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Sample records for canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar

  1. Natural occurrence and growth reaction on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar of non-neoformans Cryptococcus spp. in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tay, S T; Na, S L; Tajuddin, T H

    2008-11-01

    Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii were the predominant non-neoformans cryptococci isolated during an environmental sampling study for C. gattii at Klang Valley, Malaysia. Cryptococcus gattii was not isolated from any of the environmental samples. Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii were isolated mainly from vegetative samples of Eucalyptus trees and bird droppings. Upon testing on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue (CGB) agar, all the C. albidus isolates remained unchanged. Interestingly, a total of 29 (76.3%) C. laurentii isolates formed blue colours on the CGB agar. Sequence analysis of ITS1-5.8rDNA-ITS2 gene sequences (468 bp) of four CGB-blue C. laurentii isolates demonstrated the closest match (99%) with that of C. laurentii CBS 7140. This study demonstrated the diverse environmental niche of C. albidus and C. laurentii in Malaysia. PMID:18498307

  2. Identification of Cryptococcus gattii by use of L-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue medium and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Klein, K R; Hall, L; Deml, S M; Rysavy, J M; Wohlfiel, S L; Wengenack, N L

    2009-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are closely related pathogenic fungi. Cryptococcus neoformans is ecologically widespread and affects primarily immunocompromised patients, while C. gattii is traditionally found in tropical climates and has been reported to cause disease in immunocompetent patients. l-Canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar can be used to differentiate C. neoformans and C. gattii, but there are few reports of its performance in routine clinical practice. Growth of C. gattii on CGB agar produces a blue color, indicating the assimilation of glycine, while C. neoformans fails to cause a color change. Using reference and clinical strains, we evaluated the ability of CGB agar and D2 large ribosomal subunit DNA sequencing (D2 LSU) to differentiate C. neoformans and C. gattii. One hundred two yeast isolates were screened for urease activity, melanin production, and glycine assimilation on CGB agar as well as by D2 sequencing. Seventeen of 17 (100%) C. gattii isolates were CGB positive, and 54 of 54 C. neoformans isolates were CGB negative. Several yeast isolates other than the C. gattii isolates were CGB agar positive, indicating that CGB agar cannot be used alone for identification of C. gattii. D2 correctly identified and differentiated all C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates. This study demonstrates that the use of CGB agar, in conjunction with urea hydrolysis and Niger seed agar, or D2 LSU sequencing can be reliably used in the clinical laboratory to distinguish C. gattii from C. neoformans. We describe how CGB agar and D2 sequencing have been incorporated into the yeast identification algorithm in our laboratory. PMID:19794048

  3. Identification of Cryptococcus gattii by Use of l-Canavanine Glycine Bromothymol Blue Medium and DNA Sequencing?

    PubMed Central

    Klein, K. R.; Hall, L.; Deml, S. M.; Rysavy, J. M.; Wohlfiel, S. L.; Wengenack, N. L.

    2009-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are closely related pathogenic fungi. Cryptococcus neoformans is ecologically widespread and affects primarily immunocompromised patients, while C. gattii is traditionally found in tropical climates and has been reported to cause disease in immunocompetent patients. l-Canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar can be used to differentiate C. neoformans and C. gattii, but there are few reports of its performance in routine clinical practice. Growth of C. gattii on CGB agar produces a blue color, indicating the assimilation of glycine, while C. neoformans fails to cause a color change. Using reference and clinical strains, we evaluated the ability of CGB agar and D2 large ribosomal subunit DNA sequencing (D2 LSU) to differentiate C. neoformans and C. gattii. One hundred two yeast isolates were screened for urease activity, melanin production, and glycine assimilation on CGB agar as well as by D2 sequencing. Seventeen of 17 (100%) C. gattii isolates were CGB positive, and 54 of 54 C. neoformans isolates were CGB negative. Several yeast isolates other than the C. gattii isolates were CGB agar positive, indicating that CGB agar cannot be used alone for identification of C. gattii. D2 correctly identified and differentiated all C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates. This study demonstrates that the use of CGB agar, in conjunction with urea hydrolysis and Niger seed agar, or D2 LSU sequencing can be reliably used in the clinical laboratory to distinguish C. gattii from C. neoformans. We describe how CGB agar and D2 sequencing have been incorporated into the yeast identification algorithm in our laboratory. PMID:19794048

  4. Histopathology, serology and cultures in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Alexandra Flvia; Severo, Ceclia Bittencourt; Salles, Emily Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is one of the most common opportunistic fungal infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report 13 cases of cryptococcal infection based on histopathology, serology and cultures. Epidemiological analysis, histochemical techniques of hematoxilin and eosin (HE) and Grocot's silver (GMS), as well special histochemical techniques such as Mayer's mucicarmine (MM) and Fontana-Masson (FM), cryptococcal antigen test (CrAg) and isolation on fungal media: Sabouraud's (SAB), brain-heart infusion agar (BHI) and canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue (CGB) agar were analyzed. Unsatisfactory staining results by MM stain associated to negative titers by CrAg test, which FM stain confirmed that capsule-deficient Cryptococcus infections were observed in four cases. Eight isolated cases were identified as follows: six cases were infection with Cryptococcus neoformans and two cases were Cryptococcus gattii. PMID:19893977

  5. ACINETOBACTER SPP.: DISTINCT MORPHOLOGY ON EOSIN METHYLENE BLUE AGAR AS AN AID TO IDENTIFICATION IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    'Acinetobacter calcoaceticus', frequently found in drinking waters and implicated in nosocomial infections, was presumptively identified by its tiny, blue colonial appearance on Levine eosin methylene blue agar. All of the 33 isolates from drinking water showing this distinctive ...

