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1

The Geological Survey of Canada: Energy needs of tomorrow through collaboration today  

SciTech Connect

Canada`s national centre for geoscience research and information is the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). Two of its divisions, the Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology and the Atlantic Geoscience Centre work closely with the energy exploration and production industry and universities. One successful GSC innovation is the Industrial Farmers Program that promotes cost-shared projects on geoscience problems of mutual interest. An example is the Hydrocarbon Charge Modelling Project which has struck a series of mutually beneficial alliances among the GSC, oil and gas companies and universities. The GSC`s high quality skills in basin analysis, including sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, structure and tectonics, petroleum geology, geophysics, geochemistry and environmental work are underpinned by vast data holdings on Canada`s mature Western Canada Sedimentary Basin and onshore/offshore frontier basins. Laboratory facilities include laser ablation ICP-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Rock-Eval/TOC, pyrolysis and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, organic and inorganic petrology and paleontology processing. Sophisticated computing facilities provide capabilities in basin and crustal modelling, 2- and 3-D seismic interpretation and seismic processing and computerised cartography. Solutions to the exploration, production and environmental problems faced by a cyclical business sector are mom efficiently sought through cooperative research by bringing together the diverse capabilities of industry, government and universities. Through such broad, collaborative partnerships society will ensure the economic and environmentally sustainable development of its future energy needs.

Prior, D.B. [Atlantic Geoscience Centre, Nova Scotia (Canada); Mossop, G.D. [Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-08-01

2

Canada's Geological Survey sees onshore fields as best hope for self-sufficiency in oil: new report calls into question Ottawa's emphasis on the offshore frontiers  

SciTech Connect

The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) says that Canada will need to rely on its western reserves until offshore sites reach production status in the 1990's. The GSC recommends a renewed exploration effort and oil sands development in Alberta to secure enough oil for the 1980's but also supports government incentives for offshore exploration. The report predicts major discoveries on the East Coast, and cites the Arctic Islands as having the largest oil field in Canada. (DCK)

Hatter, D.

1984-01-01

3

Illinois State Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) homepage provides information on geologic mapping, earthquakes, fossils, groundwater, wetlands, glacial geology, bedrock geology, and Lake Michigan geology. Educational materials include field trip guides, short publications on Illinois geology for students and teachers, online tours, single-page maps, and a geologic column. Other materials include databases and collections of GIS data, well records, drill cores, and mining information; a bibliography of Illinois geology; online maps and data; and information on water and land use, resource development, and geologic hazards.

4

Maryland Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Maryland Geological Survey (MGS) homepage contains information from MGS programs on hydrogeology, hydrology, coastal and estuarine geology, environmental geology and mineral resources; an online guide to Maryland geology; and information on oyster habitat restoration projects. There are also maps, data, information on MGS publications, MGS news, and online educational resources.

5

Colorado Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) is an agency of state government within the Department of Natural Resources whose mission is to help reduce the impact of geologic hazards on the citizens of Colorado, to promote the responsible economic development of mineral and mineral fuel resources, to provide geologic insight into water resources, and to provide geologic advice and information to a variety of constituencies. This site contains extensive information about Colorado geology such as maps, a geologic time scale for the state, program information, and state field trip information. This site hosts the Avalanche Information Center which contains avalanche forecasting and education center details. Publications report on geologic hazards, land use, environmental geology, mineral resources, oil, gas, coal, geologic mapping and earthquake information for the state. There are online editions of RockTalk, which is a quarterly newsletter published by the Colorado Geological Survey dealing with all aspects of geology throughout the state of Colorado. Links are provided for more resources.

6

Geological Survey Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If your research or interests lie in the geology of South Dakota, then the state's Geological Survey Program Web site is for you. Offered are online publications and maps, a geologic reference database, a lithologic logs database, digital base maps, a water quality database, and several other quality information sources worth checking out.

7

Utah Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Utah Geological Survey. Materials available here include news articles and information on geologic hazards; information on places of geological interest; and popular geology topics such as earthquakes, rocks and minerals, fossils, economic resources, groundwater resources, and others. Educational resources include teaching kits, the 'Teacher's Corner' column in the survey's newsletter, and a series of 'Glad You Asked' articles on state geological topics. There is also an extensive list of free K-12 educational materials, as well as a set of curriculum materials such as activity packets, slide shows, and teachers' handbooks, which are available to order.

8

Kentucky Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Kentucky maintains the Kentucky Geological Survey Web site. Visitors will find a number of educational general information pages on rocks and minerals, fossils, coal, geologic hazards, industrial minerals, maps and GIS, oil and natural gas, and water, as well as the general geology of Kentucky. Each page contains specific information, data, and research summaries from the university. The geology of Kentucky page, for example, shows a map of geologic periods and gives descriptions of the rock strata in the state, a description of its landforms, and a geological photo album of physiographic regions and points of interest.

1997-01-01

9

South Carolina Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The South Carolina Geological Survey (SCGS) homepage contains information about state mapping, education and outreach programs, and recent news. For educators, there is the Earth Science education series of publications which includes presentations and page-size graphics on such topics as earthquakes, plate tectonics, geologic time, fossils, and others. Other materials include information on mineral resources, links to organizations in and about South Carolina geology, the South Carolina core repository, the Geologic Map of South Carolina, and others.

10

Iowa Geological Survey Bureau  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Iowa Geological Survey Bureau (GSB) homepage contains: general information about the geology of Iowa; the Natural Resources Geographic Information System, which is a collection of databases on geology and water wells; and information about GSB staff, geologic studies, water monitoring programs, and services. There are maps, photographs, general interest articles, technical abstracts, lists of available publications, and an on-line book about the natural resource history of Iowa.

11

Ohio Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Ohio Geological Survey. Materials available through the site include a variety of publications, particularly the Survey's reports, bulletins, information circulars, guidebooks, and many others. There is an extensive selection of maps, including topographic maps in several scales, and downloadable geologic maps of several themes (drift thickness, bedrock geology, karst areas, glacial geology, and many others), as well as digital maps and data. The interactive maps section features online map viewers of abandoned mines, earthquake epicenters, surficial geology, geology of Lake Erie, and others. The educational resources page has links to the 'Hands On Earth' series of activities, GeoFacts (short bulletins on Ohio geological topics), nontechnical educational leaflets, field guides, and links to other publications, rock and mineral clubs, educational associations, and related websites. There is also a link to the Ohio Seismic Network, a network of seismograph stations located at colleges, universities, and other institutions that collects and disseminates information about earthquakes in Ohio.

12

Arkansas Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Arkansas Geological Survey (AGS) homepage aims to develop and provide knowledge of the geology and hydrogeology of the State, and to stimulate development and effective management and utilization of the mineral, fossil-fuel, and water resources of Arkansas while protecting the environment. The AGC collects and disperses geologic data consisting of geologic maps, historical data concerning resources, and various datasets concerning water, fossil-fuel, and mineral resources of Arkansas. The site contains publications that can be ordered, sections about Arkansas geology, a list of mineral producers of Arkansas, and reports on mineral resources.

13

North Carolina Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) examines, describes, and maps the state's geology and mineral resources and publishes reports and maps. The site contains lists of publications, maps, aerial photographs, frequently asked questions about North Carolina geology, and mineral and professional information. Project Earth Science is designed to provide relevant and accurate earth science education information for the state's high school students and earth/environmental science teachers.

14

California Geological Survey - Landslides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the CA Geological Survey (CGS) presents information on landslides as well as maps and products of various past and present CGS programs to map and respond to landslides in the state of California, including the Forest and Watershed Geology Program, the Seismic Hazards Zonation Program, the Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping project, and the Landslide Map Index.

Survey, California G.

15

Kansas Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Kansas Geological Survey, operated by the University of Kansas in connection with its research and service program, is to conduct geological studies and research and to collect, correlate, preserve, and disseminate information leading to a better understanding of the geology of Kansas, with special emphasis on natural resources of economic value, water quality and quantity, and geologic hazards. The website includes information about the High Plains and Ogallala aquifers, the Upper Arkansas corridor, the Dakota aquifer, county and state geologic maps, an online bibliography of Kansas geology, publications, a photo archive, a digital petroleum atlas, a petroleum primer for the state, gravity and magnetic maps, Hugoton project information, and details about the Hutchinson Kansas natural gas fires. The educational resources section contains a mineral information page for the state, and GeoKansas, which provides information on state geology for schools.

16

Reading the Geology of Canada: Geological Discourse as Narrative  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article suggests that Sir Wil­ liam Logan's Geology of Canada can be read as a narrative describing the past dynamic changes that shaped the present structure of the earth. The author also suggests, since the foundation of nineteenth century geology was a bio-stratigraphic con­ sensus that combined stratigraphy and the fossil record, that the use of a narrative offered

WILLIAM E. EAGAN

17

British Geological Survey: Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The British Geological Survey (BGS) has a wealth of information about the earth sciences, and they are quite willing to share it with others. This page contains information and resources for anyone interested in geology for educational or leisure purposes, and it is contained with four sections. First up is "Popular geology", which includes "Britain beneath our feet", an interactive atlas of geology, resources, and land quality. This section also contains graphics about climate change and earthquakes. The second section is titled "Educational resources". Here visitors can ask scientists at the BGS specific questions and they can also download several free posters. The third section is called "Educational news and events" and it features upcoming events at the BGS and links to their free magazine, "Earthwise". The site is rounded out by the fourth section titled "From the BGS Archives". Here visitors can view historic geological photographs and also view field sketches and watercolors by Alexander Henry Green, the celebrated Victorian geologist.

18

Indiana Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Indiana Geological Survey (IGS). Site materials include information on Earth science issues such as groundwater, mapping, coal and mineral resources, oil and gas, and seismic hazards. There is also information on the geologic time scale and stratigraphic record, rocks and minerals, fossils (including nautiloids of the Ordovician period in Indiana), caves and karst topography in Indiana, and glacial geology. The Geographic Information Ssytems (GIS) and mapping section includes a GIS atlas for the state, an online map viewer, links to the Indiana coal mine information system, petroleum database management system, and a download page where users can access GIS datasets for the state.

19

Florida Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Geological Survey (FGS) homepage provides data, research materials and interpretations on aquifer systems, geologic frameworks, landforms, energy and non-energy mineral resources, and geologic hazards which which can be used to address issues of conservation and protection, sustainable development, human health protection, and implementation of successful environmental regulatory programs. Educational materials for earth science and the pre-historic development of the state are also provided. These include topics such as sinkholes, data and maps, rock and mineral identification, minerals, hydrogeology, and fossils.

20

Minnesota Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) was established in 1872 as part of the University of Minnesota. The function of the MGS is to serve "the people of Minnesota by providing systematic geoscience information to support stewardship of water, land, and mineral resources." This website from the Digital Conservancy at the University of Minnesota provides access to all of items published by the MGS. The items are contained within the Collections area, and visitors will find headings here such as "Geology of Minnesota Parks," "County Atlas Series," and the "Bulletin of the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey." First-time visitors can check out the Recent Submissions area on the right-hand side of the page to look over some new findings, including hydrogeological maps of different counties around the state. One item that should not be missed is the "Geology of Minnesota: A Centennial Volume" from 1972. It's a tremendous volume and one that cannot be ignored by students of the physical landscape and geological history of the state.

2012-09-21

21

Development of a 3-D geological model towards natural hazards mitigation, St. Lawrence River Valley, Eastern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Canadian Government's main goals to ensure safe and strong communities for its citizens, the Geological Survey of Canada has recently undertaken the development of a 3-D geological model and a seamless surficial geology map of the St. Lawrence River valley in Eastern Canada. This paper summarizes the initial phase of this project, which consists of gathering,

RÉJEAN COUTURE; DOMINIQUE GAUVREAU; J. ROBERT BÉLANGER

22

Manitoba Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers materials on Manitoba geology and minerals, mining and mineral exploration, a Digital Elevation Model of Southern Manitoba (DEMSM) landforms including oblique views, an interactive GIS map gallery of minerals and geology, a study of paleofloods in the Red River Basin including photographs illustrating how scientists delineated the paleofloods, and information on the Manitoba Protected Areas Initiative. Some maps and reports are available to download.

23

Geological Survey of Tanzania  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United Republic of Tanzania was formed in 1964 by the merger of Tanganyika and Zanzibar and is located on the eastern coast of Africa between the Great Lakes of the Rift Valley. Tanzania has a diverse mineral resource base that includes gold and base metals, diamond-bearing kimberlites, nickel, cobalt, copper, coal resources, and a variety of industrial minerals and rocks such as kaolin, graphite, and dimension stone. This web site was created by the Mineral Resources Department (MRD), a subsidiary of the Ministry of Energy and Minerals, and contains basic information about the country's logistical environment, mineral sector policy, geological database, and more.

1997-01-01

24

US Geological Survey World Energy Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released on March 24, 2000, the US Geological Survey's World Energy Project Preliminary Report "estimates the volume of oil and gas, exclusive of the U.S., that may be added to the world's reserve in the next 30 years." The preliminary report contains a world assessment showing there is more oil and gas in the Middle East and in offshore areas of western Africa and eastern South America than figured in previous assessments, and less oil and gas in Canada and Mexico, and significantly less natural gas in the Former Soviet Union. "The USGS World Petroleum Assessment 2000 is the first of its kind to provide a rigorous geologic foundation for estimating undiscovered energy resources for the world."

2000-01-01

25

US Geological Survey Fact Sheets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheets Web site summarizes research and investigations done by the agency and provides details about particular activities. The sheets are organized by theme, including resources, hazards, environment, information management, by individual state, and by scientific discipline. The fact sheets give basic summations of the research and provide links to more detailed pages for those seeking further information.

2001-01-01

26

Recent U.S. Geological Survey Studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada-Results of a 5-Year Project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents summary papers of work conducted between 2002 and 2007 under a 5-year project effort funded by the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program, formerly entitled 'Tintina Metallogenic Province: Integrated Studies on Geologic Framework, Mineral Resources, and Environmental Signatures.' As the project progressed, the informal title changed from 'Tintina Metallogenic Province' project to 'Tintina Gold Province' project, the latter being more closely aligned with the terminology used by the mineral industry. As Goldfarb and others explain in the first chapter of this report, the Tintina Gold Province is a convenient term used by the mineral exploration community for a 'region of very varied geology, gold deposit types, and resource potential'. The Tintina Gold Province encompasses roughly 150,000 square kilometers, bounded by the Kaltag-Tintina fault system on the north and the Farewell-Denali fault system on the south. It extends westward in a broad arc, some 200 km wide, from northernmost British Columbia, through the Yukon, through southeastern and central Alaska, to southwestern Alaska. The climate is subarctic and, in Alaska, includes major physiographic delineations and ecoregions such as the Yukon-Tanana Upland, Tanana-Kuskokwim Lowlands, Yukon River Lowlands, and the Kuskokwim Mountains. Although the Tintina Gold Province is historically important for some of the very first placer and lode gold discoveries in northern North America, it has recently seen resurgence in mineral exploration, development, and mining activity. This resurgence is due to both new discoveries (for example, Pogo and Donlin Creek) and to the application of modern extraction methods to previously known, but economically restrictive, low-grade, bulk-tonnage gold resources (for example, Fort Knox, Clear Creek, and Scheelite Dome). In addition, the Tintina Gold Province hosts numerous other mineral deposit types, possessing both high and low sulfide content, which are not currently in development.

Gough, Larry P.; Day, Warren C.

2010-01-01

27

Western Canada's Geological Promise in Uranium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Uranium reserves in Saskatchewan are contained in unconformity-type deposits at the base of the Athabasca sandstone. In 1980 this region accounted for about 70 percent of all surface diamond drilling in Canada. Saskatchewan's share of Canadian uranium res...

L. S. Beck

1982-01-01

28

OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Canada weathered the global economic crisis well, mainly reflecting sustained growth in domestic pending, and the economy is continuing to grow despite the persistence of international turbulence, most recently stemming from the euro zone sovereign debt crisis. In Canada's case, several factors are acting in its favour. Federal fiscal plans are…

OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

2012-01-01

29

U. S. Geological Survey Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Library is the largest earth science library in the world. The library serves the research needs of USGS scientists throughout the nation and provides information to other organizations and individuals in the areas of geology, hydrology, cartography, biology, and related fields. USGS libraries are located in Reston, Virginia, Denver, Colorado, Menlo Park, California, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Some of the library holdings are available on-line, while others can be purchased from USGS, ordered via an interlibrary loan, or attained from one of the four library locations directly. The library home page provides links to search engines for USGS publications, photographs, maps, etc. Users can search various databases to find what they need. These databases include: the Geographic Names Information System database, the Minerals Information Collection, the National Geologic Map Database, and a database of purchased journals held by the library. Users can also search the library's catalog, and can post questions to a librarian via the Ask a Librarian link.

30

Chapter 41: Geology and petroleum potential of the West Greenland-East Canada Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal programme. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geological basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Petroleum System. Potential petroleum source rocks include strata of Ordovician, Lower and Upper Cretaceous, and Palaeogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study - the Eurekan Structures AU, NW Greenland Rifted Margin AU, NE Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU - encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered technically recoverable resources. The mean volumes of undiscovered resources for the West Greenland-East Canada Province are 10.7 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 75 ?? 1012 cubic feet of gas, and 1.7 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. For the part of the province that is north of the Arctic Circle, the estimated mean volumes of these undiscovered resources are 7.3 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 52 ?? 1012 cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.1 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

Schenk, C. J.

2011-01-01

31

Efficient Geological Modelling of Large AEM Surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combining geological expert knowledge with geophysical observations into a final 3D geological model is, in most cases, not a straight forward process. It typically involves many types of data and requires both an understanding of the data and the geological target. When dealing with very large areas, such as modelling of large AEM surveys, the manual task for the geologist to correctly evaluate and properly utilise all the data available in the survey area, becomes overwhelming. In the ERGO project (Efficient High-Resolution Geological Modelling) we address these issues and propose a new modelling methodology enabling fast and consistent modelling of very large areas. The vision of the project is to build a user friendly expert system that enables the combination of very large amounts of geological and geophysical data with geological expert knowledge. This is done in an "auto-pilot" type functionality, named Smart Interpretation, designed to aid the geologist in the interpretation process. The core of the expert system is a statistical model that describes the relation between data and geological interpretation made by a geological expert. This facilitates fast and consistent modelling of very large areas. It will enable the construction of models with high resolution as the system will "learn" the geology of an area directly from interpretations made by a geological expert, and instantly apply it to all hard data in the survey area, ensuring the utilisation of all the data available in the geological model. Another feature is that the statistical model the system creates for one area can be used in another area with similar data and geology. This feature can be useful as an aid to an untrained geologist to build a geological model, guided by the experienced geologist way of interpretation, as quantified by the expert system in the core statistical model. In this project presentation we provide some examples of the problems we are aiming to address in the project, and show some preliminary results.

Bach, Torben; Martlev Pallesen, Tom; Jørgensen, Flemming; Lundh Gulbrandsen, Mats; Mejer Hansen, Thomas

2014-05-01

32

Matching magnetic trends and patterns across the Tintina fault, Alaska and Canada--evidence for offset of about 490 kilometers: Chapter C in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Magnetic anomaly patterns on opposite sides of the mapped Tintina fault in eastern Alaska and western Canada show an apparent offset of about 490 kilometers (km), probably of Eocene age. This estimate is compared with previous geologically based estimates of 400 to 430 km and paleomagnetically based estimates of more than 1,100 km. The apparent geophysical alignments have geologic implications that deserve further study.

Saltus, Richard W.

2007-01-01

33

US Geological Survey customers speak out  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Provides results of a customer survey carried out in 1994 by the US Geological Survey. Uses of cartographic products are classified, as are application areas, accuracy satisfaction, media, Digital Line Graph requirements in update, and frequency of product use. USGS responses and plans for the future are noted. -M.Blakemore

Gillespie, S.; Snyder, G.

1995-01-01

34

Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of Alaska's geological and geophysical survey, the agency responsible for collecting and distributing information about the state's geologic resources and hazards. Materials include numerous downloadable geologic publications, geophysical, geochemical, and GIS datasets, maps, photos, and news articles. The 'Guide to Alaska Geologic and Mineral Information', a document available at the site, is a source for basic and specialized research into the geology of Alaska, and the resources and issues involved in exploration for metallic mineral deposits in Alaska. It is designed to give users a broad overview of the many resources available to them from library facilities and holdings to State and Federal agencies that publish research and oversee mining and exploration activities to online databases, publications, and catalogs.

35

Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

36

Kentucky Geological Survey: Earth Science Education Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains educational resources for K-12 classrooms provided by the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS). The purpose of this site is to provide educational Earth Science resources from around the globe using the internet. Earth science links, classroom activities, demonstrations, and a listserv for teachers are provided.

37

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WELL WATERLEVEL DATA, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

USGS well waterlevel data for NC wells, as provided by North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NC-DENR). The zipped file contains 2 FoxPro databases: usgs.dbf - This database contains the well construction information for the US Geological Survey's moni...

38

The Marine Geology Program of the US Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey and charged it with the responsibility for the classification of public lands and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources and products of the national domain. The national domain for seabed resources was extended to 200 nautical miles offshore. This United States Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a marine domain surrounding the continental U.S., Hawaii, and U.S. related islands, constitutes an area about one and two thirds larger than the size of the onshore area. In this vast domain lie resources of immense importance to the Nation: an estimated 35 percent of the economically recoverable oil and gas yet to be found in the United States; major resources of strategic metals like cobalt, manganese, and nickel in seafloor crusts, pavements, and modules; massive sulfide deposits actively forming today; and major concentrations of heavy minerals in nearshore sand bodies.

Edgar, N. T.

39

U.S. Geological Survey: Coastal and Marine Geology Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geologists, meteorologists, disaster specialists and others will find much to engage their attention on this website. Created by the United States Geological Survey, this site provides succinct overviews of a range of topics from the National Coastal Program Plan to El Nino, erosion, and sea-level change. Teachers should click on the drop down Content Type menu to access the Educational Materials area. Here they will find over 100 resources that highlight ocean mapping projects, core geology work, and ocean acidification. Visitors may also browse through these resources looking for movies, maps, data sets, photographs, and more. Additionally, visitors can learn about the program's field centers, located in St. Petersburg, Woods Hole, and Menlo Park.

2012-02-28

40

A survey of telehealth coordinators in Canada.  

PubMed

Telehealth coordinators practising in Canada were invited to respond to an online survey and participate in a telephone interview. For the present study, the definition of 'telehealth' was limited to the use of videoconferencing. The coordinators were recruited with the assistance of the Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) and the Canadian Telehealth Forum (CTF). The response rate to the online survey from the OTN cohort was 4% (n = 13) and from the CTF cohort was 36% (n = 34). Of the 47 people who completed the survey, 16 also participated in a telephone interview. Most respondents were female; their mean age was 40 years. Most telehealth coordinators had some form of post-secondary education. Most, 66% (n = 31) coordinated both clinical and educational videoconferences. About half of the telehealth coordinators (55%, n = 26) indicated that their job was dedicated solely to telehealth, although 32% (n = 15) reported that their jobs involved responsibilities outside telehealth. About half of the respondents worked full-time (51%, n = 24). Most respondents either strongly agreed or agreed with the statement that 'If a telehealth coordinator's role involves patient care then that individual should be a member of a regulated health profession'. The need for organizations to more clearly define the role, better recognize and support telehealth coordinators and develop mechanisms for continuing professional education and certification were recurrent themes in the interviews. PMID:22604279

Lynch, Jay; Gay, Shirley

2012-06-01

41

Paleontology at the US Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Paleontology, the science which uses fossils to study life in past geologic time, has served an important role in geologic studies at the USGS since its establishment in 1879." The Paleontology at the US Geological Survey Web site contains a broad introduction to the subject and provides links to various products produced by the agency. The Fossil Groups link lets visitors learn about the different types of fossils, how they lived, and how they are used to answer important questions about the world we inhabit, including well written descriptions and many photographs. A products link offers a large list of paleontological publications. The educational resources page rounds out the informative and interesting site, giving anyone interested something to enjoy. [JAB

42

U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over its long history, the U.S. Geological Survey has taken many, many, photographs. In the course of their various geological studies and explorations, persons in their employ have documented volcanic explosions, mining projects, and dams. This website contains 30,000 photographs from 1868 to the present, and many of these images have never been published in any form. New users can get started by clicking one of the subject areas on the left-hand side of the homepage. These areas include "Earthquakes", "Mines, Mills, Quarries", and "Mount St. Helens". Visitors can also perform basic keyword searches, and they might wish to try out words like "dolomite", "karst", or "Colorado". Also, the site has an excellent "Portrait Gallery", which contains images of famed geological pioneers, such as Chares Van Hise.

2010-02-05

43

Geology of Gulf Canada's Pelican oil sands pilot project, Alberta Canada  

SciTech Connect

Gulf Canada Resources Incorporated is operating an experimental oil sands pilot project (Pelican Lake project) in the Wabasca deposit in NE Alberta intended to recover bitumen by steam stimulation followed by combustion. The geology of the pilot site is being studied actively through an extensive logging and coring program aimed at defining the detailed vertical and lateral variability of the Wabiskaw A sand reservoir, particularly with a view to defining such parameters as porosity, permeability, oil saturation, and isopach, net pay, and structure. The Wabiskaw A sand at the pilot site is a thin, glauconitic, coarsening-upward sheet sand interpreted as part of an offshore (shelf) bar system. The major part of the sand body at the pilot site consists of a northeast-southwest trending bar. This grades into an interbar facies at the southeast corner where the sand thickness and net pay decrease and the clay content of the reservoir increases.

Sharpe, R.J.

1982-05-01

44

U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Carbon Sequestration Assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geological storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) in consultation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State geological surveys. To conduct the assessment, the USGS developed a probability-based assessment methodology that was extensively reviewed by experts from industry, government and university organizations (Brennan et al., 2010, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1127). The methodology is intended to be used at regional to sub-basinal scales and it identifies storage assessment units (SAUs) that are based on two depth categories below the surface (1) 3,000 to 13,000 ft (914 to 3,962 m), and (2) 13,000 ft (3,962 m) and greater. In the first category, the 3,000 ft (914 m) minimum depth of the storage reservoir ensures that CO2 is in a supercritical state to minimize the storage volume. The depth of 13,000 ft (3,962 m) represents maximum depths that are accessible with average injection pressures. The second category represents areas where a reservoir formation has potential storage at depths below 13,000 ft (3,962 m), although they are not accessible with average injection pressures; these are assessed as a separate SAU. SAUs are restricted to formation intervals that contain saline waters (total dissolved solids greater than 10,000 parts per million) to prevent contamination of protected ground water. Carbon dioxide sequestration capacity is estimated for buoyant and residual storage traps within the basins. For buoyant traps, CO2 is held in place in porous formations by top and lateral seals. For residual traps, CO2 is contained in porous formations as individual droplets held within pores by capillary forces. Preliminary geologic models have been developed to estimate CO2 storage capacity in approximately 40 major sedimentary basins within the United States. More than 200 SAUs have been identified within these basins. The results of the assessment are estimates of the technically accessible storage resources based on present-day geological and engineering technology related to CO2 injection into geologic formations; therefore the assessment is not of total in-place resources. Summary geologic descriptions of the evaluated basins and SAUs will be prepared, along with the national assessment results. During the coming year, these results will be released as USGS publications available from http://energy.usgs.gov. In support of these assessment activities, CO2 sequestration related research science is being conducted by members of the project. Results of our research will contribute to current and future CO2 storage assessments conducted by the USGS and other organizations. Research topics include: (a) geochemistry of CO2 interactions with subsurface environments; (b) subsurface petrophysical rock properties in relation to CO2 injection; (c) enhanced oil recovery and the potential for CO2 storage; (d) storage of CO2 in unconventional reservoirs (coal, shale, and basalt); (e) statistical aggregation of assessment results; and (f) potential risks of induced seismicity.

Warwick, P. D.; Blondes, M. S.; Brennan, S.; Corum, M.; Merrill, M. D.

2012-12-01

45

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short topical and summary articles about the results of 1982 geologic studies on a wide range of subjects of economic and scientific interest. Included are lists of references cited for each article and a compilation of reports about Alaska written by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and published by the Geological Survey and other organizations.

Edited by Reed, Katherine M.; Bartsch-Winkler, Susan

1984-01-01

46

United States Geologic Survey: Selected Volcano Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program site contains links to selected material related to volcanic hazards. Users can access information about the volcanic hazards program, publications, topical maps of volcanoes world wide, aviation safety reports, volcanic hazard reports, computer software, volcano digital series and educational videos. Several USGS fact sheets are also available for volcanoes in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, the Pacific Northwest and around the world. Fact sheets can be downloaded as pdf files or html. This site contains a wide variety of comprehensive material on the world's volcanoes and the hazards associated with them.

2007-01-27

47

Idaho Geological Survey: Earth Science Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Idaho Geological Survey (IGS) operates and maintains the Earth Science Education Web site, which contains many interesting original and outside linked resources for students and teachers. The activities offered by IGS include topics on astronomy, earthquakes, general earth science, hydrogeology, landslides, volcanoes, and weather and climate. Other links on the site are geared toward professional development for educators, including a curriculum development project and an online clearinghouse publication of professional development courses, workshops, and conferences. Although the layout and design of it make it a bit difficult to use efficiently, the site contains many quality features and is worth exploring.

48

Geological Setting and Petroleum Potential of the Paleozoic Hudson Platform, Northern Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hudson Platform covers an area of 600,000 km2 and represents one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in Canada. The Hudson Platform contains the large Hudson Bay Basin and smaller Moose River Basin. The Hudson Bay and Moose River basins are surrounded and underlain by Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The Hudson Platform contains Ordovician to Cretaceous sedimentary strata, with a maximum known thickness of about 2500 m in Hudson Bay. The lower Paleozoic succession includes Late Ordovician to Early Devonian shallow marine carbonates and thin mudstones, deposited during widespread early Paleozoic marine inundation of the Canadian Shield, and Early to Late Devonian marine carbonates, evaporates, and mudstones deposited in saucer-shaped, isolated basin depocentres. There is no record of late Paleozoic sedimentation in the region, perhaps related to cratonic uplift accompanying the Alleghenian Orogeny. Lower Paleozoic strata are unconformably overlain by thin, erosional remnants of Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous nonmarine sandstones, mudstones and lignite seams (Moose River Basin) and Early Cretaceous marine sandstones and mudstones (Hudson Bay Basin). The Hudson Platform is currently considered a frontier prospect for hydrocarbon exploration. However, the long- held view that the region is underlain by a thin sedimentary succession with no appreciable hydrocarbon source rocks or reservoir intervals is erroneous. Geological and geophysical data indicate the Hudson Bay Basin contains many prospective petroleum reservoir and trap types, potentially including hydrothermal dolomite. Recent studies indicate Upper Ordovician oil shales are widespread and may have generated hydrocarbons in deeper parts of the Hudson Bay Basin. New high resolution bathymetric surveys in northern Hudson Bay have led to the recognition of circular sea-floor depressions similar to fluid or gas-escape pockmarks. A modern re-evaluation of the petroleum systems and energy resource potential of the Hudson Platform is the focus of a new Geological Survey of Canada research initiative.

Dietrich, J.; Hamblin, T.; Lavoie, D.; Duchesne, M.; Lajeunesse, P.; Zhang, Z.

2009-05-01

49

Sporting Goods Country Market Survey: Canada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The challenge facing American sporting goods manufacturers in Canada is enhanced by tariffs on American products, a market glut and lower priced goods entering the market from Asia and South America. American products can compete in the Canadian marketpla...

1986-01-01

50

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1983. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Reed, K. M.

1985-01-01

51

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1984. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.

1985-01-01

52

State geological surveys: Their growing national role in policy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

State geological surveys vary in organizational structure, but are political powers in the field of geology by virtue of their intimate knowledge of and involvement in legislative and political processes. Origins of state geological surveys lie in the recognition of society that settlement and prosperity depended on access to a variety of natural resources, resources that are most familiar to geologists. As the surveys adapt to modern societal pressures, making geology serve the public has become the new mission for many state geological surveys. Geologic mapping was the foundation of most early surveys, and the state surveys have brought mapping back into the public realm to meet today's challenges of growing population density, living environment desires, and resource access.

Gerhard, L. C.

2000-01-01

53

USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Survey Data in Google Earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) program has a rich data catalog of geologic field activities and metadata called InfoBank, which has been a standard tool for researchers within and outside of the agency. Along with traditional web maps, the data are now accessible in Google Earth, which greatly expands the possible user audience. The Google

C. Reiss; C. Steele; A. Ma; J. Chin

2006-01-01

54

Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey during 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies in 1985. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest. Separate bibliographic listings of published reports are included. These listings are: (1) data releases and folio components derived from the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program, (2) reports on Alaska released in U.S. Geological Survey publications in 1985, and (3) reports about Alaska by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various scientific journals in 1985.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Reed, K. M.

1986-01-01

55

Chapter 34: Geology and petroleum potential of the rifted margins of the Canada Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three sides of the Canada Basin are bordered by high-standing, conjugate rift shoulders of the Chukchi Borderland, Alaska and Canada. The Alaska and Canada margins are mantled with thick, growth-faulted sediment prisms, and the Chukchi Borderland contains only a thin veneer of sediment. The rift-margin strata of Alaska and Canada reflect the tectonics and sediment dispersal systems of adjacent continental regions whereas the Chukchi Borderland was tectonically isolated from these sediment dispersal systems. Along the eastern Alaska-southern Canada margin, termed herein the 'Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin', the rifted margin is deformed by ongoing Brooks Range tectonism. Additional contractional structures occur in a gravity fold belt that may be present along the entire Alaska and Canada margins of the Canada Basin. Source-rock data inboard of the rift shoulders and regional palaeogeographic reconstructions suggest three potential source-rock intervals: Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Albian), Upper Cretaceous (mostly Turonian) and Lower Palaeogene. Burial history modelling indicates favourable timing for generation from all three intervals beneath the Alaska and Canada passive margins, and an active petroleum system has been documented in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin. Assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources indicates the greatest potential in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin and significant potential in the Canada and Alaska passive margins. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

Houseknecht, D. W.; Bird, K. J.

2011-01-01

56

US Geological Survey World Energy Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Energy Project's Website holds a wide collection of data including province assessment reports and maps showing geology, oil and gas fields, and geologic provinces (Africa, Arabian Peninsula, South Asia, South America, Former Soviet Union, Asia Pacific Region, and Iran). Finally, a report ranks the world's oil and gas provinces by known petroleum volumes.

57

A survey of sheep diseases in Canada.  

PubMed Central

A mail survey of disease occurrence in Canadian sheep flocks was conducted. The survey, which covered the period from September 1982 to August 1983, utilized flocks on the Record of Performance (ROP) sheep program and relatively complete data were available from 116 flocks. Data about lambing rates, incidence of a variety of lamb and ewe diseases and reasons for culling were obtained. At the same time a retrospective evaluation of records of diagnoses of sheep diseases recorded at diagnostic laboratories across the country was performed. Data from the years 1978 to 1982 were obtained and summarized. A lambing percentage of 153% (1.53 lambs live born per ewe lambing) was observed and an additional 0.05 lambs were stillborn. The major identified causes of mortality amongst lambs were starvation, pneumonia, scours and accidents. Pasteurella spp. were the etiological agents most commonly associated with pneumonia in lambs and Escherichia coli had the same predominant position with regards to nonparasitic scours. A large discrepancy existed between the proportional mortality rates for internal parasites and coccidiosis as determined from the farm survey data compared to diagnostic laboratory data. This suggests that clinical parasitism may not be adequately recognized at the farm level. Abortions in ewes occurred in approximately half the flocks, but generally at a low level and no severe abortion storms occurred. Pneumonia was the most commonly identified cause of mortality in ewes and although Pasteurella spp. appear to be the most important etiological agents, regional differences were apparent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Dohoo, I R; Curtis, R A; Finley, G G

1985-01-01

58

Selection of colors and patterns for geologic maps of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) color and pattern standards and conventions for geologic maps have evolved since the USGS published its first set of standards in 1881. Since that time, USGS personnel have continuously updated and revised the standards in response to the need to show increasingly complex geologic map data and in response to changing technology. The color and pattern standards and conventions contained in this book enable geologists, cartographers, and editors to produce geologic maps that have consistent geologic-age color schemes and patterns. Such consistency enables geologists and other users of geologic maps to obtain a wealth of geologic information at a glance and to produce maps that can easily be used and compared to other published maps that follow the color and pattern standards and conventions.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

2005-01-01

59

3D geologic framework models for regional hydrogeology and land-use management: a case study from a Quaternary basin of southwestern Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a regional hydrogeologic survey in the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada, a computer-based 3D Geologic Framework Model (GFM) was constructed to obtain a consistent representation of this typical Quaternary glaciated basin over a 1,400 km2 area. Such a detailed stratigraphic reconstruction was needed because the Quaternary sediments control the recharge to the underlying regional fractured rock aquifer and also because buried

Martin Ross; Michel Parent; René Lefebvre

2005-01-01

60

Stability Zone of Natural Gas Hydrates in a Permafrost-Bearing Region of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin: Study of a Feasible Energy Source (Geological Survey of Canada Contribution No.1999275)  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of geological and geophysical data from 150 wells in the Beaufort-Mackenzie region(study area between 68 deg. 30'-70 deg. 00'N and 131 deg. -39 deg. W) led to reinterpretation of the depth of methane hydrate stability and construction of the first contour maps displaying thickness of hydrate stability zones as well as hydrate stability zone thicknesses below permafrost. Calculations were based on construction of temperature-depth profiles incorporating regional heat-flow values, temperature at the base of ice-bearing permafrost, and models relating thermal conductivity with depth. Data analysis indicates the presence and extent of the methane hydrate stability zone is related mainly to the history of permafrost development and less so by the relatively small regional variations of temperature gradients. Analysis of well logs and other indicators in conjunction with knowledge of the hydrate stability zone allows reevaluation of the location of possible gas hydrate occurrences. Log analysis indicates that in the onshore and shallow sea area of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, methane hydrate occurs in 27 wells. Fifteen of these locations coincides with underlying conventional hydrocarbon occurrences. Previous analyses place some of the hydrate occurrences at greater depths than proposed for the methane hydrate stability zone described in this study. Interpretation of geological cross sections reveals that hydrates are related mainly to sandy deltaic and delta-plain deposits in Iperk, Kugmallit, and Reindeer sequences although additional hydrate picks have been inferred in other sequences, such as Richards. Overlying permafrost may act as seal for hydrate accumulations; however, the thickness of permafrost and its related hydrate stability zone fluctuated during geological time. It is interpreted that only in the last tens of thousand of years (i.e., Sangamonian to Holocene), conditions for hydrates changed from nonstable to stable. During Early and Late Wisconsinan and Holocene time, conditions were favorable for generation and trapping of hydrates. However, previously during Sangamonian time,less favorable conditions existed for hydrate stability. Gas release from hydrates may have occurred during times when hydrate stability was non existent because of permafrost melting episodes. It is interpreted that entrapment of gas in hydrate molecular structures is related to the existence of conventional structural traps as well as less permeable sediments such as the Mackenzie Bay Formation, which act as seal.

Majorowicz, J. A., E-mail: majorowi@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca; Hannigan, P. K., E-mail: phanniga@nrcan.gc.ca

2000-03-15

61

Consideration from a geological risk in a geological survey of mountain tunnel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In mountain tunnel construction project, ground condition expected in a preliminary survey and a real condition cause often large deviations. As the result, the large increase of construction cost occurs after the start of excavation. One of the causes of such deviations is the uncertainty of ground information in a preliminary survey. Then, we have studied on the evaluation technique for the uncertainty of ground information and the risk in tunnel digging cost fluctuation caused by the uncertainty (the following, geological risk). In the past study, we paid our attention to the quantity of deviations with an expected digging cost considering the uncertainty and a real cost. However, in geological risk management, it is important to consider the situation that occurs a significant loss when actualized, too. Therefore, conducting a case study in a tunnel that carried out an addition al survey because a bad ground condition which was not foreseen in a preliminary survey appear ed, we studied the geological risk in the preliminary and the additional survey, and compared with construction cost and geological risk. We expected that the probability that the real cost appeared on the risk curve in the additional survey would be higher than the one in the preliminary survey. However, the probability in the additional survey became lower than the one in the preliminary survey when the ground information was added without evaluating uncertainty of ground information appropriately. As the result, we found that it was important to add geological information which is evaluated appropriately, instead of simply adding geological information.

Hasegawa, Nobusuke; Ohtsu, Hiroyasu

62

50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION...Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey. Notwithstanding...be submitted, the U.S. Geological Survey may at any time apply for a special use...

2009-10-01

63

50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION...Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey. Notwithstanding...be submitted, the U.S. Geological Survey may at any time apply for a special use...

2010-10-01

64

50 CFR 37.45 - Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION...Exploration by the U.S. Geological Survey. Notwithstanding...be submitted, the U.S. Geological Survey may at any time apply for a special use...

2013-10-01

65

US Geological Survey Digital Mapping Techniques 1998: Workshop Proceedings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

More than 80 selected technical representatives participated in the Digital Mapping Techniques '98 workshop, which was convened by the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) and hosted by the Illinois State Geological Survey. At the site users will find the proceedings of the workshop, including 23 papers and several short summaries covering methods on data capture, data management, and digital map production. The goal of the conference was "to help move the state surveys and the USGS toward development of more cost-effective, flexible, and useful systems for digital mapping and GIS analysis." Instructions for paper copy requests are also provided on site.

66

Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Canada. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult education for indigenous peoples in Canada was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations engaged in adult education for Canada's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy and…

Richardson, Cathy; Blanchet-Cohen, Natasha

67

Investigating Atmospheric Mercury with the U.S. Geological Survey Mobile Mercury Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric mercury is thought to be an important source of mercury present in fish, resulting in numerous local, statewide, tribal, and province-wide fish consumption advisories in the United States and Canada (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). To understand how mercury occurs in the atmosphere and its potential to be transferred from the atmosphere to the biosphere, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating sources and forms of atmospheric mercury, especially in locations where the amount of mercury deposited from precipitation is above average.

