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1

Geological Survey of Canada, Geodynamics Program: Earthquake Processes: Cascadia Subduction Zone  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page explains the tectonic setting of the west coast of North America. It explains the process of the subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath the North American plate. It describes the methods used to observe tectonic deformation caused by subduction, and explains how they are used to estimate earthquake potential in the region. Links are provided to the Geological Survey of Canada's Geodynamics Program home page, and to their Pacific Geoscience Centre page.

2

Vermont Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Vermont Geological Survey, also known as the Division of Geology and Mineral Resources in the Department of Environmental Conservation, conducts surveys and research relating to the geology, mineral resources and topography of the State. This site provides details about the states geology with a downloadable state geologic map and key, state rock information, gold in Vermont, fossils found in the state, bedrock mapping details, stream geomorphology, the Champlain thrust fault, earthquakes, radioactive waste and links for additional information.

3

Louisiana Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Louisiana Geological Survey, located at Louisiana State University, developed this website to promote its goal to provide geological and environmental data that will allow for environmentally sound natural resource development and economic decisions. Users can find general information about the Survey's mission, staff, plan, and history. The website features the research and publications of the Basin Research, Cartographic, Coastal, Geologic Mapping, and Water and Environmental sections. Researchers can discover stratigraphic charts of Louisiana, information on lignite resources, and other geologic data.

4

Oklahoma Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Geological Survey is a state agency dedicated to geological research and public service. This site contains information on earthquakes, geographic names, general Oklahoma geology, and the mountains and water resources of the state. There are educational materials available to order, many of which are free. Geologic maps indicate rock types and ages, as well as the geologic provinces of the state. Links are provided for more resources.

5

Geological Survey Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If your research or interests lie in the geology of South Dakota, then the state's Geological Survey Program Web site is for you. Offered are online publications and maps, a geologic reference database, a lithologic logs database, digital base maps, a water quality database, and several other quality information sources worth checking out.

6

Utah Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Utah Geological Survey. Materials available here include news articles and information on geologic hazards; information on places of geological interest; and popular geology topics such as earthquakes, rocks and minerals, fossils, economic resources, groundwater resources, and others. Educational resources include teaching kits, the 'Teacher's Corner' column in the survey's newsletter, and a series of 'Glad You Asked' articles on state geological topics. There is also an extensive list of free K-12 educational materials, as well as a set of curriculum materials such as activity packets, slide shows, and teachers' handbooks, which are available to order.

2011-03-30

7

Kentucky Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Kentucky maintains the Kentucky Geological Survey Web site. Visitors will find a number of educational general information pages on rocks and minerals, fossils, coal, geologic hazards, industrial minerals, maps and GIS, oil and natural gas, and water, as well as the general geology of Kentucky. Each page contains specific information, data, and research summaries from the university. The geology of Kentucky page, for example, shows a map of geologic periods and gives descriptions of the rock strata in the state, a description of its landforms, and a geological photo album of physiographic regions and points of interest.

1997-01-01

8

Arizona Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Arizona Geological Survey. Information accessible here includes maps, information on oil, gas, and minerals in the state, back issues of the survey's newsletter, and a list of resources for public education in the state. These resources include information centers for Arizona geology and Earth Science, the survey's geology library and bibliographic database, a repository of rock cuttings and cores, and a contact for earth science education who will assist teacher groups in introducing local geology to their classes.

9

South Carolina Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The South Carolina Geological Survey (SCGS) homepage contains information about state mapping, education and outreach programs, and recent news. For educators, there is the Earth Science education series of publications which includes presentations and page-size graphics on such topics as earthquakes, plate tectonics, geologic time, fossils, and others. Other materials include information on mineral resources, links to organizations in and about South Carolina geology, the South Carolina core repository, the Geologic Map of South Carolina, and others.

10

Ohio Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Ohio Geological Survey. Materials available through the site include a variety of publications, particularly the Survey's reports, bulletins, information circulars, guidebooks, and many others. There is an extensive selection of maps, including topographic maps in several scales, and downloadable geologic maps of several themes (drift thickness, bedrock geology, karst areas, glacial geology, and many others), as well as digital maps and data. The interactive maps section features online map viewers of abandoned mines, earthquake epicenters, surficial geology, geology of Lake Erie, and others. The educational resources page has links to the 'Hands On Earth' series of activities, GeoFacts (short bulletins on Ohio geological topics), nontechnical educational leaflets, field guides, and links to other publications, rock and mineral clubs, educational associations, and related websites. There is also a link to the Ohio Seismic Network, a network of seismograph stations located at colleges, universities, and other institutions that collects and disseminates information about earthquakes in Ohio.

11

Pennsylvania Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Pennsylvania Geological Survey. Users can access digital maps, data, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), information on economic resources, and information on field mapping in the state. Classroom resources include a set of lesson plans on Pennsylvania geology; 'Rock Boxes', a set of rock samples which can be ordered; information on mineral collecting; and a series of educational publications, page-sized maps, and the 'Trail of Geology' park guide.

2011-03-29

12

California Geological Survey - Landslides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the CA Geological Survey (CGS) presents information on landslides as well as maps and products of various past and present CGS programs to map and respond to landslides in the state of California, including the Forest and Watershed Geology Program, the Seismic Hazards Zonation Program, the Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping project, and the Landslide Map Index.

Survey, California G.

13

Louisiana Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Louisiana Geological Survey (LGS). The site includes general information about LGS and its various offices, as well as an overview of the Basin Research Energy Section, the oil, gas, and coal research section of LGS. The publications and data page features a catalog and ordering information for documents on mineral resources, fossils, water resources, geological bulletins and maps, and many others, as well as a selection of downloadable maps, including 30 x 60 minute geologic quadrangles, a generalized geologic map of the state with accompanying text, and an online map viewer of the state with selectable layers (geology, water bodies, cultural features, and Landsat imagery). There is also an online listing of well logs, grouped by parish, online listings of core samples, grouped by state, and downloadable public information documents on a variety of geologic topics.

14

North Dakota Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the North Dakota Geological Survey. Site materials include information on the state's oil, gas and coal resources, maps, publications, and regulations. The paleontology page features educational articles, information on fossil collecting, articles about fossil exhibits, and information on the state fossil collection. The state GIS hub creates and distributes digital spatial data that conforms to national mapping standards. The teaching tools page includes illustrations and descriptions of rocks and minerals found in the state, as well as information on meteorites and newsletter articles about teaching North Dakota geology. There are also links to landslide maps, surficial geology maps, and links to other survey publications such as reports, bulletins, field studies, other geological and topographic maps, and information on groundwater resources.

15

California Geological Survey: Geologic Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This index provides access to a selection of geologic maps of California, as well as an overview of geologic and other mapping activities in the state. The index, which can be accessed by clicking on an interactive map of the state, contains lists of selected geologic maps in California prepared by the Regional Geologic Mapping Project (RGMP). The RGMP staff monitors the literature and collects references that contain geologic mapping that may be useful for future compilations. In addition, the site has information about Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping, The Mineral Resources and Mineral Hazards Mapping Program, North Coast Watersheds Assessment Program, The Timber Harvesting Plan Enforcement Program, and The Seismic Hazards Mapping Program. A set of links is provided to other sources of geologic maps and map information.

16

Indiana Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Indiana Geological Survey (IGS). Site materials include information on Earth science issues such as groundwater, mapping, coal and mineral resources, oil and gas, and seismic hazards. There is also information on the geologic time scale and stratigraphic record, rocks and minerals, fossils (including nautiloids of the Ordovician period in Indiana), caves and karst topography in Indiana, and glacial geology. The Geographic Information Ssytems (GIS) and mapping section includes a GIS atlas for the state, an online map viewer, links to the Indiana coal mine information system, petroleum database management system, and a download page where users can access GIS datasets for the state.

17

Minnesota Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) was established in 1872 as part of the University of Minnesota. The function of the MGS is to serve "the people of Minnesota by providing systematic geoscience information to support stewardship of water, land, and mineral resources." This website from the Digital Conservancy at the University of Minnesota provides access to all of items published by the MGS. The items are contained within the Collections area, and visitors will find headings here such as "Geology of Minnesota Parks," "County Atlas Series," and the "Bulletin of the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey." First-time visitors can check out the Recent Submissions area on the right-hand side of the page to look over some new findings, including hydrogeological maps of different counties around the state. One item that should not be missed is the "Geology of Minnesota: A Centennial Volume" from 1972. It's a tremendous volume and one that cannot be ignored by students of the physical landscape and geological history of the state.

2012-09-21

18

British Geological Survey: Geomagnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The British Geological Survey illustrates its work monitoring the earth's magnetic field in the UK at this website. Users can learn about the six observatories located in the Atlantic and the UK. Using the Grid Magnetic Angle Calculator, visitors can determine the angle between the British National grid north and the magnetic north. The website features Mercator projects created with the World Magnetic Model, geomagnetic data for the academic community, space weather services for industry, and more. Students can find tutorials about the Earth's magnetic field, magnetic reversals, and magnetic storms.

19

Minnesota Geological Survey funded  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Minnesota Geological Survey, which was in danger of being closed down due to lack of funding, recently had their $1,075 million budget restored for fiscal 1993. Governor Ann Carlson signed the new bill into law on January 17.“Enactment of this legislation has effectively removed the threat of closure that has hung over our heads since the veto on June 4, 1991,” according to MGS director Priscilla Grew. Carlson vetoed the line item of the 2-year University of Minnesota budget that funds the MGS. The MGS is funded under Minnesota's Higher Education bill, rather than as a state agency.

Bush, Susan

1992-03-01

20

Unusual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Lower Cretaceous Ostracode Zone sediments and related oils of the Western Canada sedimentary basin 1 Geological Survey of Canada Contribution No. 1996492 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of the aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of extracts of Lower Cretaceous Ostracode Zone sediments from the Western Canada sedimentary basin indicate the predominance of polycyclic hydroaromatic components. Most of these have not been previously reported in the literature, but are obviously diagenetically related to a new class of molecule whose natural distribution and biological significance remain to be determined. The

Maowen Li; C. L. Riediger; M. G. Fowler; L. R. Snowdon

1997-01-01

21

Development of a 3-D geological model towards natural hazards mitigation, St. Lawrence River Valley, Eastern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Canadian Government's main goals to ensure safe and strong communities for its citizens, the Geological Survey of Canada has recently undertaken the development of a 3-D geological model and a seamless surficial geology map of the St. Lawrence River valley in Eastern Canada. This paper summarizes the initial phase of this project, which consists of gathering,

RÉJEAN COUTURE; DOMINIQUE GAUVREAU; J. ROBERT BÉLANGER

22

Wyoming State Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

23

Geological Surveys Bureau Browse Area  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Offered by the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau, the Browse Area page is a great collection of articles, photos, and maps about the state's geology geared especially to the public. Topics include Age of Dinosaurs in Iowa, Landscape Features, Satellite Image, Field Travels of Early Iowa Geologists, Meteorites in Iowa's History, Oil Exploration, and much more. This is a wonderful example of how government can provide informative and fun sites to the public without going overboard with high-end and complicated Web design.

24

Geological Survey of Tanzania  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United Republic of Tanzania was formed in 1964 by the merger of Tanganyika and Zanzibar and is located on the eastern coast of Africa between the Great Lakes of the Rift Valley. Tanzania has a diverse mineral resource base that includes gold and base metals, diamond-bearing kimberlites, nickel, cobalt, copper, coal resources, and a variety of industrial minerals and rocks such as kaolin, graphite, and dimension stone. This web site was created by the Mineral Resources Department (MRD), a subsidiary of the Ministry of Energy and Minerals, and contains basic information about the country's logistical environment, mineral sector policy, geological database, and more.

1997-01-01

25

US Geological Survey World Energy Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released on March 24, 2000, the US Geological Survey's World Energy Project Preliminary Report "estimates the volume of oil and gas, exclusive of the U.S., that may be added to the world's reserve in the next 30 years." The preliminary report contains a world assessment showing there is more oil and gas in the Middle East and in offshore areas of western Africa and eastern South America than figured in previous assessments, and less oil and gas in Canada and Mexico, and significantly less natural gas in the Former Soviet Union. "The USGS World Petroleum Assessment 2000 is the first of its kind to provide a rigorous geologic foundation for estimating undiscovered energy resources for the world."

2000-01-01

26

United States Geological Survey yearbook  

SciTech Connect

This yearbook of the U.S. Geological Survey describes results of a number of USGS research efforts in such diverse areas as studying the quality of the nation's surface-and ground-water resources, assessing the nation's oil and gas resources, and applying cartographic and remote sensing techniques to aid legislators, policymakers, and the public in solving land-and resources-management problems. Specific issues discussed in this yearbook include erosion of Louisiana's coastal barrier islands, transport of pollutants in sediment in the Mississippi River, primary mapping economic analysis, and probabilities of large earthquakes in California.

Not Available

1988-01-01

27

OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Canada weathered the global economic crisis well, mainly reflecting sustained growth in domestic pending, and the economy is continuing to grow despite the persistence of international turbulence, most recently stemming from the euro zone sovereign debt crisis. In Canada's case, several factors are acting in its favour. Federal fiscal plans are…

OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

2012-01-01

28

Chapter 41: Geology and petroleum potential of the West Greenland-East Canada Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal programme. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geological basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Petroleum System. Potential petroleum source rocks include strata of Ordovician, Lower and Upper Cretaceous, and Palaeogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study - the Eurekan Structures AU, NW Greenland Rifted Margin AU, NE Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU - encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered technically recoverable resources. The mean volumes of undiscovered resources for the West Greenland-East Canada Province are 10.7 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 75 ?? 1012 cubic feet of gas, and 1.7 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. For the part of the province that is north of the Arctic Circle, the estimated mean volumes of these undiscovered resources are 7.3 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 52 ?? 1012 cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.1 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

Schenk, C. J.

2011-01-01

29

Maine Geological Survey: Online Educational Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Maine Geological Survey (MGS) has crafted a fine set of materials for those interested in learning more about the state's natural history via virtual tours, lesson plans, and maps. First up is the Virtual Tour of Maine Geology, which includes photographs of bedrock geology, geologic hazards, mineral collecting, and surficial geology. The Lesson Plans area contains 51 lessons, including "Igneous Rock Identification" and "Composition of Topsoil." A number of MGS maps are available online in the Maps and Publications area. The site includes a Bibliography of Maine Geology, which contains over 12,000 references. Additionally, the site contains a link to the MGS publications page, which has official state of Maine wall maps available for purchase.

2009-12-08

30

US Geological Survey customers speak out  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Provides results of a customer survey carried out in 1994 by the US Geological Survey. Uses of cartographic products are classified, as are application areas, accuracy satisfaction, media, Digital Line Graph requirements in update, and frequency of product use. USGS responses and plans for the future are noted. -M.Blakemore

Gillespie, S.; Snyder, G.

1995-01-01

31

Illinois State Geological Survey: Teacher Resources for Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) has worked hard to create this vast array of materials designed for teachers working in geology and the earth sciences. The site is divided into two primary areas: "ISGS Teacher Resources" and "Other Teacher Resources." The "Ask An Expert" section is a good place to start, and it contains an A to Z archive of questions (and answers) that have been posed so far. Visitors are welcome to explore topics here like isotope geochemistry, limestone petrography, and also "Gold in Illinois." Also, this area contains links to teaching geology, which are quite useful. The "Other Teacher Resources" area brings together links to germane sites, such as the Denver Earth Science Project, NASA's meteorology home page, and online guides to landforms from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

32

Surficial geology and benthic habitat of the German Bank seabed, Scotian Shelf, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To provide the scientific context for management of a newly opened scallop fishing ground, surficial geology and benthic habitats were mapped on German Bank on the southern Scotian Shelf off Atlantic Canada. To provide a seamless regional dataset, multibeam sonar surveys covered 5320 km 2 of the bank in water depths of 30-250 m and provided 5 m horizontal resolution bathymetry and backscatter strength. Geoscience data included high-resolution geophysical profiles (seismic reflection and sidescan sonar) and seabed sediment samples. Geological interpretation revealed that bedrock is exposed at the seafloor on much of German Bank and is overlain in places by glacial and postglacial sediment. Biological data included seafloor video transects and photographs from which 127 taxa of visible megabenthos were identified. Trawl bycatch data were obtained from government annual research surveys. Statistical analysis of these two datasets and a suite of oceanographic environmental variables demonstrated that significantly different fauna exist on bedrock, glacial sediment and postglacial sediment.

Todd, Brian J.; Kostylev, Vladimir E.

33

Crustal-scale geological and thermal models of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, Arctic Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin is a petroliferous province in northwest Arctic Canada and one of the best-known segments of the Arctic Ocean margin due to decades of exploration. Our study is part of the programme MOM (Methane On the Move), which aims to quantify the methane contribution from natural petroleum systems to the atmosphere over geological times. Models reflecting the potential of a sedimentary basin to release methane require well-assessed boundary conditions such as the crustal structure and large-scale temperature variation. We focus on the crustal-scale thermal field of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin. This Basin has formed on a post-rift, continental margin which, during the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary, developed into the foreland of the North American Cordilleran foldbelt providing space for the accumulation of up to 16 km of foreland deposits. We present a 3D geological model which integrates the present topography, depth maps of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary horizons (Kroeger et al., 2008, 2009), tops of formations derived from interpreted 2D reflection seismic lines and 284 boreholes (released by the National Energy Board of Canada), and the sequence stratigraphic framework established by previous studies (e.g. Dixon et al., 1996). To determine the position and geometry of the crust-mantle boundary, an isostatic calculation (Airýs model) is applied to the geological model. We present different crustal-scale models combining isostatic modelling, published deep reflection and refraction seismic lines (e.g. Stephenson et al., 1994; O'Leary et al., 1995), and calculations of the 3D conductive thermal field. References: Dixon, J., 1996. Geological Atlas of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Area, Geological Survey of Canada Miscellaneous Report, 59, Ottawa, 173 pp. Kroeger, K.F., Ondrak, R., di Primio, R. and Horsfield, B., 2008. A three-dimensional insight into the Mackenzie Basin (Canada): Implications for the thermal history and hydrocarbon generation potential of Tertiary deltaic sequences, AAPG Bulletin, 92(2): 225-247. Kroeger, K.F., di Primio, R. and Horsfield, B., (2009). Hydrocarbon flow modeling in complex structures (Mackenzie Basin, Canada), AAPG Bulletin, 93(9): 1-25. O'Leary, D.M., Ellis, R.M., Stephenson, R.A., Lane, L.S. and Zelt, C.A., 1995. Crustal structure of the northern Yukon and Mackenzie Delta, northwestern Canada, Journal of Geophysical Research 100(B7): 9905-9920. Stephenson, R.A., Coflin, K.C., Lane, L.S. and Dietrich, J.R., 1994. Crustal structure and tectonics of the southeastern Beaufort Sea continental margin, Tectonics, 13(2): 389-400.

Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Kröger, Karsten; Lewerenz, Björn

2010-05-01

34

Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys is "to determine the potential of Alaskan land for production of metals, minerals, fuels, and geothermal resources." The homepage features a "Headlines" area that includes mining reports, links to press releases, and a fascinating interactive map of quaternary faults and folds that will be of great interest to geologists. Moving on, the Sections area contains links to specific department projects, including work on engineering geology, energy resources, and volcanology. Visitors won't want to miss the Geologic Materials Center area. Here they can learn about the Division's work cataloging, storing, and studying key metrics that tell the story of Alaska's geological resources. Finally, the Publications area contains links to all of the organization's written works, including those from the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks and a number of crucial reports from the U.S. Bureau of Mines. [KMG

35

Kentucky Geological Survey: Earth Science Education Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains educational resources for K-12 classrooms provided by the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS). The purpose of this site is to provide educational Earth Science resources from around the globe using the internet. Earth science links, classroom activities, demonstrations, and a listserv for teachers are provided.

36

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WELL WATERLEVEL DATA, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

USGS well waterlevel data for NC wells, as provided by North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NC-DENR). The zipped file contains 2 FoxPro databases: usgs.dbf - This database contains the well construction information for the US Geological Survey's moni...

37

Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, as part of the University of Wisconsin-Extension, is "an interdisciplinary organization that conducts natural resources surveys and research to produce information used for decision making, problem solving, planning, management, development, and education". The site offers downloadable online publications such as annual groundwater level summaries and understanding Wisconsin township, range, and section land descriptions. It also contains lists of other publications and various maps of Wisconsin, all of which can be ordered by mail. Information on the history of the survey and an interesting section that includes pictures and descriptions of karst (limestone) development and features is also available.

2001-01-01

38

Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

39

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short topical and summary articles about the results of 1982 geologic studies on a wide range of subjects of economic and scientific interest. Included are lists of references cited for each article and a compilation of reports about Alaska written by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and published by the Geological Survey and other organizations.

Edited by Reed, Katherine M.; Bartsch-Winkler, Susan

1984-01-01

40

Geologic Studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The collection of nine papers that follow continue the series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigative reports in Alaska under the broad umbrella of the geologic sciences. Contents: Redoubt Volcano and the Alaska Volcano Observatory, 10 years later;...

L. P. Gough F. H. Wilson

2001-01-01

41

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1984. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.

1985-01-01

42

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1983. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Reed, K. M.

1985-01-01

43

Geological Setting and Petroleum Potential of the Paleozoic Hudson Platform, Northern Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hudson Platform covers an area of 600,000 km2 and represents one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in Canada. The Hudson Platform contains the large Hudson Bay Basin and smaller Moose River Basin. The Hudson Bay and Moose River basins are surrounded and underlain by Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The Hudson Platform contains Ordovician to Cretaceous sedimentary strata, with a maximum known thickness of about 2500 m in Hudson Bay. The lower Paleozoic succession includes Late Ordovician to Early Devonian shallow marine carbonates and thin mudstones, deposited during widespread early Paleozoic marine inundation of the Canadian Shield, and Early to Late Devonian marine carbonates, evaporates, and mudstones deposited in saucer-shaped, isolated basin depocentres. There is no record of late Paleozoic sedimentation in the region, perhaps related to cratonic uplift accompanying the Alleghenian Orogeny. Lower Paleozoic strata are unconformably overlain by thin, erosional remnants of Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous nonmarine sandstones, mudstones and lignite seams (Moose River Basin) and Early Cretaceous marine sandstones and mudstones (Hudson Bay Basin). The Hudson Platform is currently considered a frontier prospect for hydrocarbon exploration. However, the long- held view that the region is underlain by a thin sedimentary succession with no appreciable hydrocarbon source rocks or reservoir intervals is erroneous. Geological and geophysical data indicate the Hudson Bay Basin contains many prospective petroleum reservoir and trap types, potentially including hydrothermal dolomite. Recent studies indicate Upper Ordovician oil shales are widespread and may have generated hydrocarbons in deeper parts of the Hudson Bay Basin. New high resolution bathymetric surveys in northern Hudson Bay have led to the recognition of circular sea-floor depressions similar to fluid or gas-escape pockmarks. A modern re-evaluation of the petroleum systems and energy resource potential of the Hudson Platform is the focus of a new Geological Survey of Canada research initiative.

Dietrich, J.; Hamblin, T.; Lavoie, D.; Duchesne, M.; Lajeunesse, P.; Zhang, Z.

2009-05-01

44

U. S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A comprehensive overview of the U.S. Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program and current volcanic activity in the United States. The Volcano Hazards Program monitors volcanoes and collects the best possible scientific information on volcanoes in the United States and elsewhere to reduce the risk from volcanic activity. Site includes links to the Program's four volcano observatories in Alaska, the Cascades (Washington State) , Hawaii, and Long Valley (California). Other links include information on volcano hazards: types, effects, locations and historical eruptions, information on reducing volcanic risks, volcano monitoring, emergency planning, and warning schemes. Other resources available are a photoglossary, volcano fact sheets and videos, an educator's page, and updates and weekly reports on worldwide, U.S., and Russian volcano activity.

45

Geologic Studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The collection of twenty-one papers continues the annual series of U.S. Geological Survey reports on the geology of Alaska. These contributions, which include full-length Articles and shorter Geologic Notes, are grouped under tow broad headings; Mineral R...

D. C. Bradley C. Dusel-Bacon

1992-01-01

46

Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey during 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies in 1985. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest. Separate bibliographic listings of published reports are included. These listings are: (1) data releases and folio components derived from the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program, (2) reports on Alaska released in U.S. Geological Survey publications in 1985, and (3) reports about Alaska by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various scientific journals in 1985.

Edited by Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Reed, K. M.

1986-01-01

47

Owl Broadcast Surveys in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broadcast surveys are used to determine the presence and relative abundance of nocturnal owls, but there has been little effort to standardize such surveys. This paper examines broadcast survey data collected in 1995 and 1996 in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada. Three hundred calls from six species of owls were recorded at 893 stops for a call rate of

D. Lisa Takats; Geoffrey L. Holroyd

48

State Geological Surveys and Related Agencies in the United States  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page is part of the California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology Web site. It provides a list of state geological surveys and related organizations in the United States (and Puerto Rico). For all of these agencies, mail addresses as well as known e-mail and Internet links are provided. Links are also provided to pages on geologic mapping, geologic hazards, earthquake engineering, mineral resources, and technical information and publications.

49

The British Geological Survey seismic monitoring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The British Geological Survey (BGS) monitors the seismicity in and around the British Isles. The seismic network was started in the seventies and built up over the years to 146 short-period stations. An upgrade of this network started a few years ago and will result in a modern network with broadband seismometers, high dynamic range digitizers and real-time communication (Internet, ADSL, satellite). In total the network will comprise about 50 stations, with only few short-period stations remaining. Equipment is used from both Guralp and Nanometrics, and their respective software for data acquisition is used to bring the data to the centre in near real-time. The automated data processing is done through Earthworm. Event data are analysed using SEISAN. Continuous data are kept for all broadband stations and checked for quality and completeness. Real-time data is also exchanged with neighbouring networks. The data is used for routine monitoring, but also research. The main research objectives are to understand distribution of seismicity and relating earthquakes to tectonics, develop velocity and attenuation models and study the seismic hazard and earthquake effects.

Ottemoller, L.; Baptie, B.; Luckett, R.

2009-04-01

50

43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... § 3836.13 What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys? (a) Geological surveys are surveys of the geology of mineral deposits. These are done by, among other things, taking mineral samples, mapping rock units, mapping...

2012-10-01

51

US Geological Survey World Energy Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Energy Project's Website holds a wide collection of data including province assessment reports and maps showing geology, oil and gas fields, and geologic provinces (Africa, Arabian Peninsula, South Asia, South America, Former Soviet Union, Asia Pacific Region, and Iran). Finally, a report ranks the world's oil and gas provinces by known petroleum volumes.

52

A Survey of Hospital Psychology in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the major advances in health psychology over the past decade and the changes that have taken place in the Canadian health sector, there remains a paucity of information available about the structure of psychological services in Canadian health-care settings. The most current information about psychology in Canada's hospitals was gathered in 1982 — almost 20 years ago (Arnett, Martin,

Kathy L. Humbke; Debby L. Brown; Andrea N. Welder; Denise T. Fillion; Keith S. Dobson; John L. Arnett

2004-01-01

53

Volcanic and geologic database projects of the Geological Survey of Japan (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) is presently implementing the GEO-DB project, which aims to integrate all kinds of geological information in GSJ. GSJ published more than 50 CD-ROM series and established more than 20 databases at the Research Information Database (RIO-DB) of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Presently, four volcanic databases are open to the public: (1) Quaternary volcano database (RIO-DB), (2) Active volcano database (RIO-DB), and (3) ASTER satellite image database of major volcanoes. The Quaternary volcano database contains information such as volcanic type, history, age and pictures of more than 300 Quaternary volcanoes in Japan. More detailed volcanic information will be added to the database in the near future. The active volcano database contains information of active volcanoes in Japan such as the catalog of eruptive events during the last 10,000 years and geological maps of active volcanoes. The ASTER satellite image database provides sequential ASTER satellite image datasets of major volcanoes in the world. Collaboration between Quaternary and active volcano databases and the VOGRIPA project is the next important activity at the Geological Survey of Japan. The Geological Survey of Japan introduced the Integrated Geological Map Database (GeoMapDB) in 2006. The GeoMapDB is based on a WebGIS technology, which makes it possible to browse, overlay and search geological maps online. The database contains geological maps with scales ranging from 1:2 million to 1:25,000. Links to aforementioned volcanic database and active fault database in RIO-DB are also available. OneGeology is an international initiative of the geological surveys of the world and a flagship project of the ‘International Year of Planet Earth’. It aims to create dynamic geological map of the world available at the world wide web. Geological Surveys from 109 countries of the world are participating in this project. The Geological Survey of Japan, AIST is promoting OneGeology in Asia. The OneGeology portal was officially launched in 2008. Volcanic hazard maps are available for most major active volcanoes in Japan. A web-based GIS system combining various types of information with real time numerical simulations are very important for the next generation of volcanic hazard maps. Volcanic gravity flow simulations using the energy cone model were developed on GEO Grid system in AIST. An interactive user interface is available on the GEO Grid website. The pyroclastic flow simulation is open to all scientists and local government officials at http://geoapp.geogrid.org/gridsphere.

Takarada, S.; Nakano, S.; Hoshizumi, H.; Itoh, J.; Urai, M.; Nishiki, K.

2009-12-01

54

Recent US Geological Survey Publications On Water Resources in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey has made available publications on Water Resources in Alaska. Although the actual reports need to be ordered, abstracts of papers on Alaska hydrology and glaciology are available at the Website.

55

Wild Bird Influenza Survey, Canada, 2005  

PubMed Central

Of 4,268 wild ducks sampled in Canada in 2005, real-time reverse transcriptase–PCR detected influenza A matrix protein (M1) gene sequence in 37% and H5 gene sequence in 5%. Mallards accounted for 61% of samples, 73% of M1-positive ducks, and 90% of H5-positive ducks. Ducks hatched in 2005 accounted for 80% of the sample.

Bastien, Nathalie; Booth, Timothy F.; Bowes, Victoria; Buck, Peter A.; Breault, Andre; Caswell, Dale; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Davies, J. Chris; Elahi, Seyyed Mehdy; Fortin, Madeleine; Kibenge, Fred; King, Robin; Li, Yan; North, Norman; Ojkic, Davor; Pasick, John; Pryor, Sydney Paul; Robinson, John; Rodrigue, Jean; Whitney, Hugh; Zimmer, Patrick; Leighton, Frederick A.

2008-01-01

56

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; organization and status of programs in 1976  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report of the activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska is organized in four parts (1) services and responsibilities of the U.S. Geological Survey; (2) organization of the U.S. Geological Survey; 13) current U.S. Geological Survey activities; and (4) cooperative projects with Federal, State, and local agencies.

Edited by Cobb, Edward Huntington

1976-01-01

57

United States Geological Survey Yearbook, fiscal year 1987  

SciTech Connect

The 1987 US Geological Survey yearbook describes the results of a number of Survey research efforts in such diverse areas as assessing the Nation's strategic and critical mineral resources studying the quality of the Nation's surface- and ground-water resources, and applying cartographic and remote sensing techniques to aid legislators, policy makers, and the public in solving land- and resource-management problems.

Not Available

1988-01-01

58

U.S. Geological Survey Research Centers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Website of USGS' Coastal and Marine Geology Program. Site features an easy to use interactive resource locator with pull down menus. Resources are broken down by topic, region, and resource type. Information includes tsunamis, earthquakes, erosion, hurricanes, and much more. Information available for many different science disciplines. Access SoundWaves, USGS's monthly newsletter, and read impact studies from past hurricanes.

59

Pacific Sardine Trawl Surveys - Canada. Document 9.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Surveys of marine fish populations are generally undertaken to obtain estimates of absolute or relative abundance of the species of interest as well as obtaining data on their distribution and biological attributes (length, weight, sex, age, maturity, etc...

J. Schweigert

2010-01-01

60

Curiosity rover surveys Martian atmosphere and geology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three months after its dramatic landing on the surface of Mars, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), known as Curiosity, is beginning to produce a variety of initial results, scientists reported at the Geological Society of America meeting in Charlotte, N. C., on 5 November. Curiosity landed on 6 August 2012 in Gale Crater, an impact crater 155 kilometers in diameter. During the next 2 years, the mission will characterize the geologic setting and search for signs of past habitable conditions. Curiosity project scientist John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) noted that Curiosity's instruments have begun sampling the Martian atmosphere. On 2 November, NASA announced that the mission's first atmospheric measurements had not detected any clear evidence of methane in the Martian atmosphere.

Balcerak, Ernie

2012-11-01

61

Volcanic and geologic database projects of the Geological Survey of Japan (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) is presently implementing the GEO-DB project, which aims to integrate all kinds of geological information in GSJ. GSJ published more than 50 CD-ROM series and established more than 20 databases at the Research Information Database (RIO-DB) of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Presently, four volcanic databases are open to the

S. Takarada; H. Hoshizumi; J. Itoh; M. Urai; K. Nishiki

2009-01-01

62

United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Earthquake Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes the research activities of the Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The activities include: borehole geophysics and rock mechanics, crustal deformation, earthquake information, earthquake geology and paleoseismology, hazards, seismology and earth structure, and strong motion seismology, site response, and ground motion. Other links include: earthquake activity, earthquake facts and education, earthquake products, hazards and preparedness, regional websites, and seismic networks.

63

Stability Zone of Natural Gas Hydrates in a Permafrost-Bearing Region of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin: Study of a Feasible Energy Source (Geological Survey of Canada Contribution No.1999275)  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of geological and geophysical data from 150 wells in the Beaufort-Mackenzie region(study area between 68 deg. 30'-70 deg. 00'N and 131 deg. -39 deg. W) led to reinterpretation of the depth of methane hydrate stability and construction of the first contour maps displaying thickness of hydrate stability zones as well as hydrate stability zone thicknesses below permafrost. Calculations were based on construction of temperature-depth profiles incorporating regional heat-flow values, temperature at the base of ice-bearing permafrost, and models relating thermal conductivity with depth. Data analysis indicates the presence and extent of the methane hydrate stability zone is related mainly to the history of permafrost development and less so by the relatively small regional variations of temperature gradients. Analysis of well logs and other indicators in conjunction with knowledge of the hydrate stability zone allows reevaluation of the location of possible gas hydrate occurrences. Log analysis indicates that in the onshore and shallow sea area of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, methane hydrate occurs in 27 wells. Fifteen of these locations coincides with underlying conventional hydrocarbon occurrences. Previous analyses place some of the hydrate occurrences at greater depths than proposed for the methane hydrate stability zone described in this study. Interpretation of geological cross sections reveals that hydrates are related mainly to sandy deltaic and delta-plain deposits in Iperk, Kugmallit, and Reindeer sequences although additional hydrate picks have been inferred in other sequences, such as Richards. Overlying permafrost may act as seal for hydrate accumulations; however, the thickness of permafrost and its related hydrate stability zone fluctuated during geological time. It is interpreted that only in the last tens of thousand of years (i.e., Sangamonian to Holocene), conditions for hydrates changed from nonstable to stable. During Early and Late Wisconsinan and Holocene time, conditions were favorable for generation and trapping of hydrates. However, previously during Sangamonian time,less favorable conditions existed for hydrate stability. Gas release from hydrates may have occurred during times when hydrate stability was non existent because of permafrost melting episodes. It is interpreted that entrapment of gas in hydrate molecular structures is related to the existence of conventional structural traps as well as less permeable sediments such as the Mackenzie Bay Formation, which act as seal.

Majorowicz, J. A., E-mail: majorowi@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca; Hannigan, P. K., E-mail: phanniga@nrcan.gc.ca

2000-03-15

64

New urbanism developments in Canada: a survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the summer of 2006, researchers surveyed Canadian “new urbanism” projects by reviewing literature and websites, examining municipal and government documentation, and contacting local authorities. The study found that many of the projects that began as “new urbanist” changed during development, eventually becoming more conventional in character. Only one development project reached build?out as a complete new urbanism community by

Jill L. Grant; Stephanie Bohdanow

2008-01-01

65

United States Geological Survey yearbook, fiscal year 1980  

SciTech Connect

The fiscal year 1980 Yearbook summarizes the activities of the US Geological Survey in response to its scientific and regulatory missions and its responsibility for exploration of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. The main sections of this Yearbook are: (1) the year in review - a brief overview of the significant events of the Geological Survey during fiscal year 1980; (2) perspectives - essays focusing on specific events (rather than scientific topics) and programs involving multi-division participation; (3) missions, organization, and budget - a description of the Geological Survey's major duties and assignments and of the organizational structure that supports its missions; (4) division chapters - a description on the significant accomplishments (rather than a comprehensive program by program discussion) of each of the eight operating divisions and offices; and (5) appendices - provide supplementary information regarding key personnel, cooperators, and selected summary budgetary tables and an index.

Not Available

1980-01-01

66

New activities at the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As the Nation's principal source of information about the configuration of the land surface, the composition and structure of the rocks at and beneath the surface, the distribution and character of its energy, mineral, and water resources, and the nature of natural geologic processes, the U. S. Geological Survey focuses its work on some of the Nation's most critical problems. As the Survey tackles new problems with new techniques, it is fully aware of the resource needs and environmental pressures of an expanding economy and growing population.

McKelvey, Vincent E.

1974-01-01

67

Geologic mapping of Kentucky; a history and evaluation of the Kentucky Geological Survey--U.S. Geological Survey Mapping Program, 1960-1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1960, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Kentucky Geological Survey began a program to map the State geologically at a scale of 1:24,000 and to publish the maps as 707 U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Maps. Fieldwork was completed by the spring of 1977, and all maps were published by December 1978. Geologic mapping of the State was proposed by the Kentucky Society of Professional Engineers in 1959. Wallace W. Hagan, Director and State Geologist of the Kentucky Geological Survey, and Preston McGrain, Assistant State Geologist, promoted support for the proposal among organizations such as Chambers of Commerce, industrial associations, professional societies, and among members of the State government. It was also arranged for the U.S. Geological Survey to supply mapping personnel and to publish the maps; the cost would be shared equally by the two organizations. Members of the U.S. Geological Survey assigned to the program were organized as the Branch of Kentucky Geology. Branch headquarters, including an editorial staff, was at Lexington, Ky., but actual mapping was conducted from 18 field offices distributed throughout the State. The Publications Division of the U.S. Geological Survey established a cartographic office at Lexington to prepare the maps for publication. About 260 people, including more than 200 professionals, were assigned to the Branch of Kentucky Geology by the U.S. Geological Survey at one time or another. The most geologists assigned any one year was 61. To complete the mapping and ancillary studies, 661 professional man-years were required, compared with an original estimate of 600 man-years. A wide variety of field methods were used, but most geologists relied on the surveying altimeter to obtain elevations. Surface data were supplemented by drill-hole records, and several dozen shallow diamond-drill holes were drilled to aid the mapping. Geologists generally scribed their own maps, with a consequent saving of publication costs. Paleontologists and stratigraphers of the U.S. Geological Survey cooperated closely with the program. Paleontologic studies were concentrated in the Ordovician of central Kentucky, the Pennsylvanian of eastern and western Kentucky, and the Mesozoic and Cenozoic of westernmost Kentucky. In addition to financial support, the Kentucky Geological Survey provided economic data, stratigraphic support, and drillhole records to the field offices. Geologists of the State Survey made subsurface structural interpretations, constructed bedrock topography maps, and mapped several quadrangles. Some of the problems encountered were the inadequacy of much of the existing stratigraphic nomenclature, the uneven quality of some of the mapping, and the effects of relative isolation on the professional development of some of the geologists. The program cost a total of $20,927,500. In terms of 1960 dollars, it cost $16,035,000; this compares with an original estimate of $12,000,000. Although it is difficult to place a monetary value on the geologic mapping, the program has contributed to newly discovered mineral wealth, jobs, and money saved by government and industry. The maps are used widely in the exploration for coal, oil and gas, fluorspar, limestone, and clay. The maps are also used in planning highways and locations of dams, in evaluating foundation and excavation conditions, in preparing environmental impact statements, and in land-use planning.

Cressman, Earle Rupert; Noger, Martin C.

1981-01-01

68

The British Geological Survey and the petroleum industry  

SciTech Connect

The British Geological Survey is the UK`s national centre for earth science information with a parallel remit to operate internationally. The Survey`s work covers the full geoscience spectrum in energy, mineral and groundwater resources and associated implications for land use, geological hazards and environmental impact. Much of the work is conducted in collaboration with industry and academia, including joint funding opportunities. Activities relating directly to hydrocarbons include basin analysis, offshore geoscience mapping, hazard assessment, fracture characterization, biostratigraphy, sedimentology, seismology, geomagnetism and frontier data acquisition techniques, offshore. The BGS poster presentation illustrates the value of the collaborative approach through consortia support for regional offshore surveys, geotechnical hazard assessments and state-of-the-art R & D into multicomponent seismic imaging techniques, among others.

Chesher, J.A. [Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1995-08-01

69

United States Geological Survey Yearbook, Fiscal Year 1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fiscal year 1978 saw the U.S. Geological Survey continuing to perform its basic historical missions of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information about the Earth, its processes, and its water and mineral resources. Classifying Federal lands and supervising lessee mineral extraction operations on those lands were also major Survey concerns during the year. In addition, substantial progress was made in the exploration and assessment of the petroleum potential of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska, a recently assigned mission. These basic missions found expression in a wide range of program activities and interests as diverse as the sands of Mars and the volcanoes of Hawaii. Programs included assessment of numerous potential energy and mineral resources, study of earthquakes and other geologic hazards, appraisal of the magnitude and quality of the Nation's water resources, and supervision of lease operations on Federal lands. The Survey also was involved in developing data on land use and producing topographic, geologic, and hydrologic maps for public and private use. In cooperation with other Federal agencies, the Survey participated in studies under the U.S. Climate Program and continued its analysis of data received from the two Viking landers on the surface of Mars. On April 3, 1978, Dr. H. William Menard became the 10th Director of the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Menard, who, until his appointment, was Professor of Geology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, Calif., brings to the Director's post the experience gained in a long and successful career as a marine geologist and oceanographer. He succeeds Dr. Vincent E. McKelvey, who continues with the Survey as a senior research scientist.