  6. Presumptive Identification of Candida kefyr on Levine Formulation of Eosin Methylene Blue Agar

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik L.; Troy, Dennis R.; Weber, Joanne K.; Messer, Shawn A.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Three hundred thirty-one yeast and yeast-like isolates were cultivated on eosin methylene blue agar. While the sensitivity rate for Candida kefyr isolates producing a metallic green sheen was 81.8%, the high positive predictive value (100%) for yeast isolates with this phenotype belonging to C. kefyr suggests that these isolates can be presumptively identified as C. kefyr. PMID:12409410

  7. Cryptococcus species identification by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Leal, Ana Lusia; Faganello, Josiane; Bassanesi, Maria Cristina; Vainstein, Marilene H

    2008-06-01

    Members of the Cryptococcus species complex are encapsulated basidiomycetous yeasts, which can affect the central nervous system (CNS) and if untreated may cause meningitis. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections mainly in immunocompromised individuals. Cryptococcus gattii is a primary pathogen responsible for a high incidence of cryptococcomas in the lung and brain and shows a delayed response to antifungal therapy. The differentiation between the two species is primarily based on their growth on and color change of canavanine - glycine-bromothymol blue agar (CGB). Since this test is not always reliable, a multiplex PCR to identify both Cryptococcus species using more than 130 samples was standardized and the results obtained compared to those with the CGB test, using the Crypto Check serotyping kit as the standard. The multiplex PCR was shown to be more specific than the CGB test, in that results obtained with it were in agreement with those from serotyping all the samples, while the data from the CGB test disagreed with 6 out of 131 samples. PMID:18415847

  8. First report on Cryptococcus neoformans in pigeon excreta from public and residential locations in the metropolitan area of Cuiabá, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Doracilde Terumi; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Trilles, Luciana; Dutra, Valéria; Paula, Daphine Ariadne Jesus de; Nakazato, Luciano; Anzai, Mariana Caselli; Leite Júnior, Diniz Pereira; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a severe systemic mycosis caused by two species of Cryptococcus that affect humans and animals: C. neoformans and C. gattii. Cosmopolitan and emergent, the mycosis results from the interaction between a susceptible host and the environment. The occurrence of C. neoformans was evaluated in 122 samples of dried pigeon excreta collected in 49 locations in the City of Cuiabá, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil, including public squares (n = 5), churches (n = 4), educational institutions (n = 3), health units (n = 8), open areas covered with asbestos (n = 4), residences (n = 23), factory (n = 1) and a prison (n = 1). Samples collected from July to December of 2010 were seeded on Niger seed agar (NSA). Dark brown colonies were identified by urease test, carbon source assimilation tests and canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue medium. Polymerase chain reaction primer pairs specific for C. neoformans were also used for identification. Cryptococcus neoformans associated to pigeon excreta was isolated from eight (6.6%) samples corresponding to six (12.2%) locations. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from urban areas, predominantly in residences, constituting a risk of acquiring the disease by immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. PMID:24213188

  9. FIRST REPORT ON Cryptococcus neoformans IN PIGEON EXCRETA FROM PUBLIC AND RESIDENTIAL LOCATIONS IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF CUIAB, STATE OF MATO GROSSO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Doracilde Terumi; Lazra, Mrcia dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Trilles, Luciana; Dutra, Valria; de Paula, Daphine Ariadne Jesus; Nakazato, Luciano; Anzai, Mariana Caselli; Leite, Diniz Pereira; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryptococcosis is a severe systemic mycosis caused by two species of Cryptococcus that affect humans and animals: C. neoformans and C. gattii. Cosmopolitan and emergent, the mycosis results from the interaction between a susceptible host and the environment. The occurrence of C. neoformans was evaluated in 122 samples of dried pigeon excreta collected in 49 locations in the City of Cuiab, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil, including public squares (n = 5), churches (n = 4), educational institutions (n = 3), health units (n = 8), open areas covered with asbestos (n = 4), residences (n = 23), factory (n = 1) and a prison (n = 1). Samples collected from July to December of 2010 were seeded on Niger seed agar (NSA). Dark brown colonies were identified by urease test, carbon source assimilation tests and canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue medium. Polymerase chain reaction primer pairs specific for C. neoformans were also used for identification. Cryptococcus neoformans associated to pigeon excreta was isolated from eight (6.6%) samples corresponding to six (12.2%) locations. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from urban areas, predominantly in residences, constituting a risk of acquiring the disease by immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. PMID:24213188

  10. Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii by use of rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E; Seah, Christine; Hoang, Linda; Fothergill, Annette; Zhang, Sean X

    2011-07-01

    Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii is imperative for facilitation of prompt treatment of cryptococcosis and for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. Our purpose was to evaluate a test algorithm incorporating commercial rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequence analysis that will allow us to differentiate these taxa rapidly and accurately. We assessed 147 type, reference, and clinical isolates, including 6 other Cryptococcus spp. (10 isolates) and 14 other yeast species (24 isolates), using a 4-hour urea broth test (Remel), a 24-hour urea broth test (Becton Dickinson), a 4-hour caffeic acid disk test (Hardy Diagnostics and Remel), 40- to 44-hour growth assessment on l-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar, and intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence analysis. All 123 Cryptococcus isolates hydrolyzed urea, along with 7 isolates of Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. Eighty-five of 86 C. neoformans (99%) and 26 of 27 C. gattii (96%) isolates had positive caffeic acid results, unlike the other cryptococci (0/10) and yeast species (0/24). Together, these two tests positively identified virtually all C. neoformans/C. gattii isolates (98%) within 4 h. CGB agar or IGS sequencing further differentiated these isolates within 48 h. On CGB, 25 of 27 (93%) C. gattii strains induced a blue color change, in contrast to 0 of 86 C. neoformans isolates. Neighbor-joining cluster analysis of IGS sequences differentiated C. neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii. Based on these results, we describe a rapid identification algorithm for use in a microbiology laboratory to distinguish clinically relevant Cryptococcus spp. PMID:21593254

  11. Rapid Identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii by Use of Rapid Biochemical Tests, Differential Media, and DNA Sequencing ?