Kolker, Allan

2007-01-01

68

Earthquakes Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the earthquake information page of the Natural Resources Canada Geologic Survey. It contains links to reports, maps, and lists of recent earthquakes, information and hazards as well as earthquake research and network and data archives. Links also connect to information on earthquake hazards, products and publications, a site to report earthquakes, and a link to other earthquake resources.

69

Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake of the Woods 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake of the Woods 4 deg x 6 deg Quadrangle, United States and Canada, was mapped as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States map series (Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1420, NM-15). The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is a product of collaboration of the Ontario Geological Survey, the Minnesota Geological Survey, the Manitoba Department of Energy and Mines, and the U.S. Geological Survey, and is designed for both scientific and practical purposes. It was prepared in two stages. First, separate maps and map explanations were prepared by the compilers. Second, the maps were combined, integrated, and supplemented by the editor. Map unit symbols were revised to a uniform system of classification and the map unit descriptions were prepared by the editor from information received from the compilers and from additional sources listed under Sources of Information. Diagrams accompanying the map were prepared by the editor. For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relationships, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and indicated in the description of map units. Deposits of some constructional landforms, such as kame moraine deposits, are distinguished as map units. Deposits of erosional landforms, such as outwash terraces, are not distinguished, although glaciofluvial, ice-contact, and lacustrine deposits that are mapped may be terraced. As a Quaternary geologic map, it serves as a base from which a variety of maps relating Quaternary geologic history can be derived. For practical purposes, the map is a surficial materials map. Materials are distinguished on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized and classified in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils as recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. As a materials map, it serves as a base from which a variety of maps for use in planning engineering, land-use, or land-management projects can be derived.

Compiled by Sado, Edward V.; Fullerton, David S.; Goebel, Joseph E.; Ringrose, Susan M.; Edited and Integrated by Fullerton, David S.

1995-01-01

70

Landscape geochemistry near mineralized areas of eastern Alaska: Chapter H in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pogo lode gold deposit was discovered in eastern Alaska in the early 1990s and provided the opportunity to study elemental distribution and mobility in the natural environment prior to mine development. Studying mineralized systems prior to mining allows us to compare the natural biogeochemical signature in mineralized versus nonmineralized areas. The resultant data and interpretation also provide a baseline for evaluating what, if any, changes in elemental distribution result from development. This report investigates the chemistry of stream water, streambed sediment, and soil in the context of regional bedrock geology. The major-ion chemistry of the waters reflects a rock-dominated aqueous system, and the waters are classified as Ca2+ and Mg2+ - HCO3- to Ca2+ and Mg2+ - SO4-2 waters. Creeks draining the gneissic lithologies tend to be more sulfate dominated than those draining the intrusive units. Sulfate also dominated creeks draining mineralized areas; however, the underlying paragneiss unit could be contributing substantially to the sulfate concentration, and the sulfate concentration in these creeks may reflect a complex baltholith-paragneiss boundary rather than mineralization. Arsenic concentrations in bed sediments were elevated in mineralized areas relative to nonmineralized areas. Elevated concentrations of nickel, chromium, iron, manganese, and cobalt appear to reflect the presence of ultramafic rocks in the drainage. In general, aqueous metal concentrations were below the State of Alaska’s Aquatic Life Criteria and Drinking Water Standards, with the exception of arsenic in stream water, which ranged in concentration from less than 1 to 14 micrograms per liter (?g/L) and exceeded the drinking water standard at one site. The arsenic and antimony concentration in the A, B, and C soil horizons ranged from 3 to 410 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg), 6.1 to 440 mg/kg, and 2 to 300 mg/kg, respectively, for arsenic and 0.4 to 24 mg/kg, 0.6 to 25 mg/kg, and 0.2 to 16 mg/kg, respectively, for antimony. The arsenic and antimony concentrations in stream waters correlate well with the concentrations in soils. However, significantly less arsenic and antimony was extracted from C horizon soils in water leaching experiments, indicating that the arsenic and antimony in the C horizon is present in a less available form than in the A or B horizons. Arsenic and antimony uptake by grayleaf willow (Salix glauca L.) appears minimal, with arsenic concentrations ranging from less than 0.01 to 0.14 mg/kg and antimony concentrations ranging from less than 0.003 to 0.23 mg/kg in willow leaves. In general, the highest concentrations of both arsenic and antimony in water and soils were found near mineralized areas. Elevated arsenic concentrations were also found in bed sediments from mineralized areas. In these sample matrices, the presence of arsenic and (or) antimony was a good indicator of contact with mineralized rock units.

Wang, Bronwen; Gough, Larry P.; Wanty, Richard B.; Crock, James G.; Lee, Gregory K.; Day, Warren C.; Vohden, Jim

2007-01-01

71

Mineral resources, geological structure, and landform surveys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diagnostic ERTS imagery has been used to pinpoint surface conditions associated with known mining districts. These include enhancements which depict hitherto unrecognized surface alteration and allow analysis of ore-controlling fractures distribution in a regional context. ERTS has likewise provided observational data containing previously unrecognized surface anomalies in large oil-producing basins which correlate closely with known oil fields. These observational data offer promise of providing new and powerful techniques for oil exploration, especially if further work using more sophisticated enhancement-processing proves capable of emphasizing the anomalies. ERTS is showing a better-than-anticipated potential for producing accurate small-scale (large-area) geologic maps, often containing details that were previously not recorded on similar regional maps. The maps produced from ERTS imagery can be prepared more effectively than previously possible, mainly because of the synoptic, multispectral, and repetitive character of ERTS data. ERTS has also provided extensive information on possible geologic hazards. Many new fractures have been identified in several regions of the Pacific Coast seismic belt that have histories of recent earthquakes. This has obvious implications for engineering projects such as dams, aqueducts, and transportation routes. In the mid-continent area, ERTS data have been used to predict zones of rooffall danger in a working coal mine from newly discovered lineations (probably fractures) used as indicators of hazards.

Short, N. M.

1974-01-01

72

U.S. Geological Survey silicate rock standards  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has processed six silicate rocks to provide new reference samples to supplement G-1 and W-1. Complete conventional, rapid rock, and spectrochemical analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey are reported for a granite (replacement for G-1), a granodiorite, an andesite, a peridotite, a dunite, and a basalt. Analyses of variance for nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium in each rock sample showed that for these elements, the rocks can be considered homogeneous. Spectrochemical estimates are given for the nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium contents of the samples. The petrography of five of the six rocks is described and CIPW norms are presented. ?? 1967.

Flanagan, F. J.

1967-01-01

73

Records and history of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This publication contains two presentations in Portable Document Format (PDF). The first is Renee M. Jaussaud's inventory of the documents accessioned by the end of 1997 into Record Group 57 (Geological Survey) at the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) Archives II facility in College Park, Md., but not the materials in NARA's regional archives. The second is Mary C. Rabbitt's 'The United States Geological Survey 1879-1989,' which appeared in 1989 as USGS Circular 1050. Additionally, USGS Circular 1050 is also presented in Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) format.

Edited by Nelson, Clifford M.

2000-01-01

74

The British Geological Survey and the petroleum industry  

SciTech Connect

The British Geological Survey is the UK`s national centre for earth science information with a parallel remit to operate internationally. The Survey`s work covers the full geoscience spectrum in energy, mineral and groundwater resources and associated implications for land use, geological hazards and environmental impact. Much of the work is conducted in collaboration with industry and academia, including joint funding opportunities. Activities relating directly to hydrocarbons include basin analysis, offshore geoscience mapping, hazard assessment, fracture characterization, biostratigraphy, sedimentology, seismology, geomagnetism and frontier data acquisition techniques, offshore. The BGS poster presentation illustrates the value of the collaborative approach through consortia support for regional offshore surveys, geotechnical hazard assessments and state-of-the-art R & D into multicomponent seismic imaging techniques, among others.

Chesher, J.A. [Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1995-08-01

75

LAND USE LAND COVER (LULC) - US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Mapping Program, a component of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), produces and distributes land use and land cover maps and digitized data for the conterminous U.S. and Hawaii. Land use refers to the human activities that are directly related to the land. The int...

76

Abbreviations used in publications of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The use of abbreviations in publications of the Geological Survey is determined by several forces working in different directions. Pulling in the direction of greater condensation and the freer use of abbreviations and symbols is the desire to achieve greater economy in publications. Working in the opposite direction is the desire to have the publications used more conveniently by an increasingly heterogeneous public.

U.S. Geological Survey

1953-01-01

77

How does a U.S. Geological Survey streamgage work?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information on the flow of rivers and streams is a vital national asset that safeguards lives, protects property, and ensures adequate water supplies for the future. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of more than 9,000 streamgages nationwide with more than 500 in Texas.

Lurry, Dee L.

2010-01-01

78

Natural Resources Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is home to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), a government agency dealing with natural resource issues important to Canadians. It covers energy, climate change, earthquakes, geography, geology, floods, landslides, minerals and metals, forest fires, mining, remote sensing, and forestry. This site links to numerous government agencies, including the Geological Survey of Canada, Canadian Forest Service, and the Office of Energy. Also offered are a Kid's page with activities, information for teachers, and links to maps, databases, publications, and library resources.

79

U.S. Geological Survey: The National Map Corps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Map Corps consists of citizens who devote some of their time to provide mapping information to the U.S. Geological Survey. Volunteers may download a guide that provides instructions on how to collect and send Global Positioning System (GPS) data to the USGS. A link is also provided to the National Map, an online, interacive mapping service. National Map users can zoom and pan about a map of the United States, find and identify features, and add layers of administrative and cultural data, elevations, topography, geology, and other data.

2008-03-19

80

Rheological and geological constraints on the earthquake distribution in the Charlevoix Seismic Zone, Quebec, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Located an the St. Lawrence River some 100 km downstream from Quebec City, the Charlevoix Seismic Zone (CSZ) is the most active seismic zone of eastern Canada with 5 historical earthquakes in the magnitude 6 to 7 range and continuous microearthquake activity. Between October 1977 and December 1997, some 1500 earthquakes with magnitudes between --1.0 and 5.0 were recorded by a local seismograph network. Epicentres define a 30 by 85 km ellipse with the long axis parallel to the river, with 99% of hypocentres shallower than 25 km depth (D99%). Earthquakes are not distributed uniformly across the seismic zone, but concentrate in groups separated by less active areas. On the basis of the heat conduction equation and Grenvillian surface heat flow, the temperature at D99% has been estimated to be between 215 and 355°C. These temperatures and the inferred quartz-depleted mid- and lower-crustal compositions imply a brittle-ductile transition deeper than 25 km. The quartz-depleted mid- to lower crust is supported by the high P-velocities revealed by seismic refraction surveys. This depth may represent the passage from velocity weakening to velocity strengthening if the onset of flow in hydrated feldspars occurs at temperatures in the 300--350°C range. With an assumed maximum crustal stress difference of about 200 MPa, fault reactivation at mid-crustal depth can occur with a low friction coefficient and/or with a high pore fluid pressure. Remote sensing, magnetic, gravimetric and seismic reflection data are used to define the positions of geological faults. Most regional normal faults correspond to lineaments or geophysical trends generally parallel to the St. Lawrence River. Most regional faults bound active volumes while one correlates with earthquake hypocentres, including some magnitude >4 events. The orientations of the local stress and of the reactivated faults vary across the CSZ. The comparison of some 20 focal mechanisms with earthquake groups and multiplets suggest reactivated faults with various orientations, not necessarily parallel to the regional paleo-rift faults. Most microearthquakes appear to occur in highly fractured volumes, partly related to the impact structure. No surface rupture is found on the seismic reflection lines acquired on the St. Lawrence River. Using local earthquake data, a pseudo-2D layered velocity model is proposed. The main upper crustal velocity perturbations are imaged. From Vp/Vs ratio information, the CSZ velocity structure differs from that of the neighbouring Laurentides Park region, where upper crustal basic rocks are found. Even with the addition of all local stress contributors, the CSZ is not subject to substantially higher stress difference levels than the rest of Eastern Canada. Consequently, the anomalous CSZ earthquake activity must be due to inherent crustal weakness and/or high pore fluid pressure. Although the presence of a gouge may weaken some faults, the existence of pervasive high pore-fluid pressure coupled with a high degree of fracturing is the favoured explanation for the weak crust that gives rise to earthquake activity. A qualitative model is proposed where some rift faults act as conduits to crustal fluids under pressure, triggering earthquakes on these faults and in neighbouring fractured volumes. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Lamontagne, Maurice

81

Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)] [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)

2013-07-01

82

Changing Conditions In The Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Biological, Geographical, And Hydrological Research Of The U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address the need for understanding past, present, and future conditions in the northern latitudes, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Alaska Science Center conducts extensive research in the Yukon River Basin. The basin originates in Canada and spans Alaska from east to west encompassing diverse landscapes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Within this large watershed, USGS research is focused

T. P. Brabets; S. A. Frenzel; C. Markon; A. R. Degange

2006-01-01

83

A survey of population-based drug databases in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify the population-based drug databases in Canada and to determine their comprehensiveness and accessibility for performing pharmacoepidemiologic and outcomes research. DESIGN: Survey (four-part mailed questionnaire). SETTING: Public and private third-party drug plans across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All provincial and territorial drug plan or pharmacare managers as well as selected private plan managers including health benefit consultants, group insurers and claims adjudicators/pharmacy benefit managers (CA/PBMs). OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient, drug and pharmacy information; potential for electronic linkages to other provincial databases (e.g., physician, hospital, vital statistics); accessibility of information; population profile. RESULTS: Of the 32 recipients of the questionnaire 29 (91%) responded and 18 (56%) completed the survey. Most databases were reported to contain patient information (e.g., patient identification number, age, sex and medication history) and prescription drug information (e.g., drug identification number, strength, quantity and cost). Six provinces and one territory reported the capability to link to other databases (e.g., hospital and physician databases). One CA/PBM reported some links to selected long-term disability data. All of the government databases except those in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory allowed use of the data for research purposes. Manitoba and Saskatchewan included all residents of the province in their database; the others included selected groups (e.g., residents 65 years of age or older, people on social assistance or people covered by private group insurance). CONCLUSION: A number of public and private population-based databases are available for use in pharmacoepidemiologic and outcomes research.

Miller, E; Blatman, B; Einarson, T R

1996-01-01

84

72 FR 26832 - Committee Establishment: United States Geological Survey-Climate Change Science Program Committee...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...United States Geological Survey--Climate Change Science Program Committee for...U.S. Geological Survey--Climate Change Science Program Committee for...Arctic and at High Latitudes. The Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), a...

2007-05-11

85

73 FR 2519 - U.S. Geological Survey-Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Committee on Synthesis and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...U.S. Geological Survey--Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Committee...Product 4.2: Thresholds of Climate Change AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey...U.S. Geological Survey--Climate Change Science Program (CCSP)...

2008-01-15

86

The U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 1979 programs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular describes the 1979 programs of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska. The mission of the Geological Survey is to identify the Nation 's land, water, energy, and mineral resources; to classify federally-owned mineral lands and water-power sites; to resolve the exploration and development of energy and natural resources on Federal and Indian lands; and to explore and appraise the petroleum potential of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. Alaska is at once the largest, the least populated, the least explored, and the least developed State in the Nation. More than half of the Nation 's 600 million acres of Outer Continental Shelf lies off Alaska 's coast, and nearly half of the remaining 762 million acres of Federal land are within its borders. Its resources of all kinds present an opportunity to demonstrate how the needs of both conservation and development can be met for the benefit of the American people. (Kosco-USGS)

Edited by Reed, Katherine M.; Technical assistance by Gilmore, Robert F.; Harris, Linda-Lee; Tennison, Lisa D.

1979-01-01

87

The US Geological Survey's national coal resource assessment: The results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey and the State geological surveys of many coal-bearing States recently completed a new assessment of the top producing coal beds and coal zones in five major producing coal regions the Appalachian Basin, Gulf Coast, Illinois Basin, Colorado Plateau, and Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. The assessments, which focused on both coal quality and quantity, utilized geographic information system technology and large databases. Over 1,600,000 million short tons of coal remain in over 60 coal beds and coal zones that were assessed. Given current economic, environmental, and technological restrictions, the majority of US coal production will occur in that portion of the assessed coal resource that is lowest in sulfur content. These resources are concentrated in parts of the central Appalachian Basin, Colorado Plateau, and the Northern Rocky Mountains. ?? Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Ruppert, L. F.; Kirschbaum, M. A.; Warwick, P. D.; Flores, R. M.; Affolter, R. H.; Hatch, J. R.

2002-01-01

88

Digital photogrammetry at the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is converting its primary map production and revision operations to use digital photogrammetric techniques. The primary source of data for these operations is the digital orthophoto quadrangle derived from National Aerial Photography Program images. These digital orthophotos are used on workstations that permit comparison of existing vector and raster data with the orthophoto and interactive collection and revision of the vector data.

Greve, Clifford, W.

1995-01-01

89

U.S. Geological Survey World Wide Web Information  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) invites you to explore an earth science virtual library of digital information, publications, and data. The USGS World Wide Web sites offer an array of information that reflects scientific research and monitoring programs conducted in the areas of natural hazards, environmental resources, and cartography. This list provides gateways to access a cross section of the digital information on the USGS World Wide Web sites.

U.S. Geological Survey

2003-01-01

90

U.S. Geological Survey World Wide Web Information  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) invites you to explore an earth science virtual library of digital information, publications, and data. The USGS Internet World Wide Web sites offer an array of information that reflects scientific research and monitoring programs conducted in the areas of natural hazards, environmental resources, and cartography. This list provides gateways to access a cross section of the digital information on the USGS World Wide Web sites.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1999-01-01

91

Geological constraints on the emplacement of the Snap Lake kimberlite dyke, NW Territories, Arctic Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Snap Lake kimberlite dyke, Northwest Territories, Canada, is a complex segmented ore-body. Detailed geological mapping was undertaken with a view of improving the productivity and efficiency of the mining operation. The relationship between the igneous geology of the kimberlite and complex structural features (e.g. ramps and steps) were investigated, to improve predictability of the dyke geometry. Geological mapping and analysis have established that the dyke is a multi-phase intrusion with four different magmatic lithofacies. In particular, olivine-rich and olivine-poor varieties of hypabyssal kimberlite have been identified. Key observations are that olivine-rich (phlogopite-poor) lithofacies has a strong tendency to be located where the dyke is thickest and that there is a good correlation between dyke thickness, olivine crystal size and crystal content. Accordingly the olivine-poor (phlogopite-rich) lithofacies tends to be most abundant where the dyke is thinnest. Empirical observations based on diamond size distributions recorded in three sets of closely spaced bulk samples, suggest that the diamond distributions might be controlled by the proportion of olivine-rich kimberlite in the sample. These relationships potentially have major economic implications for exploration and mining at other diamondiferous intrusions. Complex structural features are associated with changes in dyke thickness, and therefore parameters such as crystal and lithic size and content may allow better prediction of dyke complexity at a mining scale.

Gernon, T. M.; Sparks, S. J.; Field, M.; Ogilvie-Harris, R. C.

2009-05-01

92

The United States Geological Survey: 1879-1989  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States Geological Survey was established on March 3, 1879, just a few hours before the mandatory close of the final session of the 45th Congress, when President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the bill appropriating money for sundry civil expenses of the Federal Government for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1879. The sundry civil expenses bill included a brief section establishing a new agency, the United States Geological Survey, placing it in the Department of the Interior, and charging it with a unique combination of responsibilities: 'classification of the public lands, and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.' The legislation stemmed from a report of the National Academy of Sciences, which in June 1878 had been asked by Congress to provide a plan for surveying the Territories of the United States that would secure the best possible results at the least possible cost. Its roots, however, went far back into the Nation's history. The first duty enjoined upon the Geological Survey by the Congress, the classification of the public lands, originated in the Land Ordinance of 1785. The original public lands were the lands west of the Allegheny Mountains claimed by some of the colonies, which became a source of contention in writing the Articles of Confederation until 1781 when the States agreed to cede their western lands to Congress. The extent of the public lands was enormously increased by the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and later territorial acquisitions. At the beginning of Confederation, the decision was made not to hold the public lands as a capital asset, but to dispose of them for revenue and to encourage settlement. The Land Ordinance of 1785 provided the method of surveying and a plan for disposal of the lands, but also reserved 'one-third part of all gold, silver, lead, and copper mines to be sold or otherwise disposed of, as Congress shall thereafter direct,' thus implicitly requiring classification of the lands into mineral and nonmineral. Mapping of the public lands was begun under the direction of the Surveyor-General, but no special provision was made for classification of the public lands, and it thus became the responsibility of the surveyor. There was,of course, no thought in 1785 or for many years thereafter of employing geologists to make the classification of the mineral lands, for geology was then only in its infancy.

Rabbitt, Mary C.

1989-01-01

93

A brief history of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Established by an Act of Congress in 1879 and charged with responsibility for "classification of the public lands, and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain," the U. S. Department of the Interior's Geological Survey has been the Nation's principal source of information about its physical resources the configuration and character of the land surface, the composition and structure of the underlying rocks, and the quality, extent, and distribution of water and mineral resources. Although primarily a research and fact-finding agency, it has responsibility also for the classification of Federal mineral lands and waterpower sites, and since 1926 it has been responsible for the supervision of oil and mining operations authorized under leases on Federal land. From the outset, the Survey has been concerned with critical land and resource problems. Often referred to as the Mother of Bureaus, many of its activities led to the formation of new organizations where a management or developmental function evolved. These included the Reclamation Service (1902), the Bureau of Mines (1910), the Federal Power Commission (1920), and the Grazing Service (1934, since combined with other functions as the Bureau of Land Management). Mrs. Rabbitt's summary of the Survey's history in the following pages brings out well the development of these diverse activities and the Survey's past contributions to national needs related to land and resources.

U.S. Geological Survey; Rabbitt, Mary C.

1975-01-01

94

U. S. Geological Survey investigation of Mississippi Embayment area  

SciTech Connect

Prior to about 1974, most of the work in the Mississippi embayment area by members of the U.S. Geological Survey was motivated by interest in the embayment's paleontologic aspects, stratigraphy, and economic resources, especially ground water. However, an excellent description of the effects of the New Madrid earthquake series was published on the centennial of that 1811-1812 seismicity. During World War II, combined efforts of the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines produced a wealth of information about the Little Rock pluton and the process of laterizing exposed nepheline syenite to form bauxite. That project, in a search for additional intrusive bodies at shallow depth, sponsored a reconnaissance aeromagnetic survey along the embayment edge from Little Rock, Arkansas, to Cairo, Illinois. Magnetic anomalies that were identified then are now known to be related to the series of buried plutons aligned along the northwestern margin of the upper Mississippi embayment graben. Later investigations assessed the geochemistry of the more mafic parts of the Little Rock pluton. In 1974, U.S. Geological survey effort, along with that of other federal agencies, state agencies, and academic institutions, was directed toward finding the cause of ongoing seismicity in the upper embayment and toward assessing the related potential effects on persons and property. The purpose of this poster display is to summarize the more significant findings in this area related to (a) the rock sequence, lower crust to surface; (b) the major structural features, including a rift system; (c) the current state of stress; and (d) the present-day seismicity.

Glick, E.E.

1983-09-01

95

Chapter 50: Geology and tectonic development of the Amerasia and Canada Basins, Arctic Ocean  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Amerasia Basin is the product of two phases of counterclockwise rotational opening about a pole in the lower Mackenzie Valley of NW Canada. Phase 1 opening brought ocean-continent transition crust (serpentinized peridotite?) to near the seafloor of the proto-Amerasia Basin, created detachment on the Eskimo Lakes Fault Zone of the Canadian Arctic margin and thinned the continental crust between the fault zone and the proto-Amerasia Basin to the west, beginning about 195 Ma and ending prior to perhaps about 160 Ma. The symmetry of the proto-Amerasia Basin was disrupted by clockwise rotation of the Chukchi Microcontinent into the basin from an original position along the Eurasia margin about a pole near 72??N, 165 Wabout 145.5-140 Ma. Phase 2 opening enlarged the proto-Amerasia Basin by intrusion of mid-ocean ridge basalt along its axis between about 131 and 127.5 Ma. Following intrusion of the Phase 2 crust an oceanic volcanic plateau, the Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge LIP (large igneous province), was extruded over the northern Amerasia Basin from about 127 to 89-75 Ma. Emplacement of the LIP halved the area of the Amerasia Basin, and the area lying south of the LIP became the Canada Basin. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

Grantz, A.; Hart, P. E.; Childers, V. A.

2011-01-01

96

The U.S. Geological Survey's TRIGA® reactor  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a low-enriched uranium-fueled, pool-type reactor located at the Federal Center in Denver, Colorado. The mission of the Geological Survey TRIGA® Reactor (GSTR) is to support USGS science by providing information on geologic, plant, and animal specimens to advance methods and techniques unique to nuclear reactors. The reactor facility is supported by programs across the USGS and is organizationally under the Associate Director for Energy and Minerals, and Environmental Health. The GSTR is the only facility in the United States capable of performing automated delayed neutron analyses for detecting fissile and fissionable isotopes. Samples from around the world are submitted to the USGS for analysis using the reactor facility. Qualitative and quantitative elemental analyses, spatial elemental analyses, and geochronology are performed. Few research reactor facilities in the United States are equipped to handle the large number of samples processed at the GSTR. Historically, more than 450,000 sample irradiations have been performed at the USGS facility. Providing impartial scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other interested parties throughout the world is an integral part of the research effort of the USGS.

DeBey, Timothy M.; Roy, Brycen R.; Brady, Sally R.

2012-01-01

97

Digital Field Mapping with the British Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BGS•SIGMA project was initiated in 2001 in response to a major stakeholder review of onshore mapping within the British Geological Survey (BGS). That review proposed a significant change for BGS with the recommendation that digital methods should be implemented for field mapping and data compilation. The BGS•SIGMA project (System for Integrated Geoscience MApping) is an integrated workflow for geoscientific surveying and visualisation using digital methods for geological data visualisation, recording and interpretation, in both 2D and 3D. The project has defined and documented an underpinning framework of best practice for survey and information management, best practice that has then informed the design brief and specification for a toolkit to support this new methodology. The project has now delivered BGS•SIGMA2012. BGS•SIGMA2012 is a integrated toolkit which enables assembly and interrogation/visualisation of existing geological information; capture of, and integration with, new data and geological interpretations; and delivery of 3D digital products and services. From its early days as a system which used PocketGIS run on Husky Fex21 hardware, to the present day system which runs on ruggedized tablet PCs with integrated GPS units, the system has evolved into a complete digital mapping and compilation system. BGS•SIGMA2012 uses a highly customised version of ESRI's ArcGIS 10 and 10.1 with a fully relational Access 2007/2010 geodatabase. BGS•SIGMA2012 is the third external release of our award-winning digital field mapping toolkit. The first free external release of the award-winning digital field mapping toolkit was in 2009, with the third version (BGS-SIGMAmobile2012 v1.01) released on our website (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/research/sigma/home.html) in 2013. The BGS•SIGMAmobile toolkit formed the major part of the first two releases but this new version integrates the BGS•SIGMAdesktop functionality that BGS routinely uses to transform our field data into corporate standard geological models and derivative map outputs. BGS•SIGMA2012 is the default toolkit within BGS for bedrock and superficial geological mapping and other data acquisition projects across the UK, both onshore and offshore. It is used in mapping projects in Africa, the Middle East and the USA, and has been taken to Japan as part of the Tohoku tsunami damage assessment project. It is also successfully being used worldwide by other geological surveys e.g. Norway and Tanzania; by universities including Leicester, Keele and Kyoto, and by organisations such as Vale Mining in Brazil and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology. It is used globally, with over 2000 licenses downloaded worldwide to date and in use on all seven continents. Development of the system is still ongoing as a result of both user feedback and the changing face of technology. Investigations into the development of a BGS•SIGMA smartphone app are currently taking place alongside system developments such as a new and more streamlined data entry system.

Leslie, Graham; Smith, Nichola; Jordan, Colm

2014-05-01

98

United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Products and Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to products and publications of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP). Links are provided to fact sheets arranged by region in the U.S and by global and national areas. There are also links to general information such as bibliographies and publications on general geology, plate tectonics, and tsunamis. A section on information services includes links to email notification services for earthquakes, moment tensors, and seismicity reports; and RSS feeds on the latest earthquakes. There is also an extensive selection of maps, including earthquake maps, fault and landform maps, and seismic hazard and site response maps. Other materials include multimedia items (CD-ROMs and videos); open-file reports, bulletins, and circulars; and a selection of software for earthquake analysis, mapping, and data distribution. Some items are free; others are available for purchase.

99

What are parasitologists doing in the United States Geological Survey?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) was formed in 1879 as the nation's primary natural science and information agency. The mission of the agency is to provide scientific information to a??describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.a?? Prior to 1996, the USGS comprised 3 divisions or disciplines: geology, mapping, and water. Historically, the agency was most noted for cartographic products that were used widely by both government and private sector. With the inclusion of the National Biological Service into the USGS in 1996 as the Biological Resource Discipline (BRD), a living resources dimension was added to the earth sciences character of the USGS. With the addition of BRD, the bureau is able now to contribute both the physical and biological sciences to address the nation's resource management problems.

Cole, R. A.

2002-01-01

100

The internal geology and emplacement history of the Renard 2 kimberlite, Superior Province, Quebec, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Renard 2 kimberlite is located in the Otish Mountains region of Quebec, Canada and is one of the largest pipes in the Renard cluster. The cluster consists of nine kimberlite bodies and was discovered in 2001 by Ashton Mining of Canada Inc. and its joint venture partner SOQUEM Inc. Renard 2 was emplaced into Archean meta-greywacke derived migmatite, gneiss and granite of the Opinaca Subprovince of the eastern Superior Province at approximately 640.5 ± 2.8 Ma. An undetermined amount of erosion has occurred since emplacement with the present surface expression of the pipe estimated to be 0.75 ha. This kimberlite is interpreted as a steep-sided diatreme with minor irregularities in the external shape. The dominant infill is a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite (MVK) that is classified as tuffisitic kimberlite breccia (TKB) and is characterized by a high proportion of granitoid country rock xenoliths. A second dominant infill is a texturally complex, less diluted coherent kimberlite (CK) characterized locally by a transitional textures between CK and TKB. Surrounding the diatreme is a significant zone of variable width comprised of extensively brecciated country rock (+/-kimberlite) and referred to as marginal breccia. In addition to the two main rock types infilling the pipe, a number of hypabyssal kimberlite (HK) dykes and irregular shaped intrusions occur throughout the body, along the pipe contacts, within the marginal breccia and in the surrounding country rock. Geological features displayed by Renard 2 are similar to those described from Class 1 kimberlites of the Kimberley area of South Africa, the Gahcho Kué cluster of Canada and the Pimenta Bueno kimberlite field of Brazil. The economic evaluation of Renard 2 is in progress and to date has included extensive diamond and reverse circulation drilling as well as the collection of an underground bulk sample. Results from material sampled from Renard 2, including a 2449 tonne bulk sample, suggest Renard 2 has an estimated diamond content of 83 cpht (carats per hundred tonnes). A three dimension geology model of the pipe has been developed following the investigation of drill cores, subsurface mapping and petrography combined with diamond studies and geophysics. The model produced is being used to guide and direct the evaluation of the kimberlite and unravel the emplacement history of the pipe.

Fitzgerald, C. E.; Hetman, C. M.; Lepine, I.; Skelton, D. S.; McCandless, T. E.

2009-11-01

101

Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Canada: A Survey of Canadian IVF Units  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the current practice patterns of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in Canada related to genetic counselling, embryo biopsy, and cytogenetic and molecular analyses. Methods: An Internet survey was constructed and administered following Dillman's tailored design method. The contact information for medical directors of all 28 Canadian IVF units was provided by Assisted Human Reproduction Canada. Results: Seventeen of

Kathy N. Speechley; Jeff Nisker

2010-01-01

102

The OECD 2012 Economic Survey of Canada and the Relationship between Higher Education and Productivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report entitled, "OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012," offers an exceptionally rigorous, in-depth, well-informed and well-documented review of policy and performance of Canada's economy and postsecondary system. The report is divided into three parts. The first part contains an overview of the Canadian economy, a summary of the rest of the…

Skolnik, Michael L.

2012-01-01

103

The U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska 1980 programs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular describes the 1980 programs of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska. A brief description of the Alaskan operations of each major division of the Survey is followed by project descriptions arranged by geographic regions in which the work takes place. The mission of the Geological Survey is to identify the Nation 's land, water, energy, and mineral resources; to classify federally-owned mineral lands and waterpower sites; to resolve the exploration and development of energy and natural resources on Federal and Indian lands; and to explore and appraise the petroleum potential of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. Alaska is at once the largest, the least populated, the least explored, and the least developed State in the Nation. More than half of the Nation 's 600 million acres of Outer Continental Shelf lies off Alaska 's coast. The land area of Alaska contains 375 million acres, 16 percent of the onshore land of the Nation. Its resources of all kinds present an opportunity to demonstrate how the needs of both conservation and development can be met for the benefit of the American people. (USGS)

Edited by Reed, Katherine M.; Technical assistance by Gilmore, Robert F.; Harris, Linda-Lee; Tennison, Lisa D.

1980-01-01

104

3-D geologic modeling and its applications for the Clearwater formation Reservoir, Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional models were built to mimic the geology of the Clearwater Formation reservoir at Esso Resources Canada Limited Cold Lake production operations. Each model consists of 3.9 million cells, covers an area of 376 km{sup 2} (144 mi{sup 2}), and encompasses the Esso in-situ development area. The models, facies, bitumen saturation, and sand quality were built using stratigraphic surfaces (nonparallel surfaces) to guide the interwell data interpolation process. The Lower Cretaceous Clearwater Formation in the Cold Lake area contains 11.3 billion m{sup 3} in place (71 billion bbl) of bitumen requiring in-situ thermal stimulation processes for recovery. Within the development area, the facies are dominantly deltaic and include clean, rich, outer stream mouth bar; shaleprone inner stream mouth bar; and offshore transition sands. Sand quality affects resource distribution and reservoir performance. Erosional and downlap surfaces make the modeling process more complex than simple layer-cake, parallel surface modeling. The procedure for building the three-dimensional geologic model included (1) data gathering, (2) data editing, (3) data preparation, (4) geologic horizon gridding, (5) well modeling, (6) data interpolation, and (7) verification. Each of the models can be merged with the other. Various cutoffs with any combination of the three modeled reservoir parameters can be applied in information retrieval. These merge and search capabilities are very useful for sensitivity studies, resources distribution calculation, reservoir quality displays, production problem solving, and various statistical analyses. Moreover, the three-dimensional models can be input directly into the Exxon reservoir engineering simulator.

Leung, S.K.; Belanger, C.E.; Sheptycki, R.J. (Esso Resources Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-05-01

105

U.S. Geological Survey - Water Resources of Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can access information on Virginia water resources, including real-time streamflow and ground water data, water quality data, and water use data. Interactive streamflow and groundwater level maps allow the user to locate recent data on stream discharge, gage height,and water level. Annual surface water and ground water reports are available from 1995. Other materials include information on the Chesapeake Bay river input monitoring program, links to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and information on USGS projects in Virginia; and links to USGS outreach and educational resources. Weather information is also available.

106

The United States Geological Survey National Mapping Program Fact Sheets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers a collection of United States Geological Survey (USGS) factsheets that introduce and explain a vast array of topics related to mapping. Each subject covers the history and development of that particular topic and includes any software or instruments that may be requried to utilize the information sources described. The topics covered on this site include: GIS, UTM, aerial photographs, map projections, map accuracy measurements, digital elevation models (DEM), satellite imagery, landcover mapping, hydrography, and numerous other components of maps. Information is available in several different formats (paper, html and pdf) and includes links back to other USGS services.

107

Appraising U.S. Geological Survey science records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has legislative charters to preserve and make accessible land remote sensing records important to the United States. This essay explains the appraisal process developed by EROS to ensure the science records it holds and those offered to it align with those charters. The justifications behind the questions employed to weed and to complement the EROS archive are explained along with the literature reviewed supporting their inclusion. Appraisal results are listed by individual collection and include the recommendations accepted by EROS management. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

Faundeen, John L.

2010-01-01

108

Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Our Nation faces the simultaneous challenges of increasing demand for energy, declining domestic production from existing oil and gas fields, and increasing expectations for environmental protection. The Energy Information Administration (2000) forecasts that worldwide energy consumption will increase 32 percent between 1999 and 2020 because of growth of the world economy. Forecasts indicate that in the same time period, U.S. natural gas consumption will increase 62 percent, petroleum consumption will increase 33 percent, and coal consumption will increase 22 percent. The U.S. Geological Survey provides the objective scientific information our society needs for sound decisions regarding land management, environmental quality, and economic, energy, and strategic policy.

Weedman, Suzanne

2001-01-01

109

Celebrating 125 years of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the 125 years since its creation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has provided the science information needed to make vital decisions and safeguard society. In this anniversary year, we celebrate the mission that has guided us, the people and traditions that have shaped us, and the science and technology that will lead us into the future. Through a wealth of long-term data and research, we have served the needs of society, the Earth, and its environment. This Circular captures a few of our past achievements, current research efforts, and hopes and challenges for the future.

Gohn, Kathleen K.

2004-01-01

110

Topographic and hydrographic GIS dataset for the Afghanistan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2010 Minerals Project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset contains a collection of 24 folders, each representing a specific U.S. Geological Survey area of interest (AOI; fig. 1), as well as datasets for AOI subsets. Each folder includes the extent, contours, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and hydrography of the corresponding AOI, which are organized into feature vector and raster datasets. The dataset comprises a geographic information system (GIS), which is available upon request from the USGS Afghanistan programs Web site (http://afghanistan.cr.usgs.gov/minerals.php), and the maps of the 24 areas of interest of the USGS AOIs.

Chirico, P. G.; Moran, T. W.

2011-01-01

111

The STRATAFORM Project: U.S. Geological Survey geotechnical studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents physical property logs of core samples from an offshore area near Eureka, CA. The cores were obtained as part of the STRATAFORM Program (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1995, 1996), a study investigating how present sedimentation and sediment transport processes influence long-term stratigraphic sequences preserved in the geologic record. The core samples were collected during four separate research cruises to the northern California study area, and data shown in the logs of the cores were collected using a multi-sensor whole core logger. The physical properties collected are useful in identifying stratigraphic units, ground-truthing acoustic imagery and sub-bottom profiles, and in understanding mass movement processes. STRATA FORmation on Margins was initiated in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research, Marine Geology and Geophysics Department as a coordinated multi-investigator study of continental-margin sediment transport processes and stratigraphy (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1996). The program is investigating the stratigraphic signature of the shelf and slope parts of the continental margins, and is designed to provide a better understanding of the sedimentary record and a better prediction of strata. Specifically, the goals of the STRATAFORM Program are to (Nittrouer and Kravitz, 1995): - determine the geological relevance of short-term physical processes that erode, transport, and deposit particles and those processes that subsequently rework the seabed over time scales - improve capabilities for identifying the processes that form the strata observed within the upper ~100 m of the seabed commonly representing 104-106 years of sedimentation. - synthesize this knowledge and bridge the gap between time scales of sedimentary processes and those of sequence stratigraphy. The STRATAFORM Program is divided into studies of the continental shelf and the continental slope; the geotechnical group within the U.S. Geological Survey provides support to both parts of the project.

Minasian, Diane L.; Lee, Homa J.; Locat, Jaques; Orzech, Kevin M.; Martz, Gregory R.; Israel, Kenneth

2001-01-01

112

National Geothermal Data System: State Geological Survey Contributions to Date  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In collaboration with the Association of American State Geologists the Arizona Geological Survey is leading the effort to bring legacy geothermal data to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). NGDS is a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of data and service (application) providers entering its final stages of development. Once completed the geothermal industry, the public, and policy makers will have access to consistent and reliable data, which in turn, reduces the amount of staff time devoted to finding, retrieving, integrating, and verifying information. With easier access to information, the high cost and risk of geothermal power projects (especially exploration drilling) is reduced. This presentation focuses on the scientific and data integration methodology as well as State Geological Survey contributions to date. The NGDS is built using the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community and with other emerging data integration and networking efforts. Core to the USGIN concept is that of data provenance; by allowing data providers to maintain and house their data. After concluding the second year of the project, we have nearly 800 datasets representing over 2 million data points from the state geological surveys. A new AASG specific search catalog based on popular internet search formats enables end users to more easily find and identify geothermal resources in a specific region. Sixteen states, including a consortium of Great Basin states, have initiated new field data collection for submission to the NGDS. The new field data includes data from at least 21 newly drilled thermal gradient holes in previously unexplored areas. Most of the datasets provided to the NGDS are being portrayed as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), meaning that the data is compatible with a variety of visualization software. Web services are ideal for the NGDS data for a number of reasons including that they preserve data ownership in that they are read only and new services can be deployed to meet new requirements without modifying existing applications.

Patten, K.; Allison, M. L.; Richard, S. M.; Clark, R.; Love, D.; Coleman, C.; Caudill, C.; Matti, J.; Musil, L.; Day, J.; Chen, G.

2012-12-01

113

Geologic insights from multibeam bathymetry and seascape maps of the Bay of Fundy, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The macrotidal Bay of Fundy, Canada, was systematically mapped in the early 2000s using multibeam sonar technology, partly to support efforts to develop hydropower. The primary product was a suite of 1:50,000-scale maps of shaded seafloor relief and backscatter. In addition, a ‘seascape’ map was produced in an attempt to classify the entire bay in terms of morphology, texture, and biota. The eight seascape groups that are delineated reflect the strong signature of glaciation in much of the bay, the effects of Holocene tidal range expansion, and the results of modern processes under a dynamic current regime. As a result of the recent mapping we are able to argue that the muddy depocentre in the southwest of the bay was primarily active before the well-documented expansion of tidal range that occurred in the Bay of Fundy in the Holocene epoch. We further demonstrate the complexity of the seafloor in one of the glacial seascapes, and discuss the morphology and stability of a major tidal scour. The evidence obtained from multibeam sonar mapping reveals the complexity of the sea floor in the Bay of Fundy not necessarily apparent on the 1977 surficial geology map based on sparse lines of single-beam echo sounder data.

