AOIs containing subareas, a corresponding digital elevation model (DEM), elevation contours, areal extent, and hydrography for each AOI. In 2012, project scientists identified five new AOIs and two subareas in Afghanistan. These new areas are Ahankashan, Kandahar, Parwan, North Bamyan, and South Bamyan. The two identified subareas include Obatu-Shela and Sekhab-ZamtoKalay, both located within the larger Kandahar AOI. In addition, an extended Kandahar AOI is included in the project for water resource modeling purposes. The dataset presented in this publication consists of the areal extent of the five new AOIs, two subareas, and the extended Kandahar AOI, elevation contours at 100-, 50-, and 25-meter intervals, an enhanced DEM, and a hydrographic dataset covering the extent of the new study area. The resulting raster and vector layers are intended for use by government agencies, developmental organizations, and private companies in Afghanistan to assist with mineral assessments, monitoring, management, and investment.

  18. Airborne magnetic survey for geological purposes in the USSR and Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebovsky, Yu. S.; Mishin, Alexey A.

    1993-11-01

    In 1991 it was 55 years since the application of airborne magnetic surveys on USSR territory, and 52 years since its practical usage at geological institutes. It is possible to outline three periods of such a survey. (1) 1936-55. In this period the magnetic field vertical component was measured with the use of an induction magnetometer developed by A.A. Logachev. The main features of this simple instrument is a half-ring collector, a type of suspension, a compensation mode of measuring with a semi-automatic analog recording, and so forth, and a special system of tuning enabling one to receive a root mean square error of the survey in the range of 50-200 nT. With the use of this magnetometer, the territory of 2,000,000 km2 was surveyed, a number of deposits were discovered ( Krasnokamensk iron-ore deposit in South Siberia in 1943 included), geological maps were refined, and in the period of 1948-49 the first survey in the Arctic (for geological zonation) was conducted.

  19. Extending the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey to the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, P.; Albert, L.; Artigau, E.; Forveille, T.; Delfosse, X.; Reylé, C.; Willott, C. J.; Bertin, E.; Allard, F.

    2011-07-01

    We present the first results of the Canada-France Brown Dwarfs Survey-InfraRed, hereafter CFBDSIR, our near infrared extension to the optical wide field survey CFBDS. Our final objectives are to constrain ultracool atmosphere physics by finding a statistically significant sample of objects cooler than 600K and to explore the ultracool brown dwarf mass function building on a well defined sample of such objects. We identify candidates in CFHT/Wircam J and CFHT/MegaCam z' images using optimized psf-fitting within Source Extractor, and follow them up with pointed near infrared imaging with SOFI at NTT. We have so far analysed and followed up all candidates on the first 66 square degrees of the 280 square degrees survey. We identified 64 T dwarfs candidates with z'- J > 3.5 and have confirmed 3 of them as ultracool brown dwarfs (later than T7 dwarfs and Y dwarfs candidates), and 14 of them as early and mid-T dwarfs based on their far red and NIR colours. We also present here the NIR spectra of one of these ultracool dwarfs, CFBDSIR1458 which confirms it as one of the coldest brown dwarf known, in the 500-600 K temperature range.

  20. Serologic survey for viral and bacterial infections in western populations of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Biek, Roman; Zarnke, Randall L; Gillin, Colin; Wild, Margaret; Squires, John R; Poss, Mary

    2002-10-01

    A serologic survey for exposure to pathogens in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in western North America was conducted. Samples from 215 lynx from six study areas were tested for antibodies to feline parvovirus (FPV), feline coronavirus, canine distemper virus, feline calicivirus, feline herpesvirus, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. A subset of samples was tested for feline immunodeficiency virus; all were negative. For all other pathogens, evidence for exposure was found in at least one location. Serologic evidence for FPV was found in all six areas but was more common in southern populations. Also, more males than females showed evidence of exposure to FPV. Overall, prevalences were low and did not exceed 8% for any of the pathogens tested. This suggests that free-ranging lynx rarely encounter common feline pathogens. PMID:12528455

  1. Interpretation of surgical neuromonitoring data in Canada: a survey of practising surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Jonathan A.; Aronyk, Keith E.; Hedden, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a specialized skill set performed in the operating room to reduce the risk of neurologic injury. There appears to be a shortage of qualified personnel and a lack of Canadian guidelines on the performance of the task. We distributed a web-based survey on the attitude of the surgeons to the interpretation of intraoperative neuromonitoring data among surgeons who use the technique. At present, most of the interpretation is performed by either technologists or by the surgeons themselves. Most surgeons would prefer professional oversight from a neurologist or neurophysiologist at the doctoral level. There is a lack of personnel in Canada with the appropriate training and expertise to interpret intraoperative neuromonitoring data. PMID:25799133

  2. Survey of bottled drinking waters sold in Canada for chlorate, bromide, bromate, lead, cadmium and other trace elements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Dabeka; H. B. S. Conacher; J. F. Lawrence; W. H. Newsome; A. McKenzie; H. P. Wagner; R. K. H. Chadha; K. Pepper

    2002-01-01

    Mineral, spring and other bottled drinking waters sold in Canada in the winter of 1995–96 were surveyed for chlorate, bromide, bromate, Cr(VI), Li, B, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, Be, V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Tl, Pb, Na, K, Ca and Mg. Chlorate and bromide were determined by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection,

  3. The geology and emplacement history of the Pigeon kimberlite, EKATI Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Barbara; Hetman, Casey; Nowicki, Tom; Baumgartner, Mike; Harrison, Sara

    2009-11-01

    The Pigeon kimberlite is located approximately 6 km to the northwest of the Koala cluster of the EKATI Diamond Mine, and is presently one of ten kimberlite occurrences in the EKATI resource development plan. It was emplaced along a regional lithological contact between syn-Yellowknife Supergroup granitoid rocks and Yellowknife Supergroup metasedimentary rocks that were covered by a now eroded veneer of poorly consolidated muddy sediments. Detailed age dating has not been undertaken, however the emplacement age is inferred from sedimentary xenoliths present within the pipe to range between 45-75 Ma. Pigeon is a small kimberlite body, estimated to be approximately 3.5 ha at surface, consisting of a steep-sided pipe that can be separated into four main geological domains that are characterized by contrasting textures, different diamond characteristics and unique mineral abundance and compositional signatures. The uppermost portion of the body consists of mud-rich resedimented volcaniclastic kimberlite that was formed by the deposition of extra crater deposits by debris flow type processes into an open diatreme. Texturally complex kimberlite is present within the lower portion of the kimberlite and includes rocks that display a range of features consistent with coherent (magmatic) and less common volcaniclastic (fragmental) rocks. This texturally complex zone is interpreted to represent a clastogenic deposit formed by a low energy eruption within an open diatreme.

  4. Geologic reservoir model for the Triassic Doig Formation, northeast British Columbia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Munroe, H.D. (International Geoscience Consulting Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1991-03-01

    A subsurface investigation of the mid-Triassic Doig formation in northeastern British Columbia documented two main reservoir facies. Both are a product of mass movement and sediment gravity flow processes on a progradational, tectonically active continental shelf margin. Substrate instability was likely a product of sediment loading, perhaps in concert with seismic activity. Sedimentary facies and reservoir parameters were determined from analysis of approximately 150 cores and 900 well logs. Laterally discontinuous Doig sandstones are up to 60 m thick and trend northeasterly within the study area. The main reservoir facies are incised density flow deposits and laterally extensive slump deposits. Reservoir quality within these sands is extremely variable with porosity ranging from less than 5% to 15%. In core, these deposits consist of moderately well sorted, very fine grained sandstones with no vertical grain size variation. The best production to date is in the Buick Creek field with initial flows of 346 BOPD. The slump deposits are thinner and tend to be more elongate parallel to paleoshoreline. These sands were subject to some wave or current reworking. Modern analogs where similar processes and products of deposition are known to occur include the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf and the Fraser River Delta slope. Doig sandstones usually are enclosed in fine-grained shelf deposits that provide a good stratigraphic trapping mechanism. Successful development of Doig reservoirs must incorporate geologic modes that assist in understanding the complex and highly variable reservoir quality of sandstones units.

  5. USArray - Seismic Reconnaissance in Northwest Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Spiers, K.; Murray, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    This poster describes the results of reconnaissance carried out by the Arctic Institute of North America in summer 2014 in collaboration with USArray and IRIS for deployment of the USArray in northern British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada. USArray is a 15-year program to place a dense network of permanent and portable seismographs across the continental United States and parts of Canada. The seismographs record local, regional, and distant (teleseismic) earthquakes. The array records seismic waves that propagate through finer and finer slices of the earth enabling scientists to link structures inherited from earlier stages of continental formation to known and potential geologic hazards (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides) (www.usarray.org). USArray deployment in Canada will complement existing Canadian seismic network(s). This project will be particularly significant in the St. Elias region of southwest Yukon, northwest British Columbia, and southeast Alaska as this one of the most seismically active areas and tectonically complex areas in Canada . The deployment will complement ongoing geological mapping carried out by both Yukon Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada and several universities. This reconnaissance work is part of a growing portfolio of research conducted by the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary designed to meet needs for information and enable synthesis and transfer of knowledge for problem solving and decision-making in the north.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey Science Support Strategy for Biscayne National Park and Surrounding Areas in Southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfert-Lohmann, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; Jones, Sonya A.; Reich, Chris D.; Wingard, Georgina L.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts a wide range of research in and around the Biscayne National Park region of southern Florida. This research encompasses the biologic, ecologic, meteorologic, geologic, and hydrologic components of the system, including water-quality analyses, ground-water modeling, hydrogeologic-data collection, ecologic-habitat evaluations, wetlands characterizations, biogeochemistry of ecosystems, and paleo-ecologic analyses. Relevant information is provided herein for researchers and managers interested in the Biscayne Bay area and about current U.S. Geological Survey efforts that address important resource protection and management issues. Specifically, managers and scientists are provided with information on current and recently completed U.S. Geological Survey projects and a sample listing of potential U.S. Geological Survey research projects addressing relevant issues that face the study area.

  7. COVER PHOTOGRAPH: Glaciers near Mount Shuksan and Nooksack Cirque, Washington. Photograph 86R1-054, taken on September 5, 1986, by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    E-print Network

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    By Andrew G. Fountain, Robert M. Krimme Dennis C. Trabant U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY CIRCULAR 1132 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BRUCE BABBITT, Secretary U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Gordon P. Eaton, Director The use. Fountain, Robert M. Krimmel, and Dennis C. Trabant. P. cm. -- (U.S. Geological Survey circular ;1132

  8. SAR in support of geological investigations of the Sudbury structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhroy, V.; Mussakowski, R.; Dressler, B. O.; Trowell, N. F.; Grieve, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar is an important contributing source of information for a range of geological problems and environments. Airborne SAR and ERS-1 data integrated with other geoscience datasets are being used in an attempt to characterize the crustal fracturing associated with the Sudbury structure. This presentation highlights examples of integrated and composite images aimed at facilitating the interpretation of the Sudbury structure. This work is the result of an ongoing cooperative multidisciplinary SAR study of the basin carried out by the Canada Center for Remote Sensing, Ontario's provincial Remote Sensing Office, the Ontario Geological Survey, and the Geological Survey of Canada.

  9. US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL SYSTEM FOR PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION OF NEAR REAL-TIME HYDROLOGICAL DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shope, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is utilizing a national network of more than 1000 satellite data-collection stations, four satellite-relay direct-readout ground stations, and more than 50 computers linked together in a private telecommunications network to acquire, process, and distribute hydrological data in near real-time. The four Survey offices operating a satellite direct-readout ground station provide near real-time hydrological data to computers located in other Survey offices through the Survey's Distributed Information System. The computerized distribution system permits automated data processing and distribution to be carried out in a timely manner under the control and operation of the Survey office responsible for the data-collection stations and for the dissemination of hydrological information to the water-data users.

  10. Mapping known and potential mineral occurrences and host rocks in the Bonnifield Mining District using minimal cloud- and snow-cover ASTER data: Chapter E in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Bernard E.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Rowan, Lawrence C.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    On July 8, 2003, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor acquired satellite imagery of a 60-kilometer-wide swath covering a portion of the Bonnifield mining district within the southernmost part of the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, under unusually favorable conditions of minimal cloud and snow cover. Although rocks from more than eight different lithotectonic terranes are exposed within the extended swath of data, we focus on volcanogenic massive sulfides (VMS) and porphyry deposits within the Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT), the largest Mesozoic accretionary terrane exposed between the Denali fault system to the south of Fairbanks and the Tintina fault system to the north of Fairbanks. Comparison of thermal-infrared region (TIR) decorrelation stretch data to available geologic maps indicates that rocks from the YTT contain a wide range of rock types ranging in composition from mafic metavolcanic rocks to felsic rock types such as metarhyolites, pelitic schists, and quartzites. The nine-band ASTER visible-near-infrared region--short-wave infrared region (VNIR-SWIR) reflectance data and spectral matched-filter processing were used to map hydrothermal alteration patterns associated with VMS and porphyry deposit types. In particular, smectite, kaolinite, opaline silica, jarosite and (or) other ferric iron minerals defined narrow (less than 250-meter diameter) zonal patterns around Red Mountain and other potential VMS targets. Using ASTER we identified some of the known mineral deposits in the region, as well as mineralogically similar targets that may represent potential undiscovered deposits. Some known deposits were not identified and may have been obscured by vegetation or snow cover or were too small to be resolved.

  11. Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge, training and practice in PM. PMID:22021765

  12. Application of reservoir geology of enhanced oil recovery from upper Devonian Nisku Reefs, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, N.R. (AEC Oil and Gas Company, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Coppold, M.P. (Imperial Oil Resources Limited (Esso), Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Douglas, J.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Devonian West Pembina reef trend of west-central Alberta contains recoverable reserves of over 79 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (500 million bbl) of oil and 1.4 x 10[sup 10] m[sup 3] (500 billion ft[sup 3]) of gas within approximately 50 pinnacle reefs in the Nisku Formation. Although the oil is saturated with gas at original reservoir pressure, primary depletion would soon lower the reservoir pressure below the bubble point, decreasing recovery. Thus, pressure maintenance is applied early in the producing life of the pools through waterflood or miscible flood schemes. Selection of the appropriate enhanced recovery scheme depends upon the internal flow-unit geometry of the reefs. The Bigoray Nisku C pool and the Pembina Nisku L pool form end members of the reservoir spectrum. They can be used as flow-unit models in the geological input for reservoir simulation studies. The Bigoray Nisku C pool is dominantly limestone. The primary textures, well perserved in this reef, provide the key to interpreting the relict textures in fully dolomitized reefs. Due to the presence of horizontal permeability barriers associated with the limestone lithology, the pool is developed with a waterflood displacement scheme. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be on the order of 0.55 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (3.5 million bbl) or 46% or original oil in place (OOIP). The Pembina Nisku L pool is a completely dolomitized reef. In contrast to the Bigoray Nisku C pool, the complete dolomitization reduces the number of generic reservoir flow units observed in the L pool reef from six to three. Due to the excellent reservoir quality and absence of horizontal permeability barriers, it is being exploited by a vertical miscible flood. The Nisku L pool is one of the largest pinnacle reefs discovered in the Nisku reef fairway and contains an estimated 5 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (31 million bbl) OOIP. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be approximately 4.1 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (25.8 million bbl) or 82% of OOIP.

  13. This project was funded through the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the Illinois State Geological Survey. Illinois State Water Survey Contract Report 2004-08.

    E-print Network

    This project was funded through the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the Illinois State Geological Survey. Illinois State Water Survey Contract Report 2004-08. Hydrologic Modeling of the Iroquois Science Section Illinois State Water Survey Abstract Watershed scale hydrologic simulation models HSPF

  14. West Virginia Geological Survey's role in siting fluidized bed combustion facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.J.; King, Hobart M.; Ashton, K.C.; Kirstein, D.S.; McColloch, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    A project is presented which demonstrates the role of geology in planning and siting a fluidized bed combustion facility. Whenever a project includes natural resource utilization, cooperation between geologists and design engineers will provide an input that could and should save costs, similar to the one stated in our initial premise. Regardless of whether cost reductions stem from a better knowledge of fuel and sorbent availabilities, or a better understanding of the local hydrology, susceptibility to mine-subsidence, or other geologic hazards, the geological survey has a vital role in planning. Input to planning could help the fluidized-bed developer and design-engineer solve some economic questions and stretch the financial resources at their disposal.

  15. Cooperative activities of the U.S. Geological Survey with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, fiscal years 1983-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A. E., (Edited By); Scott, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, has been involved in numerous cooperative activities with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Assistance agreements, which include both grants and cooperative agreements, have fostered many educational research and development activities. These activities have included site visits, employment opportunities, curriculum development, seminars, and research projects. The activities are consistent with the Geological Survey's mission of conducting earth-science research and dissemination of the results. The cooperative have benefitted the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, their students, and the Geological Survey.

  16. Resolution versus speckle relative to geologic interpretability of spaceborne radar images - A survey of user preference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A survey conducted to evaluate user preference for resolution versus speckle relative to the geologic interpretability of spaceborne radar images is discussed. Thirteen different resolution/looks combinations are simulated from Seasat synthetic-aperture radar data of each of three test sites. The SAR images were distributed with questionnaires for analysis to 85 earth scientists. The relative discriminability of geologic targets at each test site for each simulation of resolution and speckle on the images is determined on the basis of a survey of the evaluations. A large majority of the analysts respond that for most targets a two-look image at the highest simulated resolution is best. For a constant data rate, a higher resolution is more important for target discrimination than a higher number of looks. It is noted that sand dunes require more looks than other geologic targets. At all resolutions, multiple-look images are preferred over the corresponding single-look image. In general, the number of multiple looks that is optimal for discriminating geologic targets is inversely related to the simulated resolution.

  17. Preliminary geology, mineral chemistry and diamond results from the C29/30 Candle Lake volcanic complex, Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verigeanu, D.; Hetman, C. M.; Jellicoe, B.; Baumgartner, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The C29/30 kimberlite is one of two diamondiferous kimberlites in the Candle Lake cluster located in east-central Saskatchewan, Canada, approximately 70 km from the Fort á la Corne kimberlite field. The kimberlites are hosted by a Cretaceous sequence of marine mudstone and shale of the Lower Colorado Group, and underlying siltstone and sandstone of the Mannville Group. This sequence overlies Paleozoic carbonates that were deposited over the Proterozoic crystalline basement. Based on the country rock stratigraphy and morphology of the body, C29/30 is inferred to be Cretaceous in age. The elongated kimberlite body has a lateral extent of approximately 2 km with the long axis oriented in a south-east to north-west direction and an estimated surface expression of 75.3 ha. The investigation of 47 drill cores suggests that this body is a single volcanic complex dominated by a single phase of volcaniclastic kimberlite that is characterised by absent to rare phlogopite within the groundmass of preserved juvenile clasts. Minor amounts of at least one other phase of kimberlite containing conspicuous groundmass phlogopite have also been documented. The subsurface shape of C29/30 is complex and is interpreted to result from a combination of explosive volcanic activity that formed two craters from separate feeder vents. The formation of the elongated trough is poorly understood. It may have formed by a fissure style eruption, or erosive processes related to the mass flow of material away from one of the craters or possible the collapse of an eruption column. The C29/30 kimberlite is similar to bodies of the Fort á la Corne kimberlite field with respect to country rock setting, pipe morphology and the dominant textural varieties present. This contribution presents a preliminary geological model of C29/30 based on data obtained from the drilling programmes completed in 2006, 2007 and 2008.

  18. The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Leddin, Desmond; Armstrong, David; Borgaonkar, Mark; Bridges, Ronald J; Fallone, Carlo A; Telford, Jennifer J; Chen, Ying; Colacino, Palma; Sinclair, Paul

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time. METHODS: During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005. RESULTS: Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P<0.05); the wait time to same-day consultation and procedure was shorter in 2012 than in 2008 (78 days versus 101 days; P<0.05), but continued to be longer than in 2005 (P<0.05). The total wait time remained longest for screening colonoscopy, increasing from 201 days in 2008 to 279 days in 2012 (P<0.05). DISCUSSION: Wait times for gastroenterology services continue to exceed recommended targets, remain unchanged since 2008 and exceed wait times reported in 2005. PMID:23472243

  19. Past, present, and future of water data delivery from the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirsch, Robert M.; Fisher, Gary T.

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of national water databases managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, including surface-water, groundwater, water-quality, and water-use data. These are readily accessible to users through web interfaces and data services. Multiple perspectives of data are provided, including search and retrieval of real-time data and historical data, on-demand current conditions and alert services, data compilations, spatial representations, analytical products, and availability of data across multiple agencies.

  20. Introduction to the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center Sioux Falls, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braconnier, L.A.; Wiepking, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The EROS Data Center is a part of the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Office of the Department of the Interior and is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. It is the national clearinghouse for the processing and dissemination of spacecraft- and aircraft-acquired images and photographs and electronic data on the Earth's resources. The Center also trains and assists users in the application of such data.

  1. An index of geophysical well logging in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulheren, M. Patrick; Larson, J.D.; Hopkins, Herbert T.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical logs have been obtained in more than 170 wells in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1968. These logs include natural gamma, electric, caliper, temperature, fluid conductivity, and fluid velocity. Most of the logs are for wells in the Coastal Plain Province of eastern Virginia. Geophysical logs aid in the interpretation of properties of earth materials, including the capacity to store and transmit water in the immediate vicinity of the well bore.

  2. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Drilleau, Margery O.

    1978-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Myers, Beverly M.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (USGS)

  4. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Drilleau, Margery O.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), and National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Myers, Beverly M.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Josefson, Beverly M.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (USGS)

  7. Hot dry rock and the U.S. geological survey: a question of priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John H.

    1996-01-01

    The enactment of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 saw the assignment of definite responsibilities relating to hot dry rock (HDR) to the US Geological Survey (USGS). This mandate provided some explicit guidelines and individual tasks in areas in which the USGS already had close ties to the Department of Energy and a number of its national laboratories. This paper discusses various tasks in terms of priorities being conducted by USGS as response to the Act.

  8. First seismic survey of Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada): sedimentary record of the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Ghienne, Jean-François; Raphaël, Certain; Nicolas, Robin; Claude, Roquin; Frédéric, Bouchette; Cousineau Pierre, A.

    2015-04-01

    The general post-glacial evolution of the Lake Saint-Jean region (Canada/Québec) was, until now, only known from onshore studies (outcrops and geomorphology). Because this lake corresponds to sediment depocentre since the area is ice free (latest Pleistocene and the entire Holocene), a comprehensive sedimentary archive could be expected from this area. As a consequence, the offshore archives of Lake Saint-Jean leave a basic, but crucial, question: can the transition from glacial to post-glacial periods be deciphered? The stratigraphy of the last deglacial sequence is investigated in Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada) from 300 km of echo-sounder 2D seismic profiles. The sedimentary archive of this basin is documented from the Late Pleistocene Laurentidian ice-front recession to the present-day situation. Ten seismic units have been identified that reflect spatio-temporal variations in depositional processes characterizing different periods of the Lake Saint-Jean basin evolution. During the postglacial marine flooding, a high deposition rate of mud settling, from proglacial glacimarine and then prodeltaic plumes in the Laflamme Gulf, produced an extensive, up to 50 m thick mud sheet draping the isostatically depressed marine basin floor. Subsequently, closing of the water body due to glacio-isostatic rebound that occurred at 8.5 cal. ka BP and ice-sheet retreat outside the Saint-Jean catchment at 7.5 cal. ka BP drastically modify the hydrodynamics and sedimentation. Hyperpycnal flows appeared because fresh lake water replaced dense marine water. River sediments were transferred towards the deeper part of the lake into river-related confined lobes. The water body is also marked by the onset of a wind-driven internal circulation associating wave-related hydrodynamics and bottom currents with sedimentary features including shoreface deposits, sediment drifts, a sedimentary shelf and important erosional surfaces. The Lake Saint-Jean reveals important diversity and complexity. It is notably worth noting that the transition from glacial to post-glacial periods is well marked by an abrupt change in depositional dynamics. In addition, this work highlights an original lacustrine sedimentary system which is not straightforward notably because of the importance of erosion, by-pass and intermittent deposition over most of the lakefloor. As it deals with both glacial environments and lake systems, this works is of interest for all those concerned by the geological record of both the transition from glacial to post-glacial periods and the lacustrine environments.

  9. Two Ordinary Chondrites Found by the Chilean Geological Survey (SERNAGEOMIN): Perspective to Include Search Protocol for next Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, L.; Valenzuela, E. M.; Álvarez, J.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Oyarzún, P.; Gattacceca, J.

    2014-09-01

    Two new findings were recovered by two mapping teams of the Chilean Geological Survey in the Atacama Desert. It is highly possible to recover more meteorites in that an others areas. We propose to include a protocol of searching meteorites.

  10. Topical index and bibliography of U.S. Geological Survey Trace Elements and related reports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Diane; Houser, Shirley S.

    1952-01-01

    Part 1, the topical index, lists the titles of reports prepared from 1941 to December 1952, in conjunction with the Geological Survey's program of uranium and other elements of related interest. It includes not only completed Trace Elements reports and those now in preparation, but also Survey publications, publications by Survey personnel in scientific journals, and open-fie releases. The titles are grouped topically under the headings listed in the table of contents. Entries in each category are listed alphabetically, by author, and numbered consecutively. Many of the reports have been cross-indexed, where appropriate. The classification of the Trace Elements reports, insofar as it is known, has been indicated after the title of the report. The classification of some of the earlier Trace Elements reports is uncertain. The Geological Survey does not have additional copies of most of the reports listed, but copies of some of the completed reports can be loaned on request to organizations officially cooperating with the Atomic Energy Commission. Many Trace Elements reports have been made available to the public, either by open-file release, reproduction by Technical Information Service, Oak Ridge (referred to as TIS), by publication as a Geological Survey circular or bulletin or by a publication in a scientific journal. This information is given, following the title of the report. If the abstract of a Trace Element report has been published in Nuclear Science Abstracts, it is noted by the initials NSA following the title of the report. Part 2 is a reference guide to information on the Trace Elements program that is available to the public. This information is categorized according to the type of publication or release.

  11. The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey: 1.2 mm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omont, A.; Willott, C. J.; Beelen, A.; Bergeron, J.; Orellana, G.; Delorme, P.

    2013-04-01

    We report 250 GHz (1.2 mm) observations of a sample of 20 quasars at redshifts 5.8 < z < 6.5 from the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS), using the Max-Planck-Millimeter-Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the 30-metre telescope of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millmétrique (IRAM). An rms sensitivity of ?0.6 mJy was achieved for 65% of the sample, and of ?1.0 mJy for 90%. Only one quasar, CFHQS J142952+544717, was robustly detected with S250 GHz = 3.46 ± 0.52 mJy. This indicates that one of the most powerful known starbursts at z ~ 6 is associated with this radio-loud quasar. On average, the other CFHQS quasars, which have a mean optical magnitude fainter than the previously studied samples of z ~ 6 quasars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), have a mean 1.2 mm flux density ? S250 GHz ? = 0.41 ± 0.14 mJy; this average detection with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 2.9 is hardly meaningful. It would correspond to ? LFIR ? ? 0.94 ± 0.32 × 1012 L?, and an average star formation rate of a few 100 M?/yr, depending on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and a possible contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to ? LFIR ?. This is consistent with previous findings of Wang et al. on the far-infrared emission of z ~ 6 quasars and extends their results toward optically fainter sources.

  12. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  13. Cosmological constraints from weak lensing peak statistics with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Li, Ran; Shan, Huanyuan; Wang, Qiao; Fu, Liping; Fan, Zuhui; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Leauthaud, Alexie; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Makler, Martin; Moraes, Bruno; Erben, Thomas; Charbonnier, Aldée

    2015-07-01

    We derived constraints on cosmological parameters using weak lensing peak statistics measured on the ˜ 130 deg2 of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. This analysis demonstrates the feasibility of using peak statistics in cosmological studies. For our measurements, we considered peaks with signal-to-noise ratio in the range of ? = [3, 6]. For a flat ? cold dark matter model with only (?m, ?8) as free parameters, we constrained the parameters of the following relation ?8 = ?8(?m/0.27)? to be ?8 = 0.82 ± 0.03 and ? = 0.43 ± 0.02. The ? value found is considerably smaller than the one measured in two-point and three-point cosmic shear correlation analyses, showing a significant complement of peak statistics to standard weak lensing cosmological studies. The derived constraints on (?m, ?8) are fully consistent with the ones from either WMAP9 or Planck. From the weak lensing peak abundances alone, we obtained marginalized mean values of ? _m=0.38^{+0.27}_{-0.24} and ?8 = 0.81 ± 0.26. Finally, we also explored the potential of using weak lensing peak statistics to constrain the mass-concentration relation of dark matter haloes simultaneously with cosmological parameters.

  14. Access to Care, Health Status, and Health Disparities in the United States and Canada: Results of a Cross-National Population-Based Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen E. Lasser; David U. Himmelstein; Steffie Woolhandler

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of med- ical services in the United States and Canada, and compared disparities accord- ing to race, income, and immigrant status. Methods. We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada\\/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we

  15. IYPE in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.; Nowlan, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Canadian National Committee picked five of the ten IYPE themes for emphasis in Canada - Water, Hazards, Energy, Resources and Environment. They are summarized in the acronym WHERE - WHERE on Earth, WHERE in Canada. Our committee raised funds from industry, with some generous support from The Geological Survey of Canada. Funds were used for publishing “Four Billion Years and Counting”, a book on Canadian geology designed for the general public. It will be useful to educators who can download many of the illustrations and images for classroom support. Recognizing the looming shortage of Geoscientists, we designed a new careers website to help attract young people to the Earth sciences. It can be seen on our website, www.EarthsciencesCanada.com. The website will be updated regularly. The WHERE Challenge was a national contest for children aged 10 to 14. They were asked to select an object, often something from their household, identify at least one non-renewable resource used to make the object, and submit an entry describing the object, the resources within it, and WHERE they came from. We received entries from more than 1000 students Some of the winning entries are posted on our website. We developed a partnership with Parks Canada called Egoists, which is a series of pamphlets on iconic views within the parks explaining the Earth science behind the views. We also supported the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the Burgess Shale by providing funding for the publication of a field guide. At the end of the year all programs will transfer to the Canadian Federation of Earth Sciences. The WHERE Challenge will be repeated in 2010. It, plus our book and careers website will continue our outreach activities.

  16. White-nose syndrome in bats: U.S. Geological Survey updates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogall, Gail Moede; Verant, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that has killed millions of hibernating bats since it first appeared in New York in 2007 and has spread at an alarming rate from the northeastern to the central United States and Canada. The disease is named for the white fungus Geomyces destructans that infects the skin of the muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), the USGS Fort Collins Science Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other partners continue to play a primary role in WNS research. Studies conducted at the NWHC led to the discovery (Blehert and others, 2009), characterization, and naming (Gargas and others, 2009) of the cold-loving fungus G. destructans and to the development of standardized criteria for diagnosing the disease (Meteyer and others, 2009). Additionally, scientists at the NWHC have pioneered laboratory techniques for studying the effects of the fungus on hibernating bats (Lorch and others, 2011). To determine if bats are affected by white-nose syndrome, scientists look for a characteristic microscopic pattern of skin erosion caused by G. destructans (Meteyer and others, 2009). Field signs of WNS can include visible white fungal growth on the bat's muzzle, wings, or both, but these signs alone are not a reliable disease indicator - laboratory examination and testing are required for disease confirmation. Infected bats also arouse from hibernation more frequently than uninfected bats (Warnecke and others, 2012) and often display abnormal behaviors in their hibernation sites, such as congregating at or near cave openings and daytime flights during winter. These abnormal behaviors may contribute to the bat's accelerated consumption of stored fat reserves, causing emaciation, a characteristic documented in some of the bats that die with WNS. During hibernation, bats likely have lowered immunity (Bouma and others, 2010), which may facilitate the ability of G. destructans to colonize and damage large areas of wing membrane (fig. 2). A current hypothesis suggests that erosion or ulceration of wing membrane caused by the fungus has the potential to alter the physiology of hibernating bats, resulting in fatal disruption of hydration, electrolyte balance, circulation, and thermoregulation (Cryan and others, 2010). Current estimates of bat population declines in the northeastern United States since the emergence of WNS are over 80 percent (Turner and others, 2011). This sudden and widespread mortality associated with WNS is unprecedented in hibernating bats, among which large-scale disease outbreaks have not been previously documented. It is unlikely that species of bats affected by WNS will recover quickly because most are long-lived and have only a single pup per year. Consequently, repopulation after widespread mortality of breeding adults will be a slow process. Worldwide, bats play essential roles as pollinators, seed dispersers, and as primary consumers of insects. The true ecological consequences of the recent large-scale reductions in populations of hibernating bats are not yet known. However, farmers might feel the impact. A recent economic analysis indicated that insect control services (ecosystem services) provided by bats to U.S. agriculture is valued between 4 to 50 billion dollars nationwide per year (Boyles and others, 2011). The number of North American bats estimated to have died from WNS thus far had the capacity to consume up to 8,000 tons of insects per year (Boyles and others, 2011). The area of North America affected by WNS continues to expand. Within the last 2 years, the disease has been confirmed in several Central States, including Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, and Missouri. High mortality of bats has not yet been reported at these locations, and it remains to be seen if WNS will develop and manifest in other States with the same severity as that in the Northeast.

  17. Combination of geological data and radon survey results for radon mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Kiselev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    The typical method of radon mapping usually used in most countries is the presenting of average radon concentrations in dwellings for districts or regions. Sometimes the maps of radon concentrations in the soil or maps of percentage above the reference level also demonstrated. Such approach not always can be used for identification of the regions with high probability of radon exposure above the reference levels where the population density is low. The combination of archive geological data and the results of representative radon survey allow estimating the typical parameters of radon concentration distribution for selected categories of buildings (multi-storey or rural type houses) situated in geological zones with the different radon potential. In this case it is possible to give grounds for the necessary level of radon protection measures in the new buildings constructed in this region. The use of such approach in Ural region of Russia is demonstrated. PMID:22466302

  18. The interoperability skill of the Geographic Portal of the ISPRA - Geological Survey of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pia Congi, Maria; Campo, Valentina; Cipolloni, Carlo; Delogu, Daniela; Ventura, Renato; Battaglini, Loredana

    2010-05-01

    The Geographic Portal of Geological Survey of Italy (ISPRA) available at http://serviziogeologico.apat.it/Portal was planning according to standard criteria of the INSPIRE directive. ArcIMS services and at the same time WMS and WFS services had been realized to satisfy the different clients. For each database and web-services the metadata had been wrote in agreement with the ISO 19115. The management architecture of the portal allow it to encode the clients input and output requests both in ArcXML and in GML language. The web-applications and web-services had been realized for each database owner of Land Protection and Georesources Department concerning the geological map at the scale 1:50.000 (CARG Project) and 1:100.000, the IFFI landslide inventory, the boreholes due Law 464/84, the large-scale geological map and all the raster format maps. The portal thus far published is at the experimental stage but through the development of a new graphical interface achieves the final version. The WMS and WFS services including metadata will be re-designed. The validity of the methodology and the applied standards allow to look ahead to the growing developments. In addition to this it must be borne in mind that the capacity of the new geological standard language (GeoSciML), which is already incorporated in the web-services deployed, will be allow a better display and query of the geological data according to the interoperability. The characteristics of the geological data demand for the cartographic mapping specific libraries of symbols not yet available in a WMS service. This is an other aspect regards the standards of the geological informations. Therefore at the moment were carried out: - a library of geological symbols to be used for printing, with a sketch of system colors and a library for displaying data on video, which almost completely solves the problems of the coverage point and area data (also directed) but that still introduces problems for the linear data (solutions: ArcIMS services from Arcmap projects or a specific SLD implementation for WMS services); - an update of "Guidelines for the supply of geological data" in a short time will be published; - the Geological Survey of Italy is officially involved in the IUGS-CGI working group for the processing and experimentation on the new GeoSciML language with the WMS/WFS services. The availability of geographic informations occurs through the metadata that can be distributed online so that search engines can find them through specialized research. The collected metadata in catalogs are structured in a standard (ISO 19135). The catalogs are a ‘common' interface to locate, view and query data and metadata services, web services and other resources. Then, while working in a growing sector of the environmental knowledgement the focus is to collect the participation of other subjects that contribute to the enrichment of the informative content available, so as to be able to arrive to a real portal of national interest especially in case of disaster management.