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E.; Seah, Christine; Hoang, Linda; Fothergill, Annette; Zhang, Sean X.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii is imperative for facilitation of prompt treatment of cryptococcosis and for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. Our purpose was to evaluate a test algorithm incorporating commercial rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequence analysis that will allow us to differentiate these taxa rapidly and accurately. We assessed 147 type, reference, and clinical isolates, including 6 other Cryptococcus spp. (10 isolates) and 14 other yeast species (24 isolates), using a 4-hour urea broth test (Remel), a 24-hour urea broth test (Becton Dickinson), a 4-hour caffeic acid disk test (Hardy Diagnostics and Remel), 40- to 44-hour growth assessment on l-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar, and intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence analysis. All 123 Cryptococcus isolates hydrolyzed urea, along with 7 isolates of Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. Eighty-five of 86 C. neoformans (99%) and 26 of 27 C. gattii (96%) isolates had positive caffeic acid results, unlike the other cryptococci (0/10) and yeast species (0/24). Together, these two tests positively identified virtually all C. neoformans/C. gattii isolates (98%) within 4 h. CGB agar or IGS sequencing further differentiated these isolates within 48 h. On CGB, 25 of 27 (93%) C. gattii strains induced a blue color change, in contrast to 0 of 86 C. neoformans isolates. Neighbor-joining cluster analysis of IGS sequences differentiated C. neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii. Based on these results, we describe a rapid identification algorithm for use in a microbiology laboratory to distinguish clinically relevant Cryptococcus spp. PMID:21593254

  12. Cryptococcus spp isolated from dust microhabitat in Brazilian libraries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Cryptococcus spp is currently composed of encapsulated yeasts of cosmopolitan distribution, including the etiological agents of cryptococcosis. The fungus are found mainly in substrates of animal and plant origin. Human infection occurs through inhalation of spores present in the environment. Methods Eighty-four swab collections were performed on dust found on books in three libraries in the city of Cuiab, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The material was seeded in Sabouraud agar and then observed for characteristics compatible with colonies with a creamy to mucous aspect; the material was then isolated in birdseed (Niger) agar and cultivated at a temperature of 37C for 5 to 7?days. Identification of isolated colonies was performed by microscopic observation in fresh preparations dyed with India ink, additional tests performed on CGB (L-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue), urea broth, and carbohydrate assimilation tests (auxanogram). Results Of the 84 samples collected from book dust, 18 (21.4%) were positive for Cryptococcus spp totalizing 41 UFCs. The most frequently isolated species was C. gattii 15 (36.6%); followed by C. terreus, 12 (29.3%); C. luteolus 4 (9.8%); C. neoformans, and C. uniguttulatus 3 (7.3%), and C. albidus and C. humiculus with 2 (4.6%) of the isolates. Conclusion The high biodiversity of the yeasts of the Cryptococcus genus, isolated from different environmental sources in urban areas of Brazil suggests the possibility of individuals whose immune systems have been compromised or even healthy individuals coming into sources of fungal propagules on a daily bases throughout their lives. This study demonstrates the acquisition possible of cryptococcosis infection from dust in libraries. PMID:22682392

  13. Cryptococcus gattii-Induced Infections in Dogs from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Di Santis, Giovana Wingeter; de Alcntara, Brgida Kussumoto; Costa, Thais Correa; da Silva, Elisangela Olegrio; Pretto-Giordano, Lucienne Garcia; Gomes, Lucas Alcio; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Bracarense, Ana Paula Frederico R L

    2015-10-01

    Cryptococcus gattii-induced cryptococcosis is an emerging infectious disease of humans and animals worldwide, with rare descriptions of this infection in domestic animals from Brazil. This study presents the findings associated with C. gattii in dogs from Londrina, Paran, Southern Brazil. Two dogs, a 3-year-old, female German shepherd and a 6-year-old, male Boxer, were evaluated by a combination of pathological, mycological, and molecular diagnostic techniques. Significant pathological alterations included cryptococcal lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, tonsillitis, and rhinitis with nasal cryptococcomas in the German shepherd dog, while cryptococcal lymphadenitis and pneumonia were observed in the Boxer; both dogs had pseudocystic cryptococcosis. The mucicarmine histochemical stain readily identified the intralesional cryptococcal budding organisms in all affected tissues. Mycological culture and isolation confirmed the yeasts as C. gattii due to positive reaction with the L-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue agar. A PCR assay using the internal transcribed spacers (ITS)1 and ITS2 primers, which target the ITS1 and 2 regions including the 5.8S rRNA gene, amplified the desired amplicons; direct sequencing confirmed the isolate as C. gattii. ITS nucleotide differentiation demonstrated that the isolate forms part of the ITS type 4 Cryptococcus organisms which corresponds to the C. gattii VGII molecular subtype or the RAPD type 2 Cryptococcus organisms. Collectively, these findings confirmed the participation of C. gattii in the etiopathogenesis of the lesions observed in these dogs and expanded the epidemiological niche of this important mycotic agent to include Southern Brazil. It is noteworthy to mention that previous epidemiological studies have suggested that C. gattii-induced cryptococcosis is more frequently diagnosed in Northern relative to Southern Brazil, so these findings might suggest an expansion of the distribution of this agent within continental Brazil. PMID:26025661

  14. Agar Diffusion Procedures for Susceptibility Testing of Malassezia pachydermatis: Evaluation of Mueller-Hinton Agar Plus 2 % Glucose and 0.5 g/ml Methylene Blue as the Test Medium.

    PubMed

    Pasquetti, M; Chiavassa, E; Tizzani, P; Danesi, P; Peano, A

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study was to verify whether Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2 % glucose and methylene blue (MH-GM), which is used for disk diffusion susceptibility testing of Candida species by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, is suitable for testing Malassezia pachydermatis. A variant of the disk diffusion procedure utilizing a 9-mm tablet was used to test 31 isolates against clotrimazole and miconazole using MH-GM as test medium. The MH-GM agar optimally supported the growth of all M. pachydermatis isolates, provided that the yeast inoculum was prepared with a lipid source (Tween 40 and 80). Zone edges were frequently definite and clear, facilitating the measurement of zone size and minimizing subjectivity. The inhibition zones correlated with MIC values obtained in a broth dilution assay. The agar diffusion method with MH-GM as the test medium appears as a suitable procedure for testing the susceptibility of M. pachydermatis to CTZ and MCZ in clinical laboratories. This test format may allow processing a large number of isolates in epidemiological studies. This may in turn facilitate clarifying to what extent the problem "drug resistance" accounts for cases of treatment failure in dogs with Malassezia otitis and dermatitis. PMID:26138434

  15. Genotypic diversity of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans isolates from Northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Sampaio, Ana; Maduro, Ana Paula; Silva, Ins; Teles, Fernando; Martins, Maria da Luz; Incio, Joo