U.S. Geological Survey

1979-01-01

70

United States Geological Survey Yearbook, Fiscal Year 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

It is not very often that a single event is so overwhelming that it changes public perceptions of natural hazards for generations. Perhaps for the U.S. Geological Survey, the explosive volcanic activity of Mount St. Helens began such a change. After 101 years of careful science of the Earth's past and meticulous observations and assessments of the present, predictive earth science was in full public view. However vague and faint the glimpse of the future made possible by earth science, it was enough. Warnings were issued, thousands of lives were saved, and the age of real-time geology began. The Survey's basic mission has not changed, but the power of our analytical tools has increased by several orders of magnitude. The Survey's efforts to understand Earth processes and hydrologic principles continued with the collection, during fiscal year 1980, of valuable new data on the geologic origin and framework, seismicity, and mineral and energy resources of the United States. The Survey is also responsible for classification of the leasable minerals on Federal lands and the regulation of mineral exploration and development activities on Federal and Indian lands. As the principal earth science fact-gathering agency, the Survey provides information for sound decisionmaking by government and private industry. Industry uses the Survey's information in exploring for energy and minerals and improving their efforts to make development of energy and minerals compatible with environmental protection standards. Government uses the Survey's information in conducting leasing operations on public lands, in regulating the safe design and siting of nuclear plants, and in establishing guidelines for determining and locating areas that are subject to geologic hazards such as landslides, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. The Yearbook reports a broad range of the Survey's accomplishments during the past fiscal year and provides an overview of future directions. Many of the topics covered will continue to be important natural resource and earth science issues of the 1980's.

U.S. Geological Survey

1981-01-01

71

LAND USE LAND COVER (LULC) - US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Mapping Program, a component of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), produces and distributes land use and land cover maps and digitized data for the conterminous U.S. and Hawaii. Land use refers to the human activities that are directly related to the land. The int...

72

Heringen Collections of the US Geological Survey Library, Reston, Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A special collection of German, Polish, and Russian language books, maps and reports in the US Geological Survey Library has an interesting and unusual history. The so-called 'Heringen Collection' came from Nazi Germany. Many of these items were captured ...

R. L. Hadden

2008-01-01

73

United States Geological Survey: Research on Invasive Species  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Invasive Species Program. Materials include information about the program, news articles, and information on research projects arranged by species, project, or region. There is also contact information for researchers and experts, as well as links to publications, events, and other sites with related information.

2011-07-12

74

United States Geological Survey: Research on Invasive Species  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Invasive Species Program. Materials include information about the program, news articles, and information on research projects arranged by species, project, or region. There is also contact information for researchers and experts, as well as links to publications, events, and other sites with related information.

75

Abbreviations used in publications of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The use of abbreviations in publications of the Geological Survey is determined by several forces working in different directions. Pulling in the direction of greater condensation and the freer use of abbreviations and symbols is the desire to achieve greater economy in publications. Working in the opposite direction is the desire to have the publications used more conveniently by an increasingly heterogeneous public.

U.S. Geological Survey

1953-01-01

76

U.S. Geological Survey Library Classification System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey library classifcation system has been designed for an earth science library. It is a tool for assigning classification numbers to earth science and allied pure science library materials in order to collect these materials into r...

R. S. Sasscer

1992-01-01

77

Maps out, models in at the British Geological Survey!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BGS has stopped its' systematic onshore geological surveying programme and the litho-printing of geological maps will cease after a final batch of completed maps are published. In future BGS will undertake integrated mapping and 3D modelling in user defined target areas considering all our available geospatial data (map, boreholes, geophysics etc) assessed in a single 3D workspace. The output will be 3D geological framework models that capture the understanding and interpretation of the survey geologist and honour all available data at the time. As well as building new models in these strategic areas, BGS is collating all existing models assembled over the last 25 years into a common framework to produce a multi-scaled National Geological Model of Britain. comprising crustal, bedrock and quaternary and anthropocene themes (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/research/UKGeology/nationalgeologicalmodel/home.html). Different to the traditional geological map, the national model will not be completed at any specific scale, but at every point in the model there may be a different geological resolution available, depending on the purpose mof the original model or the strategic national need for subsurface information. The need for a complete and robust nested stratigraphic framework (BGS Lexicon) is becoming more important as we advance this model. Archive copies of all legacy models will be approved and stored in their native formats. In addition a newly designed Geological Object Store will hold geological objects such as coverages, surfaces and cross-sections from these models inside a relational database to ensure versioning and long-term security of the National Geological Model. In the mid-term these models will be attributed with physical properties such as porosity and density and form inputs to process models such as groundwater and landslide models to help predict and simulate environmental change. A key challenge for geologists and their systems building the geological models is to maintain their models in a dynamic manner, so that they are fit for the requirements of many different users and that feedback from external parties can be incorporated into them. Only then are we achieving our vision of a shared National Geological Model.

Mathers, Steve; Kessler, Holger

2013-04-01

78

Publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The USGS has recently released this searchable database of bibliographic information on USGS publications dating back to the Survey's inception in 1785. Users have a number of search options, each of which can be further modified in many ways. Searches can be made by subject, keyword, author, and specific journal. Search returns do not include full text, but some have abstracts and all offer citation information, keywords, publisher and price. A Citation Manager allows users to download one or all of the selected items in a variety of formats, including HTML, EndNote, and ASCII. An additional feature at the site is a Query Track, which logs each user's most recent queries from the current browser session. The logs will be saved only as long as you remain connected to the Internet and do not close your browser. Users can opt to save the logs on their computer or diskette to rerun searches at a later date.

79

U.S. Geological Survey: The National Map Corps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Map Corps consists of citizens who devote some of their time to provide mapping information to the U.S. Geological Survey. Volunteers may download a guide that provides instructions on how to collect and send Global Positioning System (GPS) data to the USGS. A link is also provided to the National Map, an online, interacive mapping service. National Map users can zoom and pan about a map of the United States, find and identify features, and add layers of administrative and cultural data, elevations, topography, geology, and other data.

2008-03-19

80

Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Canada. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Adult education for indigenous peoples in Canada was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations engaged in adult education for Canada's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy and…

Richardson, Cathy; Blanchet-Cohen, Natasha

81

Changing Conditions In The Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Biological, Geographical, And Hydrological Research Of The U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address the need for understanding past, present, and future conditions in the northern latitudes, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Alaska Science Center conducts extensive research in the Yukon River Basin. The basin originates in Canada and spans Alaska from east to west encompassing diverse landscapes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Within this large watershed, USGS research is focused

T. P. Brabets; S. A. Frenzel; C. Markon; A. R. Degange

2006-01-01

82

77 FR 11565 - Agency Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: United States Geological Survey (USGS...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey [GX12GC009PLSG0] Agency Information...Request AGENCY: United States Geological Survey (USGS), Interior ACTION: Notice of...Clearance Officer, U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS...

2012-02-27

83

Canada-France Redshift Survey - X. The quasar sample  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Six objects with broad emission lines and redshifts from 0.48 to 2.07 were discovered among 736 extragalactic objects in the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). Although the luminosities of half of the objects are such that they are in the Seyfert regime (M_B<~-23), all would be designated as quasars in traditional surveys. Since the only selection criterion was that 17.5<=I_AB<=22.5, or approximately B<23 (assuming a continuum power-law slope alpha=-0.5), these quasars represent an unbiased, flux-limited sample. Although uncertain, the implied surface density, 200^-120-80 deg^-2, is the highest yet measured, and is in good agreement with extrapolations from other faint surveys and the evolving luminosity function models of Boyle. The distributions of the continuum properties, emission-line strengths, etc. of the quasars do not differ significantly from those of quasars selected by other means, and therefore they would have been detected in most traditional surveys. Three of the quasars may be associated with clusters or large structures of galaxies at z<~1.

Schade, David; Crampton, David; Hammer, F.; Le Fevre, O.; Lilly, S. J.

1996-01-01

84

Geophysical and Geologic Training of the Afghan Geological Survey, May, 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Afghanistan lies within the Alpine-Himalayan orogeny, and consists of four primary tectonic units: (1) the North Afghan Platform, part of the greater Kazakhstan craton that includes Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan; (2) the mountainous Hindu Kush-Pamirs in the northeast; (3) the transpressional plate boundary at the Chaman fault near the border with Pakistan; and (4) the southern accreted terranes located south of the east-west oriented Herat fault. The diverse geology of Afghanistan affords the country abundant natural resources, as well as many natural hazards. In order to assist in the identification of these resources and to map hazardous faults, a multi-agency consortium including the Afghan Ministry of Mines and Industry, the USGS and the US Navel Research Lab conducted a detailed airborne geophysical survey of the western half of Afghanistan during 2007. Over 110,000 km of data were collected, including aeromagnetic, gravity, hyperspectral imagery, synthetic aperture radar and photogrammetric data. These data provide remarkable images of the surficial and sub-surface structure of the country. Armed with these new, high quality data, USGS trainers conducted an in-depth training course at the offices of the Afghan Geological Survey (AGS) during May, 2008. Eighty staff members of the AGS attended the four-day course which covered the following topics: (1) the geology and tectonics of Afghanistan; (2) a synthesis of modern plate tectonic processes; (3) use of geophysical and geological data to identify natural resources and hazardous faults. Particular emphasis was placed on oil and gas, mineral, coal and water resources. Earthquake and landslide hazards in Afghanistan were also discussed in detail. The building of scientific and technical capabilities at the AGS is a high priority because the development of their natural resources will have a positive impact on economic growth in Afghanistan. Future courses will benefit from hands-on training in methods of geophysical data interpretation.

Mooney, W. D.; Bohannon, R.; Abraham, J.; Medlin, J.

2008-12-01

85

A historical survey of the pre-cretaceous geology of New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our knowledge of the pre-Cretaceous geology of New Zealand is reviewed historically from the 1840s to mid-1965, with stress laid on patterns of development, and the interrelationships and differing philosophies of field geologists and specialist personnel in University and Geological Survey. The contribution made through policy by Directors of the Geological Survey is outlined, and tribute paid to them and

J. B. Waterhouse

1965-01-01

86

United States Geological Survey Yearbook, Fiscal Year 1979  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In March 1979, the U.S. Geological Survey celebrated its 100th year of service to the Nation and 10 decades of stewardship of the land and its resources. During this year, as in the previous 99, the Survey discharged its national trust by collecting, analyzing, and disseminating earth science information and by continuing its somewhat more recent responsibilities of supervising the development of energy and mineral resources on Federal lands. The basic mission of the Survey has changed over the years, and the scope of its activities and the power of analytic tools have also increased by several orders of magnitude from the early surveys of then "remote" western areas of the United States to surveying and mapping the mountains of the Moon and the polar caps of Mars and from the use of surveyor's transits, picks, the travelling chemistry kits to interpretation of Earth imagery. These representative advances illustrate important and continuing trends for at no previous time have our earth resources been so precious or our consciousness of their finiteness so acute. The Yearbook reports a broad range of the Survey's accomplishments during the past fiscal year and offers an overview of its future. Many of the topics touched on below will continue to be important resource issues in the coming decade.

U.S. Geological Survey

1980-01-01

87

Geologic studies in Alaska by the U. S. Geological survey during 1987  

SciTech Connect

The reports presented in this book begin with an article on the advance of Hubbard Glacier and its damming of Russell Fiord in southern Alaska followed by 40 short papers related to the five regional subdivision of Alaska and to areas offshore on the Alaska continental shelf. These papers provide a representative sample of current U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research in Alaska. Two bibliographies cover reports about Alaska in USGS publications released in 1987 and reports about Alaska by USGS authors in outside publications in 1987.

Galloway, J.P.; Hamilton, T.D.

1988-01-01

88

U.S. Geological Survey - Water Resources of Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can access information on Virginia water resources, including real-time streamflow and ground water data, water quality data, and water use data. Interactive streamflow and groundwater level maps allow the user to locate recent data on stream discharge, gage height,and water level. Annual surface water and ground water reports are available from 1995. Other materials include information on the Chesapeake Bay river input monitoring program, links to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and information on USGS projects in Virginia; and links to USGS outreach and educational resources. Weather information is also available.

89

The United States Geological Survey National Mapping Program Fact Sheets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers a collection of United States Geological Survey (USGS) factsheets that introduce and explain a vast array of topics related to mapping. Each subject covers the history and development of that particular topic and includes any software or instruments that may be requried to utilize the information sources described. The topics covered on this site include: GIS, UTM, aerial photographs, map projections, map accuracy measurements, digital elevation models (DEM), satellite imagery, landcover mapping, hydrography, and numerous other components of maps. Information is available in several different formats (paper, html and pdf) and includes links back to other USGS services.

90

Isotopic Approaches to Evaluate the Fate of Injected CO2 in Two Geological Storage Projects in Mature Oilfields in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring and verification of CO2 storage is an essential component of geological storage projects. We present evidence from two enhanced oil recovery projects in Canada that geochemical and isotopic techniques can be successfully used to trace the fate of injected CO2. Geochemical and isotopic data for fluids and gases obtained from multiple wells at the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas

B. Mayer; G. Johnson; M. Nightingale; S. Maurice; M. Raistrick; S. Taylor; I. Hutcheon; E. Perkins

2008-01-01

91

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants. Topical Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capt...

K. Fisher R. McKaskle

2006-01-01

92

U.S. Geological Survey library classification system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system has been designed for earth science libraries. It is a tool for assigning call numbers to earth science and allied pure science materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. The classification can be used as a retrieval system to access materials through the subject and geographic numbers. The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and the development of new areas of research in the earth sciences. The system contains seven schedules: * Subject schedule * Geological survey schedule * Earth science periodical schedule * Government document periodical schedule * General science periodical schedule * Earth science map schedule * Geographic schedule Introduction provides detailed instructions on the construction of call numbers for works falling into the framework of the classification schedules. The tables following the introduction can be quickly accessed through the use of the newly expanded subject index. The purpose of this publication is to provide the earth science community with a classification and retrieval system for earth science materials, to offer sufficient explanation of its structure and use, and to enable library staff and clientele to classify or access research materials in a library collection.

Sasscer, R. Scott

1992-01-01

93

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; organization and status of programs in 1977  

USGS Publications Warehouse

United States Geological Survey projects in Alaska include a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. Studies in 1976 include economic geology, regional geology, stratigraphy, environmental geology, engineering geology, hydrology, and marine geology. Discussions of the findings or, in some instances, narratives of the course of the investigations are grouped in eight subdivisions corresponding to the six major onshore geographic regions, the offshore projects, and projects that are statewide in scope. Locations of the study areas are shown. In addition, many reports and maps covering various aspects of the geology and mineral and water resources of the State were published. These publications are listed. (Woodard-USGS)

Edited by Blean, Kathleen M.

1977-01-01

94

U.S. Geological Survey Presents: The Learning Web  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Learning Web, provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, is dedicated to K-12 education, exploration, and life-long learning. It is divided into two sections, Teaching in the Learning Web, and Living in the Learning Web. Teaching at present contains information about three main topics, Global Change, Working with Maps, and Earth Science. Each of these sections offers student activities, along with several images. Global Change and Working with Maps also offer teacher's guides that contain bibliographies and further information. Teaching also contains pointers to lists of USGS maintained pointers (not limited to K-12 sites) in subjects such as climate, earth science, hydrology, oceanography, and volcanology, among others. Living in the Learning Web presents information on topics such as household water supply, radon gas, preparing for volcanoes, and the affect of weather on streams. Each one of these sections connects to a pertinent USGS Web page, which in turn offers additional information and pointers.

1997-01-01

95

Groundwater technical procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A series of groundwater technical procedures documents (GWPDs) has been released by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water-Resources Discipline, for general use by the public. These technical procedures were written in response to the need for standardized technical procedures of many aspects of groundwater science, including site and measuring-point establishment, measurement of water levels, and measurement of well discharge. The techniques are described in the GWPDs in concise language and are accompanied by necessary figures and tables derived from cited manuals, reports, and other documents. Because a goal of this series of procedures is to remain current with the state of the science, and because procedures change over time, this report is released in an online format only. As new procedures are developed and released, they will be linked to this document.

Cunningham, William L.; Schalk, Charles W.

2011-01-01

96

The British Geological Survey Lexicon of Named Rock Units  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can search this database of British rock units by rock unit, preferred map code, maximum age of rock unit, and database status code (described at site) and retrieve information about which British Geological Survey (BGS) maps and publications cover those units. For example, a search for Stockdale Group and Ashgil leads to a record citing the lithology, upper and lower boundary definitions, unit thickness, geographic extent, parent unit, previous name, stratotype, and bibliographic reference for the Paleozoic Stockdale Group of Northern England. The Lexicon is intended foremost as a reference source and dictionary for the use of BGS geoscientists, but the basic information on the stratigraphical framework and rock terminology of the UK is useful for non-BGS geologists visiting the site.

97

The OECD 2012 Economic Survey of Canada and the Relationship between Higher Education and Productivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report entitled, "OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012," offers an exceptionally rigorous, in-depth, well-informed and well-documented review of policy and performance of Canada's economy and postsecondary system. The report is divided into three parts. The first part contains an overview of the Canadian economy, a summary of the rest of the…

Skolnik, Michael L.

2012-01-01

98

The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; organization and status of programs in 1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

United States Geological Survey projects in Alaska study a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. Work done in 1977 includes contributions to economic geology, regional geology, stratigraphy, engineering geology, hydrology, and marine geology. Many maps and reports covering various aspects of the geology and mineral and water resources of the State were published. In addition, the published 1:1,000,000-scale map of the State has been revised in two areas. A bibliography containing 263 reports on Alaska published in 1977 is included. (Woodard-USGS)

Edited by Johnson, Kathleen M.

1978-01-01

99

United States Geological Survey Yearbook, Fiscal Year 1977  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fiscal 1977 marked the 98th year the U.S. Geological Survey has endeavored in the unceasing task of providing information about the Earth and its physical resources, and regulating the activities of lessees engaged in extracting petroleum and other minerals from the public domain. The past year also marked the beginning of a third and challenging mission, drawing upon the Survey's scientific talents, to explore and assess the petroleum potential of a vast 37,000 square miles expanse of Alaska's North Slope known as the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. The first two missions require detailed and continuing investigations of the location, character, and extent of the Nation's land, water, mineral, and energy resources; a continuing National Topographic Mapping Program; the classification of Federal lands for mineral and waterpower potential; and a continuing program of technical review, safety inspection and royalty auditing of the operations of private parties engaged in mineral development on Federal lands to assure standards of safety, environmental protection, resource conservation, and a fair market return to the public for the development of their resources.

U.S. Geological Survey

1978-01-01

100

30 CFR Appendix to Part 253 - List of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false List of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps Appendix to Part 253 Mineral Resources MINERALS...to Part 253âList of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps Alabama (1:24,000 scale):...

2010-07-01

101

30 CFR Appendix to Part 253 - List of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false List of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps Appendix to Part 253 Mineral Resources MINERALS...to Part 253âList of U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Maps Alabama (1:24,000 scale):...

2009-07-01

102

Using an Internet Questionnaire to Characterize Bat Survey Efforts in the United States and Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standardized survey methods are important for obtaining reliable information on wildlife populations. As a precursor to creating a regional bat-survey (Chiroptera) protocol, we distributed a questionnaire via e-mail to biologists responsible for conducting bat surveys in the United States and Canada. We received 415 responses from 45 states and 7 Canadian provinces or territories. Most of the responses were from

THEODORE J. WELLER; WILLIAM J. ZIELINSKI

2006-01-01

103

Racialized identity and health in Canada: Results from a nationally representative survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses survey data to investigate health effects of racialization in Canada. The operative sample was comprised of 91,123 Canadians aged 25 and older who completed the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey. A “racial and cultural background” survey question contributed a variable that differentiated respondents who identified with Aboriginal, Black, Chinese, Filipino, Latin American, South Asian, White, or jointly

Gerry Veenstra

2009-01-01

104

Geomorphology in North American Geology Departments, 1971  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents results of a 1970-71 survey of 350 geomorphologists and geology departments to determine what sort of geomorphology is being taught in the colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. (PR)

White, Sidney E.; Malcolm, Marshall D.

1972-01-01

105

The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site includes materials on geology, coal and petroleum resources, industrial minerals, geologic hazards, ground water, topographic and geologic maps, education, and earth science. Teacher education materials include rock camps and telecourses. Special features include popular geology pages and frequently-asked-questions about geology and resources; updates about new museum specimens, flood and landslide information for homeowners, documents on mountaintop removal mining materials, and coal resource and mapping project information. Consultations, maps, publications, selected database items, and copies of documents are available at modest cost.

106

List of publications of the N. C. Geological Survey  

SciTech Connect

This booklet lists approximately 290 publications, some of which are out of print and may be borrowed from libraries and copied, but most listings include ordering information. The list contains bulletins, economic papers, regional geology series, field trip guidebooks, regional and county maps, geologic maps, orthophotoquads, topographic maps, aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric maps, etc.

Not Available

1986-01-01

107

The U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey has conducted four assessments of world oil and gas resources over the past 15 years. Recently, a new five year plan for the World Energy Program was completed. Eight regional coordinators were appointed and planning activities for a new world assessment which will include oil, natural gas and coal resources is planned within four years. Currently the program is undertaking U.S. AID sponsored collaborative work with research organizations in Russia including VINIGNI and VNIGRI. Some of the products planned for this collaborative effort include a petroleum basin map of the former Soviet Union and eventually a basin map of the world at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and databases characterizing past exploration activities in Russia. Centers are being established in Moscow and Tyumen to where state of the art seismic processing, organic geochemistry and geographic information systems will be operational. Additionally, collaborative research particularly organic geochemical studies and unconventional natural gas studies in the Timon-Pechora basin are underway. Training of Russian scientists both at the USGS and in Russia on equipment purchased for the Russian institutes has been underway for the past year. An analogous program, but at a smaller scale, focusing primarily on seismic processing and compilation of databases is underway with Ukranian geologists. Similar collaborative activities in coal research are underway in Armenian and Kyrgyzstan, and recently completed in India and Pakistan. Collaborative organic geochemical research, natural gas research with particular emphasis on basin centered gas accumulations or unconventional natural gas accumulations such as coal bed methane have been undertaken or are anticipated in several countries including Hungary, Poland, China, several Middle East countries, South America and Indonesia.

Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-08-01

108

Map Projections Used by the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

After decades of using only one map projection, the Polyconic, for its mapping program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) now uses sixteen of the more comnon map projections for its published maps. For larger scale maps, including topographic quadrangles and the State Base Map Series, conformal projections such as the Transverse Mercator and the Lambert Conformal Conic are used. On these, the shapes of small areas are shown correctly, but scale is correct only along one or two lines. Equal-area projections, especially the Albers Equal-Area Conic, and equidistant projections which have correct scale along many lines appear in the National Atlas. Other projections, such as the Miller Cylindrical and the Van der Grinten, are chosen occasionally for convenience, sometimes making use of existing base maps prepared by others. Some projections treat the Earth only as a sphere, others as either ellipsoid or sphere. The USGS has also conceived and designed several new projections, icluding the Space Oblique Mercator, the first map projection designed to permit mapping of the Earth continuously from a satellite with low distortion. The mapping of extraterrestrial bodies has resulted in the use of standard projections in completely new settings. With increased computerization, it is important to realize that rectangular coordinates for all these projections may be mathematically calculated with formulas which would have seemed too complicated in the past, but which now may be programed routinely, if clearly delineated with numerical examples. A discussion of appearance, usage, and history is given together with both forward and inverse equations for each projection involved.

Snyder, John Parr

1982-01-01

109

U.S. Geological Survey Fundamental Science Practices  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The USGS has a long and proud tradition of objective, unbiased science in service to the Nation. A reputation for impartiality and excellence is one of our most important assets. To help preserve this vital asset, in 2004 the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) of the USGS was charged by the Director to develop a set of fundamental science practices, philosophical premises, and operational principles as the foundation for all USGS research and monitoring activities. In a concept document, 'Fundamental Science Practices of the U.S. Geological Survey', the ELT proposed 'a set of fundamental principles to underlie USGS science practices.' The document noted that protecting the reputation of USGS science for quality and objectivity requires the following key elements: - Clearly articulated, Bureau-wide fundamental science practices. - A shared understanding at all levels of the organization that the health and future of the USGS depend on following these practices. - The investment of budget, time, and people to ensure that the USGS reputation and high-quality standards are maintained. The USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSP) encompass all elements of research investigations, including data collection, experimentation, analysis, writing results, peer review, management review, and Bureau approval and publication of information products. The focus of FSP is on how science is carried out and how products are produced and disseminated. FSP is not designed to address the question of what work the USGS should do; that is addressed in USGS science planning handbooks and other documents. Building from longstanding existing USGS policies and the ELT concept document, in May 2006, FSP policies were developed with input from all parts of the organization and were subsequently incorporated into the Bureau's Survey Manual. In developing an implementation plan for FSP policy, the intent was to recognize and incorporate the best of USGS current practices to obtain the optimum overall program for our science. In January 2009, the USGS moved to full implementation of FSP. The FSP Advisory Committee (FSPAC) was formed to serve as the Bureau's working and standing committee to ensure the objectivity and quality of the Bureau's science information products and to provide support for the full implementation of FSP.

Fundamental Science Practices Advisory Committee

2011-01-01

110

ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT IN CANADA: TRENDS FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY AND RELEVANCE TO PROTECTED AREAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY We conducted a nation-wide survey to assess the state of ecosystem-based management (EBM) in Canada. Detailed interviews were completed with at least 10 individuals in each region of Canada, representing government, industry, non-government environmental, and municipal agencies. Some significant results include: 1) EBM lacks explicit definitions in most jurisdictions; 2) explicit adoption of EBM terminology in policy and legislation

Michael S. Quinn; Jannette C. Theberge

111

Geological assessing of urban environments with a systematic mapping survey: The 1:5000 urban geological map of Catalonia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ground features of urban areas and the geologic processes that operate on them are, in general, strongly altered from their natural original condition as a result of anthropogenic activities. Assessing the stability of the ground, the flooding areas, and, the health risk as a consequence of soil pollution, are, among others, fundamental topics of urban areas that require a better understanding. The development of systematic urban geological mapping projects provides valuable resources to address these issues. Since 2007, the Institut Geologic de Catalunya (IGC) runs an urban geological mapping project, to provide accurate geologic information of county capitals and towns of more than 10000 inhabitants of Catalonia. The urban zones of 131 towns will be surveyed for this project, totalizing an area of about 2200 km2 to be mapped in 15 years. According to the 2008 census, the 82 % of the population of Catalonia (7.242.458 inhabitants) lives in the areas to be mapped in this project. The mapping project integrates in a GIS environment the following subjects: - Data from pre-existing geotechnical reports, historical geological and topographical maps and, from historical aerial photographs. - Data from available borehole databases. - Geological characterization of outcrops inside the urban network and neighbouring areas. - Geological, chemical and physical characterisation of representative rocks, sediments and soils. - Ortophotographs (0.5 m pixel size) and digital elevation models (5 meter grid size) made from historical aerial photographs, to depict land use changes, artificial deposits and geomorphological elements that are either hidden or destroyed by urban sprawl. - Detailed geological mapping of quaternary sediments, subsurface bedrock and artificial deposits. - Data from subsurface prospection in areas with insufficient or confuse data. - 3D modelling of the main geological surfaces such as the top of the pre-quaternary basement. All the gathered data is harmonised and stored it in a database. The analysis of the database allows to compile and print the 1:5000 scale urban geological map according to the 1:5000 topographic grid of Catalonia. The map is composed by a principal map, geologic cross sections and several complementary maps, charts and tables. Regardless of the geological map units, the principal map also includes the main artificial deposits (such as infilled river valleys and road embankments), very recent or current superficial deposits, contours of outcropping areas, structural data and other relevant information gathered in stations, sampling points, boreholes indicating the thickness of artificial deposits and the depth of the pre-quaternary basement, contour lines of the top of the pre-quaternary basement surface and, water level data. The complementary maps and charts may change depending on the gathered data, the geological features of the area and the urban typology. However, the most representative complementary maps that includes the printed urban map are the quaternary subsurface bedrock map and the isopach map of thickness of quaternary and anthropogenic deposits. The map also includes charts and tables of relevant physical and chemical parameters of the geological materials, harmonised downhole lithological columns from selected boreholes, and, photographs and figures illustrating the geology of the mapped area and how urbanisation has changed the natural environment. The object of this systematic urban mapping survey is to provide a robust database to be used in targeted studies related to urban planning, geoengineering works, soil pollution and other important environmental issues that society should deal in the future.

Vilà, Miquel; Pi, Roser; Cirés, Jordi; de Paz, Ana; Berástegui, Xavier

2010-05-01

112

Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, Vol. 35, No. 9, September 1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Appraisal of the Cretaceous Echinoid fauna of Japan; Graphic representation of rock permeability; Abstracts of Geological Survey Seminar, No. 165: The tectonic history of the neogene sedimentary basins of the fossa magna area and northeast Japan...

1984-01-01

113

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives, Fiscal Year 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the activities that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2005. Most of these USGS activities were co...

2005-01-01

114

Surveying Cross Sections of the Kootenai River Between Libby Dam, Montana, and Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, Canada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The declining population of Kootenai River white sturgeon, which was listed as an Endangered Species in 1994, has prompted a recovery team to assess the feasibility of various habitat enhancement scenarios to reestablish white sturgeon populations. As the first phase in this assessment, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section and longitudinal data during 2002—03 at about 400 locations along the Kootenai River from Libby Dam near Libby, Montana, to where the river empties into Kootenay Lake near Creston, British Columbia, Canada. Survey control stations with a horizontal and vertical accuracy of less than 0.1 foot were established using a global positioning system (GPS) prior to collection of stream channel cross-section data along the Kootenai River. A total of 245 cross sections were surveyed. Six cross sections upstream from Kootenai Falls were surveyed using a total station where the river was too shallow or dangerous to navigate by vessel. The remaining 239 cross sections were surveyed by interfacing real-time GPS equipment with an echo sounder to obtain bathymetric data and with a laser range- finder to obtain streambank data. These data were merged, straightened, ordered, and reduced in size to be useful. Spacing between these cross sections ranged from about 600 feet in the valley flat near Deep Creek and Shorty Island and near bridges to as much as several miles in other areas. These stream channel cross sections will provide information that can be used to develop hydraulic flow models of the Kootenai River from Libby Dam, Montana, to Queens Bay on Kootenay Lake in British Columbia, Canada.

Barton, Gary J.; Moran, Edward H.; Berenbrock, Charles

2004-01-01

115

Survey of bisphenol A in bottled water products in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method based on isotope dilution headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry was used to assess levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in 56 samples of bottled water products sold in Canada. Levels of BPA in samples of all 51 non-polycarbonate (PC) bottled water products were lower than the method detection limit (0.50 µg l). Levels of BPA in most

Xu-Liang Cao; Jeannette Corriveau

2008-01-01

116

An agro-geological survey and evaluation information system based on GIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, China is carried out the agro-geological survey and evaluation, and build integrated information platform is an important part. Considering the actual requirements, an agro-geological survey and evaluation information system based on GIS (ASEGIS) is discussed in this paper. Firstly, the system architecture with three tiers based on client/server and browser/server mixed mode is designed; then, the system core functions which included database construction and management, agro-geological & eco-geochemical evaluation, agro-geological & eco-geochemical forecast and early-warning, and web information distribution are elaborated; lastly, the system application in Pearl River Delta area is described. On the whole, the ASEGIS based on GIS technologies had been proved to be effective, especially in mass & heterogeneous spatial and non-spatial data management, agro-geological spatial evaluations and forecast models establishment, and web information sharing.

Huang, Haifeng; Li, Hua; Yi, Wu

2011-01-01

117

The case for transforming the Geological Survey knowledge system: where digital geoscience spatial models meet the semantic grid1  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the Internet develops into a more powerful cyberinfrastructure (the Grid), Geological Survey knowledge will enter a framework where users assess its value by its relevance and evaluated reliability rather than its source, and artificial boundaries of place and discipline lose significance. Within Geological Surveys, much effort has been devoted to the development of the geological map through digital cartography.

T V Loudon

2006-01-01

118

Bridging the Gap between the Theory and Practice of Analysis of Data from Complex Surveys - Some Statistics Canada Experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

So as not to publish misleading results, subject matter analysts at Statistics Canada are urged to take account of the complexities of the survey design when doing analysis using data from Statistics Canada's surveys. While commercial software packages that incorporate methods for controlling for features of the sample design are becoming more readily available and more efficient to use, analysts

Georgia Roberts; Milorad Kovacevic; Owen Phillips; Jane Gentleman

119

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WALES SPECIMEN CONDITION SURVEY FORM FOR GEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of condition surveys of geological collections is widely ac­ knowledged. At the National Museum of Wales a condition survey form has been devised to facilitate this task. The form lists ten parameters that are scored from a master scoring guide. The results, in a format easily entered into a database, show the current state of the collections and

CAROLINE J. BUTTLER

120

Forty-second annual report of the Director of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The direct appropriations for the work under the Geological Survey for the fiscal year 1921 comprised items amounting to $1,730,700. In addition $140,000, to be disbursed under the direction of the Public Printer, was appropriated for printing the reports of the Survey.

Smith, George Otis

1921-01-01

121

Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the

L. G. Hayes; R. D. Brackett; F. D. Floyd

1981-01-01

122

First Cosmic Shear Results from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Wide Synoptic Legacy Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first measurements of the weak gravitational lensing signal induced by the large-scale mass distribution in the universe from data obtained as part of the ongoing Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). The data used in this analysis are from the Wide Synoptic Survey, which aims to image ~170 deg2 in five filters. We have analyzed an effective area

H. Hoekstra; Y. Mellier; L. van Waerbeke; E. Semboloni; L. Fu; M. J. Hudson; L. C. Parker; I. Tereno; K. Benabed

2006-01-01

123

Geological Setting and Petroleum Potential of the Paleozoic Hudson Platform, Northern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hudson Platform covers an area of 600,000 km2 and represents one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in Canada. The Hudson Platform contains the large Hudson Bay Basin and smaller Moose River Basin. The Hudson Bay and Moose River basins are surrounded and underlain by Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The Hudson Platform contains Ordovician

J. Dietrich; T. Hamblin; D. Lavoie; M. Duchesne; P. Lajeunesse; Z. Zhang

2009-01-01

124

Geology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Geologic history and geographic distribution of Central New York's surface and subsurface mineral resources are described. Present and potential economic uses are identified; abandoned, semi-active, and active extraction sites are depicted; and resources ...

J. F. Davis

1970-01-01

125

Microbiological survey of imported produce available at retail across Canada.  

PubMed

Increasing consumption and year-round consumer demand for fresh, minimally processed green vegetables have been observed in Canada and other developed countries. However, in the past two decades, produce has been increasingly implicated in outbreaks and correspondingly recognized as a vector for the transmission of pathogenic microorganisms. To this end, we examined the microbiological quality of imported produce available at retail across Canada during a period of limited domestic availability. In total, 106 samples obtained from five Canadian cities were purchased from retail outlets and subjected to microbiological analyses, including aerobic plate (APC) and coliform counts, and enrichments for enterococci, indicator Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Also, recovered Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were screened for antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Overall, samples included herbs (n=61), leafy greens (n=25), and spinach (n=20) deriving from five countries (Columbia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Mexico, and the United States [US]). APCs were consistent across commodities regardless of country, ranging from mean log10 CFU/g of 6.1 to 7.4, with no significant differences observed. Excluding a single leafy green sample from Guatemala, the lowest prevalence of coliforms was for Mexican herbs (22.2%), with a high of 66.7% on US leafy greens. With the exception of spinach, concentrations of coliforms varied widely, ranging from undetectable to too numerous to count (>8.5 log10 CFU/g). Of the commodities assessed, Mexican and US spinach had the lowest coliform concentrations (undetectable to 4.0 log10 CFU/g). Organic herbs and conventional leafy greens possessed significantly lower (p<0.05) prevalence of coliforms compared to conventional herbs and organic leafy greens, respectively. The most frequent recovery of indicator E. coli was observed for herbs, with 11.1, 8.3, and 3.7% prevalence observed in samples from Columbia, US, and Mexico, respectively. For spinach, 0 and 6.7% of Mexican and US samples tested positive, while no leafy green samples from either country were positive. No E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella spp. were detected. E. faecium and E. faecalis were recovered from 15.1 and 5.7% of samples, respectively. Although no glycopeptide resistance was observed, resistance to other clinically relevant antibiotics was noteworthy in both species. Overall, though microbiological quality indicators were frequently high, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella were not detected. However, the presence of resistance and reduced susceptibility to clinically relevant antimicrobials in recovered enterococci demonstrate imported fresh produce may serve as a vehicle for the transmission of antimicrobial resistance across national borders. PMID:23416548

Allen, Kevin J; Kovacevic, Jovana; Cancarevic, Ana; Wood, Jayde; Xu, Jieqing; Gill, Bradford; Allen, Jennifer K; Mesak, Lili R

2013-01-23

126

A Survey of Educational Acceleration Practices in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A nationwide survey of Canadian school districts was undertaken to determine the extent to which 18 forms of acceleration were permitted and practiced. Of the high enrollment provinces, BC school districts' participation rates were highest in the most types of acceleration. A surprising number of districts did not allow some forms of…

Kanevsky, Lannie

2011-01-01

127

Report of the British Geological Survey for 1988/89. Extracts from the Natural Environmental Research Council Report for 1988/89.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Land survey; Geochemistry and hydrogeology; Geophysics and engineering geology; United Kingdom offshore surveys; Overseas activities; The survey serves the community; National Geosciences Information Services.

1989-01-01

128

U.S. Geological Survey: Science in Your State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a variety of scientific reference materials for the 50 states and some territories in the U.S. For each state, there is a section of real-time data that includes current stream flow conditions, drought and flood watches, ground water data, and current natural hazards information. A facts section provides basic geographic and demographic information such as land area, highest and lowest points, population, capital, and others. There is also a selection of links to maps and tools, and additional information on each state's geology, ecology, natural resources, and natural hazards.

129

Storage and retrieval of ground-water data at the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a computerized Ground-Water Site-Inventory (GWSI) file that contains information about wells and springs at sites from all States of the United States. This file contains data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel and personnel of cooperating State, local and Federal agencies. The file is easily accessible to members or users of the National Water Data Exchange. Since the establishment of the GWSI file in 1974, the data base has grown 19% per year and contains information on about 770,000 sites as of February 1981. (USGS)

Mercer, Maria W.; Morgan, Charles O.

1982-01-01

130

Isotopic Approaches to Evaluate the Fate of Injected CO2 in Two Geological Storage Projects in Mature Oilfields in Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring and verification of CO2 storage is an essential component of geological storage projects. We present evidence from two enhanced oil recovery projects in Canada that geochemical and isotopic techniques can be successfully used to trace the fate of injected CO2. Geochemical and isotopic data for fluids and gases obtained from multiple wells at the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas Weyburn CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project (Saskatchewan, Canada) and from the Penn West Pembina Cardium CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery Monitoring Pilot (Alberta, Canada) were collected before and throughout the CO2 injection phase. Carbon isotope ratios of injected CO2 in the Weyburn project were significantly lower than those of background CO2 in the reservoir. In contrast, carbon isotope ratios of injected CO2 at Penn West's Pembina Cardium CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery Monitoring Pilot were markedly higher than those of background CO2. After commencement of CO2 injection, the concentrations and carbon isotope values of CO2 and HCO3- in fluids and gases repeatedly obtained from monitoring wells were determined. Increasing CO2 and HCO3- concentrations in concert with carbon isotope values trending towards those of the injected CO2 revealed effective solubility and ionic trapping of injected CO2 at several monitoring wells at both study sites. In addition, changes in the oxygen isotope values of reservoir fluids provided independent evidence for dissolution of injected CO2 in the produced waters. We conclude that geochemical and isotopic monitoring techniques can play an essential role in verification of CO2 storage provided that the isotopic composition of the injected CO2 is distinct.

Mayer, B.; Johnson, G.; Nightingale, M.; Maurice, S.; Raistrick, M.; Taylor, S.; Hutcheon, I.; Perkins, E.

2008-12-01

131

First Cosmic Shear Results from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Wide Synoptic Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the first measurements of the weak gravitational lensing signal induced by the large-scale mass distribution in the universe from data obtained as part of the ongoing Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). The data used in this analysis are from the Wide Synoptic Survey, which aims to image ~170 deg2 in five filters. We have analyzed an effective area of ~22 deg2 (31 pointings) of i' data spread over two of the three survey fields. These data are of excellent quality, and the results bode well for the remainder of the survey: we do not detect a significant ``B'' mode, suggesting that residual systematics are negligible at the current level of accuracy. Assuming a cold dark matter model and marginalizing over the Hubble parameter h?[0.6, 0.8], the source redshift distribution, and systematics, we constrain ?8, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum. At a fiducial matter density ?m=0.3 we find ?8=0.85+/-0.06. This estimate is in excellent agreement with previous studies. A combination of our results with those from the Deep component of the CFHTLS enables us to place a constraint on a constant equation of state for the dark energy, based on cosmic shear data alone. We find that w0<-0.8 at 68% confidence. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime equipped with MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS.

Hoekstra, H.; Mellier, Y.; van Waerbeke, L.; Semboloni, E.; Fu, L.; Hudson, M. J.; Parker, L. C.; Tereno, I.; Benabed, K.

2006-08-01

132

Introduction and role of the US Geological Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the USGS assumed overall supervision of the program, a policy was initiated to make all acquired technical data public as promptly as possible. Consequently, weekly drilling reports were issued, and the results of the geophysical surveys were made available as soon as the data had been put into usable form. This information was incorporated into several oil-industry service files

Gryc

1989-01-01

133

The Athabasca Oil Sands — A Regional Geological Perspective, Fort McMurray Area, Alberta, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Most of the bitumen in the Athabasca deposit is hosted within fluvial, estuarine, and marginal marine deposits of the Lower\\u000a Cretaceous Wabiskaw-McMurray succession. The present study is an integration of recent outcrop and subsurface studies, mainly\\u000a focused in the Fort McMurray area of northeastern Alberta. The basis of the regional geologic framework includes outcrop sections\\u000a (78), detailed core descriptions (165),

Frances J. Hein; Darrell K. Cotterill

2006-01-01

134

Forty-fourth annual report of the Director of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The direct appropriations for the work under the Geological Survey for the fiscal year 1922 comprised items amounting to $1,450,940. In addition $119,000, to be disbursed under the direction of the Public Printer, was appropriated for printing the reports of the Survey, and allotments of $8,000 and $5,050.93 for miscellaneous printing and binding and miscellaneous supplies, respectively, were made from Interior Department appropriations.