  19. A Survey of the Utility of Satellite Magnetometer Data for Application to Solid-earth Geophysical and Geological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A survey of potential users of low altitude satellite magnetic measurements for solid-earth and geological studies was conducted. The principal objectives of this survey were to: document the utility and application of the data and resultant products obtained from such a satellite mission, and establish a users committee for the proposed low altitude vector magnetometer satellite.

  20. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  1. Promoting cessation resources through cigarette package warning labels: a longitudinal survey with adult smokers in Canada, Australia and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, James F; Osman, Amira; Moodie, Crawford; Hammond, David; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Cummings, K Michael; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Hardin, James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health warning labels (HWLs) on tobacco packaging can be used to provide smoking cessation information, but the impact of this information is not well understood. Methods Online consumer panels of adult smokers from Canada, Australia and Mexico were surveyed in September 2012, January 2013 and May 2013; replenishment was used to maintain sample sizes of 1000 participants in each country at each wave. Country-stratified logistic Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated to assess correlates of citing HWLs as a source of information on quitlines and cessation websites. GEE models also regressed having called the quitline, and having visited a cessation website, on awareness of these resources because of HWLs. Results At baseline, citing HWLs as a source of information about quitlines was highest in Canada, followed by Australia and Mexico (33%, 19% and 16%, respectively). Significant increases over time were only evident in Australia and Mexico. In all countries, citing HWLs as a source of quitline information was significantly associated with self-report of having called a quitline. At baseline, citing HWLs as a source of information about cessation websites was higher in Canada than in Australia (14% and 6%, respectively; Mexico was excluded because HWLs do not include website information), but no significant changes over time were found for either country. Citing HWLs as a source of information about cessation websites was significantly associated with having visited a website in both Canada and Australia. Conclusions HWLs are an important source of cessation information. PMID:25052860

  2. Age at menarche in Canada: results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children & Youth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Given the downward trend in age at menarche and its implications for the reproductive health and wellbeing of women, little is known about menarcheal age in Canada. Most Canadian studies are only representative of specific populations. The present study, therefore, aims to assess the distribution of age at menarche for Canadian girls and explore its variation across socio-economic and demographic factors. Methods The analysis of the study was based on all female respondents aged 14 to 17 years during Cycle 4 (2000/2001) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children & Youth (NLSCY). The main outcome was age at menarche assessed as the month and year of the occurrence of the first menstrual cycle. Kaplan Meier was used to estimate the mean and median of age at menarche. Chi-square test was used to assess the differences in early, average and later maturers across the different levels of socio-economic and demographic variables. Bootstrapping was performed to account for the complex sampling design. Results The total number of girls analyzed in this study was 1,403 weighted to represent 601,911 Canadian girls. The estimated mean and median of age at menarche was 12.72 years (standard deviation = 1.05) and 12.67 years, respectively. The proportions of early (< 11.53 years), average (?11.53 years and ?13.91 years) and late maturers (> 13.91 years) were 14.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.92-17.35), 68.0% (95% CI: 63.82-72.17) and 17.4% (95% CI: 14.10-20.63), respectively. Variations across the menarcheal groups were statistically significant for the province of residence, household income and family type. Conclusion The findings of the study pave the way for future Canadian research. More studies are warranted to understand menarcheal age in terms of its variation across the provinces, the secular trend over time and its potential predictors. PMID:21110899

  3. Methods for Adjusting U.S. Geological Survey Rural Regression Peak Discharges in an Urban Setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moglen, Glenn E.; Shivers, Dorianne E.

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted of 78 U.S. Geological Survey gaged streams that have been subjected to varying degrees of urbanization over the last three decades. Flood-frequency analysis coupled with nonlinear regression techniques were used to generate a set of equations for converting peak discharge estimates determined from rural regression equations to a set of peak discharge estimates that represent known urbanization. Specifically, urban regression equations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year return periods were calibrated as a function of the corresponding rural peak discharge and the percentage of impervious area in a watershed. The results of this study indicate that two sets of equations, one set based on imperviousness and one set based on population density, performed well. Both sets of equations are dependent on rural peak discharges, a measure of development (average percentage of imperviousness or average population density), and a measure of homogeneity of development within a watershed. Average imperviousness was readily determined by using geographic information system methods and commonly available land-cover data. Similarly, average population density was easily determined from census data. Thus, a key advantage to the equations developed in this study is that they do not require field measurements of watershed characteristics as did the U.S. Geological Survey urban equations developed in an earlier investigation. During this study, the U.S. Geological Survey PeakFQ program was used as an integral tool in the calibration of all equations. The scarcity of historical land-use data, however, made exclusive use of flow records necessary for the 30-year period from 1970 to 2000. Such relatively short-duration streamflow time series required a nonstandard treatment of the historical data function of the PeakFQ program in comparison to published guidelines. Thus, the approach used during this investigation does not fully comply with the guidelines set forth in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 17B, and modifications may be needed before it can be applied in practice.

  4. Former U.S. Geological Survey Director McNutt Discusses Highlights and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    Marcia McNutt, who served as director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and science advisor to the secretary of the Department of the Interior (DOI) since November 2009, left office on 15 February 2013, a few days after the successful launch of the Landsat 8 Earth imaging satellite and shortly before potential automatic and across-the-board federal budget cuts, known as "sequestration," were due to be implemented. McNutt said that sequestration, which currently is scheduled for 1 March, "could be devastating" for USGS.

  5. Implementation of unmanned aircraft systems by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cress, J.J.; Sloan, J.L.; Hutt, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office is leading the implementation of UAS technology in anticipation of transforming the research methods and management techniques employed across the Department of the Interior. UAS technology is being made available to monitor environmental conditions, analyse the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management missions. USGS is teaming with the Department of the Interior Aviation Management Directorate (AMD) to lead the safe and cost-effective adoption of UAS technology by the Department of the Interior Agencies and USGS scientists.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Cynthia A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2006-01-01

    The United States and its territories have about 170 volcanoes that have been active during the past 10,000 years, and most could erupt again in the future. In the past 500 years, 80 U.S. volcanoes have erupted one or more times. About 50 of these recently active volcanoes are monitored, although not all to the same degree. Through its five volcano observatories, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issues information and warnings to the public about volcanic activity. For clarity of warnings during volcanic crises, the USGS has now standardized the alert-notification system used at its observatories.

  7. National water-quality assessment: Future directions of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Philip; Alley, William M.; Wilber, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Throughout U.S. history, the Nation has made major investments in assessing natural resources, such as soils, minerals, and hydrocarbons. The maintenance and the improvement of water quality has been one of the major areas of public investment and government regulation. One of the contributions the U.S. Geological Survey proposes to make is to provide a strong, high quality National Water-Quality Assessment Program to underpin and unify the Nation's water-quality activities. Such an assessment program will satisfy a decisive share of the attainable, national scale, water quality information objectives.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program, fiscal year 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragone, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    In fiscal year 1982, the U S Geological Survey began an interdisciplinary research thrust entitled Toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program The objective of the thrust was to provide earth sciences information necessary to evaluate and mitigate existing groundwater contamination problems resulting from the planned or inadvertant disposal of wastes and from certain land-use practices, and to improve future waste disposal and land-use practices The program supports process-oriented and interdisciplinary field research, and regional groundwater quality studies This article provides an overview of the current (Fiscal Year 1985) activities of the Toxic Waste Program ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  9. U.S. Geological Survey research on surrogate measurements for suspended sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Melis, Theodore S.; Patiño, Eduardo; Larsen, Matthew C.; Topping, David J.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Figueroa-Alamo, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating potentially useful surrogate instruments and methods for inferring the physical characteristics of suspended sediments. Instruments operating on bulk acoustic, bulk and digital optic, laser, and pressure-differential technologies are being tested in riverine and laboratory settings for their usefulness to Federal agencies toward providing quantifiably reliable information on bed-material and bed-topography characteristics, and on concentrations, size distributions and transport rates of sediments in suspension and as bedload. The efficacy of four suspended-sediment surrogate technologies has been demonstrated to varying degrees of success in Kansas, Florida, Arizona, and Puerto Rico.

  10. The U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS): a master catalog and collections management plan for U.S. Geological Survey geologic samples and sample collections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geologic Materials Repository Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The general consideration for implementation of the GCMS is that all active USGS geologic sample repositories will form the core of GCMS and that participating science centers will develop procedures based on proposed GCMS methodologies. The GCMS is a collective resource for the entire USGS community and the users who discover the geologic materials kept in these repositories and seek to access them.

  11. Survey of the practice of spinal cord stimulators and intrathecal analgesic delivery implants for management of pain in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Philip WH; Fedoroff, Ingrid; Jacques, Line; Kumar, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2006, the Canadian Neuromodulation Society was formed. The present survey characterizes the practice of spinal cord stimulator (SCS) and intrathecal analgesic delivery pump (IADP) implantation for pain management in different centres across Canada. METHOD: A structured questionnaire was designed to examine the funding source, infrastructure and patient screening process in different centres implanting SCSs and IADPs. Centres that performed more than 10 implants per year were surveyed. The survey was centre-based, ie, each centre received one questionnaire regardless of the number of staff involved in neuromodulation practice. RESULTS: Fourteen centres were identified and 13 responded. Implantation of SCS and IADP was performed in 12 and 10 centres, respectively. In most centres, failed back surgery syndrome was the most frequent indication for SCS and IADP implantation. For SCS, all centres always performed a trial; the majority used percutaneous electrode (83%) before the SCS implantation. Routine psychological screening was performed in 25% of centres before any SCS trial procedure. For IADP, all centres performed a trial injection or infusion before implantation. Five centres (50%) performed psychological screening in almost all patients. Continuous infusion techniques were the most popular (50%) used for the trial. CONCLUSION: The present survey provides a ‘snapshot’ of the practice of SCS and IADP implantation in Canada. A review of SCS and IADP trials indicated that Canadian practices are mostly, but not always, consistent with those elsewhere. PMID:18080047

  12. Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Division in North Carolina, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J. F., (compiler); Deckard, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Water resources programs conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the state of North Carolina during 1985 and proposed programs for 1986 are described. This is the first in a series of biennial progress reports on Survey activities in the state. Activities such as gathering, interpreting and publishing hydrologic data and scientific information in support of state and local water resources planning, management, and regulatory programs are presented. The water resources programs described are funded through cooperative agreements with state and local agencies and through special agreements with other federal agencies. Cooperative programs are reviewed annually to insure that state, local and national priorities are being met. Groundwater withdrawals are estimated to have produced water level declines of 150 ft and more for large areas of the northeast and central Coastal Plain. Future demands for water quality and quantity are discussed.

  13. Bibliography of Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the US Geological Survey, 1978-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Ren Jen; Weeks, John B.; Grubb, Hayes F.

    1997-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1995. The purpose of this program was to define the regional geohydrology and establish a framework of background information on geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Nation's important aquifer systems. This information is critically needed to develop an understanding of the Nation's major ground-water flow systems and to support better management of ground-water resources. Twenty-five of the Nation's major aquifer systems were studied under this program. Starting in 1988, the program devoted part of its resources to compilation of a National Ground Water Atlas that presets a comprehensive summary of the Nation's major ground-water resources. The atlas, which is designed in a graphical format supported by descriptive text, serves as a basic reference for the location, geography, geology, and hydrologic characteristics of the major aquifers in the Nation. This bibliography lists 1,105 reports that result from various studies of the program. The list of reports for each study follows a brief description of that study.

  14. Lessons learned from the U.S. Geological Survey abandoned mine lands initiative: 1997-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.; Church, Stanley E.; Besser, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Growth of the United States has been facilitated, in part, by hard-rock mining in the Rocky Mountains. Abandoned and inactive mines cause many significant environmental concerns in hundreds of watersheds. Those who have responsibility to address these environmental concerns must have a basic level of scientific information about mining and mine wastes in a watershed prior to initiating remediation activities. To demonstrate what information is needed and how to obtain that information, the U.S. Geological Survey implemented the Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Initiative from 1997 to 2002 with demonstration studies in the Boulder River watershed in Montana and the Animas River watershed in Colorado. The AML Initiative included collection and analysis of geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, and biological data. The synergy of this interdisciplinary analysis produced a perspective of the environmental concerns that could not have come from a single discipline. Two examples of these perspectives include (1) the combination of hydrological tracer techniques, structural geology, and geophysics help to understand the spatial distribution of loading to the streams in a way that cannot be evaluated by monitoring at a catchment outlet, and (2) the combination of toxicology and hydrology combine to illustrate that seasonal variability of toxicity conditions occurs. Lessons have been learned by listening to and collaborating with land-management agencies to understand their needs and by applying interdisciplinary methods to answer their questions.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Climate Response Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey serves the Nation by providing reliable hydrologic information used by others to manage the Nation's water resources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measures more than 20,000 wells each year for a variety of objectives as part of Federal programs and in cooperation with State and local agencies. Water-level data are collected using consistent data-collection and quality-control methods. A small subset of these wells meets the criteria necessary to be included in a 'Climate Response Network' of wells designed to illustrate the response of the ground-water system to climate variations nationwide. The primary purpose of the Climate Response Network is to portray the effect of climate on ground-water levels in unconfined aquifers or near-surface confined aquifers that are minimally affected by pumping or other anthropogenic stresses. The Climate Response Network Web site (http://groundwaterwatch.usgs.gov/) is the official USGS Web site for illustrating current ground-water conditions in the United States and Puerto Rico. The Climate Response Network Web pages provide information on ground-water conditions at a variety of scales. A national map provides a broad overview of water-table conditions across the Nation. State maps provide a more local picture of ground-water conditions. Site pages provide the details about a specific well.

  16. An evaluation of the ERTS data collection system as a potential operational tool. [automatic hydrologic data collection and processing system for geological surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite Data Collection System has been shown to be, from the users vantage point, a reliable and simple system for collecting data from U.S. Geological Survey operational field instrumentation. It is technically feasible to expand the ERTS system into an operational polar-orbiting data collection system to gather data from the Geological Survey's Hydrologic Data Network. This could permit more efficient internal management of the Network, and could enable the Geological Survey to make data available to cooperating agencies in near-real time. The Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of the costs and benefits of satellite data-relay systems.

  17. Application of statistical approaches to analyze geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data at a fractured-rock mine site in Northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, J. M.; Allen, D. M.; Gibson, H. D.; Mackie, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Mine site characterization often results in the acquisition of geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data sets that are used in the mine design process but are rarely co-evaluated. For a study site in northern Canada, bivariate and multivariate (hierarchical) statistical techniques are used to evaluate empirical hydraulic conductivity estimation methods based on traditional rock mass characterisation schemes, as well as to assess the regional hydrogeological conceptual model. Bivariate techniques demonstrate that standard geotechnical measures of fracturing are poor indicators of the hydraulic potential of a rock mass at the study site. Additionally, rock-mass-permeability schemes which rely on these measures are shown to be poor predictors of hydraulic conductivity in untested areas. Multivariate techniques employing hierarchical cluster analysis of both geotechnical and geological data sets are able to identify general trends in the data. Specifically, the geological cluster analysis demonstrated spatial relationship between intrusive contacts and increased hydraulic conductivity. This suggests promise in the use of clustering methods in identifying new trends during the early stages of hydrogeological characterization.

  18. Information and informatics in a geological survey - the good, the bad and the ugly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.

    2008-12-01

    It is apparent that the most successful geological surveys (as measured by the only true Key Performance Indicator - their effectiveness in serving their societies) have recognised that, while their core business is making maps and models and doing scientific research to underpin that, the commodity they actually deal in is data and information and knowledge. They know that in a digital world the better they organise the data and information and knowledge, the more successful they will be. In our future world, where e-science will surely dominate, some are already sub-titling themselves as information or knowledge exchange organisations. There seems an unarguable correlation between surveys which organise their information well and those that run their projects well, their agility in responding to government agendas or national emergencies, and flexibility in delivering products their diverse users want. Look deeper and you can see the pivotal role of best practice information management and the tangible benefits a responsible approach to acquiring, storing and delivering information brings. But even in these (most successful) surveys the people leading information management will tell you that it was a gargantuan battle to get the resources to achieve this success and that, even with the downstream fruits of the investment in professional information management and informatics now obvious, it is a continuing struggle to maintain a decent level of funding for these tasks. It is not hard to see why; the struggle is innately one-sided; geoscientists are born and/or trained to be curious, to be independent and to innovate. If the choice is between more research and survey, or a professional approach to information/informatics and the adjudicators are geoscientists, it is not difficult to pick the winner. So what does lie behind a successful approach to information in a geological survey organisation? First, recognise that poor information management cannot just be cured by investing in hardware and software; it is the geoscience data content (its availability, quality and consistency) that is in greater need of investment. Second, to achieve the full synergies and benefits information management and informatics must be planned into all domains of the Survey and all project phases - acquisition, processing, analysis, dissemination and storage. Adequate investment in front office applications and services to communicate and deliver geoscience to all our stakeholders (eg virtualisation and visualisation) is essential. Without it back office work, however, worthy, is of limited value. Finally, the widely accepted truth is that the real challenge in introducing professional information management and informatics is not technical or scientific, but cultural and managerial. Unless you can sensitively and positively change the work patterns and culture of Survey geoscientists a sustainable outcome will remain beyond reach. Of course to change the work pattern and culture of the geoscientists you must first ensure that the most senior management of the organisation embrace the change wholeheartedly; now there's a challenge! Using examples and experience from the evolution on information management and informatics in the British Geological Survey over the last decade this presentation will explore the issues above.

  19. The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Imaging Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. II. Clustering Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtz, Ron; Stocke, John T.; Ellingson, E.; Yee, H. K. C.

    1997-05-01

    The results of an extensive imaging survey of BL Lac objects conducted at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6 m Telescope (CFHT) are presented. This paper details the results pertinent to the clustering environments of BL Lacs; a companion paper (Wurtz, Stocke, & Yee) presented results on the host galaxies of BL Lacs obtained from the same Gunn r-band images. The clustering environments of BL Lac objects in this survey are on average found to be poor clusters, comparable in galaxy density to Abell richness class <0. Using the formalism developed by Longair & Seldner and the specific techniques employed by Yee & Green, a mean value for the galaxy-BL Lac two-point correlation function amplitude was found to be = 209 Mpc1.77 +/- 386 (mean +/-1 ? spread for H0 = 50 km s-1 Mpc-1 and q0 = 0.02). Only a few (at most six of 45) BL Lacs in this sample are found in clusters with richness class >1, and most of these are at z > 0.4. Various subsamples of BL Lacs with unique qualities (e.g., presence/absence of weak emission lines, high/low optical core dominance or polarization, X-ray vs. radio-selected, etc.) have statistically similar clustering properties, which further argues that these BL Lacs are all members of the same active galactic nucleus (AGN) class. However, we do find that, like radio-loud quasars, BL Lac environments are significantly richer at high redshift (for z > 0.35, the median Bgb = 500 Mpc1.77 compared to a median Bgb = 120 Mpc1.77 at lower z). Correlations are also found between Bgb and host galaxy luminosity and radio core dominance. Contrary to the expectations of unification schemes for BL Lacs, the clustering environments of BL Lacs, at both high and low redshift, are more similar to those of FR 2 radio galaxies and quasars than to those of FR 1's. Approximately 20% of low-z FR 1's are in richer clusters than almost all low-z BL Lacs (PKS 0548-322 is the lone exception of a BL Lac in a rich cluster); similarly, 20% of FR 1's have more luminous host galaxies than any BL Lac (Paper I). This new line of evidence strongly suggests that the unification scenario for BL Lacs with FR 1 radio galaxies requires a critical reexamination. As a minimum the ``parent population'' of BL Lacs must be modified to exclude the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in rich clusters at low redshift. The great similarity in the cosmic evolution of the cluster environment for radio-loud quasars, FR 2 radio galaxies, and BL Lac objects between z ~ 0.5 and 0 strongly suggests that a common physical mechanism operates to create a rapid luminosity evolution for AGNs in rich clusters. Since X-ray observations find rapid cosmic evolution in the intracluster medium and cluster potential well over similar timescales, the rapidly changing gas density and/or galaxy-galaxy interaction rate could be responsible for the fading of luminous AGNs in rich clusters (Stocke & Perrenod; Roos).

  20. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geologic Maps are unique in that they show the distribution of geologic features on a landscape through specific symbols and colors. The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) site Geologic Maps provides visitors with a good introduction to these concepts, which include the unique features of a geologic map; the meaning of their lines, colors, and symbols; the location of faults; and more. Anyone working with geologic maps or just interested in learning a little about cartography or geology will find this site easy to explore and full of good information.

  1. Geological structures deduced from airborne geophysical surveys around Syowa Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Y.; Jokat, W.; Kitada, K.; Steinhage, D.

    2012-12-01

    The area around Syowa Station, the Japanese Antarctic station in Lutzow-Holm Bay, is widely considered to be a junction of the Africa, India, Madagascar, and Antarctic continents, according to the reconstruction model of Gondwana. This area is key to investigating the formation of Gondwana. Joint Japanese-German airborne geophysical surveys were conducted around Syowa Station in January 2006 to reveal the tectonic evolution contributing to the formation of Gondwana in this area. Ice radar, magnetic, and gravity data were obtained from onshore areas. Several characteristic features that may be related to the tectonic evolution of Gondwana were inferred primarily from magnetic anomalies and from gravity anomalies and bedrock topography. The boundaries of the Lutzow-Holm Complex, the Yamato-Belgica Complex, and the Western Rayner Complex are defined, but the inland extension of the boundary between the Lutzow-Holm and the Yamato-Belgica Complexes is unknown south of 71S. The main geological structural trends of the Lutzow-Holm Complex derived from magnetic anomalies are NW-SE and are concordant with the geological results in the coastal region. However, nearly NE-SW-trending magnetic anomalies cut across the NW-SW magnetic anomaly trends, and the NE-SW right lateral strike-slip faults are deduced from the magnetic and the gravity anomaly data in the Lutzow-Holm Complex. The Lutzow-Holm Complex is divided into four blocks based on the estimated strike-slip faults. The strike-slip faults were possibly generated during a younger stage of Pan-African orogeny, after the formation of NW-SE-striking geological structures. These results provide new constraints for the formation of Gondwana.

  2. Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Finley

    2006-09-30

    The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

  3. U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative-2009 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Z.H.; Aldridge, C.L.; Anderson, P.J.; Assal, T.J.; Biewick, L.R.H.; Blecker, S.W.; Bristol, S.; Carr, N.B.; Chalfoun, A.D.; Chong, G.W.; Diffendorfer, J.E.; Fedy, B.C.; Garman, S.L.; Germaine, S.; Grauch, R.I.; Holloway, J.; Homer, C.; Kauffman, M.J.; Keinath, D.; Latysh, N.; Manier, D.; McDougal, R.R.; Melcher, C.P.; Miller, K.A.; Montag, J.; Nutt, C.J.; Potter, C.J.; Sawyer, H.; Schell, S.; Shafer, S.L.; Smith, D.B.; Stillings, L.L.; Tuttle, M.; Wilson, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. The first report described work activities for 2007 and 2008; this report covers work activities conducted in 2009. Important differences between the two reports are that (1) this report does not lump all the Effectiveness Monitoring activities together as last year's report did, which will allow WLCI partners and other readers to fully appreciate the scope and accomplishments of those activities, and (2) this report does not include a comprehensive appendix of the background details for each work activity. In 2009, there were 29 ongoing or completed activities, and there were 5 new work activities conducted under the 5 original major multi-disciplinary science and technical assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis; (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research; (3) Data and Information Management; (4) Integration and Coordination; and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. New work included (1) developing a soil-quality index, (2) developing methods for assessing levels of and relationships between mercury and soil organic matter, and (3) ascertaining element source, mobility, and fate. Additionally, (4) remotely sensed imagery was used to assess vegetation as an indicator of soil condition and geology, and (5) an Integrated Assessment (IA) was initiated to synthesize what has been learned about WLCI systems to date, and to develop associated decision tools, maps, and a comprehensive report.

  4. U.S. Geological Survey Assessment of Undiscovered Petroleum Resources of the Hamra Basin, Libya, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    The Hamra Basin Province encompasses approximately 244,100 square kilometers (94,250 square miles) and is entirely within Libya. One composite total petroleum system (TPS) was defined for this assessment; it extends from Libya westward into adjacent parts of Algeria and southern Tunisia. The Hamra Basin part of the TPS was subdivided into four assessment units for the purpose of resource assessment. The assessment units cover only 172,390 square kilometers of the Hamra Basin Province; the remaining area has little potential for undiscovered petroleum resources because of the absence of petroleum source rocks. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 784 million barrels of crude oil, 4,748 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 381 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Hamra Basin of northwestern Libya. Most of the undiscovered crude oil and natural gas are interpreted to be in deeper parts of the Hamra Basin.

  5. Quaternary geologic map of the Hudson River 4 degree x 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State and province compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Sevon, William D.; Muller, Ernest H.; Judson, Sheldon; Black, Robert F.; Wagner, Phillip W.; Hartshorn, Joseph H.; Chapman, William F.; Cowan, William D.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.

    1992-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Hudson River 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  6. Description of the U.S. Geological Survey Geo Data Portal data integration framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, David L.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Kunicki, Thomas C.; Walker, Jordan I.; Lucido, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed an open-standard data integration framework for working efficiently and effectively with large collections of climate and other geoscience data. A web interface accesses catalog datasets to find data services. Data resources can then be rendered for mapping and dataset metadata are derived directly from these web services. Algorithm configuration and information needed to retrieve data for processing are passed to a server where all large-volume data access and manipulation takes place. The data integration strategy described here was implemented by leveraging existing free and open source software. Details of the software used are omitted; rather, emphasis is placed on how open-standard web services and data encodings can be used in an architecture that integrates common geographic and atmospheric data.

  7. U.S. Geological Survey programs and investigations related to soil and water conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics related to streamflow and reservoir storage; development and application of models of rainfall-runoff relations, chemical quality, and sediment movement; and studies of the interactive processes of overland and channel flow with vegetation. Networks of streamgaging stations and (or) sampling sites within numerous drainage basins are yielding information that extends databases and enhances the ability to use those data for interpretive studies.

  8. Specification for the U.S. Geological Survey Historical Topographic Map Collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allord, Gregory J.; Walter, Jennifer L.; Fishburn, Kristin A.; Shea, Gale A.

    2014-01-01

    This document provides the detailed requirements for producing, archiving, and disseminating a comprehensive digital collection of topographic maps for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Historical Topographic Map Collection (HTMC). The HTMC is a digital archive of about 190,000 printed topographic maps published by the USGS from the inception of the topographic mapping program in 1884 until the last paper topographic map using lithographic printing technology was published in 2006. The HTMC provides a comprehensive digital repository of all scales and all editions of USGS printed topographic maps that is easily discovered, browsed, and downloaded by the public at no cost. The HTMC provides ready access to maps that are no longer available for distribution in print. A digital file representing the original paper historical topographic map is produced for each historical map in the HTMC in georeferenced PDF (GeoPDF) format (a portable document format [PDF] with a geospatial extension).

  9. Availability of Earth observations data from the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS data center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Thomas M.; Draeger, William C.; Risty, Ronald R.

    1993-01-01

    For decades federal and state agencies have been collecting regional, continental, and global Earth observations data acquired by satellites, aircraft, and other information-gathering systems. These data include photographic and digital remotely sensed images of the Earth's surface, as well as earth science, cartographic, and geographic data. Since 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center (EDC) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has been a data management, production, dissemination, and research center for these data. Currently, the Data Center holds over 10 million satellite images and aerial photographs, in photographic and digital formats. Users are able to place inquiries and orders for these holdings via a nationwide computer network. In addition to cataloging the data stored in its archives, the Data Center provides users with rapid access to information on many data collections held by other facilities.

  10. Sudbury project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Petrology, chemistry, and origin of breccia formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Deutsch, A.; Avermann, M.; Brockmeyer, P.; Lakomy, R.; Mueller-Mohr, V.

    1992-01-01

    Within the Sudbury Project of the University of Muenster and the Ontario Geological Survey special emphasis was put on the breccia formations exposed at the Sudbury structure (SS) because of their crucial role for the impact hypothesis. They were mapped and sampled in selected areas of the north, east, and south ranges of the SS. The relative stratigraphic positions of these units are summarized. Selected samples were analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, microprobe, XRF and INAA, Rb-Sr and SM-Nd-isotope geochemistry, and carbon isotope analysis. The results of petrographic and chemical analysis for those stratigraphic units that were considered the main structural elements of a large impact basin are summarized.

  11. Anti-Austerity Adult Education in Canada: A Survey of a Nascent Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGray, Robert

    2015-01-01

    As the realities of austerity agendas exert pressure on adult education around the globe, this paper attempts to map the developing, albeit small, field of anti-austerity adult education in Canada. In doing so, I attempt to trace the connections between anti-austerity education and existing fields of adult education. I argue that the cases we see…

  12. Virus Survey in Strawberry Production Fields in the United States and Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to determine the distribution of strawberry viruses in the United States and Canada, approximately 1500 samples were collected and either brought back or shipped to the USDA-ARS laboratory in Corvallis between 2002 and 2007. RNA was extracted from leaf tissue and archived at -80C for s...

  13. Limitations Influencing Interventional Radiology in Canada: Results of a National Survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Jeremy [University of Western Ontario, Schulich School of Medicine (Canada); Baerlocher, Mark Otto [University of Toronto, Radiology Residency Program (Canada)], E-mail: mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca; Asch, Murray R. [Lakeridge Health Corporation (Canada); Hayeems, Eran; Kachura, John R. [Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, University Health Network (Canada); Collingwood, Peter [Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonly performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty.

  14. Rules for the preparation of manuscript and illustrations designed for publication by the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampson, Thomas

    1888-01-01

    In the annual report of the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey for 1885-'86, pages 40 and 41, you set forth the functions of the chief of the editorial division as follows: "To secure clear and accurate statement in the material sent to press, careful proof-reading, and uniformity in the details of book-making, as well as to assist the Director in exercising a general supervision over the publications of the Survey."

  15. In Eve L. Kuniansky, editor, 2001, U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4011, p. 157-162

    E-print Network

    Maynard, J. Barry

    In Eve L. Kuniansky, editor, 2001, U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Water in Karst Aquifers By William J. Wolfe and Connor J. Haugh U.S. Geological Survey, 640 Grassmere Park, Suite in characterizing chlorinated-solvent contamination in karst settings and evaluating clean-up alternatives. Five

  16. Multidisciplinary approach (geology, geomorphology, geomechanics, geomatics) for the characterization of the Blais Creek DsGSD (Monashee Mountains, BC, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Danilo; Giardino, Marco; Stead, Doug; Clague, John; Gibson, Dan; Ghirotti, Monica; Perotti, Luigi

    2013-04-01

    Field investigations, including detailed geological and geomorphological mapping have been coupled with stratigraphic and structural studies of the Blais Creek Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DsGSD), Monashee Mountains, British Columbia (BC). To reconstruct the DsGSD evolutionary stages and to evaluate its controlling factors, a complex methodology has been applied, integrating orthophotos, stereo models and 3D models of the DsGSD with field and literature data concerning tectonic and glacial history of the Seymour Valley. General geomechanical properties of the deforming rock mass has been then evaluated for using in numerical models of the failure mechanism at Blais Creek and to define a broad geomechanical characterization of different portions of the DsGSD. The combination between the aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry was appropriate in terms of the quality of the information obtained more than the quantitative information. Several Ground Control Points (GCPs) and Tie Points (TPs) were selected from the original DEM received by the BC Government. The use of a multitemporal aerial triangulation gave the possibility to minimize the error relative to every single block of images. Couples of oriented photos were used to create stereoscopic models. Multitemporal variations of the Blais Creek slope were observed and compared to the actual situation of the slope. The use of terrestrial photogrammetry through Adamtech software confirmed some of the qualitative data obtained from aerial interpretation and from field survey. The limited use of terrestrial photogrammetry was due to the impossibility of orienting the 3D terrestrial models. Anyway these models were also useful to confirm one of the possible mechanisms used to describe the evolution of Blais Creek. Geomechanical analysis was performed through field work and laboratory tests to characterize the entire slope and to produce some of the values useful for a possible numerical analysis of Blais Creek. It showed interesting differences in geomechanical properties between the calc-silicate and quartzite/gneiss. The kinematic analysis showed very the different instability areas along the slope, even if variations in landforms and rock masses volume weren't widespread along Blais Creek slope during the time span covered by aerial photographs (1973-2007). Indeed, the multitemporal analysis outlined very active instability along the large upper trench and the lateral active slopes of Blais Creek. Even without significant level of risks in the area, considering the remote area involved in this instability, some relevant hazards could occur, related to the possible collapse of SE side of Blais Creek DsGSD. Regarding the long term evolution of the DsGSD, the extensive network of linear features at Blais Creek is of a large deforming rock mass. Movement probably began with the retreat of valley glaciers during deglaciation when the oversteepened valley sides were debuttressed. By these evidences it is possible to theorize that the post-glacial retreat of the rock face and removal of the ice buttress from both the Seymour and the Blais Creeek Valleys lowered the factor of stability of the mass as a whole, allowing a deep-seated shear surface to develop gradually over time by progressive creep.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the "quantity of resource" and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource are obtained. Distributions and their properties are established for each of the following resources: (1) oil and nonassociated gas from estimates of the probability of the resource being present and the conditional probability distribution of the quantity of resource given that the resource is present, (2) associated-dissolved gas from its corresponding oil distribution, (3) total gas, (4) oil and total gas in two or more provinces. Computer graphics routines are illustrated with examples from the U.S. Geological Survey Circular 860. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  18. U.S. Geological Survey quality-assurance plan for surface-water activities in Kansas, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, Collin C.; Loving, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    This Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

  19. Supporting data for the U.S. Geological Survey 2012 world assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    World Conventional Resources Assessment Team, USGS

    2013-01-01

    This report provides information pertaining to the 2012 U.S. Geological Survey assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional oil and gas resources of the world, exclusive of the United States. Some of the results were previously published, mostly in USGS fact sheet series.