    2014-02-01

    The Cryptococcus neoformans/C.gattii species complex members are the main agents of systemic cryptococcosis. This disease is believed to be acquired from the environment via fungal cell inhalation. Often, isolates recovered from environmental and clinical sources have proven to be genotypically similar. We assessed the occurrence of C.neoformans and C.gattii in environmental substrates collected in a Portuguese region. Twenty-eight isolates were identified as C.neoformans - five from decaying Eucalyptus leaves and 23 from domestic pigeon droppings. The isolates were genotyped using a URA5-RFLP approach. The C. neoformans VNIV (53.6%, n=15) and VNI (32.1%, n=9) genotypes were abundantly present among environmental isolates. The hybrid VNIII (14.3%, n=4) genotype was underrepresented and the VNII was not found. Cryptococcus gattii was also not found although some isolates yielded a positive canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue test. PMID:23848429

  16. Comparison of biotyping methods as alternative identification tools to molecular typing of pathogenic Cryptococcus species in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Nyazika, Tinashe K; Robertson, Valerie J; Nherera, Brenda; Mapondera, Prichard T; Meis, Jacques F; Hagen, Ferry

    2016-03-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the leading fungal infection and AIDS defining opportunistic illness in patients with late stage HIV infection, particularly in South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Given the high mortality, clinical differences and the extensive ecological niche of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii species complexes, there is need for laboratories in sub-Sahara African countries to adopt new and alternative reliable diagnostic algorithms that rapidly identify and distinguish these species. We biotyped 74 and then amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genotyped 66 Cryptococcus isolates from a cohort of patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis. C. gattii sensu lato was isolated at a prevalence of 16.7% (n = 11/66) and C. neoformans sensu stricto was responsible for 83.3% (n = 55/66) of the infections. l-Canavanine glycine bromothymol blue, yeast-carbon-base-d-proline-d-tryptophan and creatinine dextrose bromothymol blue thymine were able to distinguish pathogenic C. gattii sensu lato from C. neoformans sensu stricto species when compared with AFLP genotyping. This study demonstrates high C. gattii sensu lato prevalence in Zimbabwe. In addition, biotyping methods can be used as alternative diagnostic tools to molecular typing in resource-limited areas for differentiating pathogenic Cryptococcus species. PMID:26661484

  17. Antifungal susceptibilities of Cryptococcus neoformans cerebrospinal fluid isolates from AIDS patients in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mdodo, Rennatus; Moser, Stephen A; Jaoko, Walter; Baddley, John; Pappas, Peter; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette; Aban, Inmaculada; Odera, Susan; Jolly, Pauline

    2011-09-01

    Poor susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to fluconazole (FLC) is a matter of concern among clinicians in Africa. The emergence of resistance to FLC was recently reported in Kenya, but it is not known whether it is widespread. Thus, there is need for more antifungal drug susceptibility studies in Kenya. The aim of this study was to measure the in vitro antifungal drug susceptibilities of incident C. neoformans isolates from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Kenya. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed in 67 C. neoformans isolates by broth microdilution method as outlined in the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute document M27-A3 using FLC, amphotericin B (AMB), voriconazole (VOR), ravuconazole (RAV) and flucytosine (5-FC). Isolates were grown on l-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue medium for serotype identification. Six per cent of the isolates were identified as C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B or C and 94% as C. neoformans var. neoformans. All isolates tested were susceptible to AMB, VOR and RAV (100%), and high susceptibilities were seen to FLC (97%), and 5-FC (90%). Only 3% and 10% of the isolates' susceptibility to FLC and 5-FC, respectively, was dose-dependent or intermediate. These results demonstrate high susceptibilities of incident C. neoformans isolates to FLC and AMB, antifungals used for treatment of cryptococcal meningitis in Kenya. PMID:21535451

  18. Genotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans isolated from captive birds in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Mora, Delio Jose; Pedrosa, Andr Luiz; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Silva-Vergara, Mario Len

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate Cryptococcus spp. molecular types isolated from captive birds' droppings, an epidemiological survey was carried out in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil, from December 2006 to September 2008. A total of 253 samples of bird excreta (120 fresh and 133 dry) were collected from pet shop cages and houses in different neighbourhoods. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated in 19 (14.28%) dry samples and one fresh sample (0.84%). Cryptococcus laurentii was recovered from seven (5.26%) dry samples, but not in the fresh samples. The canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue test was positive in all but one of the C. laurentii isolates. Cryptococcus neoformans molecular typing was performed using URA5-RFLP and the mating type locus using mating type specific PCR. Nineteen (95.0%) presented genotype VNI and one VNII (5.0%). In addition, all isolates presented mating type ?. Thus, the genotype of the environmental C. neoformans isolates observed in this study is in accordance with others already reported around the world and adds information about its distribution in Brazil. Cryptococcus laurentii strains were typed using URA5-RFLP and M13 fingerprinting, which showed similar profiles among them. Thus, despite the low number of C. laurentii isolates analysed, their molecular profile is different from another already reported. PMID:20492533

  19. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a dried, hydrophyllic,...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  2. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  3. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1115 Agar-agar. (a) Agar-agar (CAS Reg. No. PM 9002-18-0) is a...

  8. Electro-osmosis in gels: Application to Agar-Agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, Fabien; Boscus, Jrme; Bnet, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    Widely used in food- and bio-engineering as a reference material, Agar-Agar gel is the focus of an experimental investigation concerning the electro-osmosis phenomenon. After presenting the experimental methods, one trial is discussed in detail. A fair reproducibility of results is obtained, and the averaged electro-osmotic permeability is provided. This value lies in the range generally measured on various kind of soils, even if Agar-Agar gel does not share any micro-structural characteristics with soils. To cite this article: F. Cherblanc et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. 21 CFR 184.1115 - Agar-agar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Agar-agar. 184.1115 Section 184.1115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  10. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  11. Agar degradation by microorganisms and agar-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Won-Jae; Chang, Yong-Keun; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2012-05-01