Smith, George Otis

1923-01-01

135

The Children Are Watching: A Survey of Children's Broadcasting in Canada and Some Recommendations for the Future.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the findings of a survey of children's broadcasting in Canada, conducted by two media experts who traveled about the provinces and territories of Canada over a one-year period, and recorded their subjective responses to what they di...

P. Liptrott A. Poyser

1979-01-01

136

Adiposity, adipose tissue distribution and mortality rates in the Canada Fitness Survey follow-up study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To compare mortality rates across indicators of adiposity and relative adipose tissue distribution in the Canadian population.SUBJECTS: The sample included 10 323 adult participants 20–69 y of age from the Canada Fitness Survey who were monitored for all-cause mortality over 13 y.METHODS: BMI, waist circumference (WC) and the sum of five skinfolds (SF5) were indicators of adiposity, and the

PT Katzmarzyk; CL Craig; C Bouchard

2002-01-01

137

Research of Catalogue Service System based on China Geological Survey Information Grid platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the platform of China Geological Survey Information Grid(CGSIG), variety of spatial data of large storage capacity and different data format and spatial services which are various and powerful are collected and put together, therefore it needs a effective mechanism to store, manage, retrieve and discover these geo-resources. Catalogue Service System based on the platform of CGSIG adopts a means

Miaomiao Song; Zhong Xie; Xiangang Luo; Liang Wu; Chaoling Li

2010-01-01

138

Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1987.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Observation and research activities by the Geological Survey of Japan at the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima Volcano; The 1986 eruption and products of Izu-Oshima Volcano; Major element chemistry of products of the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima Volcan...

1987-01-01

139

Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1975. Geological Survey Circular 765.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The United States Geological Survey has compiled data on water use in this country every fifth year since 1950. This document is the most recent of this series and presents data on water withdrawn for use in the United States in 1975. In the introduction, recent and present water use studies are discussed along with a description of the…

Murray, C. Richard; Reeves, E. Bodette

140

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific bureau within the Department of the Interior; the bureau strives to produce impartial scientific results that are relevant to the people of the United States and their land and resource managers. In cooper...

1999-01-01

141

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAMS AND INVESTIGATIONS RELATED TO SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics

W. R. OSTERKAMP; J. R. GRAY

142

1995 U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM 2  

EPA Science Inventory

The gnis2_r_point layer in EPA Spatial Data Library System (ESDLS) provides a point coverage of the geographic names from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) GNIS2. Currently, the gnis2_r_point layer in the EPA New England GIS database contains only selected data for features with ...

143

Sudbury Project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Petrology, Chemistry, and Origin of Breccia Formations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Within the Sudbury Project of the University of Muenster and the Ontario Geological Survey special emphasis was put on the breccia formations exposed at the Sudbury structure (SS) because of their crucial role for the impact hypothesis. They were mapped a...

D. Stoeffler A. Deutsch M. Avermann P. Brockmeyer R. Lakomy

1992-01-01

144

Information and informatics in a geological survey - the good, the bad and the ugly  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is apparent that the most successful geological surveys (as measured by the only true Key Performance Indicator - their effectiveness in serving their societies) have recognised that, while their core business is making maps and models and doing scientific research to underpin that, the commodity they actually deal in is data and information and knowledge. They know that in

I. Jackson

2008-01-01

145

A U.S. Geological Survey marker embedded in the northeast corner ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A U.S. Geological Survey marker embedded in the northeast corner of concrete abutment. This view also shows the basic abutment and tower footing arrangement. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

146

Research opportunities in interdisciplinary ground-water science in the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is written for the scientifically literate reader but is not limited to those who are involved in ground-water science. The report is intended to encourage U.S. Geological Survey scientists to develop a sense of excitement about ground-water science in the agency, to inform scientists about existing and potential ground-water science opportunities, and to engage scientists and managers in interdisciplinary discussions and collaboration. The report is intended for use by U.S. Geological Survey and Department of the Interior management to formulate long-term ground-water science programs and to continue sustained support of ground-water monitoring and research, some of which may not have an immediate impact. Finally, the report can be used to communicate the U.S. Geological Survey's vision of ground-water science to Congress, partners, other agencies, and the research community at large with the goals of enhancing collaborative opportunities, sharing information, and maintaining dialogue regarding the directions of U.S. Geological Survey ground-water science.

Sanford, W. E.; Caine, J. S.; Wilcox, D. A.; McWreath, H. C.; Nicholas, J. R.

2006-01-01

147

US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and leaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be

E. R. Landa; J. R. Gray

1995-01-01

148

Neutron-Activation Analysis of Several US Geological Survey and National Bureau of Standards Reference Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this work, several US Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) and National Bureau of Standards (N.B.S.) reference samples have been analyzed in an effort to improve the quality of elemental concentration data available on these materials, so they can be used in a...

A. T. Daly

1981-01-01

149

Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a framework for a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic climate-response program designed to provide early warning of changes in the seasonal water cycle of Maine. Climate-related hydrologic changes on Maines rivers and lakes in th...

C. W. Schalk G. A. Hodgkins R. M. Lent R. W. Dudley

2009-01-01

150

FY 1988 USGS (US Geological Survey) annual report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the large area and great thickness of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Greater Green River basin, many of our investigations have focused on single wells or small areas containing several wells where a large amount of data is available, The investigations include structure, stratigraphy, petrography, x-ray mineralogy, source-rock evaluation, formation pressure and temperature, borehole geophysics, thermal maturity mapping, fission-trace age dating, fluid inclusion thermometry, and isotopic geochemistry. The objectives of these focused investigations are to provide geologic models that can be compared and utilized in tight gas-bearing sequences elsewhere. The purpose of this report is to summarize the tight gas reservoir research activity of USGS geoscientists during FY 88. During the reporting period, most of our efforts were focused on the assessment of gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs in the Greater Green River basin. Other significant activities included a reservoir study of the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation in the Greater Green River basin, a fracture study of Cretaceous and Tertiary outcrops in the Washakie basin, and a stratigraphic study of lower Tertiary rocks in the Washakie basin and Rock Springs uplift. 58 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Law, B.E.

1989-06-01

151

Survey of aflatoxins in beer sold in Canada.  

PubMed

Between March 1998 and March 2002, 304 samples of domestic (Canadian) and imported beers from 36 countries were picked up for the determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. Twelve samples were positive with aflatoxins greater than the limit of quantitation (LOQ) (aflatoxin B1, 4.4 ng l(-1); aflatoxin B2, 3.4 ng l(-1); aflatoxin G1, 11.2 ng l(-1); and aflatoxin G2, 6.2 ng l(-1)). Five samples from Mexico, two samples from Spain and one from Portugal contained aflatoxin B1. Four samples from India contained aflatoxins B1 and B2. The remaining samples contained less than the LOQ for aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The analytical method for this survey was based on that of Scott and Lawrence (Scott PM, Lawrence GA. 1997. Determination of aflatoxins in beer. Journal of AOAC International 80:1229-1234.). Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 were determined at parts per trillion (ng l(-1)) levels in beer by immunoaffinity column cleanup followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic acid and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. PMID:16356889

Mably, M; Mankotia, M; Cavlovic, P; Tam, J; Wong, L; Pantazopoulos, P; Calway, P; Scott, P M

2005-12-01

152

MIS training in Canada: a national survey of general surgery residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  General surgery trainees’ perceptions regarding their own laparoscopic training remain poorly defined. The objective of this\\u000a survey was to identify and evaluate learner experiences with laparoscopic procedures in general surgery programs on a national\\u000a level.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Two hundred eighty-four residents were identified and contacted at English-speaking general surgery programs across Canada.\\u000a Each was asked to complete a web- or paper-based survey

Alia Qureshi; Ashley Vergis; Carolina Jimenez; Jessica Green; Aurora Pryor; Christopher M. Schlachta; Allan Okrainec

153

Earth science photographs from the U.S. Geological Survey Library  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM set contains 1,500 scanned photographs from the U.S. Geological Survey Library for use as a photographic glossary of elementary geologic terms. Scholars are encouraged to copy these public domain images into their reports or databases to enhance their presentations. High-quality prints and (or) slides are available upon request from the library. This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 standard; however, it is intended for use on DOS-based computer systems only.

McGregor, Joseph K.; Abston, Carl C.

1995-01-01

154

Geochemical Variability and Process Recognition from Soils in the Maritime Provinces, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A soil geochemical survey was undertaken in the maritime provinces of Canada. The survey was designed to reveal the variability of the near surface geochemistry that is associated with underlying bedrock geology, effects of weathering, meteoric water infiltration, groundwater and anthropogenic activities. Soil samples collected from the O, A, B and C horizons from the Maritime Provinces of Canada were

E. C. Grunsky

2009-01-01

155

Echo Integration-Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake, 'Merluccius productus', off the Pacific Coast of the United States and Canada during July-August, 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are presented for the eighth triennial echo integration-trawl (EIT) survey of Pacific hake, Merluccius productus, along the west coasts of the United States and Canada during the summer 1998. Scientists from the United States and Canada conducted ...

C. D. Wilson K. Cooke M. A. Guttormsen M. W. Saunders

2000-01-01

156

Racialized identity and health in Canada: results from a nationally representative survey.  

PubMed

This article uses survey data to investigate health effects of racialization in Canada. The operative sample was comprised of 91,123 Canadians aged 25 and older who completed the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey. A "racial and cultural background" survey question contributed a variable that differentiated respondents who identified with Aboriginal, Black, Chinese, Filipino, Latin American, South Asian, White, or jointly Aboriginal and White racial/cultural backgrounds. Indicators of diabetes, hypertension and self-rated health were used to assess health. The healthy immigrant effect suppressed some disparity in risk for diabetes by racial/cultural identification. In logistic regression models also containing gender, age, and immigrant status, no racial/cultural identifications corresponded with significantly better health outcomes than those reported by survey respondents identifying as White. Subsequent models indicated that residential locale did little to explain the associations between racial/cultural background and health and that socioeconomic status was only implicated in relatively poor health outcomes for respondents identifying as Aboriginal or Aboriginal/White. Sizable and statistically significant relative risks for poor health for respondents identifying as Aboriginal, Aboriginal/White, Black, Chinese, or South Asian remained unexplained by the models, suggesting that other explanations for health disparities by racialized identity in Canada - perhaps pertaining to experiences with institutional racism and/or the wear and tear of experiences of racism and discrimination in everyday life - also deserve empirical investigation in this context. PMID:19560246

Veenstra, Gerry

2009-06-25

157

Canada's health promotion survey as a milestone in public health research.  

PubMed

This commentary describes the contribution of the 1985 Canadian National Health Promotion Survey to the development of public health research and policy-making in Canada and argues that on the basis of that contribution, it should be considered to be a public health research milestone. In terms of research, among its contributions which subsequently have been adopted in other survey studies were: going beyond risk factors to operationalize concepts implicit in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion; empowering users to participate in knowledge translation, sharing and transfer; ensuring sufficient sample sizes for each jurisdiction to be able to confidently generalize to its population; establishing a model as well as questions for subsequent health surveys; encouraging widespread use of data through making them available early; and developing and using an explicit social marketing strategy to reach target audiences, including the general public. With regard to policy-making, among its contributions which have been adopted were: using survey data to develop and enhance healthy public policy initiatives; encouraging researchers to work with policy-makers in developing policies; using survey data to contribute to the evaluation of public health initiatives; engaging policy-makers in the development of surveys; and encouraging the use of survey data for advocacy. PMID:21370775

Rootman, Irving; Warren, Reg; Catlin, Gary

158

Geology and genesis of overpressured sandstone reservoirs in Venture gas field, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Overpressured formations with pressure gradients up to 1.9 times normal hydrostatic occur over an area approximately 10,000 km/sup 2/ offshore Nova Scotia, Canada. In the Venture field, the abnormal pressures are confined below 4500 m and are associated with gas- and condensate-bearing Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs. Venture overpressures differ from Gulf Coast-type overpressures in that they occur within normally compacted shales containing numerous overpressured sandstone reservoir beds. Normal compaction is indicated indirectly by gradual increase in bulk density, sonic velocity, and shale resistivity with depth. Plots of temperature gradients, organic maturation gradients, and chemical composition of formation waters vs depth across the overpressured zone also indicate normal sediment compaction. Clay mineral studies show the overpressured shales are well indurated, with the transformation of smectite into mixed-layer clay minerals occurring 2500 m above the top of the overpressured zone. Furthermore, the overpressured sandstones exhibit textures indicative of normal compaction, with secondary porosity developed in both normally compacted and overpressured strata. The Venture represents hard-rock overpressures within normally compacted strata. As a result of a low geothermal gradient in the basin, the peak gas generation was reached late after most of the lithologies had lost their effective permeability due to progressing sediment diagenesis. Formation of diagenetic seals above the zone of peak gas generation in addition to continuing release of fluids as a result of shale diagenesis contribute to formation of overpressures, but organic matter maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion are the main driving forces behind the Venture overpressures.

Jansa, L.F.; Noguera, V.H.

1989-03-01

159

Geology and diagenetic history of overpressured sandstone reservoirs, Venture Gas field, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Deep exploratory wells in the Scotian Basin, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada, have encountered overpressured formations with pressures 1.9 {times} the normal hydrostatic gradient. The overpressures occur over an area of approximately 10,000 km{sup 2}. In the Venture field, the abnormal pressures are confined below a depth of 4,500 m and are associated with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous gas- and condensate-bearing sandstone reservoirs. The overpressures occur within normally compacted shales containing numerous overpressured sandstone reservoir beds. The development of overpressures, seals, and secondary reservoirs are all diagenetically driven. Three secondary porosity depth levels, which top at 2,500 m (65C), 3,700 m (95C), and 4,600 m (130C), correlate with major steps in the organic matter maturation in the basin. Secondary porosity is initially achieved by aluminosilicate dissolution, with ferroan sparry calcite cement dissolution dominating below 4,000 m. Porosity enhancement and preservation is not the result of a single diagenetic event but instead the result of a series of diagenetic events that overlapped in time. Formation of dynamic diagenetic barriers within the zone of peak gas generation helps retard the diffusive migration of hydrocarbons and other fluids expelled during shale diagenesis resulting in pressure build up. The preservation of up to 32% porosity under 500-1,000 atm of pressure could not be achieved without simultaneous pressuring of developing voids. Significant for hydrocarbon exploration is that Venture-type diagenetic overpressures are not associated with undercompacted sediments and, hence, they cannot be predicted from compaction trends during drilling. Petrographic diagenetic, and lithofacies studies can be instrumental in predicting potential areas of deep subsurface secondary reservoirs dependent.

Jansa, L.F. (Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada) Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)); Urrea V.H.N. (Chevron Canada Resources, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-10-01

160

Water-resources reports prepared by or in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, Kansas, 1886-1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data and the results of hydrologic investigations in Kansas are published or released by the U.S. Geological Survey, by cooperating State or Federal agencies, or by technical or scientific journals. This report lists more than 800 water-resources reports prepared by or in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey in Kansas for 1886 through 1983. The reports are listed by author, publication series, year of publication, and subject. The first water-resources investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey in Kansas was completed by A.C. Peale in 1886. The first cooperative program with a State agency was initiated 9 years later in 1895 and included the first stream-gaging stations operated by the Survey in western Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey continues to investigate the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of surface and ground waters within the State. (USGS)

Combs, L. J.

1984-01-01

161

Documentation of the U.S. Geological Survey Stress and Sediment Mobility Database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Sea Floor Stress and Sediment Mobility Database contains estimates of bottom stress and sediment mobility for the U.S. continental shelf. This U.S. Geological Survey database provides information that is needed to characterize sea floor ecosystems and evaluate areas for human use. The estimates contained in the database are designed to spatially and seasonally resolve the general characteristics of bottom stress over the U.S. continental shelf and to estimate sea floor mobility by comparing critical stress thresholds based on observed sediment texture data to the modeled stress. This report describes the methods used to make the bottom stress and mobility estimates, statistics used to characterize stress and mobility, data validation procedures, and the metadata for each dataset and provides information on how to access the database online.

Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.

2012-01-01

162

U.S. Geological Survey ground-water studies in Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The first groundwater study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Florida began in 1910. In 1930, a cooperative program of study was started with the Florida Geological Survey, and in 1938, the first groundwater office of the USGS was established in Miami. In fiscal year 1987, the USGS program in Florida included 35 active groundwater studies, all of which dealt with at least one of the principal groundwater issues. The 35 active studies were divided among the issues as follows: groundwater quality management, 9 studies; groundwater availability, 12 studies; seawater intrusion, 3 studies; contamination from wastewater disposal, 6 studies; contamination from landfills and hazardous waste sites, 3 studies; and contamination from agricultural practices, 2 studies. (Lantz-PTT)

Vecchioli, John

1988-01-01

163

Introduction to the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The EROS Data Center is a part of the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Office of the Department of the Interior and is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. It is the national clearinghouse for the processing and dissemination of spacecraft- and aircraft-acquired images and photographs and electronic data on the Earth's resources. The Center also trains and assists users in the application of such data.

Braconnier, L. A.; Wiepking, P. J.

1980-01-01

164

Forty-first annual report of the Director of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The appropriations for the public work under the United States Geological Survey for the fiscal year 1919-20 comprised items amounting to $1,586,353.50. In general the results of the varied activities of the Geological Survey may be regarded as meeting with a constantly increasing measure of public approval, as shown by the larger use that is being made of this branch of the public service. Correspondence with all classes of citizens—ranchers and corporation officials, school children and university professors, prospectors and mining engineers—has continued to increase, and this gain has been evident in the requests both for specific information and for publications. Ten years ago a telegraphic request for a map or report was a notable incident; now telegrams of this kind are of daily occurrence. Especially gratifying has been the popular demand for topographic maps, the increase in sales this year being 70 per cent. The number of all publications—books and maps—distributed during the year exceeded the number printed this year, this disproving the common assertion that Government publications simply accumulate until they become only waste paper. Indeed, an embarrassing feature of much of the correspondence during the year has been the thousands of requests for reports that were out of print, and more reprints than usual of exhausted editions have been authorized to meet an insistent demand. The public is making use of the publications of the Geological Survey as never before.

Smith, George Otis

1920-01-01

165

Application of reservoir geology of enhanced oil recovery from upper Devonian Nisku Reefs, Alberta, Canada  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Devonian West Pembina reef trend of west-central Alberta contains recoverable reserves of over 79 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (500 million bbl) of oil and 1.4 x 10[sup 10] m[sup 3] (500 billion ft[sup 3]) of gas within approximately 50 pinnacle reefs in the Nisku Formation. Although the oil is saturated with gas at original reservoir pressure, primary depletion would soon lower the reservoir pressure below the bubble point, decreasing recovery. Thus, pressure maintenance is applied early in the producing life of the pools through waterflood or miscible flood schemes. Selection of the appropriate enhanced recovery scheme depends upon the internal flow-unit geometry of the reefs. The Bigoray Nisku C pool and the Pembina Nisku L pool form end members of the reservoir spectrum. They can be used as flow-unit models in the geological input for reservoir simulation studies. The Bigoray Nisku C pool is dominantly limestone. The primary textures, well perserved in this reef, provide the key to interpreting the relict textures in fully dolomitized reefs. Due to the presence of horizontal permeability barriers associated with the limestone lithology, the pool is developed with a waterflood displacement scheme. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be on the order of 0.55 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (3.5 million bbl) or 46% or original oil in place (OOIP). The Pembina Nisku L pool is a completely dolomitized reef. In contrast to the Bigoray Nisku C pool, the complete dolomitization reduces the number of generic reservoir flow units observed in the L pool reef from six to three. Due to the excellent reservoir quality and absence of horizontal permeability barriers, it is being exploited by a vertical miscible flood. The Nisku L pool is one of the largest pinnacle reefs discovered in the Nisku reef fairway and contains an estimated 5 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (31 million bbl) OOIP. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be approximately 4.1 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (25.8 million bbl) or 82% of OOIP.

Watts, N.R. (AEC Oil and Gas Company, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Coppold, M.P. (Imperial Oil Resources Limited (Esso), Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Douglas, J.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1994-01-01

166

Magnetic HGI, radiometric surveys prove cost-effective in W. Canada  

SciTech Connect

The Rumsey Leduc reef (Late Devonian) in Central Alberta is an after-the-fact case history that illustrates the congruence of horizontal gradient intensity and seismic anomalies. The Rumsey reef is situated on the Feen-Big Valley Shoal near Stettler, Alberta. The geology of that shoal was described by Andrichuk. Andrichuk observed that at least 30 m of secondary dolomites indicative of subsequent Leduc reef formation can be seen underlying the Erskine, Stettler, Fenn, and Big Valley Leduc reef fields on the shoal. They further suggested that because this dolomitic trend extends about 7 miles southwest of Big Valley field, that area to the southwest may well contain productive reef buildups as yet undiscovered (in 1958). The Rumsey reef, discovered in that are in 1982, is the most significant new productive Leduc build-up discovered on the shoal since 1958. Subsequent to the Rumsey discovery, Gulf conducted a 3D seismic survey to determine the full extent of the reef. In 1994 Gulf participated in a joint project with the author to share and make public the 3D survey in exchange for the author`s HGI and DRAD survey of the same area. Gulf provided the 3D survey only after the author presented his survey results. The paper discusses results from these surveys as well as survey costs.

LeSchack, L.A. [Topaz Energy Exploration Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-05-26

167

Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis: A survey to examine the range of tests used in Canada.  

PubMed

Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada. PMID:22942884

Tsang, Raymond Sw; Radons, Sandra Michelle; Morshed, Muhammad

2011-01-01

168

Bayesian galaxy shape measurement for weak lensing surveys - III. Application to the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A likelihood-based method for measuring weak gravitational lensing shear in deep galaxy surveys is described and applied to the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). CFHTLenS comprises 154 deg2 of multi-colour optical data from the CFHT Legacy Survey, with lensing measurements being made in the i' band to a depth i'AB < 24.7, for galaxies with signal-to-noise ratio ?SN ? 10. The method is based on the lensfit algorithm described in earlier papers, but here we describe a full analysis pipeline that takes into account the properties of real surveys. The method creates pixel-based models of the varying point spread function (PSF) in individual image exposures. It fits PSF-convolved two-component (disc plus bulge) models to measure the ellipticity of each galaxy, with Bayesian marginalization over model nuisance parameters of galaxy position, size, brightness and bulge fraction. The method allows optimal joint measurement of multiple, dithered image exposures, taking into account imaging distortion and the alignment of the multiple measurements. We discuss the effects of noise bias on the likelihood distribution of galaxy ellipticity. Two sets of image simulations that mirror the observed properties of CFHTLenS have been created to establish the method's accuracy and to derive an empirical correction for the effects of noise bias.

Miller, L.; Heymans, C.; Kitching, T. D.; van Waerbeke, L.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Mellier, Y.; Rowe, B. T. P.; Coupon, J.; Dietrich, J. P.; Fu, L.; Harnois-Déraps, J.; Hudson, M. J.; Kilbinger, M.; Kuijken, K.; Schrabback, T.; Semboloni, E.; Vafaei, S.; Velander, M.

2013-03-01

169

Proceedings of the First U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Information Management Workshop, March 12-23, 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In March 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) held the first Scientific Information Management (SIM) Workshop in Reston, Virginia. The workshop brought together more than 150 SIM professionals from across the organization to discuss the range and impor...

2007-01-01

170

Selected literature on water-resources investigations in New Jersey by the U.S. Geological Survey, through 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Because of the importance and complexity of the water resources of New Jersey today, there is a need for a current bibliography to serve as a basis for future water resources studies. This report lists about 400 book reports, map reports, and articles that deal with the water resources of New Jersey published through 1986. The publications are grouped under three major headings: (1) publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, (2) publications of State agencies prepared by or in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, and (3) other publications, such as technical journals prepared by or co-authored by U.S. Geological Survey personnel. Most of the publications are available for inspection at the West Trenton office of the U.S. Geologic Survey and at large public and university libraries. Ordering information is given for those publications that are for sale. (USGS)

compiled by Schaefer, F. L.

1987-01-01

171

The 5:1 Resonance as Probed by the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examined the 5:1 resonant Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) detections in the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) and calculated a population estimate for this significant dynamical sub-population. The CFEPS survey identified and classified KBOs in over 700 square degrees of sky, split between near ecliptic and high latitude fields. One object near the 5:1 resonance with Neptune was detected in the ecliptic fields, and three additional objects were detected in the CFEPS high latitude fields. Understanding the significance of object detections in a survey requires knowledge of the survey depth and followup observations in order to determine detection efficiencies for an underlying population. The detection biases against finding these distant resonators are additionally complex due to the phase relationships between resonant objects and Neptune. Objects in a 5:1 resonance with Neptune can only reach perihelion at approximately 70, 180, or 290 degrees from Neptune, with the width of these resonant islands dependent on libration amplitude. CFEPS only detected 5:1 resonant objects near perihelion due to their large semi-major axes, approximately 88 AU. Because of this perihelion dependence, the survey pointings introduce a significant bias into the detection efficiency. The large eccentricities and inclinations of the detected objects also suggests a significant underlying population. The 5:1 resonant population is a cosmogonic lever which provides insight into the evolutionary history of the solar system.

Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, J. M.; Gladman, B. J.

2013-10-01

172

A Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste at the Bruce Nuclear Site, Ontario, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has initiated geoscientific investigations at the Bruce Nuclear site, situated on the eastern shore of Lake Huron 225 km north west of Toronto, Canada, to develop a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW). The DGR concept envisions the excavation of the repository within an Ordovician age argillaceous limestone formation overlain by thick shale sequences (200 m) at a depth of 660 m within a 830m Paleozoic sedimentary sequence of the Michigan Basin underlying the site. The geoscientific investigation, which will be conducted in a three-phase approach over five years, can be broadly classified into two elements; i) site-specific investigations and ii) Geosynthesis. These work programs combined are intent on exploring the geoscientific basis to understand geosphere stability at timeframes (1Ma) relevant to demonstrating the long-term performance of the DGR. A key aspect of the investigation is directed towards exploring the hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical stability of the variably saline (>100 g/L) deep-seated (>400 m) Ordovician sediments that have been perturbed by 9 glacial events during the latter half of the Pleistocene. Numerical simulations of the regional scale groundwater domain (approximately 20,000 km2) and the sub-regional domain (approximately 440 km2) using a density dependent version of FRAC3DVS are providing a structured framework to combine multi-disciplinary geoscientific evidence to illustrate and test hypotheses of flow system evolution. Predictive results support a conclusion that the thick (400 m) Ordovician sediments, in which the DGR would be excavated, comprise a resilient and isolated deep-seated flow domain in which mass transport is diffusion dominated.

Jensen, M. R.; Sykes, E. A.; Sykes, J. F.; Sudicky, E. A.; Frape, S. K.; Semec, B. P.

2006-12-01

173

The U.S. geological survey's project BIRDDOG (basic investigation of remotely detectable deposits of oil and gas)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental program to develop an integrated remote sensing-geochemical petroleum exploration technique has been established by the U.S. Geological Survey. Briefly, the concept is based on previous and ongoing research within the U.S. Geological Survey which demonstrates that imperfect rock seals capping petroleum and natural gas deposits may permit large volumes of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons to escape to the surface, with

Terrence J. Donovan

1975-01-01

174

Fortieth annual report of the Director of the United States Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The fortieth annual report of the United States Geological Survey is an appropriate place in which to compare the present scope of the work with that of the work done during the first year of this organization. The growth of the Survey is suggested by a comparison of the appropriations for 1918-19, which comprise items amounting to $1,437,745, with the total appropriation of $106,000 for the first year, 1879-80. During the 40 years the personnel has been increased from 39 to 967. The corresponding growth in public functions of the organization, which is one of the oldest of the Federal scientific bureaus, can be inferred from the detailed report of activities which makes up the greater part of this volume. The past year has been the most notable in the Survey's history, as it marked the completion of the period of its largest national contribution, and the later half of the year was largely a time of readjustment of program. It seems opportune, therefore, that the special topics discussed in the pages immediately following should be forward-looking and suggestive of the larger usefulness planned for the Geological Survey in the future.

Smith, George Otis

1919-01-01

175

White-nose syndrome in bats: U.S. Geological Survey updates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that has killed millions of hibernating bats since it first appeared in New York in 2007 and has spread at an alarming rate from the northeastern to the central United States and Canada. The disease is named for the white fungus Geomyces destructans that infects the skin of the muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), the USGS Fort Collins Science Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other partners continue to play a primary role in WNS research. Studies conducted at the NWHC led to the discovery (Blehert and others, 2009), characterization, and naming (Gargas and others, 2009) of the cold-loving fungus G. destructans and to the development of standardized criteria for diagnosing the disease (Meteyer and others, 2009). Additionally, scientists at the NWHC have pioneered laboratory techniques for studying the effects of the fungus on hibernating bats (Lorch and others, 2011). To determine if bats are affected by white-nose syndrome, scientists look for a characteristic microscopic pattern of skin erosion caused by G. destructans (Meteyer and others, 2009). Field signs of WNS can include visible white fungal growth on the bat's muzzle, wings, or both, but these signs alone are not a reliable disease indicator - laboratory examination and testing are required for disease confirmation. Infected bats also arouse from hibernation more frequently than uninfected bats (Warnecke and others, 2012) and often display abnormal behaviors in their hibernation sites, such as congregating at or near cave openings and daytime flights during winter. These abnormal behaviors may contribute to the bat's accelerated consumption of stored fat reserves, causing emaciation, a characteristic documented in some of the bats that die with WNS. During hibernation, bats likely have lowered immunity (Bouma and others, 2010), which may facilitate the ability of G. destructans to colonize and damage large areas of wing membrane (fig. 2). A current hypothesis suggests that erosion or ulceration of wing membrane caused by the fungus has the potential to alter the physiology of hibernating bats, resulting in fatal disruption of hydration, electrolyte balance, circulation, and thermoregulation (Cryan and others, 2010). Current estimates of bat population declines in the northeastern United States since the emergence of WNS are over 80 percent (Turner and others, 2011). This sudden and widespread mortality associated with WNS is unprecedented in hibernating bats, among which large-scale disease outbreaks have not been previously documented. It is unlikely that species of bats affected by WNS will recover quickly because most are long-lived and have only a single pup per year. Consequently, repopulation after widespread mortality of breeding adults will be a slow process. Worldwide, bats play essential roles as pollinators, seed dispersers, and as primary consumers of insects. The true ecological consequences of the recent large-scale reductions in populations of hibernating bats are not yet known. However, farmers might feel the impact. A recent economic analysis indicated that insect control services (ecosystem services) provided by bats to U.S. agriculture is valued between 4 to 50 billion dollars nationwide per year (Boyles and others, 2011). The number of North American bats estimated to have died from WNS thus far had the capacity to consume up to 8,000 tons of insects per year (Boyles and others, 2011). The area of North America affected by WNS continues to expand. Within the last 2 years, the disease has been confirmed in several Central States, including Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, and Missouri. High mortality of bats has not yet been reported at these locations, and it remains to be seen if WNS will develop and manifest in other States with the same severity as that in the Northeast.

Rogall, Gail Moede; Verant, Michelle

2012-01-01

176

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey: Stacked Images and Catalogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg2, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 × 106 sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg2 split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 × 107 sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a "Google Sky" interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

Gwyn, Stephen D. J.

2012-02-01

177

Management of primary rectal cancer by surgeons in Atlantic Canada: results of a regional survey  

PubMed Central

Background We sought to determine the current practice patterns of general surgeons in Atlantic Canada in the management of primary rectal cancer in relation to surgeon-specific variables. Methods We sent mail-out surveys to all practising general surgeons (n =183) in Atlantic Canada to determine screening preferences, preoperative assessment, the use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy, surgical therapy for rectal cancer and surgeon demographics. We analyzed the responses using ?2 tests. Results The response rate was 98 (54%) after 2 mail-outs; there were 82 (49%) eligible responses. Surgeons in practice for 21 years or more were more likely than those with fewer than 21 years of practice to order preoperative ultrasonography of the liver and were less likely to order preoperative computed tomography. Endorectal ultrasonography was ordered routinely by 23% of surgeons, whereas 71% of surgeons would order it if time and resources were available. Surgeons who were not certified by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada were significantly more likely than those who were certified to use neoadjuvant therapy in all patients with rectal cancer (43% v. 12%; p = 0.031). Surgeons who performed more than 10 rectal cancer surgeries per year were significantly more likely than those who performed 10 or fewer surgeries per year to use neoadjuvant treatment for T3 tumours (94% v. 61%; p = 0.007). Surgeons with medical or radiation oncology services in their communities were significantly more likely than those without such services to recommend neoadjuvant treatment in T3 rectal tumours and rectal tumours with pathologic lymph nodes. Conclusion We found significant variation in the management of rectal cancer depending on surgeon-specific variables. The implications of these differences on the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer are unknown.

Chuah, Teong Kuan; Lee, Tracy; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Pollett, William

2010-01-01

178

Metrics survey of industry-sponsored clinical trials in Canada and comparator jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010.  

PubMed

Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials. PMID:23968618

Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

2012-11-01

179

Metrics Survey of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials in Canada and Comparator Jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010  

PubMed Central

Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials.

Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

2012-01-01

180

U.S. Geological Survey toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program, fiscal year 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In fiscal year 1982, the U S Geological Survey began an interdisciplinary research thrust entitled Toxic Waste-Groundwater Contamination Program The objective of the thrust was to provide earth sciences information necessary to evaluate and mitigate existing groundwater contamination problems resulting from the planned or inadvertant disposal of wastes and from certain land-use practices, and to improve future waste disposal and land-use practices The program supports process-oriented and interdisciplinary field research, and regional groundwater quality studies This article provides an overview of the current (Fiscal Year 1985) activities of the Toxic Waste Program ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

Ragone, S. E.

1986-01-01

181

U.S. Geological Survey Global Seismographic Network - Five-Year Plan 2006-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Global Seismographic Network provides data for earthquake alerting, tsunami warning, nuclear treaty verification, and Earth science research. The system consists of nearly 150 permanent digital stations, distributed across the globe, connected by a modern telecommunications network. It serves as a multi-use scientific facility and societal resource for monitoring, research, and education, by providing nearly uniform, worldwide monitoring of the Earth. The network was developed and is operated through a partnership among the National Science Foundation (http://www.nsf.gov), the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/gsn), and the U.S. Geological Survey (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/gsn).

Leith, William S.; Gee, Lind S.; Hutt, Charles R.

2009-01-01

182

In Brief: McNutt confirmed to head U.S. Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Senate confirmed Marcia McNutt as director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on 21 October. McNutt served as AGU president from 2000 to 2002 and is the 2007 recipient of the AGU Maurice Ewing Medal. Since 1997, McNutt has been president and chief executive officer of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, Calif. McNutt, who begins her new position on 5 November, told Eos she is excited about the confirmation. “My priority is to raise the visibility of the USGS because they are doing such great things,” she said.

Showstack, Randy

2009-10-01

183

Participation in Performance-Evaluation Studies by U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Performance-evaluation studies provide customers of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) with data needed to evaluate performance and to compare of select laboratories for analytical work. The NWQL participates in national and international performance-evaluation (PE) studies that consist of samples of water, sediment, and aquatic biological materials for the analysis of inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and radionuclides. This Fact Sheet provides a summary of PE study results from January 1993 through April 1997. It should be of particular interest to USGS customers and potential customers of the NWQL, water-quality specialists, cooperators, and agencies of the Federal Government.

Glodt, Stephen R.; Pirkey, Kimberly D.

1998-01-01

184

United States Geological Survey: International Polar Year Resources (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides a brief overview of the upcoming International Polar Year (IPY) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiatives and resources that help support the observance. Topics include a history of IPY (this will be the third IPY) and the role of the USGS in polar research. The education section provides links to USGS resources on glaciation, the North and South Pole, Alaska, climate change, and other topics of interest for IPY investigations. Materials include information on atlases and databases, polar research projects, maps, photos, digital datasets, booklets, and educational guides.

185

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01

186

CFHTLenS: the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) that accurately determines a weak gravitational lensing signal from the full 154 deg2 of deep multicolour data obtained by the CFHT Legacy Survey. Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure is widely recognized as one of the most powerful but technically challenging probes of cosmology. We outline the CFHTLenS analysis pipeline, describing how and why every step of the chain from the raw pixel data to the lensing shear and photometric redshift measurement has been revised and improved compared to previous analyses of a subset of the same data. We present a novel method to identify data which contributes a non-negligible contamination to our sample and quantify the required level of calibration for the survey. Through a series of cosmology-insensitive tests we demonstrate the robustness of the resulting cosmic shear signal, presenting a science-ready shear and photometric redshift catalogue for future exploitation.

Heymans, Catherine; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Miller, Lance; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Kitching, Thomas D.; Mellier, Yannick; Simon, Patrick; Bonnett, Christopher; Coupon, Jean; Fu, Liping; Harnois Déraps, Joachim; Hudson, Michael J.; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuijken, Koenraad; Rowe, Barnaby; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta; van Uitert, Edo; Vafaei, Sanaz; Velander, Malin

2012-11-01

187

Bibliography of Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the US Geological Survey, 1978-96  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1995. The purpose of this program was to define the regional geohydrology and establish a framework of background information on geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Nation's important aquifer systems. This information is critically needed to develop an understanding of the Nation's major ground-water flow systems and to support better management of ground-water resources. Twenty-five of the Nation's major aquifer systems were studied under this program. Starting in 1988, the program devoted part of its resources to compilation of a National Ground Water Atlas that presets a comprehensive summary of the Nation's major ground-water resources. The atlas, which is designed in a graphical format supported by descriptive text, serves as a basic reference for the location, geography, geology, and hydrologic characteristics of the major aquifers in the Nation. This bibliography lists 1,105 reports that result from various studies of the program. The list of reports for each study follows a brief description of that study.

Sun, Ren Jen; Weeks, John B.; Grubb, Hayes F.

1997-01-01

188

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada.

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

189

Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Division in North Carolina, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources programs conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the state of North Carolina during 1985 and proposed programs for 1986 are described. This is the first in a series of biennial progress reports on Survey activities in the state. Activities such as gathering, interpreting and publishing hydrologic data and scientific information in support of state and local water resources planning, management, and regulatory programs are presented. The water resources programs described are funded through cooperative agreements with state and local agencies and through special agreements with other federal agencies. Cooperative programs are reviewed annually to insure that state, local and national priorities are being met. Groundwater withdrawals are estimated to have produced water level declines of 150 ft and more for large areas of the northeast and central Coastal Plain. Future demands for water quality and quantity are discussed.

compiled by Turner, J. F.; Deckard, R. J.

1986-01-01

190

Airborne Surveys Conducted by SOAR for Geologic Studies in Antarctica, 1998-2001  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the three austral summers that occurred in the period October, 1998 to February, 2001, the Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research (SOAR) of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted aerogeophysical campaigns for eight separate projects in both East and West Antarctica. Measurements were made of magnetic and gravitational fields, surface elevation and sub-glacial bed elevation. Surveys were accomplished with a modified deHavilland Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a towed magnetometer, gyro-stabilized gravity meter, laser altimeter, ice-penetrating radar, and carrier-phase GPS receivers. Diurnal variations of the geomagnetic field were measured at nearby base stations where static GPS data were collected for differential aircraft positioning. Four of the experiments performed were designed to address fundamental geologic questions when combined with ground-based studies and/or geophysical modeling in studies by multiple investigators at several institutions. In western Marie Byrd Land (MBL), a 330 x 440 km survey (line spacing ranged from 5.3 x 5.3 km to 10.6 x 10.6 km) was flown in order to understand the tectonic and geologic devolpment of the boundary between the Ross Sea Rift and the MBL volcanic province. A series of corridors were flown across the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) in order to study extreme and variable rift flank uplift. These consist of a 100 x 810 km corridor extending from Ice Stream B across the Watson Escarpment and into central East Antarctica beyond South Pole, a 100 x 1170 km corridor from Ross Island to Dome C, and a single line across the TAM near Robb Glacier (line spacing for corridors was 10 km with 30 km tie-lines). Three parallel lines, 1300 km long and separated by 5 km, were flown from near Taylor Dome to AGO4, complementing a passive seismic array planned in order to investigate the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the East-West Antarctic boundary. Another survey was performed in order to help determine the geologic setting and structure of the Lake Vostok environment to guide future studies. The survey block was 157.5 x 330 km (line spacing 7.5 km with 11.25 km and 22.5 km tie-lines), augmented by 12 regional lines extending 180 to 440 km outward from the primary grid. In-field data processing and subsequent analyses have shown that data quality is high for nearly all portions of these surveys.

Holt, J. W.