  20. Overview of Rare Earth Element Investigations in Acid Waters of U. S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Watersheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip L. Verplanck; D. Kirk Nordstrom; Howard E. Taylor

    The geochemistry of rare earth element (REE) variations in acid waters is being studied as part of the U. S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative in two pilot watersheds, upper Animas, Colorado and Boulder, Montana. The following objectives are under investigation: (1) comparison of acid mine waters and naturally acidic springs, (2) determination of whether the dominant control on

  1. An Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and

    E-print Network

    discharge of 580,000 ft3 /s from 402 mi2 in 1935 is a world-record defining flood discharge. #12;AnAn Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and Implications for Future Advancement of Flood Science Scientific Investigations Report 2008

  2. The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Heiken; S. Goff; K. Janik

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration

  3. Protocols for the analysis of algal samples collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Charles, Donald

    Protocols for the analysis of algal samples collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey for Environmental Research­Phycology Section 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19103-1195 www of Natural Sciences, an international museum of natural history operating since 1812, undertakes research

  4. A quality-assurance plan for district ground-water activities of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunett, J.O.; Barber, N.L.; Burns, A.W.; Fogelman, R.P.; Gillies, D.C.; Lidwin, R.A.; Mack, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    As the Nation's principal earth-science information agency, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is depended upon to collect data of the highest quality. This document provides the framework for collecting, analyzing and reporting ground-water data that are quality assured and quality controlled.

  5. Preliminary geologic investigation of the Apollo 17 landing site. [orbital and lunar surface geological surveys during Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, W. R.; Batson, R. M.; Cernan, E. A.; Freeman, V. L.; Hait, M. H.; Holt, H. E.; Howard, K. A.; Jackson, E. D.; Larson, K. B.; Reed, V. S.

    1973-01-01

    A geological investigation of the Apollo 17 lunar landing site was conducted. The Taurus-Littrow valley is interpreted as a deep graben formed by structural adjustment of lunar crustal material to the Serenitatis impact. Materials of the valley fill were sampled at many stations. Ejecta around many craters on the valley floor consist of basalt, showing that the graben was partly filled by lava flows. The geological objectives of the Apollo 17 mission are divided into orbital and lunar surface data collection. The data obtained for both types of investigation are presented in tables, photographs, and drawings.

  6. Geological-geomechanical mapping and characterization of coastal cliffs from bathymetric and TLS coupled surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Marchese, Fabio; Castellanza, Riccardo; Agliardi, Federico; Casulli, Vito; Casulli, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Geological and geomechanical characterization of coastal cliffs is fundamental for a more comprehensive understanding of coastal evolution, stability and hazard. In this contribution, both bathymetric and subaerial topographic data were used to reach a complete characterization. We performed simultaneous multibeam and TLS surveys along a vertical to overhanging rocky cliff. Macro to meso scale observations allowed the mapping of lithological contacts, the description of layer thickness and the identification of persistent discontinuities as well as their role in controlling slope cliff stability. Bathymetric observations facilitate the analysis of submerged morphologies, the description of rock mass conditions and the mapping of deposits and coastal platform remains. Furthermore, they make possible to relate deposits with more unstable cliff sectors, their orientation and the possible wave action. This detailed description of the vertical cliff is fundamental for the analysis of the cliff evolution. This can be achieved by multiple surveys, and the modelling of the cliff stability by means of numerical models In this research we investigated a sector (total length 500 m) of the Apulian coast (Italy) in Polignano a Mare (BA) of extreme cultural and natural interest because of the vicinity to historical buildings and the exceptional landscape features (e.g.Grotta Palazzese).

  7. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-L3 DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Kavelaars, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Murray, I. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Gladman, B. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Van Laerhoven, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Parker, Joel Wm.; Bieryla, A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 400, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Nicholson, P.; Margot, J. L. [Cornell University, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Observatoire de Besancon, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Scholl, H. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, Boulevard de l'Observatoire, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Marsden, B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, E.P.S.A., Universidad de Alicante, Apartado de Correos 99, Alicante 03080 (Spain); Doressoundiram, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, 92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Veillet, C. [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, P.O. Box 1597, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian comets discovered during the first discovery year of the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS). CFEPS is a Kuiper Belt object survey based on observations acquired by the Very Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (LS-VW). The first year's detections consist of 73 Kuiper Belt objects, 55 of which have now been tracked for three years or more, providing precise orbits. Although this sample size is small compared to the world-wide inventory, because we have an absolutely calibrated and extremely well-characterized survey (with known pointing history) we are able to de-bias our observed population and make unbiased statements about the intrinsic orbital distribution of the Kuiper Belt. By applying the (publically available) CFEPS Survey Simulator to models of the true orbital distribution and comparing the resulting simulated detections to the actual detections made by the survey, we are able to rule out several hypothesized Kuiper Belt object orbit distributions. We find that the main classical belt's so-called 'cold' component is confined in semimajor axis (a) and eccentricity (e) compared to the more extended 'hot' component; the cold component is confined to lower e and does not stretch all the way out to the 2:1 resonance but rather depletes quickly beyond a = 45 AU. For the cold main classical belt population we find a robust population estimate of N(H{sub g} < 10) = 50 {+-} 5 x 10{sup 3} and find that the hot component of the main classical belt represents {approx}60% of the total population. The inner classical belt (sunward of the 3:2 mean-motion resonance) has a population of roughly 2000 trans-Neptunian objects with absolute magnitudes H{sub g} < 10, and may not share the inclination distribution of the main classical belt. We also find that the plutino population lacks a cold low-inclination component, and so, the population is somewhat larger than recent estimates; our analysis shows a plutino population of N(H{sub g} < 10){approx} 25{sup +25} {sub -12} x 10{sup 3}compared to our estimate of the size of main classical Kuiper Belt population of N(H{sub g} < 10) {approx} (126{sup +50} {sub -46}) x 10{sup 3}.

  8. Bibliography of Water-Resources Investigations reports published by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1971 through 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, Sharon A.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains a cross-referenced listing of 971 Water-Resources Investigations reports (WRIR's) published by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1971 through 1982. The reports are listed by WRIR number. Most requests for WRIR 's generally are by WRIR number; however, the Survey 's annual catalog, ' Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey (year), ' indexes WRIR 's under the National Technical Information Service number, with the WRIR appearing only at the end of the citation within the index. Additionally, a few WRIR 's have been listed in the index without any reference to their WRIR number; and some WRIR 's appeared only in the discontinued Water Resources Investigations folder series. This report lists WRIR 's in sequential order to assist the readership in locating a particular publication. (USGS)

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Field Leach Test for Assessing Water Reactivity and Leaching Potential of Mine Wastes, Soils, and Other Geologic and Environmental Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a fast (5-minute), effective, simple, and cost-effective leach test that can be used to simulate the reactions that occur when materials are leached by water. The USGS Field Leach Test has been used to predict, assess, and characterize the geochemical interactions between water and a broad variety of geologic and environmental matrices. Examples of some of the samples leached include metal mine wastes, various types of dusts, biosolids (processed sewage sludge), flood and wetland sediments, volcanic ash, forest-fire burned soils, and many other diverse matrices. The Field Leach Test has been an integral part of these investigations and has demonstrated its value as a geochemical characterization tool. It has enabled investigators to identify which constituents are water reactive, soluble, mobilized, and made bioaccessible because of leaching by water, and to understand potential impacts of these interactions on the surrounding environment.

  10. Science strategy for Core Science Systems in the U.S. Geological Survey, 2013-2023

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bristol, R. Sky; Euliss, Ned H.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Burkardt, Nina; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Gesch, Dean B.; McCallum, Brian E.; Miller, David M.; Morman, Suzette A.; Poore, Barbara S.; Signell, Richard P.; Viger, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Core Science Systems is a new mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that grew out of the 2007 Science Strategy, "Facing Tomorrow's Challenges: U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017." This report describes the vision for this USGS mission and outlines a strategy for Core Science Systems to facilitate integrated characterization and understanding of the complex earth system. The vision and suggested actions are bold and far-reaching, describing a conceptual model and framework to enhance the ability of USGS to bring its core strengths to bear on pressing societal problems through data integration and scientific synthesis across the breadth of science. The context of this report is inspired by a direction set forth in the 2007 Science Strategy. Specifically, ecosystem-based approaches provide the underpinnings for essentially all science themes that define the USGS. Every point on earth falls within a specific ecosystem where data, other information assets, and the expertise of USGS and its many partners can be employed to quantitatively understand how that ecosystem functions and how it responds to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Every benefit society obtains from the planet - food, water, raw materials to build infrastructure, homes and automobiles, fuel to heat homes and cities, and many others, are derived from or effect ecosystems. The vision for Core Science Systems builds on core strengths of the USGS in characterizing and understanding complex earth and biological systems through research, modeling, mapping, and the production of high quality data on the nation's natural resource infrastructure. Together, these research activities provide a foundation for ecosystem-based approaches through geologic mapping, topographic mapping, and biodiversity mapping. The vision describes a framework founded on these core mapping strengths that makes it easier for USGS scientists to discover critical information, share and publish results, and identify potential collaborations that transcend all USGS missions. The framework is designed to improve the efficiency of scientific work within USGS by establishing a means to preserve and recall data for future applications, organizing existing scientific knowledge and data to facilitate new use of older information, and establishing a future workflow that naturally integrates new data, applications, and other science products to make it easier and more efficient to conduct interdisciplinary research over time. Given the increasing need for integrated data and interdisciplinary approaches to solve modern problems, leadership by the Core Science Systems mission will facilitate problem solving by all USGS missions in ways not formerly possible. The report lays out a strategy to achieve this vision through three goals with accompanying objectives and actions. The first goal builds on and enhances the strengths of the Core Science Systems mission in characterizing and understanding the earth system from the geologic framework to the topographic characteristics of the land surface and biodiversity across the nation. The second goal enhances and develops new strengths in computer and information science to make it easier for USGS scientists to discover data and models, share and publish results, and discover connections between scientific information and knowledge. The third goal brings additional focus to research and development methods to address complex issues affecting society that require integration of knowledge and new methods for synthesizing scientific information. Collectively, the report lays out a strategy to create a seamless connection between all USGS activities to accelerate and make USGS science more efficient by fully integrating disciplinary expertise within a new and evolving science paradigm for a changing world in the 21st century.

  11. Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program: 2004-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dresler, Paul V.; Bartish, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides a broad range of national expertise in geography, geology, hydrology, and biology. The mission of the USGS is to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; assist others in managing water, biological, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect quality of life. The USGS places a special emphasis on providing science to the land and resource management bureaus of the Department of the Interior (DOI). The Biological Resources Discipline activities assist in maintaining healthy ecosystems and natural resources so that these habitats can continue to provide food, energy, medicine, transportation, and recreation.

  12. Nonfederal Automated Weather Stations and Networks in the United States in the United States and Canada: A Preliminary Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Steven J.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.

    1992-04-01

    Not all weather data are collected by federal agencies. Fueled by the need for more specific meteorological data in real or near-real time, the number of automated weather stations (AWSS) and AWS networks has expanded to the state and private sector over the past decade. This study employed a survey to determine the spatial extent and disposition of these nonfederal AWSs and AWS networks in the United States and Canada, the type of measurements taken, the operating procedures (i.e., maintenance and data-retrieval techniques), and the uses of the data (e.g., research, public service, agency needs). The rapid growth and expansion in the number of AWSs and networks can be viewed as a positive step toward expanding data available for meteorological research and service. As AWS networks continue to grow and expand in the United States and Canada, it is recommended that an AWS climatic database be established. With proper logistical coordination and the cooperation of network operators, development of such a database can become reality.

  13. Archive of U.S. Geological Survey selected single-beam bathymetry datasets, 1969-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreppel, Heather A.; Degnan, Carolyn H.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Metzger, Dan R.

    2013-01-01

    New national programs, as well as natural and man-made disasters, have raised awareness about the need to find new and improved ways to share information about the coastal and marine environment with a wide-ranging public audience. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) has begun a large-scale effort to incorporate the program's published, digital geophysical data into a single point of access known as the Coastal and Marine Geoscience Data System (CMGDS) (http://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/). To aid in data discovery, work is also being done to import CMGP data into highly visible data and information resources, such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and two widely used Earth-science tools, GeoMapApp (GMA) (http://www.geomapapp.org) and Virtual Ocean (VO) (http://www.virtualocean.org/). This task of the CMGP Integrated Data Management System project will help support information exchange with partners, regional planning groups, and the public, as well as facilitate integrated spatial-data analysis. Sharing USGS-CMGP geophysical data via CMGDS, NGDC, GMA, and VO will aid data discovery and enable the data to support new purposes beyond those for which the data were originally intended. In order to make data available to NGDC, and from there into GMA and VO, the data must be reformatted into a standard exchange format and published. In 1977, a group of geophysical data managers from the public and private sectors developed the MGD77 format as the standard exchange format for geophysical data. In 2010, a tab-delimited version of the format was added as MGD77T (Hittelman and others, 1977). The MGD77T geophysical data format can include bathymetry, magnetics, gravity, and seismic navigation data. It is used for the transmission of data between marine institutions, data centers, and can be used by various software programs as an exchange format. A header (documentation) file and data file are created for each survey (Hittelman and others, 1977). More details about the MGD77T format are available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/dat/geodas/docs/mgd77.pdf (74MB PDF). This archive describes the detailed steps used to convert single-beam bathymetry and navigation files into the MGD77T format (Hittelman and others, 1977) for submission to NGDC and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) (http://www.fgdc.gov/metadata) metadata as a publication of these single-beam bathymetry datasets.

  14. Updated results of a search for main-belt comets using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Alyssa M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2010-12-01

    The results of a search for main-belt comets using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data are updated. The remaining observations in the Very Wide segment of data, taken in the g' or r' filters, are visually inspected for cometary activity. The number of main-belt objects in the original and new data sets are 11,438 and 13,802, respectively, giving a total number of 25,240. This is the largest, and least biased, search for main-belt comets to date. One object is observed to show cometary activity, and a new upper limit for strongly active main-belt comets is derived to be 40 ± 18.

  15. Employer-Sponsored Training in Canada: Synthesis of the Literature Using Data from the Workplace and Employee Survey. Learning Research Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostie, Benoit; Montmarquette, Claude

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a review of studies and articles on employer-sponsored training in Canada. The authors reviewed documentation that used data from the Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) and offer a synthesis of the current state of knowledge. The report looks alternately at issues pertaining to determinants of training from the employer and…

  16. Using volunteers to monitor the effects of acid precipitation on Common Loon ( Gavia immer ) reproduction in Canada: The Canadian Lakes Loon Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. K. Mcnicol; M. L. Mallory; H. S. Vogel

    1995-01-01

    The Common Loon (Gavia immer) is a conspicuous and popular aquatic bird that inhabits large lakes (generally >10 ha) on Precambrian Shield across Canada. Because it relies on fish, it is a key bioindicator species linking acid precipitation to higher trophic levels in aquatic food chains. The Canadian Lakes Loon Survey (CLLS), a monitoring program involving volunteers, was initiated in

  17. The ultracool-field dwarf luminosity-function and space density from the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reylé, C.; Delorme, P.; Willott, C. J.; Albert, L.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Artigau, E.; Malo, L.; Hill, G. J.; Doyon, R.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Thanks to recent and ongoing large scale surveys, hundreds of brown dwarfs have been discovered in the last decade. The Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey is a wide-field survey for cool brown dwarfs conducted with the MegaCam camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Aims: Our objectives are to find ultracool brown dwarfs and to constrain the field brown-dwarf luminosity function and the mass function from a large and homogeneous sample of L and T dwarfs. Methods: We identify candidates in CFHT/MegaCam i' and z' images and follow them up with pointed near infrared (NIR) imaging on several telescopes. Halfway through our survey we found ~50 T dwarfs and ~170 L or ultra cool M dwarfs drawn from a larger sample of 1400 candidates with typical ultracool dwarfs i'-z' colours, found in 780 square degrees. Results: We have currently completed the NIR follow-up on a large part of the survey for all candidates from mid-L dwarfs down to the latest T dwarfs known with utracool dwarfs' colours. This allows us to draw on a complete and well defined sample of 102 ultracool dwarfs to investigate the luminosity function and space density of field dwarfs. Conclusions: We found the density of late L5 to T0 dwarfs to be 2.0+0.8-0.7 × 10-3 objects pc-3, the density of T0.5 to T5.5 dwarfs to be 1.4+0.3-0.2 × 10-3 objects pc-3, and the density of T6 to T8 dwarfs to be 5.3+3.1-2.2 × 10-3 objects pc-3. We found that these results agree better with a flat substellar mass function. Three latest dwarfs at the boundary between T and Y dwarfs give the high density 8.3+9.0-5.1 × 10-3 objects pc-3. Although the uncertainties are very large this suggests that many brown dwarfs should be found in this late spectral type range, as expected from the cooling of brown dwarfs, whatever their mass, down to very low temperature. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. Based on observations made with the ESO New Technology Telescope at the La Silla Observatory. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), CNPq (Brazil) and CONICET (Argentina). Based on observations with the Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based on observations made at The McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.Tables 3, 5 and 8 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Sudbury project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Field studies 1984-1989 - summary of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischoff, L.; Dressler, B. O.; Avermann, M. E.; Brockmeyer, P.; Lakomy, R.; Mueller-Mohr, V.

    1992-01-01

    In cooperation between the Ontario Geological Survey and the Institute of Geology and Institute of Planetology, geological, petrological, and geochemical studies were carried out on impact-related phenomena of the Sudbury structure during the last decade. The main results of the field studies are briefly reviewed. Footwall rocks, sublayer, and lower sections of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) were mainly mapped and sampled in the northern (Levack Township) and western (Trillabelle and Sultana Properties) parts of the north range. Within these mapping areas Sudbury Breccias (SB) and Footwall Breccias (FB) were studied; SB were also investigated along extended profiles beyond the north and south ranges up to 55 km from the SIC. The Onaping Formation (OF) and the upper section of the SIC were studied both in the north range (Morgan and Dowling Townships) and in the southern east range (Capreol and McLennan Townships).

  19. U.S. Geological Survey Would Fare Well in Proposed Federal Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is among the U.S. federal science agencies that would see significant funding increases if Congress approves the Obama administration's proposed budget for fiscal year (FY) 2011. The FY 2011 budget request would provide USGS with $1.13 billion, an increase of $21.6 million, or 1.9%, above the FY 2010 enacted level. “In a time of budget austerity, to have the budget for a science agency like the USGS actually be at a level above 2010—and 2010 was a pretty good budget year for the USGS—is indeed a very good sign,” USGS director Marcia McNutt said at a 1 February budget briefing. “What we are seeing in the USGS budget is the reflection from both the president and the secretary [of the Department of the Interior, of which USGS is part] of their commitment that the problems that the nation is facing right now are problems to which science can help us find an answer,” she said.

  20. Estimating bridge scour in New York from historical U.S. geological survey streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butch, Gerard K.

    1993-01-01

    Historical streamflow measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey an bridge-inspection reports by the New York State Department of Transportation are being used to estimate scour at 31 bridges in New York State. Streamflow measurements that were made before, during, or after high flows are used to estimate scour and to define hydraulic properties associated with floods. Clear-water scour is common at most sites; local scour holes that formed during high flows did not refill after subsequent high flows. The 31 streambeds are armored by gravel; median particle size ranges form 22 to 68 millimeters. Streambed elevations measured after a high flow are assumed to represent the elevations during peak flow. Measurements at several bridges indicate scour by multiple high flows, severe floods, and debris. Three high flows at State Route 23 over the Otselic River in Cortland County produced 6.1 feet of local scour and partly exposed concrete pilings below the footing. Although the recurrence interval of each flow was less than 10 years, a 30-degree angle between the flow and the pier increased the tendency of the streambed to scour. State Route 427 over the Chemung River in Chemung County survived the 1972 flood ( recurrence interval greater than 100 years) because pilings supported the undermined piers. The maximum local scour during the 1972 flood was estimated to be 5.4 feet. A local-scour hole, 2.4 feet deep before the flood, was deepened to 7.8 feet.

  1. Data file: the 1976 Atlantic Margin Coring (AMCOR) Project of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.

    1981-01-01

    In 1976, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted the Atlantic Margin Coring Project (AMCOR) to obtain information on stratigraphy, hydrology and water chemistry, mineral resources other than petroleum hydrocarbons, and geotechnical engineering properties at sites widely distributed along the Continental Shelf and Slope of the Eastern United States (Hathaway and others, 1976, 1979). This program's primary purpose was to investigate a broad variety of sediment properties, many of which had not been previously studied in this region. Previous studies of sediments recovered by core drilling in this region were usually limited to one or two aspects of the sediment properties (Hathaway and others, 1979, table 2). The AMCOR program was limited by two factors: water depth and penetration depth. Because the ship selected for the program, the Glomar Conception, lacked dynamic positioning capability, its anchoring capacity determined the maximum water depth in which drilling could take place. Although it was equipped to anchor in water 450 m deep and did so successfully at one site, we attmepted no drilling in water depths greater than 300 m. Strong Gulf Stream currents at the one attempted deep (443 m) site frustrated attempts to "spud in" to begin the hole.

  2. Preliminary summary of the 1976 Atlantic Margin Coring Project of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hathaway, John Cummins; Schlee, J.J.; Poag, C.W.; Valentine, P.C.; Weed, E.G.A.; Bothner, Michael H.; Kohout, F.A.; Manheim, F. T.; Schloam, R.; Miller, R.E.; Schultz, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Atlantic Margin Coring Project, 1976, a 60-day expedition to obtain core samples by drilling beneath the floor of the Continental Shelf and Slope of the eastern United States, was carried out in July, August, and September 1976 aboard D/V GLOMAR CONCEPTION. The coring penetrated as much as 310 meters below the sea floor at 19 sites along the continental margin from Georgia to Georges Bank off New England in water depths ranging from 20 to 300 meters; 1,020 meters of material were recovered in 380 cores, ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. One of the major findings was the discovery of relatively fresh water (salinities less than 3 parts per thousand) extending beneath the Continental Shelf as much as 60 nautical miles seaward from the New Jersey coast. Water of about 1 part per thousand salinity was found beneath the shelf more than 7 nautical miles off Ocean City, Maryland and Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey. Analyses for light hydrocarbons in the cores show the highest concentrations (as much as 412,000 ppm) at sites in water depth greater than 200 meters (the shelf-slope break), principally in Pleistocene sediments, although methane concentrations greater than 400,000 ppm also were found in Miocene sediments at one site near the shelf edge. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Assessing Gaps in the U.S. Geological Survey Streamgage Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, J.; Archfield, S. A.; Stewart, D.; Eng, K.

    2013-12-01

    Streamgages are widely used for a variety of purposes ranging from operational support of water management facilities to flood monitoring to scientific analysis of streamflow and ecological processes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates the largest streamgage network in the U.S., with nearly 8,000 continuous-record streamgages currently in operation. This study assesses the spatial and temporal extent of the network, with particular attention to the applicability of the network for estimating streamflows and streamflow statistics at ungaged locations. There are clear regional differences in the availability of streamgage information and in the transferability of that information to ungaged locations. In particular, arid and semi-arid regions tend to have the poorest network coverage, and the high interannual variability in streamflow in these regions leads to large uncertainty in streamflow statistics calculated at gaged locations using short records. USGS streamgages are also particularly sparse in Alaska and Hawaii. Hydrologic information can be transferred from streamgages to nearby ungaged locations if there is sufficient similarity between the gaged watersheds and the ungaged watersheds. The correlation between streamflow records at existing streamgages was used to assess the transferability of streamflow information. The highest correlations were found in mountainous areas of the U.S., while the lowest correlations were found in the central U.S. and coastal areas of the southeastern U.S.

  4. U.S. Geological Survey community for data integration: data upload, registry, and access tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fort Collins Science Center Web Applications Team

    2012-01-01

    As a leading science and information agency and in fulfillment of its mission to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ensures that all scientific data are effectively hosted, adequately described, and appropriately accessible to scientists, collaborators, and the general public. To succeed in this task, the USGS established the Community for Data Integration (CDI) to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. Through the CDI, the USGS is providing data and metadata management tools, cyber infrastructure, collaboration tools, and training in support of scientists and technology specialists throughout the project life cycle. One of the significant tools recently created to contribute to this mission is the Uploader tool. This tool allows scientists with limited data management resources to address many of the key aspects of the data life cycle: the ability to protect, preserve, publish and share data. By implementing this application inside ScienceBase, scientists also can take advantage of other collaboration capabilities provided by the ScienceBase platform.

  5. Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsh, R.M.; Alley, W.M.; Wilber, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the US Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of the evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources; (2) define long-term trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- and water-management practices.

  6. An evaluation of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares the additions to conventional crude oil and natural gas reserves as reported from January 1996 to December 2003 with the estimated undiscovered and reserve-growth volumes assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000, which used data current through 1995. Approximately 28% of the estimated additions to oil reserves by reserve growth and approximately 11% of the estimated undiscovered oil volumes were realized in the 8 yr since the assessment (27% of the time frame for the assessment). Slightly more than half of the estimated additions to gas reserves by reserve growth and approximately 10% of the estimated undiscovered gas volumes were realized. Between 1995 and 2003, growth of oil reserves in previously discovered fields exceeded new-field discoveries as a source of global additions to reserves of conventional oil by a ratio of 3:1. The greatest amount of reserve growth for crude oil occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, whereas the greatest contribution from new-field discoveries occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest amount of reserve growth for natural gas occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, whereas the greatest contribution from new-field discoveries occurred in the Asia Pacific region. On an energy-equivalent basis, volumes of new gas-field discoveries exceeded new oil-field discoveries. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Documentation of the U.S. Geological Survey Oceanographic Time-Series Measurement Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Martini, Marinna A.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Butman, Bradford

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oceanographic Time-Series Measurements Database contains oceanographic observations made as part of studies designed to increase understanding of sediment transport processes and associated dynamics. Analysis of these data has contributed to more accurate prediction of the movement and fate of sediments and other suspended materials in the coastal ocean. The measurements were collected by investigators at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) and colleagues, beginning in 1975. Most of the field experiments were carried out on the U.S. continental shelf and slope. This report describes the instrumentation and platforms used to make the measurements; the methods used to process, apply quality-control criteria, and archive the data; and the data storage format. The report also includes instructions on how to access the data from the on-line database at http://stellwagen.er.usgs.gov/. As of 2008, the database contains about 4,250 files which may include observations of current velocity, ocean temperature, conductivity, pressure, and light transmission at one or more depths over some duration of time.

  8. A summary of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirsch, R.M.; Alley, W.M.; Wilber, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the U.S. Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of this evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation 's water resources; (2) define long-term trends (or lack of trends) in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- and water-management practices. (USGS)

  9. Standard for the U.S. Geological Survey Historical Topographic Map Collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allord, Gregory J.; Fishburn, Kristin A.; Walter, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    This document defines the digital map product of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Historical Topographic Map Collection (HTMC). The HTMC is a digital archive of about 190,000 printed topographic quadrangle maps published by the USGS from the inception of the topographic mapping program in 1884 until the last paper topographic map using lithographic printing technology was published in 2006. The HTMC provides a comprehensive digital repository of all scales and all editions of USGS printed topographic maps that is easily discovered, browsed, and downloaded by the public at no cost. Each printed topographic map is scanned “as is” and captures the content and condition of each map. The HTMC provides ready access to maps that are no longer available for distribution in print. A new generation of topographic maps called “US Topo” was defined in 2009. US Topo maps, though modeled on the legacy 7.5-minute topographic maps, conform to different standards. For more information on the HTMC, see the project Web site at: http://nationalmap.gov/historical/.

  10. Analytical methods of the U.S. Geological Survey's New York District Water-Analysis Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; Olson, Mark L.; Waldron, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    The New York District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Troy, N.Y., operates a water-analysis laboratory for USGS watershed-research projects in the Northeast that require analyses of precipitation and of dilute surface water and soil water for major ions; it also provides analyses of certain chemical constituents in soils and soil gas samples. This report presents the methods for chemical analyses of water samples, soil-water samples, and soil-gas samples collected in wateshed-research projects. The introduction describes the general materials and technicques for eachmethod and explains the USGS quality-assurance program and data-management procedures; it also explains the use of cross reference to the three most commonly used methods manuals for analysis of dilute waters. The body of the report describes the analytical procedures for (1) solution analysis, (2) soil analysis, and (3) soil-gas analysis. The methods are presented in alphabetical order by constituent. The method for each constituent is preceded by (1) reference codes for pertinent sections of the three manuals mentioned above, (2) a list of the method's applications, and (3) a summary of the procedure. The methods section for each constitutent contains the following categories: instrumentation and equipment, sample preservation and storage, reagents and standards, analytical procedures, quality control, maintenance, interferences, safety considerations, and references. Sufficient information is presented for each method to allow the resulting data to be appropriately used in environmental samples.

  11. A method for mapping corn using the US Geological Survey 1992 National Land Cover Dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Nuckols, J.R.; Ward, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to elevated nitrate levels in community drinking water supplies has been associated with an elevated risk of several cancers including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, colon cancer, and bladder cancer. To estimate human exposure to nitrate, specific crop type information is needed as fertilizer application rates vary widely by crop type. Corn requires the highest application of nitrogen fertilizer of crops grown in the Midwest US. We developed a method to refine the US Geological Survey National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) (including map and original Landsat images) to distinguish corn from other crops. Overall average agreement between the resulting corn and other row crops class and ground reference data was 0.79 kappa coefficient with individual Landsat images ranging from 0.46 to 0.93 kappa. The highest accuracies occurred in Regions where corn was the single dominant crop (greater than 80.0%) and the crop vegetation conditions at the time of image acquisition were optimum for separation of corn from all other crops. Factors that resulted in lower accuracies included the accuracy of the NLCD map, accuracy of corn areal estimates, crop mixture, crop condition at the time of Landsat overpass, and Landsat scene anomalies. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing Gaps in the U.S. Geological Survey Streamgage Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Julie; Archfield, Stacey; Stewart, David; Eng, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Streamgages are widely used for a variety of purposes ranging from operational support of water management facilities to flood monitoring to scientific analysis of streamflow and ecological processes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates the largest streamgage network in the U.S., with nearly 8,000 gages currently in operation. This study assesses the spatial and temporal extent of the network, with particular attention to the adequacy of the network for estimating streamflows and streamflow statistics at ungaged locations. There are clear regional differences in the availability of streamgage information and in the transferability of that information to ungaged locations. In particular, arid and semi-arid regions tend to have the poorest network coverage, and the high interannual variability in streamflow in these regions leads to large uncertainty in streamflow statistics calculated at gaged locations using short records. USGS streamgages are also particularly sparse in Alaska and Hawaii. At ungaged locations, information can be transferred from nearby streamgages if there is sufficient similarity between the gaged watersheds and the ungaged watersheds of interest. The correlation between streamflow records at existing streamgages was used to assess the likely transferability of streamflow information. The highest correlations were found in mountainous areas of the U.S., while the lowest correlations were found in the central U.S. and coastal areas of the southeastern U.S.

  13. Cost effectiveness of the US Geological Survey stream-gaging program in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the cost effectiveness of the stream gaging program in Alabama identified data uses and funding sources for 72 surface water stations (including dam stations, slope stations, and continuous-velocity stations) operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama with a budget of $393,600. Of these , 58 gaging stations were used in all phases of the analysis at a funding level of $328,380. For the current policy of operation of the 58-station program, the average standard error of estimation of instantaneous discharge is 29.3%. This overall level of accuracy can be maintained with a budget of $319,800 by optimizing routes and implementing some policy changes. The maximum budget considered in the analysis was $361,200, which gave an average standard error of estimation of 20.6%. The minimum budget considered was $299,360, with an average standard error of estimation of 36.5%. The study indicates that a major source of error in the stream gaging records is lost or missing data that are the result of streamside equipment failure. If perfect equipment were available, the standard error in estimating instantaneous discharge under the current program and budget could be reduced to 18.6%. This can also be interpreted to mean that the streamflow data records have a standard error of this magnitude during times when the equipment is operating properly. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Cost effectiveness of the US Geological Survey's stream-gaging program in New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolcott, S.W.; Gannon, W.B.; Johnston, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 5-year nationwide analysis to define and document the most cost effective means of obtaining streamflow data. This report describes the stream gaging network in New York and documents the cost effectiveness of its operation; it also identifies data uses and funding sources for the 174 continuous-record stream gages currently operated (1983). Those gages as well as 189 crest-stage, stage-only, and groundwater gages are operated with a budget of $1.068 million. One gaging station was identified as having insufficient reason for continuous operation and was converted to a crest-stage gage. Current operation of the 363-station program requires a budget of $1.068 million/yr. The average standard error of estimation of continuous streamflow data is 13.4%. Results indicate that this degree of accuracy could be maintained with a budget of approximately $1.006 million if the gaging resources were redistributed among the gages. The average standard error for 174 stations was calculated for five hypothetical budgets. A minimum budget of $970,000 would be needed to operated the 363-gage program; a budget less than this does not permit proper servicing and maintenance of the gages and recorders. Under the restrictions of a minimum budget, the average standard error would be 16.0%. The maximum budget analyzed was $1.2 million, which would decrease the average standard error to 9.4%. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water quality monitoring networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Slack, J.R.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    A nationally consistent and well-documented collection of water quality and quantity data compiled during the past 30 years for streams and rivers in the United States is now available on CD-ROM and accessible over the World Wide Web. The data include measurements from two U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national networks for 122 physical, chemical, and biological properties of water collected at 680 monitoring stations from 1962 to 1995, quality assurance information that describes the sample collection agencies, laboratories, analytical methods, and estimates of laboratory measurement error (bias and variance), and information on selected cultural and natural characteristics of the station watersheds. The data are easily accessed via user-supplied software including Web browser, spreadsheet, and word processor, or may be queried and printed according to user-specified criteria using the supplied retrieval software on CD-ROM. The water quality data serve a variety of scientific uses including research and educational applications related to trend detection, flux estimation, investigations of the effects of the natural environment and cultural sources on water quality, and the development of statistical methods for designing efficient monitoring networks and interpreting water resources data.

  16. 43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They...Geophysical surveys are surveys of the physical characteristics of mineral deposits to measure physical differences between rock types or physical discontinuities in...

  17. 43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They...Geophysical surveys are surveys of the physical characteristics of mineral deposits to measure physical differences between rock types or physical discontinuities in...

  18. 43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They...Geophysical surveys are surveys of the physical characteristics of mineral deposits to measure physical differences between rock types or physical discontinuities in...

  19. 43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They...Geophysical surveys are surveys of the physical characteristics of mineral deposits to measure physical differences between rock types or physical discontinuities in...

  20. Modern Methods of Estimating Biodiversity from Presence-Absence Robert M. Dorazio1, U.S. Geological Survey and University of Florida, Department of Statistics,

    E-print Network

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    in the replicated surveys is crucial because it allows species occurrences to be estimated without bias by using1 Modern Methods of Estimating Biodiversity from Presence-Absence Surveys Robert M. Dorazio1, U.S. Geological Survey and University of Florida, Department of Statistics, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. Nicholas J

  1. A survey of brucellosis and tuberculosis in bison in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tessaro, Stacy V.; Forbes, Lorry B.; Turcotte, Claude

    1990-01-01

    Examinations of complete or partial remains of 72 bison found dead in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, revealed evidence of brucellosis in 18 (25%) and tuberculosis in 15 (21%), with a combined prevalence of 42%. Urease-positive and ureasenegative strains of Brucella abortus biovar 1, and strains of biovar 2, were isolated from tissues of bison, including synovium and exudate from severe arthritic lesions. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from a range of granulomatous lesions that were similar to those reported in tuberculous cattle. Diseased bison had a broad geographical distribution, and were found outside the park on at least three natural corridors. The diseases have a deleterious effect on this population of bison, and pose a health risk to other bison herds, livestock, and native hunters in the region. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17423532

  2. U.S. Geological Survey water-resource monitoring activities in support of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soileau, Suzanna; Miller, Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The quality of the Nation’s water resources are vital to the health and well-being of both our communities and the natural landscapes we value. The U.S. Geological Survey investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of surface water and groundwater and provides this information to engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and the general public. This information also supplements current (2013) and historical water data provided by the National Water Information System. The U.S. Geological Survey collects and shares data nationwide, but how those data are used is often site specific; this variety of data assists natural-resource managers in addressing unique, local, and regional challenges.