Shaw, John; Todd, Brian J.; Li, Michael Z.

2014-07-01

114

43 CFR 3836.14 - What other requirements must geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys meet to qualify as...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys meet to qualify as assessment work...geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys meet to qualify as assessment work? (a) Qualified experts must conduct the surveys and verify the results in a...

2013-10-01

115

World Energy Resources program U. S. Geological Survey  

SciTech Connect

In 1973, with the OPEC embargo, the US was jarred into the world of insecure energy supplies - a harsh reality considering that throughout much of our history we had sufficient domestic supplies of oil and gas to meet all of our requirements. The US Government's response in 1973 was to assess domestic oil and gas potential, which was found to be substantial but nonetheless short of long-term requirements. Born of the need to become more certain about foreign as well has domestic resources, and working in conjunction with the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program of the US Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey undertook a program to develop a technical understanding of the reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources of petroleum in every basin in the world with petroleum potential. The World Energy Resources Program prepared an assessment of ultimate resources of crude oil for the World Petroleum Congress (WPC) in 1983, and a revision and update (including nature gas, crude oil, extra heavy oil, and tar sands) are planned for WPC in 1987. This poster session attempts to engender awareness of our scenario of world ultimate petroleum occurrence and to show some elements of the geology that guided our thinking.

Masters, C.D.

1986-05-01

116

Reaeration equations derived from U.S. geological survey database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Accurate estimation of the reaeration-rate coefficient (K2) is extremely important for waste-load allocation. Currently, available K2 estimation equations generally yield poor estimates when applied to stream conditions different from those for which the equations were derived because they were derived from small databases composed of potentially highly inaccurate measurements. A large data set of K2 measurements made with tracer-gas methods was compiled from U.S. Geological Survey studies. This compilation included 493 reaches on 166 streams in 23 states. Careful screening to detect and eliminate erroneous measurements reduced the date set to 371 measurements. These measurements were divided into four subgroups on the basis of flow regime (channel control or pool and riffle) and stream scale (discharge greater than or less than 0.556 m3/s). Multiple linear regression in logarithms was applied to relate K2 to 12 stream hydraulic and water-quality characteristics. The resulting best-estimation equations had the form of semiempirical equations that included the rate of energy dissipation and discharge or depth and width as variables. For equation verification, a data set of K2 measurements made with tracer-gas procedures by other agencies was compiled from the literature. This compilation included 127 reaches on at least 24 streams in at least seven states. The standard error of estimate obtained when applying the developed equations to the U.S. Geological Survey data set ranged from 44 to 61%, whereas the standard error of estimate was 78% when applied to the verification data set.Accurate estimation of the reaeration-rate coefficient (K2) is extremely important for waste-load allocation. Currently, available K2 estimation equations generally yield poor estimates when applied to stream conditions different from those for which the equations were derived because they were derived from small databases composed of potentially highly inaccurate measurements. A large data set of K2 measurements made with tracer-gas methods was compiled from U.S. Geological Survey studies. This compilation included 493 reaches on 166 streams in 23 states. Careful screening to detect and eliminate erroneous measurements reduced the data set to 371 measurements. These measurements were divided into four subgroups on the basis of flow regime (channel control or pool and riffle) and stream scale (discharge greater than or less than 0.556 m3/s). Multiple linear regression in logarithms was applied to relate K2 to 12 stream hydraulic and water-quality characteristics. The resulting best-estimation equations had the form of semiempirical equations that included the rate of energy dissipation and discharge or depth and width as variables. For equation verification, a data set of K2 measurements made with tracer-gas procedures by other agencies was compiled from the literature. This compilation included 127 reaches on at least 24 streams in at least seven states. The standard error of estimate obtained when applying the developed equations to the U.S. Geological Survey data set ranged from 44 to 61%, whereas the standard error of estimate was 78% when applied to the verification data set.

Melching, C. S.; Flores, H. E.

1999-01-01

117

Groundwater technical procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A series of groundwater technical procedures documents (GWPDs) has been released by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water-Resources Discipline, for general use by the public. These technical procedures were written in response to the need for standardized technical procedures of many aspects of groundwater science, including site and measuring-point establishment, measurement of water levels, and measurement of well discharge. The techniques are described in the GWPDs in concise language and are accompanied by necessary figures and tables derived from cited manuals, reports, and other documents. Because a goal of this series of procedures is to remain current with the state of the science, and because procedures change over time, this report is released in an online format only. As new procedures are developed and released, they will be linked to this document.

Cunningham, William L.; Schalk, Charles W.

2011-01-01

118

Survey of Research Resources in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine in the United States and Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of research resources in 24 veterinary colleges in the US and Canada reports information on university-wide research facilities, college-wide research facilities, personnel, and instrumentation resources. Corporate research resource management was compared with university research resource management. The survey form is outlined.…

Bowen, John M.

1979-01-01

119

U.S. Geological Survey energy and minerals science strategy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The economy, national security, and standard of living of the United States depend heavily on adequate and reliable supplies of energy and mineral resources. Based on current population and consumption trends, the Nation's use of energy and minerals can be expected to grow, driving the demand for ever broader scientific understanding of resource formation, location, and availability. In addition, the increasing importance of environmental stewardship, human health, and sustainable growth place further emphasis on energy and mineral resources research and understanding. Collectively, these trends in resource demand and the interconnectedness among resources will lead to new challenges and, in turn, require cutting-edge science for the next generation of societal decisions. The contributions of the U.S. Geological Survey to energy and minerals research are well established. Based on five interrelated goals, this plan establishes a comprehensive science strategy. It provides a structure that identifies the most critical aspects of energy and mineral resources for the coming decade. * Goal 1. - Understand fundamental Earth processes that form energy and mineral resources. * Goal 2. - Understand the environmental behavior of energy and mineral resources and their waste products. * Goal 3. - Provide inventories and assessments of energy and mineral resources. * Goal 4. - Understand the effects of energy and mineral development on natural resources. * Goal 5. - Understand the availability and reliability of energy and mineral resource supplies. Within each goal, multiple, scalable actions are identified. The level of specificity and complexity of these actions varies, consistent with the reality that even a modest refocus can yield large payoffs in the near term whereas more ambitious plans may take years to reach fruition. As such, prioritization of actions is largely dependent on policy direction, available resources, and the sequencing of prerequisite steps that will lead up to the most visionary directions. The science strategy stresses early planning and places an emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration and leveraging of expertise across the U.S. Geological Survey.

Ferrero, Richard C.; Kolak, Jonathan J.; Bills, Donald J.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Cordier, Daniel J.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Hein, James R.; Kelley, Karen D.; Nelson, Philip H.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Seal, Robert R.

2012-01-01

120

The U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska; 1981 programs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Circular describes the 1981 programs and projects of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska. A brief description of the Alaskan operations of each office and division of the Survey is followed by project descriptions arranged by geographic regions in which the work takes place. The largest program at present is related to oil and gas exploration, but programs also include mineral appraisal, water-resource studies, volcanic and seismic programs, topographic mapping, glaciological and geohazard studies, and many other activities. Alaska is the largest and the least populated, least explored, and least developed of the Nation 's States. The land area contains 375 million acres and comprises 16 percent of the onshore land and more than half of the Outer Continental Shelf of the Nation. After Native and State of Alaska land selections of 44 million acres have been made, approximately 60 percent, 225 million acres, of Alaska land will remain under Federal jurisdiction. Federal lands in Alaska then will comprise approximately 30 percent of all onshore land in the Nation 's public domain. (USGS)

Edited by Reed, Katherine M.; Gilmore, Robert F.; Harris, Linda-Lee; Tennison, Lisa D.

1981-01-01

121

Three-dimensional geological modelling workflow for fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Grosmont Basin, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonate rock masses of the Grosmont Formation is one of the important hydrocarbon resorviors in Alberta, Canada. The carbonate rock masses have been experienced various stages of digenesis, and produced structurally strong heterogenic reservoir. The characteristics of reservoir are affected by hydraulic and mechanical properties of intact rocks as well as by fractures such as joint, fault, fractured zone, and bedding plane. This study is focused on characteristics of fracture distribution in the carbonate rock masses of UG3 unit of the Grosmont Formation. Nonconfidential cores of UG3 unit from total of nine boreholes were logged in Calgary at the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board Core Research Centre to collect and characterize the fractures in the rock domain of interest. The first part of the study deals with the development of a three-dimensional hydrocarbon reservoir visualization model for a section of the Grosmont Formation based on lineament analysis as well as well-log data. The results of the homogeneity tests performed on fracture data obtained from core logging to identify structural homogeneity of the study area are discussed in the second part of the study. The third part of the study is focused on the results obtained for three-dimensional fracture network model for the statistically homogeneous regions considered of the UG3 unit based on stochastic approach using the logged fractures at the study area. Finally, the workflow for three-dimensional geological model of fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs is suggested including appropriate discussions and conclusions. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the 2011 Energy Efficiency and Resources Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant.

Noh, Y. H.; Seo, H. K.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y. S.; Park, M. H.

2012-04-01

122

1-D/3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin comprises 18 stacked intervals from the base of the Devonian Woodbend Group and age equivalent formations to ground surface; it includes an estimated thickness of eroded sediments based on 1-D burial history reconstructions for 33 wells across the study area. Each interval for the construction of the 3-D model was chosen on the basis of whether it is primarily composed of petroleum system elements of reservoir, hydrocarbon source, seal, overburden, or underburden strata, as well as the quality and areal distribution of well and other data. Preliminary results of the modeling support the following interpretations. Long-distance migration of hydrocarbons east of the Rocky Mountains is indicated by oil and gas accumulations in areas within which source rocks are thermally immature for oil and (or) gas. Petroleum systems in the basin are segmented by the northeast-trending Sweetgrass Arch; hydrocarbons west of the arch were from source rocks lying near or beneath the Rocky Mountains, whereas oil and gas east of the arch were sourced from the Williston Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and migration are primarily due to increased burial associated with the Laramide Orogeny. Hydrocarbon sources and migration were also influenced by the Lower Cretaceous sub-Mannville unconformity. In the Peace River Arch area of northern Alberta, Jurassic and older formations exhibit high-angle truncations against the unconformity. Potential Paleozoic though Mesozoic hydrocarbon source rocks are in contact with overlying Mannville Group reservoir facies. In contrast, in Saskatchewan and southern Alberta the contacts are parallel to sub-parallel, with the result that hydrocarbon source rocks are separated from the Mannville Group by seal-forming strata within the Jurassic. Vertical and lateral movement of hydrocarbons along the faults in the Rocky Mountains deformed belt probably also resulted in mixing of oil and gas from numerous source rocks in Alberta.

Higley, D. K.; Henry, M.; Roberts, L. N. R.; Steinshouer, D. W.

2005-01-01

123

Geomorphology in North American Geology Departments, 1971  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents results of a 1970-71 survey of 350 geomorphologists and geology departments to determine what sort of geomorphology is being taught in the colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. (PR)

White, Sidney E.; Malcolm, Marshall D.

1972-01-01

124

Analysis of the U.S. geological survey streamgaging network  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper summarizes the results from the first 3 years of a 5-year cost-effectiveness study of the U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging network. The objective of the study is to define and document the most cost-effective means of furnishing streamflow information. In the first step of this study, data uses were identified for 3,493 continuous-record stations currently being operated in 32 States. In the second step, evaluation of alternative methods of providing streamflow information, flow-routing models, and regression models were developed for estimating daily flows at 251 stations of the 3,493 stations analyzed. In the third step of the analysis, relationships were developed between the accuracy of the streamflow records and the operating budget. The weighted standard error for all stations, with current operating procedures, was 19.9 percent. By altering field activities, as determined by the analyses, this could be reduced to 17.8 percent. The existing streamgaging networks in four Districts were further analyzed to determine the impacts that satellite telemetry would have on the cost effectiveness. Satellite telemetry was not found to be cost effective on the basis of hydrologic data collection alone, given present cost of equipment and operation.This paper summarizes the results from the first 3 years of a 5-year cost-effectiveness study of the U. S. Geological Survey streamgaging network. The objective of the study is to define and document the most cost-effective means of furnishing streamflow information. In the first step of this study, data uses were identified for 3,493 continuous-record stations currently being operated in 32 States. In the second step, evaluation of alternative methods of providing streamflow information, flow-routing models, and regression models were developed for estimating daily flows at 251 stations of the 3, 493 stations analyzed. In the third step of the analysis, relationships were developed between the accuracy of the streamflow records and the operating budget. The weighted standard error for all stations, with current operating procedures, was 19. 9 percent. By altering field activities, as determined by the analyses, this could be reduced to 17. 8 percent. Additional study results are discussed.

Scott, A. G.

1987-01-01

125

The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site includes materials on geology, coal and petroleum resources, industrial minerals, geologic hazards, ground water, topographic and geologic maps, education, and earth science. Teacher education materials include rock camps and telecourses. Special features include popular geology pages and frequently-asked-questions about geology and resources; updates about new museum specimens, flood and landslide information for homeowners, documents on mountaintop removal mining materials, and coal resource and mapping project information. Consultations, maps, publications, selected database items, and copies of documents are available at modest cost.

126

The internal geology and emplacement history of the Renard 2 kimberlite, Superior Province, Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Renard 2 kimberlite is located in the Otish Mountains region of Quebec, Canada and is one of the largest pipes in the Renard cluster. The cluster consists of nine kimberlite bodies and was discovered in 2001 by Ashton Mining of Canada Inc. and its joint venture partner SOQUEM Inc. Renard 2 was emplaced into Archean meta-greywacke derived migmatite, gneiss

C. E. Fitzgerald; C. M. Hetman; I. Lepine; D. S. Skelton; T. E. McCandless

2009-01-01

127

ANALYSIS OF THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STREAMGAGING NETWORK.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper summarizes the results from the first 3 years of a 5-year cost-effectiveness study of the U. S. Geological Survey streamgaging network. The objective of the study is to define and document the most cost-effective means of furnishing streamflow information. In the first step of this study, data uses were identified for 3,493 continuous-record stations currently being operated in 32 States. In the second step, evaluation of alternative methods of providing streamflow information, flow-routing models, and regression models were developed for estimating daily flows at 251 stations of the 3,493 stations analyzed. In the third step of the analysis, relationships were developed between the accuracy of the streamflow records and the operating budget. The existing streamgaging networks in four Districts were further analyzed to determine the impacts that satellite telemetry would have on the cost effectiveness. Satellite telemetry was not found to be cost effective on the basis of hydrologic-data collection alone, given present cost of equipment and operation.

Scott, Arthur, G.

1986-01-01

128

U.S. Geological Survey Rewarding Environment Culture Study, 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In its 2001 review of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Research Council (NRC, p. 126) cautioned that ?high-quality personnel are essential for developing high-quality science information? and urged the USGS to ?devote substantial efforts to recruiting and retaining excellent staff.? Recognizing the importance of the NRC recommendation, the USGS has committed time and resources to create a rewarding work environment with the goal of achieving the following valued outcomes: ? USGS science vitality ? Customer satisfaction with USGS products and services ? Employee perceptions of the USGS as a rewarding place to work ? Heightened employee morale and commitment ? The ability to recruit and retain employees with critical skills To determine whether this investment of time and resources was proving to be successful, the USGS Human Resources Office conducted a Rewarding Environment Culture Study to answer the following four questions. ? Question 1: Does a rewarding work environment lead to the valued outcomes (identified above) that the USGS is seeking? ? Question 2: Which management, supervisory, and leadership behaviors contribute most to creating a rewarding work environment and to achieving the valued outcomes that the USGS is seeking? ? Question 3: Do USGS employees perceive that the USGS is a rewarding place to work? ? Question 4: What actions can and should be taken to enhance the USGS work environment? To begin the study, a conceptual model of a rewarding USGS environment was developed to test assumptions about a rewarding work environment. The Rewarding Environment model identifies the key components that are thought to contribute to a rewarding work environment and the valued outcomes that are thought to result from having a rewarding work environment. The 2002 Organizational Assessment Survey (OAS) was used as the primary data source for the study because it provided the most readily available data. Additional survey data were included as they became available The dividends of creating a rewarding work environment can be great. As the results of the USGS Rewarding Environment Culture Study of 2002 indicate, creating a rewarding work environment is an investment that can have an important impact on the outcomes that the USGS values?the vitality of our science, the satisfaction of our customers, and the morale, commitment, and performance of our employees.

Nash, Janis C.; Paradise-Tornow, Carol A.; Gray, Vicki K.; Griffin-Bemis, Sarah P.; Agnew, Pamela R.; Bouchet, Nicole M.

2010-01-01

129

Assessment of Natural Gas Resources in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past thirty years, the Geological Survey of Canada, provincial governments and industry have conducted assessments of natural gas resources. The Canadian Gas Potential Committee made the most recent study. It reported on the assessment of the natural gas resources in Canada in its second report published in September 2001, and that report forms the basis for this paper.

Robert A. Meneley

130

Integration of multibeam bathymetry and sidescan sonar data for geological surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

A geophysical survey conducted off Liverpool, Nova Scotia, Canada in November 1998 collected data using multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, high-resolution subbottom profiler, and acoustic seafloor classification systems. During the survey, multibeam bathymetric and sidescan sonar data were processed on-site and imported into a Geographical Information System for further analysis and display. Shaded relief images derived from the multibeam bathymetric data

Russell Parrott; John Hughes Clarke; Gordon Fader; J. Shaw; E. Kamerrer

1999-01-01

131

Multibeam bathymetric data for regional assessment of marine geology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Digital multibeam bathymetry has become the primary reconnaissance mapping tool used by the Geological Survey of Canada for marine geology surveys. Multibeam bathymetry and backscatter intensity data were collected as the first stage of several recent multiparameter geophysical surveys. The multibeam bathymetric data were used to create shaded relief images that depict seafloor morphology. Acoustic backscatter intensity measurements are used

Russell Parrott; Gordon Fader; J. Shaw; J. Hughes-Clarke

1997-01-01

132

Privatisation Of Education In Canada: A Survey Of Trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The construct of `neo-liberalism' well defines privatisation within a global convergence of educational policy discourses and practices. This study analyses initiatives for and processes of privatisation in Canadian education from K-12 to post-secondary levels. In considering how privatisation is affecting public education systems in Canada, the authors focus on the commodification and marketisation of education. They also examine issues of equity and the viability of universally accessible and publicly funded education systems. Finally, the study highlights two main interrelated trends: the intrusion of market discourse into education at all levels on one hand and on the other a growing tension between contrasting conceptions of education as a tradable commodity and as a social right.

Davidson-Harden, Adam; Majhanovich, Suzanne

2004-07-01

133

Proposed U.S. Geological Survey standard for digital orthophotos  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has added the new category of digital orthophotos to the National Digital Cartographic Data Base. This differentially rectified digital image product enables users to take advantage of the properties of current photoimagery as a source of geographic information. The product and accompanying standard were implemented in spring 1991. The digital orthophotos will be quadrangle based and cast on the Universal Transverse Mercator projection and will extend beyond the 3.75-minute or 7.5-minute quadrangle area at least 300 meters to form a rectangle. The overedge may be used for mosaicking with adjacent digital orthophotos. To provide maximum information content and utility to the user, metadata (header) records exist at the beginning of the digital orthophoto file. Header information includes the photographic source type, date, instrumentation used to create the digital orthophoto, and information relating to the DEM that was used in the rectification process. Additional header information is included on transformation constants from the 1927 and 1983 North American Datums to the orthophoto internal file coordinates to enable the user to register overlays on either datum. The quadrangle corners in both datums are also imprinted on the image. Flexibility has been built into the digital orthophoto format for future enhancements, such as the provision to include the corresponding digital elevation model elevations used to rectify the orthophoto. The digital orthophoto conforms to National Map Accuracy Standards and provides valuable mapping data that can be used as a tool for timely revision of standard map products, for land use and land cover studies, and as a digital layer in a geographic information system.

Hooper, David; Caruso, Vincent

1991-01-01

134

Self-rated health in Canadian immigrants: analysis of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada.  

PubMed

Using a multi-level random effects logistic model, we examine the contribution of source country, individual characteristics and post-migration experiences to the self-rated health (SRH) of 2468 male and 2614 female immigrants from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (2001-2005). Sex/gender differences were found for all categories of health determinants. Source country characteristics explained away some ethnic differentials in health and had independent negative effects, particularly among women. Thus, women from countries lower on the development index appear at greater risk of poor SRH, and should be at the forefront of public health programmes aimed at new immigrants in Canada. PMID:21334247

Setia, Maninder Singh; Lynch, John; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Tousignant, Pierre; Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie

2011-03-01

135

A Survey of Educational Acceleration Practices in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nationwide survey of Canadian school districts was undertaken to determine the extent to which 18 forms of acceleration were permitted and practiced. Of the high enrollment provinces, BC school districts' participation rates were highest in the most types of acceleration. A surprising number of districts did not allow some forms of acceleration.…

Kanevsky, Lannie

2011-01-01

136

U.S. Geological Survey Near Real-Time Dst Index  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The operational version of the United States Geological Survey one-minute Dst index (a global geomagnetic disturbance-intensity index for scientific studies and definition of space-weather effects) uses either four- or three-station input (including Honolulu, Hawaii; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Hermanus, South Africa; and Kakioka, Japan; or Honolulu, San Juan and Guam) and a method based on the U.S. Geological Survey definitive Dst index, in which Dst is more rigorously calculated. The method uses a combination of time-domain techniques and frequency-space filtering to produce the disturbance time series at an individual observatory. The operational output is compared to the U.S. Geological Survey one-minute Dst index (definitive version) and to the Kyoto (Japan) Final Dst to show that the U.S. Geological Survey operational output matches both definitive indices well.

Gannon, J.L.; Love, J.J.; Friberg, P.A.; Stewart, D.C.; Lisowski, S.W.

2011-01-01

137

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives, Fiscal Year 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information is a resource for Native American governments, communities, organizations, and people. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides technical expertise, reports, and other impartial information sources that benefit Native Americans interested in...

2003-01-01

138

77 FR 34062 - Announcement of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback Process  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback...and Land Use Change, Core Science Systems, Ecosystems, Energy...Minerals, Environmental Health, Natural Hazards, and Water. This...usgs.gov/start_with_science. DATES: The comment...

2012-06-08

139

77 FR 43110 - Announcement of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback Process  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback...and Land Use Change, Core Science Systems, Ecosystems, Energy...Minerals, Environmental Health, Natural Hazards, and Water. This...usgs.gov/start_with_science. DATES: The comment...

2012-07-23

140

76 FR 13207 - Announcement of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback Process  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback...and Land Use Change, Core Science Systems, Ecosystems, Energy...Minerals, Environmental Health, Natural Hazards, and Water. This...usgs.gov/start_with_science. DATES: The comment...

2011-03-10

141

Geological assessing of urban environments with a systematic mapping survey: The 1:5000 urban geological map of Catalonia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ground features of urban areas and the geologic processes that operate on them are, in general, strongly altered from their natural original condition as a result of anthropogenic activities. Assessing the stability of the ground, the flooding areas, and, the health risk as a consequence of soil pollution, are, among others, fundamental topics of urban areas that require a better understanding. The development of systematic urban geological mapping projects provides valuable resources to address these issues. Since 2007, the Institut Geologic de Catalunya (IGC) runs an urban geological mapping project, to provide accurate geologic information of county capitals and towns of more than 10000 inhabitants of Catalonia. The urban zones of 131 towns will be surveyed for this project, totalizing an area of about 2200 km2 to be mapped in 15 years. According to the 2008 census, the 82 % of the population of Catalonia (7.242.458 inhabitants) lives in the areas to be mapped in this project. The mapping project integrates in a GIS environment the following subjects: - Data from pre-existing geotechnical reports, historical geological and topographical maps and, from historical aerial photographs. - Data from available borehole databases. - Geological characterization of outcrops inside the urban network and neighbouring areas. - Geological, chemical and physical characterisation of representative rocks, sediments and soils. - Ortophotographs (0.5 m pixel size) and digital elevation models (5 meter grid size) made from historical aerial photographs, to depict land use changes, artificial deposits and geomorphological elements that are either hidden or destroyed by urban sprawl. - Detailed geological mapping of quaternary sediments, subsurface bedrock and artificial deposits. - Data from subsurface prospection in areas with insufficient or confuse data. - 3D modelling of the main geological surfaces such as the top of the pre-quaternary basement. All the gathered data is harmonised and stored it in a database. The analysis of the database allows to compile and print the 1:5000 scale urban geological map according to the 1:5000 topographic grid of Catalonia. The map is composed by a principal map, geologic cross sections and several complementary maps, charts and tables. Regardless of the geological map units, the principal map also includes the main artificial deposits (such as infilled river valleys and road embankments), very recent or current superficial deposits, contours of outcropping areas, structural data and other relevant information gathered in stations, sampling points, boreholes indicating the thickness of artificial deposits and the depth of the pre-quaternary basement, contour lines of the top of the pre-quaternary basement surface and, water level data. The complementary maps and charts may change depending on the gathered data, the geological features of the area and the urban typology. However, the most representative complementary maps that includes the printed urban map are the quaternary subsurface bedrock map and the isopach map of thickness of quaternary and anthropogenic deposits. The map also includes charts and tables of relevant physical and chemical parameters of the geological materials, harmonised downhole lithological columns from selected boreholes, and, photographs and figures illustrating the geology of the mapped area and how urbanisation has changed the natural environment. The object of this systematic urban mapping survey is to provide a robust database to be used in targeted studies related to urban planning, geoengineering works, soil pollution and other important environmental issues that society should deal in the future.

Vilà, Miquel; Pi, Roser; Cirés, Jordi; de Paz, Ana; Berástegui, Xavier

2010-05-01

142

Integrated analysis of remote sensing products from basic geological surveys. [Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in remote sensing led to the development of several techniques to obtain image information. These techniques as effective tools in geological maping are analyzed. A strategy for optimizing the images in basic geological surveying is presented. It embraces as integrated analysis of spatial, spectral, and temporal data through photoptic (color additive viewer) and computer processing at different scales, allowing large areas survey in a fast, precise, and low cost manner.

Dasilvafagundesfilho, E. (principal investigator)

1984-01-01

143

U.S. Geological Survey spatial data access  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has done a progress review on improving access to its spatial data holdings over the Web. The USGS EROS Data Center has created three major Web-based interfaces to deliver spatial data to the general public; they are Earth Explorer, the Seamless Data Distribution System (SDDS), and the USGS Web Mapping Portal. Lessons were learned in developing these systems, and various resources were needed for their implementation. The USGS serves as a fact-finding agency in the U.S. Government that collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific information about natural resource conditions and issues. To carry out its mission, the USGS has created and managed spatial data since its inception. Originally relying on paper maps, the USGS now uses advanced technology to produce digital representations of the Earth’s features. The spatial products of the USGS include both source and derivative data. Derivative datasets include Digital Orthophoto Quadrangles (DOQ), Digital Elevation Models, Digital Line Graphs, land-cover Digital Raster Graphics, and the seamless National Elevation Dataset. These products, created with automated processes, use aerial photographs, satellite images, or other cartographic information such as scanned paper maps as source data. With Earth Explorer, users can search multiple inventories through metadata queries and can browse satellite and DOQ imagery. They can place orders and make payment through secure credit card transactions. Some USGS spatial data can be accessed with SDDS. The SDDS uses an ArcIMS map service interface to identify the user’s areas of interest and determine the output format; it allows the user to either download the actual spatial data directly for small areas or place orders for larger areas to be delivered on media. The USGS Web Mapping Portal provides views of national and international datasets through an ArcIMS map service interface. In addition, the map portal posts news about new map services available from the USGS, many simultaneously published on the Environmental Systems Research Institute Geography Network. These three information systems use new software tools and expanded hardware to meet the requirements of the users. The systems are designed to handle the required workload and are relatively easy to enhance and maintain. The software tools give users a high level of functionality and help the system conform to industry standards. The hardware and software architecture is designed to handle the large amounts of spatial data and Internet traffic required by the information systems. Last, customer support was needed to answer questions, monitor e-mail, and report customer problems.

Faundeen, John L.; Kanengieter, Ronald L.; Buswell, Michael D.

2002-01-01

144

Beowulf Distributed Processing and the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction In recent years, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Discipline (NMD) has expanded its scientific and research activities. Work is being conducted in areas such as emergency response research, scientific visualization, urban prediction, and other simulation activities. Custom-produced digital data have become essential for these types of activities. High-resolution, remotely sensed datasets are also seeing increased use. Unfortunately, the NMD is also finding that it lacks the resources required to perform some of these activities. Many of these projects require large amounts of computer processing resources. Complex urban-prediction simulations, for example, involve large amounts of processor-intensive calculations on large amounts of input data. This project was undertaken to learn and understand the concepts of distributed processing. Experience was needed in developing these types of applications. The idea was that this type of technology could significantly aid the needs of the NMD scientific and research programs. Porting a numerically intensive application currently being used by an NMD science program to run in a distributed fashion would demonstrate the usefulness of this technology. There are several benefits that this type of technology can bring to the USGS's research programs. Projects can be performed that were previously impossible due to a lack of computing resources. Other projects can be performed on a larger scale than previously possible. For example, distributed processing can enable urban dynamics research to perform simulations on larger areas without making huge sacrifices in resolution. The processing can also be done in a more reasonable amount of time than with traditional single-threaded methods (a scaled version of Chester County, Pennsylvania, took about fifty days to finish its first calibration phase with a single-threaded program). This paper has several goals regarding distributed processing technology. It will describe the benefits of the technology. Real data about a distributed application will be presented as an example of the benefits that this technology can bring to USGS scientific programs. Finally, some of the issues with distributed processing that relate to USGS work will be discussed.

Maddox, Brian G.

2002-01-01

145

U.S. Geological Survey coastal and marine geology research; recent highlights and achievements  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program has large-scale national and regional research projects that focus on environmental quality, geologic hazards, natural resources, and information transfer. This Circular highlights recent scientific findings of the program, which play a vital role in the USGS endeavor to understand human interactions with the natural environment and to determine how the fundamental geologic processes controlling the Earth work. The scientific knowledge acquired through USGS research and monitoring is critically needed by planners, government agencies, and the public. Effective communication of the results of this research will enable the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program to play an integral part in assisting the Nation in responding the pressing Earth science challenges of the 21st century.

Williams, S. Jeffress; Barnes, Peter W.; Prager, Ellen J.

2000-01-01

146

First Cosmic Shear Results from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Wide Synoptic Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the first measurements of the weak gravitational lensing signal induced by the large-scale mass distribution in the universe from data obtained as part of the ongoing Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). The data used in this analysis are from the Wide Synoptic Survey, which aims to image ~170 deg2 in five filters. We have analyzed an effective area of ~22 deg2 (31 pointings) of i' data spread over two of the three survey fields. These data are of excellent quality, and the results bode well for the remainder of the survey: we do not detect a significant ``B'' mode, suggesting that residual systematics are negligible at the current level of accuracy. Assuming a cold dark matter model and marginalizing over the Hubble parameter h?[0.6, 0.8], the source redshift distribution, and systematics, we constrain ?8, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum. At a fiducial matter density ?m=0.3 we find ?8=0.85+/-0.06. This estimate is in excellent agreement with previous studies. A combination of our results with those from the Deep component of the CFHTLS enables us to place a constraint on a constant equation of state for the dark energy, based on cosmic shear data alone. We find that w0<-0.8 at 68% confidence. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime equipped with MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS.

Hoekstra, H.; Mellier, Y.; van Waerbeke, L.; Semboloni, E.; Fu, L.; Hudson, M. J.; Parker, L. C.; Tereno, I.; Benabed, K.

2006-08-01

147

Geology for a changing world 2010-2020-Implementing the U.S. Geological Survey science strategy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes a science strategy for the geologic activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the years 2010-2020. It presents six goals with accompanying strategic actions and products that implement the science directions of USGS Circular 1309, 'Facing Tomorrow's Challenges-U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017.' These six goals focus on providing the geologic underpinning needed to wisely use our natural resources, understand and mitigate hazards and environmental change, and understand the relationship between humans and the environment. The goals emphasize the critical role of the USGS in providing long-term research, monitoring, and assessments for the Nation and the world. Further, they describe measures that must be undertaken to ensure geologic expertise and knowledge for the future. The natural science issues facing today's world are complex and cut across many scientific disciplines. The Earth is a system in which atmosphere, oceans, land, and life are all connected. Rocks and soils contain the answers to important questions about the origin of energy and mineral resources, the evolution of life, climate change, natural hazards, ecosystem structures and functions, and the movements of nutrients and toxicants. The science of geology has the power to help us understand the processes that link the physical and biological world so that we can model and forecast changes in the system. Ensuring the success of this strategy will require integration of geological knowledge with the other natural sciences and extensive collaboration across USGS science centers and with partners in Federal, State, and local agencies, academia, industry, nongovernmental organizations and, most importantly, the American public. The first four goals of this report describe the scientific issues facing society in the next 10 years and the actions and products needed to respond to these issues. The final two goals focus on the expertise and infrastructure needed to ensure the long-term sustainability of the geological sciences in the USGS. The ultimate goal of USGS science and of the strategy laid out in this document is to contribute to the development of a sustainable society that operates in harmony with the Earth systems that society depends upon. As we begin the second decade of the 21st century, our Nation faces growing challenges in resource availability, climate and environmental change, and natural hazards. Meeting these challenges will require strong collaboration across the natural and social sciences and extensive partnerships with both the public and private sectors. The six goals described in this document represent a mix of scientific focus areas and operational necessities that together provide a comprehensive roadmap for USGS geologic science to effectively contribute to the USGS mission, providing science for a changing world.

Gundersen, Linda C.S.; Belnap, Jayne; Goldhaber, Martin; Goldstein, Arthur; Haeussler, Peter J.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Jones, John W.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Thieler, E. Robert; Thompson, Robert S.; Back, Judith M.

2011-01-01

148

The Geological Challenge for Development of Heavy Crude and Oil Sands of Western Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many years of drilling has delineated the Heavy Crude and Oil Sands Deposits of Western Canada. Although the vast areal extent of these deposits is relatively well-known, an understanding of their depositional history is less clear. For the geologist, the challenge is not the discovery of new reserves, but rather the search for suitable recovery targets within the complex stratigraphy

Don McPhee; Michael J. Ranger

1998-01-01

149

Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Summary The collection of papers that follow continues the series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigative reports in Alaska under the broad umbrella of the geologic sciences. This series represents new and sometimes-preliminary findings that are of interest to Earth scientists in academia, government, and industry; to land and resource managers; and to the general public. The reports presented in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska cover a broad spectrum of topics from various parts of the State, serving to emphasize the diversity of USGS efforts to meet the Nation's needs for Earth-science information in Alaska. This professional paper is one of a series of 'online only' versions of Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, reflecting the current trend toward disseminating research results on the World Wide Web with rapid posting of completed reports.

Edited by Haeussler, Peter J.; Galloway, John P.

2006-01-01

150

Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The collection of six papers that follow continues the series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigative reports in Alaska under the broad umbrella of the geologic sciences. This series represents new and sometimes-preliminary findings that are of interest to Earth scientists in academia, government, and industry; to land and resource managers; and to the general public. The reports presented in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska cover a broad spectrum of topics from various parts of the State, serving to emphasize the diversity of USGS efforts to meet the Nation's needs for Earth-science information in Alaska. This professional paper is the first 'online only' version of Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, reflecting the current trend toward disseminating research results on the World Wide Web with rapid posting of completed reports.

edited by Haeussler, Peter J.; Galloway, John P.

2005-01-01

151

Connectedness in Manufacturing: Results of a Survey on Standards Adoption in Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Connectedness in Manufacturing Project, sponsored by Industry Canada (discussed in the December 4, 1997 Scout Report for Business & Economics) and the Integrated Manufacturing Technologies Institute of the National Research Council Canada, provides "awareness and guidance with respect to the adoption of connectedness standards by Canadian manufacturing companies." This 63-page report from the project reviews and analyzes the results of a May 1999 survey of more than 400 Canadian manufacturers about how they plan to use electronic means of communications to share business and technical data. The survey found that four out of five companies had some experience with electronic collaboration and industry sector had a great effect on whether or not the companies collaborated electronically. Industries such as automotive, aerospace and defense, and information technologies were most likely to share data.

1999-01-01

152

Issues of geologically-focused situational awareness in robotic planetary missions: Lessons from an analogue mission at Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Remote robotic data provides different information than that obtained from immersion in the field. This significantly affects the geological situational awareness experienced by members of a mission control science team. In order to optimize science return from planetary robotic missions, these limitations must be understood and their effects mitigated to fully leverage the field experience of scientists at mission control.Results from a 13-day analogue deployment at the Mistastin Lake impact structure in Labrador, Canada suggest that scale, relief, geological detail, and time are intertwined issues that impact the mission control science team's effectiveness in interpreting the geology of an area. These issues are evaluated and several mitigation options are suggested. Scale was found to be difficult to interpret without the reference of known objects, even when numerical scale data were available. For this reason, embedding intuitive scale-indicating features into image data is recommended. Since relief is not conveyed in 2D images, both 3D data and observations from multiple angles are required. Furthermore, the 3D data must be observed in animation or as anaglyphs, since without such assistance much of the relief information in 3D data is not communicated. Geological detail may also be missed due to the time required to collect, analyze, and request data.We also suggest that these issues can be addressed, in part, by an improved understanding of the operational time costs and benefits of scientific data collection. Robotic activities operate on inherently slow time-scales. This fact needs to be embraced and accommodated. Instead of focusing too quickly on the details of a target of interest, thereby potentially minimizing science return, time should be allocated at first to more broad data collection at that target, including preliminary surveys, multiple observations from various vantage points, and progressively smaller scale of focus. This operational model more closely follows techniques employed by field geologists and is fundamental to the geologic interpretation of an area. Even so, an operational time cost/benefit analyses should be carefully considered in each situation, to determine when such comprehensive data collection would maximize the science return.Finally, it should be recognized that analogue deployments cannot faithfully model the time scales of robotic planetary missions. Analogue missions are limited by the difficulty and expense of fieldwork. Thus, analogue deployments should focus on smaller aspects of robotic missions and test components in a modular way (e.g., dropping communications constraints, limiting mission scope, focusing on a specific problem, spreading the mission over several field seasons, etc.).

Antonenko, I.; Osinski, G. R.; Battler, M.; Beauchamp, M.; Cupelli, L.; Chanou, A.; Francis, R.; Mader, M. M.; Marion, C.; McCullough, E.; Pickersgill, A. E.; Preston, L. J.; Shankar, B.; Unrau, T.; Veillette, D.

2013-07-01

153

NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-B: Geology, Information Systems and Services  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A symposium was conducted on the practical applications of earth resources survey technology including utilization and results of data from programs involving LANDSAT, the Skylab earth resources experiment package, and aircraft. Topics discussed include geological structure, landform surveys, energy and extractive resources, and information systems and services.

1975-01-01

154

Seven years of operation of the U. S. geological survey TRIGA reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

February 1976 marks 7 years of operation of the U. S. Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) facility. In these 7 years we have generated more than 5800 MWH's of thermal energy and irradiated more than 47,000 samples for experimenters from the Survey, universities, and other Governmental agencies. Several mechanical and electrical components have required attention. Changes to the technical specifications

1976-01-01

155

Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

It is important to monitor hydrologic systems in the United States that could change dramatically over the short term as a result of climate change. Many ecological effects of climate change can be understood only if hydrologic data networks are in place. Because of its humid, temperate climate and its substantial annual snowpack, Maine's seasonal water cycle is sensitive to air temperature changes (Hodgkins and others, 2003). Monitoring of relevant hydrologic data would provide important baseline information against which future climate change can be measured. A series of recent investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented changes in several components of the water cycle, including earlier snowmelt runoff in Maine during the last 30 to 40 years (Hodgkins and others, 2003), earlier lake- and river-ice breakups (Hodgkins and others, 2002; Hodgkins and others, 2005), and a denser and thinner late-winter snowpack (Hodgkins and Dudley, 2006). Snowmelt runoff timing was measured as the date, each year, by which half of the total winter-spring streamflow passed a streamflow-gaging station. Historical snowmelt runoff timing for the Piscataquis River in central Maine is shown in figure 1 as an example. Results of climate projections input to hydrologic models indicate that hydrologic trends, such as earlier spring snowmelt runoff, are expected to continue into the future (Hayhoe and others, 2007). These trends could affect species at the southern edge of their range in Maine, such as Atlantic salmon and Canada lynx, and may also affect availability of water for human use. This fact sheet describes the framework of a hydrologic climate-response program that would improve understanding of the effects of future climate change in Maine.

Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Lent, Robert M.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

2009-01-01

156

Quaternary geologic map of the Sudbury 4 degree by 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Sudbury 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

edited by Fullerton, David S.; compiled by Sado, Edward V.; Fullerton, David S.; Baker, C. L.; Farrand, William R.