2001-05-01

191

Survey of bottled drinking waters sold in Canada for chlorate, bromide, bromate, lead, cadmium and other trace elements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mineral, spring and other bottled drinking waters sold in Canada in the winter of 1995–96 were surveyed for chlorate, bromide, bromate, Cr(VI), Li, B, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, Be, V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Tl, Pb, Na, K, Ca and Mg. Chlorate and bromide were determined by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection,

R. W. Dabeka; H. B. S. Conacher; J. F. Lawrence; W. H. Newsome; A. McKenzie; H. P. Wagner; R. K. H. Chadha; K. Pepper

2002-01-01

192

Are clinicians being prepared to care for abused women? A survey of health professional education in Ontario, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The current project undertook a province-wide survey and environmental scan of educational opportunities available to future health care providers on the topic of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. METHODS: A team of experts identified university and college programs in Ontario, Canada as potential providers of IPV education to students in health care professions at the undergraduate and post-graduate

C. Nadine Wathen; Masako Tanaka; Cristina Catallo; Adrianne C. Lebner; M. Kinneret Friedman; Mark D. Hanson; Clare Freeman; Susan M. Jack; Ellen Jamieson; Harriet L. MacMillan

2009-01-01

193

Infrared survey of the Pisgah Crater area, San Bernardino County, California - a geologic interpretation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The infrared survey of the Pisgah Crater Area, San Bernardino County, California was primarily undertaken to establish parameters by which rock types, structures, and textures peculiar to this locale could be recognized or differentiated. A secondary purpose was to provide an adequate evaluation and calibration of airborne and ground-based instruments used in the survey. Pisgah Crater and its vicinity was chosen as one of the fundamental test sites for the NASA remote sensing program because of its relatively fresh basaltic flows and pyroclastics. Its typical exposure of basalt also made it a possible lunar analogue. A fundamental test site for the purpose of the program is defined as a readily accessible area for which the topography, geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation and other features are relatively well known. All remote sensor instrument teams, i.e. infrared, radar, microwave, and photography, were obligated to use the fundamental test sites for instrument evaluation and to establish terrain identification procedures. Pisgah Crater, nearby Sunshine Cone, and their associated lava flows are in the southern Mojave Desert about 40 miles east-southeast of Barstow, California. (See fig. 1.) U. S. Highway 66 skirts .the northern part of the area and provides access via asphalt-paved and dirt roads to the Crater and to the perimeters of the flows. Pisgah Crater, which is a pumiceous cone, is owned and occasionally quarried by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. The remaining part of the area to the south is within the boundary of the Marine Corps Base, Twentynine Palms, California and is currently being used as a gunnery, and bombing range. The proximate area to east, west, and north of Pisgah Crater is public domain. Originally, an area totaling 10 square miles was outlined for detailed study. (See plate 1.) This included an 8 mile long strip extending south- east from and including Pisgah Crater to Lavic Dry Lake, and a 2 mile strip aligned to include a portion of the Sunshine lava flow and the dry lake. Additional aerial infrared imagery of the Sunshine and Pisgah flows along the Pisgah fault proved so interesting and informative that this area is included in the discussion. Infrared surveys were flown February ii through 13, 1965 and August 5 and 9, 1966. The initial survey was flown by the NASA personnel aboard the NASA 926 Convair 240 aircraft. Because of technical problems with the infrared scanners (4.5-5.5 and 8-14 micron bands) and with certain ground instruments, most of the imagery and ground temperature data obtained during the initial survey period was of little value. However, excellent infrared imagery in the 8-14 micron (?) region of the spectrum was acquired by the Geological Survey during the August 1966 survey. The scanner was mounted in a Beech D-18 aircraft provided by the Survey's Water Resources Division. Likewise, more reliable ground data was obtained at this time owing to improved instrumentation and technique. Ground data were taken by Geological Survey personnel including W. A. Fischer, J. D. Friedman, W. R. Hemphill, D. L. Daniels, G. R. Boynton, Po W. Philbin and the author. C. R. Fross operated the infrared scanner during the August, 1966 survey and R. M. Turner was-responsible for photo processing of the infrared imagery. Their assistance is gratefully acknowledged.

Gawarecki, Stephen J.

1968-01-01

194

Investigations and research in Nevada by the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, is charged with (1) maintaining a hydrologic network in Nevada that provides information on the status of the State 's water resources and (2) engaging in technical water-resources investigations that have a high degree of transferability. To meet these broad objectives, 26 projects were active during fiscal year 1982, in cooperation with 36 Federal, State, and local agencies. Total funds were $3,319,455, of which State and local cooperative funding amounted to $741,500 and Federal funding (comprised of Geological Survey Federal and cooperative program plus funds from six other Federal agencies) amounted to $2,577,955 for the fiscal year. Projects other than continuing programs for collection of hydrologic data included the following topics of study: geothermal resources, areal ground-water resources and ground-water modeling, waste disposal , paleohydrology, acid mine drainage, the unsaturated zone, stream and reservoir sedimentation, river-quality modeling, flood hazards, and remote sensing in hydrology. In total, 26 reports and symposium abstracts were published or in press during fiscal year 1982. (USGS)

Katzer, Terry; Moosburner, Otto; Nichols, W. D.

1984-01-01

195

Earth history at the century mark of the U.S. Geological Survey*  

PubMed Central

Earth history involves all aspects of geological and biological evolution, especially paleontology and stratigraphy. Early paleontological exploration of the western United States by and before the U.S. Geological Survey featured the dramatic discoveries and rivalries of the great vertebrate paleontologists Leidy, Cope, Marsh, and Osborn. Invertebrate paleontology and paleobotany in the U.S. Geological Survey blossomed with emphasis on practical missions. The most illuminating and useful earth history, nevertheless, emerges where there is a high degree of interaction with academic scholars. Despite a good knowledge of its broad features, the drama of earth history remains obscure in detail. Whereas it speaks conclusively for the reality of organic evolution, it is less conclusive about mechanisms and many important transitions. Current investigations, however, especially in pre-Phanerozoic, mammalian, and human paleontology, promise improved insights. New techniques in collecting, sample preparation, and research are revealing previously unknown kinds of fossils and exquisite details of preservation. Plate tectonic theory provides a new framework for historical geography and biogeography. Emerging techniques in geochronology—matching paleopolarity sequences, for example—promise to resolve old problems of the synchroneity or heterochroneity of different biotal provinces. As it splits into subfields, the teaching and practice of paleontology expand to cover all of them. The fossils themselves, however, remain the basic objective evidence. All hypotheses about them must answer to this court of appeal. But nature rarely responds in an either-or way. The most probable hypotheses are those that have repeatedly confronted objective reality and survived all opportunity for disproof.

Simpson, George Gaylord

1979-01-01

196

Geological, Geochemical, and Geophysical Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Big Bend National Park, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Geologic features in Big Bend National Park (BBNP) formed from repetitive cycles of rifting, mountain building, basin development, faulting and folding, and volcanism and plutonism. The oldest tectonic episode recorded in the park is mountain building ass...

J. E. Gray W. R. Page

2008-01-01

197

Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine  

PubMed Central

Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge, training and practice in PM.

Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

2011-01-01

198

Hydrologic and geologic aspects of waste management and disposal; a bibliography of publications by U.S. Geological Survey authors, 1950-81  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References to more than 550 reports, articles, and maps are listed alphabetically by author and are indexed by subject. The subject index includes geographic-area terms. Citations from 69 series are included; series are listed separately. The publications listed report the results of U.S. Geological Survey research and field projects throughout the Nation concerning earth-science aspects of waste management and disposal. They include organic, inorganic, and radioactive wastes and related topics such as mathematical models of solute transport. Most of the references are to (1) Geological Survey report series such as Water-Supply Papers, Professional Papers, Bulletins, Circulars, Water-Resources Investigations, and Open-File Reports, (2) technical journals of professional organizations, or (3) reports by other Federal and State agencies.

Handman, Elinor H.

1983-01-01

199

Seismic Refraction - Wide-angle Reflection Survey of the Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In July 2009, a controlled-source seismic survey was conducted across the Coast Mountains Batholith of British Columbia, western Canada. This survey is a part of BATHOLITHS, a joint American-Canadian, interdisciplinary project to study the Jurassic-Eocene Coast Mountains Batholith and investigate the processes that generate continental crust. Crust of andesitic composition is formed in continental arcs by the distillation of more basaltic rocks originally derived from mafic mantle melts, a process which should leave behind an ultramafic residue. This residue may remain hidden beneath the geophysical Moho or may delaminate and sink into the mantle during either subduction or later arc collapse. For BATHOLITHS, 16 explosive shots along a 400-km east-west line were recorded by vertical-component seismometers at a 200-m spacing onshore and 500-m spacing along fjord shorelines and by 3-component seismometers at a 2-km spacing. Two additional shots and 104 seismometers located 150 to 250 km offline will be used to constrain along-strike variation. Refraction and wide-angle reflection data from this experiment will allow us to determine crustal thickness and velocity structure and major structural features of the crust and upper mantle. Preliminary results show that the crust is 30-38 km thick with no major root under the batholith and mountains. A strong mid-crustal reflector is observed under the batholith. Analysis is continuing and further preliminary results will be presented.

Oakley, D. O.; Kuhn, M. E.; Stephenson, A. L.; Wang, K.; Spence, G.; Hole, J. A.; Miller, K. C.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G. M.; Clowes, R. M.; Hammer, P. T.

2009-12-01

200

Reduction of GHG emissions by geological storage of CO2 : Anatomy of the Heartland Aquifer Redwater Carbon Capture and Geological Storage Project (HARP), Alberta, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and characterize a geological storage site at more than 800 m depth that is capable of storing large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Alberta Basin and is close to a large CO2 supply. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Five criteria are used to select the site: total volume of the pore

W. D. Gunter; Stefan Bachu; Maja Buschkuehle; Karsten Michael; Guillermo Ordorica-Garcia; Tyler Hauck

2009-01-01

201

U.S. Geological Survey Assessment of Undiscovered Petroleum Resources of the Hamra Basin, Libya, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hamra Basin Province encompasses approximately 244,100 square kilometers (94,250 square miles) and is entirely within Libya. One composite total petroleum system (TPS) was defined for this assessment; it extends from Libya westward into adjacent parts of Algeria and southern Tunisia. The Hamra Basin part of the TPS was subdivided into four assessment units for the purpose of resource assessment. The assessment units cover only 172,390 square kilometers of the Hamra Basin Province; the remaining area has little potential for undiscovered petroleum resources because of the absence of petroleum source rocks. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 784 million barrels of crude oil, 4,748 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 381 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Hamra Basin of northwestern Libya. Most of the undiscovered crude oil and natural gas are interpreted to be in deeper parts of the Hamra Basin.

Geological Survey (U.S)

2007-01-01

202

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

Robert Finley

2006-09-30

203

U.S. Geological Survey programs and investigations related to soil and water conservation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics related to streamflow and reservoir storage; development and application of models of rainfall-runoff relations, chemical quality, and sediment movement; and studies of the interactive processes of overland and channel flow with vegetation. Networks of streamgaging stations and (or) sampling sites within numerous drainage basins are yielding information that extends databases and enhances the ability to use those data for interpretive studies.

Osterkamp, W. R.; Gray, J. R.

2001-01-01

204

U.S. Geological Survey ArcMap Sediment Classification Tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

OVERVIEW The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ArcMap Sediment Classification tool is a custom toolbar that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) ArcGIS 9.2 Desktop application to aid in the analysis of seabed sediment classification. The tool uses as input either a point data layer with field attributes containing percentage of gravel, sand, silt, and clay or four raster data layers representing a percentage of sediment (0-100%) for the various sediment grain size analysis: sand, gravel, silt and clay. This tool is designed to analyze the percent of sediment at a given location and classify the sediments according to either the Folk (1954, 1974) or Shepard (1954) as modified by Schlee(1973) classification schemes. The sediment analysis tool is based upon the USGS SEDCLASS program (Poppe, et al. 2004).

O'Malley, John

2007-01-01

205

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives - Fiscal Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities.

Marcus, Susan M.

2008-01-01

206

Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

Wilde, Franceska D.

2010-01-01

207

U.S. Geological Survey Budget Cuts Funds for Minerals, Hazards, and Water Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bush administration's proposed US$968.5 million budget for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for fiscal year (FY) 2009 is a $38 million decrease from the FY 2008 enacted level. The proposed budget also includes some increases for high-priority programs. Funding includes an $8.2 million net increase for a water census that would be the first U.S.-wide assessment of water availability and human and environmental water use and an increase of $7 million to support the U.S. Department of Interior's Ocean and Coastal Frontiers Initiative, which will acquire key ocean health data while also providing objective scientific data to evaluate U.N. Law of the Sea claims made by other nations.

Showstack, Randy

2008-02-01

208

A user interface for the Kansas Geological Survey slug test model.  

PubMed

The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) developed a semianalytical solution for slug tests that incorporates the effects of partial penetration, anisotropy, and the presence of variable conductivity well skins. The solution can simulate either confined or unconfined conditions. The original model, written in FORTRAN, has a text-based interface with rigid input requirements and limited output options. We re-created the main routine for the KGS model as a Visual Basic macro that runs in most versions of Microsoft Excel and built a simple-to-use Excel spreadsheet interface that automatically displays the graphical results of the test. A comparison of the output from the original FORTRAN code to that of the new Excel spreadsheet version for three cases produced identical results. PMID:19583592

Esling, Steven P; Keller, John E

209

Geological effect of high-precise gravimetric and magnetic surveys in Yangqiao prospect in Biyang depression  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on Yangqiao prospect in Biyang depression which is an area where very high-degree exploration has been done. The complicated seismic and geological conditions in the border area of the depression cause very poor seismic data, so that exact structural configuration can not be known. Thus, high-precise gravimetric-magnetic surveys were done. The interpretations of gravimetric and magnetic data are mainly based on the properties of gravitational and magnetic fields. Local gravimetric and magnetic anomalies at Wangzhuang were discovered by performing forward fitting of observed gravimetric and magnetic data. The repeated seismic interpretation by reference to the gravimetric-magnetic interpretation result confirms the existence of an anticline structure in the local gravimetric and magnetic anomaly area. The effect of direct hydrocarbon prediction using high- precise gravimetric and magnetic data were checked in known Anpeng and Xiaermen oil fields. The check shows good effect.

Rongyuan, W.; Zhaoling, Y.; Zhangmin, G.; Xiaoliu, W. (Geophysical Exploration Dept., China Geology Univ., Wuhan City, Hubei Probince (CN))

1991-01-01

210

U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000: Description and Results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The set of 4 CD-ROM discs, documents the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and includes estimates of the quantities of conventional oil, gas, and natural gas liquids outside the United States that have the potential to be added to reserves in the next 30 years (1995 to 2025). Two components, undiscovered resources and reserve growth, are estimated. One hundred and forty nine total petroleum systems and two hundred and forty six assessment units (subdivisions of total petroleum systems) were assessed. The supporting maps, data, text and tables produced by the World Energy Assessment Team during this five-year project (1995-2000) are included in the set.

USGS World Energy Assessment Team

2000-01-01

211

The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey: 1.2 mm observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report 250 GHz (1.2 mm) observations of a sample of 20 quasars at redshifts 5.8 < z < 6.5 from the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS), using the Max-Planck-Millimeter-Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the 30-metre telescope of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millmétrique (IRAM). An rms sensitivity of ?0.6 mJy was achieved for 65% of the sample, and of ?1.0 mJy for 90%. Only one quasar, CFHQS J142952+544717, was robustly detected with S250 GHz = 3.46 ± 0.52 mJy. This indicates that one of the most powerful known starbursts at z ~ 6 is associated with this radio-loud quasar. On average, the other CFHQS quasars, which have a mean optical magnitude fainter than the previously studied samples of z ~ 6 quasars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), have a mean 1.2 mm flux density ? S250 GHz ? = 0.41 ± 0.14 mJy; this average detection with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 2.9 is hardly meaningful. It would correspond to ? LFIR ? ? 0.94 ± 0.32 × 1012 L?, and an average star formation rate of a few 100 M?/yr, depending on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and a possible contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to ? LFIR ?. This is consistent with previous findings of Wang et al. on the far-infrared emission of z ~ 6 quasars and extends their results toward optically fainter sources.

Omont, A.; Willott, C. J.; Beelen, A.; Bergeron, J.; Orellana, G.; Delorme, P.

2013-04-01

212

Eighth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey to the Secretary of the Interior, 1886-1887: Part 1  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Geological Survey was organized, with Mr. Clarence King as Director, in March, 1879. In March, 1881, Mr. King resigned and the present Director was appointed. From its organization to the present time the Survey has steadily grown as Congress has enlarged its functions and increased its appropriations. During this time the scientific organization has gradually developed to the condition set forth in the last annual report. It seems advisable now to describe fully the business organization and methods of the Survey, which has heretofore been done only in part. Under the act of July 7, 1884, a joint commission was created to consider the organization of certain scientific bureaus. In the volume of testimony prepared by that commission the business operations of the Geological Survey were in part set forth; but this partial presentation was unsystematic, the facts recorded being elicited in irregular order by interrogatories arising in the course of a long investigation. It is designed here to make a more thorough exposition oi the subject. The business system of the Geological Survey is subordinate to the scientific organization and its character is dependent thereon. The development of the divisions of the Survey whose function is the transaction of business has therefore followed the development of the purely scientific divisions, and overy modification of plan for the scientific work may carry with it some modification of the business organization.

Powell, J. W.

1889-01-01

213

U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, St. Petersburg, Florida, February 13-16, 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The first U.S. Geological Survey, Karst Interest Group (KIG) Workshop, was held in St. Petersburg, Florida, on February 12-16, 2001. Technical sessions were conducted on February 13 and 14, and a field trip to local area karst features took place on Febru...

E. L. Kuniansky

2001-01-01

214

Role of the U.S. Geological Survey in Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting in Illinois, 1984-2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The State of Illinois annual withdrawl from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago area waterway system (CAWS) as part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Ac...

J. J. Duncker K. K. Johnson P. R. Jackson

2012-01-01

215

U.S. Geological Survey Digital Aerial Mapping Camera Certification and Quality Assurance Plan for Digital Imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been characterizing and calibrating aerial and satellite sensors for many years. This paper will describe the USGS calibration and characterization processes and activities with respect to digital aerial mapping cameras. The paper also describes its Quality Assurance Plan for digital aerial imagery. By focusing on four distinct processes involved in procuring and generating

GREGORY L. STENSAAS; Sioux Falls

216

SOCIO-GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY AND HEALTH STATUS: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS USING THE NATIONAL POPULATION HEALTH SURVEY OF CANADA  

PubMed Central

This paper considers the relationships between health status and socio-geographic mobility over time for individuals sampled in the longitudinal National Population Health Survey of Canada. The study aims to elucidate the associations between individuals’ health outcomes (assessed on various measures), and area deprivation in their place of residence. We also aimed to investigate the significance of selective residential migration as a possible contributor to area differences in health.

Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie; Curtis, Sarah; Setia, Maninder S.

2013-01-01

217

Patterns of Innovation Capabilities in KIBS Firms: Evidence from the 2003 Statistics Canada Innovation Survey on Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to shed light on complementarities and substitutions between various types of innovation capabilities in knowledge-intensive-based service (KIBS) firms. The data used in this study are the responses of 2,625 innovative firms to the 2003 Statistics Canada Innovation Survey on services. The empirical results suggest the presence of three patterns of complementary innovation capabilities, one

Nabil Amara; Réjean Landry; Norrin Halilem; Namatié Traoré

2010-01-01

218

Understanding the Elevated Risk of Partner Violence Against Aboriginal Women: A Comparison of Two Nationally Representative Surveys of Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using two large-scale representative samples of Canada collected in 1999 and 2004, this study examined Aboriginal women’s\\u000a elevated risk for violent victimization relative to non-Aboriginal women. Aboriginal women had about four times the odds of\\u000a experiencing violence compared to non-Aboriginal women in both surveys. In general, there were fewer differences in the impact\\u000a of risk factors between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal

Douglas A. Brownridge

2008-01-01

219

Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility of the U.S. Geological Survey, annual report for fiscal year 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hydrologic lnstrumentation Facility (HIF) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has nationwide responsibility for all aspects of hydrologic field instrumentation in support of Survey data-collection programs. Each year the HIF publishes a report to inform Water Resources Division (WRD) personnel of progress made by the HIF in fulfilling its mission to improve instrumentation services to the Division. The report for fiscal year 1993 (FY93) describes the activities of the HIF, including major accomplish- ments for the year; personnel actions; active projects (reported by section--Technical Services Section, Administrative Services Section, Field Coordination, Applications and Development Section, Test and Evaluation Section, Field Service and Supply Section); and planned activities for the coming year. Also presented in the appendixes are detailed listings of the memberships of the Instrumentation Committee and the Instrumentation Technical Advisory Subcommittee; district, sub- district, and field office visits by HIF personnel; professional and technical meetings attended by HIF personnel; vendor visits; and reports prepared by HIF personnel.

Latkovich, V. J.; Tracey, Debra C.

1994-01-01

220

A Mere Shadow of an Institution: the Unhappy Story of the Portuguese Geological Survey (PGS) in the Period Between the Two World Wars  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the period between the two World Wars, the Portuguese Geological Survey (Serviços Geológicos de Portugal: PGS) was legally dependent on the General Directorate of Mines and Geological Survey (Direcção Geral de Minas e Serviços Geológicos: GDMGS). Portugal was then living through troubled times, and the PGS struggled with financial problems and a lack of technical personnel. This situation did

Teresa Salomé Alves Da Mota

2007-01-01

221

Multidisciplinary approach (geology, geomorphology, geomechanics, geomatics) for the characterization of the Blais Creek DsGSD (Monashee Mountains, BC, Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field investigations, including detailed geological and geomorphological mapping have been coupled with stratigraphic and structural studies of the Blais Creek Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DsGSD), Monashee Mountains, British Columbia (BC). To reconstruct the DsGSD evolutionary stages and to evaluate its controlling factors, a complex methodology has been applied, integrating orthophotos, stereo models and 3D models of the DsGSD with field and literature data concerning tectonic and glacial history of the Seymour Valley. General geomechanical properties of the deforming rock mass has been then evaluated for using in numerical models of the failure mechanism at Blais Creek and to define a broad geomechanical characterization of different portions of the DsGSD. The combination between the aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry was appropriate in terms of the quality of the information obtained more than the quantitative information. Several Ground Control Points (GCPs) and Tie Points (TPs) were selected from the original DEM received by the BC Government. The use of a multitemporal aerial triangulation gave the possibility to minimize the error relative to every single block of images. Couples of oriented photos were used to create stereoscopic models. Multitemporal variations of the Blais Creek slope were observed and compared to the actual situation of the slope. The use of terrestrial photogrammetry through Adamtech software confirmed some of the qualitative data obtained from aerial interpretation and from field survey. The limited use of terrestrial photogrammetry was due to the impossibility of orienting the 3D terrestrial models. Anyway these models were also useful to confirm one of the possible mechanisms used to describe the evolution of Blais Creek. Geomechanical analysis was performed through field work and laboratory tests to characterize the entire slope and to produce some of the values useful for a possible numerical analysis of Blais Creek. It showed interesting differences in geomechanical properties between the calc-silicate and quartzite/gneiss. The kinematic analysis showed very the different instability areas along the slope, even if variations in landforms and rock masses volume weren't widespread along Blais Creek slope during the time span covered by aerial photographs (1973-2007). Indeed, the multitemporal analysis outlined very active instability along the large upper trench and the lateral active slopes of Blais Creek. Even without significant level of risks in the area, considering the remote area involved in this instability, some relevant hazards could occur, related to the possible collapse of SE side of Blais Creek DsGSD. Regarding the long term evolution of the DsGSD, the extensive network of linear features at Blais Creek is of a large deforming rock mass. Movement probably began with the retreat of valley glaciers during deglaciation when the oversteepened valley sides were debuttressed. By these evidences it is possible to theorize that the post-glacial retreat of the rock face and removal of the ice buttress from both the Seymour and the Blais Creeek Valleys lowered the factor of stability of the mass as a whole, allowing a deep-seated shear surface to develop gradually over time by progressive creep.

Moretti, Danilo; Giardino, Marco; Stead, Doug; Clague, John; Gibson, Dan; Ghirotti, Monica; Perotti, Luigi

2013-04-01

222

Outside Government Science, ‘Not a Single Tiny Bone to Cheer Us Up!’ The Geological Survey of Portugal (1857–1908), The Involvement of Common Men, and the Reaction of Civil Society to Geological Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the role played by the Geological Survey of Portugal in the emergence and consolidation of geology as a government science in the nineteenth century, within a general policy of control over territory. The period under consideration covers the directorates of its first leaders, Pereira da Costa (1809–1888) and the military engineers Carlos Ribeiro (1813–1882), and Nery

Ana Carneiro

2005-01-01

223

Renal colic and urolithiasis practice patterns in Canada: a survey of Canadian Urological Association members  

PubMed Central

Background: We describe the practice variability of CUA (Canadian Urological Association) members and factors which predict these patterns for common stone scenarios. Methods: We asked 308 English- and 52 French-speaking CUA members to complete online surveys in their respective languages. We collected demographic information on fellowship training, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) access, academic setting and whether they are at a hospital with regionalized surgical services. Respondents indicated their actual as well as ideal treatment for scenarios of renal, proximal and distal ureteric calculi. Results: In total, 131 urologists responded (36% response rate), all of whom treated urolithiasis. Of this number, 17% had endourology fellowship training, 76% had access to SWL, 42% were at an academic institution and 66% were at institutions with regionalized surgical services. Actual and ideal treatment modalities selected for symptomatic, distal and proximal ureteric stones (4, 8, 14 mm) were consistent with published guidelines. There were discrepancies between the use of ureteroscopy and SWL in actual versus ideal scenarios. Actual and ideal practices were congruent for proximal ureteric stones and asymptomatic renal calculi. In multivariate analysis, respondents were less likely to perform ureteroscopy on proximal 4- and 8-mm stones if they were at a hospital with regionalized surgical services (OR: 0.097; 95% CI: 0.01–0.76, p = 0.03 and OR: 0.330; 95% CI: 0.13–0.83, p = 0.02). Interpretation: There is clinical variability in the management of urolithiasis in Canada; however, management approaches fall within published guidelines. Type of hospital and access to operating room resources may affect treatment modality selection.

Satkunasivam, Raj; Keays, Melise; Pace, Kenneth T.

2011-01-01

224

Hepatitis B learning needs assessment of family medicine trainees in Canada: Results of a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: An estimated 350 million people worldwide have chronic hepatitis B (CHB), which is a major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To assess the level of knowledge among family medicine trainees regarding the identification and management of CHB. METHODS: A questionnaire to assess knowledge regarding screening and management of patients with CHB and cirrhosis was developed. The questionnaire was pilot tested among primary care physicians, subsequently revised and distributed to family medicine trainees across Canada through an online survey program (QuestionPro). RESULTS: A total of 158 trainees completed the questionnaire. Of these, 54% to 56% routinely offered vaccination against hepatitis A or hepatitis B virus (HBV), and 42% regularly screened patients for HBV risk factors. The percentage who recognized the need to screen high-risk populations for CHB, ie, individuals from an HBV-endemic country, men who have sex with men, or intravenous drug users was 73%, 66% and 74%, respectively. While less than 50% of respondents used the appropriate HBV screening tests, 86% to 91% correctly interpreted various HBV serological patterns. Only 3% recognized cirrhosis in our case scenario. Almost 80% of respondents inappropriately preferred prescribing a narcotic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug over acetaminophen (4%) for pain control in a patient with cirrhosis. While less than 60% recognized HBeAg negative CHB as an indication for referral and treatment, 90% would have referred a patient in the immune-tolerant phase, even though treatment is not indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge gaps regarding CHB among family medicine trainees in the areas of primary prevention, disease recognition and management of cirrhosis were identified. Results suggest that opportunities to prevent potentially life-threatening complications are being missed.

Sam, Justina J; Heathcote, E Jenny; Wong, David KH; Wooster, Douglas L; Shah, Hemant

2011-01-01

225

Optical identification of XMM sources in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present optical spectroscopic identifications of X-ray sources in ~3 deg2 of the XMM-Large Scale Structure survey (XMM-LSS), also covered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS), obtained with the AAOmega instrument at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In a flux-limited sample of 829 point-like sources in the optical band with g' <= 22 mag and the 0.5-2 keV flux (f0.5-2keV) > 1 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1, we observed 693 objects and obtained reliable spectroscopic identification for 487 sources, approximately 59 per cent of the overall sample. We therefore increase the number of identifications in this field by a factor close to 5. Galactic stellar sources represent about 15 per cent of the total (74/487). About 54 per cent (265/487) are broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGN) spanning redshifts between 0.15 and 3.87 with a median value of 1.68. The optical-to-X-ray spectral index (?ox) of the broad-line AGN is 1.47 +/- 0.03, typical of optically selected type I quasars, and is found to correlate with the rest-frame X-ray and optical monochromatic luminosities at 2 keV and 2500 Å, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, we find ?ox not to be correlated with z. In addition, 32 and 116 X-ray sources are, respectively, absorption- and emission-line galaxies at z < 0.76. From a line ratio diagnostic diagram, it is found that in about 50 per cent of these emission-line galaxies, the emission lines are powered significantly by the AGN. 30 of the XMM sources are detected at one or more radio frequencies. In addition, 24 sources have ambiguous identification: in eight cases, two XMM sources have a single optical source within 6 arcsec of each of them, whereas two and 14 XMM sources have, respectively, three and two possible optical sources within 6 arcsec of each of them. Spectra of multiple possible counterparts were obtained in such ambiguous cases.

Stalin, C. S.; Petitjean, Patrick; Srianand, R.; Fox, A. J.; Coppolani, F.; Schwope, A.

2010-01-01

226

Do students’ perceptions of school smoking policies influence where students smoke?: Canada’s Youth Smoking Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The objective of this study was to explore students’ perceptions of school policy characteristics that influence the location\\u000a of smoking while at school.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data were collected from a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth in grades 7–12 as part of the 2006–2007 Youth\\u000a Smoking Survey. We used multilevel logistic regression to examine how students’ perceptions of school policies predicted smoking

Allison W. Watts; Chris Y. Lovato; Antony Card; Steve R. Manske

2010-01-01

227

Survey of the practice of spinal cord stimulators and intrathecal analgesic delivery implants for management of pain in Canada  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: In 2006, the Canadian Neuromodulation Society was formed. The present survey characterizes the practice of spinal cord stimulator (SCS) and intrathecal analgesic delivery pump (IADP) implantation for pain management in different centres across Canada. METHOD: A structured questionnaire was designed to examine the funding source, infrastructure and patient screening process in different centres implanting SCSs and IADPs. Centres that performed more than 10 implants per year were surveyed. The survey was centre-based, ie, each centre received one questionnaire regardless of the number of staff involved in neuromodulation practice. RESULTS: Fourteen centres were identified and 13 responded. Implantation of SCS and IADP was performed in 12 and 10 centres, respectively. In most centres, failed back surgery syndrome was the most frequent indication for SCS and IADP implantation. For SCS, all centres always performed a trial; the majority used percutaneous electrode (83%) before the SCS implantation. Routine psychological screening was performed in 25% of centres before any SCS trial procedure. For IADP, all centres performed a trial injection or infusion before implantation. Five centres (50%) performed psychological screening in almost all patients. Continuous infusion techniques were the most popular (50%) used for the trial. CONCLUSION: The present survey provides a ‘snapshot’ of the practice of SCS and IADP implantation in Canada. A review of SCS and IADP trials indicated that Canadian practices are mostly, but not always, consistent with those elsewhere.

Peng, Philip WH; Fedoroff, Ingrid; Jacques, Line; Kumar, Krishna

2007-01-01

228

Evaluation of stream chemistry trends in US Geological Survey reference watersheds, 1970-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) is a long-term monitoring program established by the US Geological Survey in the 1960s to track changes in the streamflow and stream chemistry in undeveloped watersheds across the USA. Trends in stream chemistry were tested at 15 HBN stations over two periods (1970–2010 and 1990–2010) using the parametric Load Estimator (LOADEST) model and the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Trends in annual streamflow and precipitation chemistry also were tested to help identify likely drivers of changes in stream chemistry. At stations in the northeastern USA, there were significant declines in stream sulfate, which were consistent with declines in sulfate deposition resulting from the reductions in SO2 emissions mandated under the Clean Air Act Amendments. Sulfate declines in stream water were smaller than declines in deposition suggesting sulfate may be accumulating in watershed soils and thereby delaying the stream response to improvements in deposition. Trends in stream chemistry at stations in other part of the country generally were attributed to climate variability or land disturbance. Despite declines in sulfate deposition, increasing stream sulfate was observed at several stations and appeared to be linked to periods of drought or declining streamflow. Falling water tables might have enhanced oxidation of organic matter in wetlands or pyrite in mineralized bedrock thereby increasing sulfate export in surface water. Increasing sulfate and nitrate at a station in the western USA were attributed to release of soluble salts and nutrients from soils following a large wildfire in the watershed.

Mast, M. Alisa

2013-01-01

229

A summary of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the U.S. Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of this evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation 's water resources; (2) define long-term trends (or lack of trends) in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- and water-management practices. (USGS)

Hirsch, R. M.; Alley, W. M.; Wilber, W. G.

1988-01-01

230

Evaluation of stream chemistry trends in US Geological Survey reference watersheds, 1970-2010.  

PubMed

The Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) is a long-term monitoring program established by the US Geological Survey in the 1960s to track changes in the streamflow and stream chemistry in undeveloped watersheds across the USA. Trends in stream chemistry were tested at 15 HBN stations over two periods (1970-2010 and 1990-2010) using the parametric Load Estimator (LOADEST) model and the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Trends in annual streamflow and precipitation chemistry also were tested to help identify likely drivers of changes in stream chemistry. At stations in the northeastern USA, there were significant declines in stream sulfate, which were consistent with declines in sulfate deposition resulting from the reductions in SO2 emissions mandated under the Clean Air Act Amendments. Sulfate declines in stream water were smaller than declines in deposition suggesting sulfate may be accumulating in watershed soils and thereby delaying the stream response to improvements in deposition. Trends in stream chemistry at stations in other part of the country generally were attributed to climate variability or land disturbance. Despite declines in sulfate deposition, increasing stream sulfate was observed at several stations and appeared to be linked to periods of drought or declining streamflow. Falling water tables might have enhanced oxidation of organic matter in wetlands or pyrite in mineralized bedrock thereby increasing sulfate export in surface water. Increasing sulfate and nitrate at a station in the western USA were attributed to release of soluble salts and nutrients from soils following a large wildfire in the watershed. PMID:23715732

Mast, M Alisa

2013-05-29

231

Streamstats: U.S. Geological Survey Web Application for Streamflow Statistics for Connecticut  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction An important mission of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to provide information on streamflow in the Nation's rivers. Streamflow statistics are used by water managers, engineers, scientists, and others to protect people and property during floods and droughts, and to manage land, water, and biological resources. Common uses for streamflow statistics include dam, bridge, and culvert design; water-supply planning and management; water-use appropriations and permitting; wastewater and industrial discharge permitting; hydropower-facility design and regulation; and flood-plain mapping for establishing flood-insurance rates and land-use zones. In an effort to improve access to published streamflow statistics, and to make the process of computing streamflow statistics for ungaged stream sites easier, more accurate, and more consistent, the USGS and the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) developed StreamStats (Ries and others, 2004). StreamStats is a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based Web application for serving previously published streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for USGS data-collection stations, and computing streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for ungaged stream sites. The USGS, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and the Connecticut Department of Transportation, has implemented StreamStats for Connecticut.

Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Ries, Kernell G., III; Steeves, Peter A.

2006-01-01

232

U.S. Geological Survey community for data integration: data upload, registry, and access tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As a leading science and information agency and in fulfillment of its mission to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ensures that all scientific data are effectively hosted, adequately described, and appropriately accessible to scientists, collaborators, and the general public. To succeed in this task, the USGS established the Community for Data Integration (CDI) to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. Through the CDI, the USGS is providing data and metadata management tools, cyber infrastructure, collaboration tools, and training in support of scientists and technology specialists throughout the project life cycle. One of the significant tools recently created to contribute to this mission is the Uploader tool. This tool allows scientists with limited data management resources to address many of the key aspects of the data life cycle: the ability to protect, preserve, publish and share data. By implementing this application inside ScienceBase, scientists also can take advantage of other collaboration capabilities provided by the ScienceBase platform.

Fort Collins Science Center Web Applications Team

2012-01-01

233

Pennsylvania Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Three decades after it was published, the Second Geological Survey of Pennsylvania was described as "the most remarkable series of reports ever issued by any survey." Considering the diversity of other geological reports, this was no small compliment. Drawing on support from the Marion and Kenneth Pollock Libraries Program Fund, the Pennsylvania State University Libraries' Digital Preservation Unit was able to digitize not only this fabled Survey, but also the Third and Fourth Surveys as well. Visitors can use the search engine on the homepage to look for items of interest, or they can just browse through the collection at their leisure. The surveys include various maps and illustrations that track mineral deposits and the disposition and location of other natural resources. Additionally, users can look through a miscellaneous set of publications from the early 20th century related to survey work performed by the U.S. Geological Survey.

234

A preliminary global geologic map of Vesta based on Dawn Survey orbit data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid 4Vesta on July 15, 2011, and is now collecting imaging, spectroscopic, and elemental abundance data during its one-year orbital mission. As part of the geological analysis of the surface, we have utilized images and data from the Survey orbital sequence to produce a global map of Vesta's surface. Unit boundaries and feature characteristics were determined primarily from morphologic analysis of image data; projected Framing Camera (FC) images were used as the base map. Spectral information from FC and VIR are used to refine unit contacts and to separate compositional distinctions from differences arising from illumination or other factors. Those units that could be discerned both in morphology and in the color data were interpreted as geologically distinct units. Vesta's surface is highly-cratered; differences in color and albedo are possible indicators of varying thicknesses and areal extents of crater ejecta. The most prominent candidate impact feature dominates the south pole. This feature consists of a depression roughly circular in shape, with a central hill that is characterized by smoother texture and lower albedo distinctive from the lower-lying surrounding terrain. A complex network of deep troughs and ridges cuts through the floor of the feature. Many of these troughs trend north-south, while others appear circumferential to the hill and are truncated by or terminate at orthogonal ridges/grooves. Detailed mapping of these features will provide information on their orientations, possible origin(s), and their relationship, if any, to the central hill. The equator of Vesta is also girdled by a wide set of flat-floored troughs. Their orientation implies that their formation is related to the south polar structure. Several regions on Vesta have a concentration of craters displaying low-albedo interiors or exteriors. These craters may have an exogenic origin, or may be the result of excavation of a thin sub-surface layer. Low-albedo regions also appear to have been uncovered by mass wasting around some topographic highs. If this dark material is endogenic in origin, this suggests that Vesta has both vertical and lateral stratigraphic heterogeneity. Current imaging also reveals dark materials and smooth regions that may be candidate locations/sites for volcanic activity. Further study at greater spatial and spectral resolution is required to unequivocally identify the character and origin of these features. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Dawn Operations, Instruments, and Science Teams.

Yingst, R.; Williams, D. A.; Garry, W. B.; Mest, S. C.; Petro, N. E.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; LeCorre, L.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; DeSanctis, C.; Ammannito, E.; Filacchione, G.

2011-12-01

235

U.S. Geological Survey water-resource monitoring activities in support of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quality of the Nation’s water resources are vital to the health and well-being of both our communities and the natural landscapes we value. The U.S. Geological Survey investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of surface water and groundwater and provides this information to engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and the general public. This information also supplements current (2013) and historical water data provided by the National Water Information System. The U.S. Geological Survey collects and shares data nationwide, but how those data are used is often site specific; this variety of data assists natural-resource managers in addressing unique, local, and regional challenges.

Soileau, Suzanna; Miller, Kirk

2013-01-01

236

U.S. Geological Survey DLG-3 and Bureau of the Census TIGER data. Development and GIS applications  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has been actively developing digital cartographic and geographic data and standards since the early 1970's. One product is Digital Line Graph data, which offer a consistently accurate source of base category geographic information. The Bureau of the Census has combined their Dual Independent Map Encoding data with the Geological Survey's 1:100,000-scale Digital Line Graph data to prepare for the 1990 decennial census. The resulting Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing data offer a wealth of information. A major area of research using these data is in transportation analysis. The attributes associated with Digital Line Graphs can be used to determine the average travel times along each segment. Geographic information system functions can then be used to optimize routes through the network and to generate street name lists. Additional aspects of the subject are discussed.

Batten, Lawrence, G.

1990-01-01

237

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications on Nevada by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1885 through 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References to 898 water-resources publications are listed alphabetically by senior author and indexed by hydrographic-area name or other geographic features. Most of the publications were written between 1960 and 1995 by U.S. Geological Survey scientists and engineers of the Water Resources Division, Nevada District. Also included are references to publications by other Water Resources Division authors that deal with Nevada hydrology. References to publications written before 1960 are included to provide a historical perspective. The references include several types of Geological Survey book and map publications, as well as State-series reports, journal articles, conference and symposium papers, abstracts, and graduate- degree theses. Information on publication availability is provided also.

Bunch, R. L.

1996-01-01

238

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

Winner, M. D., Jr.

1996-01-01

239

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-171 (trace constituents), M-164 (major constituents), N-75 (nutrient constituents), N-76 (nutrient constituents), P-39 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-35 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 102 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2003-01-01

240

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-163 (trace constituents), M-156 (major constituents), N-67 (nutrient constituents), N-68 (nutrient constituents), P-35 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-31 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 2000 to 126 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 122 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Connor, B. F.; Currier, J. P.; Woodworth, M. T.

2001-01-01

241

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in March 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-173 (trace constituents), M-166 (major constituents), N-77 (nutrient constituents), N-78 (nutrient constituents), P-40 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-36 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2003 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 110 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2003-01-01

242

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for standard reference samples distributed in March 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for 8 standard reference samples -- T-157 (trace constituents), M-150 (major constituents), N-61 (nutrient constituents), N-62 (nutrient constituents), P-32 (low ionic strength constituents), GWT-5 (ground-water trace constituents), GWM- 4 (ground-water major constituents),and Hg-28 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 1999 to 120 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 111 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the seven reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the 8 standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, Jerry W.; Chleboun, Kimberly M.

1999-01-01

243

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in April 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-165 (trace constituents), M-158 (major constituents), N-69 (nutrient constituents), N-70 (nutrient constituents), P-36 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-32 (mercury) -- that were distributed in April 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 73 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, M. T.; Connor, B. F.

2001-01-01

244

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in October 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-159 (trace constituents), M-152 (major constituents), N-63 (nutrient constituents), N-64 (nutrient constituents), P-33 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-29 (mercury) -- that were distributed in October 1999 to 149 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 131 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, T. W.