  3. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-167 (trace constituents), M-160 (major constituents), N-71 (nutrient constituents), N-72 (nutrient constituents), P-37 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-33 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 98 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  4. Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodworth, M.T.; Conner, B.F.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T- 169 (trace constituents), M- 162 (major constituents), N-73 (nutrient constituents), N-74 (nutrient constituents), P-38 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-34 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored intedaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 93 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  5. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for standard reference samples distributed in March 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Jerry W.; Chleboun, Kimberly M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for 8 standard reference samples -- T-157 (trace constituents), M-150 (major constituents), N-61 (nutrient constituents), N-62 (nutrient constituents), P-32 (low ionic strength constituents), GWT-5 (ground-water trace constituents), GWM- 4 (ground-water major constituents),and Hg-28 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 1999 to 120 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 111 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the seven reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the 8 standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  6. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Jerry W.; Copen, Ashley M.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-161 (trace constituents), M-154 (major constituents), N-65 (nutrient constituents), N-66 nutrient constituents), P-34 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-30 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2000 to 144 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 132 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  7. Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, B.F.; Currier, J.P.; Woodworth, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-163 (trace constituents), M-156 (major constituents), N-67 (nutrient constituents), N-68 (nutrient constituents), P-35 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-31 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 2000 to 126 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 122 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  8. Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in April 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodworth, M.T.; Connor, B.F.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-165 (trace constituents), M-158 (major constituents), N-69 (nutrient constituents), N-70 (nutrient constituents), P-36 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-32 (mercury) -- that were distributed in April 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 73 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  9. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-159 (trace constituents), M-152 (major constituents), N-63 (nutrient constituents), N-64 (nutrient constituents), P-33 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-29 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 1999 to 149 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 131 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  10. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in March 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-173 (trace constituents), M-166 (major constituents), N-77 (nutrient constituents), N-78 (nutrient constituents), P-40 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-36 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2003 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 110 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  11. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-171 (trace constituents), M-164 (major constituents), N-75 (nutrient constituents), N-76 (nutrient constituents), P-39 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-35 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 102 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  12. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Miami, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A. C., (compiler)

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Miami to conduct water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Miami USGS for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures that are documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Miami USGS quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities.

  13. Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

  14. Bibliography of selected water-resources publications on Nevada by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1885 through 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunch, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    References to 898 water-resources publications are listed alphabetically by senior author and indexed by hydrographic-area name or other geographic features. Most of the publications were written between 1960 and 1995 by U.S. Geological Survey scientists and engineers of the Water Resources Division, Nevada District. Also included are references to publications by other Water Resources Division authors that deal with Nevada hydrology. References to publications written before 1960 are included to provide a historical perspective. The references include several types of Geological Survey book and map publications, as well as State-series reports, journal articles, conference and symposium papers, abstracts, and graduate- degree theses. Information on publication availability is provided also.

  15. Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally, respondents support greater use of mobile-computing technology at the USGS and are interested in training opportunities and further discussions related to data archiving, access to additional digital data types, and technology development.

  16. Results and Interpretations of U.S. Geological Survey Data Collected In and Around the Tuba City Open Dump, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Otton, James K.; Horton, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This Open-File Report was originally an Administrative Report presentation to the Bureau of Indian Affairs based on U.S. Geological Survey data that has been collected and presented in four previous reports (Open-File Reports 2009-1020, 2008-1380, and 2008-1374, and an Administrative Report on geophysical data). This presentation was given at a technical meeting requested by the BIA on March 3 and 4, 2009, in Phoenix, Arizona. The idea for this meeting was for all the technical people working on issues related to the Tuba City Open Dump site to come together and share their data collection procedures, results, interpretations, and working hypotheses. The meeting goal was to have a clear record of each party's interpretations and a summary of additional data that would be needed to solve differences of opinion. The intention of this presentation is not to provide an exhaustive summary of U.S. Geological Survey efforts at the Tuba City Open Dump site given in the four previously published Open-File Reports listed above, since these reports have already been made available. This presentation briefly summarizes the data collected for those reports and provides results, interpretations, and working hypotheses relating to the data available in these reports. The major questions about the Tuba City Open Dump addressed by the U.S. Geological Survey are (1) what are the sources for uranium and other constituents found in the ground water in and around the Tuba City Open Dump, (2) what is the current distribution of ground water contaminants away from the Tuba City Open Dump (can plume limits be delineated), and (3) what controls the mobility of uranium and other constituents in and around the Tuba City Open Dump? Data collection, results, and interpretations by the U.S. Geological Survey that address these questions are presented herein.

  17. The preparation of illustrations for reports of the United States Geological survey : with brief descriptions of processes of reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgway, John L.

    1920-01-01

    There has been an obvious need in the Geological Survey o£ a paper devoted wholly to illustrations. No complete paper on the character, use, and mode of preparation of illustration has been published by the Survey, though brief suggestions concerning certain features of their use have been printed in connection wit other suggestions pertaining to publications. The present paper includes matter which it is hoped will be of service to authors in their work of making up original drafts of illustrations and to drafsmen who are using these originals in preparing more finished drawing but it is not a technical treatise on drafting.

  18. A M/T dwarf binary from the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey: probing the L/T transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reylé, C.; Delorme, P.; Artigau, E.; Delfosse, X.; Albert, L.; Forveille, T.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Robin, A. C.

    Stellar-substellar binaries are interesting benchmarks. They are useful to constrain the complex substellar atmosphere physics, by using parameters brought by the much better characterized primary star. We report the discovery of CFBDS J111807-064016, a T2 brown dwarf bounded to the low-mass M4.5-M5 star 2MASS J111806.99-064007.8. The brown-dwarf was identified from the Canada France Brown Dwarf Survey, a wide field survey for cool brown dwarfs conducted on the CFHT telescope. The primary was subsequently identified as a co-moving object. We have obtained near-infrared spectroscopy and compare these data with recent atmosphere models to determine the physical parameters of both components, and estimated the masses using evolutionary models. This system is a particularly valuable benchmark since the brown dwarf is an early T: the cloud-clearing that occurs at the L/T transition is very sensitive to gravity and metallicity, but also to dust properties. The T-dwarf, with its metallicity estimate from the primary, provides an anchor for the colors of L/T transition brown dwarfs. This makes it a prime targets to test brown dwarf atmosphere and evolution models.

  19. Late-Quaternary glaciation and postglacial emergence, southern Eureka Sound, high-Arctic Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colm Seamus O Cofaigh

    1999-01-01

    Eureka Sound is the inter-island channel separating Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands, High Arctic Canada. This thesis reconstructs the glacial and sea level history of southern Eureka Sound through surficial geological mapping, studies of glacial sedimentology and geomorphology, surveying of raised marine shorelines, radiocarbon dating of marine shells and driftwood and surface exposure dating of erratics and bedrock. Granite dispersal

  20. Resident research associateships, postdoctoral research awards 1989: opportunities for research at the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; U.S. National Research Council

    1989-01-01

    The scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey are engaged in a wide range of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, hydrologic, and cartographic programs, including the application of computer science to them. These programs offer exciting possibilities for scientific achievement and professional growth to young scientists through participation as Research Associates.

  1. October 2, 1921, view of the ferry crossing the Colorado River at Lees Ferry, Arizona. Photograph taken by Roger C. Rice (U.S. Geological Survey) from the

    E-print Network

    -0286 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Topping, David, J. Computation and analysis be purchased from: U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Information Services Box 25286 Denver, CO 80225............................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction

  2. The current practice trends in pediatric bone-anchored hearing aids in Canada: a national clinical and surgical practice survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) in the 1980s, the practices of surgeons who implant these hearing aids have become varied; different indications and surgical techniques are utilized depending on the surgeon and institution. The objective of the current study is to describe the clinical and surgical practices of otolaryngologists in Canada who perform pediatric BAHA operations. Methods A detailed practice questionnaire was devised and sent to all members of the Canadian Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Those who performed pediatric BAHA surgeries were asked to participate. Results Twelve responses were received (response rate of 80%). All of the respondents identified congenital aural atresia to be an indication for pediatric BAHAs. Other indications were chronic otitis externa or media with hearing loss (92%), allergic reactions to conventional hearing aids (75%), congenital fixation or anomaly of ossicular chain (67%), and unilateral deafness (25%). Minor complications, such as skin reactions, were reported in 25% of cases, while major complications were very rare. There was great variability with regards to surgical techinque and post-operative management. The extent of financial support for the BAHA hardware and device also varied between provinces, and even within the same province. Conclusion There is a lack of general consensus regarding pediatric BAHA surgeries in Canada. With such a small community of otolaryngologists performing this procedure, we are hopeful that this survey can serve as an impetus for a national collaboration to establish a set of general management principles and inspire multi-site research ventures. PMID:23815797

  3. Survey of hepatic and pulmonary helminths of wild cervids in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, M J

    1990-10-01

    During the 1988 hunting season, livers and lungs from 263 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), 198 moose (Alces alces), 147 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and 94 wapiti (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) from Alberta (Canada) were collected for parasitological examination. Most of the samples (89%) were submitted by big game hunters throughout the province. Giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) was found in 9% of 22 yearling and 29% of 65 adult wapiti; 4% of 161 adult moose; and 2% of 97 adult white-tailed deer. The intensity of infection generally was low; however, one wapiti had over 600 flukes in the liver. Infections were restricted to alpine and montane regions in southwestern Alberta (97%) as well as boreal uplands of the Cypress Hills in southeastern Alberta (3%). Other parasites recorded included Taenia hydatigena cysts in liver of 61% of 191 moose and 14% of 247 mule deer. Dictyocaulus viviparus was found in lungs of 14% of 50 moose, 14% of 118 mule deer, 12% of 41 wapiti, and 6% of 54 white-tailed deer. Echinococcus granulosus cysts were found in lungs (and occasionally liver) of 37% of 51 moose. Incidental infections of Thysanosoma actinoides, Orthostrongylus macrotis, and Taenia omissa were recorded. Adult Dicrocoelium dendriticum were collected from liver of two wapiti, one mule deer, and one white-tailed deer from the Cypress Hills. PMID:2250321

  4. Bibliography of reports by members of the U.S. Geological Survey on the water resources of Alaska: 1870 through 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feulner, Alvin John; Reed, Katherine M.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography lists publications prepared by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and published either by the Survey or by the other agencies and organizations between 1870 and the end of December 1976. The titles included are those whose primary topic is hydrology, water resources, or other aspects of water in Alaska. Related subjects, such as geology, included in many of these reports. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Appraisal of the accuracy of U.S. Geological Survey ore reserve estimates for uranium-vanadium deposits on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, Alfred Lerner; Stager, Harold Keith

    1954-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has made estimates of the reserves of uranium and vanadium in the carnotite deposits explored by Geological Survey drilling on the Colorado Plateau. This report presents an appraisal of the accuracy of the reserve estimates for deposits in the Uravan mineral belt, the causes of inaccuracy, and the significance of the estimates in terms of the total known reserves of the region.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Chong, Geneva W.; Drummond, Mark A.; Homer, Collin G.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Knick, Steven T.; Kosovich, John J.; Miller, Kirk A.; Owens, Tom; Shafer, Sarah L.; Sweat, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Southwest Wyoming's wildlife and habitat resources are increasingly affected by energy and urban/exurban development, climate change, and other key drivers of ecosystem change. To ensure that southwest Wyoming's wildlife populations and habitats persist in the face of development and other changes, a consortium of public resource-management agencies proposed the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), the overall goal of which is to implement conservation actions. As the principal agency charged with conducting WLCI science, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a Science Strategy for the WLCI. Workshops were held for all interested parties to identify and refine the most pressing management needs for achieving WLCI goals. Research approaches for addressing those needs include developing conceptual models for understanding ecosystem function, identifying key drivers of change affecting WLCI ecosystems, and conducting scientific monitoring and experimental studies to better understand ecosystems processes, cumulative effects of change, and effectiveness of habitat treatments. The management needs drive an iterative, three-phase framework developed for structuring and growing WLCI science efforts: Phase I entails synthesizing existing information to assess current conditions, determining what is already known about WLCI ecosystems, and providing a foundation for future work; Phase II entails conducting targeted research and monitoring to address gaps in data and knowledge during Phase I; and Phase III entails integrating new knowledge into WLCI activities and coordinating WLCI partners and collaborators. Throughout all three phases, information is managed and made accessible to interested parties and used to guide and improve management and conservation actions, future habitat treatments, best management practices, and other conservation activities.

  7. Health-based screening levels to evaluate U.S. Geological Survey ground water quality data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toccalino, P.L.; Norman, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Federal and state drinking-water standards and guidelines do not exist for many contaminants analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, limiting the ability to evaluate the potential human-health relevance of water-quality findings. Health-based screening levels (HBSLs) were developed collaboratively to supplement existing drinking-water standards and guidelines as part of a six-year, multi-agency pilot study. The pilot study focused on ground water samples collected prior to treatment or blending in areas of New Jersey where groundwater is the principal source of drinking water. This article describes how HBSLs were developed and demonstrates the use of HBSLs as a tool for evaluating water-quality data in a human-health context. HBSLs were calculated using standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methodologies and toxicity information. New HBSLs were calculated for 12 of 32 contaminants without existing USEPA drinking-water standards or guidelines, increasing the number of unregulated contaminants (those without maximum contaminant levels (MCLs)) with human-health benchmarks. Concentrations of 70 of the 78 detected contaminants with human-health benchmarks were less than MCLs or HBSLs, including all 12 contaminants with new HBSLs, suggesting that most contaminant concentrations were not of potential human-health concern. HBSLs were applied to a state-scale groundwater data set in this study, but HBSLs also may be applied to regional and national evaluations of water-quality data. HBSLs fulfill a critical need for federal, state, and local agencies, water utilities, and others who seek tools for evaluating the occurrence of contaminants without drinking-water standards or guidelines. ?? 2006 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, E. R.; Gray, J. R.

    1995-07-01

    Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and leaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 (226Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of226Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in226Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as226Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can226Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides from uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico.

  9. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis of the Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugart, Nicolas

    The United States Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) is a 1 MW reactor located in Lakewood, Colorado. In support of the GSTR's relicensing efforts, this project developed and validated a Monte Carlo N-Particle Version 5 (MCNP5) model of the GSTR reactor. The model provided estimates of the excess reactivity, power distribution and the fuel temperature, water temperature, void, and power reactivity coefficients for the current and limiting core. The MCNP5 model predicts a limiting core excess reactivity of 6.48 with a peak rod power of 22.2 kW. The fuel and void reactivity coefficients for the limiting core are strongly negative, and the core water reactivity coefficient is slightly positive, consistent with other TRIGA analyses. The average fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the full power limiting core is -0.0135 /K while the average core void coefficient is -0.069 /K from 0-20 % void. The core water temperature reactivity coefficient is +0.012 /K. Following the neutronics analysis, the project developed RELAP5 and PARET-ANL models of the GSTR hot-rod fuel channel under steady state and transient conditions. The GSTR limiting core, determined as part of this analysis, provides a worst case operating scenario for the reactor. During steady state operations, the hot rod of the limiting core has a peak fuel temperature of 829 K and a minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio of 2.16. After a $3.00 pulse reactivity insertion the fuel reaches a peak temperature is 1070 K. Examining the model results several seconds after a pulse reveals flow instabilities that result from weaknesses in the current two-channel model.

  10. Acute general surgery in Canada: a survey of current handover practices

    PubMed Central

    Johner, Amanda M.; Merchant, Shaila; Aslani, Nava; Planting, Anneke; Ball, Chad G.; Widder, Sandy; Pagliarello, Giuseppe; Parry, Neil G.; Klassen, Dennis; Hameed, S. Morad

    2013-01-01

    Background Today’s acute care surgery (ACS) service model requires multiple handovers to incoming attending surgeons and residents. Our objectives were to investigate current handover practices in Canadian hospitals that have an ACS service and assess the quality of handover practices in place. Methods We administered an electronic survey among ACS residents in 6 Canadian general surgery programs. Results Resident handover of patient care occurs frequently and often not under ideal circumstances. Most residents spend less than 5 minutes preparing handovers. Clinical uncertainty owing to inadequate handover is most likely to occur during overnight and weekend coverage. Almost one-third of surveyed residents rate the overall quality of the handovers they received as poor. Conclusion Handover skills must be taught in a systematic fashion. Improved resident communication will likely decrease loss of patient information and therefore improve ACS patient safety. PMID:23706854

  11. An Early Pennsylvanian threshold for the influence of vegetation on fluvial landscapes, based on the geological record of Atlantic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibling, Martin; Ielpi, Alessandro; Bashforth, Arden; Davies, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation profoundly influences modern fluvial systems, depending on plant life-history strategies, tolerance to disturbance, and habitat drainage. However, direct evidence for these dynamic relationships is cryptic and has commonly been overlooked in ancient deposits. We report evidence for profound interactions between channels, in situ and transported vegetation in Lower Pennsylvanian formations of Atlantic Canada (~310 Ma), attributed to braided, meandering and fixed-channel (anastomosing) systems. Plant groups include lycopsids that preferred stable wetland settings, disturbance-tolerant calamitaleans, and deeply rooted cordaitaleans (early gymnosperms) that originated in the late Mississippian and colonised both wetland and dryland settings. For the meandering and anastomosing channel deposits, upright vegetation was observed within channel-based bedforms and bars and on channel margins. Lycopsids and calamitalean groves colonized the channel bed and bank-attached bars during periods of reduced flow, nucleating bar growth after flow resumed. Upright lycopsids and cordaitaleans are common along channel cutbanks and are locally tilted towards the channel, implying involvement in bank stabilization. Rhizoconcretions that formed around deep cordaitalean roots may have aided bank reinforcement. Tetrapod and arthropod trackways in the channel deposits indicate a close linkage between riparian and aquatic ecosystems. In the braided systems, sediments that contain abundant cordaitalean logs constitute nearly 20% of channel deposits, and the logs form channel-base lags, fill channels up to 6 m deep, and form nuclei for shallow sandbars. Log accumulations overlain by shale lenses imply a contribution to channel avulsion. Rooted channel-sandstones containing upright trees are interpreted as vegetated islands in an island-braided system. Anastomosing systems are abundant in these Lower Pennsylvanian formations but rare in older strata, and the multi-channel island-braided systems are the oldest yet described. The rise to prominence of these two anabranching styles, broadly coinciding with the rise of cordaitaleans, implies that fluvial landscapes had crossed a threshold from a geomorphic and biogeomorphic mode of operation into a fully ecological mode with feedback loops between vegetation and fluvial processes. Thereafter, patterns of interaction between rivers and vegetation broadly resembled those of today, with prominent riparian corridors and profound consequences for aquatic, soil and other terrestrial ecosystems. Our field observations confirm the co-evolution of river systems, vegetation and animals, and highlight a need to incorporate vegetation more fully into earth-system and landscape models.

  12. A Regional Guide to Iowa Landforms. Iowa Geological Survey Educational Series 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Jean Cutler

    Presented is a non-technical account of the geological appearance and history of the state of Iowa. Included are Iowa's landscape features, geologic events, and processes that shaped the landscape. Maps and numerous illustrations picture the events and landforms described. Each of the state's seven principal landform regions is discussed in…

  13. Surveys of rice sold in Canada for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and fumonisins.

    PubMed

    Bansal, J; Pantazopoulos, P; Tam, J; Cavlovic, P; Kwong, K; Turcotte, A-M; Lau, B P-Y; Scott, P M

    2011-06-01

    Approximately 200 samples of rice (including white, brown, red, black, basmati and jasmine, as well as wild rice) from several different countries, including the United States, Canada, Pakistan, India and Thailand, were analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) and fumonisins by separate liquid chromatographic methods in two different years. The mean concentrations for aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) were 0.19 and 0.17 ng g(-1) with respective positive incidences of 56% and 43% (? the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.002 ng g(-1)). Twenty-three samples analysed in the second year also contained aflatoxin B(2) (AFB(2)) at levels ?LOD of 0.002 ng g(-1). The five most contaminated samples in each year contained 1.44-7.14 ng AFB(1) g(-1) (year 1) and 1.45-3.48 ng AFB(1) g(-1) (year 2); they were mostly basmati rice from India and Pakistan and black and red rice from Thailand. The average concentrations of ochratoxin A (OTA) were 0.05 and 0.005 ng g(-1) in year 1 and year 2, respectively; incidences of samples containing ?LOD of 0.05 ng g(-1) were 43% and 1%, respectively, in the 2 years. All positive OTA results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. For fumonisins, concentrations of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) averaged 4.5 ng g(-1) in 15 positive samples (?0.7 ng g(-1)) from year 1 (n = 99); fumonisin B(2) (FB(2)) and fumonisin B(3) (FB(3)) were also present (?1 ng g(-1)). In the second year there was only one positive sample (14 ng g(-1) FB(1)) out of 100 analysed. All positive FB(1) results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:21623501

  14. Surveys of rice sold in Canada for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and fumonisins

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, J.; Pantazopoulos, P.; Tam, J.; Cavlovic, P.; Kwong, K.; Turcotte, A.-M.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Scott, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 200 samples of rice (including white, brown, red, black, basmati and jasmine, as well as wild rice) from several different countries, including the United States, Canada, Pakistan, India and Thailand, were analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) and fumonisins by separate liquid Chromatographic methods in two different years. The mean concentrations for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were 0.19 and 0.17 ng g?1 with respective positive incidences of 56% and 43% (? the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.002 ng g?1). Twenty-three samples analysed in the second year also contained aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) at levels ?LOD of 0.002 ng g?1 The five most contaminated samples in each year contained 1.44–7.14 ng AFB1 g?1 (year 1) and 1.45–3.48 ng AFB1 g?1 (year 2); they were mostly basmati rice from India and Pakistan and black and red rice from Thailand. The average concentrations of ochratoxin A (OTA) were 0.05 and 0.005 ng g?1 in year 1 and year 2, respectively; incidences of samples containing ?LOD of 0.05 ng g?1 were 43% and 1%, respectively, in the 2 years. All positive OTA results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. For fumonisins, concentrations of fumonisin B1 (FB1) averaged 4.5 ng g?1 in 15 positive samples (?0.7 ng g?1) from year 1 (n = 99); fumonisin B2 (FB2) and fumonisin B3 (FB3) were also present (?1 ng g?1). In the second year there was only one positive sample (14 ng g?1 FB1) out of 100 analysed. All positive FB1 results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:21623501

  15. Survey of bottled drinking water sold in Canada. Part 2. Selected volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Page, B.D.; Conacher, H.B.S.; Salminen, J. [Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1993-01-01

    Selected volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants were determined in 182 samples of retail bottled waters purchased in Canada. Samples included spring water (86) packaged in containers of polyethylene or in smaller containers of transparent plastic or glass, mineral water (61) packaged only in transparent plastic or glass, and miscellaneous bottled waters (35). Analyses were performed by 3 laboratories, each using headspace sampling and capillary gas chromatography with either mass spectrometric (1 laboratory) or flame ionization detection with mass spectrometric confirmation, if required (2 laboratories). Benzene, the contaminant of primary interest, was detected in only 1 of the 182 samples at 2 {mu}g/kg. Other VOC contaminants detected (number of positive samples, average, and range of positives in {mu}g/kg) included toluene (20, 6.92, 0.5-63), cyclohexane (23, 39.2, 3-108), chloroform (12, 25.8, 3.7-70), and dichloromethane (4, 59, 22-97). Cyclohexane was found in the plastic and as a migrant from the plastic in 20 samples of spring water, but it was found in only 1 of 61 mineral water samples analyzed at only 3 {mu}g/kg/. Chloroform was found almost exclusively in samples that could have been obtained from public water supplies. It was not found in mineral water samples, but it was found in 1 spring water sample at 3.7 {mu}g/kg. The source of the toluene contamination was not known. Other VOCs detected include ethanol and limonene, associated with added flavoring; pentane, as a migrant from a foamed polystyrene cap liner; and 1,1,2,2-tetra-chloroethylene in a sample of demineralized water. 10 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    of the Coachella Valley, California. Upper left: Global Positioning System equipment collecting three.................................................................................6 Global Positioning System Surveys.....................................................................................................8 Global Positioning System Survey, 1996

  17. A survey of field instruction laboratories in the United States and Canada

    E-print Network

    Mikus, Timothy August

    1981-01-01

    this information. The results of the sur- vey are intended to provide management information for the Department of Recreation and Parks of the Texas A&H University. A Field Instruction Laboratory is a facility that is used for the practical application... of classroom instruction. It is a laboratory that is separate from the regular campus. In all 116 institutions that had responded to a survey by the Society of Park and Recreation Educators were sent an inquiry asking if the institution they represented had...

  18. The Handling of Hazard Data on a National Scale: A Case Study from the British Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royse, Katherine R.

    2011-11-01

    This paper reviews how hazard data and geological map data have been combined by the British Geological Survey (BGS) to produce a set of GIS-based national-scale hazard susceptibility maps for the UK. This work has been carried out over the last 9 years and as such reflects the combined outputs of a large number of researchers at BGS. The paper details the inception of these datasets from the development of the seamless digital geological map in 2001 through to the deterministic 2D hazard models produced today. These datasets currently include landslides, shrink-swell, soluble rocks, compressible and collapsible deposits, groundwater flooding, geological indicators of flooding, radon potential and potentially harmful elements in soil. These models have been created using a combination of expert knowledge (from both within BGS and from outside bodies such as the Health Protection Agency), national databases (which contain data collected over the past 175 years), multi-criteria analysis within geographical information systems and a flexible rule-based approach for each individual geohazard. By using GIS in this way, it has been possible to model the distribution and degree of geohazards across the whole of Britain.

  19. Climate variation and its effects on our land and water : Part B, Current research by the Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, George I., (Edited By)

    1978-01-01

    To better coordinate information being generated by the U.S. Geological Survey, a workshop was convened near Denver, Colo., on December 7-9, 1976, to exchange ideas about research that is oriented toward climate, climate variation, and the effects of climate on the Nation 's land and water resources. This is the first circular of a three-part report resulting from that workshop. Hydrologic records provide information to the earth scientist about the responses of ground water, surface water, and glaciers to climatic change; geologic sequences provide evidence of earth-surface water, and glaciers to climatic change; geologic sequences provide evidence of earth-surface responses to climatic change; biological records yield information about the effects of climatic change on the Earth 's biota; archeological records tell us where and how man was able to live under changing climatic conditions; and historical records allow the specific effects of short-term changes in climate to be accurately documented. The interrelation between present and past geologic environments, various methods of study , and the span of time over which the results can be applied are shown in a table. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Geoscientific Vocabularies and Linked Data at The British Geological Survey - progress and pragmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, T.; Heaven, R.

    2013-12-01

    The British Geological Survey makes extensive use of controlled vocabularies to promote standardisation and interoperability between its databases and other digital information systems. Many of our vocabularies are published and searchable at http://www.bgs.ac.uk/data/vocabularies/home.html/. There is a movement to ';open up' government data in both the US and UK. In the UK this is promoted by data.gov.uk. Some view linked data as the best way to share and connect disparate data, information and knowledge, in order to develop a ';Web of Data'. Linked data facilitate connections between data sets, and lower the barriers to accessing data that must otherwise be discovered and exploited using other methods. Recently there has been a rapid increase in the rate of publication of linked data, this increase currently being estimated at 300% per year. In the past 2 years we have undertaken a pilot study to publish some of our authoritative vocabularies as linked data. This study has focussed primarily on publishing BGS' 1:625 000 scale geologic map data for the UK, supported by development of linked data sets for: Earth materials - based on the BGS Rock Classification Scheme; lithostratigraphy - based on the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units; and geochronology - based on the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The BGS linked data sets are published at data.bgs.ac.uk. We have learned a number of lessons about the potential and limitations of linked data and associated technologies. We do not envisage SPARQL endpoints being the primary route for public access to linked data because the user would require technical knowledge of the data structure, and because it can be a security threat. Rather, SPARQL may lie behind a user-friendly API. Federated SPARQL queries that can interrogate distributed data sources are in reality too slow, and in practise the data sets would likely be combined in a single store. The data sets in our pilot study are all reasonably static and we solve performance and security issues by serving the linked data as pre-generated static files in a range of formats rather than using a triple-store. This also allows the data to be indexed by search engines. Wherever possible it is good practice to use predicates from well-known published sources, for example RDFS, SKOS, or Dublin Core, in preference to inventing new ones. This promotes re-use of the linked data by as many potential users as possible. Linked data do not directly address logical inference, which is supposed to be one of the aims of the ';Semantic Web'. This sort of ';calculating with knowledge' must be implemented using additional, possibly human-based rather than mechanical, reasoning. Linked data come with all the same issues surrounding provenance and authority of the data that any web resource is subject to. There are issues surrounding versioning and permanence of URIs. Our work on publishing BGS' vocabularies as linked data is proceeding in parallel with our work with the Commission of Geoscience Information (CGI) Geoscience Terminology Working Group which is jointly developing multilingual vocabularies in range of knowledge domains.

  1. THE SHAPE AND PROFILE OF THE MILKY WAY HALO AS SEEN BY THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Juric, Mario, E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS-72, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-04-10

    We use Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data for 170 deg{sup 2}, recalibrated and transformed to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugri photometric system, to study the distribution of near-turnoff main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo along four lines of sight to heliocentric distances of {approx}35 kpc. We find that the halo stellar number density profile becomes steeper at Galactocentric distances greater than R{sub gal} {approx} 28 kpc, with the power-law index changing from n{sub inner} = -2.62 {+-} 0.04 to n{sub outer} = -3.8 {+-} 0.1. In particular, we test a series of single power-law models and find them to be strongly disfavored by the data. The parameters for the best-fit Einasto profile are n = 2.2 {+-} 0.2 and R{sub e} = 22.2 {+-} 0.4 kpc. We measure the oblateness of the halo to be q {identical_to} c/a = 0.70 {+-} 0.01 and detect no evidence of it changing across the range of probed distances. The Sagittarius stream is detected in the l = 173 deg. and b = -62 deg. direction as an overdensity of [Fe/H] {approx} -1.5 dex stars at R{sub gal} {approx} 32 kpc, providing a new constraint for the Sagittarius stream and dark matter halo models. We also detect the Monoceros stream as an overdensity of [Fe/H] > -1.5 dex stars in the l = 232 deg. and b = 26 deg. direction at R{sub gal} {approx}< 25 kpc. In the two sight lines where we do not detect significant substructure, the median metallicity is found to be independent of distance within systematic uncertainties ([Fe/H] {approx} -1.5 {+-} 0.1 dex).

  2. Current status of core and advanced adult gastrointestinal endoscopy training in Canada: Survey of existing accredited programs

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xin; Barkun, Alan N; Waschke, Kevin; Martel, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the current status of core and advanced adult gastroenterology training in Canada. METHODS: A survey consisting of 20 questions pertaining to core and advanced endoscopy training was circulated to 14 accredited adult gastroenterology residency program directors. For continuous variables, median and range were analyzed; for categorical variables, percentage and associated 95% CIs were analyzed. RESULTS: All 14 programs responded to the survey. The median number of core trainees was six (range four to 16). The median (range) procedural volumes for gastroscopy, colonoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and sigmoidoscopy, respectively, were 400 (150 to 1000), 325 (200 to 1500), 15 (zero to 250) and 60 (25 to 300). Eleven of 13 (84.6%) programs used endoscopy simulators in their curriculum. Eight of 14 programs (57%) provided a structured advanced endoscopy training fellowship. The majority (88%) offered training of combined endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasonography. The median number of positions offered yearly for advanced endoscopy fellowship was one (range one to three). The median (range) procedural volumes for ERCP, endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic mucosal resection, respectively, were 325 (200 to 750), 250 (80 to 400) and 20 (10 to 63). None of the current programs offered training in endoscopic submucosal dissection or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. CONCLUSION: Most accredited adult Canadian gastroenterology programs met the minimal procedural requirements recommended by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology during core training. However, a more heterogeneous experience has been observed for advanced training. Additional studies would be required to validate and standardize evaluation tools used during gastroenterology curricula. PMID:23712301

  3. The Size Function of Galaxy Disks out to z ~ 1 from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Legacy Survey

    E-print Network

    Anudeep Kanwar; Luc Simard; David Schade; Stephen D. J. Gwyn

    2008-04-30

    The formation and growth of galaxy disks over cosmic time is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation. Despite steady improvements in the size and quality of disk samples over the last decade, many aspects of galaxy disk evolution remain unclear. Using two square degrees of deep, wide-field i'-band imaging from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, we compute size functions for 6000 disks from z=0.2 to z=1 and explore luminosity and number density evolution scenarios with an emphasis on the importance of selection effects on the interpretation of the data. We also compute the size function of a very large sample of disks from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to use as a local (z ~ 0.1) comparison. CFHTLS size functions computed with the same fixed luminosity-size selection window at all redshifts exhibit evolution that appears to be best modelled by a pure number density evolution. The z = 0.3 size function is an excellent match to the z = 0.9 one if disks at the highest redshift are a factor of 2.5 more abundant than in the local universe. The SDSS size function would also match the z = 0.9 CFHTLS size function very well with a similar change in number density. On the other hand, the CFHTLS size functions computed with a varying luminosity-size selection window with redshift remain constant if the selection window is shifted by 1.0$-$1.5 mag towards fainter magnitudes with decreasing redshift. There is a weak dependence on disk scale length with smaller ($h \\lesssim $ 4 kpc) disks requiring more luminosity evolution than larger ones. Given that changes in number density are primarily due to mergers and that current estimates of merger rates below z = 1 are low, luminosity evolution appears to be a more plausible scenario to explain the observations.

  4. Geological gyrocompass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, M. H.; Beason, S. C.

    1988-08-01

    The geological gyrocompass is an accurate, portable instrument useful for geologic mapping and surveying which employs an aircraft gyrocompass, strike reference bars, a pair of sights and levelling devices for horizontally levelling the instrument. A clinometer graduated in degrees indicates the dip of the surface being measured.

  5. The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, G. C.; Meldrum, R.; Baldwin, R.; Rosenberger, A.; Mulder, T.

    2009-12-01

    NEPTUNE Canada is the world’s first large regional cable-linked, multi-disciplinary scientific seafloor observatory. In the fall of 2007 an 800 kilometer ring of powered fibre optic cable was laid on the seafloor over the northern part of the Juan de Fuca plate and connected to a shore facility near Port Alberni on Vancouver Island. Five nodes were attached to the cable in the early in the summer of 2009 paving the way for junction boxes and scientific instruments installed in the late summer and fall. The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network will consist initially of four broadband and four short period seismic systems. In the summer of 2009, three broadband OBS packages were deployed forming a large triangle with apexes at ODP 1027 in mid plate and two sites on the continental slope, ODP 889 and Barkley Canyon. In summer 2010 an additional broadband package will be installed on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and four short period instruments will be installed nearby forming a small array, 6 km in maximum dimension, to record earthquake activity in the vicinity of the many multidisciplinary ridge experiments. The broadband systems comprise a broadband seismometer and strong motion accelerometer in a surficially buried spherical titanium case, with a current meter, hydrophone and differential pressure gauge deployed nearby. The short period systems will include 3-component corehole seismometers on long term loan from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). All systems will have backup capacity for modest cable outages. The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network relies heavily on knowledge gained from the previous seismographs temporarily deployed in the region by MBARI and the University of Washington and will re-occupy the broadband site and three short period sites at the ridge. NEPTUNE Canada seismic data will be archived by, and available from, both the Geological Survey of Canada and IRIS.