    Agar is a mixture of heterogeneous galactans, mainly composed of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactoses (or L-galactose-6-sulfates) D-galactoses and L-galactoses (routinely in the forms of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactoses or L-galactose-6-sulfates) alternately linked by β-(1,4) and α-(1,3) linkages. It is a major component of the cell walls of red algae and has been used in a variety of laboratory and industrial applications, owing to its jellifying properties. Many microorganisms that can hydrolyze and metabolize agar as a carbon and energy source have been identified in seawater and marine sediments. Agarolytic microorganisms commonly produce agarases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of agar. Numerous agarases have been identified in microorganisms of various genera. They are classified according to their cleavage pattern into three types-α-agarase, β-agarase, and β-porphyranase. Although, in a broad sense, many other agarases are involved in complete hydrolysis of agar, most of those identified are β-agarases. In this article we review agarolytic microorganisms and their agar-hydrolyzing systems, covering β-agarases as well as α-agarases, α-neoagarobiose hydrolases, and β-porphyranases, with emphasis on the recent discoveries. We also present an overview of the biochemical and structural characteristics of the various types of agarases. Further, we summarize and compare the agar-hydrolyzing systems of two specific microorganisms: Gram-negative Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 and Gram-positive Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). We conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of agarases and their possible future application in producing oligosaccharides with various nutraceutical activities and in sustainably generating stock chemicals for biorefinement and bioenergy. PMID:22526785

  12. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  13. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  14. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  15. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  16. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  17. Blue on Blues.

    PubMed

    Edlin, M

    1998-05-01

    Activists and regulators won't let Blue Cross & Blue Shield plans forget their roots. In fact, when these historic not-for-profits announce intentions to merge with other Blues or go for-profit, states demand repayment for years of foregone taxes. Charity has become the spoiler, dashing deal after deal. PMID:9646734

  18. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITSINTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  19. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  20. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics. PMID:18274277

  1. Prussian Blue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training and Education Social Media What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health ... blue work? Who can take Prussian blue? How is Prussian blue given? What are the side effects of Prussian blue? Where can I get Prussian ...

  2. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600....4600 Ouchterlony agar plate. (a) Identification. An ouchterlony agar plate for clinical use is a device containing an agar gel used to examine antigen-antibody reactions. In immunodiffusion, antibodies...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600....4600 Ouchterlony agar plate. (a) Identification. An ouchterlony agar plate for clinical use is a device containing an agar gel used to examine antigen-antibody reactions. In immunodiffusion, antibodies...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600....4600 Ouchterlony agar plate. (a) Identification. An ouchterlony agar plate for clinical use is a device containing an agar gel used to examine antigen-antibody reactions. In immunodiffusion, antibodies...

  5. A new selective and differential agar medium for Escherichia coli and coliform organisms.

    PubMed

    Wright, R C

    1984-06-01

    An enriched lauryl sulphate-aniline blue agar medium which is selective for Escherichia coli and coliform organisms is described. From faecal samples, the medium gave higher counts of colonies producing acid from lactose than media containing bile salts. From contaminated water and food samples, the medium gave comparable or higher counts of colonies identified as E. coli than standard media. Colonies of E. coli were more readily differentiated from those of other coliform organisms. PMID:6378872

  6. Evaluation of Rambach agar for detection of Salmonella subspecies I to VI.

    PubMed Central

    Khn, H; Wonde, B; Rabsch, W; Reissbrodt, R

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella strains belonging to subspecies I to VI were investigated for colony color when grown on Rambach agar. Most strains of Salmonella subspecies I, II, IV, and VI behaved as described. All strains of Salmonella subspecies IIIa, IIIb, and V produced beta-D-galactosidase and blue-green colonies which could not be distinguished in color from Escherichia coli and other lactose-fermenting members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:8135525

  7. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ? 2.0 and g ? 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample. PMID:25924317

  8. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirović, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Micić Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation experiments were performed to determine the impact of agar agar on the reactivity of milled ZVI and investigate the apparent corrosion rate of particles by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic corrosion of milled ZVI. The results indicate that agar agar had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability and mobility, however adverse impact on the reactivity towards trichloroethene (TCE) was observed compared to the non-stabilized material. On the other hand, this study shows that the apparent corrosion rate of non-stabilized and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles is in the same order of magnitude. These data indicate that the dechlorination pathway of TCE by agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles is possibly impacted by blocking of the reactive sites and not hydrogen revealed during particles corrosion. Finally, calculated longevity of the particles based on the apparent corrosion rate is significantly prolonged compared to the longevity of the nZVI particles reported in previous studies. This research receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n°309517.

  9. Automatic surface inoculation of agar trays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.; Boykin, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a machine and technique for the automatic inoculation of a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture, using either a conventional inoculation loop or a cotton swab. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. The described technique makes possible the visualization of the overall qualitative and, to some extent, quantitative relationships of various bacterial types in a sample tested.

  10. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amount of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis that consists in the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of the solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often lose contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is a priori difficult to anticipate since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on the syneresis phenomena in agar plates that consist in Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time $t^*$ is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, $t^*$ is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness $e_{min}$ measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of $e_{min}$ independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by the water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  11. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates.

    PubMed

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-05-14

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amounts of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis, which consists of the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often loses contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is difficult to anticipate a priori, since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on syneresis phenomena in agar plates, which consist of Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time t* is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, t* is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness emin measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of emin, independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels. PMID:25812667

  12. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  13. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  14. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium. PMID:25842535

  15. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  16. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hilia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (?80 C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials. PMID:26116384

  17. Primary Klebsiella identification with MacConkey-inositol-carbenicillin agar.

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, S T; Seidler, R J

    1978-01-01

    MacConkey-inositol-carbenicillin agar has successfully been used as a primary selective medium for Klebsiella enumeration. With pure cultures, nearly 100% recovery of Klebsiella was observed by membrane filtration. With environmental samples using membrane filtration, 95% of typical pink- to red-colored colonies were verified as Klebsiella, as opposed to only 1% of yellow background colonies. Recovery of Klebsiella on MacConkey-inositol-carbenicillin agar was as good or better than on mEndo agar LES (Difco Laboratories). Recovery and percent colony confirmation with MacConkey-inositol-carbenicillin agar were greater than for other proposed Klebsiella selective media. PMID:365108