2000-01-01

245

Results of the U. S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T- 169 (trace constituents), M- 162 (major constituents), N-73 (nutrient constituents), N-74 (nutrient constituents), P-38 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-34 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2002 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored intedaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 93 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, M. T.; Conner, B. F.

2002-01-01

246

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for Standard Reference Samples Distributed in March 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-161 (trace constituents), M-154 (major constituents), N-65 (nutrient constituents), N-66 nutrient constituents), P-34 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-30 (mercury) -- that were distributed in March 2000 to 144 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 132 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Farrar, Jerry W.; Copen, Ashley M.

2000-01-01

247

Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for standard reference samples distributed in September 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for six standard reference samples -- T-167 (trace constituents), M-160 (major constituents), N-71 (nutrient constituents), N-72 (nutrient constituents), P-37 (low ionic-strength constituents), and Hg-33 (mercury) -- that were distributed in September 2001 to laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data received from 98 laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

Woodworth, Mark T.; Connor, Brooke F.

2002-01-01

248

The Hontomin CO2 geologic storage site: results from 2D seismic survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Spanish research program on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), leaded by the state-owned foundation CIUDEN, initiated the storage project with the creation of the first Spanish technological laboratory devoted to subsurface storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2010 near the village of Hontomín (North West of Spain). This research site aims investigating the different phases involved in the CO2 injection process in underground geologic formations at real scale and monitoring its long-term behavior. The seismic baseline study consist on five innovative and non-standard seismic experiments including: 1) a 35 km2 of 3D seismic survey, 2) a 2D seismic survey, 3) a Seismovie survey, 4) a 30 passive-seismic network and 5) a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) survey programmed for this year. Here we focus on the 2D seismic reflection survey that was acquired with new generation 3-component receivers. A total of 408 receivers with 25 m interval were deployed along 2 orthogonal profiles, orientated ~NS-EW, centered near the injection point. The seismic source consisted on 4 15-Tn M22 vibroseis trucks with a 16-sec sweep vibrating at each 25 m distance. Data processing included static corrections, spherical divergence correction, airwave muting, predictive deconvolution, stack, time-variant band-pass filtering and time migration. First analysis of the vertical component data confirm the dome-geometry of the reservoir observed by previous studies and give details on the tectonic structure of the potential injection zone. The data also show two main seismic features corresponding to 1) a loss of the P-wave first arrival amplitudes resulting in a shadow zone at offsets of ~600-1500 m. and 2) a high-amplitude reflection at the base of the shadow zone. We related the presence of the shadow zone with a ~750 m-thick layer of low velocity or small velocity-gradient, associated to Early-Middle Cretaceous deposits that globally correspond to variable grain-size siliciclastic continental material of Purbeck, Weald and Utrillas-Escucha formations. The relatively high porosity of these deposits (18-26 %) support their susceptibility to fluid saturation and consequently explain the presence of low P-wave velocity values. On the other hand, the high-amplitude reflection below is related to the Purbeck-Dogger formations contact, resulting from the high impedance contrast between the low-velocity zone and the underlaying Late-Middle Jurassic marine deposits of the Dogger and Lias formations (limestones, marls and blackshales), which are the seal of the system. The main potential reservoir for C02 is located at ~1400-1500 m depth, in limestones and carniolas deposits (~30% porosity) of the Early Jurassic Lias formation.

Calahorrano, A.; Martí, D.; Alcalde, J.; Marzán, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

2012-04-01

249

MODFLOW-2000, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model -- GMG Linear Equation Solver Package Documentation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geometric multigrid solver (GMG), based in the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm, has been developed for solving systems of equations resulting from applying the cell-centered finite difference algorithm to flow in porous media. This solver has been adapted to the U.S. Geological Survey ground-water flow model MODFLOW-2000. The documentation herein is a description of the solver and the adaptation to MODFLOW-2000.

Wilson, John D.; Naff, Richard L.

2004-01-01

250

Worldwide Estimates of Deep Natural Gas Resources Based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000

T. S. Dyman; R. A. Crovelli; C. E. Bartberger; K. I. Takahashi

2002-01-01

251

Revisions to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package for Simulation of Ground-Water Interactions With Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several revisions were made to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package as part of the integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System with MODFLOW. The integrated model, named GSFLOW, is designed for the simultaneous simulation of ground-water and surface-water flow. Revisions to the Lake Package resulted in changing: (1) the numerical solution to simultaneously solve for lake stage and outflow

D. E. Prudic; R. G. Niswonger

2006-01-01

252

Results and Interpretations of U.S. Geological Survey Data Collected In and Around the Tuba City Open Dump, Arizona  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Open-File Report was originally an Administrative Report presentation to the Bureau of Indian Affairs based on U.S. Geological Survey data that has been collected and presented in four previous reports (Open-File Reports 2009-1020, 2008-1380, and 2008-1374, and an Administrative Report on geophysical data). This presentation was given at a technical meeting requested by the BIA on March 3 and 4, 2009, in Phoenix, Arizona. The idea for this meeting was for all the technical people working on issues related to the Tuba City Open Dump site to come together and share their data collection procedures, results, interpretations, and working hypotheses. The meeting goal was to have a clear record of each party's interpretations and a summary of additional data that would be needed to solve differences of opinion. The intention of this presentation is not to provide an exhaustive summary of U.S. Geological Survey efforts at the Tuba City Open Dump site given in the four previously published Open-File Reports listed above, since these reports have already been made available. This presentation briefly summarizes the data collected for those reports and provides results, interpretations, and working hypotheses relating to the data available in these reports. The major questions about the Tuba City Open Dump addressed by the U.S. Geological Survey are (1) what are the sources for uranium and other constituents found in the ground water in and around the Tuba City Open Dump, (2) what is the current distribution of ground water contaminants away from the Tuba City Open Dump (can plume limits be delineated), and (3) what controls the mobility of uranium and other constituents in and around the Tuba City Open Dump? Data collection, results, and interpretations by the U.S. Geological Survey that address these questions are presented herein.

Johnson, Raymond H.; Otton, James K.; Horton, Robert J.

2009-01-01

253

[US Geological Survey research in radioactive waste disposal, fiscal year 1982:] Search for potential [disposal] sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective is to locate and characterize rock masses at the NTS and in southern Nevada that are potentially suitable as host media for high-level commercial radioactive wastes and to describe the areal and depth distributions and structure of these rock masses. From previous geologic work at NTS, the general geology is well known. Areas likely to have suitable host

G. L. Dixon; V. M. Glanzman

1984-01-01

254

The status of restrictive smoking policies: a survey of medical schools in the United States and Canada.  

PubMed Central

All schools of medicine in the United States (N = 128) and Canada (N = 16) were surveyed by telephone to determine if they had instituted policies to restrict smoking. Some policy restricting smoking was reported by 80.56 percent of US schools (N = 103) and by 93.8 percent of Canadian schools (N = 15). However, only 52.3 percent of US (N = 67) and 56.3 percent of Canadian medical schools (N = 9) indicated they had formal written policy statements. Only 13 percent of US schools and 19 percent of Canadian schools had banned smoking totally. Images FIGURE 1

Stillman, F A; Becker, D M

1991-01-01

255

Practical implications of the geometrical sensitivity of elastic dislocation models for field geologic surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geodetic observations of both coseismic and interseismic surface deformation fields in the vicinity of subduction zones are frequently interpreted using simple elastic dislocation models (EDMs). The geometry of the megathrust interface used in these models has a first order effect on their predicted surface deformation. Here, we systematically explore the sensitivity of the surface velocity field predicted by EDMs both early and late in the seismic cycle, to parameterizations of megathrust interface geometry, effective subducting plate thickness, and gradual transitions in apparent plate coupling. We focus on how these parameterizations affect the hingeline - the location where vertical velocities switch from subsidence to uplift - as well as the location of the peak uplift rates. We find that these surface observables are much less sensitive to uncertainties in dip at the downdip end of the seismogenic zone for realistic curved faults in comparison to planar faults. For realistic megathrust geometries (planar or curved) having gradual transitions in apparent plate coupling, we find that the extent of locking is best approximated at the surface by the location of peak uplift rates. Therefore, the common notion - based on shallow-dipping planar faults - that the hingeline is located directly above the maximum depth extent of the locked plate interface is generally incorrect. Using the hingeline as the basis for coupling may lead to a significant underestimation of seismic hazard early in the cycle, as well as during the interseismic period. This analysis also demonstrates the importance of considering both vertical and horizontal velocities for determining seismic source extents, as well as interseismic coupling, on the megathrust. The tradeoffs presented here between the geometry of the megathrust and fault coupling along its surface can assist in the planning of campaign-GPS or field geologic surveys, and help improve seismic hazard estimates in active subduction zones.

Kanda, Ravi V. S.; Simons, Mark

2012-08-01

256

Ensuring Data Quality through a Lifecycle Approach: Examples and Lessons from the US Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of data, sometimes referred to as "fitness for use", is critically dependent on numerous factors including the precision and accuracy of the collection, the robustness of the metadata, the data curation and preservation, and the accessibility. Adherence to these data life-cycle management standards, critical peer review of data, and appropriate citation of use and reuse, help ensure quality through the potentially long history of a given set of data. Presently, there are many diverse quality practices across domains and sub-domains, and as the conduct of earth systems science becomes more integrated, there are increasing opportunities for scientists to use data in modeling and other analyses that may not be appropriate or fit for the intended use. Science at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is increasingly focused on complex modeling and analysis of systems utilizing a combination of field observation and sophisticated, often automated, monitoring systems and instrumentation. Understanding and expressing the uncertainty of data, integrating and quantifying observational data with instrument data, understanding the resolution and limitations of data, and using data from the growing sources outside of a scientist's domain or control are some of the current challenges USGS is trying to address. Some solutions being implemented include: working with and across scientific communities to adopt modeling, data quality, and uncertainty standards; implementing full life-cycle data management practices; establishing common protocols for collection and metadata; providing training and education on data quality and management; and implementing "fundamental science practices" that ensure the highest quality in the publication of science and data.

Gundersen, L. C.

2011-12-01

257

US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and leaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 (226Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of226Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in226Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as226Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can226Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides from uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

Landa, E. R.; Gray, J. R.

1995-01-01

258

The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey—L3 Data Release: The Orbital Structure of the Kuiper Belt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian comets discovered during the first discovery year of the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS). CFEPS is a Kuiper Belt object survey based on observations acquired by the Very Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (LS-VW). The first year's detections consist of 73 Kuiper Belt objects, 55 of which have now been tracked for three years or more, providing precise orbits. Although this sample size is small compared to the world-wide inventory, because we have an absolutely calibrated and extremely well-characterized survey (with known pointing history) we are able to de-bias our observed population and make unbiased statements about the intrinsic orbital distribution of the Kuiper Belt. By applying the (publically available) CFEPS Survey Simulator to models of the true orbital distribution and comparing the resulting simulated detections to the actual detections made by the survey, we are able to rule out several hypothesized Kuiper Belt object orbit distributions. We find that the main classical belt's so-called 'cold' component is confined in semimajor axis (a) and eccentricity (e) compared to the more extended "hot" component; the cold component is confined to lower e and does not stretch all the way out to the 2:1 resonance but rather depletes quickly beyond a = 45 AU. For the cold main classical belt population we find a robust population estimate of N(Hg < 10) = 50 ± 5 × 103 and find that the hot component of the main classical belt represents ~60% of the total population. The inner classical belt (sunward of the 3:2 mean-motion resonance) has a population of roughly 2000 trans-Neptunian objects with absolute magnitudes Hg < 10, and may not share the inclination distribution of the main classical belt. We also find that the plutino population lacks a cold low-inclination component, and so, the population is somewhat larger than recent estimates; our analysis shows a plutino population of N(Hg < 10)~ 25+25 -12 × 103compared to our estimate of the size of main classical Kuiper Belt population of N(Hg < 10) ~ (126+50 -46) × 103. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Universe of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS.

Kavelaars, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Gladman, B. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Nicholson, P.; Rousselot, P.; Scholl, H.; Mousis, O.; Marsden, B.; Benavidez, P.; Bieryla, A.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Doressoundiram, A.; Margot, J. L.; Murray, I.; Veillet, C.

2009-06-01

259

Resident research associateships, postdoctoral research awards 1989: opportunities for research at the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey are engaged in a wide range of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, hydrologic, and cartographic programs, including the application of computer science to them. These programs offer exciting possibilities for scientific achievement and professional growth to young scientists through participation as Research Associates.

U.S. Geological Survey; U.S. National Research Council

1989-01-01

260

Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy: A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and ...

H. T. Buxton J. W. Haines M. E. Andersen M. J. Focazio R. A. Hainly

2013-01-01

261

Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Processing, Taxonomy, and Quality Control of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Samples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Qualitative and quantitative methods to process benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) samples have been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Laboratory Biological Group. The qualitative processing method is based on v...

I. S. Moulton J. L. Carter S. A. Grotheer T. F. Cuffney T. M. Short

2000-01-01

262

School Psychology in Canada: A Survey of Roles and Functions, Challenges and Aspirations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|School psychology in Canada has evolved in recent years from being comprised mainly of "testers" to being regarded as an important partner in promoting the psychological and educational needs of children and supporting the mandates of our educational systems. As well, school psychology is now recognized as an area of specialization within…

Jordan, Jason J.; Hindes, Yvonne L.; Saklofske, Donald H.

2009-01-01

263

An Economic Survey of the Wine and Winegrape Industry in the United States and Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wine industry in the United States and Canada is new by Old World standards but old by New World standards. The industry has had several rebirths, so specifying its age may depend on the purpose of the investigation. In the colonial and post-colonial period up through the middle of the 19th Century, it was a relatively tiny industry with

Daniel A. Sumner; Helene Bombrun; Julian M. Alston; Dale Heien

2001-01-01

264

Mental Health Services for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Canada: Findings from a National Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: People with intellectual disabilities are known to have a high prevalence of mental health problems but few studies have considered how such mental health problems are addressed in Canada. The purpose of the present study was to document both the range of mental health services available to individuals with intellectual disabilities…

Lunsky, Y.; Garcin, N.; Morin, D.; Cobigo, V.; Bradley, E.

2007-01-01

265

Aboriginal Self-Government through Constitutional Design: A Survey of Fourteen Aboriginal Constitutions in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite a rich and diverse literature on the revitalization of Indigenous legal traditions and constitutional orders, no one has yet looked at modern Aboriginal constitutions in Canada. This essay draws upon the comparative constitutional design and Aboriginal politics literatures to describe and analyze the texts of 14 Aboriginal constitutions. The findings suggest that these constitutional documents are similar to non-Aboriginal

Christopher Alcantara; Greg Whitfield

2010-01-01

266

Aboriginal Self-Government through Constitutional Design: A Survey of Fourteen Aboriginal Constitutions in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

: Despite a rich and diverse literature on the revitalization of Indigenous legal traditions and constitutional orders, no one has yet looked at modern Aboriginal constitutions in Canada. This essay draws upon the comparative constitutional design and Aboriginal politics literatures to describe and analyze the texts of 14 Aboriginal constitutions. The findings suggest that these constitutional documents are similar to

Christopher Alcantara; Greg Whitfield

2010-01-01

267

Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada: The SAGE wait times program  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Assessment of current wait times for specialist health services in Canada is a key method that can assist government and health care providers to plan wisely for future health needs. These data are not readily available. A method to capture wait time data at the time of consultation or procedure has been developed, which should be applicable to other

Desmond Leddin MB; Ronald J Bridges; David G Morgan; Carlo Fallone; Craig Render

268

Worldwide estimates of deep natural gas resources based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000 ft), undiscovered conventional natural gas resources based on this assessment. Two hundred forty-six assessment units in 128 priority geologic provinces, 96 countries, and two jointly held areas were assessed using a probabilistic Total Petroleum System approach. Priority geologic provinces were selected from a ranking of 937 provinces worldwide. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment Team did not assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the U.S. For this report, mean estimated volumes of deep conventional undiscovered gas resources in the U.S. are taken from estimates of 101 deep plays (out of a total of 550 conventional plays in the U.S.) from the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. A probabilistic method was designed to subdivide gas resources into depth slices using a median-based triangular probability distribution as a model for drilling depth to estimate the percentages of estimated gas resources below various depths. For both the World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and the 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources, minimum, median, and maximum depths were assigned to each assessment unit and play; these depths were used in our analysis. Two-hundred seventy-four deep assessment units and plays in 124 petroleum provinces were identified for the U.S. and the world. These assessment units and plays contain a mean undiscovered conventional gas resource of 844 trillion cubic ft (Tcf) occuring at depths below 4.5 km. The deep undiscovered conventional gas resource (844 Tcf) is about 17% of the total world gas resource (4,928 Tcf) based on the provinces assessed and includes a mean estimate of 259 Tcf of U.S. gas from the U.S. 1995 National Assessment. Of the eight regions, the Former Soviet Union (Region 1) contains the largest estimated volume of undiscovered deep gas with a mean resource of 343 Tcf. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Dyman, T. S.; Crovelli, R. A.; Bartberger, C. E.; Takahashi, K. I.

2002-01-01

269

Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1986.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Special issue for overseas geology and mineral resources (II)--Studies of mineral resources related to volcanic and plutonic rocks in southeast China; Characteristics of Cretaceous magmatism and related mineralization of the Ningwu Basin, Lower ...

1986-01-01

270

Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, Vol. 35, No. 11, November 1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Special Issue for Overseas Geology and Mineral Resources (I)--Calc-alkaline Magmatism and Related Mineralization in Chile; Plutonic Rocks of North-Central Chile; Late paleozoic Granitic Rocks from Northern Chile; Geochemical Studies of Upper Cen...

1984-01-01

271

Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, Vol. 35, No. 6, June 1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Environmental changes of Tokyo bay by man - in comparison with environmental changes by nature during geological history; Fossil Foraminifera from the Neogene in the East Shimane Peninsula, Simane Prefecture; Granitic Rocks in the Iide Mountains...

1984-01-01

272

A Survey of Measurement, Mitigation, and Verification Field Technologies for Carbon Sequestration Geologic Storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program is developing state-of-the-science technologies for measurement, mitigation, and verification (MM&V) in field operations of geologic sequestration. MM&V of geologic carbon sequestration operations will play an integral role in the pre-injection, injection, and post-injection phases of carbon capture and storage projects to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Effective MM&V is critical

K. K. Cohen; S. M. Klara; R. D. Srivastava

2004-01-01

273

The U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program Website: Summary of Recent and Ongoing Developments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) website (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/) focuses on 1) earthquake reporting for informed decisions after an earthquake, 2) hazards information for informed decisions and planning before an earthquake, and 3) the basics of earthquake science to help the users of the information understand what is presented. The majority of website visitors are looking for information about current earthquakes in the U.S. and around the world, and the second most visited portion of the website are the education-related pages. People are eager for information, and they are most interested in "what's in my backyard?" Recent and future web developments are aimed at answering this question, making the information more relevant to users, and enabling users to more quickly and easily find the information they are looking for. Recent and/or current web developments include the new enhanced Recent Global Earthquakes and U.S. Earthquakes webpages, the Earthquake in the News system, the Rapid Accurate Tectonic Summaries (RATS), online Significant Earthquake Summary Posters (ESP's), and the U.S. Quaternary Fault & Fold Database, the details of which are covered individually in greater detail in this or other sessions. Future planned developments include a consistent look across all EHP webpages, an integrated one-stop-shopping earthquake notification (EQMail) subscription webpage, new navigation tabs, and a backend database allowing the user to search for earthquake information across all the various EHP websites (on different webservers) based on a topic or region. Another goal is to eventually allow a user to input their address (Zip Code?) and in return receive all the relevant EHP information (and links to more detailed information) such as closest fault, the last significant nearby earthquake, a local seismicity map, and a local hazard map, for example. This would essentially be a dynamic report based on the entered location. This type of "what's in my backyard?" information would be of great benefit to both various organizations, such as insurance agencies and building contractors, and the general public.

Wald, L. A.; Zirbes, M.; Robert, S.; Wald, D.; Presgrace, B.; Earle, P.; Schwarz, S.; Haefner, S.; Haller, K.; Rhea, S.

2003-12-01

274

Hf isotope compositions of U.S. Geological Survey reference materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic multi-isotopic and trace element characterization of U.S. Geological Survey reference materials has been carried out at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research, University of British Columbia. Values of 176Hf/177Hf are recommended for the following reference materials (mean ±2 SD): G-2: 0.282523 ± 6; G-3: 0.282518 ± 1; GSP-2: 0.281949 ± 8; RGM-1: 0.283017 ± 13; STM-1: 0.283019 ± 12; STM-2: 0.283021 ± 5; BCR-1: 0.282875 ± 8; BCR-2: 0.282870 ± 8; BHVO-1: 0.283106 ± 12; BHVO-2: 0.283105 ± 11; AGV-1: 0.282979 ± 6; and AGV-2: 0.282984 ± 9. Reproducibility is better than 50 ppm for the granitoid compositions and better than 40 ppm for the basaltic/andesitic compositions. For the isotopic analyses acquired early in this project on glass columns, Hf isotopic analyses from several of the reference materials were significantly less reproducible than Nd and Sr isotopic analyses determined from the same sample dissolution. The 176Hf/177Hf ratios for relatively radiogenic compositions (BCR-1, 2; BHVO-1, 2; RGM-1) were shifted systematically toward lower values by 100-150 ppm when a borosilicate primary column was used. Although systematic, the shift for felsic compositions was generally within analytical error, except for GSP-2, which has a very low Hf isotopic ratio, where the shift was to higher 176Hf/177Hf. Trace element and isotopic characterization of the borosilicate glass column, borosilicate frits, and quartz columns reveals extremely variable levels of trace elements. The 176Hf/177Hf ratios for these materials are very unradiogenic (borosilicate glass <0.28220 frit = 0.28193 ± 4). The borosilicate frit material appears to be the most variable in elemental concentration and isotopic composition. The quartz material has very low levels (

Weis, Dominique; Kieffer, Bruno; Hanano, Diane; Nobre Silva, Inês; Barling, Jane; Pretorius, Wilma; Maerschalk, Claude; Mattielli, Nadine

2007-06-01

275

Seventy-five years of science—The U.S. Geological Survey’s Western Fisheries Research Center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As of January 2010, 75 years have elapsed since Dr. Frederic Fish initiated the pioneering research program that would evolve into today’s Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC). Fish began his research working alone in the basement of the recently opened Fisheries Biological Laboratory on Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. WFRC’s research began under the aegis of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and ends its first 75 years as part of the U.S. Geological Survey with a staff of more than 150 biologists and support personnel and a heritage of fundamental research that has made important contributions to our understanding of the biology and ecology of the economically important fish and fish populations of the Nation. Although the current staff may rarely stop to think about it, WFRC’s antecedents extend many years into the past and are intimately involved with the history of fisheries conservation in the Western United States. Thus, WFRC Director Lyman Thorsteinson asked me to write the story of this laboratory “while there are still a few of you around who were here for some of the earlier years” to document the rich history and culture of WFRC by recognizing its many famous scientists and their achievements. This historyalso would help document WFRC’s research ‘footprint’ in the Western United States and its strategic directions. Center Director Thorsteinson concluded that WFRC’s heritage told by an emeritus scientist also would add a texture of legitimacy based on personal knowledge that will all-to-soon be lost to the WFRC and to the USGS. The WFRC story is important for the future as well as for historical reasons. It describes how we got to the place we are today by documenting the origin, original mission, and our evolving role in response to the constantly changing technical information requirements of new environmental legislation and organizational decision-making. The WFRC research program owes its existence to the policy requirements of Federal conservation legislation originating with the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1933. The research program was shaped by laws enacted in subsequent years such as the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (1972), National Environmental Policy Act (1973), Endangered Species Act (1974), and Northwest Power Planning Act (1980), to name only a few. The WFRC has not been constrained by direct management or regulatory responsibility for a particular fishery (such as providing sustainable catch limits data to a resource management structure). Thus, WFRC has been able to concentrate on scientific pursuits and information needs required by contemporary environmental legislation. Over the years, we have pioneered in several important areas of fisheries research including the diagnoses and control of diseases in economically important fish, effects of environmental alterations on the physiological quality and survival of Pacific salmon released from federal mitigation hatcheries, applications in biotelemetry, and the bioenergetics of predator-prey interactions in the Columbia River. The WFRC of today is a widely distributed organization in the Western United States. Knowledge of the historical connections and accomplishments of our predecessors is important beyond the sense of pride and unity it instills in the WFRC family of today. For example, a discerning reader will note the evolution of WFRC’s research from a single disciplinary focus (early era—hatchery disease problems), to multiple disciplines (middle to late era—species, populations, habitats; threatened and endangered species), to the present era (multidisciplinary and with increasing process focus). For the benefit of the current WFRC staff, more emphasis has been placed on the early years rather than on the present day because people are quite naturally more familiar with the recent past than with the research done during the first decades of WFRC’s existence. By every rational measure, the WFRC has evolved into a fisheries research organization well positioned to provide the biological info

Wedemeyer, Gary A.

2013-01-01

276

Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains summaries of the progress of water-resources studies in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division, Utah District, from October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. The program in Utah during this period consisted of 21 projects; a discussion of each project is presented in the main body of the report. The USGS was established by an act of Congress on March 3, 1879, to provide a permanent Federal agency to conduct the systematic and scientific classifi- cation of the public lands, and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources, and products of national domain. An integral part of that original mission includes publishing and dissemi- nating the earth-science information needed to understand, to plan the use of, and to manage the Nation's energy, land, mineral, and water resources.

Compiled by Hardy, Ellen E.; Dragos, Stefanie L.

1995-01-01

277

Public perceptions of climate change as a human health risk: surveys of the United States, Canada and Malta.  

PubMed

We used data from nationally representative surveys conducted in the United States, Canada and Malta between 2008 and 2009 to answer three questions: Does the public believe that climate change poses human health risks, and if so, are they seen as current or future risks? Whose health does the public think will be harmed? In what specific ways does the public believe climate change will harm human health? When asked directly about the potential impacts of climate change on health and well-being, a majority of people in all three nations said that it poses significant risks; moreover, about one third of Americans, one half of Canadians, and two-thirds of Maltese said that people are already being harmed. About a third or more of people in the United States and Canada saw themselves (United States, 32%; Canada, 67%), their family (United States, 35%; Canada, 46%), and people in their community (United States, 39%; Canada, 76%) as being vulnerable to at least moderate harm from climate change. About one third of Maltese (31%) said they were most concerned about the risk to themselves and their families. Many Canadians said that the elderly (45%) and children (33%) are at heightened risk of harm, while Americans were more likely to see people in developing countries as being at risk than people in their own nation. When prompted, large numbers of Canadians and Maltese said that climate change can cause respiratory problems (78-91%), heat-related problems (75-84%), cancer (61-90%), and infectious diseases (49-62%). Canadians also named sunburn (79%) and injuries from extreme weather events (73%), and Maltese cited allergies (84%). However, climate change appears to lack salience as a health issue in all three countries: relatively few people answered open-ended questions in a manner that indicated clear top-of-mind associations between climate change and human health risks. We recommend mounting public health communication initiatives that increase the salience of the human health consequences associated with climate change. PMID:20644690

Akerlof, Karen; Debono, Roberto; Berry, Peter; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Clarke, Kaila-Lea; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Nisbet, Matthew C; Weathers, Melinda R; Maibach, Edward W

2010-06-14

278

Public Perceptions of Climate Change as a Human Health Risk: Surveys of the United States, Canada and Malta  

PubMed Central

We used data from nationally representative surveys conducted in the United States, Canada and Malta between 2008 and 2009 to answer three questions: Does the public believe that climate change poses human health risks, and if so, are they seen as current or future risks? Whose health does the public think will be harmed? In what specific ways does the public believe climate change will harm human health? When asked directly about the potential impacts of climate change on health and well-being, a majority of people in all three nations said that it poses significant risks; moreover, about one third of Americans, one half of Canadians, and two-thirds of Maltese said that people are already being harmed. About a third or more of people in the United States and Canada saw themselves (United States, 32%; Canada, 67%), their family (United States, 35%; Canada, 46%), and people in their community (United States, 39%; Canada, 76%) as being vulnerable to at least moderate harm from climate change. About one third of Maltese (31%) said they were most concerned about the risk to themselves and their families. Many Canadians said that the elderly (45%) and children (33%) are at heightened risk of harm, while Americans were more likely to see people in developing countries as being at risk than people in their own nation. When prompted, large numbers of Canadians and Maltese said that climate change can cause respiratory problems (78–91%), heat-related problems (75–84%), cancer (61–90%), and infectious diseases (49–62%). Canadians also named sunburn (79%) and injuries from extreme weather events (73%), and Maltese cited allergies (84%). However, climate change appears to lack salience as a health issue in all three countries: relatively few people answered open-ended questions in a manner that indicated clear top-of-mind associations between climate change and human health risks. We recommend mounting public health communication initiatives that increase the salience of the human health consequences associated with climate change.

Akerlof, Karen; DeBono, Roberto; Berry, Peter; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Clarke, Kaila-Lea; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Nisbet, Matthew C.; Weathers, Melinda R.; Maibach, Edward W.

2010-01-01

279

163 years of refinement: the British Geological Survey sample registration scheme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The British Geological Survey manages the largest UK geoscience samples collection, including: - 15,000 onshore boreholes, including over 250 km of drillcore - Vibrocores, gravity cores and grab samples from over 32,000 UK marine sample stations. 640 boreholes - Over 3 million UK fossils, including a "type and stratigraphic" reference collection of 250,000 fossils, 30,000 of which are "type, figured or cited" - Comprehensive microfossil collection, including many borehole samples - 290km of drillcore and 4.5 million cuttings samples from over 8000 UK continental shelf hydrocarbon wells - Over one million mineralogical and petrological samples, including 200,00 thin sections The current registration scheme was introduced in 1848 and is similar to that used by Charles Darwin on the Beagle. Every Survey collector or geologist has been issue with a unique prefix code of one or more letters and these were handwritten on preprinted numbers, arranged in books of 1 - 5,000 and 5,001 to 10,000. Similar labels are now computer printed. Other prefix codes are used for corporate collections, such as borehole samples, thin sections, microfossils, macrofossil sections, museum reference fossils, display quality rock samples and fossil casts. Such numbers infer significant immediate information to the curator, without the need to consult detailed registers. The registration numbers have been recorded in a series of over 1,000 registers, complete with metadata including sample ID, locality, horizon, collector and date. Citations are added as appropriate. Parent-child relationships are noted when re-registering subsubsamples. For example, a borehole sample BDA1001 could have been subsampled for a petrological thin section and off-cut (E14159), a fossil thin section (PF365), micropalynological slides (MPA273), one of which included a new holotype (MPK111), and a figured macrofossil (GSE1314). All main corporate collection now have publically-available online databases, such as PalaeoSaurus (fossils), Britrocks (mineralogy and petrology) and ComBo (combined onshore and offshore boreholes). ComBo links to core images, when available. Similar links are under development for Britrocks and PalaeoSaurus, with the latter also to include HR laser scanned digital models. These databases also link to internal and public GIS systems and to the BGS digital field data capture system. PalaeoSaurus holds an identification/authority/date history for each specimen, as well as recording type status, and figure and citation details. Similar comments can be added to Britrocks and ComBo. For several years, the BGS has provided online web access to the databases, for the discovery of physical samples , including parent-child links and citation information. Regretfully, authors frequently fail to cite sample registration numbers (nineteenth century geologists were sometimes better than their twenty-first century counterparts), or to supply copies of, or links to, the data generated, despite it being a condition of sample access. The need for editors and referees to enforce the inclusion of sample registration numbers, and for authors to lodge copies of papers, reports and data with the sample providers, is more important than yet another new database.

Howe, M. P.

2011-12-01

280

Managing non-response rates for the National Child Safety Seat Survey in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCanada has a Road Safety Vision of having the safest roads in the world, yet vehicle crashes have remained the leading cause of death of Canadian children for a number of years.ObjectivesDetermine the influence of high rates of non-participation on the estimates for correct use of safety seats for child occupants in vehicles. Examine the impact of three different criteria

Tang Yi Wen; Anne W Snowdon; Abdulkadir Hussein; S Ejaz Ahmed

2010-01-01

281

Survey of vomitoxin contamination of the 1980 white winter wheat crop in ontario, canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the summer of 1980, there was a great deal of rainfall and high humidity in southwestern Ontario. Sprouting of the\\u000a kernels on plants in the field and pink discoloration down-graded the white winter wheat crop. Samples were submitted to Agriculture\\u000a Canada from elevators and boats loading wheat for export. Chemical analyses indicated low levels of vomitoxin, with some analytical

H. L. Trenholm; W. P. Cochrane; H. Cohen; J. I. Elliot; E. R. Farnworth; D. W. Friend; R. M. G. Hamilton; G. A. Neish; J. F. Standish

1981-01-01

282

43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and mapping mineralized zones. (b) Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They are done by, among other things, sampling soils, waters, and bedrock to identify areas of anomalous mineral values and...

2010-10-01

283

43 CFR 3836.13 - What are geological, geochemical, or geophysical surveys?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and mapping mineralized zones. (b) Geochemical surveys are surveys of the chemistry of mineral deposits. They are done by, among other things, sampling soils, waters, and bedrock to identify areas of anomalous mineral values and...

2009-10-01

284

Guidelines for preparing a quality assurance plan for district offices of the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has a policy that requires each District office to prepare a Quality Assurance Plan. This plan is a combination of a District's management principles and quality assurance processes. The guidelines presented in this report provide a framework or expanded outline that a District can use to prepare a plan. Parti- cular emphasis is given to a District's: (1) quality assurance policies; (2) organization and staff responsibilities; and (3) program and project planning. The guidelines address the 'how', 'what', and 'who' questions that need to be answered when a District Quality Assurance Plan is prepared.

Schroder, L. J.; Shampine, W. J.

1992-01-01

285

Numerical simulation of groundwater flow in regional rock aquifers, southwestern Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The St. Lawrence Lowlands platform, Quebec, Canada, is a densely-populated area, heavily dependent on groundwater resources. In 1999, the Geological Survey of Canada initiated a large-scale hydrogeological assessment study over a 1,500 km2 region northwest of Montreal. The objectives were to define the regional groundwater flow, and to give quantitative estimates of the groundwater dynamic parameters and of the available groundwater

M. Nastev; A. Rivera; R. Lefebvre; R. Martel; M. Savard

2005-01-01

286

Survey of senior resident training in urologic laparoscopy, robotics and endourology surgery in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: We determined the status of Canadian training dur - ing senior residency in laparoscopic, robotic and endourologic surgery. Methods: Fifty-six residents in their final year of urology residency training were surveyed in person in 2007 or 2008. Results: All residents completed the survey. Most residents (85.7%) train at centres performing more than 50 laparoscopic procedures yearly and almost all

Mark A. Preston; Brian D. M. Blew; Rodney H. Breau; Darren Beiko; Stuart J. Oake; J. D. Watterson

2010-01-01

287

A mail survey of growers to estimate potato common scab prevalence and economic loss in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mail-out survey of Canadian potato growers was conducted in February 2003 to determine common scab prevalence and extent of economic loss resulting from scab for their 2002 yield. A survey of this type is feasible given that the disease is readily observed on the surface of the tubers. A questionnaire was sent to grower associations for distribution to a

Jackie Hill; George Lazarovits

2005-01-01

288

U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction This report describes the activities that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2005. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Others were conducted cooperatively with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities. As described in this report, there are many USGS activities that are directly relevant to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and to Native lands. A USGS website, dedicated to making USGS more accessible to American Indians, Alaska Natives, their governments, and institutions, is available at www.usgs.gov/indian. This website includes information on how to contact USGS American Indian/Alaska Native Liaisons, training opportunities, and links to other information resources. This report and previous editions are also available through the website. The USGS realizes that Native knowledge and cultural traditions of living in harmony with nature result in unique Native perspectives that enrich USGS studies. USGS seeks to increase the sensitivity and openness of its scientists to the breadth of Native knowledge, expanding the information on which their research is based. USGS scientific studies include data collection, mapping, natural resource modeling, and research projects. These projects typically last 2 or 3 years, although some are parts of longer-term activities. Some projects are funded cooperatively, with USGS funds matched or supplemented by individual Tribal governments, or by the BIA. These projects may also receive funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Indian Health Service (part of the Department of Health and Human Services), or other Federal agencies. The USGS routinely works with its sister bureaus in the Department of the Interior to provide the scientific information and expertise needed to meet the Department's science priorities. Some USGS activities described in this report are conducted as collateral tasks that result from USGS employees identifying and responding to perceived needs. These endeavors are usually prompted by employee interests and frequently involve educational activities. The education is often a reciprocal learning and teaching experience for USGS employees and for Native participants. Through these activities, USGS employees help to fulfill a mission of the USGS - to demonstrate scientific relevance - while helping their fellow citizens. Increasingly, some of the educational activities are becoming parts of formal USGS projects. USGS employees also take initiative in assisting American Indians and Alaska Natives by participating in several organizations that promote awareness of science career opportunities among Native peoples and help build support and communication networks. One such group is the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). USGS employees join this organization on a voluntary basis, bringing the benefits of this expanded network to the USGS, as many employees do with other professional organizations. The studies briefly described in this report span subsistence issues, wildlife health, water quality, mineral resources, monitoring and modeling to gather information and predict what may happen in the future. Although each project description relates to Native Americans in some way, the projects vary widely, including who conducted the work, the goals and products, the duration of the study, and whether it was local or covered a broad area. Each major organizational unit of the USGS has identified an American Indian/Alaska Native liaison. The USGS has a regional organizational structure, with Western, Central,

Marcus, Susan M.

2007-01-01

289

Geologic-engineering surveys for the repair and reconstruction of water-development works  

Microsoft Academic Search

in tile foundation, abutments, or in the body of tile structure belong to the second group. Processes resulting from military and terrorist activities, and also sabotage, are also classed with this group. Negative results of the manitbstation of geologic-engineering processes will depend to a large degree on the composition, state, and properties of tile soils and their location (fbmldation bed,

A. A. Kagan; N. F. Krivonogova

2000-01-01

290

Gravity surveys in California---recent progress by the California Division of Mines and Geology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the AGU gravity symposium in 1963, the California Division of Mines and Geology has continued an active program of gravity measurements within the state. This program includes the establishment of a statewide gravity base station network; the compilation of a series of gravity maps that will eventually cover the entire state; and local studies related to the search for

Roger H. Chapman

1969-01-01

291

Water Facts and Figures for Planners and Managers. Geological Survey Circular 601-1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet presents the language used in dealing with water. The booklet is intended to provide decision-makers with an adequate base of information to analyze water sources for consumption, recreation, and industry. The first section defines water and its properties, geologic locations, domestic and industrial uses, and patterns of change. The…

Feth, J. H.

292

EEZ-SCAN: A U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SEA-FLOOR IMAGING PROGRAM USING THE GLORIA SIDE-SCAN SONAR SYSTEM.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey initiated Program EEZ-SCAN in April 1984 in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) of the United Kingdom to map the U. S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at reconnaissance scale as a first effort to develop a geologic understanding of the new national territory. GLORIA*, a unique side-scan sonar system capable of mapping over 27,000 sq. km per day, is the principal tool being used in the mapping surveys. In 1984, GLORIA surveys were conducted in the EEZ off California, Oregon, and Washington covering an area of approximately 250,000 sq. nautical miles. These surveys were highlighted by discoveries of major geologic features.

Hill, Gary, W.

1985-01-01

293

Updated results of a search for main-belt comets using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of a search for main-belt comets using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data are updated. The remaining observations in the Very Wide segment of data, taken in the g' or r' filters, are visually inspected for cometary activity. The number of main-belt objects in the original and new data sets are 11,438 and 13,802, respectively, giving a total number of 25,240. This is the largest, and least biased, search for main-belt comets to date. One object is observed to show cometary activity, and a new upper limit for strongly active main-belt comets is derived to be 40 ± 18.

Gilbert, Alyssa M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

2010-12-01

294

Biology as an integrated component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey?s (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to integrate chemical, physical, and biological data to assess the status of and trends in the Nation?s water quality at local, regional, and national levels. The Program consists of 60 study units (major river basins and large parts of aquifers) located throughout the Nation (fig. 1). Data are collected at stream, river, and ground-water sites that represent the Nation?s mix of major natural and human factors that influence water quality. Biological data are collected from streams and rivers, and include (1) fish and other aquatic organisms whose tissues are analyzed for a wide array of chemical contaminants; (2) characterizations of algal, benthic invertebrate, and fish communities; and (3) characterizations of vegetation growing in streams and along streambanks. These biological data are collected in conjunction with physical (streamflow, characterizations of instream, bank, and flood-plain habitats) and chemical data.

Meador, Michael R.; Gurtz, Martin E.

1994-01-01

295

Survey of current vitamin D food fortification practices in the United States and Canada.  

PubMed

Widespread poor vitamin D status in all age and gender groups in the United States (USA) and Canada increases the need for new food sources. Currently ?60% of the intake of vitamin D from foods is from fortified foods in these countries. Those groups in greatest need are consuming significantly lower amounts of commonly fortified foods such as milk. Both countries allow voluntary vitamin D fortification of some other foods, although in Canada this practice is only done on a case-by-case basis. Novel approaches to vitamin D fortification of food in both countries now include "bio-addition" in which food staples are fortified through the addition of another vitamin D-rich food to animal feed during production, or manipulation of food post-harvest or pre-processing. These bio-addition approaches provide a wider range of foods containing vitamin D, and thus appeal to differing preferences, cultures and possibly economic status. An example is the post-harvest exposure of edible mushrooms to ultraviolet light. However, further research into safety and efficacy of bio-addition needs to be established in different target populations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:23104118

Calvo, Mona S; Whiting, Susan J

2012-10-24

296

A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada  

PubMed Central

Background The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT) technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Methods Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. Results IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for "virtually all" head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. Conclusions The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process.