  6. Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardy, Ellen E., (compiler); Dragos, Stefanie L.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains summaries of the progress of water-resources studies in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division, Utah District, from October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. The program in Utah during this period consisted of 21 projects; a discussion of each project is presented in the main body of the report. The USGS was established by an act of Congress on March 3, 1879, to provide a permanent Federal agency to conduct the systematic and scientific classifi- cation of the public lands, and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources, and products of national domain. An integral part of that original mission includes publishing and dissemi- nating the earth-science information needed to understand, to plan the use of, and to manage the Nation's energy, land, mineral, and water resources.

  7. Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Lent, Robert M.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a framework for a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic climate-response program designed to provide early warning of changes in the seasonal water cycle of Maine. Climate-related hydrologic changes on Maine's rivers and lakes in the winter and spring during the last century are well documented, and several river and lake variables have been shown to be sensitive to air-temperature changes. Monitoring of relevant hydrologic data would provide important baseline information against which future climate change can be measured. The framework of the hydrologic climate-response program presented here consists of four major parts: (1) identifying homogeneous climate-response regions; (2) identifying hydrologic components and key variables of those components that would be included in a hydrologic climate-response data network - as an example, streamflow has been identified as a primary component, with a key variable of streamflow being winter-spring streamflow timing; the data network would be created by maintaining existing USGS data-collection stations and establishing new ones to fill data gaps; (3) regularly updating historical trends of hydrologic data network variables; and (4) establishing basins for process-based studies. Components proposed for inclusion in the hydrologic climate-response data network have at least one key variable for which substantial historical data are available. The proposed components are streamflow, lake ice, river ice, snowpack, and groundwater. The proposed key variables of each component have extensive historical data at multiple sites and are expected to be responsive to climate change in the next few decades. These variables are also important for human water use and (or) ecosystem function. Maine would be divided into seven climate-response regions that follow major river-basin boundaries (basins subdivided to hydrologic units with 8-digit codes or larger) and have relatively homogeneous climates. Key hydrologic variables within each climate-response region would be analyzed regularly to maintain up-to-date analyses of year-to-year variability, decadal variability, and longer term trends. Finally, one basin in each climate-response region would be identified for process-based hydrologic and ecological studies.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2011 annual report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Blecker, Steven W.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephanie; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Holloway, JoAnn; Homer, Collin G.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Olexa, Edward M.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Sweat, Michael J.; Tuttle, Michele L.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2013-01-01

    This is the fourth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. In FY2011, there were 37 ongoing, completed, or new projects conducted under the five major multi-disciplinary science and technical-assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis, (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research, (3) Data and Information Management, (4) Integration and Coordination, and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. The four new work activities were (1) development of the Western Energy Citation Clearinghouse, a Web-based energy-resource database of references for literature and on-line resources focused on energy development and its effects on natural resources; (2) a study to support the Sublette County Conservation District in ascertaining potential water-quality impacts to the New Fork River from energy development in the Pinedale Anticline Project Area; (3) a study to test the efficacy of blending high-frequency temporal data provided by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors and high-resolution Landsat data for providing the fine-resolution data required to evaluate habitat responses to management activities at the landscape level; and (4) a study to examine the seasonal water chemistry of Muddy Creek, including documenting salinity patterns and providing a baseline for assessing potential effects of energy and other development on water quality in the Muddy Creek watershed. Two work activities were completed in FY2011: (1) the assessment of rancher perceptions of energy development in Southwest Wyoming and (2) mapping aspen stands and conifer encroachment using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis for effectiveness monitoring. The USGS continued to compile data, develop geospatial products, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts, including (1) ranking and prioritizing proposed conservation projects, (2) developing the WLCI integrated assessment, (3) developing the WLCI 5-year Conservation Action Plan, and (4) continuing to upgrade the content and improve the functionality of the WLCI Web site. For the WLCI FY2012 annual report, a decision was made to greatly reduce the overall length of the annual report, which will be accomplished by simplifying the report format and focusing on the take-home messages of each work activity for WLCI partners.

  9. Geophysical survey for geological hazards assessment of Wadi Thuwal area, KSA: a case history

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mansour A. Al-Garni; Mohamed G. El-Behiry; Mohamed M. Gobashy

    Magnetic and seismic methods have been used in this study as complementary methods to each other to construct a geologic hazard\\u000a map for Wadi Thuwal area. Magnetic interpretation for deep-seated geologic structures has involved reduction to pole algorithm\\u000a and downward continuation techniques. It showed that there are three major fault trends: NE-SW and NNE-SSW, NW-SE, and N-S.\\u000a Furthermore, shear zone

  10. Lithospheric structure beneath the Archaean Slave Province and Proterozoic Wopmay orogen, northwestern Canada, from a LITHOPROBE refraction/wide-angle reflection survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Viejo, G.; Clowes, R. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Slave geological province, a relatively small craton in NW Canada that includes the oldest rocks in the world, is one of five cratons that form the Archaean continental core of North America. The Palaeoproterozoic Wopmay orogen, lying between the craton and the Phanerozoic northern Canadian Cordillera, represents crustal growth through addition of a series of north-south oriented magmatic arcs and accreted terranes. As part of LITHOPROBE's multidisciplinary studies, Line 11 of the SNoRE 97 seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection survey investigated the structure of the lithosphere in this region. Interpretation of crustal and mantle arrivals from 13 record sections followed an iterative procedure of traveltime inversion and forward modelling. Results show that crustal thickness at 32-35 km remains relatively constant from the Archaean regions in the east to Proterozoic domains in the west, contrary to average values of crustal thicknesses from global compilations that suggest thicker Proterozoic crust. At the westernmost end of the line, where crustal extension and basin formation are inferred, the crust thins to 30 km. Upper crustal velocities to about 12 km depth lie in the range of 5.8-6.2 km s-1. The middle crust of thickness 8-10 km has velocities between 6.2 and 6.6 km s-1. Average velocities for the lower crust, differentiated as a 10 km thick layer, range between 6.6 and 6.9 km s-1 with a higher velocity region (7.1 km s-1) in the transition zone between the Fort Simpson magmatic arc and Hottah accreted terrane in the Wopmay orogen, where a Palaeoproterozoic subduction zone has been inferred from coincident multichannel reflection data. In the same area, anomalously low upper-mantle velocities (7.5 km s-1) have been found, indicating that the effects of collision, subduction and accompanying physical changes in the rocks comprising the mantle lithospheric wedge above the underthrusting structure, may have been retained for 1800 Ma. Data from most record sections with offset distances greater than 250 km show continuous wide-angle reflections from upper-mantle depths of about 75 km and almost 100 km. Although poorly constrained, velocities in this depth range vary from 8.4 to 8.8 km s-1. Interpretation of these phases and mantle reflections from equivalent depths in coincident, near-vertical incidence multichannel data relates them to subduction and underthrusting of oceanic crust and subsequent phase changes that occurred during the assembly of the craton and the evolution of the Palaeoproterozoic orogen.

  11. U.S. Department of the Interior December 2013 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    a new mine shaft, thus completing the phase I expansion at its Lac des Iles Mine near Thunder Bay, Ontario. Ore was hoisted through the shaft and production was being transitioned from ramp to shaft commences shaft hoisting at Lac des Iles: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, North American Palladium Ltd. news

  12. Data retransmission from water survey of Canada gauging stations using the ERTS data collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliday, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Nine sites were selected for installation of Data Collection Platforms (DCPs) with the objective of obtaining one near real time water level reading a day from each site. Also the dependability, costs and other aspects of the system could be studied and decisions made with respect to the feasibility of operating a much larger network of DCPs. The number of transmissions received each day from the gauging stations varies from a maximum of 26 to 12 and a minimum of 10 to 3, depending on the location. Quality checks of data have indicated that the data are good. None of the nine DCPs have failed once they have been successfully activated. The experience with the ERTS data collection system has been excellent. The DCP appears to be a rugged, reliable piece of equipment. The ones installed at water survey sites have withstood temperatures less than -40 C and the antennas have withstood wind speeds of over 80 kph (50 mph) and snow loads of 0.6 m (2 ft).

  13. A review and evaluation of alternatives for updating U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milazzo, Valerie A.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1974, the U.S. Geological Survey has been engaged in a nationwide program of baseline mapping of land use and land cover and associated data at a scale of 1:250,000. As l:100,000-scale bases have become available, they have been used for mapping certain areas and for special applications. These two scales are appropriate for mapping land use and land cover data on a nationwide basis within a practical time frame, and with an acceptable degree of standardization, accuracy, and level of detail. An essential requisite to better use of the land is current information on land use and land cover conditions and on the rates and trends of changes with time. Thus, plans are underway to update these maps and data. The major considerations in planning a nationwide program for updating U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover maps are as follows: (1) How often should maps be updated? (2) What remotely sensed source materials should be used for detecting and compiling changes in land use and land cover? (3) What base maps should be used for presenting data on land use and land cover changes? (4) What maps or portions of a map should be updated? (5) What methods should be used for identifying and mapping changes? (6) What procedures should be followed for updating maps and what formats should be used? These factors must be considered in developing a map update program that portrays an appropriate level of information, relates to and builds upon the existing U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover digital and statistical data base, is timely, cost-effective and standardized, and meets the varying needs of land use and land cover data users.

  14. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-FULL DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, J.-M.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Observatoire de Besancon, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Gladman, B. J.; Jones, R. L.; Van Laerhoven, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Parker, J. Wm.; Bieryla, A. [Planetary Science Directorate, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Nicholson, P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Mars, G. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Marsden, B.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Taylor, M.; Bernabeu, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, E.P.S.A., Universidad de Alicante, Apartado de Correos 99, Alicante 03080 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), whose discovery phase ran from early 2003 until early 2007. The follow-up observations started just after the first discoveries and extended until late 2009. We obtained characterized observations of 321 deg{sup 2} of sky to depths in the range g {approx} 23.5-24.4 AB mag. We provide a database of 169 TNOs with high-precision dynamical classification and known discovery efficiency. Using this database, we find that the classical belt is a complex region with sub-structures that go beyond the usual splitting of inner (interior to 3:2 mean-motion resonance [MMR]), main (between 3:2 and 2:1 MMR), and outer (exterior to 2:1 MMR). The main classical belt (a = 40-47 AU) needs to be modeled with at least three components: the 'hot' component with a wide inclination distribution and two 'cold' components (stirred and kernel) with much narrower inclination distributions. The hot component must have a significantly shallower absolute magnitude (H{sub g} ) distribution than the other two components. With 95% confidence, there are 8000{sup +1800}{sub -1600} objects in the main belt with H{sub g} {<=} 8.0, of which 50% are from the hot component, 40% from the stirred component, and 10% from the kernel; the hot component's fraction drops rapidly with increasing H{sub g} . Because of this, the apparent population fractions depend on the depth and ecliptic latitude of a trans-Neptunian survey. The stirred and kernel components are limited to only a portion of the main belt, while we find that the hot component is consistent with a smooth extension throughout the inner, main, and outer regions of the classical belt; in fact, the inner and outer belts are consistent with containing only hot-component objects. The H{sub g} {<=} 8.0 TNO population estimates are 400 for the inner belt and 10,000 for the outer belt to within a factor of two (95% confidence). We show how the CFEPS Survey Simulator can be used to compare a cosmogonic model for the orbital element distribution to the real Kuiper Belt.

  15. Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 1, 1991, to September 30, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardy, E.E.; Gates, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of water-resources studies in Utah from October 1, 1991, to September 30, 1992, has been released by the U.S. Geological Survey. The report details progress for 20 studies. These studies were done in cooperation with other Federal, State, County, or local agencies. The 20 projects include 5 involved mainly with collection of data, 2 with the hydrology of and groundwater quality in Utah's energy-resource areas, 5 with surface water and surface-water quality, 3 with groundwater in unconsolidated sediments, 3 with groundwater quality or the protection of groundwater quality, and 2 with ground- and surface-water relations.

  16. Guidelines for preparing a quality assurance plan for district offices of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Shampine, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Quality Assurance Plan. This plan is a combination of a District's management principles and quality assurance processes. The guidelines presented in this report provide a framework or expanded outline that a District can use to prepare a plan. Parti- cular emphasis is given to a District's: (1) quality assurance policies; (2) organization and staff responsibilities; and (3) program and project planning. The guidelines address the 'how', 'what', and 'who' questions that need to be answered when a District Quality Assurance Plan is prepared.

  17. How do physician assessments of patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening tests differ from actual preferences? A comparison in Canada and the United States using a stated-choice survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DEBORAH A. MARSHALLa; F. Reed Johnson; Nathalie A. Kulin; Semra Özdemir; Judith M. E. Walsh; John K. Marshall; Stephanie Van Bebber; Kathryn A. Phillips

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patient preferences can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test use. We compared utility-based preferences for alternative CRC screening tests from a stated-preference discrete-choice survey of the general population and physicians in Canada and the United States. Methods: General population respondents (Canada, n=501; US, n=1087) participated in a survey with 12 choice scenarios and 9 CRC screening test attributes. Physicians

  18. Utah Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Utah Geological Survey's Web site, Utah Geology, offers a variety of interesting geological information about the state. Good descriptions, illustrations, and photographs can be accessed on earthquakes and hazards, dinosaurs and fossils, rocks and minerals, oil and energy, and more. For example, the Rocks and Minerals page contains everything from how to stake a mining claim to downloadable summaries of mineral activity in the state. There is quite a bit of information within the site, and anyone interested in geology will find themselves exploring these pages for quite a while.

  19. Airborne geophysical survey of ice caps in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, S. J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Christoffersen, P.; Benham, T. J.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.; Richter, T.; Ng, G.; Grima, C.; Habbal, F.; Sharp, M. J.; Rutishauser, A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that between 2003 and 2009, 60 ± 6 Gt of ice was lost each year from the Canadian Arctic (Gardner et al., 2013), making the region the largest cryospheric contributor to global sea level rise outside of the great ice sheets. Glacier ice in the Queen Elizabeth Islands (QEI) currently covers more than 100,000 km2, representing 20% of Earth's ice-covered land area outside of Greenland and Antarctica. The vast majority of this ice is stored within six ice caps located on Ellesmere, Devon and Axel Heiberg islands. Recent satellite observations of the outlet glaciers draining these ice caps have revealed significant velocity variability on inter-annual and multi-year timescales (Van Wychen et al., 2014), though the drivers of these dynamics are not yet understood. Here we present results obtained in May 2014 during an airborne geophysical survey of the ice caps of Axel Heiberg, Ellesmere and Devon islands, including Agassiz Ice Cap (17,300 km2), Prince of Wales Icefield (19,300 km2) and Devon Ice Cap (14,000 km2). We used a Basler BT-67 aircraft equipped with a suite of geophysical instruments, including a phase-coherent VHF ice-penetrating radar, to measure ice thickness and investigate ice basal conditions along outlet glacier flow lines and in the interior of the ice caps. We reveal that the glaciers draining the ice caps of the QEI exhibit diverse characteristics over short spatial scales, and that fast-flowing tidewater glaciers are located adjacent to previously fast-flowing areas that have subsequently stagnated. Our results show that many ice cap outlet glaciers on Ellesmere and Devon islands are between 700 and 1000 m thick and flow through deep bedrock troughs whose beds lie below sea-level. Some of the outlet glaciers also have floating tongues of ice which extend into the adjacent fjord waters. We intend to use our results to characterize the substrate beneath the ice, and to reveal any variations in conditions at the ice-bed interface. Improved understanding of the processes controlling the flow of these outlet glaciers is required to improve projections of how ice in the QEI will respond to expected temperature increases, particularly in the context of amplified regional warming due to rapidly-declining Arctic sea ice cover.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 2011 report of selected wildlife diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, David E.; Hines, Megan K.; Russell, Robin E.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) was founded in 1975 to provide technical assistance in identifying, controlling, and preventing wildlife losses from diseases, conduct research to understand the impact of diseases on wildlife populations, and devise methods to more effectively manage these disease threats. The impetus behind the creation of the NWHC was, in part, the catastrophic loss of tens of thousands of waterfowl as a result of an outbreak of duck plague at the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge in South Dakota during January 1973. In 1996, the NWHC, along with other Department of Interior research functions, was transferred from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), where we remain one of many entities that provide the independent science that forms the bases of the sound management of the Nation’s natural resources. Our mission is to provide national leadership to safeguard wildlife and ecosystem health through dynamic partnerships and exceptional science. The main campus of the NWHC is located in Madison, Wis., where we maintain biological safety level 3 (BSL–3) diagnostic and research facilities purposefully designed for work with wildlife species. The NWHC provides research and technical assistance on wildlife health issues to State, Federal, and international agencies. In addition, since 1992 we have maintained a field station in Hawaii, the Honolulu Field Station, which focuses on marine and terrestrial natural resources throughout the Pacific region. The NWHC conducts diagnostic investigations of unusual wildlife morbidity and mortality events nationwide to detect the presence of wildlife pathogens and determine the cause of death. This is also an important activity for detecting new, emerging and resurging diseases. The NWHC provides this crucial information on the presence of wildlife diseases to wildlife managers to support sound management decisions. The data and information generated also allows for further indepth analyses for determining the biological and ecological significance of disease events, detecting disease trends over time and space, as well as detecting any significant changes to how diseases manifest in the field. Moreover, this information allows us to gain insight into the significance of future wildlife disease events. The purpose of this report is to provide a sample of NWHC data that are available from our Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS). These data are presented in summary format with minimal statistical analysis and interpretation. The goal is to share these data with wildlife managers and other stakeholders, promote the use of NHWC data, and encourage the sharing of wildlife disease data to improve temporal and geographic surveillance coverage. Continued national surveillance for wildlife diseases is essential for providing early detection and warning of events that have the potential to result in harm to human health, economic losses, declines in wildlife populations, and subsequent ecological disturbances. Increased collaboration, coordination, and sharing of surveillance data will enhance this Nation’s ability to detect and respond to wildlife disease threats.

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Ecosystems science strategy: advancing discovery and application through collaboration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.; Wingard, G. Lynn; Brewer, Gary; Cloern, James E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Jacobson, Robert B.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.; McGuire, Anthony David; Nichols, James D.; Shapiro, Carl D.; van Riper, Charles, III; White, Robin P.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem science is critical to making informed decisions about natural resources that can sustain our Nation’s economic and environmental well-being. Resource managers and policymakers are faced with countless decisions each year at local, regional, and national levels on issues as diverse as renewable and nonrenewable energy development, agriculture, forestry, water supply, and resource allocations at the urbanrural interface. The urgency for sound decisionmaking is increasing dramatically as the world is being transformed at an unprecedented pace and in uncertain directions. Environmental changes are associated with natural hazards, greenhouse gas emissions, and increasing demands for water, land, food, energy, mineral, and living resources. At risk is the Nation’s environmental capital, the goods and services provided by resilient ecosystems that are vital to the health and wellbeing of human societies. Ecosystem science—the study of systems of organisms interacting with their environment and the consequences of natural and human-induced change on these systems—is necessary to inform decisionmakers as they develop policies to adapt to these changes. This Ecosystems Science Strategy is built on a framework that includes basic and applied science. It highlights the critical roles that U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and partners can play in building scientific understanding and providing timely information to decisionmakers. The strategy underscores the connection between scientific discoveries and the application of new knowledge, and it integrates ecosystem science and decisionmaking, producing new scientific outcomes to assist resource managers and providing public benefits. We envision the USGS as a leader in integrating scientific information into decisionmaking processes that affect the Nation’s natural resources and human well-being. The USGS is uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in ecosystem science. With its wide range of expertise, the Bureau can bring holistic, cross-scale, interdisciplinary capabilities to the design and conduct of monitoring, research, and modeling and to new technologies for data collection, management, and visualization. Collectively, these capabilities can be used to reveal ecological patterns and processes, explain how and why ecosystems change, and forecast change over different spatial and temporal scales. USGS science can provide managers with options and decision-support tools to use resources sustainably. The USGS has long-standing, collaborative relationships with the Department of the Interior (DOI) and other partners in the natural sciences, in both conducting science and applying the results. The USGS engages these partners in cooperative investigations that otherwise would lack the necessary support or be too expensive for a single bureau to conduct. The heart of this strategy is a framework for USGS ecosystems science that focuses on five long-term goals, which are seen as interconnected components that reinforce our vision of the USGS providing science that is at the forefront of decisionmaking.

  2. Evaluation of the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Data-Collection Program in Hawaii, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, Stephen S.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey ground-water data-collection program in the State of Hawaii consisted of 188 wells distributed among the islands of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii. Water-level and water-quality (temperature, specific conductance, and chloride concentration) data were collected from observation wells, deep monitoring wells that penetrate the zone of transition between freshwater and saltwater, free-flowing wells, and pumped wells. The objective of the program was to collect sufficient spatial and temporal data to define seasonal and long-term changes in ground-water levels and chloride concentrations induced by natural and human-made stresses for different climatic and hydrogeologic settings. Wells needed to meet this objective can be divided into two types of networks: (1) a water-management network to determine the response of ground-water flow systems to human-induced stresses, such as pumpage, and (2) a baseline network to determine the response of ground-water flow systems to natural stresses for different climatic and hydrogeologic settings. Maps showing the distribution and magnitude of pumpage and the distribution of proposed pumped wells are presented to identify areas in need of water-management networks. Wells in the 1992 U.S. Geological Survey ground-water data-collection program were classified as either water-management or baseline network wells. In addition, locations where additional water-management network wells are needed for water-level and water-quality data were identified.

  3. Water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana, October 1993 through September 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harksen, C. J., (compiler); Midtlyng, Karen S.

    1995-01-01

    Water-resources programs and activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana consist principally of hydrologic-data collection and investigative studies that address water-resource issues. The work is supported by direct Federal funding, by transfer of funds from other Federal agencies, and by joint funding agreements with State or local agencies. The Montana District of the Geological Survey's Water Resources Division conducts its hydrologic work through a District Office in Helena and Field Headquarters in Helena, Billings, Kalispell, and Fort Peck. Thirty-two projects currently are being conducted. As outlined in this report, these projects are operated under the general categories of data-collection programs and investigative studies. This report describes the projects funded for fiscal years 1994 and 1995. The report also describes the operations of the Montana District, general hydrology of Montana, activities in addition to regular programs, and sources of publications and information. It also lists reports published or released during the preceding 5 years.

  4. Water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana, October 1991 through September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midtlyng, K. S., (compiler); Harksen, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Water-resources programs and activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana consist principally of hydrologic-data collection and investigative studies that address water-resource issues. The work is supported by direct Federal funding, by transfer of funds from other Federal agencies, and by joint funding agreements with State or local agencies. The Montana District of the Geological Survey's Water Resources Division conducts its hydrologic work through a District Office in Helena, and Field Headquarters in Helena, Billings, Fort Peck, and Kalispell. Twenty-seven projects are being con- ducted. As outlined in this report, these projects are operated under the general categories of data- collection programs and investigative studies. This report describes the projects funded for fiscal years 1992 and 1993. hi addition, it describes the operations of the Montana District, hydrologic conditions during water year 1992, activities in addition to regular programs, and sources of publications and information. It also lists reports published or released during the preceding 5 years.

  5. U.S. Geological Survey Water science strategy--observing, understanding, predicting, and delivering water science to the nation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evenson, Eric J.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Blome, Charles D.; Böhlke, John Karl; Hershberger, Paul K.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Morlock, Scott E.; Reeves, Howard W.; Verdin, James P.; Weyers, Holly S.; Wood, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    This report expands the Water Science Strategy that began with the USGS Science Strategy, “Facing Tomorrow’s Challenges—U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007–2017” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). This report looks at the relevant issues facing society and develops a strategy built around observing, understanding, predicting, and delivering water science for the next 5 to 10 years by building new capabilities, tools, and delivery systems to meet the Nation’s water-resource needs. This report begins by presenting the vision of water science for the USGS and the societal issues that are influenced by, and in turn influence, the water resources of our Nation. The essence of the Water Science Strategy is built on the concept of “water availability,” defined as spatial and temporal distribution of water quantity and quality, as related to human and ecosystem needs, as affected by human and natural influences. The report also describes the core capabilities of the USGS in water science—the strengths, partnerships, and science integrity that the USGS has built over its 134-year history. Nine priority actions are presented in the report, which combine and elevate the numerous specific strategic actions listed throughout the report. Priority actions were developed as a means of providing the audience of this report with a list for focused attention, even if resources and time limit the ability of managers to address all of the strategic actions in the report.

  6. Seafloor video footage and still-frame grabs from U.S. Geological Survey cruises in Hawaiian nearshore waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Tierney, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Underwater video footage was collected in nearshore waters (<60-meter depth) off the Hawaiian Islands from 2002 to 2011 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program's Pacific Coral Reef Project, to improve seafloor characterization and for the development and ground-truthing of benthic-habitat maps. This report includes nearly 53 hours of digital underwater video footage collected during four USGS cruises and more than 10,200 still images extracted from the videos, including still frames from every 10 seconds along transect lines, and still frames showing both an overview and a near-bottom view from fixed stations. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) shapefiles of individual video and still-image locations, and Google Earth kml files with explanatory text and links to the video and still images, are included. This report documents the various camera systems and methods used to collect the videos, and the techniques and software used to convert the analog video tapes into digital data in order to process the images for optimum viewing and to extract the still images, along with a brief summary of each survey cruise.

  7. U.S. Geological Survey offshore program of resource and geo-environmental studies and topical investigations, Pacific-Arctic region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, David William

    1978-01-01

    The Geological Survey 's marine geology investigations in the Pacific-Arctic area are presented in this report in the context of the underlying socio-economic problem of expanding the domestic production of oil and gas and other mineral and hard- and soft-rock resources while maintaining acceptable standards in the marine environment. The primary mission of the Survey 's Pacific-Arctic Branch of Marine Geology is to provide scientifically interpreted information about the (1) resource potential, (2) geo-environmental setting, and (3) overall geologic characteristics of the continental margins (that is, the continental shelf, slope and rise) and adjacent deeper water and shallower coastal areas off California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii and also, where it is of interest to the U.S. Government, more remote deep-sea areas of the Pacific-Arctic realm. (Sinha-OEIS)

  8. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    ..............................................................................................................................3 Basic Geology of Rare Earth Elements­5220 The Principal Rare Earth Elements Deposits of the United States--A Summary of Domestic Deposits and a Global Perspective SmSm GdGd PrPr LaLa NdNd CeCe #12;Cover photo: Powders of six rare earth elements oxides

  9. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    southeast In the 1850's, gold fever brought the first waves of European settlers through the Long Valley monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discov- ered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively

  10. Strategic Directions for U.S. Geological Survey Water Science, 20122022--

    E-print Network

    , Reston, Virginia: 2012 For more information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth://www.usgs.gov or call 1­888­ASK­USGS. For an overview of USGS information products, including maps, imagery to their problem. External partners rarely approached us with a problem in "geology," but they might need help

  11. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY CIRCULAR 930-N International Strategic Minerals Inventory

    E-print Network

    , and the United States of America #12;Geologic Time Scale I Million years Age before present Holocene Quaternary 1 of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America 1993 #12;U Kingdom, and the United States of America.'' Includes bibliographical references. Supt. of Docs. no.: II9

  12. Coal resources of Northern Canada with emphasis on Whitehorse Trough, Bonnet Plume Basin and Brackett Basin 1 Geological Survey of Canada Contribution No. 1999-127. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R Cameron; A. P Beaton

    2000-01-01

    In the Yukon Territory and District of Mackenzie, coal-bearing strata, ranging in age from Mississippian to Oligocene, have been found in some 27 areas. In the Yukon, such rocks underlie 37,000 km2, while in the District of Mackenzie, 3000 km2 are believed to contain coal in the Brackett Basin alone, with additional potential in the Liard River, Godlin Lake and

  13. Geologic Maps and Mapping

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to resources on geologic mapping, and to sources of geologic maps. There is an introduction to geologic mapping, which summarizes its principles and practices, and a history of United States Geological Survey (USGS) mapping activities from 1879 to the present, as well as links to papers on the values and hazards associated with geologic maps and mapping. Online sources of maps include the USGS Geologic Map Database, other federal map products (FEDMAP), state geological survey products (STATEMAP), and university map products (EDMAP).

  14. Aadland, R.K., and E.H. Bennett. 1979. Geologic Map of the Sandpoint Quadrangle, Idaho and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate.

    E-print Network

    and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate. Abbot, A. H. and Duvenack. 1939. 1934 (Acipenser transmontanus): An empirical expansive gene flow model. (Chapter 3) In: Anders, P.J. 2002. 2002. Geographic and Frequency Distributions of Control Region Length Variation in the mtDNA Genome

  15. Cross-Canada survey of resistance of 2747 aerobic blood culture isolates to piperacillin/tazobactam and other antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Forward, Kevin R; Franks, Patricia A; Low, Donald E; Rennie, Robert; Simor, Andrew E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity of piperacillin/tazobactam with that of other broad parenteral antibiotics against aerobic and facultative anaerobic blood culture isolates in a Canada-wide survey. DESIGN: Fifty-eight laboratories in nine provinces each contributed up to 50 consecutive clinically significant aerobic and facultative anaerobic isolates for susceptibility testing. SETTING: Participating hospitals included both tertiary care and community hospitals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Testing was performed in five regional centres by using the same microbroth dilution method, and results were interpreted according to National Commitee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M7-A3 and M100-S5 guidelines. RESULTS: Piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem were both active against more than 99% of the 1616 strains of Enterobacteriaceae species tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 90% of isolates (MIC90) of all Enterobacteriaceae species was 2 mg/L for piperacillin/tazobactam compared with 64 mg/L for piperacillin alone. Seventeen per cent of strains of Enterobacteriaceae species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam but resistant to piperacillin. Piperacillin/tazobactam was highly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibiting 99.1% of strains. MIC90 was 8 mg/L. Nine per cent of P aeruginosa strains were not susceptible to imipenem. Most of these strains had a MIC of 8 mg/L, which falls in the intermediate category. Ninety-seven per cent of P aeruginosa were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and 97.3% to tobramycin. Ninety-six per cent of strains of Actinobacter species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam, whereas only 76% of strains were susceptible to piperacillin alone. Overall, piperacillin/tazobactam was the most active agent tested; 98% of all strains were susceptible, followed closely by imipenem, to which 97.8% of strains were susceptible. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic blood culture isolates from Canadian centres continue to be highly susceptible to a variety of antibiotics. The broad spectrum of activity of piperacillin/tazobactam suggests that this combination should be considered for empirical treatment of sepsis while awaiting results of cultures and susceptibility testing. PMID:22346534

  16. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    of these critical habitat designations, concluded that the current morphology of Platte River channels is limiting of the channel to be surveyed. For rivers of sufficient depth to be navigated by boat, hydroacoustic sensors

  17. Geologic results of the TMS survey over Mt. Emmons, Colorado. [Thematic Mapper Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D. L.; Sadowski, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In 1981, NASA conducted with an American company a cooperative study, involving the use of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data. The study was concerned with an area near Crested Butte, Colorado, which contains a known, but unmined, major molybdenum deposit. Detailed ground observations in the Mt. Emmons area demonstrated that the imagery was extremely effective for detection of geologically significant features. The imagery specifically delineated areas of ferric iron staining, seritization, and hornfelized rock. Attention is given to data acquisition and data processing, field work in 1982 and in 1983, the integration of gravity data, and costs.

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Assessment 2000: Estimates of undiscovered oil and gas resources for the world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Whitney, G.

    2000-01-01

    Worldwide supply of oil and natural gas is ultimately linked to the geologic abundance and distribution of those fossil fuels. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed a new assessment of the technically recoverable undiscovered oil and gas resources of the world. Nearly 1000 provinces were defined and known petroleum resources exist in 406 of these. A total of 76 priority provinces, containing over 95 percent of the world's known oil and gas, and 52 'boutique', or prospective, provinces were assessed. Based upon our initial analyses, several observations are clear. First, our estimates of total undiscovered technically recoverable petroleum (oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids) resources do not differ greatly (+9.5 percent) from the world totals determined in the 1994 USGS world assessment. However, our estimates of undiscovered oil are up considerably (+24.3 percent), and the regional distribution differs significantly from previous estimates. Secondly, estimates of global undiscovered natural gas resources are smaller than previously estimated (-10.4 percent), largely due to reduced estimates for the former Soviet Union, and natural gas liquids resources are significantly larger than previous estimates because co-product ratio calculations were included in this assessment. In addition, mean estimates of field growth of known oil and gas fields will likely approximate quantities of undiscovered resources and are a critical component of any analysis of world oil and gas supply.

  19. Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey, Mid-Atlantic District, 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGreevy, L.J.; Hyatt, G.J.; Cockey, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Mid-Atlantic District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, includes the States of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia and the District of Columbia. The water resources program of the Mid-Atlantic District is conducted from offices located at seven sites in the three states. The program consists of two elements: Collection of basic records concerning quantitative and qualitative data for streams, reservoirs, estuaries, and groundwater; and interpretative investigations based on the water facts collected in the basic data activities. The organization and activities of the Mid-Atlantic District are described. Projects that were active during 1984, 1985, or 1986 are summarized with a listing of reports of results of water resources studies in the District that were approved between January 1980 and June 1986. (USGS)

  20. Programs for generating data tables for the annual water-resources data report of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, R.R.; Hill, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed software that interfaces with the Automated Data Processing System to facilitate and expedite preparation of the annual water-resources data report. This software incorporates a feature that prepares daily values tables and appends them to previously edited files containing station manuscripts. Other features collate the merged files with miscellaneous sections of the report. The report is then printed as page-size, camera-ready copy. All system components reside on a minicomputer; this provides easy access and use by remote field offices. Automation of the annual report preparation process results in significant savings of labor and cost. Use of the system for producing the 1986 annual report in the North Carolina District realized a labor savings of over two man-months. A fully implemented system would produce a greater savings and speed release of the report to users.