  18. Cost-effective nanoporous Agar-Agar polymer/Nickel powder composite particle for effective bio-products adsorption by expanded bed chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Setareh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2014-09-26

    In the present work a novel kind of dense nanoporous composite matrix for expanded bed application has been successfully first prepared with Nickel powder as a densifier and was covered with Agar-Agar layer as a skeleton, through the method of water-in-oil emulsification. Agar-Agar is a porous and inexpensive polymer. In order to fabricate cost-effective adsorbent with favorable qualities Agar-Agar polymer was used. Thereafter, the customized composite particle was modified by pseudo-affinity dye-ligand, Reactive Blue 4 (RB4), aimed at preparing a pseudo-affinity adsorbent (RB4-Agar-Ni) for bioprodut adsorption from aqueous solution. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was selected as a model protein to investigate the adsorption behavior in batchwise and expanded bed chromatography, and the obtained results were evaluated with that of Streamline (Amersham-Pharmacia Biotech, Sweden). Spherical appearance and porous structure of composite particles were observed by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results suggested that the matrices followed the logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 65-300 ?m and average diameter of 126.81-151.47 ?m, proper wet density of 1.64-2.78 g/ml, water content of 62.74-34%, porosity of 98-90% and pore size of about 38-130 nm. For better comprehension of the impact of solid phase properties on the performance of the expanded bed, the expansion and hydrodynamic properties of a composite matrix with a series of densities was evaluated and estimated by the retention time distribution method (RTD) in an expanded bed and was compared with that of other matrices. According to obtained results the expansion factors under the same fluid velocity decreased by increasing the matrix density. Moreover, the axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) is the most appropriate parameter for evaluating the stability of expanded bed, on various operating conditions, such as different flow velocity, bed expansion degree, viscosity of the liquid phase and the density of adsorbent. It was observed that the application of matrix with high density was proper for high operation, fluid velocity, since the addition of densifier improves the rigidity of the matrix. Three momentous factors, pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of BSA were analyzed. The best results showed that the adsorption equilibrium isotherms seems to follow a typical Langmuir isotherm and also the maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of BSA on RB4-Agar-Ni (64.01 mg/ml adsorbent) was higher than that on RB4-Streamline commercial adsorbent (about 54 mg.ml adsorbent). Additionally kinetic adsorption processes were characterized by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics equations. The experimental data followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic equation. Also the breakthrough curves were investigated. It was found that dynamic binding capacity (DBC) decreased with increasing the flow rate and the values of DBC decreased from 21.08 to 11.15 mg/ml adsorbent when the density of composite beads increased from 1.64 to 2.78 g/ml. All results indicate that the prepared composite is promising for efficient bioproduct adsorption with good hydrodynamic characteristics, high stability and it is suitable for expanded bed usage as a cost-effective adsorbent. PMID:25152492

  19. Rapid fluorescence method for screening Salmonella spp. from enteric differential agars.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, P M; Cacho, J B; Folgueira, L; López, M; García, J; Velasco, A C

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred thirty-two lactose-negative colonies isolated from human feces on stool differential agar media were flooded with one drop of MUCAP Test reagent (Biolife Italiana S.r.I., Milan, Italy) and observed under a Wood lamp for the development of a blue fluorescence over or around the colony. On the basis of manual and automated conventional tests for the screening of Salmonella spp., the MUCAP Test yielded the following results: 79 true-positives, 314 true-negatives, 35 false-positives, and 4 false-negatives (sensitivity, 95%; specificity, 90%; positive predictive value, 69%; negative predictive value, 99%). The specificity of the test performed on colonies isolated on MacConkey agar (95%) was higher than that performed on colonies isolated on SS agar (88%; P less than 0.03). The MUCAP Test is an easy, rapid, and sensitive method for the screening of colonies suspected of being Salmonella spp., reducing the number of biochemical tests needed. PMID:2405010

  20. A Novel Chromogenic Ester Agar Medium for Detection of Salmonellae

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Venitia M.; Miles, R. J.; Price, R. G.; Richardson, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel agar medium, chromogenic Salmonella esterase (CSE) agar, for the differentiation of salmonellae is described. The agar contains peptones and nutrient extracts together with the following (grams per liter unless otherwise specified): 4-[2-(4-octanoyloxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-vinyl]-quinolinium-1-(propan-3-yl carboxylic acid) bromide (SLPA-octanoate; bromide form), 0.3223; lactose, 14.65; trisodium citrate dihydrate, 0.5; Tween 20, 3.0; ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate, 0.035% (wt/vol), novobiocin, 70 mg liter?1. The key component of the medium is SLPA-octanoate, a newly synthesized ester formed from a C8 fatty acid and a phenolic chromophore. In CSE agar, the ester is hydrolyzed by Salmonella spp. to yield a brightly colored phenol which remains tightly bound within colonies. After 24 h of incubation at 37 or 42C, colonies of typical Salmonella spp. were burgundy colored on a transparent yellow background, whereas non-Salmonella spp. were white, cream, yellow or transparent. CSE agar was evaluated by using a panel of strains including a high proportion of Salmonella and non-Salmonella strains giving atypical reactions on other differential agars. The sensitivity (93.1%) of CSE agar for non-typhi salmonellae compared favorably with those of Rambach (82.8%), xylose-lysine-deoxycholate (XLD; 91.4%), Hektoen-enteric (89.7%), and SM ID (91.4%) agars. The specificity (93.9%) was also comparable to those of other Salmonella media (SM ID agar, 95.9%; Rambach agar, 91.8%; XLD agar, 91.8%; Hektoen-enteric agar, 87.8%). Strains of Citrobacter freundii and Proteus spp. giving false-positive reactions with other media gave a negative color reaction on CSE agar. CSE agar enabled the detection of >30 Salmonella serotypes, including agona, anatum, enteritidis, hadar, heidelberg, infantis, montevideo, thompson, typhimurium, and virchow, which accounted for 91.8% of the salmonella isolates recorded by the Public Health Laboratory Service (Colindale, London, England) for 1997. PMID:9925620

  1. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm). PMID:17849303

  2. BLUE HONEYSUCKLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-four blue honeysuckle, Lonicera caerulea L., cultivars available to North America are described. The origin, description and uses of the cultivars are presented. The majority of the cultivars were released from Russia but two were released from Canada. These cultivars have fruits which look l...