2012-01-01

297

Using volunteers to monitor the effects of acid precipitation on Common Loon ( Gavia immer ) reproduction in Canada: The Canadian Lakes Loon Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Common Loon (Gavia immer) is a conspicuous and popular aquatic bird that inhabits large lakes (generally >10 ha) on Precambrian Shield across Canada. Because it relies on fish, it is a key bioindicator species linking acid precipitation to higher trophic levels in aquatic food chains. The Canadian Lakes Loon Survey (CLLS), a monitoring program involving volunteers, was initiated in

D. K. Mcnicol; M. L. Mallory; H. S. Vogel

1995-01-01

298

Support for a tax increase to provide unrestricted access to an Alzheimer's disease medication: a survey of the general public in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Public drug insurance plans provide limited reimbursement for Alzheimer's disease (AD) medications in many jurisdictions, including Canada and the United Kingdom. This study was conducted to assess Canadians' level of support for an increase in annual personal income taxes to fund a public program of unrestricted access to AD medications. METHODS: A telephone survey was administered to a national

Mark Oremus; Jean-Eric Tarride; Natasha Clayton; Parminder Raina

2009-01-01

299

A telephone survey of eel fishermen regarding external lesions and mortalities of American eels ( Anguilla rostrata) from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signs of decreasing landings and recruitment have been observed during the last decade in American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada. A study was undertaken to examine whether important manifestational diseases among commercial catches could be associated with these declines. During this survey, 56 fishermen from Lakes Ontario, Saint-François and Saint-Pierre, the Richelieu River, the Québec

Lucie Dutil; Denise Bélanger; Catherine M Couillard

1997-01-01

300

User's manual for the National Water Information System of the U.S. Geological Survey: Automated Data Processing System (ADAPS)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Automated Data Processing System (ADAPS) was developed for the processing, storage, and retrieval of water data, and is part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. NWIS is a distributed water database in which data can be processed over a network of computers at U.S. Geological Survey offices throughout the United States. NWIS comprises four subsystems: ADAPS, the Ground-Water Site Inventory System (GWSI), the Water-Quality System (QWDATA), and the Site-Specific Water-Use Data System (SWUDS). This section of the NWIS User's Manual describes the automated data processing of continuously recorded water data, which primarily are surface-water data; however, the system also allows for the processing of water-quality and ground-water data. This manual describes various components and features of the ADAPS, and provides an overview of the data processing system and a description of the system framework. The components and features included are: (1) data collection and processing, (2) ADAPS menus and programs, (3) command line functions, (4) steps for processing station records, (5) postprocessor programs control files, (6) the standard format for transferring and entering unit and daily values, and (7) relational database (RDB) formats.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

2003-01-01

301

U.S. Geological Survey Water science strategy--observing, understanding, predicting, and delivering water science to the nation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report expands the Water Science Strategy that began with the USGS Science Strategy, “Facing Tomorrow’s Challenges—U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007–2017” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). This report looks at the relevant issues facing society and develops a strategy built around observing, understanding, predicting, and delivering water science for the next 5 to 10 years by building new capabilities, tools, and delivery systems to meet the Nation’s water-resource needs. This report begins by presenting the vision of water science for the USGS and the societal issues that are influenced by, and in turn influence, the water resources of our Nation. The essence of the Water Science Strategy is built on the concept of “water availability,” defined as spatial and temporal distribution of water quantity and quality, as related to human and ecosystem needs, as affected by human and natural influences. The report also describes the core capabilities of the USGS in water science—the strengths, partnerships, and science integrity that the USGS has built over its 134-year history. Nine priority actions are presented in the report, which combine and elevate the numerous specific strategic actions listed throughout the report. Priority actions were developed as a means of providing the audience of this report with a list for focused attention, even if resources and time limit the ability of managers to address all of the strategic actions in the report.

Evenson, Eric J.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Blome, Charles D.; Böhlke, John Karl; Hershberger, Paul K.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Morlock, Scott E.; Reeves, Howard W.; Verdin, James P.; Weyers, Holly S.; Wood, Tamara M.

2013-01-01

302

The Canada-France deep fields survey-II: Lyman-break galaxies and galaxy clustering at z ~ 3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a large sample of z ~ 3 U-band dropout galaxies extracted from the Canada-France deep fields survey (CFDF). Our catalogue covers an effective area of ~ 1700 arcmin2 divided between three large, contiguous fields separated widely on the sky. To IAB=24.5, the survey contains 1294 Lyman-break candidates, in agreement with previous measurements by other authors, after appropriate incompleteness corrections have been applied to our data. Based on comparisons with spectroscopic observations and simulations, we estimate that our sample of Lyman-break galaxies is contaminated by stars and interlopers (lower-redshift galaxies) at no more than { ~ } 30%. We find that omega (theta ) is well fitted by a power-law of fixed slope, gamma =1.8, even at small (theta <10'') angular separations. In two of our three fields, we are able to fit simultaneously for both the slope and amplitude and find gamma = 1.8 +/- 0.2 and r0 = (5.3+6.8-2.2)h-1 Mpc, and gamma = 1.8 +/- 0.3 and r0 = (6.3+17.9-2.8)h-1 Mpc (all spatially dependent quantities are quoted for a Lambda -flat cosmology). Our data marginally indicates in one field (at a 3 sigma level) that the Lyman-break correlation length r0 depends on sample limiting magnitude: brighter Lyman-break galaxies are more clustered than fainter ones. For the entire CFDF sample, assuming a fixed slope gamma =1.8 we find r0=(5.9+/-0.5)h-1 Mpc. Using these clustering measurements and prediction for the dark matter density field computed assuming cluster-normalised linear theory, we derive a linear bias of b=3.5+/-0.3. Finally we show that the dependence of the correlation length with the surface density of Lyman-break galaxies is in good agreement with a simple picture where more luminous galaxies are hosted by more massive dark matter halos with a simple one-to-one correspondence. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut des Sciences de l'Univers (INSU) of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and the University of Hawaii, and at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and Mayall 4-meter Telescopes, divisions of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Foucaud, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Arnouts, S.; Brodwin, M.; Lilly, S. J.; Crampton, D.; Mellier, Y.

2003-10-01

303

U.S. Geological Survey offshore program of resource and geo-environmental studies and topical investigations, Pacific-Arctic region  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Geological Survey 's marine geology investigations in the Pacific-Arctic area are presented in this report in the context of the underlying socio-economic problem of expanding the domestic production of oil and gas and other mineral and hard- and soft-rock resources while maintaining acceptable standards in the marine environment. The primary mission of the Survey 's Pacific-Arctic Branch of Marine Geology is to provide scientifically interpreted information about the (1) resource potential, (2) geo-environmental setting, and (3) overall geologic characteristics of the continental margins (that is, the continental shelf, slope and rise) and adjacent deeper water and shallower coastal areas off California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii and also, where it is of interest to the U.S. Government, more remote deep-sea areas of the Pacific-Arctic realm. (Sinha-OEIS)

Scholl, David William

1978-01-01

304

A survey of brucellosis and tuberculosis in bison in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada  

PubMed Central

Examinations of complete or partial remains of 72 bison found dead in and around Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, revealed evidence of brucellosis in 18 (25%) and tuberculosis in 15 (21%), with a combined prevalence of 42%. Urease-positive and ureasenegative strains of Brucella abortus biovar 1, and strains of biovar 2, were isolated from tissues of bison, including synovium and exudate from severe arthritic lesions. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from a range of granulomatous lesions that were similar to those reported in tuberculous cattle. Diseased bison had a broad geographical distribution, and were found outside the park on at least three natural corridors. The diseases have a deleterious effect on this population of bison, and pose a health risk to other bison herds, livestock, and native hunters in the region. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.

Tessaro, Stacy V.; Forbes, Lorry B.; Turcotte, Claude

1990-01-01

305

Factors Influencing the Success of Women in the Geosciences: An Example from the U.S. Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A review of my education and 30 year career at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), starting as a field assistant in 1979 to becoming Chief Scientist for Geology in 2001, reveals some of the critical success factors for women in the geosciences as well as factors that inhibit success. Women comprised 5% of the geosciences workforce when I started as an undergraduate in 1975, so why did I pursue the geosciences? A high school course covering earth and biological field science was taught by an excellent teacher who encouraged me to pursue geology. In college, several factors influenced my continuation in geology: two supportive mentors, an earth science department providing a broad diversity of courses; opportunities to take graduate courses, interaction with graduate students, and doing an undergraduate thesis. Most important was the individual attention given to undergraduates by both faculty and graduates regardless of gender. The summer intern program sponsored by the National Association of Geology Teachers and the USGS was a deciding factor to my becoming a geoscientist in the public service. Family and job concerns made it difficult to complete a doctorate however, and there existed gender bias against women conducting field work. Critical factors for success at USGS included: dealing ethically, openly, and immediately with gender-biased behavior, taking on responsibilities and science projects out of my "comfort zone", having the support of mentors and colleagues, and always performing at the highest level. In the past 15 years, there have been many "first" women in various leadership roles within the USGS, and now, after 131 years, we have the first woman Director. It is important to note that as gender barriers are broken at the upper levels in an organization, it paves the way for others. Statistics regarding women are improving in terms of percentage of enrollment in degrees and jobs in the private, public, and academic sectors. Women, however, still bear the brunt of decision-making in work and family life issues no matter what the occupation, and thus need the support of colleagues, community, law, and family to continue succeeding at the highest levels of government, business, and academia.

Gundersen, Linda C. S.

2010-05-01

306

The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey—Full Data Release: The Orbital Structure of the Kuiper Belt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), whose discovery phase ran from early 2003 until early 2007. The follow-up observations started just after the first discoveries and extended until late 2009. We obtained characterized observations of 321 deg2 of sky to depths in the range g ~ 23.5-24.4 AB mag. We provide a database of 169 TNOs with high-precision dynamical classification and known discovery efficiency. Using this database, we find that the classical belt is a complex region with sub-structures that go beyond the usual splitting of inner (interior to 3:2 mean-motion resonance [MMR]), main (between 3:2 and 2:1 MMR), and outer (exterior to 2:1 MMR). The main classical belt (a = 40-47 AU) needs to be modeled with at least three components: the "hot" component with a wide inclination distribution and two "cold" components (stirred and kernel) with much narrower inclination distributions. The hot component must have a significantly shallower absolute magnitude (Hg ) distribution than the other two components. With 95% confidence, there are 8000+1800 -1600 objects in the main belt with Hg <= 8.0, of which 50% are from the hot component, 40% from the stirred component, and 10% from the kernel; the hot component's fraction drops rapidly with increasing Hg . Because of this, the apparent population fractions depend on the depth and ecliptic latitude of a trans-Neptunian survey. The stirred and kernel components are limited to only a portion of the main belt, while we find that the hot component is consistent with a smooth extension throughout the inner, main, and outer regions of the classical belt; in fact, the inner and outer belts are consistent with containing only hot-component objects. The Hg <= 8.0 TNO population estimates are 400 for the inner belt and 10,000 for the outer belt to within a factor of two (95% confidence). We show how the CFEPS Survey Simulator can be used to compare a cosmogonic model for the orbital element distribution to the real Kuiper Belt. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at CFHT which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Universe of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the CFHT Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS.

Petit, J.-M.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Gladman, B. J.; Jones, R. L.; Parker, J. Wm.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Nicholson, P.; Mars, G.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Marsden, B.; Bieryla, A.; Taylor, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Bernabeu, G.

2011-10-01

307

Poster Introductions I--Health of Newly Arrived Immigrant Youth: Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The immigrant population is large and growing. Nearly one in five persons living in Canada was born abroad (Statistics Canada, 2007). They are younger than the Canadian-born population. These two demographic factors imply that immigrant youth will play a significant role in Canada over the next decade. While immigrant youth have been the focus of a significant body of research,

Bosu Seo

2009-01-01

308

Survey of Salmonid Pathogens in Ocean-Caught Fishes in British Columbia, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of wild fishes captured around marine net-pen salmon farms and from open waters for certain salmonid pathogens was conducted in the coastal waters of British Columbia. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus was detected in Pacific herring Clupea pallasi, shiner perch Cymatogaster aggregata, and threespine sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was detected in one Pacific herring (collected

M. L. Kent; G. S. Traxler; D. Kieser; J. Richard; S. C. Dawe; R. W. Shaw; G. Prosperi-Porta; J. Ketcheson; T. P. T. Evelyn

1998-01-01

309

Career and Other Factors Influencing Postsecondary Decisions: Survey of High School Students in Alberta, Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a survey of grade 11 students in Alberta (n=1,047), 35% preferred university career paths, 18.5% community college, 21.9% technical institutes/apprenticeship. Many contemplated career choices for more than two years. They had limited knowledge of the work force but were developing positive work habits. Parents and peers were important career…

Powlette, Nina M.; Young, Darius R.

1996-01-01

310

Why Do We Stay? Survey of Long-Term Academic Librarians in Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of long-term academic librarians at English language Canadian universities attempts to determine which of four factors has the strongest influence over long-term careers: career commitment, organizational commitment, personal factors, or economic factors. Findings show career commitments far outweigh the other three factors, proving, in…

Millard, Donna M.

2003-01-01

311

Report on geological surveys in the 300-FF-1 operable unit.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. Th...

G. A. Sandness

1991-01-01

312

Survey of hepatic and pulmonary helminths of wild cervids in Alberta, Canada.  

PubMed

During the 1988 hunting season, livers and lungs from 263 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), 198 moose (Alces alces), 147 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and 94 wapiti (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) from Alberta (Canada) were collected for parasitological examination. Most of the samples (89%) were submitted by big game hunters throughout the province. Giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) was found in 9% of 22 yearling and 29% of 65 adult wapiti; 4% of 161 adult moose; and 2% of 97 adult white-tailed deer. The intensity of infection generally was low; however, one wapiti had over 600 flukes in the liver. Infections were restricted to alpine and montane regions in southwestern Alberta (97%) as well as boreal uplands of the Cypress Hills in southeastern Alberta (3%). Other parasites recorded included Taenia hydatigena cysts in liver of 61% of 191 moose and 14% of 247 mule deer. Dictyocaulus viviparus was found in lungs of 14% of 50 moose, 14% of 118 mule deer, 12% of 41 wapiti, and 6% of 54 white-tailed deer. Echinococcus granulosus cysts were found in lungs (and occasionally liver) of 37% of 51 moose. Incidental infections of Thysanosoma actinoides, Orthostrongylus macrotis, and Taenia omissa were recorded. Adult Dicrocoelium dendriticum were collected from liver of two wapiti, one mule deer, and one white-tailed deer from the Cypress Hills. PMID:2250321

Pybus, M J

1990-10-01

313

National Geochemical Database, U.S. Geological Survey RASS (Rock Analysis Storage System) geochemical data for Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset contains geochemical data for Alaska produced by the analytical laboratories of the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These data represent analyses of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate (derived from stream sediment), soil, and organic material samples. Most of the data comes from mineral resource investigations conducted in the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). However, some of the data were produced in support of other USGS programs. The data were originally entered into the in-house Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database. The RASS database, which contains over 580,000 data records, was used by the Geologic Division from the early 1970's through the late 1980's to archive geochemical data. Much of the data have been previously published in paper copy USGS Open-File Reports by the submitter or the analyst but some of the data have never been published. Over the years, USGS scientists recognized several problems with the database. The two primary issues were location coordinates (either incorrect or lacking) and sample media (not precisely identified). This dataset represents a re-processing of the original RASS data to make the data accessible in digital format and more user friendly. This re-processing consisted of checking the information on sample media and location against the original sample submittal forms, the original analytical reports, and published reports. As necessary, fields were added to the original data to more fully describe the sample preparation methods used and sample medium analyzed. The actual analytical data were not checked in great detail, but obvious errors were corrected.

Bailey, E. A.; Smith, D. B.; Abston, C. C.; Granitto, Matthew; Burleigh, K. A.

1999-01-01

314

Acute general surgery in Canada: a survey of current handover practices  

PubMed Central

Background Today’s acute care surgery (ACS) service model requires multiple handovers to incoming attending surgeons and residents. Our objectives were to investigate current handover practices in Canadian hospitals that have an ACS service and assess the quality of handover practices in place. Methods We administered an electronic survey among ACS residents in 6 Canadian general surgery programs. Results Resident handover of patient care occurs frequently and often not under ideal circumstances. Most residents spend less than 5 minutes preparing handovers. Clinical uncertainty owing to inadequate handover is most likely to occur during overnight and weekend coverage. Almost one-third of surveyed residents rate the overall quality of the handovers they received as poor. Conclusion Handover skills must be taught in a systematic fashion. Improved resident communication will likely decrease loss of patient information and therefore improve ACS patient safety.

Johner, Amanda M.; Merchant, Shaila; Aslani, Nava; Planting, Anneke; Ball, Chad G.; Widder, Sandy; Pagliarello, Giuseppe; Parry, Neil G.; Klassen, Dennis; Hameed, S. Morad

2013-01-01

315

Emerging trends in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer in Canada: a survey  

PubMed Central

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a poor prognosis compared to other subtypes and lacks common therapeutic targets, including HER 2 and the estrogen and progesterone receptors. The clinicopathological heterogeneity of the disease and limited treatment options make clinical management particularly challenging. Here we present the results of a survey of Canadian clinical oncologists regarding treatment of TNBC, and review recent and ongoing clinical research in this area. Our survey results show that the majority of respondents use a combination of anthracyclines-taxanes as adjuvant therapy for early TNBC. For the first-line treatment of metastatic TNBC, most clinicians recommend taxanes, while single agent capecitabine and platinum-based therapies are more common for subsequent lines of therapy. Despite the ongoing development of novel targeted therapies, chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for TNBC.

Verma, S.; Provencher, L.; Dent, R.

2011-01-01

316

National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): Status Report on U.S. Geological Survey Program Providing Access to Proprietary Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last four decades, hundreds of thousands of line kilometers of 2D marine seismic reflection data have been collected by the hydrocarbon exploration industry within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone. The commercial value of much of these data has decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and new technology such as 3D acquisition. However, these data still have tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes. The U.S. Geological Survey has recently made agreements with two commercial owners of large data holdings to transfer to the public domain over 250,000 line kilometers of marine data from off the eastern, western, and Alaskan coasts of the United States. In order to provide access to the data, the USGS has developed the National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) program. For a small fraction of the money that would be required to collect new data, work is underway to organize and recover digital data currently stored on tens of thousands of 9-track tapes. Even where new data collection efforts could be funded, current environmental restrictions on marine seismic exploration could preclude operations. The NAMSS web site at http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/NAMSS/ has trackline maps of surveys that are now or will soon be available for downloading in SEG-Y format. As more owners and users become aware of this new data resource, it is hoped that additional partners in will join this data rescue effort.

Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

2005-05-01

317

Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the\\u000a expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies\\u000a examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer’s (2006, ‘Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage\\u000a and corporate social responsibility’, Harvard Business Review, 78–92.) CSR model. The

Debra Z. Basil; Mary S. Runte; M. Easwaramoorthy; Cathy Barr

2009-01-01

318

A Dendrochemical Survey of Sugar Maple ( Acer saccharum Marsh) in South-Central Ontario, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dendrochemical survey of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) was conducted insouth-central Ontario, which encompassed twenty-two sites in areas that both exceeded orwere below the published Critical Loads with respect to acid deposition. Areas thatexceeded the Critical Load were located remote from point emission sources, but were alsocharacterized by thin, nutrient-poor soils overlying the Precambrian Shield. ThepHaq of surface soils

Shaun A. Watmough

2002-01-01

319

Development of Microanaytical Reference Materials for In-situ Anaysis at the U.S. Geological Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increased use of microanalysis in geochemical investigations comes the need for a reliable and diversified supply of reference materials homogenous at the micrometer scale to assist analysts in element quantification. To meet these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to develop a series of reference materials which cover a range of sample types currently being investigated in our microanalytical laboratories. Initial efforts have focused on the development of natural basalt glasses (BCR- 2G, BHVO-2G, BIR-1G, TB-1G, NKT-1G) from a variety of geologic settings. In addition to these natural basalt materials a series of synthetic basalt glasses GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G, GSE-1G have also been developed with 65 trace elements at 0, 3, 30, and 300, ppm respectively. The homogeneity of these materials and their use in international microanalytical proficiency studies will be presented. Application of this technology to the development of glass reference materials as part of a USGS/NASA collaborative studies on the development of Lunar Soil Simulant material will also be discussed.

Wilson, S.

2006-05-01

320

Report on geological surveys in the 300-FF-1 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. These actions were terminated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company before completion in December 1989. Work was reinitiated in October 1990, to complete the processing of the data that had already been collected and to report the results. Because the field work was only partially completed, the task objectives, as presented in the Statement of Work, could not be fully met. This report is, therefore, a progress report covering the work performed through December 11, 1989. This task involved (1) ground-penetrating radar surveys of the 618-4 and 618-5 Burial Grounds, and (2) ground-penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction surveys along the assumed routes of the abandoned process sewers and radioactive liquid waste sewers in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The surveys in the burial grounds were intended to identify burial trenches and pits, to determine the depth of fill, and to locate waste materials, including any that might be outside the perimeter fences. The surveys along the sewer routes were intended, first, to confirm the locations of the sewers as shown on existing maps or to otherwise accurately determine their locations, and second, to attempt to identify locations of possible leaks. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Sandness, G.A.

1991-03-01

321

A Review of Methods Applied by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Assessment of Identified Geothermal Resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an updated assessment of geothermal resources in the United States. The primary method applied in assessments of identified geothermal systems by the USGS and other organizations is the volume method, in which the recoverable heat is estimated from the thermal energy available in a reservoir. An important focus in the assessment project is on the development of geothermal resource models consistent with the production histories and observed characteristics of exploited geothermal fields. The new assessment will incorporate some changes in the models for temperature and depth ranges for electric power production, preferred chemical geothermometers for estimates of reservoir temperatures, estimates of reservoir volumes, and geothermal energy recovery factors. Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize uncertainties in the estimates of electric power generation. These new models for the recovery of heat from heterogeneous, fractured reservoirs provide a physically realistic basis for evaluating the production potential of natural geothermal reservoirs.

Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

2008-01-01

322

Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey : July 1, 1986, to June 30, 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains summaries of the progress of water-resources studies in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Utah District, from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987. The program in Utah during this period consisted of 24 projects; a discussion of each project is given in the main body of the report. Short descriptions are given at the end of the report for six projects proposed to be started on or after July 1987. The following sections outline the basic mission and program of the Water Resources Division, the organizational structure of the Utah District, the distribution of District funding in terms of source of funds and type of activity funded, and the introduction is a list of reports produced by the District for July 1986 to June 1987. (Author 's abstract)

Dragos, S. L.

1988-01-01

323

Water-resources activities in Utah by the U.S. Geological Survey, July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Twenty-three studies of water resources in Utah were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey during July 1, 1984, through June 30, 1985. Seven of these studies were completed on or before June 30, 1985 or will be completed on September 30, 1985 and one study was discontinued during the year. Eighteen of these studies were in cooperation with Federal, State, county, or local agencies. Three additional studies are proposed to begin on July 1 or October 1, 1985. The 26 current and proposed projects include 5 involved mainly with collection of data, 4 concerned with the hydrology of Utah 's energy resource areas, 2 focused on floods, 3 on surface water quality, 5 on groundwater in unconsolidated sediments in the basins of western Utah, 3 concerned with groundwater in consolidated rock, mostly in southeastern Utah, and 4 focused on groundwater quality. (USGS)

Dragos, S. L.

1985-01-01

324

Surface-water quality-assurance plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Surface-Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Washington District, Water Resources Discipline office, also known as the Washington Water Science Center, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all District personnel involved in surface-water data activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the District and Discipline change. Regular updates to this Plan represent an integral part of the qualityassurance process. In the Washington District, direct oversight and responsibility by the hydrographer(s) assigned to a surface-water station, combined with team approaches in all work efforts, assure high-quality data, analyses, reviews, and reports for cooperating agencies and the public.

Kresch, David L.; Tomlinson, Stewart A.

2004-01-01

325

Peak-flow frequency estimates for U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Connecticut  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annual peak-flow data from 128 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Connecticut with at least 10 consecutive years of record were used to estimate peak-flow magnitudes for 1.5-, 2-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100- and 500-year recurrence intervals (exceedance probabilities of 0.67, 0.50, 0.10, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.002, respectively). Peak-flow frequency analyses of annual peak flows through the 2001 water year were performed using the procedures in the publication 'Guidelines for Determining Flood-Flow Frequency,' commonly referred to as Bulletin 17B, by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data (1982). A generalized skew coefficient of 0.34, with a standard error of prediction of 0.51, was developed to improve peak-flow frequency estimates in the state; this replaces the generalized skew coefficients for Connecticut shown in Bulletin 17B.

Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

2003-01-01

326

Surveys of rice sold in Canada for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and fumonisins  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 samples of rice (including white, brown, red, black, basmati and jasmine, as well as wild rice) from several different countries, including the United States, Canada, Pakistan, India and Thailand, were analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) and fumonisins by separate liquid Chromatographic methods in two different years. The mean concentrations for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were 0.19 and 0.17 ng g?1 with respective positive incidences of 56% and 43% (? the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.002 ng g?1). Twenty-three samples analysed in the second year also contained aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) at levels ?LOD of 0.002 ng g?1 The five most contaminated samples in each year contained 1.44–7.14 ng AFB1 g?1 (year 1) and 1.45–3.48 ng AFB1 g?1 (year 2); they were mostly basmati rice from India and Pakistan and black and red rice from Thailand. The average concentrations of ochratoxin A (OTA) were 0.05 and 0.005 ng g?1 in year 1 and year 2, respectively; incidences of samples containing ?LOD of 0.05 ng g?1 were 43% and 1%, respectively, in the 2 years. All positive OTA results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. For fumonisins, concentrations of fumonisin B1 (FB1) averaged 4.5 ng g?1 in 15 positive samples (?0.7 ng g?1) from year 1 (n = 99); fumonisin B2 (FB2) and fumonisin B3 (FB3) were also present (?1 ng g?1). In the second year there was only one positive sample (14 ng g?1 FB1) out of 100 analysed. All positive FB1 results were confirmed by LC-MS/MS.

Bansal, J.; Pantazopoulos, P.; Tam, J.; Cavlovic, P.; Kwong, K.; Turcotte, A.-M.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Scott, P.M.

2011-01-01

327

Survey of Trends in Adult Education and Training in Canada (1985-1995). Report of Canada in Preparation for CONFINTEA V.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Between 1985 and 1995, the progress of adult education in Canada was largely influenced by the restructuring of the economy and the job market; the changing nature of the state; the media and new information and communication technologies; and social and cultural change. Adult participation in education and training increased from 19 percent in…

Beaudet, Gaetan; Senechal, Gilles

328

Oil and gas developments in eastern Canada in 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from a record drilling year offshore the Canadian east coast were 5 gas wells, 3 oil wells, 20 wells plugged and suspended or plugged and abandoned, and 6 wells drilling at year end. Thirty-seven exploration agreements, covering an area of 22.1 million ha. (54.6 million acres), were negotiated. The Geological Survey of Canada estimated the average expected recoverable reserves

R. A. Trevail; D. K. Parker

1984-01-01

329

Protect and Present—Parks Canada and Public Archaeology in Atlantic Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atlantic Canada’s rich and complex history is written everywhere upon its varied landscapes, from the geological wonders of Gros Morne to the Acadian dyke lands of Grand-Pré. The federal Parks Canada Agency is mandated to protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. A diverse family of protected areas, the Parks Canada system encompasses national parks,

Denise Hansen; Jonathan Fowler

330

Vertical gravity gradient surveys: field results and interpretations in British Columbia, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Two vertical gravity gradient (VGG) surveys were completed during 1977 in British Columbia. The VGG method utilizes a La Coste and Rouberg model D gravity meter in conjunction with a small gradient tripod. The work indicates that the 'free-air' effect ranges between 2600-2800 E for southwestern British Columbia, which is somewhat lower than the theoretical value of 3086 E. The usefulness of the method in mining exploration is doubtful, especially in hilly or mountainous terrain where VGG values are shown to be very terrain-sensitive. However, the importance of knowing the regional VGG variations is emphasized by the work over the Hat Creek coal deposit, B.C.

Agar, C.A.; Liard, J.O.

1982-06-01

331

Airborne Surveys Conducted by SOAR for Geologic Studies in Antarctica, 1998-2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the three austral summers that occurred in the period October, 1998 to February, 2001, the Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research (SOAR) of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted aerogeophysical campaigns for eight separate projects in both East and West Antarctica. Measurements were made of magnetic and gravitational fields, surface elevation and sub-glacial bed elevation. Surveys were

J. W. Holt

2001-01-01

332

Report on geological surveys in the 300FF1 operable unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. These actions were terminated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company before completion in December 1989. Work was reinitiated in October 1990, to complete the processing

Sandness

1991-01-01

333

Spatial focusing of electrical resistivity surveys considering geologic and hydrologic layering  

SciTech Connect

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has shown great promise for monitoring transient hydrologic processes. One advantage of ERT under those conditions is the ability of a user to tailor the spatial sensitivity of an ERT survey through selection of electrode locations and electrode combinations. Recent research has shown that quadripoles can be selected in a manner that improves the independent inversion of ERT data. Our ultimate interest lies in using ERT data along with measurements from other sensors, which typically can provide high-quality data from shallow regions of the subsurface, in a joint inversion. As a result, we do not consider the selection of quadripoles specifically for inde-pendent ERT inversion. Rather, we present an approach to focusthe spatial sensitivity of ERT surveys in specificsubsurface regions with the assumption that those data, when interpreted along with other measurements that are sensitive to those regions, will lead to more complete hydrologic characterization. Because we are interested in monitoring rapid processes, our approach is designed to efficiently identify optimal quadripoles. This is achieved by separating the optimization from the inversion grid, significantly reducing computational effort. We extend our previous work to consider the use of both surface and borehole ERT electrodes and to consider the impacts of horizontally layered electrical conductivity conditions. Results confirm the ability of the method to focus survey sensitivity while showing the importance of incorporation of prior knowledge of the subsurface electric conductivity structure in designing optimal ERT surveys.

Gail L. Heath; Alex Fuman; Ty P.A. Ferre'

2007-03-01

334

Geology and resource assessment of Costa Rica at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1987 Folio I-1865  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM contains digital versions of the geology and resource assessment maps of Costa Rica originally published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Direccion General de Geologia, Minas e Hidrocarburos, and the Universidad de Costa Rica in 1987 at a scale of 1:500,000 in USGS Folio I-1865. The following layers of the map are available on the CD-ROM: geology, favorable domains for selected deposit types, Bouguer gravity, isostatic gravity, mineral deposits, and rock geochemistry sample points. Some of the layers are provided in the following formats: ArcView 1 for Windows and UNIX, ARC/INFO 6.1.2 Export, Digital Line Graph (DLG) Optional, and Drawing Exchange File (DXF). This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 and Apple Computer's HFS standards.

Schruben, Paul G.

1996-01-01

335

Geology and resource assessment of Costa Rica at 1:500,000 scale; a digital representation of maps of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1987 folio I-1865  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM contains digital versions of the geology and resource assessment maps of Costa Rica originally published in USGS Folio I-1865 (U.S. Geological Survey, the Direccion General de Geologia, Minas e Hidrocarburos, and the Universidad de Costa Rica, 1987) at a scale of 1:500,000. The following layers are available on the CD-ROM: geology and faults; favorable domains for selected deposit types; Bouguer gravity data; isostatic gravity contours; mineral deposits, prospects, and occurrences; and rock geochemistry sample points. For DOS users, the CD-ROM contains MAPPER, a user-friendly map display program. Some of the maps are also provided in the following additional formats on the CD-ROM: (1) ArcView 1 and 3, (2) ARC/INFO 6.1.2 Export, (3) Digital Line Graph (DLG) Optional, and (4) Drawing Exchange File (DXF.)

Schruben, Paul G.

1997-01-01

336

Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey.  

PubMed

Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14,000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log-normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m(-3) and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ?10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log-normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m(-3) and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. PMID:22874897

Chen, J; Moir, D; Whyte, J

2012-08-08

337

Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of soil and moisture conservation on public domain lands, 1941-1964  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The passage of the Taylor Grazing Act in 1934 marked the end of an era in the land policies in the United States in that disposal of the public lands by homesteading was terminated except under rigidly prescribed procedures, and the remaining public lands covering about 175 million acres in the western conterminous states were brought under regulatory authority for grazing use. In 1934 the lands were mostly in a severe state of deterioration as a result of overgrazing and drought. In addition to reducing numbers of livestock using the lands, successive programs of conservation practices were established of which the Soil and Moisture Conservation Program of the Department of the Interior is of particular interest here. The services of the Geological Survey, in an investigational and advisory capacity were enlisted in this program. The work of the Geological Survey has consisted of the collection of hydrologic data, investigations of range-water supplies to facilitate management and provide information for design of structures and land-treatment measures. Appraisal of the effects of treatment practices has also been an important activity. Conservation on the public domain involves mainly growing vegetation for forage and reducing erosion. The two elements are intimately related--accomplishment in one is usually reflected by an improvement in the other. Erosion is a serious problem on most of the public domain, but particularly in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins where, despite low annual water yields, the public domain and similar lands on the Indian reservations contribute the major part of the sediment measured at the downstream gaging stations. In parts of the Missouri River basin also, erosion is obviously very active but the sediment yield contributed by the public domain cannot be as readily isolated. The reasons for the erosion are generally evident--the erodibility of the rock and soils and the sparsity of vegetation as a result of low precipitation, unfavorable soils, or past land use. How much is due to the land use is still controversial, resulting in many questions relative to planning corrective measures. The problem facing the early administrators of the Taylor Grazing Act to bring about proper use and conservation of the public domain was a difficult one because of the lack of records on actual grazing use in animal-unit months of the qualified allottees and the lack of data on treatment practices in an arid area. Reduction of grazing was imperative in some localities, but generally, it could not be brought about as rapidly as it should have been. Numbers of animal units in the grazing districts were reduced from about 3.6 million in 1941 to about 3.2 million in 1964, whereas the areas included in districts was increased about 3 percent. Reductions are still being made in certain areas where deterioration is evident. One of the earliest activities connected with management of the range was the development of water supplies to facilitate the distribution of grazing. The investigations needed for such development formed a large part of the early work in the Soil and Moisture program of the Geological Survey and has continued to be a major activity to the present time. Most of the work has involved investigations of sites for wells but has included also the investigation of proposed spring developments and collection of hydrologic data for use in reservoir design. Well-site investigations have been of two general types: (1) the investigation of a site selected by the land administration agency, and (2) an areal investigation covering entire grazing districts or units thereof. In each type of investigation, a study is made of the geology and the recharge conditions. Reports are prepared giving estimates of the depth of drilling required, the depth to water, the yield, and the quality of the water, together with other information on drilling conditions and developing. Springs are a significant so

Peterson H. V.; Melin, K. R.

1979-01-01

338

Quality-assurance plan and field methods for quality-of-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-quality activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Project Office are part of the US Geological Survey`s (USGS) Water Resources Division (WRD) mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation`s water resources. The purpose of the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for water-quality activities performed by the INEL Project Office is to maintain and improve the quality of

Mann

1996-01-01

339

The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NEPTUNE Canada is the world’s first large regional cable-linked, multi-disciplinary scientific seafloor observatory. In the fall of 2007 an 800 kilometer ring of powered fibre optic cable was laid on the seafloor over the northern part of the Juan de Fuca plate and connected to a shore facility near Port Alberni on Vancouver Island. Five nodes were attached to the cable in the early in the summer of 2009 paving the way for junction boxes and scientific instruments installed in the late summer and fall. The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network will consist initially of four broadband and four short period seismic systems. In the summer of 2009, three broadband OBS packages were deployed forming a large triangle with apexes at ODP 1027 in mid plate and two sites on the continental slope, ODP 889 and Barkley Canyon. In summer 2010 an additional broadband package will be installed on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and four short period instruments will be installed nearby forming a small array, 6 km in maximum dimension, to record earthquake activity in the vicinity of the many multidisciplinary ridge experiments. The broadband systems comprise a broadband seismometer and strong motion accelerometer in a surficially buried spherical titanium case, with a current meter, hydrophone and differential pressure gauge deployed nearby. The short period systems will include 3-component corehole seismometers on long term loan from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). All systems will have backup capacity for modest cable outages. The NEPTUNE Canada Seismograph Network relies heavily on knowledge gained from the previous seismographs temporarily deployed in the region by MBARI and the University of Washington and will re-occupy the broadband site and three short period sites at the ridge. NEPTUNE Canada seismic data will be archived by, and available from, both the Geological Survey of Canada and IRIS.

Rogers, G. C.; Meldrum, R.; Baldwin, R.; Rosenberger, A.; Mulder, T.

2009-12-01

340

Microbialite Morphologies and Distributions-Geoacoustic Survey with an AUV of Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With advances in lake bottom mapping it has been observed that modern microbialites, much like the ancient stromatolites, thrive in freshwater lake environments. Previously collected data shows that a diverse community of living stromatolites are present within Pavilion Lake (Laval et al., 2000, Lim et al., 2009). An additional comprehensive data set was collected in June-July 2010. By building on the previous dataset it is possible to compare two high-resolution geoacoustic datasets. Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) as exploration platforms to conduct surveys of the lake bottom, very high-resolution sonar data has been collected. The data collected in June-July 2010 is composed of 125 km of AUV trackline. This length of trackline allowed for survey coverage of nearly the entire lake bottom. The Gavia AUV used for this survey collected bathymetry data collocated with backscatter information. The data has been processed and gridded to 1m, with specific high value areas gridded to a finer 0.5m. The bathymetric data was compiled to create a base map of the floor of Pavilion Lake. Backscatter data was also collected and processed using the same 1m grid resolution. After the backscatter data was processed, it was draped over the bathymetry map of Pavilion Lake. The tools offered within the Fledermaus software package allow for the bathymetry data to be analyzed with respect to slope and rugosity. By analyzing this dense phase measuring bathymetric sonar of the lake bottom, with respect to slope and rugosity, it is possible to map the morphological trends of the stromatolites. Additionally, the ability to compare two datasets allows for erosional changes in the lake bottom to be identified. The bathymetry data allows for the quantitative analysis of bed forms within Pavilion Lake, allowing for a better understanding of microbialite morphologies. The backscatter data is increasingly important to the Pavilion Lake project because of the location and general surroundings of the lake. The lake itself is located in a limestone canyon, which frequently sustains erosional episodes. The backscatter data allows for the differentiation between erosional deposits and microbial mounds. The combination of backscatter and bathymetry allows for a further understanding of bedforms and microbialite growth patterns.

Gutsche, J. R.; Trembanis, A. C.

2010-12-01

341

THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATE IN RADIO AND INFRARED GALAXIES FROM THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE SUPERNOVA LEGACY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We have combined the large SN Ia database of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and catalogs of galaxies with photometric redshifts, Very Large Array 1.4 GHz radio sources, and Spitzer infrared sources. We present eight SNe Ia in early-type host galaxies which have counterparts in the radio and infrared source catalogs. We find the SN Ia rate in subsets of radio and infrared early-type galaxies is {approx}1-5 times the rate in all early-type galaxies, and that any enhancement is always {approx}<2{sigma}. Rates in these subsets are consistent with predictions of the two-component 'A+B' SN Ia rate model. Since infrared properties of radio SN Ia hosts indicate dust-obscured star formation, we incorporate infrared star formation rates into the 'A+B' model. We also show the properties of SNe Ia in radio and infrared galaxies suggest the hosts contain dust and support a continuum of delay time distributions (DTDs) for SNe Ia, although other DTDs cannot be ruled out based on our data.

Graham, M. L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Balam, D.; Fabbro, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria BC V8T 1M8 (Canada); Sullivan, M.; Hook, I. M. [University of Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Howell, D. A. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9530 (United States); Gwyn, S. D. J. [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, NRC Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universites Paris VI and VII, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Basa, S. [LAM, Pole de l'Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Carlberg, R. G.; Perrett, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Conley, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0391 (United States); Fouchez, D. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Aix-Marseille II, Case 907, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Rich, J. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Spp, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] (and others)

2010-02-15

342

X-ray and optical properties of broad absorption line quasars in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the X-ray and optical properties of 16 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars detected in a ?3 deg2 region common to the wide synoptic (W-1) component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the XMM Large Scale Structure Survey (XMM-LSS). The BAL fraction is found to be 10 per cent in the full sample, 7 per cent for the optical colour-selected quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and as high as 33 per cent if we consider QSOs selected from their infrared colours. The X-ray-detected non-BAL and BAL quasars have a mean observed X-ray-to-optical spectral slope (?ox) of -1.47 ± 0.13 and -1.66 ± 0.17, respectively. We also find that the BAL QSOs have ?ox systematically smaller than what is expected from the relationship between optical luminosity and ?ox as derived from our sample. Based on this, we show, as already reported in the literature for quasars with high optical luminosities, that our new sample of BAL QSOs has X-ray luminosity a factor of 3 smaller than what has been found for non-BAL QSOs with similar optical luminosities. Comparison of hardness ratios of the BAL and non-BAL QSOs suggests a possible soft X-ray weakness of BAL QSOs. Combining our sample, of relatively fainter QSOs, with others from the literature we show that larger balnicity index (BI) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of the C IV absorption are correlated with steeper X-ray-to-optical spectral index. We argue that this is most likely a consequence of the existence of a lower envelope in the distribution of BI (or Vmax) values versus optical luminosity. Our results thus show that the previously known X-ray weakness of BAL QSOs extends to lower optical luminosities as well.

Stalin, C. S.; Srianand, R.; Petitjean, P.