  1. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey reports documenting flood profiles of streams in Iowa, 1963-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This report is part of an ongoing program that is publishing flood profiles of streams in Iowa. The program is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Transportation and the Iowa Highway Research Board (Project HR-140). Information from flood profiles is used by engineers to analyze and design bridges, culverts, and roadways. This report summarizes 47 U.S. Geological Survey flood-profile reports that were published for streams in Iowa during a 50-year period from 1963 to 2012. Flood events profiled in the reports range from 1903 to 2010. Streams in Iowa that have been selected for the preparation of flood-profile reports typically have drainage areas of 100 square miles or greater, and the documented flood events have annual exceedance probabilities of less than 2 to 4 percent. This report summarizes flood-profile measurements, changes in flood-profile report content throughout the years, streams that were profiled in the reports, the occurrence of flood events profiled, and annual exceedance-probability estimates of observed flood events. To develop flood profiles for selected flood events for selected stream reaches, the U.S. Geological Survey measured high-water marks and river miles at selected locations. A total of 94 stream reaches have been profiled in U.S. Geological Survey flood-profile reports. Three rivers in Iowa have been profiled along the same stream reach for five different flood events and six rivers in Iowa have been profiled along the same stream reach for four different flood events. Floods were profiled for June flood events for 18 different years, followed by July flood events for 13 years, May flood events for 11 years, and April flood events for 9 years. Most of the flood-profile reports include estimates of annual exceedance probabilities of observed flood events at streamgages located along profiled stream reaches. Comparisons of 179 historic and updated annual exceedance-probability estimates indicate few differences that are considered substantial between the historic and updated estimates for the observed flood events. Overall, precise comparisons for 114 observed flood events indicate that updated annual exceedance probabilities have increased for most of the observed flood events compared to the historic annual exceedance probabilities. Multiple large flood events exceeding the 2-percent annual exceedance-probability discharge estimate occurred at 37 of 98 selected streamgages during 1960–2012. Five large flood events were recorded at two streamgages in Ames during 1990–2010 and four large flood events were recorded at four other streamgages during 1973–2010. Results of Kendall’s tau trend-analysis tests for 35 of 37 selected streamgages indicate that a statistically significant trend is not evident for the 1963–2012 period of record; nor is an overall clear positive or negative trend evident for the 37 streamgages.

  2. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities in the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Kimbrough, Robert A.; Turney, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), this quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the USGS Washington Water Science Center (WAWSC) in conducting water-quality activities. The plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the personnel of the WAWSC for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures that are documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the WAWSC's quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities and to supplement the WAWSC quality-assurance plan.

  3. Geology and mineral resource assessment of the Venezuelan Guayana Shield at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.; Wynn, J.C.; Gray, Floyd; Cox, D.P.; Sterwart, J.H.; Brooks, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains vector-based digital maps of the geology and resource assessment of the Venezuela Guayana Shield originally published as paper maps in 1993 in U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2062, at a scale of 1:1 million and revised in 1993-95 as separate maps at a scale of 1:500,000. Although the maps on this disc can be displayed at different scales, they are not intended to be used at any scale more detailed than 1:500,000.

  4. Quality-assurance plan and field methods for quality-of-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mann

    1996-01-01

    Water-quality activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Project Office are part of the US Geological Survey`s (USGS) Water Resources Division (WRD) mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation`s water resources. The purpose of the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for water-quality activities performed by the INEL Project Office is to maintain and improve the quality of

  5. Access to primary health care for immigrants: results of a patient survey conducted in 137 primary care practices in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immigrants make up one fifth of the Canadian population and this number continues to grow. Adequate access to primary health care is important for this population but it is not clear if this is being achieved. This study explored patient reported access to primary health care of a population of immigrants in Ontario, Canada who were users of the primary care system and compared this with Canadian-born individuals; and by model of primary care practice. Methods This study uses data from the Comparison of Models of Primary Care Study (COMP-PC), a mixed-methods, practice-based, cross-sectional study that collected information from patients and providers in 137 primary care practices across Ontario, Canada in 2005-2006. The practices were randomly sampled to ensure an equal number of practices in each of the four dominant primary care models at that time: Fee-For-Service, Community Health Centres, and the two main capitation models (Health Service Organization and Family Health Networks). Adult patients of participating practices were identified when they presented for an appointment and completed a survey in the waiting room. Three measures of access were used, all derived from the patient survey: First Contact Access, First Contact Utilization (both based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool) and number of self-reported visits to the practice in the past year. Results Of the 5,269 patients who reported country of birth 1,099 (20.8%) were born outside of Canada. In adjusted analysis, recent immigrants (arrival in Canada within the past five years) and immigrants in Canada for more than 20 years were less likely to report good health compared to Canadian-born (Odds ratio 0.58, 95% CI 0.36,0.92 and 0.81, 95% CI 0.67,0.99). Overall, immigrants reported equal access to primary care services compared with Canadian-born. Within immigrant groups recently arrived immigrants had similar access scores to Canadian-born but reported 5.3 more primary care visits after adjusting for health status. Looking across models, recent immigrants in Fee-For-Service practices reported poorer access and fewer primary care visits compared to Canadian-born. Conclusions Overall, immigrants who were users of the primary care system reported a similar level of access as Canadian-born individuals. While recent immigrants are in poorer health compared with Canadian-born they report adequate access to primary care. The differences in access for recently arrived immigrants, across primary care models suggests that organizational features of primary care may lead to inequity in access. PMID:23272805

  6. A slingram survey on the Nevada Test Site: part of an integrated geologic geophysical study of site evaluation for nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanigan, Vincent J.

    1979-01-01

    A slingram geophysical survey was made in early 1978 as part of the integrated geologlcal-geophysical study aimed at evaluating the Eleana Formation as a possible repository for nuclear waste. The slingram data were taken over an alluvial fan and pediments along the eastern flank of Syncline Ridge about 45 km north of Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. The data show that the more conductive argillaceous Eleana Formation varies in depth from 40 to 85 m from west to east along traverse lines. Northeast-trending linear anomalies suggest rather abrupt changes in subsurface geology that may be associated with faults and fractures. The results of the slingram survey will, when interpreted in the light of other geologic and geophysical evidence, assist in understanding the shallow parts of the geologic setting of the Eleana Formation.

  7. Use of the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) to Simulate Water Quality at Five U.S. Geological Survey Research Watersheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Webb; G. H. Leavesley; J. B. Shanley; N. E. Peters; B. T. Aulenbach; A. E. Blum; D. H. Campbell; D. W. Clow; M. A. Mast; R. F. Stallard; M. C. Larsen; J. W. Troester; J. F. Walker; A. F. White

    2003-01-01

    The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was developed as an aid to compare and contrast basic hydrologic and biogeochemical processes active in the diverse hydroclimatic regions represented by the five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico.

  8. PhotographbyRobertE.Broshears,U.S.GeologicalSurvey(retired) Villagers lining up for water at a community well near Kabul, Afghanistan.

    E-print Network

    .S. Geological Survey in Afghanistan From 2004 Through 2014 Safe and reliable supply of water, for irrigation Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation, and Livestock, and nongovernmental organizations in Afghanistan with Afghan scientists, developed a regional ground water flow model to assist with water resource planning

  9. Spatial focusing of electrical resistivity surveys considering geologic and hydrologic layering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Furman; Ty P. A. Ferre?; Gail L. Heath

    2007-01-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography ERT has shown great promise for monitoring transient hydrologic processes. One ad- vantage of ERT under those conditions is the ability of a user to tailor the spatial sensitivity of an ERT survey through selection of electrode locations and electrode combinations. Recent re- search has shown that quadripoles can be selected in a manner that improves the

  10. Standards for illustrations in reports of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robert A.; Balthrop, Barbara H.

    1987-01-01

    This volume will provide a convenient and much-needed compilation of standards for the design of illustrations for authors of Survey reports produced in the Southeastern Region. While it presents very little that is new, it does draw material together under one cover for easy reference.

  11. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of soil and moisture conservation on public domain lands, 1941-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, H.V.; Melin, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The passage of the Taylor Grazing Act in 1934 marked the end of an era in the land policies in the United States in that disposal of the public lands by homesteading was terminated except under rigidly prescribed procedures, and the remaining public lands covering about 175 million acres in the western conterminous states were brought under regulatory authority for grazing use. In 1934 the lands were mostly in a severe state of deterioration as a result of overgrazing and drought. In addition to reducing numbers of livestock using the lands, successive programs of conservation practices were established of which the Soil and Moisture Conservation Program of the Department of the Interior is of particular interest here. The services of the Geological Survey, in an investigational and advisory capacity were enlisted in this program. The work of the Geological Survey has consisted of the collection of hydrologic data, investigations of range-water supplies to facilitate management and provide information for design of structures and land-treatment measures. Appraisal of the effects of treatment practices has also been an important activity. Conservation on the public domain involves mainly growing vegetation for forage and reducing erosion. The two elements are intimately related--accomplishment in one is usually reflected by an improvement in the other. Erosion is a serious problem on most of the public domain, but particularly in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins where, despite low annual water yields, the public domain and similar lands on the Indian reservations contribute the major part of the sediment measured at the downstream gaging stations. In parts of the Missouri River basin also, erosion is obviously very active but the sediment yield contributed by the public domain cannot be as readily isolated. The reasons for the erosion are generally evident--the erodibility of the rock and soils and the sparsity of vegetation as a result of low precipitation, unfavorable soils, or past land use. How much is due to the land use is still controversial, resulting in many questions relative to planning corrective measures. The problem facing the early administrators of the Taylor Grazing Act to bring about proper use and conservation of the public domain was a difficult one because of the lack of records on actual grazing use in animal-unit months of the qualified allottees and the lack of data on treatment practices in an arid area. Reduction of grazing was imperative in some localities, but generally, it could not be brought about as rapidly as it should have been. Numbers of animal units in the grazing districts were reduced from about 3.6 million in 1941 to about 3.2 million in 1964, whereas the areas included in districts was increased about 3 percent. Reductions are still being made in certain areas where deterioration is evident. One of the earliest activities connected with management of the range was the development of water supplies to facilitate the distribution of grazing. The investigations needed for such development formed a large part of the early work in the Soil and Moisture program of the Geological Survey and has continued to be a major activity to the present time. Most of the work has involved investigations of sites for wells but has included also the investigation of proposed spring developments and collection of hydrologic data for use in reservoir design. Well-site investigations have been of two general types: (1) the investigation of a site selected by the land administration agency, and (2) an areal investigation covering entire grazing districts or units thereof. In each type of investigation, a study is made of the geology and the recharge conditions. Reports are prepared giving estimates of the depth of drilling required, the depth to water, the yield, and the quality of the water, together with other information on drilling conditions and developing. Springs are a significant so

  12. Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Canada: First Population-Based Survey Using Rome II Criteria with Suggestions for Improving the Questionnaire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Thompson; E. J. Irvine; P. Pare; S. Ferrazzi; L. Rance

    2002-01-01

    The Rome II criteria and questionnaires developed to identify functional gastrointestinal disorders have not been evaluated. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders in Canada, compare our results with data from other published studies, assess concordance of Rome I and Rome II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome, and suggest improvements in the Rome II questionnaire. An

  13. Operating manual for the U.S. Geological Survey minimonitor, 1988 revised edition; punched-paper-tape model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficken, James H.; Scott, Carl T.

    1988-01-01

    This manual describes the U.S. Geological Survey Minimonitor Water Quality Data Measuring and Recording System. Instructions for calibrating, servicing, maintaining, and operating the system are provided. The Survey Minimonitor is a battery-powered , multiparameter water quality monitoring instrument designed for field use. A watertight can containing signal conditioners is connected with cable and waterproof connectors to various water quality sensors. Data are recorded on a punched paper-tape recorder. An external battery is required. The operation and maintenance of various sensors and signal conditioners are discussed, for temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Calibration instructions are provided for each parameter, along with maintenance instructions. Sections of the report explain how to connect the Minimonitor to measure direct-current voltages, such as signal outputs from other instruments. Instructions for connecting a satellite data-collection platform or a solid-state data recorder to the Minimonitor are given also. Basic information is given for servicing the Minimonitor and trouble-shooting some of its electronic components. The use of test boxes to test sensors, isolate component problems, and verify calibration values is discussed. (USGS)

  14. Environmental flow studies of the Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey-Cherry Creek, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, Terry J.; Bovee, Ken D.

    2010-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Forest Service, an instream flow assessment was conducted at Cherry Creek, Ariz., to investigate habitat for native and introduced fish species and to describe the beneficial use of a possible instream flow water right. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center performed an intensive field study of two sections of Cherry Creek in September 2008 to provide base data for hydrodynamic simulation of the flow conditions in the stream. The USGS Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, at the University of Arizona School of Natural Resources, conducted a survey of the habitat requirements of the resident fish species in Cherry Creek and provided the habitat suitability criteria used in this study. The habitat suitability criteria were combined with hydrodynamic simulation results to quantify fish habitat for the full range of daily flow experienced in the creek and to produce maps of habitat occurrence for those flows. The flow record at the Cherry Creek stream gage was used to generate habitat response values over time. The long-term habitat response was incorporated into an Excel (Registered) spreadsheet to allow evaluation of habitat occurrence with and without an instream water right under different hypothetical water withdrawal scenarios. The spreadsheet displays information about the time sequence of habitat events, the duration of critical events, and habitat retention.

  15. Thematic Conference on Remote Sensing for Exploration Geology - Methods, Integration, Solutions, 7th, Calgary, Canada, Oct. 2-6, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in airborne and satellite remote-sensing technology for application to geological exploration are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to basement tectonics and their surface expressions, spectral geology, hydrocarbon exploration applications, radar applications and future systems, engineering and environment issues, geobotanical remote sensing, advanced image processing, data integration and mapping, and mineral exploration. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and sample images are provided.

  16. Pilot CCS project in Indonesia "Gundih CCS project": Geological and geophysical surveys for site selection and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Toru; Kitamura, Keigo; Onishi, Kyosuke; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Rachmat Sule, Mohammad; Kadir, Wawan Gunawan A.; Widarto, Djedi S.; Sebayang, Rio I.; Prasetyo, Agung; Priyono, Awali; Widianto, Eko; Sapiie, Benyamin

    2013-04-01

    A pilot CCS project in Indonesia will be implemented in Gundih area, Central Java Province. The Gundih area is a gas field, and gas is ready to be produced by Pertamina EP. The CO2 content within the produced gas is more than 20% in the Gundih field, so that CO2 injection near the gas production well could be effective way to avoid abundant CO2 emission. Before implementing CO2 injection, the reservoir for CO2 injection must be characterized carefully by conducting subsurface characterization and evaluation, in order to make sure that the reservoir is suitable for CCS. Here we report preliminary results of site surveys for the determination of CO2 injection site in the Gundih area. Subsurface structures imaged on seismic reflection profiles indicate that the Ngrayong formation is one of the candidates for CO2 injection. The lithology of the Ngrayong formation is sandstone, and the depth of the formation is ~1 km in the Gundih area. Since we could not find large-scale structural closure (i.e., anticline) for the Ngrayong formation, we need to consider residual trapping. To reveal hydrological properties (e.g., permeability) of the Ngrayong formation, we obtained rock samples from the outcrop of the Ngrayong formation. Using the laboratory-derived hydrological properties and subsurface structures extracted from seismic data (e.g., geometry of the Ngrayong formation), we will apply reservoir simulation in order to determine CO2 injection site. To design the geophysical monitoring survey (e.g., receiver and source position in time-lapse seismic survey), furthermore, we conduct simulation study for the constructed geological model and estimate elastic and electric responses associated with CO2 injection.

  17. A Survey of Measurement, Mitigation, and Verification Field Technologies for Carbon Sequestration Geologic Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, K. K.; Klara, S. M.; Srivastava, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program is developing state-of-the-science technologies for measurement, mitigation, and verification (MM&V) in field operations of geologic sequestration. MM&V of geologic carbon sequestration operations will play an integral role in the pre-injection, injection, and post-injection phases of carbon capture and storage projects to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Effective MM&V is critical to the success of CO2 storage projects and will be used by operators, regulators, and stakeholders to ensure safe and permanent storage of CO2. In the U.S. DOE's Program, Carbon sequestration MM&V has numerous instrumental roles: Measurement of a site's characteristics and capability for sequestration; Monitoring of the site to ensure the storage integrity; Verification that the CO2 is safely stored; and Protection of ecosystems. Other drivers for MM&V technology development include cost-effectiveness, measurement precision, and frequency of measurements required. As sequestration operations are implemented in the future, it is anticipated that measurements over long time periods and at different scales will be required; this will present a significant challenge. MM&V sequestration technologies generally utilize one of the following approaches: below ground measurements; surface/near-surface measurements; aerial and satellite imagery; and modeling/simulations. Advanced subsurface geophysical technologies will play a primary role for MM&V. It is likely that successful MM&V programs will incorporate multiple technologies including but not limited to: reservoir modeling and simulations; geophysical techniques (a wide variety of seismic methods, microgravity, electrical, and electromagnetic techniques); subsurface fluid movement monitoring methods such as injection of tracers, borehole and wellhead pressure sensors, and tiltmeters; surface/near surface methods such as soil gas monitoring and infrared sensors and; aerial and satellite imagery. This abstract will describe results, similarities, and contrasts for funded studies from the U.S. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program including examples from the Sleipner North Sea Project, the Canadian Weyburn Field/Dakota Gasification Plant Project, the Frio Formation Texas Project, and Yolo County Bioreactor Landfill Project. The abstract will also address the following: How are the terms ``measurement,'' ``mitigation''and ``verification'' defined in the Program? What is the U.S. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program Roadmap and what are the Roadmap goals for MM&V? What is the current status of MM&V technologies?

  18. Present investigations of radioactive raw materials by the Geological Survey and a recommended program for future work

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, A.P., Jr.; Stead, F.W.

    1947-01-01

    The Geological Survey's program of investigation of radioactive raw materials is presented herewith under present investigations, plans for future investigations, plan of operation, and cost of operation. This report was prepared at the request of the Atomic Energy Commission. Present investigations are summarized to show the scope of the present Trace Elements program, grouping individual projects into related types of investigations. Plans for future investigations on an expanded scale are outlined. These should provide sufficient data and knowledge of the occurrence and availability of uranium, thorium, and related elements, to permit a more complete evaluation of domestic resources. Reconnaissance projects are designed to discover possible new sources of uranium and thorium and to select areas and materials warranting further investigation. Typical projects leading to the estimation of reserves are the investigation of the carnotite ores of the Colorado Plateau by geologic mapping, exploratory drilling, and related research, and investigation of asphaltic sandstone in Emery County, Utah. Extensive research will be undertaken to establish the principles governing the geological and geochemical relations of uranium, thorium, and associated elements as an essential guide in appraising domestic resources. Particular emphasis will be placed on phosphatic rocks and black shales which offer ultimate resources of uranium far greater than carnotite ores. All the foregoing investigations will be accompanied by chemical, gephysical, and mineralogical research and analytical work. Under plan of operation is discussed the organization of the Trace Elements Unit, space requirements for laboratory and office, the scheduling of investigations, and other related problems. The proposed scheduling of work calls for approximately 109, 173, and 203 man years in fiscal years 1948, 1949, and 1950 respectively. Definite plans have been formulated only for the next three fiscal years, by which time it is assumed the program will reach stable proportions or can be altered as experience dictates. Under cost of operation is set forth the funds available in fiscal year 1947, the status of funds transferred from Atomic Services (14-217/80920), and funds necessary in succeeding fiscal years. The estimate for fiscal year 1948 inclues a non-recurring item of $1,025,000 for establishing adequate laboratories for chemical, physical, spectrographic and mineralogic research and analytical work. The total funds required in fiscal years 1948, 1949, and 1950 to support the proposed program will be $2,440,000, $2,161,000 and $2,198,000 respectively. The Geological survey anticipates contributing from its appropriation in fiscal years 1948, 1949 and 1950 approximately $243,000, $350,000, and $400,000 respectively; the balance of the necessary funds to be contributed by the Atomic Energy Commission in fiscal years 1948, 1949, and 1950 will be approximately $2,196,900, $1,811,000, and $1,798,000 respectively.

  19. Combining Geological and Geophysical Surveys with Cave Explorations for the Assessment of the Sinkhole Susceptibility in Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margiotta, Stefano; Negri, Sergio; Pagliara, Antonio; Parise, Mario; Quarta, Tatiana A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Evaluating the susceptibility related to occurrence of sinkholes is of particular relevance in coastal settings, due to the likely high frequency of sinkholes, that are especially favored by the interaction between fresh and brackish water, with the consequent strong aggressivity on the soluble rock masses. Long stretches of the Ionian coastline (southern Apulia, SE Italy) are affected by sinkholes, that in more than one occasion have caused significant damage and problems to the human infrastructures, and in particular to the main communication routes in the area. In this study, we combine the outcomes of different methodologies to reach a good understanding of the sinkhole susceptibility in the area of Torre Castiglione, in the proximity of Porto Cesareo (Lecce province): starting from geological analysis, and the building up of a detailed database on the sinkholes in the study area, the obtained data were used to plan the following research, consisting of geophysical surveys, that were carried out with different techniques. At the same time, cave explorations (including scuba-diving) were performed in one of the most important sinkhole at Torre Castiglione: this phase of the activity allowed to get remarkable insights into the features of the submerged karst systems in the area. Flooded passages, 4 to 9 mt-wide and 5,5 mt-high, were explored for several tens of meters. A chaotic jumble of breakdown deposits constitute the cave pavement, and the vault and walls of the passages are heavily fractured, pointing out to the possibility of further detachments, which likely will result in opening additional sinkholes at the surface. The underground systems appear to be quite complex and extensive, but the difficulty in the explorations (mostly due to narrowing of the passages and to the rock mass instability) suggested to stop the scuba-diving activity for safety reasons. Sinkholes detection and imaging is a challenging task for geophysical methods, not only because of the required resolution and depth of penetration, but also because major pitfalls may arise in such geologically complex areas, from the speculative interpretation of geophysical anomalies as geological features. Data integration from different geophysical methods is essential to remove these interpretation ambiguities, caused by large near-surface gradients and heterogeneities in the soil properties, as well as by water table. In the case of Torre Castiglione, we illustrate here an investigation procedure consisting in the sequential application and integrated interpretation of several geophysical methods (Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Seismic Reflection measurements) for locating sinkholes and for the characterization of the subsoil. Geophysical surveys allowed us to obtain a detailed geological model in the study area, cross-checked by the outcomes of several boreholes, and to detect the presence of underground voids, that are characterized by low resistivity values (<100 ohm*m) and a seismic velocity of about 1500 m/s.

  20. Changing Conditions In The Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Biological, Geographical, And Hydrological Research Of The U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabets, T. P.; Frenzel, S. A.; Markon, C.; Degange, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    To address the need for understanding past, present, and future conditions in the northern latitudes, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Alaska Science Center conducts extensive research in the Yukon River Basin. The basin originates in Canada and spans Alaska from east to west encompassing diverse landscapes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Within this large watershed, USGS research is focused on understanding the rapidly changing conditions in the land cover and fires, fish and wildlife populations, and the hydrologic cycle. Some of Alaska largest and most extensive fires occur in the Yukon River Basin. Research suggests that recent fire frequency outpaces the forest replenishment. To provide a more thorough assessment of current fires, and prediction of future fire threats, Landsat imagery with its 30-m spatial resolution and 30-year history allow for unprecedented analysis of historical and existing landscape cover, the effects of fire and climate change on lake drying, and updating of fire burn boundaries. Additionally, caribou have been shown to avoid burned areas for at least 60 years because forage lichens were eliminated and preferred forage may require over 100 years to reach pre-fire abundance. Glaciers in Alaska and in Canada feed the Tanana River, a major tributary to the Yukon River. Gulkana Glacier is one such glacier where the USGS has measured the mass balance continuously since 1966. There has been a cumulative mass loss of more than 15 meters water equivalent since 1966, with two-thirds of that loss occurring since 1990. Streamflow statistics from long-term gaging stations show a tendency for earlier ice break up in the spring and earlier snowmelt peak flows. Glacier-fed streams show higher summer flows as warmer temperatures increased glacier melt. To provide a better understanding of the factors that regulate salmon production, USGS has examined the characteristics of chum salmon spawning habitats and survival of juvenile salmon at two locations within the Yukon River basin. Spawning sites characterized by up-welling ground water and stable water temperatures are used by chum salmon in Upper Yukon River tributaries where spawning may occur as late as November. In lower Yukon River tributaries, earlier spawning salmon use down-welling sites where water temperatures may vary between 0 and 13 ºC. The Yukon River delta is an internationally important breeding area for many waterfowl. Long-term studies of geese have recorded shifts in breeding phenology that are likely climate linked. Frequency and magnitude of storm surges may play a pivotal role in population dynamics of most breeding birds by indirectly mediating predation of nests. The hypothesis underpinning current research is that large storm surges decimate populations of tundra voles, which are the primary prey of arctic foxes. In the absence of voles, foxes increase predation of bird nests. Avian nest success this decade has been substantially lower than in the 1990s.

  1. High-resolution geophysical data collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael to supplement existing datasets from Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Danforth, William W.; Foster, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in Buzzards Bay, in the shallow-water areas of Vineyard Sound, and in the nearshore areas off the eastern Elizabeth Islands and northern coast of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael between 2007 and 2011, in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes results of this collaborative effort, which include mapping the geology of the inner shelf zone of the Elizabeth Islands and the sand shoals of Vineyard Sound and studying geologic processes that contribute to the evolution of this area. Data collected during these surveys include: bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, seismic-reflection profiles, sound velocity profiles, and navigation. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and (2) to inventory subtidal marine habitats and their distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  2. Report upon United States geological surveys west of the one hundredth meridian, Volume VI: Botany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, George Montague

    1878-01-01

    Although investigations in Botany, governed in a measure by the sparsely settled condition of the regions visited, are but incidental to the systematic purpose of the Survey, which has for its main object the determination of data necessary for the construction of a detailed topographical map, yet it is believed that the material here presented, as the result of examination, by specialists, of large and complete collections, will have its value as a substantial contribution to the knowledge of the Botany of portions of the United States west of the 1OOth meridian and south of the 40th parallel.

  3. The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

  4. Regional water balance trends and evaporation-transpiration partitioning from a stable isotope survey of lakes in northern Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Gibson; T. W. D. Edwards

    2002-01-01

    Regional variations in evaporation losses and water budget are interpreted from systematic isotopic patterns in surface waters across a 275,000 km2 region of northern Canada. Differential heavy isotope enrichment in a set of >255 nonheadwater lakes sampled by floatplane during 1993 and 1994 is strongly correlated to varying hydroclimatic conditions across the region. Calculated catchment-weighted evaporation losses typically range from

  5. Quality characterization of western Cretaceous coal from the Colorado Plateau as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.

    1999-07-01

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment program is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis is placed on coals that are most likely to provide energy over the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated as new information becomes available. Environmental factors may eventually control how coal will be mined, and determine to what extent measures will be implemented to reduce trace element emissions. In the future, increased emphasis will also be placed on coal combustion products and the challenges of waste product disposal or utilization. Therefore, coal quality characterization is an important aspect of the coal assessment program in that it provides important data that will influence future utilization of this resource. The Colorado Plateau study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey. Restrictions on coal thickness and overburden will be applied to the resource calculations and the resources will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis is being placed on areas where the coal is controlled by the Federal Government.

  6. Functional requirements of computer systems for the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, 1988-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hathaway, R.M.; McNellis, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Investigating the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the Nation 's water resources is the principal mission of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Water Resources Division. Reports of these investigations are published and available to the public. To accomplish this mission, the Division requires substantial computer technology to process, store, and analyze data from more than 57,000 hydrologic sites. The Division 's computer resources are organized through the Distributed Information System Program Office that manages the nationwide network of computers. The contract that provides the major computer components for the Water Resources Division 's Distributed information System expires in 1991. Five work groups were organized to collect the information needed to procure a new generation of computer systems for the U. S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Each group was assigned a major Division activity and asked to describe its functional requirements of computer systems for the next decade. The work groups and major activities are: (1) hydrologic information; (2) hydrologic applications; (3) geographic information systems; (4) reports and electronic publishing; and (5) administrative. The work groups identified 42 functions and described their functional requirements for 1988, 1992, and 1997. A few new functions such as Decision Support Systems and Executive Information Systems, were identified, but most are the same as performed today. Although the number of functions will remain about the same, steady growth in the size, complexity, and frequency of many functions is predicted for the next decade. No compensating increase in the Division 's staff is anticipated during this period. To handle the increased workload and perform these functions, new approaches will be developed that use advanced computer technology. The advanced technology is required in a unified, tightly coupled system that will support all functions simultaneously. The new approaches and expanded use of computers will require substantial increases in the quantity and sophistication of the Division 's computer resources. The requirements presented in this report will be used to develop technical specifications that describe the computer resources needed during the 1990's. (USGS)

  7. The U.S. Geological Survey streamflow and observation-well network in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Socolow, Roy S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began systematic streamflow monitoring in Massachusetts nearly 100 years ago (1904) on the Connecticut River at Montague City. Since that time, hydrologic data collection has evolved into a monitoring network of 103 streamgage stations and 200 ground-water observation wells in Massachusetts and Rhode Island (2000 water year). Data from this network provide critical information for a variety of purposes to Federal, State, and local government agencies, engineering consultants, and the public. The uses of this information have been enhanced by the fact that about 70 percent of the streamgage stations and a small but increasing number of observation wells in Massachusetts and Rhode Island have been equipped with digital collection platforms that transmit data by satellite every 4 hours. Twenty-one of the telemetered streamgage stations are also equipped with precipitation recorders. The near real-time data provided by these stations, along with historical data collected at all stations, are available over the Internet at no charge. The monitoring network operated during the 2000 water year was summarized and evaluated with respect to spatial distribution, the current uses of the data, and the physical characteristics associated with the monitoring sites. This report provides maps that show locations and summary tables for active continuous record streamgage stations, discontinued streamgage stations, and observation wells in each of the 28 major basins identified by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs and five of the major Rhode Island basins. Metrics of record length, regulation, physiographic region and physical and land-cover characteristics indicate that the streamflow-monitoring network represents a wide range of drainage-area sizes, physiographic regions, and basin characteristics. Most streamgage stations are affected by regulation, which provides information for specific water-management purposes, but diminishes the usefulness of these stations for many types of hydrologic analysis. Only 26 of the 103 active streamgage stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Massachusetts and Rhode Island are unaffected by regulation; of these, 17 are in Massachusetts and 9 are in Rhode Island. The paucity of unregulated stations is particularly evident when the stations are grouped into five drainage-area size classes; the fact that about half of these size classes have no representative unregulated stations underscores the importance of establishing and maintaining stations that are unaffected by regulation. The observation-well network comprises 200 wells; 80 percent of these wells are finished in sand and gravel, 19 percent are finished in till, and 1 percent are finished in bedrock. About 6 percent of the wells are equipped with continuous data recorders, and about half of these are capable of transmitting data in near real time.

  8. The choice of discount brand cigarettes: A comparative analysis of International Tobacco Control (ITC) Surveys in Canada and the United States (2002–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Nargis, Nigar; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing tobacco taxes to increase price is a proven tobacco control measure. This paper investigates how smokers respond to tax and price increases in their choice of discount brand cigarettes vs. premium brands. Objective To estimate how increase in the tax rate can affect smokers’ choice of discount brands versus premium brands. Methods Using data from ITC Surveys in Canada and the United States, a logit model was constructed to estimate the probability of choosing discount brand cigarettes in response to its price changes relative to premium brands, controlling for individual-specific demographic and socio-economic characteristics and regional effects. The self-reported price of an individual smoker is used in a random-effects regression model to impute price and to construct the price ratio for discount and premium brands for each smoker, which is used in the logit model. Findings An increase in the ratio of price of discount brand cigarettes to the price of premium brands by 0.1 is associated with a decrease in the probability of choosing discount brands by 0.08 in Canada. No significant effect is observed in case of the United States. Conclusion The results of the model explain two phenomena: (1) the widened price differential between premium and discount brand cigarettes contributed to the increased share of discount brand cigarettes in Canada in contrast to a relatively steady share in the United States during 2002–2005, and (2) increasing the price ratio of discount brands to premium brands—which occurs with an increase in specific excise tax—may lead to upward shifting from discount to premium brands rather than to downward shifting. These results underscore the significance of studying the effectiveness of tax increases in reducing overall tobacco consumption, particularly for specific excise taxes. PMID:23986408

  9. Information and Communication Technologies and Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada. A Survey of Providers Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memorial Univ., St. John's (Newfoundland).

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in continuing health professional education (CHPE) was examined in a national survey of Canadian CHPE providers. Of the 3,044 surveys distributed to schools of medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, national/provincial health professional associations, nonprofit health advocacy organizations,…

  10. Statistical Survey of Icing Data Measured on Scheduled Airline Flights over the United States and Canada from November 1951 to June 1952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Porter J

    1955-01-01

    A statistical survey and a preliminary analysis are made of icing data collected from scheduled flights over the United States and Canada from November 1951 to June 1952 by airline aircraft equipped with NACA pressure-type icing-rate meters. This interim report presents information obtained from a continuing program sponsored by the NACA with the cooperation of the airlines. An analysis of over 600 icing encounters logged by three airlines operating in the United States, one operating in Canada and one operating up the coast to Alaska, is presented. The icing conditions encountered provided relative frequencies of many icing-cloud variables, such as horizontal extent, vertical thickness, temperatures, icing rate, liquid-water content, and total ice accumulation. Liquid-water contents were higher than data from earlier research flights in layer-type clouds but slightly lower than previous data from cumulus clouds. Broken-cloud conditions, indicated by intermittent icing, accounted for nearly one-half of all the icing encounters. About 90 percent of the encounters did not exceed a distance of 120 miles, and continuous icing did not exceed 50 miles for 90 percent of the unbroken conditions. Icing cloud thicknesses measured during climbs and descents were less than 4500 feet for 90 percent of the vertical cloud traverses.

  11. Enhanced Historical Land-Use and Land-Cover Data Sets of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Curtis V.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Hitt, Kerie J.; Clawges, Rick M.

    2007-01-01

    Historical land-use and land-cover data, available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the conterminous United States and Hawaii, have been enhanced for use in geographic information systems (GIS) applications. The original digital data sets were created by the USGS in the late 1970s and early 1980s and were later converted by USGS and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to a geographic information system (GIS) format in the early 1990s. These data were made available on USEPA's Web site since the early 1990s and have been used for many national applications, despite minor coding and topological errors. During the 1990s, a group of USGS researchers made modifications to the data set for use in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These edited files have been further modified to create a more accurate, topologically clean, and seamless national data set. Several different methods, including custom editing software and several batch processes, were applied to create this enhanced version of the national data set. The data sets are included in this report in the commonly used shapefile and Tagged Image Format File (TIFF) formats. In addition, this report includes two polygon data sets (in shapefile format) representing (1) land-use and land-cover source documentation extracted from the previously published USGS data files, and (2) the extent of each polygon data file.

  12. Water-Resources Activities of the U. S. Geological Survey in Wyoming, October 1991 through September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming District. The activities are classified as data- collection programs and water-resources-appraisal projects. Much of the work is done in cooperation with other agencies. During fiscal years 1992 and 1993, cooperators included nine local agencies, two Native American tribes, seven State agencies, and nine Federal agencies. This report is a biennial progress report to the cooperating agencies and the general public. During fiscal year 1992, the Wyoming District operated 166 streamflow stations, 1 reservoir station, 93 surface-water-quality stations, 34 fluvial-sediment stations, 85 ground- water-level observation wells, and 100 ground- water-quality sites, of which 25 were sampled during fiscal year 1992. Descriptions, location maps, and status statements are given for the 4 long-term data-collection projects and for 16 water-resources appraisal projects that were active (funded) during fiscal year 1992 or 1993. Also included are lists of 14 projects that were completed between May 1991 and June 1993; and 2 projects for which funding ended prior to 1993 and that are completed except for the final report(s). The final section is a bibliographic listing of reports by USGS authors about the water resources of Wyoming.