  3. Blue Water

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St-Laurent has a mechanical system that creates bubbles that rise to the surface and push ice away from the ship's hull. It also happens to churn the water into an amazing shade of blue....

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Agar for Isolation of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium species are grown using specific media that increase laboratory cost, thus hampering their diffusion in resource-limited countries. Preliminary data suggested that versatile blood agar may be also used for mycobacterial culture. Methodology We examined the growth of 41 different Mycobacterium species on 5% blood agar. Over a 24-month period we analysed isolation of mycobacteria after parallel inoculation of clinical specimens into both a reference automated system (BACTEC 9000 MB broth) and 5% blood agar slant tubes, after NaOH decontamination, and compared the cost of performing 1,000 analyses using these two techniques. Conclusions Mycobacterium reference species cultured on blood agar, with the exception of Mycobacterium ulcerans. Inoculation of 1,634 specimens yielded 95 Mycobacterium isolates. Blood agar performed significantly more efficiently than BACTEC 9000 MB broth (94 vs 88 isolates, P?=?0.03). Decontamination of Candida albicans in 5 specimens by addition of amphotericin B in blood agar yielded one more M. tuberculosis isolate that could not be isolated in BACTEC broth. Uneven distribution of time to culture positivity for M. tuberculosis had a median (range) of 195 days using blood agar and 266 days using BACTEC 9000 MB broth. Cost for 1,000 analyses in France was estimated to be of 1,913 euros using the blood agar method and 8,990 euros using the BACTEC 9000 MB method. Blood agar should be regarded as a first-line medium for culturing Mycobacterium species. It saves time, is cost-effective, is more sensitive than, and at least as rapid as the automated method. This is of particular importance for resource-limited countries in which the prevalence of tuberculosis is high. PMID:18060087

  5. Blue Halite.

    PubMed

    Howard, C L; Kerr, P F

    1960-12-23

    Remarkable deep blue and occasionally purple forms of halite (rock salt) have long been known. These occur associated with potassium minerals in the Zechstein basin of northern Germany, elsewhere in Europe, and in North America. In recent laboratory studies, data have been developed which confirm the hypothesis that this coloration in natural salt may be attributed to gamma-ray bombardment by associated potassium-40 from sylvite, accompanied or followed by structural deformation. PMID:17733316

  6. Comparison of Supplemented Brucella Agar and Modified Clostridium difficile Agar for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gye Hyeong; Kim, Jieun; Pai, Hyunjoo

    2014-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of Clostridium difficile is increasingly important because of the rise in resistant strains. The standard medium for the AST of C. difficile is supplemented Brucella agar (sBA), but we found that the growth of C. difficile on sBA was not optimal. Because active growth is critical for reliable AST, we developed a new, modified C. difficile (mCD) agar. C. difficile grew better on mCD agar than on sBA. Methods C. difficile isolates were collected from patients with healthcare-associated diarrhea. sBA medium was prepared according to the CLSI guidelines. Homemade mCD agar containing taurocholate, L-cysteine hydrochloride, and 7% horse blood was used. For 171 C. difficile isolates, we compared the agar dilution AST results from mCD agar with those from sBA. Results No significant differences were observed in the 50% minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC50) and 90% minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of clindamycin (CLI), metronidazole (MTZ), moxifloxacin (MXF), piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ), and rifaximin (RIX), but the values for vancomycin (VAN) were two-fold higher on mCD agar than on sBA. The MICs of CLI, MXF, and RIX were in 100% agreement within two-fold dilutions, but for MTZ, VAN, and PTZ, 13.7%, 0.6%, and 3.1% of the isolates, respectively, were outside the acceptable range. Conclusions The MIC ranges, MIC50 and MIC90, were acceptable when AST was performed on mCD agar. Thus, mCD agar could be used as a substitute medium for the AST of C. difficile. PMID:25368819

  7. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement. PMID:22657388

  8. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Yang, Wei; Mao, Xuan; Mou, Shansong; Tang, Shunqing

    2008-12-01

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 degrees C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H&E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers. PMID:19029613

  9. New Chromogenic Agar Medium for the Identification of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Venitia M.; Miles, R. J.; Price, R. G.; Midgley, G.; Khamri, W.; Richardson, A. C.

    2002-01-01

    A new chromogenic agar medium (Candida diagnostic agar [CDA]) for differentiation of Candida spp. is described. This medium is based on Sabouraud dextrose agar (Oxoid CM41) and contains (per liter) 40.0 g of glucose, 10.0 g of mycological peptone, and 15.0 g of agar along with a novel chromogenic glucosaminidase substrate, ammonium 4-{2-[4-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-?-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-3-methoxyphenyl]-vinyl}-1-(propan-3-yl-oate)-quinolium bromide (0.32 g liter?1). The glucosaminidase substrate in CDA was hydrolyzed by Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis, yielding white colonies with deep-red spots on a yellow transparent background after 24 to 48 h of incubation at 37C. Colonies of Candida tropicalis and Candida kefyr were uniformly pink, and colonies of other Candida spp., including Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis, were white. CDA was evaluated by using 115 test strains of Candida spp. and other clinically important yeasts and was compared with two commercially available chromogenic agars (Candida ID agar [bioMerieux] and CHROMagar Candida [CHROMagar Company Ltd.]). On all three agars, colonies of C. albicans were not distinguished from colonies of C. dubliniensis. However, for the group containing C. albicans plus C. dubliniensis, both the sensitivity and the specificity of detection when CDA was used were 100%, compared with values of 97.6 and 100%, respectively, with CHROMagar Candida and 100 and 96.8%, respectively, with Candida ID agar. In addition, for the group containing C. tropicalis plus C. kefyr, the sensitivity and specificity of detection when CDA was used were also 100%, compared with 72.7 and 98.1%, respectively, with CHROMagar Candida. Candida ID agar did not differentiate C. tropicalis and C. kefyr strains but did differentiate members of a broader group (C. tropicalis, C. kefyr, Candida lusitaniae plus Candida guilliermondii); the sensitivity and specificity of detection for members of this group were 94.7 and 93.8%, respectively. In addition to the increased sensitivity and/or specificity of Candida detection when CDA was used, differentiation of colony types on CDA (red spotted, pink, or no color) was unambiguous and did not require precise assessment of colony color. PMID:12089051