2004-01-01

157

Mapping surficial geology and assessment of permafrost conditions under the Iqaluit airport, Nunavut, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formerly, characterization of permafrost conditions was minimal before the construction of infrastructures. It was assumed that the permafrost would forever remain a solid substrate. Before global warming, transportation infrastructures were not designed, especially in terms of materials and dimensions, to withstand without damage an increased input of heat in the soil. Iqaluit airport, the hub of the eastern Canadian Arctic, is currently affected by thawing permafrost. In fact, the runway, taxiways and apron are affected by differential settlements resulting from the presence of localized ice-rich soils. This study uses a GIS approach that makes up for the absence of appropriate characterization before the construction of the airport during WWII and in the 1950s. Mapping of surficial geology, hydrography and landforms indicative of the presence of ground ice (e.g. tundra polygons) was produced by interpreting aerial photographs dating back from the initial phases of construction (1948) and photographs taken at intervals since then, to the most recent high-resolution satellite images. Subsequent map analysis shows that the original terrain conditions prevailing before the construction of the airport have a significant impact on the current stability of the infrastructure. Data integration allowed us to summarize the main problems affecting the Iqaluit airport which are: 1) Differential settlements associated with pre-construction drainage network 2) Cracking due to thermal contraction, 3) Linear depressions associated with ice wedge degradation and 4) Sink holes. Most of the sectors affected by differential settlements and instabilities are perfectly coincident with the original streams and lakes network that has been filled to increase the size of the runway, taxiways and the apron. In addition, the runway is affected by intense frost cracking. Similarities with nearby natural terrain suggest that the network pattern of the cracks follows pre-existing ice wedges in the natural terrain. Analysis of ground penetrating radar profiles indeed shows parabolic reflectors typical of ice wedges under the larger runway cracks. Temperature data acquired with five thermistor cables in the runway, in a taxiway, in the apron and in nearby natural terrain shows that the thickness of the active layer varies between 90 centimeters for sectors covered with vegetation and more than 2 meters below paved surfaces which means that the thaw depth has now reached down into the original natural terrain under the infrastructure, thus causing settlements due to melting ice wedges. Sink holes are mostly localised on the edges of the northern part of the runway. Processes responsible for these holes possibly are seepage of water into the base course and the subgrade, melting of bodies of ice or soil compaction problems. This established context of permafrost is now used for planning a detailed investigation program in preparation for the restoration of the airport and its adaptation to climate change. The program will include drilling, more geophysical surveys, thermal monitoring and numerical simulations.

Mathon-Dufour, V.; Allard, M.; Leblanc, A.; L'Hérault, E.; Oldenborger, G. A.; Sladen, W. E.

2012-12-01

158

Geology of Wisconsin: Survey of 1873-1879, Volume I  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The leading purpose df this volume was determined by the following enactment, being section 1, chapter 121, of the Laws of 1876. "The people of the State of Wisconsin, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: Section 1. That in the preparation of his final report, the chief geologist be, and he is hereby authorized to collate the general geology and the leading facts and principles relating to the material resources of the State, together with practical suggestions as to the methods of detecting and utilizing the same, so as to constitute the material for a volume suited to the wants of explorers, miners, land owners, and manufacturers, who use crude native products, and to the needs of the schools of the State, and the masses of intelligent people who are not familiar with the principles of geology; said volume to be written in clear, plain language, with explanations of technical terms, and to be properly illustrated with maps and diagrams, and to be so arranged as to constitute a key to the more perfect understanding of the whole report." To subserve the purposes thus legally defined, the volume will be found to consist of three distinct portions; Part I, embracing the General Geology of the State, with explanatory matter; Part II, consisting of lists of the minerals, rocks and life-products of the State, with descriptions and auxiliary discussions; and Part III, embracing industrial descriptions and practical suggestions with reference to the leading natural resources of the State.

Chamberlin, T. C.

1883-01-01

159

Ground penetrating radar surveys of peatlands for oilfield pipelines in Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Placement of buried pipelines in thick peat deposits is difficult because of the low bearing strength and high water content of the material for support of heavy construction equipment. Previously, ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used to assess thickness and volume of peat as a fuel resource and horticultural material in Scandinavia and Canada. To our knowledge, GPR has not been applied to the site assessment and placement of pipelines crossing peatlands. Field experiments were conducted in the Mitsue oilfield operated by Chevron Canada Resources Ltd., located immediately southeast of Lesser Slave Lake in north-central Alberta Province, Canada. Surficial deposits consist of Holocene, linear, sandy beach ridges separated by peatlands underlain by sand. Several GPR surveys assessed the thickness of the peat along two oil pipeline right-of-ways. Results show the peat-sand contact as irregular and undulating, ranging from 0 to 3.7 m deep. Each survey, 460 and 550 m long, was completed in two hours. Such results from 1 m station spacings (sampling interval) can considerably reduce the uncertainties in planning and placement of oil, gas, and water pipelines crossing peatlands. Results indicate that thickness variations of peat can be detected more effectively in terms of quality of results, lower cost, and less time with GPR than with a peat probe or by coring.

Jol, Harry M.; Smith, Derald G.

1995-12-01

160

U.S. Geological Survey: Science in Your State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a variety of scientific reference materials for the 50 states and some territories in the U.S. For each state, there is a section of real-time data that includes current stream flow conditions, drought and flood watches, ground water data, and current natural hazards information. A facts section provides basic geographic and demographic information such as land area, highest and lowest points, population, capital, and others. There is also a selection of links to maps and tools, and additional information on each state's geology, ecology, natural resources, and natural hazards.

161

Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.  

PubMed

Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities. PMID:2103875

Fooks, C; Rachlis, M; Kushner, C

1990-01-01

162

Canada's health promotion survey as a milestone in public health research.  

PubMed

This commentary describes the contribution of the 1985 Canadian National Health Promotion Survey to the development of public health research and policy-making in Canada and argues that on the basis of that contribution, it should be considered to be a public health research milestone. In terms of research, among its contributions which subsequently have been adopted in other survey studies were: going beyond risk factors to operationalize concepts implicit in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion; empowering users to participate in knowledge translation, sharing and transfer; ensuring sufficient sample sizes for each jurisdiction to be able to confidently generalize to its population; establishing a model as well as questions for subsequent health surveys; encouraging widespread use of data through making them available early; and developing and using an explicit social marketing strategy to reach target audiences, including the general public. With regard to policy-making, among its contributions which have been adopted were: using survey data to develop and enhance healthy public policy initiatives; encouraging researchers to work with policy-makers in developing policies; using survey data to contribute to the evaluation of public health initiatives; engaging policy-makers in the development of surveys; and encouraging the use of survey data for advocacy. PMID:21370775

Rootman, Irving; Warren, Reg; Catlin, Gary

2010-01-01

163

Support by the U.S. Geological Survey for adjudications, compacts, and treaties  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey supports interstate compacts, treaties, and court decrees by providing hydrologic data and analysis needed in their administration and by providing Federal representation on compact commissions. As part of this program, in fiscal year 1982 the Geological Survey operated 171 streamflow stations, 3 sediment stations, and 13 water-quality stations, and conducted ground-water studies at a cost of $1,014,000. Funding for Federal representation to i0 interstate compacts is presently budgeted at $56,000.

Condes de la Torre, Alberto

1982-01-01

164

Storage and retrieval of ground-water data at the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a computerized Ground-Water Site-Inventory (GWSI) file that contains information about wells and springs at sites from all States of the United States. This file contains data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel and personnel of cooperating State, local and Federal agencies. The file is easily accessible to members or users of the National Water Data Exchange. Since the establishment of the GWSI file in 1974, the data base has grown 19% per year and contains information on about 770,000 sites as of February 1981. (USGS)

Mercer, Maria W.; Morgan, Charles O.

1982-01-01

165

U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL REAL-TIME HYDROLOGIC INFORMATION SYSTEM USING GOES SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey maintains the basic hydrologic data collection system for the United States. The Survey is upgrading the collection system with electronic communications technologies that acquire, telemeter, process, and disseminate hydrologic data in near real-time. These technologies include satellite communications via the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Data Collection Platforms in operation at over 1400 Survey gaging stations, Direct-Readout Ground Stations at nine Survey District Offices and a network of powerful minicomputers that allows data to be processed and disseminate quickly.

Shope, Jr. , William, G.

1987-01-01

166

37 NEW T-TYPE BROWN DWARFS IN THE CANADA-FRANCE BROWN DWARFS SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

The Canada-France Brown Dwarfs Survey is an i'- and z'-band survey realized with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope that covers a surface area of 780 deg{sup 2}. Image analysis is now completed while J-band follow-up campaigns are {approx}90% done. The survey identified about 70 T dwarf candidates, of which 43 now have near-infrared spectra obtained with NIRI and GNIRS at Gemini and ISAAC at the Very Large Telescope. Six of these were previously published and we present here the 37 new discoveries, all T dwarfs. They range from T0 to T8.5 with four being of type T7 or later. Both newly identified T8 dwarfs are possibly high log (g) massive brown dwarfs of thin disk age. One T4.5 dwarf shows signs of sub-metallicity. We present proper motions and near-infrared photometry, and discuss about the most peculiar/interesting objects in some details.

Albert, Loic [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Artigau, Etienne [Departement de physique and Observatoire du mont Megantic, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Delorme, Philippe [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Reyle, Celine [Observatoire de Besancon, Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut Utinam, UMR CNRS 6213, BP1615, 25010 Besan con Cedex (France); Forveille, Thierry; Delfosse, Xavier [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Willott, Chris J., E-mail: albert@cfht.hawaii.edu [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

2011-06-15

167

Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Nipigon 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Nipigon 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is a product of collaboration of the Ontario Geological Survey, the University of Michigan, and the U.S. Geological Survey, and is designed for both scientific and practical purposes. It was prepared in two stages. First, separate maps and map explanations were prepared by the compilers. Second, the maps were combined, integrated, and supplemented by the editor. Map unit symbols were revised to a uniform system of classification and the map unit descriptions were prepared by the editor from information received from the compilers and from additional sources listed under Sources of Information. Diagrams accompanying the map were prepared by the editor. For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relationships, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and indicated in the map unit descriptions. Deposits of some constructional landforms, such as kame moraine deposits, are distinguished as map units. Deposits of erosional landforms, such as outwash terraces, are not distinguished, although glaciofluvial, ice-contact, and lacustrine deposits that are mapped may be terraced. As a Quaternary geologic map it serves as a base from which a variety of maps relating Quaternary geologic history can be derived. For practical purposes, the map is a surficial materials map. Materials are distinguished on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized and classified in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils as recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. As a materials map it serves as a base from which a variety of maps for use in planning engineering, land use, or land management projects can be derived.

Compiled by Sado, Edward V.; Fullerton, David S.; Farrand, William R.; Edited and Integrated by Fullerton, David S.

1994-01-01

168

A survey of volunteer reconstructive surgery performed outside of Canada by Canadian plastic surgeons  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Members of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons have been offering humanitarian services to countries outside of Canada since the 1960s. OBJECTIVE: To document the extent of voluntary reconstructive services performed by members of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons. METHOD: A survey was sent to all members of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons asking them to list the extent of their voluntary services. RESULTS: Over 80 Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons members have performed voluntary reconstructive services with more than 40 organizations in over 60 countries. CONCLUSION: These voluntary services provide a significant benefit to patients around the world and are rewarding for the surgeons who perform them.

Fitzcharles-Bowe, Colleen M; Lalonde, Donald H

2005-01-01

169

Natural Resources Canada: Earth Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Natural Resources Canada agency has created a wonderful set of resources for curious visitors seeking to learn more about the earth sciences. The agency's formal scientific research work involves divisions such as the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, the Geodetic Survey Division, the Geological Survey of Canada, and the National Air Photo Library. On the homepage, visitors can use the Earth Sciences Resources area to find data, maps, and tools for their own research or personal edification. The site's primary materials are divided into sections that include Climate Change, Energy and Minerals, Geography and Boundaries, Groundwater, and Natural Hazards. The Geography and Boundaries area is a real find, as it provides access to the impressive Atlas of Canada, which includes 393 interactive maps and over 1,000 referenced and archived maps on all aspects of Canadian geography. Visitors should check out the Products and Services area to learn more about the maps and image services offered here.

2011-04-03

170

DATA ACQUISITION AND APPLICATIONS OF SIDE-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR IN THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) program encompasses a multi-discipline effort involving geologists, hydrologists, engineers, geographers, and cartographers of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Since the program began in 1980, more than 520,000 square miles of aerial coverage of SLAR data in the conterminous United States and Alaska have been acquired or contracted for acquisition. The Geological Survey has supported more than 60 research and applications projects addressing the use of this technology in the earth sciences since 1980. These projects have included preparation of lithographic reproductions of SLAR mosaics, research to improve the cartographic uses of SLAR, research for use of SLAR in assessing earth hazards, and studies using SLAR for energy and mineral exploration through improved geologic mapping.

Jones, John, Edwin; Kover, Allan, N.

1985-01-01

171

WATSTORE: National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System of the U. S. Geological Survey; user's guide  

USGS Publications Warehouse

with an IBM 370/155 computer. WATSTORE is now (1975) available to other Federal agencies and selected cooperators of the Geological Survey who acquire and(or) use water data. The WATSTORE User's Guide describes the systeb and how it operates.

Hutchison, Norman E.

1975-01-01

172

Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1975. Geological Survey Circular 765.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States Geological Survey has compiled data on water use in this country every fifth year since 1950. This document is the most recent of this series and presents data on water withdrawn for use in the United States in 1975. In the introduction, recent and present water use studies are discussed along with a description of the…

Murray, C. Richard; Reeves, E. Bodette

173

1995 U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM 2  

EPA Science Inventory

The gnis2_r_point layer in EPA Spatial Data Library System (ESDLS) provides a point coverage of the geographic names from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) GNIS2. Currently, the gnis2_r_point layer in the EPA New England GIS database contains only selected data for features with ...

174

Research opportunities in interdisciplinary ground-water science in the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is written for the scientifically literate reader but is not limited to those who are involved in ground-water science. The report is intended to encourage U.S. Geological Survey scientists to develop a sense of excitement about ground-water science in the agency, to inform scientists about existing and potential ground-water science opportunities, and to engage scientists and managers in interdisciplinary discussions and collaboration. The report is intended for use by U.S. Geological Survey and Department of the Interior management to formulate long-term ground-water science programs and to continue sustained support of ground-water monitoring and research, some of which may not have an immediate impact. Finally, the report can be used to communicate the U.S. Geological Survey's vision of ground-water science to Congress, partners, other agencies, and the research community at large with the goals of enhancing collaborative opportunities, sharing information, and maintaining dialogue regarding the directions of U.S. Geological Survey ground-water science.

Sanford, W. E.; Caine, J. S.; Wilcox, D. A.; McWreath, H. C.; Nicholas, J. R.

2006-01-01

175

Applications of the U.S. Geological Survey's global land cover product  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with several international agencies and universities, has produced a global land cover characteristics database. The land cover data were created using multitemporal analysis of advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite images in conjunction with other existing geographic data. A translation table permits the conversion of the land cover classes into several conventional land

B. Reed

1997-01-01

176

Operation of hydrologic data collection stations by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey operates hydrologic data collection stations nationwide which serve the needs of all levels of government, the private sector, and the general public, for water resources information. During fiscal year 1987, surface water discharge was determined at 10,624 stations; stage data on streams, reservoirs, and lakes were recorded at 1,806 stations; and various surface water quality characteristics were determined at 2,901 stations. In addition, groundwater levels were measured at 32,588 stations, and the quality of groundwater was determined at 9,120 stations. Data on sediment were collected daily at 174 stations and on a periodic basis at 878 stations. Information on precipitation quantity was collected at 909 stations, and the quality of precipitation was analyzed at 78 stations. Data collection platforms for satellite telemetry of hydrologic information were used at 2,292 Geological Survey stations. Funding for the hydrologic stations was derived, either solely or from a combination, from three major sources - the Geological Survey 's Federal Program appropriation, the Federal-State Cooperative Program, and reimbursements from other Federal agencies. The number of hydrologic stations operated by the Geological Survey declined from fiscal year 1983 to 1987. The number of surface water discharge stations were reduced by 452 stations; surface water quality stations declined by 925 stations; groundwater level stations declined by 1,051 stations; while groundwater quality stations increased by 1,472 stations. (Author 's abstract)

Condes de la Torre, Alberto

1987-01-01

177

Energy-Related Research in the U.S. Geological Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report examines the short- and long-range plans of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for energy-related earth science research on fossil fuels, uranium and thorium, and other resources as appropriate. The principle task was to examine the adequacy of...

1988-01-01

178

THE AIRBORNE SCINTILLOMETER A GEOPHYSICAL APPLIANCE FOR GEOLOGICAL AND MINING SURVEYS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The airborne scintillometric survey of the Mortagne batholite (Vendee-; France), has brought to light certain facts about the interpretation of small, or ; even of spot, anomalies in uranium prospecting. If carried out accurately, the ; interpretation can make it possible to establish with accuracy the correlation ; between the classical detailed geological map and the isorad map. This is

C. R. Collin; H. Sanselme; J. Thomas

1957-01-01

179

The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units as Online and Linked Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units provides freely accessible definitions and supplementary information about geological units of Great Britain, Northern Ireland, and their associated continental shelf. It is an online database that can be searched at www.bgs.ac.uk/Lexicon/. It has existed since 1990 (under different names) but the database and user interface have recently been completely redesigned to improve their semantic capabilities and suitability for describing different styles of geology. The data are also now freely available as linked data from data.bgs.ac.uk/. The Lexicon of Named Rock Units serves two purposes. First, it is a dictionary, defining and constraining the geological units that are referenced in the Survey's data sets, workflows, products and services. These can include printed and digital geological maps at a variety of scales, reports, books and memoirs, and 3- and 4-dimensional geological models. All geological units referenced in any of these must first be present and defined, at least to a basic level of completeness, in the Lexicon database. Only then do they become available for use. The second purpose of the Lexicon is as a repository of knowledge about the geology of the UK and its continental shelf, providing authoritative descriptions written and checked by BGS geoscientists. Geological units are assigned to one of four themes: bedrock, superficial, mass movement and artificial. They are further assigned to one of nine classes: lithostratigraphical, lithodemic intrusive, lithodemic tectono-metamorphic, lithodemic mixed, litho-morpho-genetic, man-made, age-based, composite, and miscellaneous. The combination of theme and class controls the fields that are available to describe each geological unit, so that appropriate fields are offered for each, whether it is a Precambrian tectono-metamorphic complex, a Devonian sandstone formation, or a Devensian river terrace deposit. Information that may be recorded about each unit includes its rank, parentage, previous and alternative names and usage, geochronological age, lithology, environment of deposition / mode of origin, thickness, boundaries, type and reference localities and sections, geographical distribution, associated landforms, and literature references. BGS geoscientists use a web-based 'sandbox' system to write and revise definitions. The Lexicon currently stores information on approximately 13,400 geological units that BGS considers to be 'current', with cross references to some 6,000 other names that are considered to be obsolete or alternative names. The entries span the entire preserved geological history of the UK from Archaean to Recent, onshore and offshore.

McCormick, T.

2012-12-01

180

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reports on the hydrology of Oklahoma have been issued by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1901. This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Of the nearly 350 reports issued from 1901 through 1988, about 200 have been concerned primarily with groundwater; the remainder have dealt with some aspect of surface water, water quality, or geology. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed both by author and subject. (USGS)

Compiled by Havens, John S.

1989-01-01

181

A history of the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey. Volume VII, 1966-79, integrating the disciplines  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This volume is the seventh in the series of reports on the history of the water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey. The first four volumes were written by Robert Follansbee, and each is entitled "A History of the Water Resources Branch of the United States Geological Survey."

Biesecker, James E.; Blakey, James F.; Feltz, Herman R.; George, John R.

2000-01-01

182

The Black Mountain tectonic zone--a reactivated northeast-trending crustal shear zone in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska: Chapter D in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Black Mountain tectonic zone in the YukonTanana terrane of east-central Alaska is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can been traced across Black Mountain in the southeast corner of the Big Delta 1°×3° degree quadrangle. Geologic mapping in the larger scale B1 quadrangle of the Big Delta quadrangle, in which Black Mountain is the principal physiographic feature, has revealed a continuous zone of normal and left-lateral strikeslip high-angle faults and shear zones, some of which have late Tertiary to Quaternary displacement histories. The tectonic zone includes complexly intruded wall rocks and intermingled apophyses of the contiguous mid-Cretaceous Goodpaster and Mount Harper granodioritic plutons, mafic to intermediate composite dike swarms, precious metal mineralization, early Tertiary volcanic activity and Quaternary fault scarps. These structures define a zone as much as 6 to 13 kilometers (km) wide and more than 40 km long that can be traced diagonally across the B1 quadrangle into the adjacent Eagle 1°×3° quadrangle to the east. Recurrent activity along the tectonic zone, from at least mid-Cretaceous to Quaternary, suggests the presence of a buried, fundamental tectonic feature beneath the zone that has influenced the tectonic development of this part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The tectonic zone, centered on Black Mountain, lies directly above a profound northeast-trending aeromagnetic anomaly between the Denali and Tintina fault systems. The anomaly separates moderate to strongly magnetic terrane on the northwest from a huge, weakly magnetic terrane on the southeast. The tectonic zone is parallel to the similarly oriented left-lateral, strike-slip Shaw Creek fault zone 85 km to the west.

O'Neill, J. Michael; Day, Warren C.; Alienikoff, John N.; Saltus, Richard W.

2007-01-01

183

Topographic and hydrographic GIS datasets for the Afghan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2013 mineral areas of interest  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Afghanistan is endowed with a vast amount of mineral resources, and it is believed that the current economic state of the country could be greatly improved through investment in the extraction and production of these resources. In 2007, the “Preliminary Non-Fuel Resource Assessment of Afghanistan 2007” was completed by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and Afghan Geological Survey (Peters and others, 2007). The assessment delineated 20 mineralized areas for further study using a geologic-based methodology. In 2011, a follow-on data product, “Summaries and Data Packages of Important Areas for Mineral Investment and Production Opportunities of Nonfuel Minerals in Afghanistan,” was released (Peters and others, 2011). As part of this more recent work, geologic, geohydrologic, and hyperspectral studies were carried out in the areas of interest (AOIs) to assess the location and characteristics of the mineral resources. The 2011 publication included a dataset of 24 identified AOIs containing subareas, a corresponding digital elevation model (DEM), elevation contours, areal extent, and hydrography for each AOI. In 2012, project scientists identified five new AOIs and two subareas in Afghanistan. These new areas are Ahankashan, Kandahar, Parwan, North Bamyan, and South Bamyan. The two identified subareas include Obatu-Shela and Sekhab-ZamtoKalay, both located within the larger Kandahar AOI. In addition, an extended Kandahar AOI is included in the project for water resource modeling purposes. The dataset presented in this publication consists of the areal extent of the five new AOIs, two subareas, and the extended Kandahar AOI, elevation contours at 100-, 50-, and 25-meter intervals, an enhanced DEM, and a hydrographic dataset covering the extent of the new study area. The resulting raster and vector layers are intended for use by government agencies, developmental organizations, and private companies in Afghanistan to assist with mineral assessments, monitoring, management, and investment.

Casey, Brittany N.; Chirico, Peter G.

2013-01-01

184

A survey of the practice of after-hours and emergency endoscopy in Canada  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine staffing and practice patterns for after-hours endoscopy service in Canada METHODS: A link to a web-based survey was sent by e-mail to all clinical members of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology in February 2011. A priori, it was planned to compare variations in practice among gastroenterologists (GIs) performing endoscopy in different regions of Canada, between pediatric and adult GIs, and between university and community hospitals. RESULTS: Of 422 potential respondents, 168 (40%) responded. Of the 139 adult GIs, 61% performed after-hours endoscopy in the endoscopy suite where daytime procedures were performed, 62% had a trained endoscopy nurse available for all procedures, 38% had access to propofol sedation, 12% reprocessed the endoscopes themselves or with the help of a resident, 4% had out-of-hospital patients come directly to their endoscopy suite and 53% were highly satisfied. The adult endoscopists practising at community hospitals were more likely to have an anesthetist attend the procedure. Regional differences were noted, with more involvement of anesthetists (13%) and availability of propofol (50%) in Ontario, more frequent reprocessing of endoscopes in the central reprocessing units in British Columbia (78%) and almost universal availability of a trained endoscopy nurse (96%) with concomitant higher endoscopist satisfaction (84% highly satisfied) in Alberta. CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of surveyed endoscopists across the country do not have a trained endoscopy nurse to assist in after-hours endoscopy – the time period when urgent patients often present and typically require therapeutic endoscopic interventions. There are significant regional differences in the practice of after-hours endoscopy in Canada.

Muthiah, Karuppan Chetty; Enns, Robert; Armstrong, David; Noble, Angela; Gray, James; Sinclair, Paul; Colacino, Palma; Singh, Harminder

2012-01-01

185

CFHTLenS: the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey - imaging data and catalogue products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present data products from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). CFHTLenS is based on the Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). It encompasses 154 deg2 of deep, optical, high-quality, sub-arcsecond imaging data in the five optical filters u*g'r'i'z'. The scientific aims of the CFHTLenS team are weak gravitational lensing studies supported by photometric redshift estimates for the galaxies. This paper presents our data processing of the complete CFHTLenS data set. We were able to obtain a data set with very good image quality and high-quality astrometric and photometric calibration. Our external astrometric accuracy is between 60 and 70 mas with respect to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, and the internal alignment in all filters is around 30 mas. Our average photometric calibration shows a dispersion of the order of 0.01-0.03 mag for g'r'i'z' and about 0.04 mag for u* with respect to SDSS sources down to iSDSS ? 21. We demonstrate in accompanying papers that our data meet necessary requirements to fully exploit the survey for weak gravitational lensing analyses in connection with photometric redshift studies. In the spirit of the CFHTLS, all our data products are released to the astronomical community via the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre at http://www.cadc-ccda.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/community/CFHTLens/query.html. We give a description and how-to manuals of the public products which include image pixel data, source catalogues with photometric redshift estimates and all relevant quantities to perform weak lensing studies.

Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Miller, L.; van Waerbeke, L.; Heymans, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Kitching, T. D.; Mellier, Y.; Benjamin, J.; Blake, C.; Bonnett, C.; Cordes, O.; Coupon, J.; Fu, L.; Gavazzi, R.; Gillis, B.; Grocutt, E.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Holhjem, K.; Hudson, M. J.; Kilbinger, M.; Kuijken, K.; Milkeraitis, M.; Rowe, B. T. P.; Schrabback, T.; Semboloni, E.; Simon, P.; Smit, M.; Toader, O.; Vafaei, S.; van Uitert, E.; Velander, M.

2013-08-01

186

The geology and emplacement history of the Pigeon kimberlite, EKATI Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pigeon kimberlite is located approximately 6 km to the northwest of the Koala cluster of the EKATI Diamond Mine, and is presently one of ten kimberlite occurrences in the EKATI resource development plan. It was emplaced along a regional lithological contact between syn-Yellowknife Supergroup granitoid rocks and Yellowknife Supergroup metasedimentary rocks that were covered by a now eroded veneer of poorly consolidated muddy sediments. Detailed age dating has not been undertaken, however the emplacement age is inferred from sedimentary xenoliths present within the pipe to range between 45-75 Ma. Pigeon is a small kimberlite body, estimated to be approximately 3.5 ha at surface, consisting of a steep-sided pipe that can be separated into four main geological domains that are characterized by contrasting textures, different diamond characteristics and unique mineral abundance and compositional signatures. The uppermost portion of the body consists of mud-rich resedimented volcaniclastic kimberlite that was formed by the deposition of extra crater deposits by debris flow type processes into an open diatreme. Texturally complex kimberlite is present within the lower portion of the kimberlite and includes rocks that display a range of features consistent with coherent (magmatic) and less common volcaniclastic (fragmental) rocks. This texturally complex zone is interpreted to represent a clastogenic deposit formed by a low energy eruption within an open diatreme.

Crawford, Barbara; Hetman, Casey; Nowicki, Tom; Baumgartner, Mike; Harrison, Sara

2009-11-01

187

Airborne magnetic survey for geological purposes in the USSR and Russian Federation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1991 it was 55 years since the application of airborne magnetic surveys on USSR territory, and 52 years since its practical usage at geological institutes. It is possible to outline three periods of such a survey. (1) 1936-55. In this period the magnetic field vertical component was measured with the use of an induction magnetometer developed by A.A. Logachev. The main features of this simple instrument is a half-ring collector, a type of suspension, a compensation mode of measuring with a semi-automatic analog recording, and so forth, and a special system of tuning enabling one to receive a root mean square error of the survey in the range of 50-200 nT. With the use of this magnetometer, the territory of 2,000,000 km2 was surveyed, a number of deposits were discovered ( Krasnokamensk iron-ore deposit in South Siberia in 1943 included), geological maps were refined, and in the period of 1948-49 the first survey in the Arctic (for geological zonation) was conducted.

Glebovsky, Yu. S.; Mishin, Alexey A.

1993-11-01

188

Earth science photographs from the U.S. Geological Survey Library  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM set contains 1,500 scanned photographs from the U.S. Geological Survey Library for use as a photographic glossary of elementary geologic terms. Scholars are encouraged to copy these public domain images into their reports or databases to enhance their presentations. High-quality prints and (or) slides are available upon request from the library. This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 standard; however, it is intended for use on DOS-based computer systems only.

McGregor, Joseph K.; Abston, Carl C.

1995-01-01

189

Geology and engineering characteristics of selected low-permeability gas sands: A survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blanket-geometry sands have been deposited by different depositional systems than lenticular sands, with resulting differences in external and internal reservoir geometry and in the techniques necessary to find, develop, and produce the tight, blanket-geometry gas sand. This survey was conducted with emphasis on clastic depositional systems and the expected transferability of results betweeen stratigraphic units. The expected transferability has been termed extrapolation potential. Information was compiled for stratigraphic units in 16 sedimentary basins regarding the general attributes, economic factors, geologic parameters of the basin, geologic and engineering parameters of the unit itself, and operating conditions applicable to selected blanket-geometry tight gas sands.

Finly, R. J.; Speer, S. W.

1982-06-01

190

THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

2012-02-15

191

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL SYSTEM FOR PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION OF NEAR REAL-TIME HYDROLOGICAL DATA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey is utilizing a national network of more than 1000 satellite data-collection stations, four satellite-relay direct-readout ground stations, and more than 50 computers linked together in a private telecommunications network to acquire, process, and distribute hydrological data in near real-time. The four Survey offices operating a satellite direct-readout ground station provide near real-time hydrological data to computers located in other Survey offices through the Survey's Distributed Information System. The computerized distribution system permits automated data processing and distribution to be carried out in a timely manner under the control and operation of the Survey office responsible for the data-collection stations and for the dissemination of hydrological information to the water-data users.

Shope, Jr. , William, G.

1987-01-01

192

Mapping known and potential mineral occurrences and host rocks in the Bonnifield Mining District using minimal cloud- and snow-cover ASTER data: Chapter E in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On July 8, 2003, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor acquired satellite imagery of a 60-kilometer-wide swath covering a portion of the Bonnifield mining district within the southernmost part of the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, under unusually favorable conditions of minimal cloud and snow cover. Although rocks from more than eight different lithotectonic terranes are exposed within the extended swath of data, we focus on volcanogenic massive sulfides (VMS) and porphyry deposits within the Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT), the largest Mesozoic accretionary terrane exposed between the Denali fault system to the south of Fairbanks and the Tintina fault system to the north of Fairbanks. Comparison of thermal-infrared region (TIR) decorrelation stretch data to available geologic maps indicates that rocks from the YTT contain a wide range of rock types ranging in composition from mafic metavolcanic rocks to felsic rock types such as metarhyolites, pelitic schists, and quartzites. The nine-band ASTER visible-near-infrared region--short-wave infrared region (VNIR-SWIR) reflectance data and spectral matched-filter processing were used to map hydrothermal alteration patterns associated with VMS and porphyry deposit types. In particular, smectite, kaolinite, opaline silica, jarosite and (or) other ferric iron minerals defined narrow (less than 250-meter diameter) zonal patterns around Red Mountain and other potential VMS targets. Using ASTER we identified some of the known mineral deposits in the region, as well as mineralogically similar targets that may represent potential undiscovered deposits. Some known deposits were not identified and may have been obscured by vegetation or snow cover or were too small to be resolved.

Hubbard, Bernard E.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Rowan, Lawrence C.; Eppinger, Robert G.

2007-01-01

193

U.S. Geological Survey Science Support Strategy for Biscayne National Park and Surrounding Areas in Southeastern Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey conducts a wide range of research in and around the Biscayne National Park region of southern Florida. This research encompasses the biologic, ecologic, meteorologic, geologic, and hydrologic components of the system, including water-quality analyses, ground-water modeling, hydrogeologic-data collection, ecologic-habitat evaluations, wetlands characterizations, biogeochemistry of ecosystems, and paleo-ecologic analyses. Relevant information is provided herein for researchers and managers interested in the Biscayne Bay area and about current U.S. Geological Survey efforts that address important resource protection and management issues. Specifically, managers and scientists are provided with information on current and recently completed U.S. Geological Survey projects and a sample listing of potential U.S. Geological Survey research projects addressing relevant issues that face the study area.

Wolfert-Lohmann, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; Jones, Sonya A.; Reich, Chris D.; Wingard, Georgina L.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

2008-01-01

194

Metrics Survey of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials in Canada and Comparator Jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010  

PubMed Central

Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials.

Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

2012-01-01

195

(222)Rn activity in groundwater of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Quebec, eastern Canada: relation with local geology and health hazard.  

PubMed

One hundred ninety-eight groundwater wells were sampled to measure the (222)Rn activity in the region between Montreal and Quebec City, eastern Canada. The aim of this study was to relate the spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity to the geology and the hydrogeology of the study area and to estimate the potential health risks associated with (222)Rn in the most populated area of the Province of Quebec. Most of the groundwater samples show low (222)Rn activities with a median value of 8.6Bq/L. Ninety percent of samples show (222)Rn activity lower than 100Bq/L, the exposure limit in groundwater recommended by the World Health Organization. A few higher (222)Rn activities (up to 310Bq/L) have been measured in wells from the Appalachian Mountains and from the magmatic intrusion of Mont-Saint-Hilaire, known for its high level of indoor radon. The spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity seems to be related mainly to lithology differences between U-richer metasediments of the Appalachian Mountains and magmatic intrusions and the carbonaceous silty shales of the St. Lawrence Platform. Radon is slightly enriched in sodium-chlorine waters that evolved at contact with clay-rich formations. (226)Ra, the parent element of (222)Rn could be easily adsorbed on clays, creating a favorable environment for the production and release of (222)Rn into groundwater. The contribution of groundwater radon to indoor radon or by ingestion is minimal except for specific areas near Mont-Saint-Hilaire or in the Appalachian Mountains where this contribution could reach 45% of the total radioactive annual dose. PMID:24973780

Pinti, Daniele L; Retailleau, Sophie; Barnetche, Diogo; Moreira, Floriane; Moritz, Anja M; Larocque, Marie; Gélinas, Yves; Lefebvre, René; Hélie, Jean-François; Valadez, Arisai

2014-10-01

196

A Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste at the Bruce Nuclear Site, Ontario, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has initiated geoscientific investigations at the Bruce Nuclear site, situated on the eastern shore of Lake Huron 225 km north west of Toronto, Canada, to develop a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW). The DGR concept envisions the excavation of the repository within an Ordovician age argillaceous limestone formation overlain by thick shale sequences (200 m) at a depth of 660 m within a 830m Paleozoic sedimentary sequence of the Michigan Basin underlying the site. The geoscientific investigation, which will be conducted in a three-phase approach over five years, can be broadly classified into two elements; i) site-specific investigations and ii) Geosynthesis. These work programs combined are intent on exploring the geoscientific basis to understand geosphere stability at timeframes (1Ma) relevant to demonstrating the long-term performance of the DGR. A key aspect of the investigation is directed towards exploring the hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical stability of the variably saline (>100 g/L) deep-seated (>400 m) Ordovician sediments that have been perturbed by 9 glacial events during the latter half of the Pleistocene. Numerical simulations of the regional scale groundwater domain (approximately 20,000 km2) and the sub-regional domain (approximately 440 km2) using a density dependent version of FRAC3DVS are providing a structured framework to combine multi-disciplinary geoscientific evidence to illustrate and test hypotheses of flow system evolution. Predictive results support a conclusion that the thick (400 m) Ordovician sediments, in which the DGR would be excavated, comprise a resilient and isolated deep-seated flow domain in which mass transport is diffusion dominated.

Jensen, M. R.; Sykes, E. A.; Sykes, J. F.; Sudicky, E. A.; Frape, S. K.; Semec, B. P.

2006-12-01

197

The Energy Lands Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, fiscal year 1976  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Energy Lands Program of the U.S. Geological Survey comprises several projects that conduct basic and interpretive earth-science investigations into the environmental aspects of energy-resource recovery, transmission, and conversion. More than half the coal reserves of the United States occur west of the Mississippi River; therefore, the program concentrates mostly on coal-producing regions in the Western interior. Additional studies involve the oil-shale region in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah, and coal-related work in Alaska and Appalachia. The work is done both by USGS personnel and under USGS grants and contracts through the Energy Lands Program to universities, State Geological Surveys, and private individuals. Maps and reports characterizing many aspects of environmental earth science are being prepared for areas of Alaska, Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas. Types of studies underway include bedrock, surficial, and interpretive geology; engineering geology, geochemistry of surface materials and plants; climatic conditions as they influence rehabilitation potential of mined lands; and feasibility of surface vs. underground mining. The purpose common to all investigations in the Energy Lands Program is to provide timely earth-science information for use by managers, policy-makers, engineers, scientists, planners, and others, in order to contribute to an environmentally sound, orderly, and safe development of the energy resources of the Nation.

Compiled by Maberry, John O.

1978-01-01

198

Strategic plan for the U.S. Geological Survey 1996 to 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the past two decades profound changes have swept across the scientific, social, and political landscape in which the U.S. Geological Survey (the USGS) functions and to which it is inextricably linked. Core values that were institutionally forged and universally embraced in the past have been vigorously challenged and even vigorously assaulted. Political, economic, and societal forces that coalesced in 1995 threatened the very existence of the U.S. Geological Survey an organization that we long believed to be vital and important to the well-being of the American people and to the advancement of the earth sciences. The near abolishment of the USGS was averted largely by our customers. It was their understanding of the value of our work and their demand that we continue to provide our products and services that ensured our near-term survival.

U.S. Geological Survey

1996-01-01

199

Operation of hydrologic data collection stations by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey operated hydrologic data collection stations during 1983 in response to the needs of all levels of Government for hydrologic information. Surface-water discharge was determined at 11,076 stations; stage data on streams, reservoirs, and lakes were recorded at 2,136 stations; and surface-water quality was determined at 4,610 stations. Ground-water levels were measured at 35,621 stations, and the quality of ground water was determined at 7,648 stations nationwide. Information on precipitation quantity was collected at 800 stations, and quality of precipitation was analyzed at 121 stations. Funding support for the hydrologic stations was derived either solely or from a combination of three major sources--the Geological Survey's Federal Program, the Federal-State Cooperative Program, and reimbursements from other Federal agencies.

Condes de la Torre, Alberto

1983-01-01

200

Documentation of the U.S. Geological Survey Stress and Sediment Mobility Database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Sea Floor Stress and Sediment Mobility Database contains estimates of bottom stress and sediment mobility for the U.S. continental shelf. This U.S. Geological Survey database provides information that is needed to characterize sea floor ecosystems and evaluate areas for human use. The estimates contained in the database are designed to spatially and seasonally resolve the general characteristics of bottom stress over the U.S. continental shelf and to estimate sea floor mobility by comparing critical stress thresholds based on observed sediment texture data to the modeled stress. This report describes the methods used to make the bottom stress and mobility estimates, statistics used to characterize stress and mobility, data validation procedures, and the metadata for each dataset and provides information on how to access the database online.

Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.

2012-01-01

201

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region: Alaska Coastal and Ocean Science  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a bureau of the Department of the Interior (DOI), is the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and mapping agency. The bureau's science strategy 'Facing Tomorrow's Challenges - U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017' describes the USGS vision for its science in six integrated areas of societal concern: Understanding Ecosystems and Predicting Ecosystem Change; Climate Variability and Change; Energy and Minerals; Hazards, Risk, and Resilience; Environment and Wildlife in Human Health; and Water Census of the United States. USGS has three Regions that encompass nine geographic Areas. This fact sheet describes examples of USGS science conducted in coastal, nearshore terrestrial, and ocean environments in the Alaska Area.

Holland-Bartels, Leslie

2009-01-01

202

Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With three levels to choose from on each page - beginner, intermediate or advanced - this site provides information on the many different kinds of geological exploration. The elements that make up minerals and the different ways minerals are developed, The special characteristics of minerals, like physical properties, is explained. Earths tectonic plates, the reasons they move, and the effects of the shifting are also given. Also featured is fossils and how they are developed and are found, as well as why fossils are useful tools for scientists.

Bergman, Jennifer

2009-08-03

203

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada.

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

204

Introduction to the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The EROS Data Center is a part of the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Office of the Department of the Interior and is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. It is the national clearinghouse for the processing and dissemination of spacecraft- and aircraft-acquired images and photographs and electronic data on the Earth's resources. The Center also trains and assists users in the application of such data.

Braconnier, L. A.; Wiepking, P. J.

1980-01-01

205

An index of geophysical well logging in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geophysical logs have been obtained in more than 170 wells in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1968. These logs include natural gamma, electric, caliper, temperature, fluid conductivity, and fluid velocity. Most of the logs are for wells in the Coastal Plain Province of eastern Virginia. Geophysical logs aid in the interpretation of properties of earth materials, including the capacity to store and transmit water in the immediate vicinity of the well bore.

Mulheren, M. Patrick.; Larson, J. D.; Hopkins, Herbert T.

1982-01-01

206

Hot dry rock and the U.S. geological survey: a question of priorities  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The enactment of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 saw the assignment of definite responsibilities relating to hot dry rock (HDR) to the US Geological Survey (USGS). This mandate provided some explicit guidelines and individual tasks in areas in which the USGS already had close ties to the Department of Energy and a number of its national laboratories. This paper discusses various tasks in terms of priorities being conducted by USGS as response to the Act.

Sass, John, H.