  13. Overview of hydro-acoustic current-measurement applications by the U.S. geological survey in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Stewart, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a network of 170 streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana to collect data from which continuous records of river discharges are produced. Traditionally, the discharge record from a station is produced by recording river stage and making periodic discharge measurements through a range of stage, then developing a relation between stage and discharge. Techniques that promise to increase data collection accuracy and efficiency include the use of hydro-acoustic instrumentation to measure river velocities. The velocity measurements are used to compute river discharge. In-situ applications of hydro-acoustic instruments by the USGS in Indiana include acoustic velocity meters (AVM's) at six streamflow-gaging stations and newly developed Doppler velocity meters (DVM's) at two stations. AVM's use reciprocal travel times of acoustic signals to measure average water velocities along acoustic paths, whereas DVM's use the Doppler shift of backscattered acoustic signals to compute water velocities. In addition to the in-situ applications, three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) are used to make river-discharge measurements from moving boats at streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana. The USGS has designed and is testing an innovative unmanned platform from which to make ADCP discharge measurements.

  14. Coupling of ocean bottom seismometers to sediment: results of tests with the U.S. Geological Survey ocean bottom seismometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.

    1985-01-01

    The response of an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) to a transient pull that excites the natural OBS-sediment coupling resonance can be modeled as a mass-spring-dashpot system in which the resonant frequency and damping are functions of instrument mass and bearing radius and of the physical properties of the sediment (primarily the shear modulus). For the very soft sediments sometimes found on the sea floor, this resonance may be within the main frequency band of interest (2 to 15 Hz) for many common instrument configurations. To test the model and to find an anchor that would shift the coupling resonance to a higher frequency and decrease its amplitude, we conducted a series of tests which measured the response of the vertical and horizontal components of the U.S. Geological Survey OBS to transient pulls as a function of anchor configuration and sediment properties. The tested anchors included a concrete “flowerpot,” a tripod, a plate, and a perforated plate. Sites were on soft, organic-rich ooze and on firm sand. Several small shots were also fired at the ooze site in order to compare the response of the plate and “flowerpot” anchors to seismic signals. For a given anchor at a given site, the observed response was very repeatable. We found that the model predicts the vertical coupling response quite well and that good vertical coupling can be achieved with the plate or perforated-plate anchors. The response to the horizontal pulls, however, was similar and resonant for all anchors.

  15. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop, Estes Park, Colorado, October 15-17, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Briggs, Kay Marano, (Edited By)

    2010-01-01

    Preface A U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop was held in Estes Park, Colorado, on October 15-17, 2008. Participants came from all USGS regions and disciplines. This report contains abstracts from 36 presentations and 35 poster sessions and notes from 5 breakout sessions. The seven presentation topics follow: Ecology of wildlife and fish disease Mechanisms of fish and wildlife disease Microbial ecology Geographic patterns/visualization Public health and water quality Geomicrobiology Ecosystem function The six poster session topics follow: Wildlife disease Disease detection methods Water quality Microbial ecology Metabolic processes Tools and techniques Five working groups met in breakout sessions on October 16, 2008. The highlights for each working group are summarized in this report, and their goals are listed below: Working Group I: to plan a Fact Sheet on interdisciplinary microbiology in the USGS Working Group II: to plan a USGS interdisciplinary microbiology Web site Working Group III: to suggest ways to broadcast and publicize the types of microbiology conducted at the USGS Working Group IV: to identify emerging issues in USGS interdisciplinary microbiology research Working Group V: to identify potential opportunities for interdisciplinary microbiology work at the USGS After the workshop, the USGS interdisciplinary microbiology Web site was activated in June 2009 at http://microbiology.usgs.gov/.

  16. Quality-assurance and data management plan for groundwater activities by the U.S. Geological Survey in Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, James E.; Hansen, Cristi V.

    2014-01-01

    As the Nation’s principle earth-science information agency, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is depended on to collect data of the highest quality. This document is a quality-assurance plan for groundwater activities (GWQAP) of the Kansas Water Science Center. The purpose of this GWQAP is to establish a minimum set of guidelines and practices to be used by the Kansas Water Science Center to ensure quality in groundwater activities. Included within these practices are the assignment of responsibilities for implementing quality-assurance activities in the Kansas Water Science Center and establishment of review procedures needed to ensure the technical quality and reliability of the groundwater products. In addition, this GWQAP is intended to complement quality-assurance plans for surface-water and water-quality activities and similar plans for the Kansas Water Science Center and general project activities throughout the USGS. This document provides the framework for collecting, analyzing, and reporting groundwater data that are quality assured and quality controlled. This GWQAP presents policies directing the collection, processing, analysis, storage, review, and publication of groundwater data. In addition, policies related to organizational responsibilities, training, project planning, and safety are presented. These policies and practices pertain to all groundwater activities conducted by the Kansas Water Science Center, including data-collection programs, interpretive and research projects. This report also includes the data management plan that describes the progression of data management from data collection to archiving and publication.

  17. Historical review of the international water-resources program of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1940-70

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, George C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The review describes the history of the U.S. Geological Survey 's (USGS) activities in international water-resources investigations and institutional development as well as exchange in scientific and applied hydrology during 1940-70. The bulk of these activities has been carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development and its predecessors, the United Nations and its specialized agencies, and the regional intergovernmental agencies. The central objectives of the USGS ' international water-resources activities have been to strengthen the administrative, staff, and operational functions of counterpart governmental hydrological and water-resources agencies; to improve the skills and capabilities of host-country scientific, engineering, and technical personnel; to exchange research specialists and publications in the sharing of advances in hydrological knowledge and methodology; and to participate in mutually beneficial international organizations, symposia, conferences, seminars, and special programs dedicated to various aspects of scientific and applied hydrology. Between 1940 and 1970, USGS hydrogeologists, water chemists, engineers, and hydrologists completed 340 short- and long-term project-oriented international assignments in some 80 host countries. During the same time more than 428 water scientists, engineers, and technicians from 60 countries have received academic and in-service training through USGS water-resources facilities in the United States. Also in this period some 336 reports of a technical and scientific nature have resulted from water-resources projects in the U.S bilateral program. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Catskill/Delaware Water-Quality Network: Water-Quality Report Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, Michael R.; Siemion, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates a 60-station streamgaging network in the New York City Catskill/Delaware Water Supply System. Water-quality samples were collected at 13 of the stations in the Catskill/Delaware streamgaging network to provide resource managers with water-quality and water-quantity data from the water-supply system that supplies about 85 percent of the water needed by the more than 9 million residents of New York City. This report summarizes water-quality data collected at those 13 stations plus one additional station operated as a part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Long-Term Monitoring Network for the 2006 water year (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006). An average of 62 water-quality samples were collected at each station during the 2006 water year, including grab samples collected every other week and storm samples collected with automated samplers. On average, 8 storms were sampled at each station during the 2006 water year. The 2006 calendar year was the second warmest on record and the summer of 2006 was the wettest on record for the northeastern United States. A large storm on June 26-28, 2006, caused extensive flooding in the western part of the network where record peak flows were measured at several watersheds.

  19. Petrology and hydrothermal mineralogy of U. S. Geological Survey Newberry 2 drill core from Newberry caldera, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Bargar, K.E.

    1988-09-10

    U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2 was drilled to a depth of 932 m within Newberry caldera. The bottom-hole temperature of 265/sup 0/C is the highest reported temperature of any drill hole in the Cascades region of the United States. The upper part of the stratigraphic section pentrated by Newberry 2 consists of caldera fill below which are increasingly more mafic lavas ranging from rhyodacite at 501 m to basalt at 932 m. Measured temperatures shallower than 300 m are less than 35/sup 0/C, and rock alteration consists of hydration of glass and local palagonitization of basaltic tuffs. Incipient zeolitization and partial smectite replacement of ash and pumice occurred throughout the pumiceous lithic tuffs from 300 to 500 m. Higher-temperature alteration of the tuffs to chlorite and mordenite occurs adjacent to a rhyodacite sill at 460--470 m; alteration minerals within the sill consist of pyrrhotite, pyrite, quartz, calcite, and siderite. Below 697 m the rocks are progressively more altered with depth mainly because of increased temperature along a conductive gradient from 100/sup 0/C at 697 m to 265/sup 0/C at 930 m. Fluid inclusions in quartz and calcite indicate that temperature in the past have been higher than at present, most likely due to local confining pressures between impermeable lava flows.

  20. Water-related scientific activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Nevada, fiscal years 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foglesong, M. Teresa, (compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has been collecting water-resources data in Nevada since 1890. Most of the projects that constitute the current Nevada District program can be classified as either basic- data acquisition (about 25 percent) or hydrologic interpretation (about 75 percent). About 39 percent of the activities are supported by cooperative agreements with State and local agencies. Technical projects supported by other Federal agencies make up about 32 percent of the program, and the re- maining 29 percent consists of USGS data collection, interpretive projects, and research. Water con- ditions in most of Nevada during fiscal years 1993 and 1994 continued to be dry, a continuation of drought conditions since late 1986. The major water-resource issues in Nevada include: water allocation in the Truckee River and Carson River Basins; water-supply needs of Las Vegas and the Reno/Sparks area, including water-importation plans; hydrologic effects of weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site; assessment of potential long-term effects of the proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository; and drought. Future water-resources issues in Nevada are likely to center on water supply for, and environmental effects of, the rapidly growing population centers at Las Vegas, Reno, and Elko; impacts of operations at the Nevada Test Site; management of interstate rivers such as the Truckee, Carson, Walker, and Colorado Rivers; hydrologic and environmental impacts at heavily mined areas; and water-quality management in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

  1. The role of the U.S. Geological Survey in Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting in Illinois, 1984-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.; Jackson, P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawl from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago area waterway system (CAWS) as part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting (LMDA) overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every five years, the USGS streamgage practices in the CAWS are reviewed by a committee of practicing engineers and academics to ensure that the best engineering practices are implemented in accordance with the U.S. Supreme Court decree and as part of LMDA. This report provides a perspective on the role of the USGS in LMDA from 1984 to 2010 including the responses to the review committees. Six technical review committees have been convened by the U.S. Corps of Engineers to evaluate the key components of LMDA especially the USGS streamgages within the CAWS. Any changes in streamgaging practices at CAWS gaging stations require detailed analysis to ensure the change will not adversely affect the ability of the USGS to accurately monitor flows.

  2. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L., Jr.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey's stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadoury, R.A.; Smath, J.A.; Fontaine, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The report documents the results of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey 's continuous-record stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 91 gaging stations being operated in Massachusetts are being operated to provide data for two special purpose hydrologic studies, and they are planned to be discontinued at the conclusion of the studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed on 63 continuous-record gaging stations in Massachusetts and 15 stations in Rhode Island, at budgets of $353,000 and $60,500, respectively. Current operations policies result in average standard errors per station of 12.3% in Massachusetts and 9.7% in Rhode Island. Minimum possible budgets to maintain the present numbers of gaging stations in the two States are estimated to be $340,000 and $59,000, with average errors per station of 12.8% and 10.0%, respectively. If the present budget levels were doubled, average standards errors per station would decrease to 8.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Further budget increases would not improve the standard errors significantly. (USGS)

  4. Water-resources investigations in Tennessee; programs and activities of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1987-1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, Ferdinand; Balthrop, B.H.; Baker, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a summation of 44 projects which were active in the Tennessee District during 1987 and 1988. Given in each summary is the name of the project chief, the objective of the project, the progress or results of the study to date, and the name of the cooperator. Hydrologic data are the backbone of the investigations conducted by the U.S Geological Survey (USGS). The basic data programs conducted by the Tennessee District provide streamflow, quality of water, and groundwater levels information essential to the assessment and management of the State 's water resources. Long-term streamflow, quality of water, and groundwater levels network are operated as part of the Hydrologic Data Section. Field operations are about equally divided among field offices in Memphis, Nashville, and Knoxville. A staff of about 40 engineers, hydrologists, and hydrologic technicians labor in the operation of the long-term network as well as short-term efforts in support of areal investigations. The data collected as part of the networks are published in the series of annual data reports. (USGS)

  5. Comparison of SeaWiFS measurements of the Moon with the U.S. Geological Survey lunar model.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Robert A; Eplee, Robert E; Patt, Frederick S; Kieffer, Hugh H; Stone, Thomas C; Meister, Gerhard; Butler, James J; McClain, Charles R

    2004-11-01

    The Sea-Viewing Wide-Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has made monthly observations of the Moon since 1997. Using 66 monthly measurements, the SeaWiFS calibration team has developed a correction for the instrument's on-orbit response changes. Concurrently, a lunar irradiance model has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from extensive Earth-based observations of the Moon. The lunar irradiances measured by SeaWiFS are compared with the USGS model. The comparison shows essentially identical response histories for SeaWiFS, with differences from the model of less than 0.05% per thousand days in the long-term trends. From the SeaWiFS experience we have learned that it is important to view the entire lunar image at a constant phase angle from measurement to measurement and to understand, as best as possible, the size of each lunar image. However, a constant phase angle is not required for using the USGS model. With a long-term satellite lunar data set it is possible to determine instrument changes at a quality level approximating that from the USGS lunar model. However, early in a mission, when the dependence on factors such as phase and libration cannot be adequately determined from satellite measurements alone, the USGS model is critical to an understanding of trends in instruments that use the Moon for calibration. This is the case for SeaWiFS. PMID:15540442

  6. Simulation of cylindrical flow to a well using the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    1993-01-01

    Cylindrical (axisymmetric) flow to a well is an important specialized topic of ground-water hydraulics and has been applied by many investigators to determine aquifer properties and determine heads and flows in the vicinity of the well. A recent modification to the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model provides the opportunity to simulate axisymmetric flow to a well. The theory involves the conceptualization of a system of concentric shells that are capable of reproducing the large variations in gradient in the vicinity of the well by decreasing their area in the direction of the well. The computer program presented serves as a preprocessor to the U.S. Geological Survey model by creating the input data file needed to implement the axisymmetric conceptualization. Data input requirements to this preprocessor are described, and a comparison with a known analytical solution indicates that the model functions appropriately.

  7. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Pedro; Mateus, António; Paiva, Isabel; Trindade, Romão; Santos, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in radiological terms, the prevalent geological features. PMID:20971016

  8. Standard procedures and quality-control practices for the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program from 1982 through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates the National Field Quality Assurance Program to provide quality- assurance reference samples to field personnel who make water-quality field measurements. The program monitors the accuracy and precision of pH, specific conductance, and alkalinity field measurements. This report documents the operational procedures and quality-control techniques used in operating the quality-assurance program.

  9. Attenuation-difference radar tomography: results of a multiple-plane experiment at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Research Site, Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Harris, J.M.; Haeni, F.P.; Gorelick, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Attenuation-difference, borehole-radar tomography was used to monitor a series of sodium chloride tracer injection tests conducted within the FSE, wellfield at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Hydrology Research Site in Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. Borehole-radar tomography surveys were conducted using the sequential-scanning and injection method in three boreholes that form a triangular prism of adjoining tomographic image planes. Results indicate that time-lapse tomography methods provide high-resolution images of tracer distribution in permeable zones.

  10. Physician opinion of the privatization of health care services in Canada: a survey of Canadian urologists by the Canadian Urological Association Socioeconomic Committee

    PubMed Central

    Mayson, Brian; Fleshner, Neil; So, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Canadian health care policy faces unprecedented pressures to reform. With new advances in health care technologies and treatments, proven difficulties in obtaining timely access to necessary health care and the realities of limited fiscal resources sinking in, the status quo is being challenged with the increased role of privately funded health care. To assess the opinions of Canadian urologists on privatization of health care in Canada, the Socioeconomic Committee of the Canadian Urological Association (CUA) surveyed all active members on their beliefs on the role and impact private health care should have in urology. Methods: We emailed a short survey of 9 questions proposed by the CUA Socioeconomic Committee regarding private health care delivery to all active CUA members in April 2007. We received responses by email, fax or mail over a 1-month period. Results: Of the 440 emails sent out, 90 surveys were returned. Respondents believed that a parallel private heath care system would shorten wait times and improve access to care (74%), improve outcomes for those with private health care (58.8%), would not impair the outcomes of those without private health care (74.2%) and would not interfere with the accessibility of health care for most Canadians (73.3%). Most respondents (91.1%) believed that, if privately delivered health care was allowed, urologists should spend a fixed amount of time providing services within the public health care system as well. Conclusion: This survey on Canadian urologists’ beliefs on the role and impact private health care should have in urology indicated that most respondents anticipate a growing influence of private health care and advocate for a regulated fixed proportion of service dedicated to the public system. PMID:19543461

  11. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGIC MAP OF THE PINEDALE QUADRANGLE, McKINLEY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques F. Robertson

    The 1:24,000 scale geologic map of the Pinedale 7.5' quadrangle lies in the western part of the Grants uranium mineral belt, which was mapped and studied under a cooperative agreement between the USGS and the U.S. Department of Energy. A spectacular panoramic view of the southern half of the Pinedale quadrangle is obtained looking northward from Interstate Highway 40, particularly

  12. Guidelines for Coding and Entering Ground-Water Data into the Ground-Water Site Inventory Database Version 4.6, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    This report establishes and documents the procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center, to code and enter ground-water data into the Ground-Water Site Inventory database of the U.S. Geological Survey's Ground Water Site Inventory System. These guidelines are consistent with Version 4.6 of the system, but will be updated as each new version becomes available.

  13. Summary of the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program from 1979 through 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, D.L.; Boozer, T.M.; Schroder, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    Since the inception of the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program, over 85,000 proficiency samples have been analyzed by water-quality analysts. This includes more than 10,000 alkalinity samples, more than 15,000 pH samples, and more than 16,000 specific conductance samples, which were analyzed from 1990 through 1997, and a total of more than 43,000 proficiency samples analyzed from 1979 through 1989. The analyte values were evaluated to determine the fourth-spread, a measure of the width of the middle half of the data, and the F-pseudosigma, a robust replacement for the standard deviation, for each of the different measurement ranges. The result of the statistical evaluation showed that the vast majority of reference sample measurements made by water-quality analysts were within acceptable ranges. From 1990 to 1997, the measurement of pH had the highest level of acceptable results, 98.4 percent, followed by specific conductance with 95.2 percent acceptable results, and alkalinity with 88.6 percent acceptable results. The statistical summary of pH indicates the calculated fourth-spread values for the entire tested range is +0.06 pH units. For specific conductance, the magnitude of the fourth-spread increases as the magnitude of the specific conductance ranges increases. The average relative fourth-spread percent for all reported specific conductance values is +1.8 percent. From 1990 through 1997, the evaluation of the results for alkalinity measurement for the average fourth-spread was determined to be + 3.3 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

  14. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview of these applications is provided in the fact sheet.

  15. A comparison of U.S. geological survey seamless elevation models with shuttle radar topography mission data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, D.; Williams, J.; Miller, W.

    2001-01-01

    Elevation models produced from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data will be the most comprehensive, consistently processed, highest resolution topographic dataset ever produced for the Earth's land surface. Many applications that currently use elevation data will benefit from the increased availability of data with higher accuracy, quality, and resolution, especially in poorly mapped areas of the globe. SRTM data will be produced as seamless data, thereby avoiding many of the problems inherent in existing multi-source topographic databases. Serving as precursors to SRTM datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced and is distributing seamless elevation datasets that facilitate scientific use of elevation data over large areas. GTOPO30 is a global elevation model with a 30 arc-second resolution (approximately 1-kilometer). The National Elevation Dataset (NED) covers the United States at a resolution of 1 arc-second (approximately 30-meters). Due to their seamless format and broad area coverage, both GTOPO30 and NED represent an advance in the usability of elevation data, but each still includes artifacts from the highly variable source data used to produce them. The consistent source data and processing approach for SRTM data will result in elevation products that will be a significant addition to the current availability of seamless datasets, specifically for many areas outside the U.S. One application that demonstrates some advantages that may be realized with SRTM data is delineation of land surface drainage features (watersheds and stream channels). Seamless distribution of elevation data in which a user interactively specifies the area of interest and order parameters via a map server is already being successfully demonstrated with existing USGS datasets. Such an approach for distributing SRTM data is ideal for a dataset that undoubtedly will be of very high interest to the spatial data user community.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey laboratory method for methyl tert-Butyl ether and other fuel oxygenates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raese, Jon W.; Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was found in shallow ground-water samples in a study of 8 urban and 20 agricultural areas throughout the United States in 1993 and 1994 (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 1). The compound is added to gasoline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase the octane level and to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone levels in the air. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL), near Denver, uses state-of-the-art technology to analyze samples for MTBE as part of the USGS water-quality studies. In addition, the NWQL offers custom analyses to determine two other fuel oxygenates--ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). The NWQL was not able to obtain a reference standard for tert-amyl ethyl ether (TAEE), another possible fuel oxygenate (Shelley and Fouhy, 1994, p. 63). The shallow ground-water samples were collected as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These samples were collected from 211 urban wells or springs and 562 agricultural wells sampled by the USGS in 1993 and 1994. The wells were keyed to specific land-use areas to assess the effects of different uses on ground-water quality (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 2). Ground-water samples were preserved on site to pH less than or equal to 2 with a solution of 1:1 hydrochloric acid. All samples were analyzed at the NWQL within 2 weeks after collection. The purpose of this fact sheet is to explain briefly the analytical method implemented by the USGS for determining MTBE and other fuel oxygenates. The scope is necessarily limited to an overview of the analytical method (instrumentation, sample preparation, calibration and quantitation, identification, and preservation of samples) and method performance (reagent blanks, accuracy, and precision).

  17. Water and streambed-material data, Eagle Creek watershed, Indiana, August 1980, October and December 1982, and April 1983; updating of U.S. Geological Survey Open-file report 83-215

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, David J.

    1983-01-01

    Water-quality surveys within the Eagle Creek watershed were done by the U.S. Geological Survey in August 1980, October and December 1982 and April 1983 in cooperation with the city of Indianapolis, Department of Public Works. Streambed-material and water samples were collected from Finley and Eagle Creek and was analyzed for selected metals, insecticides, and acid-extractable and base-neutral-extractable compounds. Water samples also were analyzed for volatile organic compounds. The 1982-83 surveys represent different flow conditions. This report lists all the data collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey but does not interpret any of the results.

  18. A National Survey of Services for Women with Substance Use Issues and Their Children in Canada: Challenges for Knowledge Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niccols, Alison; Dobbins, Maureen; Sword, Wendy; Smith, Ainsley; Henderson, Joanna; Milligan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Across cultures, approximately one third of people with drug dependence are women of child-bearing age. There is emerging evidence regarding the effectiveness of integrating pregnancy, parenting, and child development services with addiction services. In 2007, we conducted a national survey of addiction agencies serving women to provide…

  19. Description of the U.S. Geological Survey`s water-quality sampling and water-level monitoring program at the Hallam Nuclear Facility, August through September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-11-14

    A water-quality and water-level program between the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) was re-established in August 1997 to (1) collect one set of water-quality samples from 17 of the 19 USDOE monitor wells, and (2) make five water-level measurements during a 2-month period from the 19 USDOE monitor wells at the Hallam Nuclear Facility, Hallam, Nebraska. Data from these wells are presented.

  20. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2005 through June 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2005 through June 2007. Results for the quality-control samples for 19 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: total aluminum, calcium, magnesium, nitrate (colorimetric method), potassium, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. Eight of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits; these procedures were: total aluminum, calcium, dissolved organic carbon, chloride, nitrate (ion chromatograph), potassium, silicon, and sulfate. The magnesium and pH procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, nitrite, and specific conductance procedures were biased for the high-concentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicated that the procedures for 16 of 17 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for dissolved organic carbon. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 18 of the 21 analytes. At least 93 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for all analytes except acid-neutralizing capacity (85 percent of samples met objectives), total monomeric aluminum (83 percent of samples met objectives), total aluminum (85 percent of samples met objectives), and chloride (85 percent of samples met objectives). The ammonium and total dissolved nitrogen did not meet the data-quality objectives. Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample (SRS) Project met the Troy Laboratory data-quality objectives for 87 percent of the samples analyzed. The P-sample (low-ionic-strength constituents) analysis had two outliers each in two studies. The T-sample (trace constituents) analysis and the N-sample (nutrient constituents) analysis had one outlier each in two studies. Results of Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) program indicated that at least 85 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for 11 of the 14 analytes; the exceptions were acid-neutralizing capacity, total aluminum and ammonium. Data-quality objectives were not met in 41 percent of samples analyzed for acid-neutralizing capacity, 50 percent of samples analyzed for total aluminum, and 44 percent of samples analyzed for ammonium. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data-quality objectives were met by at least 86 percent of the samples analyzed for calcium, magnesium, pH, potassium, and sodium. Data-quality objectives were met by 76 percent of the samples analyzed for chloride, 80 percent of the samples analyzed for specific conductance, and 77 percent of the samples analyzed for sulfate.

  1. Quality-assurance data for routine water quality analyses by the U. S. Geological Survey laboratory in Troy, New York; July 1993 through June 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory for analysis of low-ionic strength water has been developed at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) office in Troy, N.Y., to analyze samples collected by USGS projects in the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance/quality-control data are stored in the laboratory's SAS data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of quality-assurance/quality-control data. This report presents and discusses samples analyzed from July 1993 through June 1995. Quality-control results for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts show that data from seven of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (soil expulsions), chloride, magnesium, nitrate (colorimetric method), and pH. Three of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased but were within control limits; they were: calcium (high for high-concentration samples for May 1995), dissolved organic carbon (high for highconcentration samples from January through September 1994), and fluoride (high in samples for April and June 1994). No quality-control sample has been developed for the organic monomeric aluminum procedure. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that all analytical procedures in which blanks were run were within control limits, although values for a few blanks were outside the control limits. Blanks were not analyzed for acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved inorganic carbon, fluoride, nitrate (colorimetric method), or pH. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in 14 of the 18 procedures. Data-quality objectives were met by more than 90 percent of the samples analyzed in all procedures except total monomeric aluminum (85 percent of samples met objectives), total aluminum (70 percent of samples met objectives), and dissolved organic carbon (85 percent of samples met objectives). Triplicate samples were not analyzed for ammonium, fluoride, dissolved inorganic carbon, or nitrate (colorimetric method). Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample Program indicated high data quality with a median result of 3.6 of a possible 4.0. Environment Canada's LRTAP interlaboratory study results indicated that more than 85 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives in 6 of the 12 analyses; exceptions were calcium, dissolved organic carbon, chloride, pH, potassium, and sodium. Data-quality objectives were not met for calcium samples in one LRTAP study, but 94 percent of samples analyzed were within control limits for the remaining studies. Data-quality objectives were not met by 35 percent of samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, but 94 percent of sample values were within 20 percent of the most probable value. Data-quality objectives were not met for 30 percent of samples analyzed for chloride, but 90 percent of sample values were within 20 percent of the most probable value. Measurements of samples with a pH above 6.0 were biased high in 54 percent of the samples, although 85 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for pH measurements below 6.0. Data-quality objectives for potassium and sodium were not met in one study (only 33 percent of the samples analyzed met the objectives), although 85 percent of the sample values were within control limits for the other studies. Measured sodium values were above the upper control limit in all studies. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data

  2. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2001 Through June 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2001 through June 2003. Results for the quality-control samples for 19 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for six of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, chloride, magnesium, nitrate (ion chromatography), potassium, and sodium. The calcium procedure was biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but was within control limits. The total monomeric aluminum and fluoride procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The total aluminum, pH, specific conductance, and sulfate procedures were biased for the high-concentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 16 of 18 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for the dissolved organic carbon or specific conductance procedures. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 18 of the 21 analytes. At least 90 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for all procedures except total monomeric aluminum (83 percent of samples met objectives), total aluminum (76 percent of samples met objectives), ammonium (73 percent of samples met objectives), dissolved organic carbon (86 percent of samples met objectives), and nitrate (81 percent of samples met objectives). The data-quality objective was not met for the nitrite procedure. Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample (SRS) Project indicated satisfactory or above data quality over the time period, with most performance ratings for each sample in the good-to-excellent range. The N-sample (nutrient constituents) analysis had one unsatisfactory rating for the ammonium procedure in one study. The T-sample (trace constituents) analysis had one unsatisfactory rating for the magnesium procedure and one marginal rating for the potassium procedure in one study and one unsatisfactory rating for the sodium procedure in another. Results of Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) program indicated that at least 90 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for 10 of the 14 analytes; the exceptions were acid-neutralizing capacity, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, and sodium. Data-quality objectives were not met in 37 percent of samples analyzed for acid-neutralizing capacity, 28 percent of samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, and 30 percent of samples analyzed for sodium. Results indicate a positive bias for the ammonium procedure in one study and a negative bias in another. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data-quality objectives were met by at least 90 percent of the samples analyzed for calcium, chloride, magnesium, pH, potassium, and sodium. Data-quality objectives were met by 78 percent of

  3. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York-July 1997 through June 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance/quality-control data for the time period addressed in this report were stored in the laboratory's SAS data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality- control samples analyzed from July 1997 through June 1999. Results for the quality-control samples for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration and (or) low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, total aluminum, ammonium, calcium, chloride, specific conductance, and sulfate. The data from the potassium and sodium analytical procedures are insufficient for evaluation. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 11 of 13 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. Blank analysis results for chloride showed that 22 percent of blanks did not meet data-quality objectives and results for dissolved organic carbon showed that 31 percent of the blanks did not meet data-quality objectives. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 14 of the 18 analytes. At least 90 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for all analytes except total aluminum (70 percent of samples met objectives) and potassium (83 percent of samples met objectives). Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample (SRS) Project indicated good data quality for most constituents over the time period. The P-sample (low-ionic-strength constituents) analysis had good ratings in two of these studies and a satisfactory rating in the third. The results of the T-sample (trace constituents) analysis indicated high data quality with good ratings in all three studies. The N-sample (nutrient constituents) studies had one each of excellent, good, and satisfactory ratings. Results of Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) program indicated that at least 80 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for 9 of the 13 analytes; the exceptions were dissolved organic carbon, ammonium, chloride, and specific conductance. Data-quality objectives were not met for dissolved organic carbon in two NWRI studies, but all of the samples were within control limits for the last study. Data-quality objectives were not met in 41 percent of samples analyzed for ammonium, 25 percent of samples analyzed for chloride, and 30 percent of samples analyzed for specific conductance. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data-quality objectives were met by at least 84 percent of the samples analyzed for calcium, chloride, magnesium, pH, and potassium. Data-quality objectives were met by 73 percent of those analyzed for sulfate. The data-quality objective was not met for sodium. The data are insufficient for evaluation of the specific conductance results.

  4. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York--July 1999 through June 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory quality-assurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's LabMaster data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality-control samples analyzed from July 1999 through June 2001. Results for the quality-control samples for 18 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for eight of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, total aluminum, calcium, chloride and nitrate (ion chromatography and colormetric method) and sulfate. The total aluminum and dissolved organic carbon procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The calcium and specific conductance procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The magnesium procedure was biased for the high-concentration and low concentration samples, but was within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 14 of 15 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for dissolved organic carbon. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 17 of the 18 analytes. At least 90 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for all analytes except ammonium (81 percent of samples met objectives), chloride (75 percent of samples met objectives), and sodium (86 percent of samples met objectives). Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample (SRS) Project indicated good data quality over the time period, with most ratings for each sample in the good to excellent range. The P-sample (low-ionic-strength constituents) analysis had one satisfactory rating for the specific conductance procedure in one study. The T-sample (trace constituents) analysis had one satisfactory rating for the aluminum procedure in one study and one unsatisfactory rating for the sodium procedure in another. The remainder of the samples had good or excellent ratings for each study. Results of Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) program indicated that at least 89 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for 10 of the 14 analytes; the exceptions were ammonium, total aluminum, dissolved organic carbon, and sodium. Results indicate a positive bias for the ammonium procedure in all studies. Data-quality objectives were not met in 50 percent of samples analyzed for total aluminum, 38 percent of samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, and 27 percent of samples analyzed for sodium. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data-quality objectives were met by at least 91 percent of the samples analyzed for calcium, chloride, fluoride, magnesium, pH, potassium, and sulfate. Data-quality objectives were met by 75 percent of the samples analyzed for sodium and 58 percent of the samples analyzed for specific conductance.

  5. Quality-Assurance Data for Routine Water Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory in Troy, New York - July 2003 through June 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; McHale, Michael R.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory for analysis of low-ionic-strength water at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Science Center in Troy, N.Y., analyzes samples collected by USGS projects throughout the Northeast. The laboratory's quality-assurance program is based on internal and interlaboratory qualityassurance samples and quality-control procedures that were developed to ensure proper sample collection, processing, and analysis. The quality-assurance and quality-control data were stored in the laboratory's Lab Master data-management system, which provides efficient review, compilation, and plotting of data. This report presents and discusses results of quality-assurance and quality control samples analyzed from July 2003 through June 2005. Results for the quality-control samples for 20 analytical procedures were evaluated for bias and precision. Control charts indicate that data for five of the analytical procedures were occasionally biased for either high-concentration or low-concentration samples but were within control limits; these procedures were: acid-neutralizing capacity, total monomeric aluminum, pH, silicon, and sodium. Seven of the analytical procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the high-concentration sample, but were within control limits; these procedures were: dissolved organic carbon, chloride, nitrate (ion chromatograph), nitrite, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. The calcium and magnesium procedures were biased throughout the analysis period for the low-concentration sample, but were within control limits. The total aluminum and specific conductance procedures were biased for the highconcentration and low-concentration samples, but were within control limits. Results from the filter-blank and analytical-blank analyses indicate that the procedures for 17 of 18 analytes were within control limits, although the concentrations for blanks were occasionally outside the control limits. The data-quality objective was not met for dissolved organic carbon. Sampling and analysis precision are evaluated herein in terms of the coefficient of variation obtained for triplicate samples in the procedures for 18 of the 22 analytes. At least 85 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for all analytes except total monomeric aluminum (82 percent of samples met objectives), total aluminum (77 percent of samples met objectives), chloride (80 percent of samples met objectives), fluoride (76 percent of samples met objectives), and nitrate (ion chromatograph) (79 percent of samples met objectives). The ammonium and total dissolved nitrogen did not meet the data-quality objectives. Results of the USGS interlaboratory Standard Reference Sample (SRS) Project indicated good data quality over the time period, with ratings for each sample in the satisfactory, good, and excellent ranges or less than 10 percent error. The P-sample (low-ionic-strength constituents) analysis had one marginal and two unsatisfactory ratings for the chloride procedure. The T-sample (trace constituents)analysis had two unsatisfactory ratings and one high range percent error for the aluminum procedure. The N-sample (nutrient constituents) analysis had one marginal rating for the nitrate procedure. Results of Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) program indicated that at least 84 percent of the samples met data-quality objectives for 11 of the 14 analytes; the exceptions were ammonium, total aluminum, and acid-neutralizing capacity. The ammonium procedure did not meet data quality objectives in all studies. Data-quality objectives were not met in 23 percent of samples analyzed for total aluminum and 45 percent of samples analyzed acid-neutralizing capacity. Results from blind reference-sample analyses indicated that data-quality objectives were met by at least 86 percent of the samples analyzed for calcium, chloride, fluoride, magnesium, pH, potassium, sodium, and sulfate. Data-quality objectives were not met

  6. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Western Region: Coastal ecosystem responses to influences from land and sea, Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Sea otters and the nearshore ecosystems they inhabit-from highly urbanized California to relatively pristine Alaska-are the focus of a new multidisciplinary study by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and a suite of international, academic and government collaborators. The Coastal Ecosystem Responses to Influences from Land and Sea project will investigate the many interacting variables that influence the health of coastal ecosystems along the Northeast Pacific shore. These ecosystems face unprecedented challenges, with threats arising from the adjacent oceans and lands. From the ocean, challenges include acidification, sea level rise, and warming. From the land, challenges include elevated biological, geological and chemical pollutants associated with burgeoning human populations along coastlines. The implications of these challenges for biological systems are only beginning to be explored. Comparing sea otter population status indicators from around the northeastern Pacific Rim, will begin the process of defining factors of coastal ecosystem health in this broad region.