2011-05-01

343

A Survey of Measurement, Mitigation, and Verification Field Technologies for Carbon Sequestration Geologic Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program is developing state-of-the-science technologies for measurement, mitigation, and verification (MM&V) in field operations of geologic sequestration. MM&V of geologic carbon sequestration operations will play an integral role in the pre-injection, injection, and post-injection phases of carbon capture and storage projects to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Effective MM&V is critical to the success of CO2 storage projects and will be used by operators, regulators, and stakeholders to ensure safe and permanent storage of CO2. In the U.S. DOE's Program, Carbon sequestration MM&V has numerous instrumental roles: Measurement of a site's characteristics and capability for sequestration; Monitoring of the site to ensure the storage integrity; Verification that the CO2 is safely stored; and Protection of ecosystems. Other drivers for MM&V technology development include cost-effectiveness, measurement precision, and frequency of measurements required. As sequestration operations are implemented in the future, it is anticipated that measurements over long time periods and at different scales will be required; this will present a significant challenge. MM&V sequestration technologies generally utilize one of the following approaches: below ground measurements; surface/near-surface measurements; aerial and satellite imagery; and modeling/simulations. Advanced subsurface geophysical technologies will play a primary role for MM&V. It is likely that successful MM&V programs will incorporate multiple technologies including but not limited to: reservoir modeling and simulations; geophysical techniques (a wide variety of seismic methods, microgravity, electrical, and electromagnetic techniques); subsurface fluid movement monitoring methods such as injection of tracers, borehole and wellhead pressure sensors, and tiltmeters; surface/near surface methods such as soil gas monitoring and infrared sensors and; aerial and satellite imagery. This abstract will describe results, similarities, and contrasts for funded studies from the U.S. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program including examples from the Sleipner North Sea Project, the Canadian Weyburn Field/Dakota Gasification Plant Project, the Frio Formation Texas Project, and Yolo County Bioreactor Landfill Project. The abstract will also address the following: How are the terms ``measurement,'' ``mitigation''and ``verification'' defined in the Program? What is the U.S. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program Roadmap and what are the Roadmap goals for MM&V? What is the current status of MM&V technologies?

Cohen, K. K.; Klara, S. M.; Srivastava, R. D.

2004-12-01

344

A survey study on geology and location of major sand resources in Lebanon, eastern mediterranean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reconstruction of Lebanon has started after more than 15 years of devastating civil wars. There is an urgent need today\\u000a to evaluated sources of ma for the construction industry. Extensive surveys and investigations were carried out, covering\\u000a 80 percent of the Lebanese territory, to locate the major sand resources of Lebanon. The part of Lebanon occupied by Israel\\u000a was

B. S. Hamad; M. Y. Yassine; M. R. Khawlie

1996-01-01

345

Hydrology and subsurface transport of oil-field brine at the U.S. Geological Survey OSPER site “A”, Osage County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spillage and improper disposal of saline produced water from oil wells has caused environmental damage at thousands of sites in the United States. In order to improve understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants at these sites, the U.S. Geological Survey carried out multidisciplinary investigations at two oil production sites near Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. As a part of this

W. N. Herkelrath; Y. K. Kharaka; J. J. Thordsen; M. M. Abbott

2007-01-01

346

GWM: A Ground-Water Management Process for the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model (MODFLOW-2000).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

GWM is a Ground-Water Management Process for the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional ground-water model, MODFLOW-2000. GWM uses a response-matrix approach to solve several types of linear, nonlinear, and mixed-binary linear ground-water manag...

D. P. Ahlfeld P. M. Barlow A. E. Mulligan

2005-01-01

347

Title: AN OVERVIEW OF THE SOUTHERN INLAND AND COASTAL SYSTEM PROJECT OF THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an interdisciplinary study of the complex ecosystem processes at the interface of the southern Everglades with Florida Bay. Scientific findings derived from hydrologic studies and extensive data collected to characterize the ecosystem properties are being synthesized and integrated into the development of a research tool and management model of the ecosystem. Simulation results produced

Raymond W. Schaffranek; Maria E. Hansler

348

Survey of senior resident training in urologic laparoscopy, robotics and endourology surgery in Canada  

PubMed Central

Introduction: We determined the status of Canadian training during senior residency in laparoscopic, robotic and endourologic surgery. Methods: Fifty-six residents in their final year of urology residency training were surveyed in person in 2007 or 2008. Results: All residents completed the survey. Most residents (85.7%) train at centres performing more than 50 laparoscopic procedures yearly and almost all (96.4%) believe laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is the gold standard. About 82% of residents participated in a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in 2008, compared to 64.7% in 2007. Of the respondents, 66% have participated in a laparoscopic prostatectomy and 54% believe the procedure has promising potential. Exposure and training in robotic-assisted laparoscopic procedures seem to be increasing as 35.7% of 2008 residents have access to a surgical robot and 7% consider themselves trained in robotic-assisted procedures. Most residents (71.4%) train at centres that perform percutaneous ablation. However, 65% state the procedure is performed solely by radiologists. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is widely performed (98.2%), but only 37.5% of residents report training in obtaining primary percutaneous renal access. Despite only 12.5% of residents ranking their laparoscopic experience as below average or poor, an increasing proportion of graduating residents are pursuing fellowships in minimally-invasive urology. Conclusion: Laparoscopic nephrectomy is commonly performed and is considered the standard of care by Canadian urology residents. Robotic-assisted surgery is becoming more common but will require continued evaluation by educators who will ultimately define its role in the urological residency training curriculum. Minimally-invasive surgical fellowships remain popular, as Canadian residents do not feel adequately trained in certain advanced procedures. Urologists must strive to learn and adapt to new technologies or risk losing them to other specialties.

Preston, Mark A.; Blew, Brian D.M.; Breau, Rodney H.; Beiko, Darren; Oake, Stuart J.; Watterson, J.D.

2010-01-01

349

Airborne-temperature-survey maps of heat-flow anomalies for exploration geology  

SciTech Connect

Precise airborne temperature surveys depicted small predawn surface temperature differences related to heat flow anomalies at the Long Valley, California, KGRA. Zones with conductive heat flow differences of 45 +- 16 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/(s) has predawn surface temperature differences of 1.4 +- 0.3/sup 0/C. The warmer zones had hot water circulating in a shallow (less than 60-m-deep) aquifer. Hot water is a useful geochemical indicator of geothermal and mineral resource potential. The precise airborne temperature survey method recorded redundant infrared scanner signals at two wavelengths (10 to 12 ..mu..m and 4.5 to 5.5 ..mu..m) and two elevations (0.3 km and 1.2 km). Ground thermistor probes recorded air and soil temperatures during the survey overflights. Radiometric temperatures were corrected for air-path and reflected-sky-radiation effects. Corrected temperatures were displayed in image form with color-coded maps which depicted 0.24/sup 0/C temperature differences. After accounting for surficial features on the corrected predawn thermal imagery, there remained several anomalous zones. These zones had high temperature gradients at depths from 6 to 30 m, compared to the temperature gradients in nearby areas.

Del Grande, N.K.

1982-11-10

350

Processing map and well log data for geological and soil surveys  

SciTech Connect

Design of a system which accepts geological maps or soil maps, together with corresponding well logs and produces interpretation maps, is described. The major aim was to get a processing program that would be useful at an operational scale that avoids the use of special purpose graphics hardware. This was achieved by using segment encoding of lines and by treatment of mapped units as basic graphical units (atoms). The system operation was split into an input phase and a processed phase. Input- and file-building require some technical experience, but are a one-time affair, whereas subsequent processing requires less (graphical) resources and experience, but is of a repetitive nature. When writing processing programs, emphasis was placed on ease of adding options. Clever improvements of efficiency (e.g., disk traffic) were not deemed worthwhile or even wise. Two driving forces behind the project required the programs reported here. First was the observation that digital data can be used only if appropriate programs are readily available to produce required results without need for large investments in hardware. Second was the idea that digital tools could be most effective if they allow the end-user (customer) to interact directly with the full base of data without recourse to technical experts. The resulting system is operational and running on a VAX 11/750, coded in FORTRAN.

van Kuilenburg, J.

1986-01-01

351

Parasites of Dogs from Indian Settlements in Northwestern Canada: A Survey with Public Health Implications  

PubMed Central

A total of 959 faecal samples were obtained from dogs in 12 native communities in Northern Saskatchewan, Central and Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories. All samples were examined using a flotation technique. Samples from an area of endemic human amoebic infections were also examined by a formol-ether sedimentation method. Eighteen necropsies were performed. Entamoeba histolytica cysts were recovered from dog faeces at Loon Lake, Saskatchewan. Toxocara canis had low incidence in Saskatchewan and Central Alberta, and appeared to be almost non-existent further North. Toxascaris leonina was found in all areas surveyed. Canine hookworm infections were plentiful in all areas, the highest incidence being recorded from Northern Alberta and Northwest Territories. Many Taenia (or Echinococcus) infections were found consistently in all areas. Only one infection with Dipylidium caninum was discovered. Metorchis conjunctus infections were found to be common in the Saskatchewan reserves. Infections with Diphyllobothrium sp. were found in all communities with access to good fishing. One specimen of Dioctophyma renale was recovered at necropsy. Infections with parasites of no known zoonotic importance such as Trichuris, Alaria and Isospora species were also recorded.

Unruh, D. H. A.; King, J. E.; Allen, J. R.; Eaton, R. D. P.

1973-01-01

352

Geologic characteristics of permeable groundwater intervals defined by electromagnetic borehole flowmeter surveys on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater system in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) area is stratigraphically controlled and divisible into aquitards, where flow is through fractures only, and aquifers, where flow is in karst conduits. An electromagnetic borehole flowmeter was used to survey 60 piezometer wells and 12 coreholes on the ORR. Piezometer well depths ranges from 5--80 ft with screen lengths of approximately 10 ft at various depths, and open corehole surveys reached depths of 350 ft. Previously, the results were used to develop a model for groundwater flow paths by assuming that permeable intervals consist of a single fracture intersecting the borehole. The purpose was to test this assumption by direct examination of core within permeable intervals. In addition, the geologic characteristics of the permeable intervals in non-cored piezometer wells have been interpreted based on correlations with nearby coreholes and geophysical logs. Occasionally, pinpointing the exact feature responsible for flow within a permeable interval was hampered by a relatively large sampling interval (>1 ft) of the flowmeter surveys. Regardless, potential transmissive features were identified by the presence of iron staining, euhedral calcite and gypsum crystallization, partial infilling of fractures, and dissolution features. Within carbonate units permeable intervals are associated with a number of different features: (1) open fractures normal and oblique to bedding that are parallel, oblique, and perpendicular to bedrock strike; (2) [<=]2 cm vugs that form within fracture mineral fillings; (3) [>=]3 cm solution cavities that are not fracture related; (4) open bed-parallel clay seams; and (5) open bed-parallel shear fractures. Within non-carbonate units permeable intervals consist of highly fractured zones, associated with changes in bedding dip and the development of shear fractures that are related to the development of faults and folds.

Neuhoff, P.S.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Dreier, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-03-01

353

THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-FULL DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), whose discovery phase ran from early 2003 until early 2007. The follow-up observations started just after the first discoveries and extended until late 2009. We obtained characterized observations of 321 deg{sup 2} of sky to depths in the range g {approx} 23.5-24.4 AB mag. We provide a database of 169 TNOs with high-precision dynamical classification and known discovery efficiency. Using this database, we find that the classical belt is a complex region with sub-structures that go beyond the usual splitting of inner (interior to 3:2 mean-motion resonance [MMR]), main (between 3:2 and 2:1 MMR), and outer (exterior to 2:1 MMR). The main classical belt (a = 40-47 AU) needs to be modeled with at least three components: the 'hot' component with a wide inclination distribution and two 'cold' components (stirred and kernel) with much narrower inclination distributions. The hot component must have a significantly shallower absolute magnitude (H{sub g} ) distribution than the other two components. With 95% confidence, there are 8000{sup +1800}{sub -1600} objects in the main belt with H{sub g} {<=} 8.0, of which 50% are from the hot component, 40% from the stirred component, and 10% from the kernel; the hot component's fraction drops rapidly with increasing H{sub g} . Because of this, the apparent population fractions depend on the depth and ecliptic latitude of a trans-Neptunian survey. The stirred and kernel components are limited to only a portion of the main belt, while we find that the hot component is consistent with a smooth extension throughout the inner, main, and outer regions of the classical belt; in fact, the inner and outer belts are consistent with containing only hot-component objects. The H{sub g} {<=} 8.0 TNO population estimates are 400 for the inner belt and 10,000 for the outer belt to within a factor of two (95% confidence). We show how the CFEPS Survey Simulator can be used to compare a cosmogonic model for the orbital element distribution to the real Kuiper Belt.

Petit, J.-M.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Observatoire de Besancon, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Gladman, B. J.; Jones, R. L.; Van Laerhoven, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Parker, J. Wm.; Bieryla, A. [Planetary Science Directorate, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Nicholson, P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Mars, G. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Marsden, B.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Taylor, M.; Bernabeu, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, E.P.S.A., Universidad de Alicante, Apartado de Correos 99, Alicante 03080 (Spain)

2011-10-15

354

The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

1992-01-01

355

A survey of dairy calf management practices in Canada that affect animal welfare.  

PubMed

There is growing interest among the public in farm animal welfare and a need for methods to assess animal welfare on farm. A survey on calf rearing practices that might affect dairy calf welfare was performed via a 1-h interview on 115 dairy farms (mean +/- SD: herd size=52.5+/-20.9 cows; milk production=8,697+/-1,153L) distributed throughout the province of Quebec. Despite frequent recommendations, many dairy producers continue to use management practices that increase the health risks of milk-fed calves. Major risk factors for poor calf welfare identified were 1) no use of calving pen in 51.3% of herds and low level of surveillance of calvings, especially at nighttime (once every 12h), 2) no disinfection of newborn's navel in 36.8% of herds, and delayed identification and, hence, calf monitoring (3 d), 3) 15.6% of farms relied on the dam to provide colostrum and none checked colostrum quality or passive transfer of immunity, 4) dehorning and removal of extra teats proceeded at late ages (6.4 wk and 6.7 mo, respectively) and without adequate pain control, 5) use of traditional restrictive milk feeding and waste milk distributed to unweaned calves without precaution in 48.2% of herds, 6) abrupt weaning performed in 16.5% of herds, and 7) calves housed individually in 87.9% of herds, and most inappropriate housing systems (crate=27.0%, tie-stall=13.9%, attached against a wall=5.7%) remained. This risk factor assessment was the first step in an intervention strategy to improve calf welfare on dairy farms. PMID:20172250

Vasseur, E; Borderas, F; Cue, R I; Lefebvre, D; Pellerin, D; Rushen, J; Wade, K M; de Passillé, A M

2010-03-01

356

The U.S. Geological Survey Bird Banding Laboratory: an integrated scientific program supporting research and conservation of North American birds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) was established in 1920 after ratification of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act with the United Kingdom in 1918. During World War II, the BBL was moved from Washington, D.C., to what is now the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC). The BBL issues permits and bands to permittees to band birds, records bird band recoveries or encounters primarily through telephone and Internet reporting, and manages more than 72 million banding records and more than 4.5 million records of encounters using state-of-the-art technologies. Moreover, the BBL also issues bands and manages banding and encounter data for the Canadian Bird Banding Office (BBO). Each year approximately 1 million bands are shipped from the BBL to banders in the United States and Canada, and nearly 100,000 encounter reports are entered into the BBL systems. Banding data are essential for regulatory programs, especially migratory waterfowl harvest regulations. The USGS BBL works closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to develop regulations for the capture, handling, banding, and marking of birds. These regulations are published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In 2006, the BBL and the USFWS Division of Migratory Bird Management (DMBM) began a comprehensive revision of the banding regulations. The bird banding community has three major constituencies: Federal and State agency personnel involved in the management and conservation of bird populations that include the Flyway Councils, ornithological research scientists, and avocational banders. With increased demand for banding activities and relatively constant funding, a Federal Advisory Committee (Committee) was chartered and reviewed the BBL program in 2005. The final report of the Committee included six major goals and 58 specific recommendations, 47 of which have been addressed by the BBL. Specifically, the Committee recommended the BBL continue to support science, conservation, and management of birds through the use of banding and banding data and that the BBL be managed by the USGS and located at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in Laurel, Maryland. Recommendations that have not been implemented include those already addressed by other organizations, as well as lower priority, such as developing a BBL business plan. The comprehensive review and recommendations of the Committee, the response of the BBL to address the Committee’s recommendations, and other improvements to its operations have positioned the BBL to provide a high level of service to the banding community. As new technologies are developed and incorporated into BBL operations, further efficiencies are expected to enable the BBL to continue to meet emerging scientific needs.

Smith, Gregory J.

2013-01-01

357

How do physician assessments of patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening tests differ from actual preferences? A comparison in Canada and the United States using a stated-choice survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Patient preferences can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test use. We compared utility-based preferences for alternative CRC screening tests from a stated-preference discrete-choice survey of the general population and physicians in Canada and the United States. Methods: General population respondents (Canada, n=501; US, n=1087) participated in a survey with 12 choice scenarios and 9 CRC screening test attributes. Physicians

DEBORAH A. MARSHALLa; F. Reed Johnson; Nathalie A. Kulin; Semra Özdemir; Judith M. E. Walsh; John K. Marshall; Stephanie Van Bebber; Kathryn A. Phillips

2009-01-01

358

Comprenhensive Program of Engineering and Geologic Surveys for Designing and Constructing Radioactive Waste Storage Facilities in Hard Rock Massifs  

SciTech Connect

Geological, geophysical, and engineering-geological research conducted at the 'Yeniseisky' site obtained data on climatic, geomorphologic, geological conditions, structure and properties of composing rock, and conditions of underground water recharge and discharge. These results provide sufficient information to make an estimate of the suitability of locating a radioactive waste (R W) underground isolation facility at the Nizhnekansky granitoid massif

Gupalo, T; Milovidov, V; Prokopoca, O; Jardine, L

2002-12-27

359

Geologic and Site Survey Setting for JIP Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Drilling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The JIP Gulf of Mexico drilling program targeted two contrasting geologic settings to understand natural gas hydrates: a salt-withdrawal minibasin and a mound/seep site, both at mid-slope water depths of about 1300 m. The minibasin site (lease block Keathley Canyon 151) contains a Bottom Simulating Reflection (BSR) that deepens from 260 m below the sea floor near the edge of the basin to 500 mbsf towards the center of the basin. Drilling was conducted at a site in which the BSR is about 415 mbsf. Seismic stratigraphy of the minibasin consists of continuous laminated sequences of variable thicknesses alternating with more massive units of discontinuous reflections. These sequences represent uniform hemipelagic deposition, which drapes the basin, and turbidite deposition, which pinches out along the basin edges. The BSR crosses several of these sequences. A map of amplitude values at the BSR shows a strong banding pattern indicative of the layering, with the highest amplitudes interpreted to be trapped gas in the coarser-grained units. Prior to drilling, piston-core data indicated extensive shallow mass wasting near the edges of the minibasin. Heat flow data indicated thermal gradients that in general predicted a BSR deeper than observed in the seismic data. Full-waveform inversion of 3D multichannel data indicated a probable thick zone of low-saturation hydrate immediately above the BSR. There is little coherent seismic stratigraphy at the mound/seep site in the Mississippi Canyon (lease blocks Atwater Valley 13/14), as the canyon fill is dominated by a complex mix of turbidite and mass-wasting deposits. Hints of a possible BSR that is warped upwards beneath the mound can be seen in both 3D and 2D multichannel seismic data, but it cannot be traced laterally away from the mound with any certainty. A seismic pull-down pseudo-structure beneath the mound suggests the presence of a free-gas low-velocity zone at shallow depths. Pore-water analyses from shallow piston cores and closely-spaced heat-flow data indicate the mound is a site of probable fluid venting. A transect of bottom photographs crosses a possible mud flow and numerous bacterial mats, consistent with features seen in fluid venting at other sites in the Gulf. Prestack inversion of the multichannel data did not predict significant gas hydrate at the site on the edge of the mound. However, at the control site off the mound, predictions were more favorable for low hydrate saturations in the deeper part of the drill hole.

Hutchinson, D. R.; Snyder, F.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Wood, W. T.; Coffin, R. B.; Edwards, K. M.

2005-12-01

360

Do geological field survey and remote sensing record the same fractures? The case of the corallian Loyalty Islands (SW Pacific)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Loyalty Islands are a series of corallian islands uplifted on the elastic bulge of the Australian lithosphere before its subduction at the Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides) Trench. They are located on the non seismic Loyalty Ridge, which is starting colliding the Vanuatu Trench. The interiors of the islands are covered with dense forests and devoid of outcrops. Lineaments seen on remote sensing data (aerial photos, SPOT 3 and 4, Envisat) are compared with fractures and joints measured on a geological survey near the coasts, where corallian limestones outcrop. Lineaments observed by remote sensing in the inner Islands correspond to one main N110 direction with a large variance of nearly 15° in rms, two minor directions nearly 45° apart (N150 and N60) and no systematic evolution with distance to coasts. The three lineament families are seen near coasts as centimetric to decimetric aperture cracks without evidence of any displacement. However, an extensive geological survey of the fractures near the coast of the islands reveals a clear N135 direction and possibly an EW direction in the Lifou Island, while in the Maré island fractures present a large variance with a single N70 direction. The directions N 135, N110 and N60 are also observed regionally on the seafloor and are presumably present in the basement of the islands. It is shown that lineaments longer than 2000 m are close to the N110 direction and that the mean orientation shifts progressively to reach the N125 direction for L<400 m. Therefore, it is likely that the progressive shift in orientation continues up to the N135 direction observed in the field at the 10-50 m scale. The origin of this apparent difference between field data and remote sensing lineaments is discussed, considering (i) the intense karstification of these islands, where dissolution occurs during infiltration of rainwater, but also due to corrosion mixing at the top and the bottom of the freshwater lens and at its tips near coast. This results in numerous collapse structures, mainly observed near coasts;(ii) the rheological contrast between the inner island, which consists in lagoon derived non cohesive limestone with a chalky texture and their rims, which consist in brittle corallian limestone; (iii) the amount of deformation of 0.02% deduced from previous elastic modeling of the lithosphere in this area.

Thovert, J.; Huaman, D.; Genthon, P.; Adler, P. M.

2010-12-01

361

Changing Conditions In The Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Biological, Geographical, And Hydrological Research Of The U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To address the need for understanding past, present, and future conditions in the northern latitudes, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Alaska Science Center conducts extensive research in the Yukon River Basin. The basin originates in Canada and spans Alaska from east to west encompassing diverse landscapes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Within this large watershed, USGS research is focused on understanding the rapidly changing conditions in the land cover and fires, fish and wildlife populations, and the hydrologic cycle. Some of Alaska largest and most extensive fires occur in the Yukon River Basin. Research suggests that recent fire frequency outpaces the forest replenishment. To provide a more thorough assessment of current fires, and prediction of future fire threats, Landsat imagery with its 30-m spatial resolution and 30-year history allow for unprecedented analysis of historical and existing landscape cover, the effects of fire and climate change on lake drying, and updating of fire burn boundaries. Additionally, caribou have been shown to avoid burned areas for at least 60 years because forage lichens were eliminated and preferred forage may require over 100 years to reach pre-fire abundance. Glaciers in Alaska and in Canada feed the Tanana River, a major tributary to the Yukon River. Gulkana Glacier is one such glacier where the USGS has measured the mass balance continuously since 1966. There has been a cumulative mass loss of more than 15 meters water equivalent since 1966, with two-thirds of that loss occurring since 1990. Streamflow statistics from long-term gaging stations show a tendency for earlier ice break up in the spring and earlier snowmelt peak flows. Glacier-fed streams show higher summer flows as warmer temperatures increased glacier melt. To provide a better understanding of the factors that regulate salmon production, USGS has examined the characteristics of chum salmon spawning habitats and survival of juvenile salmon at two locations within the Yukon River basin. Spawning sites characterized by up-welling ground water and stable water temperatures are used by chum salmon in Upper Yukon River tributaries where spawning may occur as late as November. In lower Yukon River tributaries, earlier spawning salmon use down-welling sites where water temperatures may vary between 0 and 13 ºC. The Yukon River delta is an internationally important breeding area for many waterfowl. Long-term studies of geese have recorded shifts in breeding phenology that are likely climate linked. Frequency and magnitude of storm surges may play a pivotal role in population dynamics of most breeding birds by indirectly mediating predation of nests. The hypothesis underpinning current research is that large storm surges decimate populations of tundra voles, which are the primary prey of arctic foxes. In the absence of voles, foxes increase predation of bird nests. Avian nest success this decade has been substantially lower than in the 1990s.

Brabets, T. P.; Frenzel, S. A.; Markon, C.; Degange, A. R.

2006-12-01

362

Use of a remote car starter in relation to smog and climate change perceptions: a population survey in Québec (Canada).  

PubMed

Remote car starters encourage motorists to warm up their vehicles by idling the motor--thus increasing atmospheric pollutants, including several greenhouse gas (GHG) with impacts on public health. This study about climate change (CC) adaptation and mitigation actions examined perceptions on air pollution and climate change and individual characteristics associated with the use of a remote car starter. A telephone survey (n = 2,570; response rate: 70%) of adults living in Québec (Canada) measured the respondents' beliefs and current behaviours regarding CC. Approximately 32.9% (daily car users) and 27.4% (occasional users) reported using a remote car starter during winter. The odds of the use of a remote car starter was higher in the less densely populated central (OR: 1.5) and peripheral regions (OR: 2.7) compared to the urban centers (ex. Montreal). The odds was also higher in population with a mother tongue other than English or French (OR: 2.6) and francophones than anglophones (OR: 2.1), women than men (OR: 1.5), daily drivers than occasional ones (OR: 1.2), and respondents who at least sometimes consulted temperature/humidity reports than those who consulted them less often (OR: 1.5). In multivariate analysis, the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, being aware of smog warnings, or the belief in the human contribution to CC did not significantly influence the use of a remote car starter. The use of remote car starters encourages idling which produces increased atmospheric pollution and GHG production and it should be more efficiently and vigorously managed by various activities. A five-minute daily reduction in idling is equivalent to reducing the total car emissions by 1.8%. This would constitute a "no-regrets" approach to CC as it can simultaneously reduce GHG, air pollution and their health impacts. PMID:19440410

Bélanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre; Valois, Pierre; Germain, Stéphane; Abdous, Belkacem

2009-02-16

363

The Space Density Evolution of Wet and Dry Mergers in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze 1298 merging galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.7 from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, taken from the catalog presented in the work of Bridge et al. By analyzing the internal colors of these systems, we show that the so-called wet and dry mergers evolve in different senses, and quantify the space densities of these systems. The local space density of wet mergers is essentially identical to the local space density of dry mergers. The evolution in the total merger rate is modest out to z ~ 0.7, although the wet and dry populations have different evolutionary trends. At higher redshifts, dry mergers make a smaller contribution to the total merging galaxy population, but this is offset by a roughly equivalent increase in the contribution from wet mergers. By comparing the mass density function of early-type galaxies to the corresponding mass density function for merging systems, we show that not all the major mergers with the highest masses (M stellar>1011 M sun) will end up with the most massive early-type galaxies, unless the merging timescale is dramatically longer than that usually assumed. On the other hand, the usually assumed merging timescale of ~0.5-1 Gyr is quite consistent with the data if we suppose that only less massive early-type galaxies form via mergers. Since low-intermediate-mass ellipticals are 10-100 times more common than their most massive counterparts, the hierarchical explanation for the origin of early-type galaxies may be correct for the vast majority of early types, even if incorrect for the most massive ones.

Chou, Richard C. Y.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Abraham, Roberto G.

2011-03-01

364

The Space Density Evolution of Wet and Dry Mergers in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze 1298 merging galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.7 from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, taken from the catalog presented in Bridge et al. (2010). By analyzing the internal colors of these systems, we show that so-called wet and dry mergers evolve in different senses, and quantify the space densities of these systems. The local space density of wet mergers is essentially identical to the local space density of dry mergers. The evolution in the total merger rate is modest out to z ˜ 0.7, although the wet and dry populations have different evolutionary trends. At higher redshifts dry mergers make a smaller contribution to the total merging galaxy population, but this is offset by a roughly equivalent increase in the contribution from wet mergers. By comparing the mass density function of early-type galaxies to the corresponding mass density function for merging systems, we show that not all the major mergers with the highest masses (Mstellar > 1011M?) will end up with the most massive early-type galaxies, unless the merging timescale is dramatically longer than that usually assumed. On the other hand, the usually-assumed merging timescale of ˜ 0.5–1 Gyr is quite consistent with the data if we suppose that only less massive early-type galaxies form via mergers. Since low-intermediate mass ellipticals are 10–100 times more common than their most massive counterparts, the hierarchical explanation for the origin of early-type galaxies may be correct for the vast majority of early-types, even if incorrect for the most massive ones.

Chou, R. C. Y.; Bridge, C. R.; Abraham, R. G.

2013-10-01

365

Use of residential wood heating in a context of climate change: a population survey in Qu?bec (Canada)  

PubMed Central

Background Wood heating is recommended in several countries as a climate change (CC) adaptation measure, mainly to increase the autonomy of households during power outages due to extreme climatic events. The aim of this study was to examine various perceptions and individual characteristics associated with wood heating through a survey about CC adaptations. Methods A telephone survey (n = 2,545) of adults living in the southern part of the province of Québec (Canada) was conducted in the early fall season of 2005. The questionnaire used closed questions and measured the respondents' beliefs and current adaptations about CC. Calibration weighting was used to adjust the data analysis for the respondent's age and language under stratified sampling based on health regions. Results More than three out of four respondents had access to a single source of energy at home, which was mainly electricity; 22.2% combined two sources or more; 18.5% heated with wood occasionally or daily during the winter. The prevalence of wood heating was higher in the peripheral regions than in the more urban regions, where there was a higher proportion of respondents living in apartments. The prevalence was also higher with participants completely disagreeing (38.5%) with the eventual prohibition of wood heating when there is smog in winter, compared to respondents somewhat disagreeing (24.2%) or agreeing (somewhat: 17.5%; completely: 10.4%) with the adoption of this strategy. It appears that the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, smog warnings in the media, or the belief in the human contribution to CC, did not influence significantly wood heating practices. Conclusion Increased residential wood heating could very well become a maladaptation to climate change, given its known consequences on winter smog and respiratory health. It would thus be appropriate to implement a long-term national program on improved and controlled residential wood heating. This would constitute a "no-regrets" adaptation to climate change, while reducing air pollution and its associated health impacts.

Belanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre; Valois, Pierre; Abdous, Belkacem

2008-01-01

366

U.S. Geological Survey Catskill/Delaware Water-Quality Network: Water-Quality Report Water Year 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey operates a 60-station streamgaging network in the New York City Catskill/Delaware Water Supply System. Water-quality samples were collected at 13 of the stations in the Catskill/Delaware streamgaging network to provide resource managers with water-quality and water-quantity data from the water-supply system that supplies about 85 percent of the water needed by the more than 9 million residents of New York City. This report summarizes water-quality data collected at those 13 stations plus one additional station operated as a part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Long-Term Monitoring Network for the 2006 water year (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006). An average of 62 water-quality samples were collected at each station during the 2006 water year, including grab samples collected every other week and storm samples collected with automated samplers. On average, 8 storms were sampled at each station during the 2006 water year. The 2006 calendar year was the second warmest on record and the summer of 2006 was the wettest on record for the northeastern United States. A large storm on June 26-28, 2006, caused extensive flooding in the western part of the network where record peak flows were measured at several watersheds.

McHale, Michael R.; Siemion, Jason

2010-01-01

367

Historical review of the international water-resources program of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1940-70  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The review describes the history of the U.S. Geological Survey 's (USGS) activities in international water-resources investigations and institutional development as well as exchange in scientific and applied hydrology during 1940-70. The bulk of these activities has been carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development and its predecessors, the United Nations and its specialized agencies, and the regional intergovernmental agencies. The central objectives of the USGS ' international water-resources activities have been to strengthen the administrative, staff, and operational functions of counterpart governmental hydrological and water-resources agencies; to improve the skills and capabilities of host-country scientific, engineering, and technical personnel; to exchange research specialists and publications in the sharing of advances in hydrological knowledge and methodology; and to participate in mutually beneficial international organizations, symposia, conferences, seminars, and special programs dedicated to various aspects of scientific and applied hydrology. Between 1940 and 1970, USGS hydrogeologists, water chemists, engineers, and hydrologists completed 340 short- and long-term project-oriented international assignments in some 80 host countries. During the same time more than 428 water scientists, engineers, and technicians from 60 countries have received academic and in-service training through USGS water-resources facilities in the United States. Also in this period some 336 reports of a technical and scientific nature have resulted from water-resources projects in the U.S bilateral program. (Woodard-USGS)

Taylor, George C., Jr.

1976-01-01

368

Funding history of the U.S. Geological Survey Federal data collection and analysis program, 1973-1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Federal program activities in the collection and analysis of hydrologic data are funded in six categories established in order of priority. Over the period 1973 to 1982, the funding available for the programs supported in each category has increased, but when viewed without the effect of inflation the purchasing power of the programs has generally decreased. Funding for adjudications, compacts, and treaties increased continuously from $588,600 in 1973 to $1,035,500 in 1981, and then decreased to $1,014,200 in 1982. However, when adjusted for inflation, based on a 1972 constant dollar, the constant dollars decreased from $555,800 in 1973 to $411,900 in 1982, which indicates that purchasing power was 26% less in 1982 than in 1973. Funding for the other five categories--the National Stream Quality Accounting Network, National Benchmark Network, Other Federal Agencies within the Department of the Interior, and General Federal Agencies Outside the Department of the Interior, and General Federal Hydrologic Interests--increased during the period, but the funding increase did not keep pace with inflation. During this 1973-82 period the U.S. Geological Survey has worked to make the Federal Data Collection and Analysis Program more cost effective by more efficient operational procedures and improved instrumentation, laboratory, and computation procedures. (USGS)

Condes de la Torre, Alberto

1983-01-01

369

Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48,600 km2 in Southern Brazil. The source data was the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project back-calibrated in a cooperative work among the Geological Survey of Brazil, the Geological Survey of Canada, and Paterson, Grant & Watson Ltd. The

Rodrigo O. Bastos; Carlos R. Appoloni; Jose´ P. P. Pinese

2008-01-01

370

GIS of selected geophysical and core data in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope collected by the U.S. Geological Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep-water parts of the US EEZ in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These data, released with the publication, include digital sidescan sonar imagery, digital seismic-reflection data, and descriptions and analyses of piston and gravity cores. The data were collected during several different projects that addressed surficial and shallow subsurface geologic processes. Some of these datasets have already been published, but the growing interest in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico warrants integrating these existing USGS datasets and associated interpretations into a GIS to provide regional background information for ongoing and future gas hydrate research.

Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Winters, William J.; Hart, Patrick E.

2006-01-01

371

Corrosion damage to the aluminum tank liner of the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor  

SciTech Connect

During a routine maintenance small holes at the side of the tank of the reactor, penetrating the tank liner were discovered. Apparently the corrosion was acting from the back side of the tank forming the holes. The NRC was promptly notified and routine operations were suspended. Further investigation lead to the discovery of 74 holes, most of which were less than 1/8 inch in diameter with a few as large as 1/4 inch diameter. The results of an examination of the plate cut from the side of the tank correlated the absence of tar coating with the presence of numerous corrosion pits and craters. Along the welds in the corroded areas, parallel corrosion troughs existed on either side of the weld. Most of the pits and craters were too small to be detected by ultrasonic survey. In order to remedy the physical problem and be able to resume the reactor operation, a short-term strategy was adopted which involved covering the 74 holes with aluminum patches coated with epoxy. Reactor operations were resumed and over the next month four new holes were found and four patches applied. An inspection conducted after four months of operation found 28 new holes and the rate of leakage of water from the tank had increased to about 0.7 l/h. Because the rate of formation of holes seemed to be accelerating and the time required for maintenance was becoming unacceptable, it was decided to cease operation of the reactor until long-term repairs could be made. A new aluminum tank liner will be installed within the existing tank. A 2-inch wide annular void will then exist between the new and old liners. A pump will be installed inside the new liner to prevent the ground water from contacting it. The top of the void will be shielded to reduce the exposure to neutrons and gamma rays scattered from areas near the reactor. The reactor will be reinstalled at the bottom of the new liner on a plate which can be levelled from a distance of 10 feet.

Perryman, R.E.; Millard, H.T. Jr.; Rusling, D.H.; Heifer, P.G.; Smith, W.L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

1988-07-01

372

Proceedings of the First U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Information Management Workshop, March 21-23, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In March 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) held the first Scientific Information Management (SIM) Workshop in Reston, Virginia. The workshop brought together more than 150 SIM professionals from across the organization to discuss the range and importance of SIM problems, identify common challenges and solutions, and investigate the use and value of 'communities of practice' (CoP) as mechanisms to address these issues. The 3-day workshop began with presentations of SIM challenges faced by the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) network and two USGS programs from geology and hydrology. These presentations were followed by a keynote address and discussion of CoP by Dr. Etienne Wenger, a pioneer and leading expert in CoP, who defined them as 'groups of people who share a passion for something that they know how to do and who interact regularly to learn how to do it better.' Wenger addressed the roles and characteristics of CoP, how they complement formal organizational structures, and how they can be fostered. Following this motivating overview, five panelists (including Dr. Wenger) with CoP experience in different institutional settings provided their perspectives and lessons learned. The first day closed with an open discussion on the potential intersection of SIM at the USGS with SIM challenges and the potential for CoP. The second session began the process of developing a common vocabulary for both scientific data management and CoP, and a list of eight guiding principles for information management were proposed for discussion and constructive criticism. Following this discussion, 20 live demonstrations and posters of SIM tools developed by various USGS programs and projects were presented. Two community-building sessions were held to explore the next steps in 12 specific areas: Archiving of Scientific Data and Information; Database Networks; Digital Libraries; Emerging Workforce; Field Data for Small Research Projects; Knowledge Capture; Knowledge Organization Systems and Controlled Vocabularies; Large Time Series Data Sets; Metadata; Portals and Frameworks; Preservation of Physical Collections; and Scientific Data from Monitoring Programs. In about two-thirds of these areas, initial steps to forming CoP are now underway. The final afternoon included a panel in which information professionals, managers, program coordinators, and associate directors shared their perspectives on the workshop, on ways in which the USGS could better manage its scientific information, and on the use of CoP as informal mechanisms to complement formal organizational structures. The final session focused on developing the next steps, an action plan, and a communication strategy to ensure continued development.

Compiled by Henkel, Heather S.

2007-01-01

373

Comments on a letter by George D. DeBuchananne (US Geological Survey) regarding the use of salt domes for high-level waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey (USGS) concluded in a letter to the US Department of Energy, dated March 7, 1981, that subsurface geologic conditions in bedded salt are more predictable and less complex than those in domal salt. This predictability is equated with the relative suitability of bedded and domal salt as repository host media. This report comments on the USGS letter. The key points made are as follows: Complexities which may exist in the geologic setting of a salt dome (or other potential host medium) should not a priori preclude the dome from being an acceptable host medium for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. Predictability, as used by the USGS, focused on the spatial extrapolation of information on geologic conditions and should not be confused with predicting the performance of a repository. Notwithstanding the general characteristics of bedded and domal salt, there are salt domes whose individual characteristics should make them as acceptable as potential bedded salt areas for HLW repository sites. Complexities which may occur in the geologic setting of a salt dome can be explored and characterized with sufficient accuracy by available techniques.

Not Available

1984-08-01

374

Standard procedures and quality-control practices for the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program from 1982 through 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey operates the National Field Quality Assurance Program to provide quality- assurance reference samples to field personnel who make water-quality field measurements. The program monitors the accuracy and precision of pH, specific conductance, and alkalinity field measurements. This report documents the operational procedures and quality-control techniques used in operating the quality-assurance program.

Stanley, D. L.

1995-01-01

375

Bibliography of selected publications approved by the U.S. Geological Survey on the water resources of New Mexico, 1975-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bibliography of about 500 references authored by U.S. Geological Survey employees has been compiled to assist in the study and development of water resources. The citations are dated from January 1975 to December 1993. Each citation is numbered and indexed by geographic location and discipline. Selected citations are indexed by physiographic province and basin, military, Indian, and other reservations, and topics of special hydrologic interest.

Sandoval, O. M.

1994-01-01

376

Use of Video Podcasts to Communicate Scientific Findings to Non-Scientists--- Examples from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) provides information about (1) water-quality conditions and how those conditions vary locally, regionally, and nationally, (2) water-quality trends, and (3) factors that affect those conditions. As part of the NAWQA Program, the Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems (EUSE) study examined the vulnerability and resilience of streams to urbanization. Completion

D. A. Harned; G. McMahon; K. Capelli

2010-01-01

377

Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for selected sites of the U.S. Geological Survey's NASQAN and benchmark surface-water networks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increasingly, hydrologic studies require information on the isotopic composition of natural waters. This report presents stable hydrogen (delta2H) and oxygen isotope ratios (delta18O) from 391 selected sites of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and BENCHMARK surface water networks collected during the years 1984-1987. Depth-integrated samples were collected and analyzed from each site bimonthly or quarterly for about 3 years.

Coplen, Tyler B.; Kendall, Carol

2000-01-01

378

Assessing rock aquifer vulnerability using downward advective times from a 3D model of surficial geology: A case study from the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aquifer vulnerability assessment method which relates vulnerability directly to groundwater Downward Advective Time (DAT) from a 3D geologic model is tested over a 1400 km 2 area in the St. Lawrence Lowlands in SW Québec. The goal was to assess the vulnerability of the regional rock aquifer which is overlain by discontinuous and unconsolidated Quaternary units. Hydrogeologic parameters such

Martin Ross; Richard Martel; René Lefebvre; Michel Parent; Martine M. Savard

379

Cross-Canada survey of resistance of 2747 aerobic blood culture isolates to piperacillin/tazobactam and other antibiotics  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity of piperacillin/tazobactam with that of other broad parenteral antibiotics against aerobic and facultative anaerobic blood culture isolates in a Canada-wide survey. DESIGN: Fifty-eight laboratories in nine provinces each contributed up to 50 consecutive clinically significant aerobic and facultative anaerobic isolates for susceptibility testing. SETTING: Participating hospitals included both tertiary care and community hospitals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Testing was performed in five regional centres by using the same microbroth dilution method, and results were interpreted according to National Commitee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M7-A3 and M100-S5 guidelines. RESULTS: Piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem were both active against more than 99% of the 1616 strains of Enterobacteriaceae species tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 90% of isolates (MIC90) of all Enterobacteriaceae species was 2 mg/L for piperacillin/tazobactam compared with 64 mg/L for piperacillin alone. Seventeen per cent of strains of Enterobacteriaceae species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam but resistant to piperacillin. Piperacillin/tazobactam was highly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibiting 99.1% of strains. MIC90 was 8 mg/L. Nine per cent of P aeruginosa strains were not susceptible to imipenem. Most of these strains had a MIC of 8 mg/L, which falls in the intermediate category. Ninety-seven per cent of P aeruginosa were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and 97.3% to tobramycin. Ninety-six per cent of strains of Actinobacter species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam, whereas only 76% of strains were susceptible to piperacillin alone. Overall, piperacillin/tazobactam was the most active agent tested; 98% of all strains were susceptible, followed closely by imipenem, to which 97.8% of strains were susceptible. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic blood culture isolates from Canadian centres continue to be highly susceptible to a variety of antibiotics. The broad spectrum of activity of piperacillin/tazobactam suggests that this combination should be considered for empirical treatment of sepsis while awaiting results of cultures and susceptibility testing.