1996-01-01

207

The interoperability skill of the Geographic Portal of the ISPRA - Geological Survey of Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Geographic Portal of Geological Survey of Italy (ISPRA) available at http:\\/\\/serviziogeologico.apat.it\\/Portal was planning according to standard criteria of the INSPIRE directive. ArcIMS services and at the same time WMS and WFS services had been realized to satisfy the different clients. For each database and web-services the metadata had been wrote in agreement with the ISO 19115. The management architecture

Maria Pia Congi; Valentina Campo; Carlo Cipolloni; Daniela Delogu; Renato Ventura; Loredana Battaglini

2010-01-01

208

Compilation of field methods used in geochemical prospecting by the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The field methods described in this report are those currently used in geochemical prospecting by the U. S. Geological Survey. Some have been published, others are being processed for publication, while others are still being investigated. The purpose in compiling these methods is to make them readily available in convenient form. The methods have not been thoroughly tested and none is wholly satisfactory. Research is being continued.

Lakin, Hubert William; Ward, Frederick Norville; Almond, Hy

1952-01-01

209

U.S. Geological Survey national computer technology meeting; program and abstracts, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 10-15, 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains some of the abstracts of papers that were presented at the National Computer Technology Meeting that was held in April 1994. This meeting was sponsored by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, and was attended by more than 200 technical and managerial personnel representing all the Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Computer-related information from all Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey are discussed in this compilation of abstracts. Some of the topics addressed are data transfer, data-base management, hydrologic applications, national water information systems, and geographic information systems applications and techniques.

compiled by Balthrop, B. H.; Baker, E. G.

1994-01-01

210

Cooperative activities of the U.S. Geological Survey with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, fiscal years 1983-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, has been involved in numerous cooperative activities with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Assistance agreements, which include both grants and cooperative agreements, have fostered many educational research and development activities. These activities have included site visits, employment opportunities, curriculum development, seminars, and research projects. The activities are consistent with the Geological Survey's mission of conducting earth-science research and dissemination of the results. The cooperative have benefitted the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, their students, and the Geological Survey.

edited by Hall, A. E.; Scott, J. C.

1991-01-01

211

Are clinicians being prepared to care for abused women? A survey of health professional education in Ontario, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The current project undertook a province-wide survey and environmental scan of educational opportunities available to future health care providers on the topic of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. METHODS: A team of experts identified university and college programs in Ontario, Canada as potential providers of IPV education to students in health care professions at the undergraduate and post-graduate

C. Nadine Wathen; Masako Tanaka; Cristina Catallo; Adrianne C. Lebner; M. Kinneret Friedman; Mark D. Hanson; Clare Freeman; Susan M. Jack; Ellen Jamieson; Harriet L. MacMillan

2009-01-01

212

Topical index and bibliography of U.S. Geological Survey Trace Elements and related reports  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Part 1, the topical index, lists the titles of reports prepared from 1941 to December 1952, in conjunction with the Geological Survey's program of uranium and other elements of related interest. It includes not only completed Trace Elements reports and those now in preparation, but also Survey publications, publications by Survey personnel in scientific journals, and open-fie releases. The titles are grouped topically under the headings listed in the table of contents. Entries in each category are listed alphabetically, by author, and numbered consecutively. Many of the reports have been cross-indexed, where appropriate. The classification of the Trace Elements reports, insofar as it is known, has been indicated after the title of the report. The classification of some of the earlier Trace Elements reports is uncertain. The Geological Survey does not have additional copies of most of the reports listed, but copies of some of the completed reports can be loaned on request to organizations officially cooperating with the Atomic Energy Commission. Many Trace Elements reports have been made available to the public, either by open-file release, reproduction by Technical Information Service, Oak Ridge (referred to as TIS), by publication as a Geological Survey circular or bulletin or by a publication in a scientific journal. This information is given, following the title of the report. If the abstract of a Trace Element report has been published in Nuclear Science Abstracts, it is noted by the initials NSA following the title of the report. Part 2 is a reference guide to information on the Trace Elements program that is available to the public. This information is categorized according to the type of publication or release.

Curtis, Diane; Houser, Shirley S.

1952-01-01

213

High resolution integrated geological and geophysical surveys for the detection of cavities in coastal karst areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface or shallow karst constitute a significant problem for many coastal urbanized areas where soluble rocks crop out. This presentation illustrates the advantages of integrating geological and geomorphological methods with geophysical for the detection of cavities in a coastal environment. Direct geological and topographic surveys and indirect with Ground-penetrating radar (GPR), seismic refraction tomography, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys have been conducted in the southern Salento peninsula (Italy) in order to map subsurface karstic features. The study was conducted in Santa Maria di Leuca (Lecce) where an important construction (ex Colonia Scarciglia) is located. The carbonatic nature of the rocks means they are affected by karst phenomena, forming such features as sinkholes, collapsed dolines and caverns, as a result of chemical leaching of carbonates by percolating water. Difficulties take the form of the risk of collapse or damage to the construction . By using three geophysical methods and careful processing for the geophysical data, and by modeling these data with geological and topographic information from within the cave, accurate interpretations have been achieved. The constraints on the interpreted geologic models are better when combining the geological and geophysical methods than when using only one of the methods, despite the general limitations of two-dimensional 2D profiling. ERT and seismic methods can complement GPR for accurately delineating a shallow cave section. Conversely, GPR method can be complementary in determining and verifying the presence of off-line features and numerous areas of small cavities and fractures, which may be difficult to resolve in ERT and seismic data. Nevertheless the use of more Integrated geophysical methods could be expensive, therefore with the aim to reduce the geophysical methods 3D ERT models have been realized: this technique applied in karstic areas characterized by the presence of conductive rocks is demonstrated to be appropriate and to give results to high resolution.

Margiotta, S.; Negri, S.; Mazzone, F.

2012-04-01

214

U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the quantity of resource and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource

Robert A. Crovelli

1984-01-01

215

Seafloor Video Footage and Still-Frame Grabs from U.S. Geological Survey Cruises in Hawaiian Nearshore Waters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Underwater video footage was collected in nearshore waters (<60-meter depth) off the Hawaiian Islands from 2002 to 2011 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Programs Pacific Coral Reef Project, to improve seafloor charac...

A. E. Gibbs P. W. Tierney S. A. Cochran

2013-01-01

216

Selected literature on water-resources investigations in New Jersey by the U.S. Geological Survey, through 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Because of the importance and complexity of the water resources of New Jersey today, there is a need for a current bibliography to serve as a basis for future water resources studies. This report lists about 400 book reports, map reports, and articles that deal with the water resources of New Jersey published through 1986. The publications are grouped under three major headings: (1) publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, (2) publications of State agencies prepared by or in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, and (3) other publications, such as technical journals prepared by or co-authored by U.S. Geological Survey personnel. Most of the publications are available for inspection at the West Trenton office of the U.S. Geologic Survey and at large public and university libraries. Ordering information is given for those publications that are for sale. (USGS)

compiled by Schaefer, F. L.

1987-01-01

217

Weak lensing mass map and peak statistics in Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a weak lensing mass map covering ˜124 deg2 of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey (CS82). We study the statistics of rare peaks in the map, including peak abundance, the peak-peak correlation functions and the tangential-shear profiles around peaks. We find that the abundance of peaks detected in CS82 is consistent with predictions from a ? cold dark matter cosmological model, once noise effects are properly included. The correlation functions of peaks with different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are well described by power laws, and there is a clear cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Constant Mass galaxies and high SNR peaks. The tangential-shear profiles around peaks increase with peak SNR. We fit analytical models to the tangential-shear profiles, including a projected singular isothermal sphere (SIS) model and a projected Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) model, plus a two-halo term. For the high SNR peaks, the SIS model is rejected at ˜3?. The NFW model plus a two-halo term gives more acceptable fits to the data. Some peaks match the positions of optically detected clusters, while others are relatively dark. Comparing dark and matched peaks, we find a difference in lensing signal of a factor of 2, suggesting that about half of the dark peaks are false detections.

Shan, Huan Yuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Comparat, Johan; Jullo, Eric; Charbonnier, Aldée; Erben, Thomas; Makler, Martin; Moraes, Bruno; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Courbin, Frédéric; Meylan, Georges; Tao, Charling; Taylor, James E.

2014-08-01

218

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Included are citations of about 550 reports, abstracts, and journal articles issued from 1901 through July 1993. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed by author, subject, and USGS report number.

compiled by Havens, J. S.

1993-01-01

219

Summary of water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Colorado: fiscal year 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey in Colorado consist of collecting water-resources data and conducting interpretive hydrologic investigations. The water-resources data and the results of the investigations are published or released by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by cooperating agencies. This report describes the water- resources investigations in Colorado for the 1984 fiscal year (October 1, 1983, to September 30, 1984).

U.S. Geological Survey

1984-01-01

220

Access routes to the United States Geological Survey's National Center, Reston, Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Center: The U.S. Geological Survey, established in 1879 as a bureau in the Department of the Interior, is one of the Federal Government's major earth science research and fact-finding agencies. By 1960, the continued growth of the Survey's natural resources and environmental programs and activities led to the agency's headquarters personnel being housed in more than 30 different buildings scattered throughout the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. In 1962, Congress approved the construction of a National Center to consolidate the overall Survey's headquarters effort. A site in Reston's industrial/educational complex was selected and on July 15, 1971, ground was broken for the John Wesley Powell Federal Building.

U.S. Geological Survey

1977-01-01

221

Climate variation and its effects on our land and water : Part C, Geological Survey climate plan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To better coordinate information being generated by the U.S. Geological Survey, a workshop was convened near Denver, Colo., on December 7-9, 1976, to exchange ideas about research that is oriented toward climate, climate variation, and the effects of climate on the Nation 's land and water resources. This is the first circular of a three-part report resulting from that workshop. Hydrologic records provide information to the earth scientist about the responses of ground water, surface water, and glaciers to climatic change; geologic sequences provide evidence of earth-surface water, and glaciers to climatic change; geologic sequences provide evidence of earth-surface responses to climatic change; biological records yield information about the effects of climatic change on the Earth 's biota; archeological records tell us where and how man was able to live under changing climatic conditions; and historical records allow the specific effects of short-term changes in climate to be accurately documented. The interrelation between present and past geologic environments, various methods of study , and the span of time over which the results can be applied are shown in a table. (Woodard-USGS)

edited by Howard, Keith A.; Smith, George I.

1978-01-01

222

Times and locations of explosions; U.S. Geological Survey 1962 field season  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey detonated 86 large charges of chemical explosives in the western United States from 6 June to 9 August 1962, in a study of crustal structure in the western United States. This Technical Letter consists of two tables containing information about these explosions. Table I gives a brief geographical description of the shotpoints, and Table II gives the date, time, location, charge size, surface elevation, and some general information about the shots. In the Remarks column (Table II), the configuration and depth of most of the charges are given. This part of the table is not complete, as some of this information has not yet been compiled. Three types of explosives were used in the program. These were: Nitramon WW, a carbo-nitrate blasting agent; Composition B, a mixture of RDX and TNT; and Tovex-Gel, a non-nitroglycerin blasting slurry. The loading, firing, and surveying was done by United ElectroDynamics, Inc., of Pasadena, California. The timing was done by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Roller, John C.

1962-01-01

223

Access routes to the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The EROS Data Center is a part of the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program of the Department of the Interior, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. It is the national center for the processing anddissemination of spacecraft and aircraft acquired photographic imagery and electronic data of the Earth's resources. The center also trains and assists users in the application of such data. The EROS Data Center provides access to Landsat data, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and other remotely sensed data acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft.

U.S. Geological Survey

1976-01-01

224

U.S. Geological Survey archived data recovery in Texas, 2008-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 2008–11 data rescue and recovery efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center resulted in an efficient workflow process, database, and Web user interface for scientists and citizens to access archived environmental information with practical applications. Much of this information is unique and has never been readily available to the public. The methods developed and lessons learned during this effort are now being applied to facilitate recovering archived information requested by USGS scientists, cooperators, and the general public.

Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Reece, Brian D.

2011-01-01

225

U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Modeling Software: Making Sense of a Complex Natural Resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Computer models of groundwater systems simulate the flow of groundwater, including water levels, and the transport of chemical constituents and thermal energy. Groundwater models afford hydrologists a framework on which to organize their knowledge and understanding of groundwater systems, and they provide insights water-resources managers need to plan effectively for future water demands. Building on decades of experience, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to lead in the development and application of computer software that allows groundwater models to address scientific and management questions of increasing complexity.

Provost, Alden M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Pollock, David W.

2009-01-01

226

Multispectral techniques for general geological surveys evaluation of a four-band photographic system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general geological survey at 1:62,500 scale of the well exposed rocks of the White Mountains and the adjacent volcanic desert plateau is reported. The tuffs, granites, sedimentary rocks and metavolcanic rocks in this arid region are varicolored and conventional black and white aerial photographs have been a useful mapping aid. A large number of true color and false color aerial photographs and multispectral viewer screen images of the study area are evaluated in order to consider what imagery is the most useful for distinguishing rock types. Photographs of true color film are judged the most useful for recognizing geographic locations.

Crowder, D., F.

1969-01-01

227

Pilot study for U.S. Geological Survey Standard Reference Water Samples for pesticides  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey has been preparing and maintaining a library of standard reference water samples for inorganic constituents for 19 years. Recently, a pilot study was conducted to see if the reference-sample program could be expanded to include pesticides and other organic materials. Two samples containing organochlorine and organophosphorus insecticides, and chlorophenoxy acid herbicides were distributed to a number of laboratories in the United States. One of the samples also contained polychlorinated biphenyls. Interlaboratory data obtained from these round robin studies are presented with intralaboratory information on long-term stability.

Friedman, L. C.; Fishman, M. J.; Boyle, D. K.

1984-01-01

228

Implementation of unmanned aircraft systems by the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office is leading the implementation of UAS technology in anticipation of transforming the research methods and management techniques employed across the Department of the Interior. UAS technology is being made available to monitor environmental conditions, analyse the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management missions. USGS is teaming with the Department of the Interior Aviation Management Directorate (AMD) to lead the safe and cost-effective adoption of UAS technology by the Department of the Interior Agencies and USGS scientists.

Cress, J. J.; Sloan, J. L.; Hutt, M. E.

2011-01-01

229

Geochemical work of the Geochemistry and Petrology Branch U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The current geochemical work of the Geochemistry and Petrology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey is outlined under the headings of geochemical compilations, laboratory projects, and field-laboratory projects. Some thirty-seven active projects are described. Six others are mentioned which are planned for the near future. The importance and value of cooperative projects and the "team approach" are emphasized. The hope is expressed that more such projects can be undertaken; also, that summaries of geochemical work under way elsewhere will be published soon for the advancement and better coordination of geochemical research. ?? 1954.

Ingerson, E.

1954-01-01

230

United States Geological Survey: International Polar Year Resources (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides a brief overview of the upcoming International Polar Year (IPY) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiatives and resources that help support the observance. Topics include a history of IPY (this will be the third IPY) and the role of the USGS in polar research. The education section provides links to USGS resources on glaciation, the North and South Pole, Alaska, climate change, and other topics of interest for IPY investigations. Materials include information on atlases and databases, polar research projects, maps, photos, digital datasets, booklets, and educational guides.

231

Contaminants and drinking-water sources in 2001; recent findings of the U. S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As the Nation's principal earth-science agency, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies numerous issues related to contamination of drinking-water sources. The work includes monitoring to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of contaminants; research to determine sources, transport, transformations, and fate of contaminants, and assessments of vulnerability. Much of the work is conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other Federal, State, Tribal, and local governments, to help provide a scientific basis for resource management and regulation. Examples of recent results are presented for two broad categories of drinking-water projects: occurrence studies, and source-water assessments.

Patterson, G. G.; Focazio, M. J.

2000-01-01

232

U.S. Geological Survey toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program, fiscal year 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In fiscal year 1982, the U S Geological Survey began an interdisciplinary research thrust entitled Toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program The objective of the thrust was to provide earth sciences information necessary to evaluate and mitigate existing groundwater contamination problems resulting from the planned or inadvertant disposal of wastes and from certain land-use practices, and to improve future waste disposal and land-use practices The program supports process-oriented and interdisciplinary field research, and regional groundwater quality studies This article provides an overview of the current (Fiscal Year 1985) activities of the Toxic Waste Program ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

Ragone, S. E.

1986-01-01

233

Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan for the Alabama District of the U. S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan. The plan for each District describes the policies and procedures that ensure high quality in the collection, processing, analysis, computer storage, and publication of surface-water data. The Alabama District Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the District for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

Hedgecock, T. Scott; Pearman, J. Leroy; Stricklin, Victor E.

2002-01-01

234

Methods for Adjusting U.S. Geological Survey Rural Regression Peak Discharges in an Urban Setting  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted of 78 U.S. Geological Survey gaged streams that have been subjected to varying degrees of urbanization over the last three decades. Flood-frequency analysis coupled with nonlinear regression techniques were used to generate a set of equations for converting peak discharge estimates determined from rural regression equations to a set of peak discharge estimates that represent known urbanization. Specifically, urban regression equations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year return periods were calibrated as a function of the corresponding rural peak discharge and the percentage of impervious area in a watershed. The results of this study indicate that two sets of equations, one set based on imperviousness and one set based on population density, performed well. Both sets of equations are dependent on rural peak discharges, a measure of development (average percentage of imperviousness or average population density), and a measure of homogeneity of development within a watershed. Average imperviousness was readily determined by using geographic information system methods and commonly available land-cover data. Similarly, average population density was easily determined from census data. Thus, a key advantage to the equations developed in this study is that they do not require field measurements of watershed characteristics as did the U.S. Geological Survey urban equations developed in an earlier investigation. During this study, the U.S. Geological Survey PeakFQ program was used as an integral tool in the calibration of all equations. The scarcity of historical land-use data, however, made exclusive use of flow records necessary for the 30-year period from 1970 to 2000. Such relatively short-duration streamflow time series required a nonstandard treatment of the historical data function of the PeakFQ program in comparison to published guidelines. Thus, the approach used during this investigation does not fully comply with the guidelines set forth in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 17B, and modifications may be needed before it can be applied in practice.

Moglen, Glenn E.; Shivers, Dorianne E.

2006-01-01

235

Uranium resource assessment by the Geological Survey; methodology and plan to update the national resource base  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Based on the Memorandum of Understanding {MOU) of September 20, 1984, between the U.S. Geological Survey of the U.S. Department of Interior and the Energy Information Administration {EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy {DOE), the U.S. Geological Survey began to make estimates of the undiscovered uranium endowment of selected areas of the United States in 1985. A modified NURE {National Uranium Resource Evaluation) method will be used in place of the standard NURE method of the DOE that was used for the national assessment reported in October 1980. The modified method, here named the 'deposit-size-frequency' {DSF) method, is presented for the first time, and calculations by the two methods are compared using an illustrative example based on preliminary estimates for the first area to be evaluated under the MOU. The results demonstrate that the estimate of the endowment using the DSF method is significantly larger and more uncertain than the estimate obtained by the NURE method. We believe that the DSF method produces a more realistic estimate because the principal factor estimated in the endowment equation is disaggregated into more parts and is more closely tied to specific geologic knowledge than by the NURE method. The DSF method consists of modifying the standard NURE estimation equation, U=AxFxTxG, by replacing the factors FxT by a single factor that represents the tonnage for the total number of deposits in all size classes. Use of the DSF method requires that the size frequency of deposits in a known or control area has been established and that the relation of the size-frequency distribution of deposits to probable controlling geologic factors has been determined. Using these relations, the principal scientist {PS) first estimates the number and range of size classes and then, for each size class, estimates the lower limit, most likely value, and upper limit of the numbers of deposits in the favorable area. Once these probable estimates have been refined by elicitation of the PS, they are entered into the DSF equation, and the probability distribution of estimates of undiscovered uranium endowment is calculated using a slight modification of the program by Ford and McLaren (1980). The EIA study of the viability of the domestic uranium industry requires an annual appraisal of the U.S. uranium resource situation. During DOE's NURE Program, which was terminated in 1983, a thorough assessment of the Nation's resources was completed. A comprehensive reevaluation of uranium resource base for the entire United States is not possible for each annual appraisal. A few areas are in need of future study, however, because of new developments in either scientific knowledge, industry exploration, or both. Four geologic environments have been selected for study by the U.S. Geological Survey in the next several years: (1) surficial uranium deposits throughout the conterminous United States, (2) uranium in collapse-breccia pipes in the Grand Canyon region of Arizona, (3) uranium in Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Northern Great Plains, and (4) uranium in metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont province in the eastern States. In addition to participation in the National uranium resource assessment, the U.S. Geological Survey will take part in activities of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and those of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Finch, Warren Irvin; McCammon, Richard B.

1987-01-01

236

FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

2013-03-01

237

Survey of information technology in Intensive Care Units in Ontario, Canada  

PubMed Central

Background The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a data-rich environment where information technology (IT) may enhance patient care. We surveyed ICUs in the province of Ontario, Canada, to determine the availability, implementation and variability of information systems. Methods A self-administered internet-based survey was completed by ICU directors between May and October 2006. We measured the spectrum of ICU clinical data accessible electronically, the availability of decision support tools, the availability of electronic imaging systems for radiology, the use of electronic order entry and medication administration systems, and the availability of hardware and wireless or mobile systems. We used Fisher's Exact tests to compare IT availability and Classification and Regression Trees (CART) to estimate the optimal cut-point for the number of computers per ICU bed. Results We obtained responses from 50 hospitals (68.5% of institutions with level 3 ICUs), of which 21 (42%) were university-affiliated. The majority electronically accessed laboratory data and imaging reports (92%) and used picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) (76%). Other computing functions were less prevalent (medication administration records 46%, physician or nursing notes 26%; medication order entry 22%). No association was noted between IT availability and ICU size or university affiliation. Sites used clinical information systems from15 different vendors and 8 different PACS systems were in use. Half of the respondents described the number of computers available as insufficient. Wireless networks and mobile computing systems were used in 23 ICUs (46%). Conclusion Ontario ICUs demontrate a high prevalence of the use of basic information technology systems. However, implementation of the more complex and potentially more beneficial applications is low. The wide variation in vendors utilized may impair information exchange, interoperability and uniform data collection.

Lapinsky, Stephen E; Holt, David; Hallett, David; Abdolell, Mohamed; Adhikari, Neill KJ

2008-01-01

238

A Survey of the Utility of Satellite Magnetometer Data for Application to Solid-Earth Geophysical and Geological Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of potential users of low altitude satellite magnetic measurements for solid-earth and geological studies was conducted. The principal objectives of this survey were to: document the utility and application of the data and resultant products obtained from such a satellite mission, and establish a users committee for the proposed low altitude vector magnetometer satellite.

1975-01-01

239

U.S. Geological Survey National Computer Technology Meeting: Program and Abstracts, May 7-11, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey has made major advancements in the use of computer technology to meet the Survey's mission of providing the hydrologic information and understanding needed for the optimum use and management of t...

B. H. Balthrop E. G. Baker

1990-01-01

240

Aeromagnetic Survey of the Amargosa Desert, Nevada and California: A Tool for Understanding Near-Surface Geology and Hydrology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Amargosa Desert and surrounding areas provides insights into the buried geology of this structurally complex region. The survey covers an area of approximately 7,700 km2 (2,970 mi2), extending from Beatty, Nevada...

R. J. Blakely V. E. Langenheim D. A. Ponce G. L. Dixon

2000-01-01

241

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01

242

Suggestions to authors of the reports of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Knowledge acquired by the Geological Survey through programs of research and investigations has no value to the public if it remains in office files or in the minds of the scientists and engineers who did the work. The full discharge of the Survey's responsibilities is attained only by making its acquired knowledge available promptly and effectively to all people who will find it of interest and use. And, to insure effectiveness, reports must be not only accurate but so clearly and simply written that they are easy to read and understand. Efforts by the Geological Survey to attain high quality in reports are necessarily group efforts. The largest contribution is made by the author, who has assembled facts, has worked out ideas to explain them, and has a direct personal interest in making the facts and ideas clearly and effectively known. The Geological Survey encourages that interest, recognizing that it is an essential ingredient of the high morale of the members of the Survey. Authors should keep in mins, however, that the Survey has a proprietary interest in all their manuscript reports and as proprietor may dispose of the reports, or require that they be changed before publication, as it sees git. The Survey generally exercises its proprietary interest only to the extent of seeing that a report is scientifically and technically sound, will reach the proper audience, and will reflect credit on both the Survey and the author. To these ends, each report is reviewed by the author's fellow workers, supervisors, and staff officials, who bring to bear upon it their specialized knowledge, skill, judgement to assure a sound product. In its final form each Survey report is that product of team effort in which many persons do their share -- even though most of them remain anonymous. There is no easy way to prepare reports of high quality, any more than there is an easy means of carrying out research to sure and outstanding conclusions. Each task calls for intensive thinking and for preserving work. The author bears the primary responsibility and correspondingly faces the most difficult task. To aid him is the chief purpose of this volume. The subject matter of this volume is arranged under several principal headings. First, a summary is given of the Survey's publications: the historical basis for them, statistics as to what has been issued in the periods 1879-1957, and a list and description of the several series of reports and maps in which material is being published. Next are outlined successive steps that the author will normally take from the start of a project to his final proofreading of the text and illustrations. Under the third broad heading is brought together much detailed information about the form and content of reports. The fourth part of this volume is devoted to advice on expression -- what to seek and what to avoid. A fifth major part of this volume bears on the most common questions of typographic style that affect Survey publications. The final sections of the volume give instructions for typing manuscript copy and correcting the galley and page proofs; also they include a few useful tables and a discussion of the purpose and content of press releases.

1958-01-01

243

Access to Care, Health Status, and Health Disparities in the United States and Canada: Results of a Cross-National Population-Based Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of med- ical services in the United States and Canada, and compared disparities accord- ing to race, income, and immigrant status. Methods. We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada\\/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we

Karen E. Lasser; David U. Himmelstein; Steffie Woolhandler

2006-01-01

244

initial results from the first year of the p ermafrost outreach p rogram, Yukon, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lipovsky, P.S. and Yoshikawa, K., 2009. Initial results from the first year of the Permafrost Outreach Program, Yukon, Canada. In: Yukon Exploration and Geology 2008, L.H. Weston, L.R. Blackburn and L.L. Lewis (eds.), Yukon Geological Survey, p. 161-172. abstraC t In 2007, a permafrost outreach program was initiated in Yukon, Canada by installing long-term permafrost monitoring stations near public schools

Panya S. Lipovsky

245

Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Division in North Carolina, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources programs conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the state of North Carolina during 1985 and proposed programs for 1986 are described. This is the first in a series of biennial progress reports on Survey activities in the state. Activities such as gathering, interpreting and publishing hydrologic data and scientific information in support of state and local water resources planning, management, and regulatory programs are presented. The water resources programs described are funded through cooperative agreements with state and local agencies and through special agreements with other federal agencies. Cooperative programs are reviewed annually to insure that state, local and national priorities are being met. Groundwater withdrawals are estimated to have produced water level declines of 150 ft and more for large areas of the northeast and central Coastal Plain. Future demands for water quality and quantity are discussed.

compiled by Turner, J. F.; Deckard, R. J.

1986-01-01

246

Geological and geophysical survey of a building site: the "European Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological and geophysical surveys are an essential aspect to determine irregularities in the bedrock surface caused by tectonic faults and active weathering process. Such kind of investigation is particularly important when dealing with the design of foundations for living block infrastructures. In the particular case presented in this work, the bedrock is covered by sediments that form quite a flat surface, thus requiring some kind of sub-surface study. The solely use of drilling in this situation can not be enough for civil engineering purposes. Also, the option to drill at a denser grid would increase the price drastically. On the other hand, an insufficient sampling grid is prone to the risk of missing potentially dangerous anomalies. In addition to that, the urban environment makes the choice of geophysical techniques difficult. In order to obtain a continuous picture of the cross-section, the 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) was chosen. Geomorphology of the site is quite typical for the Ob river floodplain. The Paleozoic bedrock is covered by Paleogene alluvial sediments; modern alluvial, biogene and artificial sediments are on the top. As a result of the survey, the geological elements of the cross-section, such as bedrock and sediments were determined. The combined use of geophysical techniques, together with drilling, in-situ testing and laboratory analysis have drastically decreased the time and costs of the exploration work, improving its quality and informational content, thus providing essential information for the design of the infrastructure.

Manstein, Y. A.; Lavrov, S. N.; Scozzari, A.

2012-04-01

247

Operation of hydrologic data collection stations by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operated hydrologic data collection stations during fiscal yr 1985 in response to the needs of all levels of Government for hydrologic information. Surface water discharge was determined at 11,076 stations; stage data on streams, reservoirs, and lakes were recorded at 2,141 stations; and surface water quality was determined at 4,166 stations. Groundwater levels were measured at 39,301 stations, and the quality of groundwater was determined at 9,263 stations nationwide. Data on sediment were collected daily at 212 stations and on a periodic basis at 1,027 stations. Information on precipitation quantity was collected at 921 stations, and the quality of precipitation was analyzed at 108 stations. Data collection platforms for satellite telemetry of hydrologic information were used at 1,520 USGS stations. Funding support for the hydrologic stations was derived either solely or from a combination of three major sources--the Geological Survey 's Federal Program appropriation, the Federal-State Cooperative Program, and reimbursements from other Federal agencies. (Author 's abstract)

Condes de la Torre, Alberto

1985-01-01

248

Earth history at the century mark of the U.S. Geological Survey*  

PubMed Central

Earth history involves all aspects of geological and biological evolution, especially paleontology and stratigraphy. Early paleontological exploration of the western United States by and before the U.S. Geological Survey featured the dramatic discoveries and rivalries of the great vertebrate paleontologists Leidy, Cope, Marsh, and Osborn. Invertebrate paleontology and paleobotany in the U.S. Geological Survey blossomed with emphasis on practical missions. The most illuminating and useful earth history, nevertheless, emerges where there is a high degree of interaction with academic scholars. Despite a good knowledge of its broad features, the drama of earth history remains obscure in detail. Whereas it speaks conclusively for the reality of organic evolution, it is less conclusive about mechanisms and many important transitions. Current investigations, however, especially in pre-Phanerozoic, mammalian, and human paleontology, promise improved insights. New techniques in collecting, sample preparation, and research are revealing previously unknown kinds of fossils and exquisite details of preservation. Plate tectonic theory provides a new framework for historical geography and biogeography. Emerging techniques in geochronology—matching paleopolarity sequences, for example—promise to resolve old problems of the synchroneity or heterochroneity of different biotal provinces. As it splits into subfields, the teaching and practice of paleontology expand to cover all of them. The fossils themselves, however, remain the basic objective evidence. All hypotheses about them must answer to this court of appeal. But nature rarely responds in an either-or way. The most probable hypotheses are those that have repeatedly confronted objective reality and survived all opportunity for disproof.

Simpson, George Gaylord

1979-01-01

249

U.S. Geological Survey: A synopsis of Three-dimensional Modeling  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a multidisciplinary agency that provides assessments of natural resources (geological, hydrological, biological), the disturbances that affect those resources, and the disturbances that affect the built environment, natural landscapes, and human society. Until now, USGS map products have been generated and distributed primarily as 2-D maps, occasionally providing cross sections or overlays, but rarely allowing the ability to characterize and understand 3-D systems, how they change over time (4-D), and how they interact. And yet, technological advances in monitoring natural resources and the environment, the ever-increasing diversity of information needed for holistic assessments, and the intrinsic 3-D/4-D nature of the information obtained increases our need to generate, verify, analyze, interpret, confirm, store, and distribute its scientific information and products using 3-D/4-D visualization, analysis, modeling tools, and information frameworks. Today, USGS scientists use 3-D/4-D tools to (1) visualize and interpret geological information, (2) verify the data, and (3) verify their interpretations and models. 3-D/4-D visualization can be a powerful quality control tool in the analysis of large, multidimensional data sets. USGS scientists use 3-D/4-D technology for 3-D surface (i.e., 2.5-D) visualization as well as for 3-D volumetric analyses. Examples of geological mapping in 3-D include characterization of the subsurface for resource assessments, such as aquifer characterization in the central United States, and for input into process models, such as seismic hazards in the western United States.

Jacobsen, Linda J.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Phelps, Geoff A.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Grauch, V.J.S.

2011-01-01

250

Suggestions to authors of papers submitted for publication by the United States Geological Survey with directions to typists  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The present edition, like the others, is intended primarily for Geological Survey authors or prospective authors: it is not the manual of wider scope that Mr. Wood had planned, and it contains none of his new material. If authors outside the Survey shall continue to find the suggestions useful, that will be a byproduct that testifies to the quality of the Survey's standards, which were established early in its history.

edited by Wood, George McLane; Lane, Bernard H.

1935-01-01

251

Information and informatics in a geological survey - the good, the bad and the ugly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is apparent that the most successful geological surveys (as measured by the only true Key Performance Indicator - their effectiveness in serving their societies) have recognised that, while their core business is making maps and models and doing scientific research to underpin that, the commodity they actually deal in is data and information and knowledge. They know that in a digital world the better they organise the data and information and knowledge, the more successful they will be. In our future world, where e-science will surely dominate, some are already sub-titling themselves as information or knowledge exchange organisations. There seems an unarguable correlation between surveys which organise their information well and those that run their projects well, their agility in responding to government agendas or national emergencies, and flexibility in delivering products their diverse users want. Look deeper and you can see the pivotal role of best practice information management and the tangible benefits a responsible approach to acquiring, storing and delivering information brings. But even in these (most successful) surveys the people leading information management will tell you that it was a gargantuan battle to get the resources to achieve this success and that, even with the downstream fruits of the investment in professional information management and informatics now obvious, it is a continuing struggle to maintain a decent level of funding for these tasks. It is not hard to see why; the struggle is innately one-sided; geoscientists are born and/or trained to be curious, to be independent and to innovate. If the choice is between more research and survey, or a professional approach to information/informatics and the adjudicators are geoscientists, it is not difficult to pick the winner. So what does lie behind a successful approach to information in a geological survey organisation? First, recognise that poor information management cannot just be cured by investing in hardware and software; it is the geoscience data content (its availability, quality and consistency) that is in greater need of investment. Second, to achieve the full synergies and benefits information management and informatics must be planned into all domains of the Survey and all project phases - acquisition, processing, analysis, dissemination and storage. Adequate investment in front office applications and services to communicate and deliver geoscience to all our stakeholders (eg virtualisation and visualisation) is essential. Without it back office work, however, worthy, is of limited value. Finally, the widely accepted truth is that the real challenge in introducing professional information management and informatics is not technical or scientific, but cultural and managerial. Unless you can sensitively and positively change the work patterns and culture of Survey geoscientists a sustainable outcome will remain beyond reach. Of course to change the work pattern and culture of the geoscientists you must first ensure that the most senior management of the organisation embrace the change wholeheartedly; now there's a challenge! Using examples and experience from the evolution on information management and informatics in the British Geological Survey over the last decade this presentation will explore the issues above.

Jackson, I.

2008-12-01

252

Renal colic and urolithiasis practice patterns in Canada: a survey of Canadian Urological Association members  

PubMed Central

Background: We describe the practice variability of CUA (Canadian Urological Association) members and factors which predict these patterns for common stone scenarios. Methods: We asked 308 English- and 52 French-speaking CUA members to complete online surveys in their respective languages. We collected demographic information on fellowship training, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) access, academic setting and whether they are at a hospital with regionalized surgical services. Respondents indicated their actual as well as ideal treatment for scenarios of renal, proximal and distal ureteric calculi. Results: In total, 131 urologists responded (36% response rate), all of whom treated urolithiasis. Of this number, 17% had endourology fellowship training, 76% had access to SWL, 42% were at an academic institution and 66% were at institutions with regionalized surgical services. Actual and ideal treatment modalities selected for symptomatic, distal and proximal ureteric stones (4, 8, 14 mm) were consistent with published guidelines. There were discrepancies between the use of ureteroscopy and SWL in actual versus ideal scenarios. Actual and ideal practices were congruent for proximal ureteric stones and asymptomatic renal calculi. In multivariate analysis, respondents were less likely to perform ureteroscopy on proximal 4- and 8-mm stones if they were at a hospital with regionalized surgical services (OR: 0.097; 95% CI: 0.01–0.76, p = 0.03 and OR: 0.330; 95% CI: 0.13–0.83, p = 0.02). Interpretation: There is clinical variability in the management of urolithiasis in Canada; however, management approaches fall within published guidelines. Type of hospital and access to operating room resources may affect treatment modality selection.

Satkunasivam, Raj; Keays, Melise; Pace, Kenneth T.

2011-01-01

253

Food consumption patterns in the Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada: a cross-sectional telephone survey  

PubMed Central

Background The demographics and lifestyles of Canadians are changing, thereby influencing food choices and food preparation in the home. Although different dietary practices are associated with increased risk of foodborne illness, our ability to evaluate food consumption trends and assess risks associated with foodborne illness is limited by lack of data on current eating habits and consumer food safety practices. The objective of this study was to describe, for the first time, the food consumption patterns in a Canadian-based population from a food safety perspective, in order to establish baseline data on actual food intake of individuals. Method A cross-sectional telephone survey of 2,332 randomly selected residents of Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada (C-EnterNet pilot site) was conducted between November 2005 and March 2006. Food intake was assessed using a 7-day dietary recall method. Results Certain food items were consumed more than others among the same food groups, and consumption of many food items varied by gender and age. Specific foods considered high-risk for the transmission of certain enteric pathogens were significantly more likely to be consumed by males (i.e. unpasteurized juice, bean sprouts, and undercooked meat) and elderly individuals (i.e. undercooked eggs). The majority of households prepared and consumed most meals at home, allocating an average of 44 minutes to prepare a meal. Conclusion Baseline data on actual food intake is useful to public health professionals and food safety risk assessors for developing communication messages to consumers and in foodborne outbreak investigations.

Nesbitt, Andrea; Majowicz, Shannon; Finley, Rita; Pollari, Frank; Pintar, Katarina; Marshall, Barbara; Cook, Angela; Sargeant, Jan; Wilson, Jeff; Ribble, Carl; Knowles, Lewinda

2008-01-01

254

Application of statistical approaches to analyze geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data at a fractured-rock mine site in Northern Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mine site characterization often results in the acquisition of geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data sets that are used in the mine design process but are rarely co-evaluated. For a study site in northern Canada, bivariate and multivariate (hierarchical) statistical techniques are used to evaluate empirical hydraulic conductivity estimation methods based on traditional rock mass characterisation schemes, as well as to assess the regional hydrogeological conceptual model. Bivariate techniques demonstrate that standard geotechnical measures of fracturing are poor indicators of the hydraulic potential of a rock mass at the study site. Additionally, rock-mass-permeability schemes which rely on these measures are shown to be poor predictors of hydraulic conductivity in untested areas. Multivariate techniques employing hierarchical cluster analysis of both geotechnical and geological data sets are able to identify general trends in the data. Specifically, the geological cluster analysis demonstrated spatial relationship between intrusive contacts and increased hydraulic conductivity. This suggests promise in the use of clustering methods in identifying new trends during the early stages of hydrogeological characterization.

Mayer, J. M.; Allen, D. M.; Gibson, H. D.; Mackie, D. C.

2014-05-01

255

Hydrologic and geologic aspects of waste management and disposal; a bibliography of publications by U.S. Geological Survey authors, 1950-81  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References to more than 550 reports, articles, and maps are listed alphabetically by author and are indexed by subject. The subject index includes geographic-area terms. Citations from 69 series are included; series are listed separately. The publications listed report the results of U.S. Geological Survey research and field projects throughout the Nation concerning earth-science aspects of waste management and disposal. They include organic, inorganic, and radioactive wastes and related topics such as mathematical models of solute transport. Most of the references are to (1) Geological Survey report series such as Water-Supply Papers, Professional Papers, Bulletins, Circulars, Water-Resources Investigations, and Open-File Reports, (2) technical journals of professional organizations, or (3) reports by other Federal and State agencies.

Handman, Elinor H.

1983-01-01

256

77 FR 11565 - Agency Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: United States Geological Survey (USGS...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP)--EDMAP and STATEMAP...Title: National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP-EDMAP and STATEMAP...professors, who are skilled in geologic mapping, request EDMAP funding to support...

2012-02-27

257

An evaluation of the ERTS data collection system as a potential operational tool. [automatic hydrologic data collection and processing system for geological surveys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Resources Technology Satellite Data Collection System has been shown to be, from the users vantage point, a reliable and simple system for collecting data from U.S. Geological Survey operational field instrumentation. It is technically feasible to expand the ERTS system into an operational polar-orbiting data collection system to gather data from the Geological Survey's Hydrologic Data Network. This could permit more efficient internal management of the Network, and could enable the Geological Survey to make data available to cooperating agencies in near-real time. The Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of the costs and benefits of satellite data-relay systems.

Paulson, R. W.

1974-01-01

258

Reconnaissance Snow Survey across Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada, April 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During April 2007, a coordinated series of snow measurements were made across the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada, during a 4200-km snowmobile traverse from Fairbanks, Alaska, to Baker Lake, Nunavut. While detailed, local snow measurements have ...

A. Silis C. Derksen D. Solie G. Liston M. Sturm

2008-01-01

259

U.S. Geological Survey National Computer Technology Meeting; Program and abstracts, May 7-11, 1990  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Computer-related information from all Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey are discussed in this compilation of abstracts. Some of the topics addressed are system administration; distributed information systems and data bases, both current (1990) and proposed; hydrologic applications; national water information systems; geographic information systems applications and techniques. The report contains some of the abstracts that were presented at the National Computer Technology Meeting that was held in May 1990. The meeting was sponsored by the Water Resources Division and was attended by more than 200 technical and managerial personnel representing all the Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. (USGS)

compiled by Balthrop, B. H.; Baker, E. G.