  7. Information relevant to the U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the Middle Devonian Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    USGS Marcellus Shale Assessment Team

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed the potential for natural gas resources in the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province. The Marcellus Shale was assessed as a continuous gas accumulation using a methodology identical to that used in the assessment of shale and other continuous-type assessment units throughout the United States. This preliminary report provides some additional geologic information used in the Marcellus Shale assessment. The Appalachian Basin Province encompasses rocks of the Paleozoic passive margins, the foreland basins, and fold and thrust belts formed during several episodes in the Paleozoic. The Marcellus Shale is one of many marine shales deposited in the area that is now encompassed by the Appalachian Basin Province.

  8. Investigating the Environmental Effects of Agriculture Practices on Natural Resources: Scientific Contributions of the U.S. Geological Survey to Enhance the Management of Agricultural Landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) enhances and protects the quality of life in the United States by advancing scientific knowledge to facilitate effective management of hydrologic, biologic, and geologic resources. Results of selected USGS research and monitoring projects in agricultural landscapes are presented in this Fact Sheet. Significant environmental and social issues associated with agricultural production include changes in the hydrologic cycle; introduction of toxic chemicals, nutrients, and pathogens; reduction and alteration of wildlife habitats; and invasive species. Understanding environmental consequences of agricultural production is critical to minimize unintended environmental consequences. The preservation and enhancement of our natural resources can be achieved by measuring the success of improved management practices and by adjusting conservation policies as needed to ensure long-term protection.

  9. Third U.S. Geological Survey Wildland Fire-Science Workshop : Denver, Colorado, November 12-15, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livingston, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The historically significant wildland fire events that occurred in the United States during 2000 and 2002, together with the associated recognition of the need for a different national policy of forest management, has led to an increased awareness of the need for cooperative effort among all Federal agencies in planning for and managing the risks and consequences of wildland fire. The expertise and capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are significant resources in this regard, and the agency is becoming increasingly involved in fire-science activities in support of the various land-management agencies that are dealing directly with this issue. The First USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1997 and helped to establish the direction of USGS in sharing its expertise with the fire-management agencies. The Second USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 2000 and brought together all the agencies involved in the management of wildland fires in order to determine their needs, to demonstrate USGS capabilities to meet those needs, and to establish methods for the USGS to distribute data and tools useful in fire management. It enhanced the relationships developed during the 1997 workshop and helped to define USGS' role in the fire-management community. The Third USGS Wildland Fire-Science Workshop, held in Denver, Colorado, November 12?15, 2002, was an opportunity for exchange of information on recent progress in the area of fire science and to determine the gaps in fire-science research that could be addressed by the USGS. In addition to more than 90 USGS scientists engaged in fire-related research and managers of organizational units involved in some aspect of wildland fire activities, the workshop was attended by about 30 representatives of 11 other Federal agencies. There also were a number of attendees affiliated with several universities, private companies, and State and local agencies. The 4-day meeting consisted of a pre-workshop field trip to the Hayman Fire area, several keynote presentations, five panel discussions, presentation and 'breakout' discussion of four 'white paper' topics, and a poster session with more than 30 presentations.

  10. British Geological Survey remotely operated sea bed rockdrills and vibrocorers: new advances to meet the needs of the scientific community.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, H. A.; Stevenson, A.; Wilson, M.; Pheasant, I.

    2014-12-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) have developed a number of coring and drilling systems for use in science projects in the UK and internationally. These include 3m and 6m vibrocoring systems; a 5m combined rockdrill and vibrocorer system; an oriented drill designed specifically to recover samples for use in palaeomagnetic studies; and a 55m rockdrill (RockDrill2). Recently, BGS have developed an autonomous, battery-operated vibrocoring system compatible with both the 3m and 6m vibrocorers, which can be used in water depths up to 6000m. Use of a battery system negates the use of an umbilical power cable to operate the vibrocorer, which instead can be deployed using the vessels A-frame and winch. The autonomous battery system comprises six 48V 19Ah batteries connected in series to give a 288V power source, a microprocessor and real-time clock. Data from the sensors are recorded with a time-stamp, giving diagnostic information that can be downloaded once the system is returned to the deck. The vibrocorer is operated via a pre-set program which is set up before deployment.The new system not only allows vibrocoring in greater water depths, but can also be used on smaller vessels where deck space is limited as a separate winch and umbilical is not required. The autonomous system was used for the first time in June 2014 on-board the RV Belgica to acquire samples from 20 sites in the Dangeard and Explorer canyon heads, off the southwest of England in 430m water depth.Another development is the BGS 55m rockdrill (RockDrill2), a remotely operated sampling system capable of coring up to 55m below sea floor in water depths up to 4000m. The rockdrill can be operated via its own launch and recovery system and can be outfitted with additional sensors such as gas flow meters, which have been designed by the BGS for assessing volume of gas hydrate, and down-hole logging tools. The 55m rockdrill has recently been used to sample hydrate-entrained sediments in the Sea of Japan. The maximum coring depth achieved was 32m below sea floor and the system can operate for more than 50 hours on a single deployment. The BGS system will be used in conjunction with the Bremen University (MARUM) MeBo sea-floor rockdrill on future International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions.

  11. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center-Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Janice S.

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facility focused on providing science and imagery to better understand our Earth. As part of the USGS Geography Discipline, EROS contributes to the Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program, the Geographic Analysis and Monitoring (GAM) Program, and the National Geospatial Program (NGP), as well as our Federal partners and cooperators. The work of the Center is shaped by the Earth sciences, the missions of our stakeholders, and implemented through strong program and project management and application of state-of-the-art information technologies. Fundamentally, EROS contributes to the understanding of a changing Earth through 'research to operations' activities that include developing, implementing, and operating remote sensing based terrestrial monitoring capabilities needed to address interdisciplinary science and applications objectives at all levels-both nationally and internationally. The Center's programs and projects continually strive to meet and/or exceed the changing needs of the USGS, the Department of the Interior, our Nation, and international constituents. The Center's multidisciplinary staff uses their unique expertise in remote sensing science and technologies to conduct basic and applied research, data acquisition, systems engineering, information access and management, and archive preservation to address the Nation's most critical needs. Of particular note is the role of EROS as the primary provider of Landsat data, the longest comprehensive global land Earth observation record ever collected. This report is intended to provide an overview of the scientific and engineering achievements and illustrate the range and scope of the activities and accomplishments at EROS throughout fiscal year (FY) 2009. Additional information concerning the scientific, engineering, and operational achievements can be obtained from the scientific papers and other documents published by EROS staff. We welcome comments and follow-up questions on any aspect of this Annual Report and invite any of our customers or partners to contact us at their convenience. To communicate with us, or for more information about EROS, contact: Communications and Outreach, USGS EROS Center, 47914 252nd Street, Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57198, jsnelson@usgs.gov, http://eros.usgs.gov/.

  12. Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessments at the U.S. Geological Survey - Recent Advances and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, D. M.; Kean, J. W.; Smoczyk, G. M.; Negri, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire can have profound effects on the hydrologic response of a watershed, and debris-flow activity is among the most destructive consequences of these effects. The continued high likelihood of catastrophic wildfires in the western U. S. and the encroachment of development into fire-prone areas have created the need to develop tools to identify and quantify the potential hazards posed by debris flows generated from burned watersheds. These tools are critically needed by Federal, State, and local agencies to mitigate the impacts of debris flows on people, their property, infrastructure and natural resources. Applied research at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program is focused on providing timely, science-based assessments of post-fire debris-flow hazard. Formerly, post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments were disseminated by means of the USGS Open-File Report publication series, which included poster-sized maps that predicted the probability, volume, and combined hazard for given watersheds. Feedback from collaborators suggested that 1) the reports were not sufficiently timely for immediate post-fire use, 2) the static maps were difficult to use for site-specific assessments, and 3) individual assessments were often cost-prohibitive. Beginning in January 2014, the USGS has transitioned to a web-based method for disseminating post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments. This new platform addresses the primary concerns of our stakeholders in three ways. First, the turnaround time has been reduced from 1-2 months for a map and written report, to 3-4 days for a web-based map assessment. This allows response teams to incorporate the assessment results into their reports, which are urgently needed immediately after fires. Second, the new website is interactive and accompanied by downloadable geospatial data of predictions for several storm scenarios. These features permit casual (local residents) and power-users (GIS experts) to evaluate site-specific debris-flow hazards. Finally, the new web-based assessments are completely free and publicly available online. This new method for assessment dissemination permits the Landslide Hazards Program to focus energies on improving existing predictive models of post-fire debris-flow probability, magnitude and timing.

  13. The Canada-UK Deep Submillimetre Survey: First Submillimetre Images, the Source Counts, and Resolution of the Background

    E-print Network

    Stephen Eales; Simon Lilly; Walter Gear; Loretta Dunne; J. Richard Bond; Francois Hammer; Olivier Le Fevre; David Crampton

    1998-08-05

    We present the first results of a deep unbiased submillimetre survey carried out at 450 and 850 microns. We detected 12 sources at 850 microns, giving a surface density of sources with 850-micron flux densities > 2.8mJy of of 0.49+-0.16 per square arcmin. The sources constitute 20-30% of the background radiation at 850 microns and thus a significant fraction of the entire background radiation produced by stars. This implies, through the connection between metallicity and background radiation, that a significant fraction of all the stars that have ever been formed were formed in objects like those detected here. The combination of their large contribution to the background radiation and their extreme bolometric luminosities make these objects excellent candidates for being proto-ellipticals. Optical astronomers have recently shown that the UV-luminosity density of the universe increases by a factor of about 10 between z=0 and z=1 and then decreases again at higher redshifts. Using the results of a parallel submillimetre survey of the local universe, we show that both the submillimetre source density and background can be explained if the submillimetre luminosity density evolves in a similar way to the UV-luminosity density. Thus, if these sources are ellipticals in the process of formation, they may be forming at relatively modest redshifts.

  14. Comparative hydrocarbon geology of two Mesozoic Circum-Pacific foreland basins as function of sediment provenance: Surat basin, eastern Australia and western Canada basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hawlader, H.M. (Macquarie Univ. (Australia))

    1990-06-01

    The Surat basin in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, is a foreland basin formed in response to a magmatic arc during Early Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous time. It has a maximum basin-fill of about 2.5 km of Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sediments. The first commercial production of oil in Australia came from this basin in the early 1960s. The Western Canada basin is a retro-arc foreland basin with up to 3.5 km of sediments deposited during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. The basin was developed on the cratonward side of an arc/cordillera by plate convergence. It is a composite basin with sediments ranging in age from Devonian to Tertiary and is one of the prolific petroliferous basins of the world. The famous Athabasca-Peace River-Lloydminister tar sands alone contain a reserve of about 3 {times} 10{sup 12} barrels of oil, which exceeds three times the recoverable reserves of the world's known oil. The main sediment source was, in both basins, a rising arc/cordillera that shed a cratonward tapering clastic wedge into the flanking foreland basins. Sedimentation, in both cases, was episodic and the patterns of sedimentation in each present striking similarities. During the waxing phase of magmatism/orogeny in the arc/cordillera, the foreland subsided in response to flexural loading of the foreland fold-thrust belt and downward drag by the subducting plate. Continental synorogenic sediments were rapidly emplaced in mainly terrestrial environments into the subsiding foreland. These sediments are lithic-labile in nature and because of their physical and chemical reactivity are prone to be tight and thus of little hydrocarbon reservoir potential. During the waning phase of the arc/orogen the foreland gently rose in response partly to the cessation of drag (decoupling) by the subducting plate and to isostatic rebound (tectonic relaxation).

  15. A Deep Percolation Model for Estimating Ground-Water Recharge: Documentation of Modules for the Modular Modeling System of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    A daily water-budget model for estimating ground-water recharge, the Deep Percolation Model, was modularized for inclusion into the U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Modeling System. The model was modularized in order to facilitate estimation of ground-water recharge under a large range in climatic, landscape, and land-use and land-cover conditions. The model can be applied to areas as large as regions or as small as a field plot. An overview of the Modular Modeling System and the Deep Percolation Model is presented. Data requirements, parameters, and variables for the model are described. The modules that compose the Deep Percolation Model are documented.

  16. A workbook for preparing surface water quality-assurance plans for districts of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvin, Donald V.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, has a policy that each District Office is required to prepare a District Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan. The plan for each District describes the policies and procedures that ensure high quality in the collection, processing, analysis, computer storage, and publication of surface-water data. The guidelines presented in this report are structured as a workbook to provide a specific framework for Districts in preparing their District Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plans.

  17. Chapter 2: Tabular Data and Graphical Images in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment - The Wind River Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files) because of the number and variety of platforms and software available.

  18. U.S. Geological Survey climate and land use change science strategy: a framework for understanding and responding to global change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, Virginia R.; Kirtland, David A.; Taylor, Ione L.; Belnap, Jayne; Cronin, Thomas M.; Dettinger, Michael D.; Frazier, Eldrich L.; Haines, John W.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Milly, Paul C.D.; O’Malley; Robin; Thompson; Robert, S.; Maule, Alec G.; McMahon, Gerard; Striegl, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the seven thematic goals, we address the central role of monitoring in accordance with the USGS Science Strategy recommendation that global change research should rely on existing “…decades of observational data and long-term records to interpret consequences of climate variability and change to the Nation’s biological populations, ecosystems, and land and water resources” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007, p. 19). We also briefly describe specific needs and opportunities for coordinating USGS global change science among USGS Mission Areas and address the need for a comprehensive and sustained communications strategy.

  19. GEODE (Geo-Data Explorer) - A U.S. Geological Survey Application for Data Retrieval, Display, and Analysis through the Internet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, Marc; Schultz, Adam

    2001-01-01

    GEODE (Geo-Data Explorer) is a free service offered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on the Internet at http://geode.usgs.gov (fig. 1). It provides digital geographically referenced data to the desktop computers of any user, including policymakers, land and resource managers, educators, industries, and private citizens. The ultimate goal of GEODE is to provide diverse users a gateway (data portal) that will supply real-time data and analysis over the Internet without the need for special hardware, software, and training.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey approved inorganic and organic methods for the analysis of water and fluvial sediment, 1954-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Raese, Jon W.; Gerlitz, Carol N.; Husband, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    All inorganic and organic methods for analyzing samples of water and fluvial sediment, which have been approved for use by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1954 to the present (1994), are listed. Descriptive method names include references to published reports for easy retrieval of methodology. The year each method was approved is listed as well as the year the method was discontinued. Inorganic and organic methods are listed separately by sample type (dissolved, whole water, bottom material, suspended sediment, or fish tissue) and by mode of analysis (manual or automated, or both).

  1. Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, 1946-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Marques, Ferdinand; Lopez, Marisol

    1984-01-01

    A bibliography of water-resources investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands was compiled. The bibliography includes an alphabetical listing by author as well as listings by general and specific areas in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The publications are also classified by type of report: Open File, Open-File Data Report, KWater-Supply Paper, Water-Resources Investigations, and Professional Paper. (USGS)

  2. Shipper Preferences Suggest Strong Mistrust of Rail: Results from Stated Preference Carrier Choice Survey for Quebec City-Windsor Corridor in Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zachary Rupert Patterson; Gordon O Ewing; Murtaza Haider

    2007-01-01

    The Quebec City–Windsor corridor is the busiest and most important trade and transportation corridor in Canada. The transportation sector is the second-largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the country. Governments around the world, including Canada’s, are considering increasing mode share by rail as a way of reducing transportation emissions. To understand whether freight mode shift is a realistic means

  3. USGS: Geology in the Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Geology in the Parks Web site is a cooperative project of the USGS Western Earth Surface Processes Team and the National Park Service. This extensive site covers geologic maps, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, geologic time, US geologic provinces, park geology of the Mojave, Sunset Crater, Lake Mead, North Cascades, Death Valley, Yosemite National Park, and much more. Descriptions, graphics, photographs, and animations all contribute to this informative and interesting Web site making it a one stop, all encompassing, resource for everything geology and US national park related.

  4. Geologic Time: Online Edition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-10-09

    Offered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as a general interest publication, this site is an online edition of a text by the same name, offering a concise overview of the concepts associated with the age of the Earth. The online edition was revised in October of 1997 to reflect current thinking on this topic. Section headers are Geologic Time, Relative Time Scale, Major Divisions of Geologic Time, Index Fossils, Radiometric Time Scale, and Age of the Earth.

  5. Sex and gender diversity among transgender persons in Ontario, Canada: results from a respondent-driven sampling survey.

    PubMed

    Scheim, Ayden I; Bauer, Greta R

    2015-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that as many as 1 in 200 adults may be trans (transgender, transsexual, or transitioned). Knowledge about dimensions of sex and gender in trans populations is crucial to development of inclusive policy, practice, and research, but limited data have been available, particularly from probability samples. The Trans PULSE community-based research project surveyed trans Ontarians (n=433) in 2009-2010 using respondent-driven sampling. Frequencies were weighted by recruitment probability to produce estimates for the networked Ontario trans population. An estimated 30% of trans Ontarians were living their day-to-day lives in their birth gender, and 23% were living in their felt gender with no medical intervention. In all, 42% were using hormones, while 15% of male-to-female spectrum persons had undergone vaginoplasty and 0.4% of female-to-male spectrum persons had had phalloplasty. Of those living in their felt gender, 59% had begun to do so within the past four years. A minority of trans Ontarians reported a linear transition from one sex to another, yet such a trajectory is often assumed to be the norm. Accounting for this observed diversity, we recommend policy and practice changes to increase social inclusion and service access for trans persons, regardless of transition status. PMID:24750105

  6. Sex and Gender Diversity Among Transgender Persons in Ontario, Canada: Results From a Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey

    PubMed Central

    Scheim, Ayden I.; Bauer, Greta R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that as many as 1 in 200 adults may be trans (transgender, transsexual, or transitioned). Knowledge about dimensions of sex and gender in trans populations is crucial to development of inclusive policy, practice, and research, but limited data have been available, particularly from probability samples. The Trans PULSE community-based research project surveyed trans Ontarians (n = 433) in 2009–2010 using respondent-driven sampling. Frequencies were weighted by recruitment probability to produce estimates for the networked Ontario trans population. An estimated 30% of trans Ontarians were living their day-to-day lives in their birth gender, and 23% were living in their felt gender with no medical intervention. In all, 42% were using hormones, while 15% of male-to-female spectrum persons had undergone vaginoplasty and 0.4% of female-to-male spectrum persons had had phalloplasty. Of those living in their felt gender, 59% had begun to do so within the past four years. A minority of trans Ontarians reported a linear transition from one sex to another, yet such a trajectory is often assumed to be the norm. Accounting for this observed diversity, we recommend policy and practice changes to increase social inclusion and service access for trans persons, regardless of transition status. PMID:24750105

  7. Summary of Tertiary investigations in western Saudi Arabia, current work by the U.S. Geological Survey and recommended future studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, Donald G.; Schmidt, Dwight Lyman; Coleman, Robert Griffin

    1983-01-01

    In 1936, geologic work related to the Tertiary System in western Saudi Arabia began with a study of the Umm Gerad barite deposit by K. S. Twitchell. In 1944, a study focusing specifically on Tertiary rocks was conducted by Steineke and others near Jiddah. Small-scale mapping of Tertiary sequences began in 1950 in southwestern Saudi Arabia and later in northern 3audi Arabia as part of the Kingdom's early mapping program. These studies were part of a larger program being directed by the Government of Saudi Arabia in connection with mineral resource investigations. In the mid- to late-1960's, the Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres discovered mineralized Tertiary rocks al Jabal Dhaylan and began a study, which continues to the present, of both the Tertiary rocks and the mineralization. Following a number of early local studies, in 1973 the U.S. Geological Survey began detailed study of the Tertiary layered rocks along the Red Sea coastal plain south of Jiddah. More recently, Riofinex and Seltrust have been exploring for selected commodities in Tertiary sequences of northwestern Saudi Arabia and the Red Sea coastal plain. Results of these studies, including work by the Saudi Arabian Directorate General of Mineral Resources and the Saudi government agency preceding it, are summarized in this report. Characteristics of the Tertiary rocks south of lat 23? N. and the Tertiary mineral deposits of western Saudi Arabia are also summarized. Recommendations are made for future geologic studies and mineral assessment of the Tertiary rocks of western Saudi Arabia.

  8. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  9. Geology of Caves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This webpage of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) describes the geology and features of caves. It discusses cave formation, features, minerals found in caves, uses of caves, and various investigations of caves. There is an educational activity on karst topography formation, and links for additional information.

  10. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water-quality monitoring networks (WQN) on CD-ROM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Data from two U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national stream water-quality monitoring networks, the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and the Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN), are now available in a two CD-ROM set. These data on CD-ROM are collectively referred to as WQN, water-quality networks. Data from these networks have been used at the national, regional, and local levels to estimate the rates of chemical flux from watersheds, quantify changes in stream water quality for periods during the past 30 years, and investigate relations between water quality and streamflow as well as the relations of water quality to pollution sources and various physical characteristics of watersheds. The networks include 679 monitoring stations in watersheds that represent diverse climatic, physiographic, and cultural characteristics. The HBN includes 63 stations in relatively small, minimally disturbed basins ranging in size from 2 to 2,000 square miles with a median drainage basin size of 57 square miles. NASQAN includes 618 stations in larger, more culturally-influenced drainage basins ranging in size from one square mile to 1.2 million square miles with a median drainage basin size of about 4,000 square miles. The CD-ROMs contain data for 63 physical, chemical, and biological properties of water (122 total constituents including analyses of dissolved and water suspended-sediment samples) collected during more than 60,000 site visits. These data approximately span the periods 1962-95 for HBN and 1973-95 for NASQAN. The data reflect sampling over a wide range of streamflow conditions and the use of relatively consistent sampling and analytical methods. The CD-ROMs provide ancillary information and data-retrieval tools to allow the national network data to be properly and efficiently used. Ancillary information includes the following: descriptions of the network objectives and history, characteristics of the network stations and water-quality data, historical records of important changes in network sample collection and laboratory analytical methods, water reference sample data for estimating laboratory measurement bias and variability for 34 dissolved constituents for the period 1985-95, discussions of statistical methods for using water reference sample data to evaluate the accuracy of network stream water-quality data, and a bibliography of scientific investigations using national network data and other publications relevant to the networks. The data structure of the CD-ROMs is designed to allow users to efficiently enter the water-quality data to user-supplied software packages including statistical analysis, modeling, or geographic information systems. On one disc, all data are stored in ASCII form accessible from any computer system with a CD-ROM driver. The data also can be accessed using DOS-based retrieval software supplied on a second disc. This software supports logical queries of the water-quality data based on constituent concentrations, sample- collection date, river name, station name, county, state, hydrologic unit number, and 1990 population and 1987 land-cover characteristics for station watersheds. User-selected data may be output in a variety of formats including dBASE, flat ASCII, delimited ASCII, or fixed-field for subsequent use in other software packages.

  11. U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Carlsbad, New Mexico, April 29-May 2, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Acknowledgments Karst aquifer systems are present throughout parts of the United States and some of its territories, and have developed in carbonate rocks (primarily limestone and dolomite) that span an interval of time encompassing more than 550 million years. The depositional environments, diagenetic processes, post-depositional tectonic events, and geochemical weathering processes that form karst aquifers are varied and complex, and involve biological, chemical, and physical changes. These factors, combined with the diverse climatic regimes under which karst development in these rocks has taken place, result in the unique dual- or triple-porosity nature of karst aquifers. These complex hydrogeologic systems typically represent challenging and unique conditions to scientists attempting to study groundwater flow and contaminant transport in these terrains. The dissolution of carbonate rocks and the subsequent development of distinct and beautiful landscapes, caverns, and springs has resulted in the most exceptional karst areas of the United States being designated as national or state parks; commercial caverns and known privately owned caves number in the tens of thousands. Both public and private properties provide access for scientists to study the flow of groundwater in situ. Likewise, the range and complexity of landforms and groundwater flow systems associated with karst terrains are enormous, perhaps more than for any other aquifer type. Karst aquifers and landscapes that form in tropical areas, such as the cockpit karst along the north coast of Puerto Rico, differ greatly from karst landforms in more arid climates, such as the Edwards Plateau in west-central Texas or the Guadalupe Mountains near Carlsbad, New Mexico, where hypogenic processes have played a major role in speleogenesis. Many of these public and private lands also contain unique flora and fauna associated with these karst hydrogeologic systems. As a result, numerous federal, state, and local agencies have a strong interest in the study of karst terrains. Many of the major springs and aquifers in the United States have developed in carbonate rocks, such as the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina; the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma; and the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in west-central Texas. These aquifers, and the springs that discharge from them, serve as major water-supply sources and as unique ecological habitats. Competition for the water resources of karst aquifers is common, and urban development and the lack of attenuation of contaminants in karst areas can impact the ecosystem and water quality of these aquifers. The concept for developing a platform for interaction among scientists within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) working on karst-related studies evolved from the November 1999 National Ground-Water Meeting of the USGS. As a result, the Karst Interest Group (KIG) was formed in 2000. The KIG is a loose-knit, grass-roots organization of USGS and non-USGS scientists and researchers devoted to fostering better communication among scientists working on, or interested in, karst science. The primary mission of the KIG is to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration and technology transfer among scientists working in karst areas. Additionally, the KIG encourages collaborative studies between the different mission areas of the USGS as well as other federal and state agencies, and with researchers from academia and institutes. The KIG also encourages younger scientists by participation of students in the poster and oral sessions. To accomplish its mission, the KIG has organized a series of workshops that are held near nationally important karst areas. To date (2014) six KIG workshops, including the workshop documented in this report, have been held. The workshops typically include oral and poster sessions on selected karst-related topics and research, as well as field trips to local karst features. Proceedings of t

  12. U.S. Geological Survey environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, quality of life, and economic prosperity lead to environmental change. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will compound the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, synthetic chemicals and substances, natural earth materials, toxins, and other biogenic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau and providing it to environmental, natural resource, agricultural, and public health managers. USGS specializes in science at the environment-health interface, by characterizing the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, and the resulting factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents. The USGS is a Federal science agency with a broad range of natural science expertise relevant to environmental health. USGS provides scientific information and tools as a scientific basis for management and policy decisionmaking. This report describes a 10-year strategy that encompasses the portfolio of USGS environmental health science. It summarizes national environmental health priorities that USGS is best suited to address, and will serve as a strategic framework for USGS environmental health science goals, actions, and outcomes for the next decade. Implementation of this strategy is intended to aid coordination of USGS environmental health activities and to provide a focal point for disseminating information to stakeholders. The "One Health" paradigm advocated by the World Health Organization (WHO; World Health Organization, 2011), and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA; American Veterinary Medical Association, 2008), among others, is based on a general recognition that the health of humans, animals, and the environment are inextricably linked. Thus, successful efforts to protect that health will require increased interdisciplinary research and increased communication and collaboration among the broader scientific and health community. This strategy is built upon that paradigm.

  13. Exploratory drilling in the Prairie du Chien group of the Wisconsin zinc-lead districts by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1949-1950

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heyl, Allen Van; Lyons, Erwin J.; Agnew, Allen F.

    1951-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey explored the Prairie du Chien group in the main productive area of the Wisconsin zinc-lead district during 1949-50. Eight properties--Crow Branch diggings, Leix, Harris, Spitzbarth, Kennedy, James, Raisbeck and Vinegar Hill Roaster--were explored using both diamond and churn drills. Twenty holes were drilled that totaled 8,582 feet in depth. The objectives of the exploration were to determine if the Prairie du Chien and other formations below the principal ore-bearing strata (Galena, Decorah, and Platteville formations) of the district are favorable for ore deposits, and to determine the type of ore deposits, if present. Lean deposits of sphalerite, marcasite, and pyrite were found in the Prairie du Chien on five properties--Crow Branch, Leix, Harris, Spitzbarth, and Vinegar Hill 1%ouster-and also in the Franconia sandstone on the Leix property. In the drilled area the sulfides in the Prairie du Chien group occur in certain more brittle or soluble dolomite beds that contain cavities formed by brecciation or solution.

  14. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; in-bottle acid digestion of whole-water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, G.L.; Fishman, M.J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Water samples for trace-metal determinations routinely have been prepared in open laboratories. For example, the U.S. Geological Survey method I-3485-85 (Extraction Procedure, for Water- Suspended Sediment) is performed in a laboratory hood on a laboratory bench without any special precautions to control airborne contamination. This method tends to be contamination prone for several trace metals primarily because the samples are transferred, acidified, digested, and filtered in an open laboratory environment. To reduce trace-metal contamination of digested water samples, procedures were established that rely on minimizing sample-transfer steps and using a class-100 clean bench during sample filtration. This new procedure involves the following steps: 1. The sample is acidified with HCl directly in the original water-sample bottle. 2. The water-sample bottle with the cap secured is heated in a laboratory oven. 3. The digestate is filtered in a class-100 laminar-flow clean bench. The exact conditions used (that is, oven temperature, time of heating, and filtration methods) for this digestion procedure are described. Comparisons between the previous U.S Geological Survey open-beaker method I-3485-85 and the new in-bottle procedure for synthetic and field-collected water samples are given. When the new procedure is used, blank concentrations for most trace metals determined are reduced significantly.

  15. Mitigating the consequences of future earthquakes in historical centres: what perspectives from the joined use of past information and geological-geophysical surveys?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzio Gizzi, Fabrizio; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Potenza, Maria Rosaria; Zotta, Cinzia; Simionato, Maurizio; Pileggi, Domenico; Castenetto, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    To mitigate the damage effects of earthquakes in urban areas and particularly in historical centres prone to high seismic hazard is an important task to be pursued. As a matter of fact, seismic history throughout the world informs us that earthquakes have caused deep changes in the ancient urban conglomerations due to their high building vulnerability. Furthermore, some quarters can be exposed to an increase of seismic actions if compared with adjacent areas due to the geological and/or topographical features of the site on which the historical centres lie. Usually, the strategies aimed to estimate the local seismic hazard make only use of the geological-geophysical surveys. Thorough this approach we do not draw any lesson from what happened as a consequences of past earthquakes. With this in mind, we present the results of a joined use of historical data and traditional geological-geophysical approach to analyse the effects of possible future earthquakes in historical centres. The research activity discussed here is arranged into a joint collaboration between the Department of Civil Protection of the Presidency of Council of Ministers, the Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering and the Institute of Archaeological and Monumental Heritage of the National (Italian) Research Council. In order to show the results, we discuss the preliminary achievements of the integrated study carried out on two historical towns located in Southern Apennines, a portion of the Italian peninsula exposed to high seismic hazard. Taking advantage from these two test sites, we also discuss some methodological implications that could be taken as a reference in the seismic microzonation studies.

  16. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Russell Graymer

    This web site provides an introduction to geologic maps. Topics covered include what is a geologic map, unique features of geologic maps, letter symbols, faults, and strike and dip. Users may click to view colored geologic maps, the geologic map of the United States and the geologic relief map of the United States.

  17. P-Them Response for Geologically Active and Non-Active Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Time Domain Electromagnetic air-borne systems are widely used in geological exploration for minerals associated with conductive rocks, underground water resources and geological underground mapping. The newly designed P-THEM system has been test-flown at the Reid Mahaffy geological test site in Northern Ontario, Canada; and then over an area near Newmarket, north of Toronto. While the flight in Reid Mahaffy was made to verify real characteristics of the system: stability and repeatability of results, the flight over the Newmarket area was made to verify correct operation of the EM system with a magnetometer and gamma-ray spectrometer. Interesting and significant response of the TDEM observations to geological, agricultural and engineering objects were observed during the test flights. These results demonstrate a possibility of TDEM method for mineral research and environmental tasks. The Reid Mahaffy Test Site is located in the Abitibi Subprovince, immediately east of the Mattagami River Fault in Ontario, Canada. The test site was created in 1999 by the Ontario Geological Survey, initially to enable various airborne geophysical systems to demonstrate their basic performance capabilities. The general geology of the site contains known overburden thickness based on almost 50 diamond drill holes, with geological logs available for these. The survey flights over Reid Mahaffy test site were performed in April 2010. The altitude and direction tests were flown on three lines over the test survey area. The response of early times represents overburden and correlates with its known thickness. The conductive body appears on later time channels and remains detectable over noise level. The electrical inversion of the results allows distinguishing a structure of several vertical conductor slices, forming the conductive body. The Newmarket area selected for tests in June 2010 is a highly developed urban zone in the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada. Geologically, the area is represented with Quadrennial sediments with underlying bedrocks of the Ordovician formation. The main area is represented with sand and gravel of Glacial lake, River and Moraine deposits. The main purpose of the test flights was to check the functional integration of the P-THEM system with a Magnetometer and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer system. The results indicated a very good agricultural response of the P-THEM system after the interpretation of the observed data. The salty soils along roads, where the salt is spread during winter time, the grounded industrial constructions and powerline towers can be observed on the mapped data (see image). The achieved results of the survey show the possibility of the TDEM airborne system for applications in characterization of environmental and engineering properties, such as detection of surface and near surface pollution, grounding of metal constructions and other, over large areas of interest.

  18. Pennsylvania's contribution to petroleum geology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dickey

    1989-01-01

    John F. Carll of the Second Geological Survey of Pennsylvania laid the foundations of both petroleum geology and reservoir engineering. J. P. Lesley, director of the Second Survey, had introduced structure contours when he was working in the anthracite fields. He pointed out that the great oil fields of Pennsylvania were in the only part of the state where there

  19. NERC/BGS 2008 British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA; 2

    E-print Network

    : · Mapping - field survey, high-res DSM, air photos · New BGS research: Focus: · YD glacial stratigraphy of Hubbard (1999). Nunataks are not shown. Key dated margins and Lateglacial pollen sites provide important

  20. Geologic Map of the Atlin Quadrangle, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Ford, Arthur B.; Himmelberg, Glen R.

    2009-01-01

    This map presents the results of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologic bedrock mapping studies in the mostly glacier covered Atlin 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, northern southeastern Alaska. These studies are part of a long-term systematic effort by the USGS to provide bedrock geologic and mineral-resource information for all of southeastern Alaska, covering all of the Tongass National Forest (including Wilderness Areas) and Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Some contributions to this effort are those concerned with southwesternmost part of the region, the Craig and Dixon Entrance quadrangles (Brew, 1994; 1996) and with the Wrangell-Petersburg area (Brew, 1997a-m; Brew and Grybeck, 1997; Brew and Koch, 1997). As shown on the index map (fig. 1), the study area is almost entirely in the northern Coast Mountains adjacent to British Columbia, Canada. No previous geologic map has been published for the area, although Brew and Ford (1985) included a small part of it in a preliminary compilation of the adjoining Juneau quadrangle; and Brew and others (1991a) showed the geology at 1:500,000 scale. Areas mapped nearby in British Columbia and the United States are also shown on figure 1. All of the map area is in the Coast Mountains Complex as defined by Brew and others (1995a). A comprehensive bibliography is available for this and adjacent areas (Brew, 1997n).