Forward, Kevin R; Franks, Patricia A; Low, Donald E; Rennie, Robert; Simor, Andrew E

1998-01-01

380

Revisions to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package for Simulation of Ground-Water Interactions With Lakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several revisions were made to the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW Lake Package as part of the integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System with MODFLOW. The integrated model, named GSFLOW, is designed for the simultaneous simulation of ground-water and surface-water flow. Revisions to the Lake Package resulted in changing: (1) the numerical solution to simultaneously solve for lake stage and outflow to streams; (2) the method of calculating lake-water budgets to maintain a budget when a lake is empty; and (3) the calculation of leakage across the lakebed in areas where the water table is below the lakebed. The first change was done to reduce numerical instabilities in the calculation of lake outflow to streams. The second change was done to allow for intermittent lakes to refill on the basis of surface water inflow and to limit leakage across the lakebed to the surface-water inflow when the lake is empty. The third change was done to account for flow through an unsaturated zone beneath lakes. These revisions allow for greater flexibility in the simulation of ground-water interactions with lakes. Possible new applications for the revised Lake Package include the simulation of ground-water interaction with: (1) intermittent lakes that fill and drain as a result of seasonal changes in surface-water inflow; (2) reservoirs that fill during wet periods and are drained during droughts; (3) flood plains of streams that are inundated periodically by floods; (4) anastomosing flood plains where larger channels correspond to more than one MODFLOW cell; and (5) areas beneath lakes that are separated from ground water by an unsaturated zone.

Prudic, D. E.; Niswonger, R. G.

2006-12-01

381

Earthquake Scenarios Based Upon the Data and Methodologies of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project (NSHMP) utilizes a database of over 500 faults across the conterminous United States to constrain earthquake source models for probabilistic seismic hazard maps. Additionally, the fault database is now being used to produce a suite of deterministic ground motions for earthquake scenarios that are based on the same fault source parameters and empirical ground motion prediction equations used for the probabilistic hazard maps. Unlike the calculated hazard map ground motions, local soil amplification is applied to the scenario calculations based on the best available Vs30 (average shear-wave velocity down to 30 meters) mapping, or in some cases using topographic slope as a proxy. Systematic outputs include all standard USGS ShakeMap products, including GIS, KML, XML, and HAZUS input files. These data are available from the ShakeMap web pages with a searchable archive. The scenarios are being produced within the framework of a geographic information system (GIS) so that alternative scenarios can readily be produced by altering fault source parameters, Vs30 soil amplification, as well as the weighting of ground motion prediction equations used in the calculations. The alternative scenarios can then be used for sensitivity analysis studies to better characterize uncertainty in the source model and convey this information to decision makers. By providing a comprehensive collection of earthquake scenarios based upon the established data and methods of the USGS NSHMP, we hope to provide a well-documented source of data which can be used for visualization, planning, mitigation, loss estimation, and research purposes.

Rukstales, K. S.; Petersen, M. D.; Frankel, A. D.; Harmsen, S. C.; Wald, D. J.; Quitoriano, V. R.; Haller, K. M.

2011-12-01

382

U.S. Geological Survey laboratory method for methyl tert-Butyl ether and other fuel oxygenates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was found in shallow ground-water samples in a study of 8 urban and 20 agricultural areas throughout the United States in 1993 and 1994 (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 1). The compound is added to gasoline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase the octane level and to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone levels in the air. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL), near Denver, uses state-of-the-art technology to analyze samples for MTBE as part of the USGS water-quality studies. In addition, the NWQL offers custom analyses to determine two other fuel oxygenates--ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). The NWQL was not able to obtain a reference standard for tert-amyl ethyl ether (TAEE), another possible fuel oxygenate (Shelley and Fouhy, 1994, p. 63). The shallow ground-water samples were collected as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These samples were collected from 211 urban wells or springs and 562 agricultural wells sampled by the USGS in 1993 and 1994. The wells were keyed to specific land-use areas to assess the effects of different uses on ground-water quality (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 2). Ground-water samples were preserved on site to pH less than or equal to 2 with a solution of 1:1 hydrochloric acid. All samples were analyzed at the NWQL within 2 weeks after collection. The purpose of this fact sheet is to explain briefly the analytical method implemented by the USGS for determining MTBE and other fuel oxygenates. The scope is necessarily limited to an overview of the analytical method (instrumentation, sample preparation, calibration and quantitation, identification, and preservation of samples) and method performance (reagent blanks, accuracy, and precision).

Raese, Jon W.; Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

1995-01-01

383

The perceived impact of location privacy: A web-based survey of public health perspectives and requirements in the UK and Canada  

PubMed Central

Background The "place-consciousness" of public health professionals is on the rise as spatial analyses and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are rapidly becoming key components of their toolbox. However, "place" is most useful at its most precise, granular scale – which increases identification risks, thereby clashing with privacy issues. This paper describes the views and requirements of public health professionals in Canada and the UK on privacy issues and spatial data, as collected through a web-based survey. Methods Perceptions on the impact of privacy were collected through a web-based survey administered between November 2006 and January 2007. The survey targeted government, non-government and academic GIS labs and research groups involved in public health, as well as public health units (Canada), ministries, and observatories (UK). Potential participants were invited to participate through personally addressed, standardised emails. Results Of 112 invitees in Canada and 75 in the UK, 66 and 28 participated in the survey, respectively. The completion proportion for Canada was 91%, and 86% for the UK. No response differences were observed between the two countries. Ninety three percent of participants indicated a requirement for personally identifiable data (PID) in their public health activities, including geographic information. Privacy was identified as an obstacle to public health practice by 71% of respondents. The overall self-rated median score for knowledge of privacy legislation and policies was 7 out of 10. Those who rated their knowledge of privacy as high (at the median or above) also rated it significantly more severe as an obstacle to research (P < 0.001). The most critical cause cited by participants in both countries was bureaucracy. Conclusion The clash between PID requirements – including granular geography – and limitations imposed by privacy and its associated bureaucracy require immediate attention and solutions, particularly given the increasing utilisation of GIS in public health. Solutions include harmonization of privacy legislation with public health requirements, bureaucratic simplification, increased multidisciplinary discourse, education, and development of toolsets, algorithms and guidelines for using and reporting on disaggregate data.

AbdelMalik, Philip; Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Jones, Ray

2008-01-01

384

Shahejie-Shahejie/Guantao/Wumishan and Carboniferous/Permian Coal-Paleozoic Total Petroleum Systems in the Bohaiwan Basin, China (based on geologic studies for the 2000 World Energy Assessment Project of the U.S. Geological Survey)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report discusses the geologic framework and petroleum geology used to assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the Bohaiwan basin province for the 2000 World Energy Assessment Project of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Bohaiwan basin in northeastern China is the largest petroleum-producing region in China. Two total petroleum systems have been identified in the basin. The first, the Shahejie&ndashShahejie/Guantao/Wumishan Total Petroleum System, involves oil and gas generated from mature pods of lacustrine source rock that are associated with six major rift-controlled subbasins. Two assessment units are defined in this total petroleum system: (1) a Tertiary lacustrine assessment unit consisting of sandstone reservoirs interbedded with lacustrine shale source rocks, and (2) a pre-Tertiary buried hills assessment unit consisting of carbonate reservoirs that are overlain unconformably by Tertiary lacustrine shale source rocks. The second total petroleum system identified in the Bohaiwan basin is the Carboniferous/Permian Coal–Paleozoic Total Petroleum System, a hypothetical total petroleum system involving natural gas generated from multiple pods of thermally mature coal beds. Low-permeability Permian sandstones and possibly Carboniferous coal beds are the reservoir rocks. Most of the natural gas is inferred to be trapped in continuous accumulations near the center of the subbasins. This total petroleum system is largely unexplored and has good potential for undiscovered gas accumulations. One assessment unit, coal-sourced gas, is defined in this total petroleum system.

Ryder, Robert T.; Qiang, Jin; McCabe, Peter J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Persits, Felix

2012-01-01

385

Expanding the lens of HIV services provision in Canada: results of a national survey of HIV health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Those living with HIV may experience a range of disabilities, including body impairments, activity limitations, and social participation restrictions. The aim of this study was to examine HIV services provision in Canada by exploring practices, referrals, and service delivery challenges from the perspective of HIV health professionals (including nurses, physicians, social workers, pharmacists, psychologists, and dieticians), and to explore differences

Catherine Worthington; Kelly OBrien; Ted Myers; Stephanie Nixon; Rhonda Cockerill

2009-01-01

386

Isotope mass balance techniques for determining site-specific estimates of water yield: Results from regional acid sensitivity surveys across western Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A stable isotope mass balance technique for estimating water yield is applied to a dataset of deuterium and oxygen-18 data from 730 lakes collected as part of provincial surveys across western Canada. These surveys were initiated to constrain water yield estimates to lakes as part of a dynamic critical loadings assessment. The approach uses readily obtainable physical and climatological data combined with analysis of evaporative isotopic enrichment of deuterium and oxygen-18 in lake water as a quantitative tracer of throughflow, lake residency and runoff. The lakes are located in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia spanning large gradients in climatological parameters and representing very diverse range of landscape types. The results illustrate regional differences on the controls on water yield and lake hydrology but also provide an indication of added value to be gained by incorporating such site-specific measurements within water quality networks. Implications for the role of different terrain types on the regional runoff are discussed.

Gibson, J. J.; Birks, S. J.

2009-05-01

387

Acting Locally, Thinking Globally: One Geology?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological survey organizations around the world are responsible for geological data for their own countries, but until recently those data had never been made accessible worldwide. This raised the question of whether we really do have a holistic understanding of the geology of our planet—one geology. OneGeology (http://www.onegeology.org) is a global venture created to increase the accessibility of geological map data and make them available on the Web. Geological survey organizations from 113 countries are currently participating in ¬OneGeology, and to date more than 40 of those organizations are serving geological data to a dedicated Web map portal (see Figure 1).

Jackson, Ian

2010-02-01

388

Western Canada basin conventional gas resource estimated at 232 tcf  

SciTech Connect

An estimate of 232 tcf of conventional undiscovered gas resources for the entire Western Canada Sedimentary basin indicates that more than half of the total gas resource remains to be discovered. This preliminary figure results from the main resource potential study, Conventional Gas Resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, being conducted by the Geological Survey of Canada. The study is the most comprehensive project of its kind undertaken by GSC because of the enormity of the pool database, the number of plays, and the geological complexities of those plays. The basin encompasses practically all of Alberta, Northeast British Columbia, southern Saskatchewan, and southwestern Manitoba. Hence it was necessary to divide the overall assessment into play groups using geological criteria, primarily major stratigraphic time/rock units, and structural/tectonic provinces. Although the Cretaceous--Tertiary play groups have not yet been subjected to the same Petrimes methodological assessment as the other play groups, it is believed that the overall assessment of 232 tcf presented here is reasonable, perhaps even somewhat conservative.

Reinson, G.E.; Lee, P.J.; Barclay, J.E.; Bird, T.D.; Osadetz, K.G. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1993-10-25

389

U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives-Fiscal years 2007 and 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and is not responsible for regulations or land management. Climate change is a major current issue affecting Native lives and traditions throughout the United States. Climate projections for the coming century indicate an increasing probability for more frequent and more severe droughts in the Southwest, including the Navajo Nation. Erosion has claimed Native homes in Alaska. Fish have become inedible due to diseases that turn their flesh mushy. Native people who rely on or who are culturally sustained by hunting, fishing, and using local plants are living with climate change now. The traditional knowledge of Native peoples enriches and confirms the work of USGS scientists. The results are truly synergistic-greater than the sum of their parts. Traditional ecological knowledge is respected and increasingly used in USGS studies-when the holders of that knowledge choose to share it. The USGS respects the rights of Native people to maintain their patrimony of traditional ecological knowledge. The USGS studies can help Tribes, Native organizations, and natural resource professionals manage Native lands and resources with the best available unbiased data and information that can be added to their traditional knowledge. Wise Native leaders have noted that traditional ecological knowledge includes the connections between Earth and her denizens. From this perspective, it is the connections among these ?relatives? that needs to be nurtured. This perspective on nature is finding new adherents among Natives and non-Natives as understanding of climate change and other environmental conditions deepens. Although this report uses the term ?resources,? the USGS, through its interdisciplinary research, acknowledges the interconnectedness of the Earth and the things that live upon it.

Marcus, Susan M.

2010-01-01

390

Third U.S. Geological Survey Wildland Fire-Science Workshop : Denver, Colorado, November 12-15, 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Executive Summary -- The historically significant wildland fire events that occurred in the United States during 2000 and 2002, together with the associated recognition of the need for a different national policy of forest management, has led to an increased awareness of the need for cooperative effort among all Federal agencies in planning for and managing the risks and consequences of wildland fire. The expertise and capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are significant resources in this regard, and the agency is becoming increasingly involved in fire-science activities in support of the various land-management agencies that are dealing directly with this issue. The First USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1997 and helped to establish the direction of USGS in sharing its expertise with the fire-management agencies. The Second USGS Wildland Fire Workshop was held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 2000 and brought together all the agencies involved in the management of wildland fires in order to determine their needs, to demonstrate USGS capabilities to meet those needs, and to establish methods for the USGS to distribute data and tools useful in fire management. It enhanced the relationships developed during the 1997 workshop and helped to define USGS' role in the fire-management community. The Third USGS Wildland Fire-Science Workshop, held in Denver, Colorado, November 12?15, 2002, was an opportunity for exchange of information on recent progress in the area of fire science and to determine the gaps in fire-science research that could be addressed by the USGS. In addition to more than 90 USGS scientists engaged in fire-related research and managers of organizational units involved in some aspect of wildland fire activities, the workshop was attended by about 30 representatives of 11 other Federal agencies. There also were a number of attendees affiliated with several universities, private companies, and State and local agencies. The 4-day meeting consisted of a pre-workshop field trip to the Hayman Fire area, several keynote presentations, five panel discussions, presentation and 'breakout' discussion of four 'white paper' topics, and a poster session with more than 30 presentations.

Livingston, Russell K.

2004-01-01

391

U.S. Geological Survey Streamgage Operation and Maintenance Cost Evaluation...from the National Streamflow Information Program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To help meet the goal of providing earth-science information to the Nation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains the largest streamgage network in the world, with over 7,600 active streamgages in 2010. This network is operated in cooperation with over 850 Federal, tribal, State, and local funding partners. The streamflow information provided by the USGS is used for the protection of life and property; for the assessment, allocation, and management of water resources; for the design of roads, bridges, dams, and water works; for the delineation of flood plains; for the assessment and evaluation of habitat; for understanding the effects of land-use, water-use, and climate changes; for evaluation of water quality; and for recreational safety and enjoyment. USGS streamgages are managed and operated to rigorous national standards, allowing analyses of data from streamgages in different areas and spanning long time periods, some with more than 100 years of data. About 90 percent of USGS streamgages provide streamflow information real-time on the web. Physical measurements of streamflow are made at streamgages multiple times a year, depending on flow conditions, to ensure the highest level of accuracy possible. In addition, multiple reviews and quality assurance checks are performed before the data is finalized. In 2006, the USGS reviewed all activities, operations, equipment, support, and costs associated with operating and maintaining a streamgage program (Norris and others, 2008). A summary of the percentages of costs associated with activities required to operate a streamgage on an annual basis are presented in figure 1. This information represents what it costs to fund a 'typical' USGS streamgage and how those funds are utilized. It should be noted that some USGS streamgages have higher percentages for some categories than do others depending on location and conditions. Forty-one percent of the funding for the typical USGS streamgage is for labor costs of the USGS staff responsible for the measurement of the streamflow in the field and the time in the office to quality assure and finalize the data. It is reasonable that funding for the entire national streamgage network would closely follow the percentages shown in figure 1 as to how the funds are invested in the network. However, actual costs are specific to a particular streamgage and can vary substantially depending on location and operational issues.

Norris, J. Michael

2010-01-01

392

Geologic Time: Online Edition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Offered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as a general interest publication, this site is an online edition of a text by the same name, offering a concise overview of the concepts associated with the age of the Earth. The online edition was revised in October of 1997 to reflect current thinking on this topic. Section headers are Geologic Time, Relative Time Scale, Major Divisions of Geologic Time, Index Fossils, Radiometric Time Scale, and Age of the Earth.

1997-10-09

393

Thermal Maturity Data Used by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Gulf Coast Region Oil and Gas Assessment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is currently assessing the oil and natural gas resources of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico region using a total petroleum system approach. An essential part of this geologically based method is evaluating the effectiveness of potential source rocks in the petroleum system. The purpose of this report is to make available to the public RockEval and vitrinite reflectance data from more than 1,900 samples of Mesozoic and Tertiary rock core and coal samples in the Gulf of Mexico area in a format that facilitates inclusion into a geographic information system. These data provide parameters by which the thermal maturity, type, and richness of potential sources of oil and gas in this region can be evaluated.

Dennen, Kristin O.; Warwick, Peter D.; McDade, Elizabeth Chinn

2010-01-01

394

Historical development of the U.S. Geological Survey hydrologic monitoring and investigative programs at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1949 to 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a summary of the historical development, from 1949 to 2001, of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) hydrologic monitoring and investigative programs at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The report covers the USGS's water-level monitoring program, water-quality sampling program, geophysical program, geologic framework program, drilling program, modeling program, surface-water program, and unsaturated-zone program. The report provides physical information about the wells and information about the frequencies of sampling and measurement. Summaries of USGS published reports with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) report numbers also are provided in an appendix. This report was prepared by the USGS in cooperation with the DOE.

Knobel, LeRoy L.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Rousseau, Joseph P.

2005-01-01

395

Information relevant to the U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the Middle Devonian Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed the potential for natural gas resources in the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province. The Marcellus Shale was assessed as a continuous gas accumulation using a methodology identical to that used in the assessment of shale and other continuous-type assessment units throughout the United States. This preliminary report provides some additional geologic information used in the Marcellus Shale assessment. The Appalachian Basin Province encompasses rocks of the Paleozoic passive margins, the foreland basins, and fold and thrust belts formed during several episodes in the Paleozoic. The Marcellus Shale is one of many marine shales deposited in the area that is now encompassed by the Appalachian Basin Province.

USGS Marcellus Shale Assessment Team

2011-01-01

396

Geologic Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site provides an introduction to geologic maps. Topics covered include what is a geologic map, unique features of geologic maps, letter symbols, faults, and strike and dip. Users may click to view colored geologic maps, the geologic map of the United States and the geologic relief map of the United States.

Graymer, Russell

397

SOPAC marine geology atlases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Geological Survey conducted a series of marine geologic and geophysical cruises in the southwest Pacific Ocean in 1982 and 1984 as part of a program with participation by Australia and New Zealand. These two SOPAC expeditions obtained various data, which have been compiled into a series of charts and thematic products for the offshore areas of Tonga, Fiji,

T. E. Chase; B. A. Seekins; J. D. Young; J. A. Wahler

1986-01-01

398

Geologic Map Database of Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to release a digital geologic map database for the State of Texas. This database was compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Program, National Surveys and Analysis Project, whose goal is a nationwide assemblage of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This release makes the geologic data from the Geologic Map of Texas available in digital format. Original clear film positives provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology were photographically enlarged onto Mylar film. These films were scanned, georeferenced, digitized, and attributed by Geologic Data Systems (GDS), Inc., Denver, Colorado. Project oversight and quality control was the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey. ESRI ArcInfo coverages, AMLs, and shapefiles are provided.

Stoeser, Douglas B.; Shock, Nancy; Green, Gregory N.; Dumonceaux, Gayle M.; Heran, William D.

2005-01-01

399

Preliminary assessment of thoron exposure in Canada.  

PubMed

Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. (222)Rn (radon gas) and (220)Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In this study, thoron exposure in Canada was assessed based on three community radon/thoron surveys conducted recently. It was confirmed that thoron was detectable in most homes and thoron progeny were present in every home surveyed. Results demonstrated that thoron concentrations varied more widely than radon. No clear correlation between (222)Rn and (220)Rn concentrations was observed in simultaneous measurements. It is estimated that thoron contributes to about 7 % of the radiation dose due to indoor radon exposure based on measurements in about 260 individual homes. Because indoor measurements and geological gamma-ray surveys did not support a reasonable association between (222)Rn and (220)Rn, thoron concentrations could not be predicted from widely available indoor radon information. In order to better assess thoron exposure in Canada and thoron risk to the Canadian population in various geographic locations, more thoron progeny measurements are required. PMID:20966201

Chen, J; Dessau, J C; Frenette, E; Moir, D; Cornett, R J

2010-10-01

400

APPLICATION OF NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTICS TO EVALUATE THE COMPARABILITY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FROM TWO U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER-QUALITY LABORATORIES.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey operates two water-quality laboratories. The quality of data produced by each laboratory is judged primarily from an evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of reference samples. Quality-assurance reports that contain an analysis of the results obtained from chemical analysis of these reference materials by the two laboratories are prepared quarterly, and annual summaries of the data are published. The procedures that are used to determine whether a laboratory shows an overall lack of precision or bias involve the application of binomial distributions to the data.

Peart, Dale, B.; Friedman, Linda, C.

1984-01-01

401

Computing the Accuracy of Complex NonRandom Sampling Methods: The Case of the Bank of Canada's Business Outlook Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of central banks publish their own business conditions survey based on non-random sampling methods. The results of these surveys influence monetary policy decisions and thus affect expectations in financial markets. To date, however, no one has computed the statistical accuracy of these surveys because their respective non-random sampling method renders this assessment non-trivial. This paper describes a methodology

Daniel de Munnik; David Dupuis; Mark Illing

2009-01-01

402

The role and future of nuclear power in Canada  

SciTech Connect

Canada is rich in energy. Hydraulic power is the main source of electricity in Canada. The availability of natural resources and energy has guided the economic development of all the provinces. The Canadian Nuclear Association sponsored a survey of public attitudes in May of 1988. There appears to be less understanding of the actual supply of electricity and of the future natural resource availability. One out of five Canadians strongly opposes the use of nuclear energy. The CANDU type reactor proven to be a very economical and reliable choice in Canada. With the attention now being focused on the greenhouse effect and acid rain in Canada, opinion leaders, even in the traditionally antinuclear environmental community, are reconsidering the nuclear option. A significant hurdle has to be cleared in the relatively near future: a public review of the deep geologic high-level waste disposal concept. Groundwork has been laid to prepare for significant participation in a nuclear renaissance, across Canada and around the world.

Runnalls, O.J.C.

1989-01-01

403

Public Release of Estimated Impact-Based Earthquake Alerts - An Update to the U.S. Geological Survey PAGER System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has begun publicly releasing earthquake alerts for significant earthquakes around the globe based on estimates of potential casualties and economic losses. These estimates should significantly enhance the utility of the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system that has been providing estimated ShakeMaps and computing population exposures to specific shaking intensities since 2007. Quantifying earthquake impacts and communicating loss estimates (and their uncertainties) to the public has been the culmination of several important new and evolving components of the system. First, the operational PAGER system now relies on empirically-based loss models that account for estimated shaking hazard, population exposure, and employ country-specific fatality and economic loss functions derived using analyses of losses due to recent and past earthquakes. In some countries, our empirical loss models are informed in part by PAGER’s semi-empirical and analytical loss models, and building exposure and vulnerability data sets, all of which are being developed in parallel to the empirical approach. Second, human and economic loss information is now portrayed as a supplement to existing intensity/exposure content on both PAGER summary alert (available via cell phone/email) messages and web pages. Loss calculations also include estimates of the economic impact with respect to the country’s gross domestic product. Third, in order to facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake responses based on our probable loss estimates, in early 2010 we proposed a four-level Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS). Instead of simply issuing median estimates for losses—which can be easily misunderstood and misused—this scale provides ranges of losses from which potential responders can gauge expected overall impact from strong shaking. EIS is based on two complementary criteria: the estimated cost of damage, which is most suitable for U.S. domestic events; and estimated ranges of fatalities, which are generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in earthquake-vulnerable countries. Alert levels are characterized by alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered when estimated US dollar losses reach 1 million, 100 million, and 1 billion+ levels, respectively. Finally, alerting protocols now explicitly support EIS-based alerts. Critical users can receive PAGER alerts i) based on the EIS-based alert level, in addition to or as an alternative to magnitude and population/intensity exposure-based alerts, and ii) optionally, based on user-selected regions of the world. The essence of PAGER’s impact-based alerting is that actionable loss information is now available in the immediate aftermath of significant earthquakes worldwide based on quantifiable, albeit uncertain, loss estimates provided by the USGS.

Wald, D. J.; Jaiswal, K. S.; Marano, K.; Hearne, M.; Earle, P. S.; So, E.; Garcia, D.; Hayes, G. P.; Mathias, S.; Applegate, D.; Bausch, D.

2010-12-01

404

U.S. Geological Survey environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world  

USGS Publications Warehouse

America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, quality of life, and economic prosperity lead to environmental change. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will compound the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, synthetic chemicals and substances, natural earth materials, toxins, and other biogenic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau and providing it to environmental, natural resource, agricultural, and public health managers. USGS specializes in science at the environment-health interface, by characterizing the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, and the resulting factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents. The USGS is a Federal science agency with a broad range of natural science expertise relevant to environmental health. USGS provides scientific information and tools as a scientific basis for management and policy decisionmaking. This report describes a 10-year strategy that encompasses the portfolio of USGS environmental health science. It summarizes national environmental health priorities that USGS is best suited to address, and will serve as a strategic framework for USGS environmental health science goals, actions, and outcomes for the next decade. Implementation of this strategy is intended to aid coordination of USGS environmental health activities and to provide a focal point for disseminating information to stakeholders. The "One Health" paradigm advocated by the World Health Organization (WHO; World Health Organization, 2011), and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA; American Veterinary Medical Association, 2008), among others, is based on a general recognition that the health of humans, animals, and the environment are inextricably linked. Thus, successful efforts to protect that health will require increased interdisciplinary research and increased communication and collaboration among the broader scientific and health community. This strategy is built upon that paradigm.

Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross; Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

2013-01-01

405

U.S. Geological Survey input-data form and operational procedure for the assessment of conventional petroleum accumulations: Chapter 25 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey model for undiscovered conventional accumulations is designed to aid in the assessment of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids (collectively called petroleum) resources. Conventional accumulations may be described in terms of discrete fields or pools localized in structural and stratigraphic traps by the buoyancy of oil or natural gas in water. Conventional accumulations are commonly bounded by a down-dip water contact. The assessment model requires estimates of the number and sizes of undiscovered conventional accumulations. Technically recoverable petroleum resources from undiscovered conventional accumulations are calculated by statistically combining probability distributions of the estimated number and sizes of undiscovered accumulations, along with associated risks and coproduct ratios. Probabilistic estimates of petroleum resources are given for oil in oil accumulations, gas (associated/dissolved) in oil accumulations, natural gas liquids in oil accumulations, gas (nonassociated) in gas accumulations, and total liquids (oil and natural gas liquids) in gas accumulations.

Klett, T.R.; Schmoker, James W.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

2007-01-01

406

Information and Communication Technologies and Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada. A Survey of Providers Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in continuing health professional education (CHPE) was examined in a national survey of Canadian CHPE providers. Of the 3,044 surveys distributed to schools of medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, national/provincial health professional associations, nonprofit health advocacy organizations,…

Memorial Univ., St. John's (Newfoundland).

407

Comparative hydrocarbon geology of two Mesozoic Circum-Pacific foreland basins as function of sediment provenance: Surat basin, eastern Australia and western Canada basin  

SciTech Connect

The Surat basin in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, is a foreland basin formed in response to a magmatic arc during Early Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous time. It has a maximum basin-fill of about 2.5 km of Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sediments. The first commercial production of oil in Australia came from this basin in the early 1960s. The Western Canada basin is a retro-arc foreland basin with up to 3.5 km of sediments deposited during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. The basin was developed on the cratonward side of an arc/cordillera by plate convergence. It is a composite basin with sediments ranging in age from Devonian to Tertiary and is one of the prolific petroliferous basins of the world. The famous Athabasca-Peace River-Lloydminister tar sands alone contain a reserve of about 3 {times} 10{sup 12} barrels of oil, which exceeds three times the recoverable reserves of the world's known oil. The main sediment source was, in both basins, a rising arc/cordillera that shed a cratonward tapering clastic wedge into the flanking foreland basins. Sedimentation, in both cases, was episodic and the patterns of sedimentation in each present striking similarities. During the waxing phase of magmatism/orogeny in the arc/cordillera, the foreland subsided in response to flexural loading of the foreland fold-thrust belt and downward drag by the subducting plate. Continental synorogenic sediments were rapidly emplaced in mainly terrestrial environments into the subsiding foreland. These sediments are lithic-labile in nature and because of their physical and chemical reactivity are prone to be tight and thus of little hydrocarbon reservoir potential. During the waning phase of the arc/orogen the foreland gently rose in response partly to the cessation of drag (decoupling) by the subducting plate and to isostatic rebound (tectonic relaxation).

Hawlader, H.M. (Macquarie Univ. (Australia))

1990-06-01

408

Overview of Ontario Power Generation's Proposed Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Waste at the Bruce Site, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect

A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste is being proposed by Ontario Power Generation at the Bruce site near Kincardine, Ontario. The DGR would be located at a depth of approximately 680 m within a 200 m thick layer of low-permeability Ordovician argillaceous limestone, which is below a 200 m layer of low permeability Ordovician shale. The repository would have the capacity for approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} of as-disposed waste, sufficient for the current fleet of 20 OPG-owned nuclear reactors. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the project. In summary: Site-specific studies to confirm the suitability of the site to host the DGR were initiated in 2006. These studies include site characterization, environmental assessment, facility engineering and safety assessment. The preliminary results of this work, which is ongoing, continue to confirm our expectations that the site is suitable. (authors)

Gierszewski, P. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto (Canada)

2008-07-01

409

Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; in-bottle acid digestion of whole-water samples  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water samples for trace-metal determinations routinely have been prepared in open laboratories. For example, the U.S. Geological Survey method I-3485-85 (Extraction Procedure, for Water- Suspended Sediment) is performed in a laboratory hood on a laboratory bench without any special precautions to control airborne contamination. This method tends to be contamination prone for several trace metals primarily because the samples are transferred, acidified, digested, and filtered in an open laboratory environment. To reduce trace-metal contamination of digested water samples, procedures were established that rely on minimizing sample-transfer steps and using a class-100 clean bench during sample filtration. This new procedure involves the following steps: 1. The sample is acidified with HCl directly in the original water-sample bottle. 2. The water-sample bottle with the cap secured is heated in a laboratory oven. 3. The digestate is filtered in a class-100 laminar-flow clean bench. The exact conditions used (that is, oven temperature, time of heating, and filtration methods) for this digestion procedure are described. Comparisons between the previous U.S Geological Survey open-beaker method I-3485-85 and the new in-bottle procedure for synthetic and field-collected water samples are given. When the new procedure is used, blank concentrations for most trace metals determined are reduced significantly.

Hoffman, G. L.; Fishman, M. J.; Garbarino, J. R.

1996-01-01

410

Exploratory drilling in the Prairie du Chien group of the Wisconsin zinc-lead districts by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1949-1950  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey explored the Prairie du Chien group in the main productive area of the Wisconsin zinc-lead district during 1949-50. Eight properties--Crow Branch diggings, Leix, Harris, Spitzbarth, Kennedy, James, Raisbeck and Vinegar Hill Roaster--were explored using both diamond and churn drills. Twenty holes were drilled that totaled 8,582 feet in depth. The objectives of the exploration were to determine if the Prairie du Chien and other formations below the principal ore-bearing strata (Galena, Decorah, and Platteville formations) of the district are favorable for ore deposits, and to determine the type of ore deposits, if present. Lean deposits of sphalerite, marcasite, and pyrite were found in the Prairie du Chien on five properties--Crow Branch, Leix, Harris, Spitzbarth, and Vinegar Hill 1%ouster-and also in the Franconia sandstone on the Leix property. In the drilled area the sulfides in the Prairie du Chien group occur in certain more brittle or soluble dolomite beds that contain cavities formed by brecciation or solution.

Heyl, Allen Van; Lyons, Erwin J.; Agnew, Allen F.

1951-01-01

411

U.S. Geological Survey applied research studies of the Cheyenne River System, South Dakota; description and collation of data, water years 1987-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cheyenne River System in western South Dakota has been impacted by the discharge of about 100 million metric tons of gold-mill tailings to Whitewood Creek near Lead, South Dakota. In April 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated an extensive series of research studies to investigate the magnitude of the impact and to define important processes acting on the contaminated sediments present in the system. The report presents all data collected during the 1987 and 1988 water years for these research studies. Some of the data included have been published previously. Data collected in the 1985 and 1986 water years have been published in a companion report (U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 88-484). Hydrologic, geochemical, and biologic data are available for sites on Whitewood Creek, and the Belle Fourche and Cheyenne Rivers. Data complexity varies from routine discharge and water-quality to very complex energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Methods for sample collection, handling and preservation, and laboratory analysis are also presented. No interpretations or complex statistical summaries are included. (See also W89-08390) (USGS)

edited by Goddard, K. E.

1990-01-01

412

Geodatabase of sites, basin boundaries, and topology rules used to store drainage basin boundaries for the U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado Water Science Center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geodatabase and its component datasets are part of U.S. Geological Survey Digital Data Series 650 and were generated to store basin boundaries for U.S. Geological Survey streamgages and other sites in Colorado. The geodatabase and its components were created by the U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado Water Science Center, and are used to derive the numeric drainage areas for Colorado that are input into the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System (NWIS) database and also published in the Annual Water Data Report and on NWISWeb. The foundational dataset used to create the basin boundaries in this geodatabase was the National Watershed Boundary Dataset. This geodatabase accompanies a U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods report (Book 11, Section C, Chapter 6) entitled "Digital Database Architecture and Delineation Methodology for Deriving Drainage Basins, and Comparison of Digitally and Non-Digitally Derived Numeric Drainage Areas." The Techniques and Methods report details the geodatabase architecture, describes the delineation methodology and workflows used to develop these basin boundaries, and compares digitally derived numeric drainage areas in this geodatabase to non-digitally derived areas. 1. COBasins.gdb: This geodatabase contains site locations and basin boundaries for Colorado. It includes a single feature dataset, called BasinsFD, which groups the component feature classes and topology rules. 2. BasinsFD: This feature dataset in the "COBasins.gdb" geodatabase is a digital container that holds the feature classes used to archive site locations and basin boundaries as well as the topology rules that govern spatial relations within and among component feature classes. This feature dataset includes three feature classes: the sites for which basins have been delineated (the "Sites" feature class), basin bounding lines (the "BasinLines" feature class), and polygonal basin areas (the "BasinPolys" feature class). The feature dataset also stores the topology rules (the "BasinsFD_Topology") that constrain the relations within and among component feature classes. The feature dataset also forces any feature classes inside it to have a consistent projection system, which is, in this case, an Albers-Equal-Area projection system. 3. BasinsFD_Topology: This topology contains four persistent topology rules that constrain the spatial relations within the "BasinLines" feature class and between the "BasinLines" feature class and the "BasinPolys" feature classes. 4. Sites: This point feature class contains the digital representations of the site locations for which Colorado Water Science Center basin boundaries have been delineated. This feature class includes point locations for Colorado Water Science Center active (as of September 30, 2009) gages and for other sites. 5. BasinLines: This line feature class contains the perimeters of basins delineated for features in the "Sites" feature class, and it also contains information regarding the sources of lines used for the basin boundaries. 6. BasinPolys: This polygon feature class contains the polygonal basin areas delineated for features in the "Sites" feature class, and it is used to derive the numeric drainage areas published by the Colorado Water Science Center.

Dupree, Jean A.; Crowfoot, Richard M.

2012-01-01

413

Accommodating the medical use of marijuana: surveying the differing legal approaches in Australia, the United States and Canada.  

PubMed

While the scientific and medical communities continue to be divided on the therapeutic benefits and risks of cannabis use, anecdotal evidence from medical users themselves suggests that using cannabis is indeed improving their quality of life by alleviating their pain and discomfort. Notwithstanding the benefits anecdotally claimed by these medical users and the existence of some scientific studies confirming their claims, criminal drug laws in all Australian and most United States jurisdictions continue to prohibit the possession, cultivation and supply of cannabis even for medical purposes. However, in contrast to Australia and most parts of the United States, the medical use of cannabis has been legal in Canada for about a decade. This article reviews these differing legal and regulatory approaches to accommodating the medical use of cannabis (namely, marijuana) as well as some of the challenges involved in legalising it for medical purposes. PMID:20329455

Bogdanoski, Tony

2010-02-01

414

Combining Geological, Geodetic, and Tide-Gauge Data to Estimate Coastal Subsidence and Flooding Hazards in the Mackenzie Delta, Western Arctic Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Relative sea-level trends across the Canadian Arctic are highly variable, in part because of the strong imprint of postglacial isostatic adjustment. In many parts of the central Arctic, ongoing uplift exceeds the rate of regional sea-level rise, resulting in continued coastal emergence. In peripheral areas such as the western Arctic coastal plain, models and geological evidence point to ongoing subsidence, adding to relative sea-level (RSL) rise in the Beaufort-Mackenzie region. Additional sources of subsidence in the Mackenzie Delta include long-term sediment loading and sediment compaction, as well as thaw subsidence where thermal changes such as deeper seasonal thaw lead to melting of excess ground ice. Compaction is reduced in ice-bonded sediments and the thickness of ice bonding varies with the depth of permafrost, which ranges from 0 to 100 m in the main body of the Holocene delta and >500 m in areas outside the main valley fill. Ice-bonding is reduced or absent in thaw taliks beneath deep lakes and channels. Differential subsidence rates may play a role in maintaining or expanding lake area on the delta plain and in promoting delta-front erosion. Beginning in 2001, we have established an Arctic network of continuous GPS (CGPS) stations, including CGPS co-located with tide gauges at Tuktoyaktuk and Ulukhaktok. Fixed monuments for episodic GPS observations have been established and occupied repeatedly in the Mackenzie Delta and we are currently developing a network of fixed reflectors for persistent-scatterer InSAR. Velocities from the North American Reference Frame Working Group (consistent with rates from JPL and SOPAC) indicate positive values (uplift) at all CGPS stations, even in the Beaufort-Mackenzie region. However, the long-term tide-gauge record at Tuktoyaktuk shows a 45-year rising RSL trend (1961-2006) of +3.5±1.3 mm/a. If sea-level rise in the Beaufort Sea has been comparable to the global mean trend during this interval, the implied motion at Tuktoyaktuk is about -1.7±1.8 mm/a (subsidence). Preliminary GPS results from the Mackenzie Delta indicate natural subsidence ranging from 0 to 20 mm/a. These results are being used in the environmental review of proposed natural gas production and transportation facilities. Impacts of natural and potential induced subsidence on nesting waterfowl habitat are being assessed by simulating effects on flooding frequency using high-resolution digital elevation models derived from scanning airborne laser altimetry (LiDAR).

Forbes, D. L.; Craymer, M.; Henton, J.; Herron, T.; Kokelj, S.; Lapelle, E.; Manson, G. K.; Marsh, P.; Mazzotti, S.; Piraszewski, M.; Solomon, S. M.; Whalen, D.

2007-12-01

415

Geophysical Surveys of the Northern North Carolina Inner Continental Shelf Show Geologic Framework, Modern Sediment Distribution and Sediment Transport Patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have recently mapped the inner continental shelf off the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina using sidescan sonar, interferometric swath bathymetry, and high-resolution CHIRP and boomer subbottom profiling systems. The study area is approximately 170 km long by 11 km wide, extending from False Cape, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC, in water depths ranging from 7 m (mid-shoreface) to 34 m (inner shelf). Late Pleistocene stratigraphic units provide the basic, shallow geologic framework of this region. Regional to local-scale variations in the geometry and lithology of these units dictate the character of sediments on the sea floor as shown by sidescan sonar imagery. For example, areas of high acoustic backscatter typically correspond to coarse-grained, fluvial and marine sediments representing several Pleistocene units that crop out on the sea floor. The distribution of Recent sediment (above the Holocene ravinement surface) on the shoreface and inner shelf suggests that sediment availability is controlled by the underlying geologic framework, which influences the geomorphology of the overall barrier island system. For example, sediment-rich coastal segments have wide, accretionary barriers dominated by beach ridges; sediment-starved coastal segments have narrow, washover-dominated barriers. The large shoal complexes in the study area, False Cape, Platt, Wimble and Kinnakeet, are composed of both underlying indurated sediments and mobile sand bodies. Historical bathymetric comparisons indicate that large volumes of sediment in these complexes are moving hundreds of meters in tens of years. Sediment transport patterns inferred from the analysis of modern bedforms suggest that the inherited paleo-topography of the present sea floor may exert a primary influence on near-bottom currents and thus sediment transport pathways. When viewed in a larger context with other studies of this area, it appears that inner shelf geology and the regional coastal sediment budget are coupled in complex but understandable ways over time scales ranging from storm events to millennia.

T