1990-01-01

260

Geological structures deduced from airborne geophysical surveys around Syowa Station, Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The area around Syowa Station, the Japanese Antarctic station in Lutzow-Holm Bay, is widely considered to be a junction of the Africa, India, Madagascar, and Antarctic continents, according to the reconstruction model of Gondwana. This area is key to investigating the formation of Gondwana. Joint Japanese-German airborne geophysical surveys were conducted around Syowa Station in January 2006 to reveal the tectonic evolution contributing to the formation of Gondwana in this area. Ice radar, magnetic, and gravity data were obtained from onshore areas. Several characteristic features that may be related to the tectonic evolution of Gondwana were inferred primarily from magnetic anomalies and from gravity anomalies and bedrock topography. The boundaries of the Lutzow-Holm Complex, the Yamato-Belgica Complex, and the Western Rayner Complex are defined, but the inland extension of the boundary between the Lutzow-Holm and the Yamato-Belgica Complexes is unknown south of 71S. The main geological structural trends of the Lutzow-Holm Complex derived from magnetic anomalies are NW-SE and are concordant with the geological results in the coastal region. However, nearly NE-SW-trending magnetic anomalies cut across the NW-SW magnetic anomaly trends, and the NE-SW right lateral strike-slip faults are deduced from the magnetic and the gravity anomaly data in the Lutzow-Holm Complex. The Lutzow-Holm Complex is divided into four blocks based on the estimated strike-slip faults. The strike-slip faults were possibly generated during a younger stage of Pan-African orogeny, after the formation of NW-SE-striking geological structures. These results provide new constraints for the formation of Gondwana.

Nogi, Y.; Jokat, W.; Kitada, K.; Steinhage, D.

2012-12-01

261

Preliminary geologic investigation of the Apollo 17 landing site. [orbital and lunar surface geological surveys during Apollo 17 flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A geological investigation of the Apollo 17 lunar landing site was conducted. The Taurus-Littrow valley is interpreted as a deep graben formed by structural adjustment of lunar crustal material to the Serenitatis impact. Materials of the valley fill were sampled at many stations. Ejecta around many craters on the valley floor consist of basalt, showing that the graben was partly filled by lava flows. The geological objectives of the Apollo 17 mission are divided into orbital and lunar surface data collection. The data obtained for both types of investigation are presented in tables, photographs, and drawings.

Muehlberger, W. R.; Batson, R. M.; Cernan, E. A.; Freeman, V. L.; Hait, M. H.; Holt, H. E.; Howard, K. A.; Jackson, E. D.; Larson, K. B.; Reed, V. S.

1973-01-01

262

Geologic Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geologic Maps are unique in that they show the distribution of geologic features on a landscape through specific symbols and colors. The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) site Geologic Maps provides visitors with a good introduction to these concepts, which include the unique features of a geologic map; the meaning of their lines, colors, and symbols; the location of faults; and more. Anyone working with geologic maps or just interested in learning a little about cartography or geology will find this site easy to explore and full of good information.

2000-01-01

263

U.S. Geological Survey Assessment of Undiscovered Petroleum Resources of the Hamra Basin, Libya, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hamra Basin Province encompasses approximately 244,100 square kilometers (94,250 square miles) and is entirely within Libya. One composite total petroleum system (TPS) was defined for this assessment; it extends from Libya westward into adjacent parts of Algeria and southern Tunisia. The Hamra Basin part of the TPS was subdivided into four assessment units for the purpose of resource assessment. The assessment units cover only 172,390 square kilometers of the Hamra Basin Province; the remaining area has little potential for undiscovered petroleum resources because of the absence of petroleum source rocks. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 784 million barrels of crude oil, 4,748 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 381 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Hamra Basin of northwestern Libya. Most of the undiscovered crude oil and natural gas are interpreted to be in deeper parts of the Hamra Basin.

Geological Survey (U.S)

2007-01-01

264

U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative-2009 Annual Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the second report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. The first report described work activities for 2007 and 2008; this report covers work activities conducted in 2009. Important differences between the two reports are that (1) this report does not lump all the Effectiveness Monitoring activities together as last year's report did, which will allow WLCI partners and other readers to fully appreciate the scope and accomplishments of those activities, and (2) this report does not include a comprehensive appendix of the background details for each work activity. In 2009, there were 29 ongoing or completed activities, and there were 5 new work activities conducted under the 5 original major multi-disciplinary science and technical assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis; (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research; (3) Data and Information Management; (4) Integration and Coordination; and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. New work included (1) developing a soil-quality index, (2) developing methods for assessing levels of and relationships between mercury and soil organic matter, and (3) ascertaining element source, mobility, and fate. Additionally, (4) remotely sensed imagery was used to assess vegetation as an indicator of soil condition and geology, and (5) an Integrated Assessment (IA) was initiated to synthesize what has been learned about WLCI systems to date, and to develop associated decision tools, maps, and a comprehensive report.

Bowen, Z. H.; Aldridge, C. L.; Anderson, P. J.; Assal, T. J.; Biewick, L. R. H.; Blecker, S. W.; Bristol, S.; Carr, N. B.; Chalfoun, A. D.; Chong, G. W.; Diffendorfer, J. E.; Fedy, B. C.; Garman, S. L.; Germaine, S.; Grauch, R. I.; Holloway, J.; Homer, C.; Kauffman, M. J.; Keinath, D.; Latysh, N.; Manier, D.; McDougal, R. R.; Melcher, C. P.; Miller, K. A.; Montag, J.; Nutt, C. J.; Potter, C. J.; Sawyer, H.; Schell, S.; Shafer, S. L.; Smith, D. B.; Stillings, L. L.; Tuttle, M.; Wilson, A. B.

2010-01-01

265

CRIB; the mineral resources data bank of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The recently established Computerized Resources Information Bank (CRIB) of the U.S. Geological Survey is expected to play an increasingly important role in the study of United States' mineral resources. CRIB provides a rapid means for organizing and summarizing information on mineral resources and for displaying the results. CRIB consists of a set of variable-length records containing the basic information needed to characterize one or more mineral commodities, a mineral deposit, or several related deposits. The information consists of text, numeric data, and codes. Some topics covered are: name, location, commodity information, geology, production, reserves, potential resources, and references. The data are processed by the GIPSY program, which performs all the processing tasks needed to build, operate, and maintain the CRIB file. The sophisticated retrieval program allows the user to make highly selective searches of the files for words, parts of words, phrases, numeric data, word ranges, numeric ranges, and others, and to interrelate variables by logic statements to any degree of refinement desired. Three print options are available, or the retrieved data can be passed to another program for further processing.

Calkins, James Alfred; Kays, Olaf; Keefer, Eleanor K.

1973-01-01

266

The U.S. Geological Survey mapping and cartographic database activities, 2006-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began systematic topographic mapping of the United States in the 1880s, beginning with scales of 1:250,000 and 1:125,000 in support of geological mapping. Responding to the need for higher resolution and more detail, the 1:62,500-scale, 15-minute, topographic map series was begun in the beginning of the 20th century. Finally, in the 1950s the USGS adopted the 1:24,000-scale, 7.5-minute topographic map series to portray even more detail, completing the coverage of the conterminous 48 states of the United States with this series in 1992. In 2001, the USGS developed the vision and concept of The National Map, a topographic database for the 21st century and the source for a new generation of topographic maps (http://nationalmap.gov/). In 2008, the initial production of those maps began with a 1:24,000-scale digital product. In a separate, but related project, the USGS began scanning the existing inventory of historical topographic maps at all scales to accompany the new topographic maps. The USGS also had developed a digital database of The National Atlas of the United States. The digital version of Atlas is now Web-available and supports a mapping engine for small scale maps of the United States and North America. These three efforts define topographic mapping activities of the USGS during the last few years and are discussed below.

Craun, Kari J.; Donnelly, John P.; Allord, Gregory J.

2011-01-01

267

Availability of Earth observations data from the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS data center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For decades federal and state agencies have been collecting regional, continental, and global Earth observations data acquired by satellites, aircraft, and other information-gathering systems. These data include photographic and digital remotely sensed images of the Earth's surface, as well as earth science, cartographic, and geographic data. Since 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center (EDC) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has been a data management, production, dissemination, and research center for these data. Currently, the Data Center holds over 10 million satellite images and aerial photographs, in photographic and digital formats. Users are able to place inquiries and orders for these holdings via a nationwide computer network. In addition to cataloging the data stored in its archives, the Data Center provides users with rapid access to information on many data collections held by other facilities.

Holm, Thomas M.; Draeger, William C.; Risty, Ronald R.

1993-01-01

268

Stream-Network navigation in the U.S. geological survey streamStats web application  

USGS Publications Warehouse

StreamStats is a U.S. Geological Survey Webbased geographic information systems application developed as a tool for water-resources planning and management, engineering design, and other applications. The primary functionality of StreamStats allows users to obtain drainage-basin boundaries, basin characteristics, and streamflow statistics for gaged and ungaged sites. Recently, tools that allow stream-network navigation were added to StreamStats. These tools allow users to select any point along a stream and locate activities upstream and downstream from the selected point, such as streamgaging stations, dams, and point-source discharges, and obtain information about such activities. Users also can obtain stream-reach addresses and estimates of streamflow statistics for the selected points.

Ries, K. G.; Steeves, P. A.; Guthrie, J. D.; Rea, A. H.; Stewart, D. W.

2009-01-01

269

United States Geological Survey fire science--Fire danger monitoring and forecasting  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Each day, the U.S. Geological Survey produces 7-day forecasts for all Federal lands of the distributions of number of ignitions, number of fires above a given size, and conditional probabilities of fires growing larger than a specified size. The large fire probability map is an estimate of the likelihood that ignitions will become large fires. The large fire forecast map is a probability estimate of the number of fires on federal lands exceeding 100 acres in the forthcoming week. The ignition forecast map is a probability estimate of the number of fires on Federal land greater than 1 acre in the forthcoming week. The extreme event forecast is the probability estimate of the number of fires on Federal land that may exceed 5,000 acres in the forthcoming week.

Eidenshink, Jeff C.; Howard, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

270

A statistical summary of data from the U.S. Geological Survey's national water quality networks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Operates two nationwide networks to monitor water quality, the National Hydrologic Bench-Mark Network and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN). The Bench-Mark network is composed of 51 stations in small drainage basins which are as close as possible to their natural state, with no human influence and little likelihood of future development. Stations in the NASQAN program are located to monitor flow from accounting units (subregional drainage basins) which collectively encompass the entire land surface of the nation. Data collected at both networks include streamflow, concentrations of major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and trace metals. The goals of the two water quality sampling programs include the determination of mean constituent concentrations and transport rates as well as the analysis of long-term trends in those variables. This report presents a station-by-station statistical summary of data from the two networks for the period 1974 through 1981. (Author 's abstract)

Smith, R. A.; Alexander, R. B.

1983-01-01

271

The US Geological Survey's National Mapping Division programs, products, and services that can support wetlands mapping  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey (USGS) programs can play an important role in support of President Bush's policy of no net loss of wetlands. A principal goal of USGS is to provide cartographic information that contributes to the wise management of the Nation's natural resources. This information consists of maps, cartographic data bases (graphic and digital), remotely sensed imagery, and information services. These products are used by Federal, State, and local governments, the private sector, and individual citizens in making decisions on the existence and use of land and water resources. I discuss the programs, products, and information services of the National Mapping Division, the tools available to determine where wetlands exist, and the capability of periodic measurement of wetlands to help in assessing compliance with the concept of no net loss of wetlands. -from Author

Baxter, F. S.

1990-01-01

272

Strategic plan for science-U.S. Geological Survey, Ohio Water Science Center, 2010-15  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Science Plan identifies specific scientific and technical programmatic issues of current importance to Ohio and the Nation. An examination of those issues yielded a set of five major focus areas with associated science goals and strategies that the Ohio Water Science Center will emphasize in its program during 2010-15. A primary goal of the Science Plan is to establish a relevant multidisciplinary scientific and technical program that generates high-quality products that meet or exceed the expectations of our partners while supporting the goals and initiatives of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Science Plan will be used to set the direction of new and existing programs and will influence future training and hiring decisions by the Ohio Water Science Center.

U.S. Geological Survey

2010-01-01

273

Status of ground-water modeling in the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is active in the development and use of models for the analysis of various types of ground-water problems. Types of problems for which models have been, or are being, developed include: (1) ground-water flow in saturated or partially unsaturated materials, (2) land subsidence resulting from ground-water extraction, (3) flow in coupled ground water-stream systems, (4) coupling of rainfall-runoff basin models with soil moisture accounting and aquifer flow models, (5) interaction of economic and hydrologic considerations, (6) predicting the transport of contaminants in an aquifer, and (7) estimating the effects of proposed development schemes for geothermal systems. The status of modeling activity for various models is reported as being in a developmental, verification, operational, or continued improvement phase. Recently published references that provide useful details on the characteristics of the models are identified. (Woodard-USGS)

Appel, Charles A.; Bredehoeft, J. D.

1976-01-01

274

A user interface for the Kansas Geological Survey slug test model.  

PubMed

The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) developed a semianalytical solution for slug tests that incorporates the effects of partial penetration, anisotropy, and the presence of variable conductivity well skins. The solution can simulate either confined or unconfined conditions. The original model, written in FORTRAN, has a text-based interface with rigid input requirements and limited output options. We re-created the main routine for the KGS model as a Visual Basic macro that runs in most versions of Microsoft Excel and built a simple-to-use Excel spreadsheet interface that automatically displays the graphical results of the test. A comparison of the output from the original FORTRAN code to that of the new Excel spreadsheet version for three cases produced identical results. PMID:19583592

Esling, Steven P; Keller, John E

2009-01-01

275

McNutt Outlines Priorities for the U.S. Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Marcia McNutt, the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and science advisor to the secretary of the interior, the clock is ticking. “Everyone feels that we have perhaps 3 years in which a very ambitious agenda needs to be accomplished,” McNutt told Eos in a recent exclusive interview. “We want to make sure by the end of [U.S. President Obama's] first term we have got significant accomplishments on issues such as climate change, environment, and energy, and other things that are important to the president.” “Everything is on a fast track to move quickly,” she said. “Everything had to be done yesterday, if not last week.” While the political process often requires immediate scientific information, the scientific process can take a bit longer, McNutt said, noting that it is fortunate research at the USGS has persisted in many areas.

Showstack, Randy

2010-01-01

276

U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000: Description and Results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The set of 4 CD-ROM discs, documents the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and includes estimates of the quantities of conventional oil, gas, and natural gas liquids outside the United States that have the potential to be added to reserves in the next 30 years (1995 to 2025). Two components, undiscovered resources and reserve growth, are estimated. One hundred and forty nine total petroleum systems and two hundred and forty six assessment units (subdivisions of total petroleum systems) were assessed. The supporting maps, data, text and tables produced by the World Energy Assessment Team during this five-year project (1995-2000) are included in the set.

USGS World Energy Assessment Team

2000-01-01

277

U.S. Geological Survey Methodology Development for Ecological Carbon Assessment and Monitoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ecological carbon sequestration refers to transfer and storage of atmospheric carbon in vegetation, soils, and aquatic environments to help offset the net increase from carbon emissions. Understanding capacities, associated opportunities, and risks of vegetated ecosystems to sequester carbon provides science information to support formulation of policies governing climate change mitigation, adaptation, and land-management strategies. Section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 mandates the Department of the Interior to develop a methodology and assess the capacity of our nation's ecosystems for ecological carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas (GHG) flux mitigation. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) LandCarbon Project is responding to the Department of Interior's request to develop a methodology that meets specific EISA requirements.

Zhu, Zhiliang; Stackpoole, S. M.

2009-01-01

278

Proposed Budget for U.S. Geological Survey: A Mixed Bag of Increases and Cuts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2012 budget, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) would receive $1.1 billion, a scant $6.1 million more than the 2010 enacted budget. Within the agency, which is part of the Department of the Interior (DOI), some key initiatives slated for new or increased funding include the National Land Imaging Program, the USGS portion of the America's Great Outdoors Initiative, and DOI Climate Science Centers. However, the request also includes $89.1 million in program reductions and the elimination of some programs. With Congress currently considering a budget continuing resolution to fund the federal government through the end of the current fiscal year, 2011, USGS faces possible additional cuts.

Showstack, Randy

2011-03-01

279

U.S. Geological Survey budget would increase but includes targeted cuts to some key programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Obama administration's proposed budget for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for fiscal year (FY) 2013 is $1.1 billion, $34.5 million (3.2%) above the Agency's 2012 enacted level. The budget includes $73.2 million in targeted increases but also has $49.5 million in proposed reductions, including cuts to some water and minerals programs and other areas. Funding for the budget was prioritized to maintain programs that are legislatively mandated, that are important for protecting lives and human property, and that are among the Obama administration's key emphases. These include research and development, which the administration believes will help end the economic recession, USGS director Marcia McNutt said at a 14 February briefing.

Showstack, Randy

2012-03-01

280

U.S. Geological Survey ArcMap Sediment Classification Tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

OVERVIEW The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ArcMap Sediment Classification tool is a custom toolbar that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) ArcGIS 9.2 Desktop application to aid in the analysis of seabed sediment classification. The tool uses as input either a point data layer with field attributes containing percentage of gravel, sand, silt, and clay or four raster data layers representing a percentage of sediment (0-100%) for the various sediment grain size analysis: sand, gravel, silt and clay. This tool is designed to analyze the percent of sediment at a given location and classify the sediments according to either the Folk (1954, 1974) or Shepard (1954) as modified by Schlee(1973) classification schemes. The sediment analysis tool is based upon the USGS SEDCLASS program (Poppe, et al. 2004).

O'Malley, John

2007-01-01

281

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region Kasatochi Volcano Coastal and Ocean Science  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alaska is noteworthy as a region of frequent seismic and volcanic activity. The region contains 52 historically active volcanoes, 14 of which have had at least one major eruptive event since 1990. Despite the high frequency of volcanic activity in Alaska, comprehensive studies of how ecosystems respond to volcanic eruptions are non-existent. On August 7, 2008, Kasatochi Volcano, in the central Aleutian Islands, erupted catastrophically, covering the island with ash and hot pyroclastic flow material. Kasatochi Island was an annual monitoring site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR); therefore, features of the terrestrial and nearshore ecosystems of the island were well known. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), AMNWR, and University of Alaska Fairbanks began long-term studies to better understand the effects of the eruption and the role of volcanism in structuring ecosystems in the Aleutian Islands, a volcano-dominated region with high natural resource values.

DeGange, Anthony

2010-01-01

282

U.S. Geological Survey programs and investigations related to soil and water conservation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics related to streamflow and reservoir storage; development and application of models of rainfall-runoff relations, chemical quality, and sediment movement; and studies of the interactive processes of overland and channel flow with vegetation. Networks of streamgaging stations and (or) sampling sites within numerous drainage basins are yielding information that extends databases and enhances the ability to use those data for interpretive studies.

Osterkamp, W. R.; Gray, J. R.

2001-01-01

283

Landsat Image Map Production Methods at the U. S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To maintain consistently high quality in satellite image map production, the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed standard procedures for the photographic and digital production of Landsat image mosaics, and for lithographic printing of multispectral imagery. This paper gives a brief review of the photographic, digital, and lithographic procedures currently in use for producing image maps from Landsat data. It is shown that consistency in the printing of image maps is achieved by standardizing the materials and procedures that affect the image detail and color balance of the final product. Densitometric standards are established by printing control targets using the pressplates, inks, pre-press proofs, and paper to be used for printing.

Kidwell, R. D.; Binnie, D. R.; Martin, S.

1987-01-01

284

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives - Fiscal Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities.

Marcus, Susan M.

2008-01-01

285

Quaternary geologic map of the Lake Erie 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Erie 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

edited by Fullerton, David S.; Richmond, Gerald M.; state compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Cowan, W. R.; Sevon, W. D.; Goldthwait, R. P.; Farrand, W. R.; Muller, E. H.; Behling, R. E.; Stravers, J. A.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.; Richmond, Gerald Martin

1991-01-01

286

Quaternary geologic map of the Hudson River 4 degree x 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Hudson River 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

State and province compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Sevon, William D.; Muller, Ernest H.; Judson, Sheldon; Black, Robert F.; Wagner, Phillip W.; Hartshorn, Joseph H.; Chapman, William F.; Cowan, William D.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.

1992-01-01

287

SIX MORE QUASARS AT REDSHIFT 6 DISCOVERED BY THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present imaging and spectroscopic observations for six quasars at z {>=} 5.9 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS). The CFHQS contains subsurveys with a range of flux and area combinations to sample a wide range of quasar luminosities at z {approx} 6. The new quasars have luminosities 10-75 times lower than the most luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at this redshift. The least luminous quasar, CFHQS J0216-0455 at z = 6.01, has absolute magnitude M {sub 1450} = -22.21, well below the likely break in the luminosity function. This quasar is not detected in a deep XMM-Newton survey showing that optical selection is still a very efficient tool for finding high-redshift quasars.

Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Rd., Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Delorme, Philippe; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, Observatoire de Grenoble, Universite J. Fourier, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Reyle, Celine [Institut Utinam, Observatoire de Besancon, Universite de Franche-Comte, BP1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Albert, Loic [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); McLure, Ross J. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: chris.willott@nrc.ca

2009-03-15

288

United States geological survey's reserve-growth models and their implementation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The USGS has developed several mathematical models to forecast reserve growth of fields both in the United States (U.S.) and the world. The models are based on historical reserve growth patterns of fields in the U.S. The patterns of past reserve growth are extrapolated to forecast future reserve growth. Changes of individual field sizes through time are extremely variable, therefore, the reserve growth models take on a statistical approach whereby volumetric changes for populations of fields are used in the models. Field age serves as a measure of the field-development effort that is applied to promote reserve growth. At the time of the USGS World Petroleum Assessment 2000, a reserve growth model for discovered fields of the world was not available. Reserve growth forecasts, therefore, were made based on a model of historical reserve growth of fields of the U.S. To test the feasibility of such an application, reserve growth forecasts were made of 186 giant oil fields of the world (excluding the U.S. and Canada). In addition, forecasts were made for these giant oil fields subdivided into those located in and outside of Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The model provided a reserve-growth forecast that closely matched the actual reserve growth that occurred from 1981 through 1996 for the 186 fields as a whole, as well as for both OPEC and non-OPEC subdivisions, despite the differences in reserves definition among the fields of the U.S. and the rest of the world. ?? 2005 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Klett, T. R.

2005-01-01

289

Rules for the preparation of manuscript and illustrations designed for publication by the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the annual report of the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey for 1885-'86, pages 40 and 41, you set forth the functions of the chief of the editorial division as follows: "To secure clear and accurate statement in the material sent to press, careful proof-reading, and uniformity in the details of book-making, as well as to assist the Director in exercising a general supervision over the publications of the Survey."

Hampson, Thomas

1888-01-01

290

U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the "quantity of resource" and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource are obtained. Distributions and their properties are established for each of the following resources: (1) oil and nonassociated gas from estimates of the probability of the resource being present and the conditional probability distribution of the quantity of resource given that the resource is present, (2) associated-dissolved gas from its corresponding oil distribution, (3) total gas, (4) oil and total gas in two or more provinces. Computer graphics routines are illustrated with examples from the U.S. Geological Survey Circular 860. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Crovelli, R. A.

1984-01-01

291

U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: 2002-03 Field Season.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapping program in Antarctica is one of the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). This is the 53rd U.S. expedition to Antarctica in which USGS scientists have participated. Th...

J. G. Ferrigno R. S. Williams T. K. Meunier

2006-01-01

292

Results and Interpretations of U.S. Geological Survey Data Collected in and Around the Tuba City Open Dump, Arizona.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Open-File Report was originally an Administrative Report presentation to the Bureau of Indian Affairs based on U.S. Geological Survey data that has been collected and presented in four previous reports (Open-File Reports 2009-1020, 2008-1380, and 200...

J. K. Otton R. H. Johnson R. J. Horton

2009-01-01

293

A history of the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey: vol. VIII 1979-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mission of the Water Resources Division (WAD) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to provide the hydrologic information and understanding needed for the optimum use and management of the Nation·s water resources for the overall benefit of the people of the United States.

Blakey,James F.; Biesecker, James E.; Feltz, Herman R.; Kantrowitz, Irwin H.; Yong, Loren E.; et al.

2005-01-01

294

Overview of Rare Earth Element Investigations in Acid Waters of U. S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Watersheds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geochemistry of rare earth element (REE) variations in acid waters is being studied as part of the U. S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative in two pilot watersheds, upper Animas, Colorado and Boulder, Montana. The following objectives are under investigation: (1) comparison of acid mine waters and naturally acidic springs, (2) determination of whether the dominant control on

Philip L. Verplanck; D. Kirk Nordstrom; Howard E. Taylor

295

U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: 1995-96 Field Season.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapping program in Antarctica is one of the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). This is the 46th U.S. expedition to Antarctica in which USGS scientists have participated. Th...

J. G. Ferrigno R. S. Williams T. K. Meunier

2006-01-01

296

Sediment Quality-Assurance Plan for the New Mexico Water Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes a sediment quality-assurance plan for the U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Water Science Center (WSC), to assure that standard procedures for collecting, storing, shipping, and processing are followed. The plan also serves as a guide for all WSC personnel involved in sediment activities.

Stiles, J.; Roark, D. Michael

2007-01-01

297

Fold-Related Fractures and Postfolding Fracturing, Rock Mass Condition Analyses and Geological Modelling in Turtle Mountain (Alberta Canada).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Turtle Mountain is located in the Foothills in southwest Alberta and is formed by highly fractured Paleozoic carbonates rocks and Mesozoic clastic rocks. This area is mainly affected by two major geological structures that are the Turtle Mountain anticline and the Turtle Mountain thrust. This site has become famous after a 30 M m3 rock avalanche of massive limestone and dolostone affecting the eastern mountainside of Turtle Mountain on April 1903. This resulted in more than 70 casualties and buried part of the Frank village. A detailed analysis of predisposing factors leading to failure has been performed using a structural and rock mass condition field analysis (geological and geotechnical mapping, rock mass classification, Schmidt hammer). In addition remote sensing analyses have been provided (High Resolution Digital Elevation Model, Coltop 3D software). The local variations of discontinuity sets and rock mass conditions has been estimated in order to separate the study zone into homogenous structural domains and to correlate them with unstable areas (volumes and failure mechanisms). The aim of this study is to build a theoretical model that shows the relationship between the anticline geometry and the fracturating density. It should be able to determine the origin and the chronology of the discontinuity sets in relation to the tectonic phases (mainly the folding one). A 3D geological model based on several geological profiles performed perpendicular to the Turtle Mountain anticline is necessary to make a detailed analysis. The preliminary results indicate the role of discontinuity sets in the failure mechanisms of the mountain. Moreover if some sets only appear in one limb of the anticline, some others are present in both limbs indicating their posteriority compared with the first ones. Furthermore, a relation between the distance to the fold axis and the quality of the rock mass (Geological Strength Index) has been statistically pointed out, illustrating the influence of the high fracturing density of the hinge area on the weathering of the mountain. In fact, we can easily expect in carbonate rocks, that the denser the fracturing is, the stronger the chemical weathering occur. Consequently the GSI values are smaller in the hinge area than in the outer zones. The GSI values are interpolated using Cokrieging producing a map that shows this relation.

Humair, Florian; Epard, Jean-Luc; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Pedrazzini, Andrea; Froese, Corey

2010-05-01

298

Mental Health Services for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Canada: Findings from a National Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: People with intellectual disabilities are known to have a high prevalence of mental health problems but few studies have considered how such mental health problems are addressed in Canada. The purpose of the present study was to document both the range of mental health services available to individuals with intellectual disabilities…

Lunsky, Y.; Garcin, N.; Morin, D.; Cobigo, V.; Bradley, E.

2007-01-01

299

Survey of bottled drinking water sold in Canada. Part 2. Selected volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selected volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants were determined in 182 samples of retail bottled waters purchased in Canada. Samples included spring water (86) packaged in containers of polyethylene or in smaller containers of transparent plastic or glass, mineral water (61) packaged only in transparent plastic or glass, and miscellaneous bottled waters (35). Analyses were performed by 3 laboratories, each using

B. D. Page; H. B. S. Conacher; J. Salminen

1993-01-01

300

Geologic survey in the south-central region of Mato Grosso  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The field observations made in the Cuiaba Project area are described. Many geologic cross-sections were done in which the stratigraphic units and the geologic structures defined in the literature and observed in the LANDSAT MSS imagery were recognized.

Parada, N. D. J. (principal investigator); Balieiro, M. G.

1983-01-01

301

Archive of U.S. Geological Survey selected single-beam bathymetry datasets, 1969-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New national programs, as well as natural and man-made disasters, have raised awareness about the need to find new and improved ways to share information about the coastal and marine environment with a wide-ranging public audience. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) has begun a large-scale effort to incorporate the program's published, digital geophysical data into a single point of access known as the Coastal and Marine Geoscience Data System (CMGDS) (http://cmgds.marine.usgs.gov/). To aid in data discovery, work is also being done to import CMGP data into highly visible data and information resources, such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and two widely used Earth-science tools, GeoMapApp (GMA) (http://www.geomapapp.org) and Virtual Ocean (VO) (http://www.virtualocean.org/). This task of the CMGP Integrated Data Management System project will help support information exchange with partners, regional planning groups, and the public, as well as facilitate integrated spatial-data analysis. Sharing USGS-CMGP geophysical data via CMGDS, NGDC, GMA, and VO will aid data discovery and enable the data to support new purposes beyond those for which the data were originally intended. In order to make data available to NGDC, and from there into GMA and VO, the data must be reformatted into a standard exchange format and published. In 1977, a group of geophysical data managers from the public and private sectors developed the MGD77 format as the standard exchange format for geophysical data. In 2010, a tab-delimited version of the format was added as MGD77T (Hittelman and others, 1977). The MGD77T geophysical data format can include bathymetry, magnetics, gravity, and seismic navigation data. It is used for the transmission of data between marine institutions, data centers, and can be used by various software programs as an exchange format. A header (documentation) file and data file are created for each survey (Hittelman and others, 1977). More details about the MGD77T format are available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/dat/geodas/docs/mgd77.pdf (74MB PDF). This archive describes the detailed steps used to convert single-beam bathymetry and navigation files into the MGD77T format (Hittelman and others, 1977) for submission to NGDC and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) (http://www.fgdc.gov/metadata) metadata as a publication of these single-beam bathymetry datasets.

Schreppel, Heather A.; Degnan, Carolyn H.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Metzger, Dan R.

2013-01-01

302

Limitations Influencing Interventional Radiology in Canada: Results of a National Survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonly performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty.

O'Brien, Jeremy [University of Western Ontario, Schulich School of Medicine (Canada); Baerlocher, Mark Otto [University of Toronto, Radiology Residency Program (Canada)], E-mail: mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca; Asch, Murray R. [Lakeridge Health Corporation (Canada); Hayeems, Eran; Kachura, John R. [Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, University Health Network (Canada); Collingwood, Peter [Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada)

2007-09-15

303

Canada-France Redshift Survey. XIV. Spectral Properties of Field Galaxies up to z = 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectral properties of more than 400 Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS) galaxies and their changes over the redshift interval 0 <= z <= 1.3 are investigated. Emission-line intensities and equivalent widths for accessible lines have been measured, as well as continuum color indices based on 200 Å wide spectral regions. Within the CFRS sample, the comoving fraction of galaxies with significant emission lines [W0(O II) > 15 Å] increases from about 13% locally to over 50% at z > 0.5. The fraction of luminous (MB < -20) quiescent galaxies (those without [O II] 3727 emission) decreases with redshift from 53% at z = 0.3 to 23% at z > 0.5, the latter fraction being similar to that of early-type galaxies at that redshift. There is considerable evidence in the data presented here that star formation increases from z = 0 to z > 0.5 in disk galaxies. However, the absence of extremely blue colors and the presence of significant Balmer absorption suggests that the star formation is primarily taking place over long periods of time, rather than in short-duration, high-amplitude ``bursts.'' There are several indications that the average metallicity and dust opacity were lower in emission-line galaxies at high redshift than those typically seen in luminous galaxies locally. Beyond z = 0.7, almost all the emission-line galaxies, including the most luminous (at 1 ?m at rest) ones, have colors approaching those of present-day irregular galaxies, and one-third of them have indications (primarily from the strength of the 4000 Å break) of metallicities significantly less than solar (Z < 0.2 Z?). It is argued that changes in metallicity and dust extinction could be contributing to the observed evolution of the line and continuum luminosity densities, the luminosity function, and/or the surface brightnesses and morphologies of galaxies in the CFRS. If the Kennicutt (1992) relation is used to convert the large increase in the comoving luminosity density of [O II] 3727 back to z ~ 1 into a star formation rate, then it implies a present stellar mass density in excess of that observed locally. This result suggests that the Kennicutt relation is inappropriate for the CFRS objects, perhaps because of the changes in their metallicities and dust opacities and/or in their initial mass functions. Using the Gallagher et al. (1989) relation for objects having colors of irregular galaxies reduces the production of long-lived stars since z = 1 to 75% of the present-day value. More complex mechanisms are probably responsible for changes seen in the emission-line ratios of H II regions in CFRS galaxies, which show higher ionization parameters than local H II galaxy ones. This change could be due to a higher ionizing efficiency of the photons from hot stars in galaxies at high redshift.

Hammer, F.; Flores, H.; Lilly, S. J.; Crampton, David; Le Fèvre, O.; Rola, C.; Mallen-Ornelas, G.; Schade, D.; Tresse, L.

1997-05-01

304

Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 069  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education…

King, Darren; Eisl-Culkin, Judy; Desjardins, Louise

2008-01-01

305

Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program: 2004-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides a broad range of national expertise in geography, geology, hydrology, and biology. The mission of the USGS is to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; assist others in managing water, biological, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect quality of life. The USGS places a special emphasis on providing science to the land and resource management bureaus of the Department of the Interior (DOI). The Biological Resources Discipline activities assist in maintaining healthy ecosystems and natural resources so that these habitats can continue to provide food, energy, medicine, transportation, and recreation.

Dresler, Paul V.; Bartish, Timothy M.

2004-01-01

306

Aquifer descriptions from the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program, 1978-1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began in 1978. The overall purpose of this program is to define the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical framework of the Nation's most important aquifers and aquifer systems. This report summarizes the aquifer or aquifer system name, geographic area, rock units, equivalent names, lithology, thickness, hydrologic characteristics, water quality, water use, and references for 157 aquifers in 23 areas of the United States. A .zip file containing the aquifer data and data search programs (in compressed ASCII format) is included in the report.

Davidson, Claire B.; Doherty, Helen

1994-01-01

307

Geomatics Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of Natural Resources Canada, Geomatics Canada provides "a reliable system of surveys, maps, remotely sensed data and geographically referenced information describing the Canadian landmass." Although many of the hundreds of graphic products listed at the site are not free of charge, the Website nevertheless provides a useful service by organizing and centralizing graphic data, providing color (browse-only) images of the available data, and giving a clear overview of the centers and divisions responsible for creating specific information (e.g., remote sensing images, geodetic survey data), as well as links to other graphic information hubs (e.g., GeoConnections). For anyone seeking graphic images of Canada, this is an excellent resource.

308

Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water quality monitoring networks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A nationally consistent and well-documented collection of water quality and quantity data compiled during the past 30 years for streams and rivers in the United States is now available on CD-ROM and accessible over the World Wide Web. The data include measurements from two U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national networks for 122 physical, chemical, and biological properties of water collected at 680 monitoring stations from 1962 to 1995, quality assurance information that describes the sample collection agencies, laboratories, analytical methods, and estimates of laboratory measurement error (bias and variance), and information on selected cultural and natural characteristics of the station watersheds. The data are easily accessed via user-supplied software including Web browser, spreadsheet, and word processor, or may be queried and printed according to user-specified criteria using the supplied retrieval software on CD-ROM. The water quality data serve a variety of scientific uses including research and educational applications related to trend detection, flux estimation, investigations of the effects of the natural environment and cultural sources on water quality, and the development of statistical methods for designing efficient monitoring networks and interpreting water resources data.

Alexander, R. B.; Slack, J. R.; Ludtke, A. S.; Fitzgerald, K. K.; Schertz, T. L.

1998-01-01

309

Using U.S. Geological Survey data in material flow analysis: An introduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A few sources of basic data on worldwide raw materials production and consumption exist that are independently developed and freely available to the public. This column is an introduction to the types of information available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and explains how the data are assembled. The kind of information prepared by the USGS is essential to U.S. materials flow studies because the data make it possible to conduct these studies within a global context. The data include primary and secondary (scrap) production, consumption and stocks (mostly limited to the United States unless calculated), trade (not readily available for all countries), and prices for more than 80 mineral commodities. Materials flow studies by USGS specialists using these data are continuing (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/mflow/). Figure 1 shows from where the data are collected and where they are used. Minerals information was downloaded by users 5.8 million times from USGS minerals information Web pages in 2008.

Sibley, S. F.

2009-01-01

310

Performance Audit of the U.S. Geological Survey, Energy Resource Program Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A performance audit of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Energy Resource Program (ERP) Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory (IGL) was conducted between August, 2003 and October, 2005. The goals were to ensure that a high level of analytical performance was maintained and identify any areas that could be enhanced. The audit was subdivided into three phases. Phase 1 was a preliminary assessment of current performance based on recent performance on CANSPEX samples. IGL performance was also compared to laboratories world-wide with similar scope. Phase 2 consisted of the implementation of the recommended changes made in Phase 1. Phase 3 of the audit consisted of a reassessment effort to evaluate the effectiveness of the recommendations made in the Phase 1 and an on-site audit of the laboratory facilities. Phases 1 and 3 required summary reports that are included in Appendices A and B of this report. The audit found that the IGL was one of the top two laboratories compared for trace element analyses. Several recommendations to enhance performance on major and minor elemental parameters were made and implemented. Demonstrated performance improvements as a result of the recommended changes were documented. Several initiatives to sustain the performance improvements gained from the audit have been implemented.

Luppens, James A; Janke, Louis G.; McCord, Jamey D.; Bullock, John H.; Brazeau, Lisa; Affronter, Ronald H.

2007-01-01

311

The U.S. Geological Survey cartographic and geographic information science research activities 2006-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produces geospatial databases and topographic maps for the United States of America. A part of that mission includes conducting research in geographic information science (GIScience) and cartography to support mapping and improve the design, quality, delivery, and use of geospatial data and topographic maps. The Center of Excellence for Geospatial Information Science (CEGIS) was established by the USGS in January 2006 as a part of the National Geospatial Program Office. CEGIS (http://cegis.usgs.gov) evolved from a team of cartographic researchers at the Mid-Continent Mapping Center. The team became known as the Cartographic Research group and was supported by the Cooperative Topographic Mapping, Geographic Analysis and Monitoring, and Land Remote Sensing programs of the Geography Discipline of the USGS from 1999-2005. In 2006, the Cartographic Research group and its projects (http://carto-research.er.usgs.gov/) became the core of CEGIS staff and research. In 2006, CEGIS research became focused on The National Map (http://nationalmap.gov).

Usery, E. Lynn

2011-01-01

312

U.S. Geological Survey community for data integration: data upload, registry, and access tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As a leading science and information agency and in fulfillment of its mission to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ensures that all scientific data are effectively hosted, adequately described, and appropriately accessible to scientists, collaborators, and the general public. To succeed in this task, the USGS established the Community for Data Integration (CDI) to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. Through the CDI, the USGS is providing data and metadata management tools, cyber infrastructure, collaboration tools, and training in support of scientists and technology specialists throughout the project life cycle. One of the significant tools recently created to contribute to this mission is the Uploader tool. This tool allows scientists with limited data management resources to address many of the key aspects of the data life cycle: the ability to protect, preserve, publish and share data. By implementing this application inside ScienceBase, scientists also can take advantage of other collaboration capabilities provided by the ScienceBase platform.

Fort Collins Science Center Web Applications Team

2012-01-01

313

Water resources program of the U.S. Geological Survey related to agriculture in Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surveillance activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Louisiana District include long-term, hydrologic-data-collection sites that serve a current-purpose, management function and (or) that furnish a data base for interpretative studies. The proposed program for 1982 includes a network of 69 surface-water data sites (continuous gaging stations), 250 flood-data sites (crest-stage stations), 679 ground-water wells (water-level observation and water-quality monitor wells), and 138 water-quality sites. The geographic distribution of the data sites is shown in the report. Interpretive studies have objectives that are oriented toward a particular geographic area , to a particular set of hydrologic phenomena, or to obtain information for use in solving specific problems. Current studies of interest to agriculture include the following: (1) Flood hydraulics and hydrology, (2) Low-flow or base-flow of streams in Louisiana, (3) Hydrologic studies in southwestern Louisiana, (4) Hydrologic impacts of surface mining in northern Louisiana, (5) Sparta aquifer study, and (6) Limnology of freshwater lakes. A network of partial record sites is also maintained to monitor specific flows. Peak stages (crest stage) are only recorded at sites where flood information is of interest. At other sites, only the low-flow or base-flow recession is obtained for use in determining relations between ground water and surface water, to assess water supply, and for effluent studies. (USGS)

Huntzinger, T. L.

1982-01-01

314

A summary of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the U.S. Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of this evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation 's water resources; (2) define long-term trends (or lack of trends) in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- and water-management practices. (USGS)

Hirsch, R. M.; Alley, W. M.; Wilber, W. G.

1988-01-01

315

Status of surface-water modeling in the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is active in the development and use of models for the analysis of various types of surface-water problems. Types of problems for which models have been, or are being developed, include categories such as the following: (1)specialized hydraulics, (2)flow routing in streams, estuaries, lakes, and reservoirs, (3) sedimentation, (4) transport of physical, chemical, and biological constituents, (5) surface exchange of heat and mass, (6) coupled stream-aquifer flow systems, (7) physical hydrology for rainfall-runoff relations, stream-system simulations, channel geometry, and water quality, (8) statistical hydrology for synthetic streamflows, floods, droughts, storage, and water quality, (9) management and operation problems, and (10) miscellaneous hydrologic problems. Following a brief review of activities prior to 1970, the current status of surface-water modeling is given as being in a developmental, verification, operational, or continued improvement phase. A list of recently published selected references, provides useful details on the characteristics of models.

Jennings, Marshall E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro

1979-01-01

316

Web services in the U.S. geological survey streamstats web application  

USGS Publications Warehouse

StreamStats is a U.S. Geological Survey Web-based GIS application developed as a tool for waterresources planning and management, engineering design, and other applications. StreamStats' primary functionality allows users to obtain drainage-basin boundaries, basin characteristics, and streamflow statistics for gaged and ungaged sites. Recently, Web services have been developed that provide the capability to remote users and applications to access comprehensive GIS tools that are available in StreamStats, including delineating drainage-basin boundaries, computing basin characteristics, estimating streamflow statistics for user-selected locations, and determining point features that coincide with a National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) reach address. For the state of Kentucky, a web service also has been developed that provides users the ability to estimate daily time series of drainage-basin average values of daily precipitation and temperature. The use of web services allows the user to take full advantage of the datasets and processes behind the Stream Stats application without having to develop and maintain them. ?? 2009 IEEE.

Guthrie, J. D.; Dartiguenave, C.; Ries, III, K. G.

2009-01-01

317

A method for mapping corn using the US Geological Survey 1992 National Land Cover Dataset  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Long-term exposure to elevated nitrate levels in community drinking water supplies has been associated with an elevated risk of several cancers including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, colon cancer, and bladder cancer. To estimate human exposure to nitrate, specific crop type information is needed as fertilizer application rates vary widely by crop type. Corn requires the highest application of nitrogen fertilizer of crops grown in the Midwest US. We developed a method to refine the US Geological Survey National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) (including map and original Landsat images) to distinguish corn from other crops. Overall average agreement between the resulting corn and other row crops class and ground reference data was 0.79 kappa coefficient with individual Landsat images ranging from 0.46 to 0.93 kappa. The highest accuracies occurred in Regions where corn was the single dominant crop (greater than 80.0%) and the crop vegetation conditions at the time of image acquisition were optimum for separation of corn from all other crops. Factors that resulted in lower accuracies included the accuracy of the NLCD map, accuracy of corn areal estimates, crop mixture, crop condition at the time of Landsat overpass, and Landsat scene anomalies. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Maxwell, S. K.; Nuckols, J. R.; Ward, M. H.

2006-01-01

318

U.S. Geological Survey, remote sensing, and geoscience data: Using standards to serve us all  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) advocates the use of standards with geosciences and remotely sensed data and metadata for its own purposes and those of its customers. In activities that range from archiving data to making a product, the incorporation of standards makes these functions repeatable and understandable. More important, when accepted standards are followed, data discovery and sharing can be more efficient and the overall value to society can be expanded. The USGS archives many terabytes of digital geoscience and remotely sensed data. Several million photographs are also available to the research community. To manage these vast holdings and ensure that strict preservation and high usability criteria are observed, the USGS uses standards within the archival, data management, public access and ordering, and data distribution areas. The USGS uses Federal and international standards in performing its role as the U.S. National Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive and in its mission as the long-term archive and production center for aerial photographs and cartographic data covering the United States.

Benson, Michael, G.; Faundeen, John, L.

2000-01-01

319

Integrating quality assurance in project work plans of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's objectives for including quality assurance procedures in a project work plan are to ensure that the quality of the data collected is defined and is appropriate for the objectives of the investigation. The data- quality information can be used in the interpre- tation of the data. A project work plan that includes quality assessment provides definable benefits such as clarity of expectations, a method for obtaining a set of data that is expected and has been proven valid, a documentation trail, products that are produced on time and that meet project objectives, and a decrease in work that is lost or redone. Project chiefs must prepare and can publish the work plan for scientific investigations. An expanded outline of a framework that can be used to prepare a project work plan that includes quality assurance is described in this report and contains the following topics: data-quality objectives; project organization and responsibilities; data collection; data processing; project reviews; data analysis; remedial actions; project progress reports and quality assurance reports to management.

Shampine, W. J.; Pope, L. M.; Koterba, M. T.

1992-01-01

320

Preliminary summary of the 1976 Atlantic Margin Coring Project of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Atlantic Margin Coring Project, 1976, a 60-day expedition to obtain core samples by drilling beneath the floor of the Continental Shelf and Slope of the eastern United States, was carried out in July, August, and September 1976 aboard D/V GLOMAR CONCEPTION. The coring penetrated as much as 310 meters below the sea floor at 19 sites along the continental margin from Georgia to Georges Bank off New England in water depths ranging from 20 to 300 meters; 1,020 meters of material were recovered in 380 cores, ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. One of the major findings was the discovery of relatively fresh water (salinities less than 3 parts per thousand) extending beneath the Continental Shelf as much as 60 nautical miles seaward from the New Jersey coast. Water of about 1 part per thousand salinity was found beneath the shelf more than 7 nautical miles off Ocean City, Maryland and Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey. Analyses for light hydrocarbons in the cores show the highest concentrations (as much as 412,000 ppm) at sites in water depth greater than 200 meters (the shelf-slope break), principally in Pleistocene sediments, although methane concentrations greater than 400,000 ppm also were found in Miocene sediments at one site near the shelf edge. (Woodard-USGS)

Hathaway, John Cummins; Schlee, J. J.; Poag, C. W.; Valentine, P. C.; Weed, E. G. A.; Bothner, M. H.; Kohout, F. A.; Manheim, F. T.; Schloam, R.; Miller, R. E.; Schultz, D. M.

1976-01-01

321

Sudbury project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Summary of results - an updated impact model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1984 the Ontario Geological Survey initiated a research project on the Sudbury structure (SS) in cooperation with the University of Muenster. The project included field mapping (1984-1989) and petrographic, chemical, and isotope analyses of the major stratigraphic units of the SS. Four diploma theses and four doctoral theses were performed during the project (1984-1992). Specific results of the various investigations are reported. Selected areas of the SS were mapped and sampled: Footwall rocks; Footwall breccia and parts of the sublayer and lower section of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC); Onaping Formation and the upper section of the SIC; and Sudbury breccia and adjacent Footwall rocks along extended profiles up to 55 km from the SIC. All these stratigraphic units of the SS were studied in substantial detail by previous workers. The most important characteristic of the previous research is that it was based either on a volcanic model or on a mixed volcanic-impact model for the origin of the SS. The present project was clearly directed toward a test of the impact origin of the SS without invoking an endogenic component. In general, our results confirm the most widely accepted stratigraphic division of the SS. However, our interpretation of some of the major stratigraphic units is different from most views expressed. The stratigraphy of the SS and its new interpretation is given as a basis for discussion.

Avermann, M.; Bischoff, L.; Brockmeyer, P.; Buhl, D.; Deutsch, A.; Dressler, B. O.; Lakomy, R.; Mueller-Mohr, V.; Stoeffler, D.

1992-01-01

322

U.S. Geological Survey Would Fare Well in Proposed Federal Budget  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is among the U.S. federal science agencies that would see significant funding increases if Congress approves the Obama administration's proposed budget for fiscal year (FY) 2011. The FY 2011 budget request would provide USGS with $1.13 billion, an increase of $21.6 million, or 1.9%, above the FY 2010 enacted level. “In a time of budget austerity, to have the budget for a science agency like the USGS actually be at a level above 2010—and 2010 was a pretty good budget year for the USGS—is indeed a very good sign,” USGS director Marcia McNutt said at a 1 February budget briefing. “What we are seeing in the USGS budget is the reflection from both the president and the secretary [of the Department of the Interior, of which USGS is part] of their commitment that the problems that the nation is facing right now are problems to which science can help us find an answer,” she said.

Showstack, Randy

2010-02-01

323

An evaluation of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study compares the additions to conventional crude oil and natural gas reserves as reported from January 1996 to December 2003 with the estimated undiscovered and reserve-growth volumes assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000, which used data current through 1995. Approximately 28% of the estimated additions to oil reserves by reserve growth and approximately 11% of the estimated undiscovered oil volumes were realized in the 8 yr since the assessment (27% of the time frame for the assessment). Slightly more than half of the estimated additions to gas reserves by reserve growth and approximately 10% of the estimated undiscovered gas volumes were realized. Between 1995 and 2003, growth of oil reserves in previously discovered fields exceeded new-field discoveries as a source of global additions to reserves of conventional oil by a ratio of 3:1. The greatest amount of reserve growth for crude oil occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, whereas the greatest contribution from new-field discoveries occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest amount of reserve growth for natural gas occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, whereas the greatest contribution from new-field discoveries occurred in the Asia Pacific region. On an energy-equivalent basis, volumes of new gas-field discoveries exceeded new oil-field discoveries. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

Klett, T. R.; Gautier, D. L.; Ahlbrandt, T. S.

2005-01-01

324

Documentation of the U.S. Geological Survey Oceanographic Time-Series Measurement Database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oceanographic Time-Series Measurements Database contains oceanographic observations made as part of studies designed to increase understanding of sediment transport processes and associated dynamics. Analysis of these data has contributed to more accurate prediction of the movement and fate of sediments and other suspended materials in the coastal ocean. The measurements were collected by investigators at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) and colleagues, beginning in 1975. Most of the field experiments were carried out on the U.S. continental shelf and slope. This report describes the instrumentation and platforms used to make the measurements; the methods used to process, apply quality-control criteria, and archive the data; and the data storage format. The report also includes instructions on how to access the data from the on-line database at http://stellwagen.er.usgs.gov/. As of 2008, the database contains about 4,250 files which may include observations of current velocity, ocean temperature, conductivity, pressure, and light transmission at one or more depths over some duration of time.

Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Martini, Marinna A.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Butman, Bradford

2008-01-01

325

The U.S. Geological Survey Multi-dimensional Surface Water Modeling System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System is a generic Graphical User Interface (GUI) for computational models of flow and transport in channels. The modeling system is intended to provide the operations program of the USGS the tools necessary to study and evaluate surface water issues including: TMDLs, water rights, channel restoration and habitat assessment. The GUI is a standard graphical modeling interface that provides the user with interactive graphical tools for grid generation, managing model-specific attributes and boundary conditions and visualization of results. We use an OpenGL based graphics package to render high-level visualizations both on and off screen. The GUI is generic in the sense that it prescribes a fixed input and output data structure that is sufficiently general to be used by any model of flow or transport from 1-dimensional to multi-dimensional. The generic data structure allows easy incorporation of additional models into the framework. We will present progress on the modeling system to date and discuss future directions and goals.

McDonald, R. R.; Bennett, J. P.; Nelson, J. M.

2001-05-01

326

Analytical methods of the U.S. Geological Survey's New York District Water-Analysis Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The New York District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Troy, N.Y., operates a water-analysis laboratory for USGS watershed-research projects in the Northeast that require analyses of precipitation and of dilute surface water and soil water for major ions; it also provides analyses of certain chemical constituents in soils and soil gas samples. This report presents the methods for chemical analyses of water samples, soil-water samples, and soil-gas samples collected in wateshed-research projects. The introduction describes the general materials and technicques for eachmethod and explains the USGS quality-assurance program and data-management procedures; it also explains the use of cross reference to the three most commonly used methods manuals for analysis of dilute waters. The body of the report describes the analytical procedures for (1) solution analysis, (2) soil analysis, and (3) soil-gas analysis. The methods are presented in alphabetical order by constituent. The method for each constituent is preceded by (1) reference codes for pertinent sections of the three manuals mentioned above, (2) a list of the method's applications, and (3) a summary of the procedure. The methods section for each constitutent contains the following categories: instrumentation and equipment, sample preservation and storage, reagents and standards, analytical procedures, quality control, maintenance, interferences, safety considerations, and references. Sufficient information is presented for each method to allow the resulting data to be appropriately used in environmental samples.

Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; Olson, Mark L.; Waldron, Laura A.

1995-01-01

327

Managing non-response rates for the National Child Safety Seat Survey in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCanada has a Road Safety Vision of having the safest roads in the world, yet vehicle crashes have remained the leading cause of death of Canadian children for a number of years.ObjectivesDetermine the influence of high rates of non-participation on the estimates for correct use of safety seats for child occupants in vehicles. Examine the impact of three different criteria

Tang Yi Wen; Anne W Snowdon; Abdulkadir Hussein; S Ejaz Ahmed

2010-01-01

328

Geological and seismological survey for new design-basis earthquake ground motion of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At about 10:13 on July 16, 2007, a strong earthquake named 'Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake' of Mj6.8 on Japan Meteorological Agencyfs scale occurred offshore Niigata prefecture in Japan. However, all of the nuclear reactors at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station (KKNPS) in Niigata prefecture operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company shut down safely. In other words, automatic safety function composed of shutdown, cooling and containment worked as designed immediately after the earthquake. During the earthquake, the peak acceleration of the ground motion exceeded the design-basis ground motion (DBGM), but the force due to the earthquake applied to safety-significant facilities was about the same as or less than the design basis taken into account as static seismic force. In order to assess anew the safety of nuclear power plants, we have evaluated a new DBGM after conducting geomorphological, geological, geophysical, seismological survey and analyses. [Geomorphological, Geological and Geophysical survey] In the land area, aerial photograph interpretation was performed at least within the 30km radius to extract geographies that could possibly be tectonic reliefs as a geomorphological survey. After that, geological reconnaissance was conducted to confirm whether the extracted landforms are tectonic reliefs or not. Especially we carefully investigated Nagaoka Plain Western Boundary Fault Zone (NPWBFZ), which consists of Kakuda-Yahiko fault, Kihinomiya fault and Katakai fault, because NPWBFZ is the one of the active faults which have potential of Mj8 class in Japan. In addition to the geological survey, seismic reflection prospecting of approximate 120km in total length was completed to evaluate the geological structure of the faults and to assess the consecutiveness of the component faults of NPWBFZ. As a result of geomorphological, geological and geophysical surveys, we evaluated that the three component faults of NPWBFZ are independent to each other from the viewpoint of geological structure, however we have decided to take into consideration simultaneous movement of the three faults which is 91km long in seismic design as a case of uncertainty. In the sea area, we conducted seismic reflection prospecting with sonic wave in the area stretching for about 140km along the coastline and 50km in the direction of perpendicular to the coastline. When we analyze the seismic profiles, we evaluated the activities of faults and foldings carefully on the basis of the way of thinking of 'fault-related-fault' because the sedimentary layers in the offing of Niigata prefecture are very thick and the geological structures are characterized by foldings. As a result of the seismic reflection survey and analyses, we assess that five active faults (foldings) to be taken into consideration to seismic design in the sea area and we evaluated that the F-B fault of 36km will have the largest impact on the KKNPS. [Seismological survey] As a result of analyses of the geological survey, data from NCOE and data from 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake, it became clear that there are factors that intensifies seismic motions in this area. For each of the two selected earthquake sources, namely NPWBFZ and F-B fault, we calculated seismic ground motions on the free surface of the base stratum as the design-basis ground motion (DBGM) Ss, using both empirical and numerical ground motion evaluation method. PGA value of DBGM is 2,300Gal for unit 1 to 4 located in the southern part of the KKNPS and 1,050Gal for unit 5 to 7 in the northern part of the site.

Takao, M.; Mizutani, H.

2009-05-01

329

Are clinicians being prepared to care for abused women? A survey of health professional education in Ontario, Canada  

PubMed Central

Background The current project undertook a province-wide survey and environmental scan of educational opportunities available to future health care providers on the topic of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. Methods A team of experts identified university and college programs in Ontario, Canada as potential providers of IPV education to students in health care professions at the undergraduate and post-graduate levels. A telephone survey with contacts representing these programs was conducted between October 2005 and March 2006. The survey asked whether IPV-specific education was provided to learners, and if so, how and by whom. Results In total, 222 eligible programs in dentistry, medicine, nursing and other allied health professions were surveyed, and 95% (212/222) of programs responded. Of these, 57% reported offering some form of IPV-specific education, with undergraduate nursing (83%) and allied health (82%) programs having the highest rates. Fewer than half of undergraduate medical (43%) and dentistry (46%) programs offered IPV content. Postgraduate programs ranged from no IPV content provision (dentistry) to 41% offering content (nursing). Conclusion Significant variability exists across program areas regarding the methods for IPV education, its delivery and evaluation. The results of this project highlight that expectations for an active and consistent response by health care professionals to women experiencing the effects of violence may not match the realities of professional preparation.

Wathen, C Nadine; Tanaka, Masako; Catallo, Cristina; Lebner, Adrianne C; Friedman, M Kinneret; Hanson, Mark D; Freeman, Clare; Jack, Susan M; Jamieson, Ellen; MacMillan, Harriet L

2009-01-01

330

Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally, respondents support greater use of mobile-computing technology at the USGS and are interested in training opportunities and further discussions related to data archiving, access to additional digital data types, and technology development.

Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

2006-01-01

331

Sudbury project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Field studies 1984-1989 - summary of results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In cooperation between the Ontario Geological Survey and the Institute of Geology and Institute of Planetology, geological, petrological, and geochemical studies were carried out on impact-related phenomena of the Sudbury structure during the last decade. The main results of the field studies are briefly reviewed. Footwall rocks, sublayer, and lower sections of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) were mainly mapped and sampled in the northern (Levack Township) and western (Trillabelle and Sultana Properties) parts of the north range. Within these mapping areas Sudbury Breccias (SB) and Footwall Breccias (FB) were studied; SB were also investigated along extended profiles beyond the north and south ranges up to 55 km from the SIC. The Onaping Formation (OF) and the upper section of the SIC were studied both in the north range (Morgan and Dowling Townships) and in the southern east range (Capreol and McLennan Townships).

Bischoff, L.; Dressler, B. O.; Avermann, M. E.; Brockmeyer, P.; Lakomy, R.; Mueller-Mohr, V.

1992-12-01

332

U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative - 2008 Annual Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) was launched in 2007 in response to concerns about threats to the State's world class wildlife resources, especially the threat posed by rapidly increasing energy development in southwest Wyoming. The overriding purpose of the WLCI is to assess and enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale, while facilitating responsible energy and other types of development. The WLCI includes partners from Federal, State, and local agencies, with participation from public and private entities, industry, and landowners. As a principal WLCI partner, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides multidisciplinary scientific and technical support to inform decisionmaking in the WLCI. To address WLCI management needs, USGS has designed and implemented five integrated work activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis, (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research, (3) Integration and Coordination, (4) Data and Information Management, and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. Ongoing information management of data and products acquired or generated through the integrated work activities will ensure that crucial scientific information is available to partners and stakeholders in a readily accessible and useable format for decisionmaking and evaluation. Significant progress towards WLCI goals has been achieved in many Science and Technical Assistance tasks of the work activities. Available data were identified, acquired, compiled, and integrated into a comprehensive database for use by WLCI partners and to support USGS science activities. A Web-based platform for sharing these data and products has been developed and is already in use. Numerous map products have been completed and made available to WLCI partners, and other products are in progress. Initial conceptual, habitat, and climate change models have been developed or refined. Monitoring designs for terrestrial and aquatic indicators have been completed, pilot data have been collected for terrestrial indicators, and evaluations of alternative monitoring designs are underway. Initial models and map products have been developed for assessing vegetation, surface disturbance, oil and gas resources, mineral resources, surficial geology, invasive species, aspen treatments, ungulate migration corridors, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and songbirds, and data were collected or compiled to validate and refine the models. Coordination and collaboration among partners has led to the production of several documents addressing WLCI objectives, strategies, and guiding principles, and has facilitated implementation of on-the-ground habitat treatments.

Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Baer, Lori Anne; Bristol, Sky; Carr, Natasha B.; Chong, Geneva W.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen; Grauch, Richard I.; Homer, Collin; Manier, Daniel; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Latysh, Natalie; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Nutt, Constance J.; Potter, Christopher; Sawyer, Hall; Smith, David B.; Sweat, Michael J.; Wilson, Anna B.

2009-01-01

333

A preliminary global geologic map of Vesta based on Dawn Survey orbit data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid 4Vesta on July 15, 2011, and is now collecting imaging, spectroscopic, and elemental abundance data during its one-year orbital mission. As part of the geological analysis of the surface, we have utilized images and data from the Survey orbital sequence to produce a global map of Vesta's surface. Unit boundaries and feature characteristics were determined primarily from morphologic analysis of image data; projected Framing Camera (FC) images were used as the base map. Spectral information from FC and VIR are used to refine unit contacts and to separate compositional distinctions from differences arising from illumination or other factors. Those units that could be discerned both in morphology and in the color data were interpreted as geologically distinct units. Vesta's surface is highly-cratered; differences in color and albedo are possible indicators of varying thicknesses and areal extents of crater ejecta. The most prominent candidate impact feature dominates the south pole. This feature consists of a depression roughly circular in shape, with a central hill that is characterized by smoother texture and lower albedo distinctive from the lower-lying surrounding terrain. A complex network of deep troughs and ridges cuts through the floor of the feature. Many of these troughs trend north-south, while others appear circumferential to the hill and are truncated by or terminate at orthogonal ridges/grooves. Detailed mapping of these features will provide information on their orientations, possible origin(s), and their relationship, if any, to the central hill. The equator of Vesta is also girdled by a wide set of flat-floored troughs. Their orientation implies that their formation is related to the south polar structure. Several regions on Vesta have a concentration of craters displaying low-albedo interiors or exteriors. These craters may have an exogenic origin, or may be the result of excavation of a thin sub-surface layer. Low-albedo regions also appear to have been uncovered by mass wasting around some topographic highs. If this dark material is endogenic in origin, this suggests that Vesta has both vertical and lateral stratigraphic heterogeneity. Current imaging also reveals dark materials and smooth regions that may be candidate locations/sites for volcanic activity. Further study at greater spatial and spectral resolution is required to unequivocally identify the character and origin of these features. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Dawn Operations, Instruments, and Science Teams.

Yingst, R.; Williams, D. A.; Garry, W. B.; Mest, S. C.; Petro, N. E.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; LeCorre, L.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; DeSanctis, C.; Ammannito, E.; Filacchione, G.

2011-12-01

334

The Hontomin CO2 geologic storage site: results from 2D seismic survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Spanish research program on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), leaded by the state-owned foundation CIUDEN, initiated the storage project with the creation of the first Spanish technological laboratory devoted to subsurface storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2010 near the village of Hontomín (North West of Spain). This research site aims investigating the different phases involved in the CO2 injection process in underground geologic formations at real scale and monitoring its long-term behavior. The seismic baseline study consist on five innovative and non-standard seismic experiments including: 1) a 35 km2 of 3D seismic survey, 2) a 2D seismic survey, 3) a Seismovie survey, 4) a 30 passive-seismic network and 5) a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) survey programmed for this year. Here we focus on the 2D seismic reflection survey that was acquired with new generation 3-component receivers. A total of 408 receivers with 25 m interval were deployed along 2 orthogonal profiles, orientated ~NS-EW, centered near the injection point. The seismic source consisted on 4 15-Tn M22 vibroseis trucks with a 16-sec sweep vibrating at each 25 m distance. Data processing included static corrections, spherical divergence correction, airwave muting, predictive deconvolution, stack, time-variant band-pass filtering and time migration. First analysis of the vertical component data confirm the dome-geometry of the reservoir observed by previous studies and give details on the tectonic structure of the potential injection zone. The data also show two main seismic features corresponding to 1) a loss of the P-wave first arrival amplitudes resulting in a shadow zone at offsets of ~600-1500 m. and 2) a high-amplitude reflection at the base of the shadow zone. We related the presence of the shadow zone with a ~750 m-thick layer of low velocity or small velocity-gradient, associated to Early-Middle Cretaceous deposits that globally correspond to variable grain-size siliciclastic continental material of Purbeck, Weald and Utrillas-Escucha formations. The relatively high porosity of these deposits (18-26 %) support their susceptibility to fluid saturation and consequently explain the presence of low P-wave velocity values. On the other hand, the high-amplitude reflection below is related to the Purbeck-Dogger formations contact, resulting from the high impedance contrast between the low-velocity zone and the underlaying Late-Middle Jurassic marine deposits of the Dogger and Lias formations (limestones, marls and blackshales), which are the seal of the system. The main potential reservoir for C02 is located at ~1400-1500 m depth, in limestones and carniolas deposits (~30% porosity) of the Early Jurassic Lias formation.

Calahorrano, A.; Martí, D.; Alcalde, J.; Marzán, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

2012-04-01

335

Accuracy assessment of the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset, and comparison with other large-area elevation datasets: SRTM and ASTER  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Elevation Dataset (NED) is the primary elevation data product produced and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The NED provides seamless raster elevation data of the conterminous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, U.S. island territories, Mexico, and Canada. The NED is derived from diverse source datasets that are processed to a specification with consistent resolutions, coordinate system, elevation units, and horizontal and vertical datums. The NED serves as the elevation layer of The National Map, and it provides basic elevation information for earth science studies and mapping applications in the United States and most of North America. An important part of supporting scientific and operational use of the NED is provision of thorough dataset documentation including data quality and accuracy metrics. The focus of this report is on the vertical accuracy of the NED and on comparison of the NED with other similar large-area elevation datasets, namely data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER).

Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Evans, Gayla A.

2014-01-01

336

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications on Nevada by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1885 through 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References to 898 water-resources publications are listed alphabetically by senior author and indexed by hydrographic-area name or other geographic features. Most of the publications were written between 1960 and 1995 by U.S. Geological Survey scientists and engineers of the Water Resources Division, Nevada District. Also included are references to publications by other Water Resources Division authors that deal with Nevada hydrology. References to publications written before 1960 are included to provide a historical perspective. The references include several types of Geological Survey book and map publications, as well as State-series reports, journal articles, conference and symposium papers, abstracts, and graduate- degree theses. Information on publication availability is provided also.

Bunch, R. L.

1996-01-01

337

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

Winner, M. D., Jr.

1996-01-01

338

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-163 (trace constituents), M-156 (major constituents), N-67 (nutrient constituents), N-68 (nutrient constituents), P-35 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-31 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 2000 to 126 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 122 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Connor, B. F.; Currier, J. P.; Woodworth, M. T.

2001-01-01

339

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-167 (trace constituents), M-160 (major constituents), N-71 (nutrient constituents), N-72 (nutrient constituents), P-37 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-33 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 98 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2002-01-01

340

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T- 169 (trace constituents), M- 162 (major constituents), N-73 (nutrient constituents), N-74 (nutrient constituents), P-38 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-34 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored intedaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 93 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, M. T.; Conner, B. F.

2002-01-01

341

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in March 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-173 (trace constituents), M-166 (major constituents), N-77 (nutrient constituents), N-78 (nutrient constituents), P-40 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-36 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2003 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 110 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2003-01-01

342

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-171 (trace constituents), M-164 (major constituents), N-75 (nutrient constituents), N-76 (nutrient constituents), P-39 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-35 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 102 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2003-01-01

343

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in April 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-165 (trace constituents), M-158 (major constituents), N-69 (nutrient constituents), N-70 (nutrient constituents), P-36 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-32 (mercury) -- that were distributed in April 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 73 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, M. T.; Connor, B. F.

2001-01-01

344

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-159 (trace constituents), M-152 (major constituents), N-63 (nutrient constituents), N-64 (nutrient constituents), P-33 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-29 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 1999 to 149 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 131 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, T. W.

2000-01-01

345

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for standard reference samples distributed in March 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for 8 standard reference samples -- T-157 (trace constituents), M-150 (major constituents), N-61 (nutrient constituents), N-62 (nutrient constituents), P-32 (low ionic strength constituents), GWT-5 (ground-water trace constituents), GWM- 4 (ground-water major constituents),and Hg-28 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 1999 to 120 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 111 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the seven reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the 8 standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, Jerry W.; Chleboun, Kimberly M.

1999-01-01

346

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-161 (trace constituents), M-154 (major constituents), N-65 (nutrient constituents), N-66 nutrient constituents), P-34 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-30 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2000 to 144 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 132 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, Jerry W.; Copen, Ashley M.

2000-01-01

347

U.S. Geological Survey DLG-3 and Bureau of the Census TIGER data. Development and GIS applications  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has been actively developing digital cartographic and geographic data and standards since the early 1970's. One product is Digital Line Graph data, which offer a consistently accurate source of base category geographic information. The Bureau of the Census has combined their Dual Independent Map Encoding data with the Geological Survey's 1:100,000-scale Digital Line Graph data to prepare for the 1990 decennial census. The resulting Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing data offer a wealth of information. A major area of research using these data is in transportation analysis. The attributes associated with Digital Line Graphs can be used to determine the average travel times along each segment. Geographic information system functions can then be used to optimize routes through the network and to generate street name lists. Additional aspects of the subject are discussed.

Batten, Lawrence, G.

1990-01-01

348

Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Miami, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Miami to conduct water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Miami USGS for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures that are documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Miami USGS quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities.

compiled by Lietz, A. C.

2003-01-01

349

U.S. Geological Survey water-resource monitoring activities in support of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quality of the Nation’s water resources are vital to the health and well-being of both our communities and the natural landscapes we value. The U.S. Geological Survey investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of surface water and groundwater and provides this information to engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and the general public. This information also supplements current (2013) and historical water data provided by the National Water Information System. The U.S. Geological Survey collects and shares data nationwide, but how those data are used is often site specific; this variety of data assists natural-resource managers in addressing unique, local, and regional challenges.

Soileau, Suzanna; Miller, Kirk

2013-01-01

350

Geology at the steepbank [open quotes]In-Situ[close quotes] HASDrive Pilot Site, Athabasca Tar Sands, Canada  

SciTech Connect

The Athabasca tar sands of northeastern Alberta contain 13 trillion bbl of bitumen in place, 5% of which is accessible by surface mining techniques. If there is to be significant exploitation of the deeper buried resources, it will have to be done using subsurface [open quotes]in-situ[close quotes] technologies. Compared to surface mining, these methods are potentially more economic, can be developed on a smaller scale and are environmentally more sound. The Lower Cretaceous McMurray Formation is by far the richest hydrocarbon bearing unit in Canada. Overall, it is a transgressive sand and mud dominated unit deposited in fluvial to marine environments. The main reservoir unit is an estuarine sand, whole complexity makes for an elusive exploration target and a challenging development project. Successful reservoir management of a subsurface [open quotes]in-situ[close quotes] operation depends on a solid understanding of estuarine stratigraphy and its lithologic heterogeneities. For the past 20 years, Chevron has been developing an [open quotes]in-situ[close quotes] heavy oil extraction process called HASDrive (Heated Annulus Steam Drive). Recently, HASDrive and other technologies have been employed on a 77 mi[sup 2] lease with 9 billion bbl of heavy oil in place. The goal is to bring the lease to a fully commercial 10,000 bbl/day operation by 1997. In the exploration phase, 64 core hole wells were located with the aid of shallow 3-D seismic and electromagnetic techniques. The current pilot phase has utilized HASDrive to extract the bitumen from and sand and specialized seismic methods to monitor the development of the steam chamber.

Holloway, D.C.

1993-02-01

351

Results and Interpretations of U.S. Geological Survey Data Collected In and Around the Tuba City Open Dump, Arizona  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Open-File Report was originally an Administrative Report presentation to the Bureau of Indian Affairs based on U.S. Geological Survey data that has been collected and presented in four previous reports (Open-File Reports 2009-1020, 2008-1380, and 2008-1374, and an Administrative Report on geophysical data). This presentation was given at a technical meeting requested by the BIA on March 3 and 4, 2009, in Phoenix, Arizona. The idea for this meeting was for all the technical people working on issues related to the Tuba City Open Dump site to come together and share their data collection procedures, results, interpretations, and working hypotheses. The meeting goal was to have a clear record of each party's interpretations and a summary of additional data that would be needed to solve differences of opinion. The intention of this presentation is not to provide an exhaustive summary of U.S. Geological Survey efforts at the Tuba City Open Dump site given in the four previously published Open-File Reports listed above, since these reports have already been made available. This presentation briefly summarizes the data collected for those reports and provides results, interpretations, and working hypotheses relating to the data available in these reports. The major questions about the Tuba City Open Dump addressed by the U.S. Geological Survey are (1) what are the sources for uranium and other constituents found in the ground water in and around the Tuba City Open Dump, (2) what is the current distribution of ground water contaminants away from the Tuba City Open Dump (can plume limits be delineated), and (3) what controls the mobility of uranium and other constituents in and around the Tuba City Open Dump? Data collection, results, and interpretations by the U.S. Geological Survey that address these questions are presented herein.

Johnson, Raymond H.; Otton, James K.; Horton, Robert J.

2009-01-01

352

Revisions to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package for Simulation of Ground-Water Interactions With Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several revisions were made to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package as part of the integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System with MODFLOW. The integrated model, named GSFLOW, is designed for the simultaneous simulation of ground-water and surface-water flow. Revisions to the Lake Package resulted in changing: (1) the numerical solution to simultaneously solve for lake stage and outflow

D. E. Prudic; R. G. Niswonger

2006-01-01

353

Quality-assurance plan for the analysis of suspended sediment by the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A quality-assurance plan has been developed for use by the sediment laboratory of the U.S. Geological Survey Montana Water Science Center in conducting activities related to the analysis of suspended sediment. The plan documents quality-assurance policies for sediment-laboratory certification, personnel responsibilities and training, documentation requirements, and laboratory safety. The plan also documents quality-assurance procedures related to laboratory equipment and supplies, sample management, sample analysis, analytical quality control, and data management.

Dodge, Kent A.; Lambing, John H.

2006-01-01

354

A Survey of the Current Study and Teaching of North American Indian Languages in the United States and Canada. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 17.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This survey attempts to bring together as much information as possible on the current study and teaching of North American Indian languages in the United States and Canada. The primary source of data for this survey was a questionnaire distributed in the spring of 1973 to 61 universities and colleges in the U.S. and Canada. Other sources were…

Martin, Jeanette

355

The preparation of illustrations for reports of the United States Geological survey : with brief descriptions of processes of reproduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There has been an obvious need in the Geological Survey o£ a paper devoted wholly to illustrations. No complete paper on the character, use, and mode of preparation of illustration has been published by the Survey, though brief suggestions concerning certain features of their use have been printed in connection wit other suggestions pertaining to publications. The present paper includes matter which it is hoped will be of service to authors in their work of making up original drafts of illustrations and to drafsmen who are using these originals in preparing more finished drawing but it is not a technical treatise on drafting.

Ridgway, John L.

1920-01-01

356

Waterborne and on-land electrical surveys to suggest the geological evolution of a glacial lake in NW Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geophysical surveys on and around the Candia Lake, located NE of Turin (NW Italy), in the internal depression of the Ivrea Morainic Amphitheater (IMA) right frontal sector, are reported in this paper. The surveys were intended to obtain a geophysical characterization of the lakebed, to investigate the interconnection paths between surface water and groundwater and to be used as a first general survey for suggesting the geological processes which lead to the actual morphology. An extensive waterborne continuous vertical electrical sounding (CVES) survey consisting of 15 profiles, with a total length of about 19 km of acquisition, was carried out on the lake surface. The processing of the acquired profiles with a laterally constrained inversion (LCI) approach lead to the reconstruction of the lakebed sediment distribution, down to 10 m depth. Self potential (SP) data recorded on the lake surface have also been analyzed. Moreover, to verify the areal distribution of the deposits, three electrical resistivity tomographies (ERTs) were carried out on land near the northern and southern shores of the lake. The combination of the geophysical survey results with hydrogeological information and geological observations and interpretations allowed the characterization of the submerged deposits, the probable identification of the main areas of groundwater recharge and the preliminary reconstruction of the lake genesis.

Colombero, Chiara; Comina, Cesare; Gianotti, Franco; Sambuelli, Luigi

2014-06-01

357

Proceedings of a U.S. Geological Survey pressure-sensor Workshop, Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a Pressure Sensor Workshop, oriented toward the measurement of stage in surface waters, in Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992. Twenty attendees from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gave presentations concerning their experiences with the use of pressure sensors in hydrologic investigations. This report is a compilation of the abstracts of the presentations made at the workshop. Workshop participants concluded that each of the sensors evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey has strengths and weaknesses. Personnel contemplating the use of pressure sensors discussed at this workshop should contact workshop attendees and consult with them about their experiences with those sensors. The attendees preferred to use stilling wells with float-operated water-level sensors as the primary means for monitoring water levels. However, pressure sensor systems were favored as replacements for mercury manometers and as alternatives to stilling wells at sites where stilling wells are not practical or cost effective.

Wilbourn, Sammy L.

1994-01-01

358

Optimal mapping of terrestrial gamma dose rates using geological parent material and aerogeophysical survey data.  

PubMed

Regulatory authorities need ways to estimate natural terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (nGy h?¹) across the landscape accurately, to assess its potential deleterious health effects. The primary method for estimating outdoor dose rate is to use an in situ detector supported 1 m above the ground, but such measurements are costly and cannot capture the landscape-scale variation in dose rates which are associated with changes in soil and parent material mineralogy. We investigate the potential for improving estimates of terrestrial gamma dose rates across Northern Ireland (13,542 km²) using measurements from 168 sites and two sources of ancillary data: (i) a map based on a simplified classification of soil parent material, and (ii) dose estimates from a national-scale, airborne radiometric survey. We used the linear mixed modelling framework in which the two ancillary variables were included in separate models as fixed effects, plus a correlation structure which captures the spatially correlated variance component. We used a cross-validation procedure to determine the magnitude of the prediction errors for the different models. We removed a random subset of 10 terrestrial measurements and formed the model from the remainder (n = 158), and then used the model to predict values at the other 10 sites. We repeated this procedure 50 times. The measurements of terrestrial dose vary between 1 and 103 (nGy h?¹). The median absolute model prediction errors (nGy h?¹) for the three models declined in the following order: no ancillary data (10.8) > simple geological classification (8.3) > airborne radiometric dose (5.4) as a single fixed effect. Estimates of airborne radiometric gamma dose rate can significantly improve the spatial prediction of terrestrial dose rate. PMID:23147566

Rawlins, B G; Scheib, C; Tyler, A N; Beamish, D

2012-12-01

359

US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes  

SciTech Connect

Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and reaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of {sup 226}Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in {sup 226}Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as {sup 226}Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can {sup 226}Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides form uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. 48 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Landa, E.R.; Gray, J.R. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1995-07-01

360

The Carancas meteorite impact crater, Peru: Geologic surveying and modeling of crater formation and atmospheric passage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent Carancas meteorite impact event caused a worldwide sensation. An H4-5 chondrite struck the Earth south of Lake Titicaca in Peru on September 15, 2007, and formed a crater 14.2 m across. It is the smallest, youngest, and one of two eye-witnessed impact crater events on Earth. The impact violated the hitherto existing view that stony meteorites below a size of 100 m undergo major disruption and deceleration during their passage through the atmosphere and are not capable of producing craters. Fragmentation occurs if the strength of the meteoroid is less than the aerodynamic stresses that occur in flight. The small fragments that result from a breakup rain down at terminal velocity and are not capable of producing impact craters. The Carancas cratering event, however, demonstrates that meter-sized stony meteoroids indeed can survive the atmospheric passage under specific circumstances. We present results of a detailed geologic survey of the crater and its ejecta. To constrain the possible range of impact parameters we carried out numerical models of crater formation with the iSALE hydrocode in two and three dimensions. Depending on the strength properties of the target, the impact energies range between approximately 100-1000 MJ (0.024- 0.24 t TNT). By modeling the atmospheric traverse we demonstrate that low cosmic velocities (12- 14 kms-1) and shallow entry angles (<20°) are prerequisites to keep aerodynamic stresses low (<10 MPa) and thus to prevent fragmentation of stony meteoroids with standard strength properties. This scenario results in a strong meteoroid deceleration, a deflection of the trajectory to a steeper impact angle (40-60°), and an impact velocity of 350-600 ms-1, which is insufficient to produce a shock wave and significant shock effects in target minerals. Aerodynamic and crater modeling are consistent with field data and our microscopic inspection. However, these data are in conflict with trajectories inferred from the analysis of infrasound signals.

Kenkmann, T.; Artemieva, N. A.; Wünnemann, K.; Poelchau, M. H.; Elbeshausen, D.; Núñez Del Prado, H.

2009-08-01

361

Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis of the Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The United States Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) is a 1 MW reactor located in Lakewood, Colorado. In support of the GSTR's relicensing efforts, this project developed and validated a Monte Carlo N-Particle Version 5 (MCNP5) model of the GSTR reactor. The model provided estimates of the excess reactivity, power distribution and the fuel temperature, water temperature, void, and power reactivity coefficients for the current and limiting core. The MCNP5 model predicts a limiting core excess reactivity of 6.48 with a peak rod power of 22.2 kW. The fuel and void reactivity coefficients for the limiting core are strongly negative, and the core water reactivity coefficient is slightly positive, consistent with other TRIGA analyses. The average fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the full power limiting core is -0.0135 /K while the average core void coefficient is -0.069 /K from 0-20 % void. The core water temperature reactivity coefficient is +0.012 /K. Following the neutronics analysis, the project developed RELAP5 and PARET-ANL models of the GSTR hot-rod fuel channel under steady state and transient conditions. The GSTR limiting core, determined as part of this analysis, provides a worst case operating scenario for the reactor. During steady state operations, the hot rod of the limiting core has a peak fuel temperature of 829 K and a minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio of 2.16. After a $3.00 pulse reactivity insertion the fuel reaches a peak temperature is 1070 K. Examining the model results several seconds after a pulse reveals flow instabilities that result from weaknesses in the current two-channel model.

Shugart, Nicolas

362

U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Southwest Wyoming's wildlife and habitat resources are increasingly affected by energy and urban/exurban development, climate change, and other key drivers of ecosystem change. To ensure that southwest Wyoming's wildlife populations and habitats persist in the face of development and other changes, a consortium of public resource-management agencies proposed the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), the overall goal of which is to implement conservation actions. As the principal agency charged with conducting WLCI science, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a Science Strategy for the WLCI. Workshops were held for all interested parties to identify and refine the most pressing management needs for achieving WLCI goals. Research approaches for addressing those needs include developing conceptual models for understanding ecosystem function, identifying key drivers of change affecting WLCI ecosystems, and conducting scientific monitoring and experimental studies to better understand ecosystems processes, cumulative effects of change, and effectiveness of habitat treatments. The management needs drive an iterative, three-phase framework developed for structuring and growing WLCI science efforts: Phase I entails synthesizing existing information to assess current conditions, determining what is already known about WLCI ecosystems, and providing a foundation for future work; Phase II entails conducting targeted research and monitoring to address gaps in data and knowledge during Phase I; and Phase III entails integrating new knowledge into WLCI activities and coordinating WLCI partners and collaborators. Throughout all three phases, information is managed and made accessible to interested parties and used to guide and improve management and conservation actions, future habitat treatments, best management practices, and other conservation activities.

Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Chong, Geneva W.; Drummond, Mark A.; Homer, Collin; Johnson, Ronald C.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Knick, Steven T.; Kosovich, John J.; Miller, Kirk A.; Owens, Tom; Shafer, Sarah; Sweat, Michael J.

2009-01-01

363

Health-based screening levels to evaluate U.S. Geological Survey ground water quality data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Federal and state drinking-water standards and guidelines do not exist for many contaminants analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, limiting the ability to evaluate the potential human-health relevance of water-quality findings. Health-based screening levels (HBSLs) were developed collaboratively to supplement existing drinking-water standards and guidelines as part of a six-year, multi-agency pilot study. The pilot study focused on ground water samples collected prior to treatment or blending in areas of New Jersey where groundwater is the principal source of drinking water. This article describes how HBSLs were developed and demonstrates the use of HBSLs as a tool for evaluating water-quality data in a human-health context. HBSLs were calculated using standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methodologies and toxicity information. New HBSLs were calculated for 12 of 32 contaminants without existing USEPA drinking-water standards or guidelines, increasing the number of unregulated contaminants (those without maximum contaminant levels (MCLs)) with human-health benchmarks. Concentrations of 70 of the 78 detected contaminants with human-health benchmarks were less than MCLs or HBSLs, including all 12 contaminants with new HBSLs, suggesting that most contaminant concentrations were not of potential human-health concern. HBSLs were applied to a state-scale groundwater data set in this study, but HBSLs also may be applied to regional and national evaluations of water-quality data. HBSLs fulfill a critical need for federal, state, and local agencies, water utilities, and others who seek tools for evaluating the occurrence of contaminants without drinking-water standards or guidelines. ?? 2006 Society for Risk Analysis.

Toccalino, P. L.; Norman, J. E.

2006-01-01

364

Creation of next generation U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is 2 years into a 3-year cycle to create new digital topographic map products for the conterminous United States from data acquired and maintained as part of The National Map databases. These products are in the traditional, USGS topographic quadrangle, 7.5-minute (latitude and longitude) cell format. The 3-year cycle was conceived to follow the acquisition of National Aerial Imagery Program (NAIP) orthorectified imagery, a key layer in the new product. In fiscal year (FY) 2009 (ending September 30, 2009), the first year of the 3-year cycle, the USGS produced 13,200 products. These initial products of the “Digital MapBeta” series had limited feature content, including only the NAIP image, some roads, geographic names, and grid and collar information. The products were created in layered georegistered Portable Document Format (PDF) files, allowing users with freely available Adobe® Reader® software to view, print, and perform simple Geographic Information System-like functions. In FY 2010 (ending September 30, 2010), the USGS produced 20,380 products. These products of the “US Topo” series added hydrography (surface water features), contours, and some boundaries. In FY 2011 (ending September 30, 2011), the USGS will complete the initial coverage with US Topo products and will add additional feature content to the maps. The design, development, and production associated with the US Topo products provide management and technical challenges for the USGS and its public and private sector partners. One challenge is the acquisition and maintenance of nationally consistent base map data from multiple sources. Another is the use of these data to create a consistent, current series of cartographic products that can be used by the broad spectrum of traditional topographic map users. Although the USGS and its partners have overcome many of these challenges, many, such as establishing and funding a sustainable base data-maintenance program, remain to be resolved for the long term.

Craun, Kari J

2010-01-01

365

US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and leaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 (226Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of226Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in226Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as226Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can226Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides from uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico.

Landa, E. R.; Gray, J. R.

1995-07-01

366

THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low-redshift universe using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M {sub r} = -21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog of Yang et al. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalog of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power-law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross-correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M {sub r} = -21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 mag. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way (MW) and M31 shows that the MW/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.

Jiang, C. Y.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2012-11-20

367

Survey of current vitamin D food fortification practices in the United States and Canada.  

PubMed

Widespread poor vitamin D status in all age and gender groups in the United States (USA) and Canada increases the need for new food sources. Currently ?60% of the intake of vitamin D from foods is from fortified foods in these countries. Those groups in greatest need are consuming significantly lower amounts of commonly fortified foods such as milk. Both countries allow voluntary vitamin D fortification of some other foods, although in Canada this practice is only done on a case-by-case basis. Novel approaches to vitamin D fortification of food in both countries now include "bio-addition" in which food staples are fortified through the addition of another vitamin D-rich food to animal feed during production, or manipulation of food post-harvest or pre-processing. These bio-addition approaches provide a wider range of foods containing vitamin D, and thus appeal to differing preferences, cultures and possibly economic status. An example is the post-harvest exposure of edible mushrooms to ultraviolet light. However, further research into safety and efficacy of bio-addition needs to be established in different target populations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:23104118

Calvo, Mona S; Whiting, Susan J

2013-07-01

368

A telephone survey of eel fishermen regarding external lesions and mortalities of American eels ( Anguilla rostrata) from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signs of decreasing landings and recruitment have been observed during the last decade in American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada. A study was undertaken to examine whether important manifestational diseases among commercial catches could be associated with these declines. During this survey, 56 fishermen from Lakes Ontario, Saint-François and Saint-Pierre, the Richelieu River, the Québec

Lucie Dutil; Denise Bélanger; Catherine M Couillard

1997-01-01

369

Employer-Sponsored Training in Canada: Synthesis of the Literature Using Data from the Workplace and Employee Survey. Learning Research Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents a review of studies and articles on employer-sponsored training in Canada. The authors reviewed documentation that used data from the Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) and offer a synthesis of the current state of knowledge. The report looks alternately at issues pertaining to determinants of training from the employer and…

Dostie, Benoit; Montmarquette, Claude

2007-01-01

370

Airborne Geophysical Surveys Illuminate the Geologic and Hydrothermal Framework of the Pilgrim Springs Geothermal Area, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An airborne magnetic and frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) survey of the Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located on the Seward Peninsula in west-central Alaska, delineates key structures controlling hydrothermal fluid flow. Hot springs, nearby thawed regions, and high lake temperatures are indicative of high heat flow in the region that is thought to be related to recent volcanism. By providing a region-wide geologic and geophysical framework, this work will provide informed decisions regarding drill-site planning and further our understanding of geothermal systems in active extensional basins. Helicopter magnetic and EM data were acquired using a Fugro RESOLVE system equipped with a high sensitivity cesium magnetometer and a multi-coil, multi-frequency EM system sensitive to the frequency range of 400-140,000 Hz. The survey was flown ~40 m above ground along flight lines spaced 0.2-0.4 km apart. Various derivative and filtering methods, including maximum horizontal gradient of the pseudogravity transformation of the magnetic data, are used to locate faults, contacts, and structural domains. A dominant northwest trending anomaly pattern characterizes the northeastern portion of the survey area between Pilgrim Springs and Hen and Chickens Mountain and may reflect basement structures. The area south of the springs, however, is dominantly characterized by east-west trending, range-front-parallel anomalies likely caused by late Cenozoic structures associated with the north-south extension that formed the basin. Regionally, the springs are characterized by a magnetic high punctuated by several east-west trending magnetic lows, the most prominent occurring directly over the springs. The lows may result from demagnetization of magnetic material along range-front parallel features that dissect the basin. We inverted in-phase and quadrature EM data along each profile using the laterally-constrained inversion of Auken et al. (2005). Data were inverted for 20-layer models starting from a 50 ohm-m half-space and with no prior model. Lateral constraints were relaxed in proximity to known or suspected structures using horizontal gradients in the measured data as a proxy for lateral variations in subsurface resistivity. A region of low resistivity (< 5 ohm-m) characterizes Pilgrim Springs and extends farther to the north and northeast, indicative of high heat flow and saline geothermal fluids associated with the hot springs. More moderate resistivities (50-200 ohm-m) characterize surrounding rivers and streams and are likely due to variations in sediment clay content. High resistivities (> 1000 ohm-m) associated with the mountain ranges reflect Precambrian metamorphic basement and overlying Paleozoic carbonates. An equally resistive region exists between the range front of the Kigluaik Mountains and dense stream channels surrounding Pilgrim Springs. This region of high resistivity reflects permafrost in the subsurface, in agreement with permafrost mapping in the area. An east-west trending, low resistivity (100-200 ohm-m) anomaly follows the base of the Kigluaik Mountains and may indicate fractured rocks within the range-front fault that hosted fluid flow and subsequent mineralization.

McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

2012-12-01

371

A survey of brucellosis and tuberculosis in bison in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada  

PubMed Central

Examinations of complete or partial remains of 72 bison found dead in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, revealed evidence of brucellosis in 18 (25%) and tuberculosis in 15 (21%), with a combined prevalence of 42%. Urease-positive and ureasenegative strains of Brucella abortus biovar 1, and strains of biovar 2, were isolated from tissues of bison, including synovium and exudate from severe arthritic lesions. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from a range of granulomatous lesions that were similar to those reported in tuberculous cattle. Diseased bison had a broad geographical distribution, and were found outside the park on at least three natural corridors. The diseases have a deleterious effect on this population of bison, and pose a health risk to other bison herds, livestock, and native hunters in the region. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.

Tessaro, Stacy V.; Forbes, Lorry B.; Turcotte, Claude

1990-01-01

372

Unpublished letter from US Geological Survey Scientists to the editor of the New York Times Magazine regarding William J. Broads` November 18, 1990 article on Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

This letter documents objections of a group of US Geological Survey Scientists to an article appearing November 18, 1990 in New York Times Magazine. The article was written by William J. Broad and dealt with a hypothesis of Jerry S. Szymanski. The letter addressed areas of concern; including hydrology, geology, tectonics, and the integrity of the scientists and their conclusions. (SM)

Dudley, W.W. Jr.; Buono, A.; Carr, M.D.; Downey, J.S.; Ervin, E.M.; Fox, K.F. Jr.; Gutentag, E.D.; Hayes, L.R.; Jones, B.F.; Luckey, R.R.; Muhs, D.R.; Peterman, Z.E.; Reheis, M.; Spengler, R.W.; Stuckless, J.S.; Taylor, E.M.; Whitney, J.W.; Wilson, W.E.; Winogard, I.J.

1990-11-28

373

Unpublished letter from US Geological Survey Scientists to the editor of the New York Times Magazine regarding William J. Broads` November 18, 1990 article on Yucca Mountain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter documents objections of a group of US Geological Survey Scientists to an article appearing November 18, 1990 in New York Times Magazine. The article was written by William J. Broad and dealt with a hypothesis of Jerry S. Szymanski. The letter addressed areas of concern; including hydrology, geology, tectonics, and the integrity of the scientists and their conclusions.

W. W. Jr. Dudley; A. Buono; M. D. Carr; J. S. Downey; E. M. Ervin; K. F. Jr. Fox; E. D. Gutentag; L. R. Hayes; B. F. Jones; R. R. Luckey; D. R. Muhs; Z. E. Peterman; M. Reheis; R. W. Spengler; J. S. Stuckless; E. M. Taylor; J. W. Whitney; W. E. Wilson; I. J. Winogard

1990-01-01

374

Quality-assurance plan and field methods for quality-of-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-quality activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Project Office are part of the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Water Resources Division (WRD) mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation's water resources. The pu...

L. J. Mann

1996-01-01

375

Partnering for Science: Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Workshop on Citizen Science. Held in Denver, Colorado on September 11-13, 2012.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Citizen Science Workshop, sponsored by the Community for Data Integration (CDI), brought together a dynamic group of professionals from six USGS mission areas and nine external experts who engage with citizens to achieve ...

A. Benson B. Poore D. Govoni D. Masaki M. Hines

2013-01-01

376

Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop. Held in Estes Park, Colorado on October 15-17, 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop was held in Estes Park, Colorado, on October 15-17, 2008. Participants came from all USGS regions and disciplines. This report contains abstracts from 36 presentations and 35 poster sessions...

K. M. Briggs

2010-01-01

377

Geoscientific Vocabularies and Linked Data at The British Geological Survey - progress and pragmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The British Geological Survey makes extensive use of controlled vocabularies to promote standardisation and interoperability between its databases and other digital information systems. Many of our vocabularies are published and searchable at http://www.bgs.ac.uk/data/vocabularies/home.html/. There is a movement to ';open up' government data in both the US and UK. In the UK this is promoted by data.gov.uk. Some view linked data as the best way to share and connect disparate data, information and knowledge, in order to develop a ';Web of Data'. Linked data facilitate connections between data sets, and lower the barriers to accessing data that must otherwise be discovered and exploited using other methods. Recently there has been a rapid increase in the rate of publication of linked data, this increase currently being estimated at 300% per year. In the past 2 years we have undertaken a pilot study to publish some of our authoritative vocabularies as linked data. This study has focussed primarily on publishing BGS' 1:625 000 scale geologic map data for the UK, supported by development of linked data sets for: Earth materials - based on the BGS Rock Classification Scheme; lithostratigraphy - based on the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units; and geochronology - based on the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The BGS linked data sets are published at data.bgs.ac.uk. We have learned a number of lessons about the potential and limitations of linked data and associated technologies. We do not envisage SPARQL endpoints being the primary route for public access to linked data because the user would require technical knowledge of the data structure, and because it can be a security threat. Rather, SPARQL may lie behind a user-friendly API. Federated SPARQL queries that can interrogate distributed data sources are in reality too slow, and in practise the data sets would likely be combined in a single store. The data sets in our pilot study are all reasonably static and we solve performance and security issues by serving the linked data as pre-generated static files in a range of formats rather than using a triple-store. This also allows the data to be indexed by search engines. Wherever possible it is good practice to use predicates from well-known published sources, for example RDFS, SKOS, or Dublin Core, in preference to inventing new ones. This promotes re-use of the linked data by as many potential users as possible. Linked data do not directly address logical inference, which is supposed to be one of the aims of the ';Semantic Web'. This sort of ';calculating with knowledge' must be implemented using additional, possibly human-based rather than mechanical, reasoning. Linked data come with all the same issues surrounding provenance and authority of the data that any web resource is subject to. There are issues surrounding versioning and permanence of URIs. Our work on publishing BGS' vocabularies as linked data is proceeding in parallel with our work with the Commission of Geoscience Information (CGI) Geoscience Terminology Working Group which is jointly developing multilingual vocabularies in range of knowledge domains.

McCormick, T.; Heaven, R.

2013-12-01

378

Worldwide estimates of deep natural gas resources based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000 ft), undiscovered conventional natural gas resources based on this assessment. Two hundred forty-six assessment units in 128 priority geologic provinces, 96 countries, and two jointly held areas were assessed using a probabilistic Total Petroleum System approach. Priority geologic provinces were selected from a ranking of 937 provinces worldwide. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment Team did not assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the U.S. For this report, mean estimated volumes of deep conventional undiscovered gas resources in the U.S. are taken from estimates of 101 deep plays (out of a total of 550 conventional plays in the U.S.) from the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. A probabilistic method was designed to subdivide gas resources into depth slices using a median-based triangular probability distribution as a model for drilling depth to estimate the percentages of estimated gas resources below various depths. For both the World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and the 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources, minimum, median, and maximum depths were assigned to each assessment unit and play; these depths were used in our analysis. Two-hundred seventy-four deep assessment units and plays in 124 petroleum provinces were identified for the U.S. and the world. These assessment units and plays contain a mean undiscovered conventional gas resource of 844 trillion cubic ft (Tcf) occuring at depths below 4.5 km. The deep undiscovered conventional gas resource (844 Tcf) is about 17% of the total world gas resource (4,928 Tcf) based on the provinces assessed and includes a mean estimate of 259 Tcf of U.S. gas from the U.S. 1995 National Assessment. Of the eight regions, the Former Soviet Union (Region 1) contains the largest estimated volume of undiscovered deep gas with a mean resource of 343 Tcf. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Dyman, T. S.; Crovelli, R. A.; Bartberger, C. E.; Takahashi, K. I.

2002-01-01

379

The Handling of Hazard Data on a National Scale: A Case Study from the British Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reviews how hazard data and geological map data have been combined by the British Geological Survey (BGS) to produce a set of GIS-based national-scale hazard susceptibility maps for the UK. This work has been carried out over the last 9 years and as such reflects the combined outputs of a large number of researchers at BGS. The paper details the inception of these datasets from the development of the seamless digital geological map in 2001 through to the deterministic 2D hazard models produced today. These datasets currently include landslides, shrink-swell, soluble rocks, compressible and collapsible deposits, groundwater flooding, geological indicators of flooding, radon potential and potentially harmful elements in soil. These models have been created using a combination of expert knowledge (from both within BGS and from outside bodies such as the Health Protection Agency), national databases (which contain data collected over the past 175 years), multi-criteria analysis within geographical information systems and a flexible rule-based approach for each individual geohazard. By using GIS in this way, it has been possible to model the distribution and degree of geohazards across the whole of Britain.

Royse, Katherine R.

2011-11-01

380

Coast Salish and U.S. Geological Survey 2009 Tribal Journey Water-Quality Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Salish Sea, contained within the United States and British Columbia, Canada, is the homeland of the Coast Salish Peoples and contains a diverse array of marine resources unique to this area that have sustained Coast Salish cultures and traditions for ...

E. E. Grossman S. K. Skin

2010-01-01

381

A drug use survey among clients of harm reduction sites across British Columbia, Canada, 2012  

PubMed Central

Background In British Columbia (BC), understanding of high-risk drug use trends is largely based on survey and cohort study data from two major cities, which may not be representative of persons who use drugs in other regions. Harm reduction stakeholders, representing each of the five geographic health regions in BC, identified a need for data on drug use to inform local and regional harm reduction activities across the province. The aims of this project were to (1) develop a drug use survey that could be feasibly administered at harm reduction (HR) sites across all health regions and (2) assess the data for differences in reported drug use frequencies by region. Methods A pilot survey focusing on current drug use was developed with stakeholders and administered among clients at 28 HR supply distribution sites across the province by existing staff and peers. Data were collated and analysed using univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics to assess differences in reported drug use frequencies by geography. A post-survey evaluation was conducted to assess acceptability and feasibility of the survey process for participating sites. Results Crack cocaine, heroin, and morphine were the most frequently reported drugs with notable regional differences. Polysubstance use was common among respondents (70%) with one region having 81% polysubstance use. Respondents surveyed in or near their region's major centre were more likely to report having used crack cocaine (p?50 km from the major centre. Participants accessing services >50 km from the regional centre were more likely to have used morphine (p?survey process acceptable, feasible to administer annually, and useful for responding to client needs. Conclusions The survey was a feasible way for harm reduction sites across BC to obtain drug use data from clients who actively use drugs. Drug use frequencies differed substantially by region and community proximity to the regional centre, underlining the need for locally collected data to inform service planning.

2014-01-01

382

U.S. Geological Survey Emerging Applications of Unmanned Aircraft Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In anticipation of transforming the research methods and resource management techniques employed across the Department of the Interior, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office is conducting missions using small UAS- sUAS platforms (<20 lbs.). The USGS is dedicated to expanding the use of sUAS technology in support of scientific, resource and land management missions. UAS technology is currently being used by USGS and our partners to monitor environmental conditions, analyze the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management and law enforcement missions. Our ultimate goal is to support informed decision making by creating the opportunity, via UAS technology, to gain access to an increased level of persistent monitoring of earth surface processes (forest health conditions, wildfires, earthquake zones, invasive species, etc.) in areas that have been logistically difficult, cost prohibitive or technically impossible to obtain consistent, reliable, timely information. USGS is teaming with the Department of the Interior Aviation Management Directorate to ensure the safe and cost effective adoption of UAS technology. While the USGS is concentrating on operating sUAS, the immense value of increased flight time and more robust sensor capabilities available on larger platforms cannot be ignored. We are partnering with several groups including the Department of Homeland Security, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Defense, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for access to data collected from their fleet of high altitude, long endurance (HALE) UAS. The HALE systems include state of the art sensors including Electro-Optical, Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The data being collected by High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) systems is can be routinely shared in near real time at several DOI- USGS locations. Analysis tools are becoming available that can produce a robust set of products including a geo-referenced base for value added investigations. Much like the use of global positioning systems, unmanned aircraft systems have the potential of enabling us to be better stewards of the land. We are actively working to develop applications of the traditional full motion video capabilities and are engaged in developing additional sensor capabilities for sUAS including- magnetometers, temperature, radio telemetry, chemical and biological gas detection, and gimbal mounted "photogrammetric" cameras.

Hutt, M. E.

2012-12-01

383

U.S. Geological Survey science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2011 annual report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the fourth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. In FY2011, there were 37 ongoing, completed, or new projects conducted under the five major multi-disciplinary science and technical-assistance activities: (1) Baseline Synthesis, (2) Targeted Monitoring and Research, (3) Data and Information Management, (4) Integration and Coordination, and (5) Decisionmaking and Evaluation. The four new work activities were (1) development of the Western Energy Citation Clearinghouse, a Web-based energy-resource database of references for literature and on-line resources focused on energy development and its effects on natural resources; (2) a study to support the Sublette County Conservation District in ascertaining potential water-quality impacts to the New Fork River from energy development in the Pinedale Anticline Project Area; (3) a study to test the efficacy of blending high-frequency temporal data provided by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors and high-resolution Landsat data for providing the fine-resolution data required to evaluate habitat responses to management activities at the landscape level; and (4) a study to examine the seasonal water chemistry of Muddy Creek, including documenting salinity patterns and providing a baseline for assessing potential effects of energy and other development on water quality in the Muddy Creek watershed. Two work activities were completed in FY2011: (1) the assessment of rancher perceptions of energy development in Southwest Wyoming and (2) mapping aspen stands and conifer encroachment using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis for effectiveness monitoring. The USGS continued to compile data, develop geospatial products, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts, including (1) ranking and prioritizing proposed conservation projects, (2) developing the WLCI integrated assessment, (3) developing the WLCI 5-year Conservation Action Plan, and (4) continuing to upgrade the content and improve the functionality of the WLCI Web site. For the WLCI FY2012 annual report, a decision was made to greatly reduce the overall length of the annual report, which will be accomplished by simplifying the report format and focusing on the take-home messages of each work activity for WLCI partners.

Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Biewick, Laura R. H.; Blecker, Steven W.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephanie; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Holloway, JoAnn; Homer, Collin; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Olexa, Edward M.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Sweat, Michael J.; Tuttle, Michele; Wilson, Anna B.

2013-01-01

384

Hf isotope compositions of U.S. Geological Survey reference materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic multi-isotopic and trace element characterization of U.S. Geological Survey reference materials has been carried out at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research, University of British Columbia. Values of 176Hf/177Hf are recommended for the following reference materials (mean ±2 SD): G-2: 0.282523 ± 6; G-3: 0.282518 ± 1; GSP-2: 0.281949 ± 8; RGM-1: 0.283017 ± 13; STM-1: 0.283019 ± 12; STM-2: 0.283021 ± 5; BCR-1: 0.282875 ± 8; BCR-2: 0.282870 ± 8; BHVO-1: 0.283106 ± 12; BHVO-2: 0.283105 ± 11; AGV-1: 0.282979 ± 6; and AGV-2: 0.282984 ± 9. Reproducibility is better than 50 ppm for the granitoid compositions and better than 40 ppm for the basaltic/andesitic compositions. For the isotopic analyses acquired early in this project on glass columns, Hf isotopic analyses from several of the reference materials were significantly less reproducible than Nd and Sr isotopic analyses determined from the same sample dissolution. The 176Hf/177Hf ratios for relatively radiogenic compositions (BCR-1, 2; BHVO-1, 2; RGM-1) were shifted systematically toward lower values by 100-150 ppm when a borosilicate primary column was used. Although systematic, the shift for felsic compositions was generally within analytical error, except for GSP-2, which has a very low Hf isotopic ratio, where the shift was to higher 176Hf/177Hf. Trace element and isotopic characterization of the borosilicate glass column, borosilicate frits, and quartz columns reveals extremely variable levels of trace elements. The 176Hf/177Hf ratios for these materials are very unradiogenic (borosilicate glass <0.28220 frit = 0.28193 ± 4). The borosilicate frit material appears to be the most variable in elemental concentration and isotopic composition. The quartz material has very low levels (

Weis, Dominique; Kieffer, Bruno; Hanano, Diane; Nobre Silva, Inês; Barling, Jane; Pretorius, Wilma; Maerschalk, Claude; Mattielli, Nadine

2007-06-01

385

Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents a framework for a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic climate-response program designed to provide early warning of changes in the seasonal water cycle of Maine. Climate-related hydrologic changes on Maine's rivers and lakes in the winter and spring during the last century are well documented, and several river and lake variables have been shown to be sensitive to air-temperature changes. Monitoring of relevant hydrologic data would provide important baseline information against which future climate change can be measured. The framework of the hydrologic climate-response program presented here consists of four major parts: (1) identifying homogeneous climate-response regions; (2) identifying hydrologic components and key variables of those components that would be included in a hydrologic climate-response data network - as an example, streamflow has been identified as a primary component, with a key variable of streamflow being winter-spring streamflow timing; the data network would be created by maintaining existing USGS data-collection stations and establishing new ones to fill data gaps; (3) regularly updating historical trends of hydrologic data network variables; and (4) establishing basins for process-based studies. Components proposed for inclusion in the hydrologic climate-response data network have at least one key variable for which substantial historical data are available. The proposed components are streamflow, lake ice, river ice, snowpack, and groundwater. The proposed key variables of each component have extensive historical data at multiple sites and are expected to be responsive to climate change in the next few decades. These variables are also important for human water use and (or) ecosystem function. Maine would be divided into seven climate-response regions that follow major river-basin boundaries (basins subdivided to hydrologic units with 8-digit codes or larger) and have relatively homogeneous climates. Key hydrologic variables within each climate-response region would be analyzed regularly to maintain up-to-date analyses of year-to-year variability, decadal variability, and longer term trends. Finally, one basin in each climate-response region would be identified for process-based hydrologic and ecological studies.

Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Lent, Robert M.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

2009-01-01

386

Standards for scanned U.S. Geological Survey historical topographic quadrangle collection  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is scanning, cataloging and georeferencing all scales and all editions of approximately 200,000 topographic maps published by the USGS since the inception of the topographic mapping program in 1884. This effort will provide a comprehensive digital repository of USGS topographic maps that are easily discovered, browsed, and downloaded by the public at no cost. Historical maps are an important national resource because they provide the long-term record and documentation of the natural, physical, and cultural landscape. The history documented by this collection and the analysis of distribution and spatial patterns is invaluable throughout the sciences and nonscience disciplines. Genealogists, historians, anthropologists, archeologists and others use this collection for research, as well as for a framework on which a myriad of information can be presented in relation to the landscape. Topographic maps originally were produced to support minerals exploration, but they quickly became popular with many other disciplines and with the general public because of their usefulness for viewing and studying the Nation's vast landscape. For more than 130 years, the USGS topographic mapping program has accurately portrayed the complex geography of our Nation through maps using the lithographic printing process. Digital maps are georeferenced (tied to a known earth coordinate system) to provide for basic map analysis, such as distance and area calculation, and for coordinate readouts. Two georeferenced digital formats are used for distribution of the maps: (1) Portable Document Format (PDF) with a geospatial extension that is called Georeferenced PDF (GeoPDF®); and (2) Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) with an accompanying transformation file in Extensible Markup Language (XML) readable by open-source and proprietary Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This report provides standards for the georeferenced maps, including data sources, file formats, file resolution, datums and projections, georeferencing, data quality, metadata content descriptions, and supporting documentation. In digital form, and with the added benefit of georeferencing, the maps become a versatile document that can be viewed individually, or viewed together across large areal extents.

Allord, Gregory J.; Fishburn, Kristin A.

2011-01-01

387

Quality-assurance results for routine water analysis in US Geological Survey laboratories, water year 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US. Geological Survey operates a quality- assurance program based on the analyses of reference samples for the National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado, and the Quality of Water Service Unit in Ocala, Florida. Reference samples containing selected inorganic, nutrient, and low ionic-strength constituents are prepared and disguised as routine samples. The program goal is to determine precision and bias for as many analytical methods offered by the participating laboratories as possible. The samples typically are submitted at a rate of approximately 5 percent of the annual environmental sample load for each constituent. The samples are distributed to the laboratories throughout the year. Analytical data for these reference samples reflect the quality of environmental sample data produced by the laboratories because the samples are processed in the same manner for all steps from sample login through data release. The results are stored permanently in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System. During water year 1991, 86 analytical procedures were evaluated at the National Water Quality Laboratory and 37 analytical procedures were evaluated at the Quality of Water Service Unit. An overall evaluation of the inorganic (major ion and trace metal) constituent data for water year 1991 indicated analytical imprecision in the National Water Quality Laboratory for 5 of 67 analytical procedures: aluminum (whole-water recoverable, atomic emission spectrometric, direct-current plasma); calcium (atomic emission spectrometric, direct); fluoride (ion-exchange chromatographic); iron (whole-water recoverable, atomic absorption spectrometric, direct); and sulfate (ion-exchange chromatographic). The results for 11 of 67 analytical procedures had positive or negative bias during water year 1991. Analytical imprecision was indicated in the determination of two of the five National Water Quality Laboratory nutrient constituents: orthophosphate as phosphorus and phosphorus. A negative or positive bias condition was indicated in three of five nutrient constituents. There was acceptable precision and no indication of bias for the 14 low ionic-strength analytical procedures tested in the National Water Quality Laboratory program and for the 32 inorganic and 5 nutrient analytical procedures tested in the Quality of Water Service Unit during water year 1991.

Maloney, T. J.; Ludtke, A. S.; Krizman, T. L.

1994-01-01

388

77 FR 6580 - National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP) and National Geological and Geophysical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Geological Survey National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP) and National Geological...the purposes of the National Geological Mapping Act of 1992; the Federal, State, and...of the National Cooperative Geological Mapping Program and National Geological and...

2012-02-08

389

A M/T dwarf binary from the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey: probing the L/T transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stellar-substellar binaries are interesting benchmarks. They are useful to constrain the complex substellar atmosphere physics, by using parameters brought by the much better characterized primary star. We report the discovery of CFBDS J111807-064016, a T2 brown dwarf bounded to the low-mass M4.5-M5 star 2MASS J111806.99-064007.8. The brown-dwarf was identified from the Canada France Brown Dwarf Survey, a wide field survey for cool brown dwarfs conducted on the CFHT telescope. The primary was subsequently identified as a co-moving object. We have obtained near-infrared spectroscopy and compare these data with recent atmosphere models to determine the physical parameters of both components, and estimated the masses using evolutionary models. This system is a particularly valuable benchmark since the brown dwarf is an early T: the cloud-clearing that occurs at the L/T transition is very sensitive to gravity and metallicity, but also to dust properties. The T-dwarf, with its metallicity estimate from the primary, provides an anchor for the colors of L/T transition brown dwarfs. This makes it a prime targets to test brown dwarf atmosphere and evolution models.

Reylé, C.; Delorme, P.; Artigau, E.; Delfosse, X.; Albert, L.; Forveille, T.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Robin, A. C.

390

Proposed program for and present status of the Geological Survey's investigation of domestic resources of radioactive raw materials  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This interim report is designed to show the present status of the Geological Survey's information and the parts of a comprehensive program necessary to improve our information about the raw material resources of uranium and thorium. Rarely in geologic work has it been necessary. to determine so completely a nation's resources of useful minerals in so brief a span of time. Ordinarily, information on mineral resources Is accumulated during a long period of years. However, uranium and thorium were suddenly thrust from a position of subsidiary economic interest into one of great strategic importance. Information concerning their occurrence must, therefore, be obtained as rapidly as reliable methods of investigation will permit. Accordingly the program must be at once comprehensive and carried out over an area more extensive than is usual in the search for and appraisal of most other mineral resources.

Bulter, A.P., Jr.; Killeen, P.L.; Page, G.B.; Rubey, W.W.

391

The U.S. geological survey rass-statpac system for management and statistical reduction of geochemical data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

RASS is an acronym for Rock Analysis Storage System and STATPAC, for Statistical Package. The RASS and STATPAC computer programs are integrated into the RASS-STATPAC system for the management and statistical reduction of geochemical data. The system, in its present form, has been in use for more than 9 yr by scores of U.S. Geological Survey geologists, geochemists, and other scientists engaged in a broad range of geologic and geochemical investigations. The principal advantage of the system is the flexibility afforded the user both in data searches and retrievals and in the manner of statistical treatment of data. The statistical programs provide for most types of statistical reduction normally used in geochemistry and petrology, but also contain bridges to other program systems for statistical processing and automatic plotting. ?? 1977.

VanTrump, Jr. , G.; Miesch, A. T.

1977-01-01

392

Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains summaries of the progress of water-resources studies in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division, Utah District, from October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. The program in Utah during this period consisted of 21 projects; a discussion of each project is presented in the main body of the report. The USGS was established by an act of Congress on March 3, 1879, to provide a permanent Federal agency to conduct the systematic and scientific classifi- cation of the public lands, and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources, and products of national domain. An integral part of that original mission includes publishing and dissemi- nating the earth-science information needed to understand, to plan the use of, and to manage the Nation's energy, land, mineral, and water resources.

Compiled by Hardy, Ellen E.; Dragos, Stefanie L.

1995-01-01

393

THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6  

SciTech Connect

We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Delorme, Philippe [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Reyle, Celine [Observatoire de Besancon, Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut Utinam, UMR CNRS 6213, BP1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Albert, Loic [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, Observatoire de Grenoble, Universite J. Fourier, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McLure, Ross J. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: chris.willott@nrc.ca

2010-03-15

394

Acute general surgery in Canada: a survey of current handover practices  

PubMed Central

Background Today’s acute care surgery (ACS) service model requires multiple handovers to incoming attending surgeons and residents. Our objectives were to investigate current handover practices in Canadian hospitals that have an ACS service and assess the quality of handover practices in place. Methods We administered an electronic survey among ACS residents in 6 Canadian general surgery programs. Results Resident handover of patient care occurs frequently and often not under ideal circumstances. Most residents spend less than 5 minutes preparing handovers. Clinical uncertainty owing to inadequate handover is most likely to occur during overnight and weekend coverage. Almost one-third of surveyed residents rate the overall quality of the handovers they received as poor. Conclusion Handover skills must be taught in a systematic fashion. Improved resident communication will likely decrease loss of patient information and therefore improve ACS patient safety.

Johner, Amanda M.; Merchant, Shaila; Aslani, Nava; Planting, Anneke; Ball, Chad G.; Widder, Sandy; Pagliarello, Giuseppe; Parry, Neil G.; Klassen, Dennis; Hameed, S. Morad

2013-01-01

395

A review and evaluation of alternatives for updating U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover maps  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1974, the U.S. Geological Survey has been engaged in a nationwide program of baseline mapping of land use and land cover and associated data at a scale of 1:250,000. As l:100,000-scale bases have become available, they have been used for mapping certain areas and for special applications. These two scales are appropriate for mapping land use and land cover data on a nationwide basis within a practical time frame, and with an acceptable degree of standardization, accuracy, and level of detail. An essential requisite to better use of the land is current information on land use and land cover conditions and on the rates and trends of changes with time. Thus, plans are underway to update these maps and data. The major considerations in planning a nationwide program for updating U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover maps are as follows: (1) How often should maps be updated? (2) What remotely sensed source materials should be used for detecting and compiling changes in land use and land cover? (3) What base maps should be used for presenting data on land use and land cover changes? (4) What maps or portions of a map should be updated? (5) What methods should be used for identifying and mapping changes? (6) What procedures should be followed for updating maps and what formats should be used? These factors must be considered in developing a map update program that portrays an appropriate level of information, relates to and builds upon the existing U.S. Geological Survey land use and land cover digital and statistical data base, is timely, cost-effective and standardized, and meets the varying needs of land use and land cover data users.

Milazzo, Valerie A.

1980-01-01

396

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, Canada, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed a geoscience-based assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of provinces within the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin primarily comprises the (1) Alberta Basin Province of Alberta, eastern British Columbia, and the southwestern Northwest Territories; (2) the Williston Basin Province of Saskatchewan, southeastern Alberta, and southern Manitoba; and (3) the Rocky Mountain Deformed Belt Province of western Alberta and eastern British Columbia. This report is part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Resources Project assessment of priority geologic provinces of the world. The assessment was based on geoscience elements that define a total petroleum system (TPS) and associated assessment unit(s). These elements include petroleum source rocks (geochemical properties and petroleum generation, migration, and accumulation), reservoir description (reservoir presence, type, and quality), and petroleum traps (trap and seal types, and timing of trap and seal formation relative to petroleum migration). Using this framework, the Elk Point-Woodbend Composite TPS, Exshaw-Fernie-Mannville Composite TPS, and Middle through Upper Cretaceous Composite TPS were defined, and four conventional assessment units within the total petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered resources in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

Higley, Debra

2013-01-01

397

Cartography at the U.S. Geological Survey: the National Mapping Division's cartographic programs, products, design, and technology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the prime source of many kinds of topographic and special-purpose maps of the United States and its outlying areas. It is also a prime source of digital map data. One main goal of the USGS is to provide large-scale topographic map coverage of the entire United States. Most of the Nation is already covered. We expect that initial coverage will be completed by 1991. For many purposes, many public agencies, private organizations, and individuals need reliable cartographic and geographic knowledge about our Nation. To serve such needs, all USGS maps are compiled to exacting standards of accuracy and content.

Ogrosky, Charles; Gwynn, William; Jannace, Richard

1989-01-01

398

U.S. Geological Survey and Afghanistan Ministry of Mines and Industry cooperative assessment of Afghanistan's undiscovered oil and gas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey and Afghanistan Ministry of Mines and Industry cooperative assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources of northern Afghanistan were first released through this presentation on March 14, 2006, at the Afghan Embassy in Washington, D.C. On March 15 the results were presented in Kabul, Afghanistan. The purpose of the assessment and release of the results is to provide energy data required to implement the rebuilding and development of Afghanistan's energy infrastructure. This presentation includes a summary of the goals, process, methodology, results, and accomplishments of the assessment. It provides context for Fact Sheet 2006-3031, a summary of assessment results provided in the presentations.

Wandrey, Craig J.; Ulmishek, Gregory; Agena, Warren; Klett, Timothy R.; Afghanistan Oil and Gas Research Assessment Team

2006-01-01

399

Land-cover change research at the U.S. Geological Survey-assessing our nation's dynamic land surface  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an unprecedented, 27-year assessment of land-use and land-cover change for the conterminous United States. For the period 1973 to 2000, scientists generated estimates of change in major types of land use and land cover, such as development, mining, agriculture, forest, grasslands, and wetlands. To help provide the insight that our Nation will need to make land-use decisions in coming decades, the historical trends data is now being used by the USGS to help model potential future land use/land cover under different scenarios, including climate, environmental, economic, population, public policy, and technological change.

Wilson, Tamara S.

2011-01-01

400

Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan for the North Florida Program Office of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan. The plan for each District describes the policies and procedures that ensure high quality in the collection, processing, analysis, computer storage, and publication of surface-water data. The North Florida Program Office Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the North Florida Program office for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

Franklin, Marvin A.

2000-01-01

401

Guidelines for preparing a quality assurance plan for district offices of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Quality Assurance Plan. This plan is a combination of a District's management principles and quality assurance processes. The guidelines presented in this report provide a framework or expanded outline that a District can use to prepare a plan. Parti- cular emphasis is given to a District's: (1) quality assurance policies; (2) organization and staff responsibilities; and (3) program and project planning. The guidelines address the 'how', 'what', and 'who' questions that need to be answered when a District Quality Assurance Plan is prepared.

Schroder, L. J.; Shampine, W. J.

1992-01-01

402

US Geological Survey research in radioactive waste disposal, fiscal year 1979  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geologic and hydrologic research related to the disposal of radioactive wastes is reported. The categories are described as they relate most directly to: (1) high level and transuranic wastes; (2) low level wastes; or (3) uranium mill tailings. The identification and geohydrologic characterization of waste disposal sites, investigations of specific sites where wastes have been stored, and regions or environments where waste disposal sites might be located are studied. Techniques and methods for characterizing disposal sites and studies of geologic and hydrologic processes related to the transport and (or) retention of waste radionuclides are presented.

Schneider, R.; Roseboom, E. H., Jr.; Robertson, J. B.; Stevens, P. R.

403

Late-Quaternary glaciation and postglacial emergence, southern Eureka Sound, high-Arctic Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eureka Sound is the inter-island channel separating Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands, High Arctic Canada. This thesis reconstructs the glacial and sea level history of southern Eureka Sound through surficial geological mapping, studies of glacial sedimentology and geomorphology, surveying of raised marine shorelines, radiocarbon dating of marine shells and driftwood and surface exposure dating of erratics and bedrock. Granite dispersal

Colm Seamus O Cofaigh

1999-01-01

404

U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative-2010 Annual Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the third report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual work activities. The first report described activities for 2007 and 2008, and the second report covered work activities for FY09. This third report covers work activities conducted in FY2010, and it continues the 2009 approach of reporting on all the individual activities to help give WLCI partners and other readers the full scope of what has been accomplished. New in this year's report is an additional section for each work activity that outlines the work planned for the following fiscal year. In FY2010, there were 35 ongoing/expanded, completed, or new projects conducted under the five major multi-disciplinary