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  11. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints. PMID:15904689

  12. Growth of Desulfovibrio on the Surface of Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Warren P.

    1966-01-01

    Growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (API strain) was found to take place in an atmosphere of hydrogen on the agar surface of complex media, including yeast extract (Difco), and Trypticase Soy Agar (BBL) without any added reducing agents. For growth on a 2% yeast extract-agar surface in the absence of hydrogen (nitrogen atmosphere), sodium lactate was required in the medium. Growth on the surface of Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA) under nitrogen took place readily in the absence of an added hydrogen donor. A medium (TSA plus salts) is described based upon the addition of sodium lactate (4 ml per liter), magnesium sulfate (2 g per liter), and ferrous ammonium sulfate (0.05%) to TSA, which appears suitable for the isolation and growth of Desulfovibrio on the surface of agar plates in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Sodium lactate does not appear to be essential in this medium for good growth and sulfate reduction in a hydrogen atmosphere, but is essential in a nitrogen atmosphere. Growth of Desulfovibrio (hydrogen atmosphere) on the agar surface of media commonly used for its cultivation as well as on an inorganic medium containing bicarbonate as a source of carbon is poor and erratic unless inoculated (Desulfovibrio) plates of TSA plus salts are incubated in the same container with plates of these media. This stimulatory effect of incubation with inoculated plates of TSA plus salts medium appears to be due to as yet unidentified volatile material produced by D. desulfuricans when growing on this medium. Another volatile material, or possibly the identical material, appears to act similarly to a hydrogen donor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:5955798

  13. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are a kind of birthmark that are flat, blue, or blue-gray. They appear at birth or in the ... Mongolian blue spots are common among persons who are of Asian, Native American, Hispanic, East Indian, and African descent. ...

  14. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Blue nightshade poisoning occurs when someone eats parts of the blue nightshade plant. This is for information only and ... The poison is found in the blue nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) plant, especially in the fruit and leaves.

  15. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  16. Color vision: retinal blues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2012-08-21

    Two complementary studies have resolved the circuitry underlying green-blue color discrimination in the retina. A blue-sensitive interneuron provides the inhibitory signal required for computing green-blue color opponency. PMID:22917511

  17. Effect of BiTek agar on lysostaphin susceptibility of staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, B E; Dawson, K; Akers, K

    1990-01-01

    Staphylococci which were considered to be lysostaphin susceptible on P agar containing Bacto-Agar showed different degrees of resistance to lysostaphin when tested on P agar made with BiTek agar. As a result, lysostaphin-susceptible strains were misidentified as lysostaphin-resistant strains. Images PMID:2254432

  18. Is blood agar an alternative to sabouraud dextrose agar for the isolation of fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ashok Kumar; Brahmaiah, Upputuri; Narayen, Nitesh; Reddy, Ravi Kumar; Reddy, Rupak Kumar; Chitta, Meghraj; Prasad, Srinivas; Swarup, Rishi; Mohiuddin, Syed Maaz; Reddy, Madhukar; Aasuri, Murali K; Murthy, B S R; Bhide, Milind; Ahmed, Sajid

    2013-06-01

    To compare the blood agar (BA), sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and chocolate agar (CA) for the isolation of fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis. Corneal Scrapings of 229 patients with clinically diagnosed microbial keratitis were inoculated on BA, SDA, CA. The culture media were evaluated for the rate and time taken for the fungal growth. Seventy six of 229 patients had fungal keratitis. Fungus grew on BA in 60/76(78.9 %), on SDA in 76/76 (100 %), on CA in 40/76(52.6 %) patients. The fungi which grew on BA (60/76) also grown on SDA at the same time. The colony morphologies of different fungi were better on SDA than BA/CA. Among the different culture media, SDA is essential for the isolation fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis. PMID:23196788

  19. Maintenance of Leptospira Species in Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun Agar

    PubMed Central

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Langla, Sayan; Oyuchua, Malinee; Day, Nicholas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of Leptospira species in liquid or semisolid medium is time-consuming and at risk of contamination due to the needs of routine subculture and dark field microscopy. Using Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) agar, we maintained 100 pathogenic Leptospira isolates for 12 months without the need for subculture and confirmed the viability of all isolates by the naked eye. PMID:25253789

  20. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  2. [Salmonella diagnosis and expanded bacteriologic differential diagnosis using Rambach agar].

    PubMed

    Wermter, R; Mller, U

    1995-05-01

    The present study gives not only additional advises and ideas for the use of Rambach agar but also diagnostic support. Resulting from several years of diagnostic experience the medium can be recommended for enlarged routine differential-diagnosis of bacteria and also for improved Salmonella-diagnosis as an alternative medium (under section 35 LMBG; Untersuchung von Lebensmitteln; Nachweis von Salmonellen). PMID:7575387

  3. Internal structure and thermo-viscoelastic properties of agar ionogels.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Aswal, V K; Kohlbrecher, J; Bohidar, H B

    2015-12-10

    Ionic liquids (IL) can alter the physical properties of agar hydrogels. Rheology studies show that gels with wide range of storage moduli (gel strength) G0 values ranging from 1 to 20 KPa could be made in imidazolium based IL solutions where the IL concentration may not exceed 5% (w/v). Gelation and gel melting temperatures (tgel and Tm) could be altered by as much as ≈ 10 °C. Small angle neutron scattering studies revealed the presence of fibre bundles of agar double helices having typical length of 120 nm that increased to ≈ 180 nm under favorable conditions. These structures gain flexibility from the cladding of the agar bundles by IL molecules which in turn caused partial charge neutralization of its surface. Raman spectroscopy revealed differential hydration of these bundles. It was found that IL molecules with longer alkyl chain (more hydrophobic) altered the gel homogeneity, and changed its thermal and mechanical properties significantly. Therefore, customization of agar hydrogels in green solvent medium (IL solutions) widens the scope of its application potential that may include sensing. PMID:26428165

  4. Growth kinetics of three species of Tetrahymena on solid agar

    SciTech Connect

    Dobra, K.W.; McArdle, E.W.; Ehret, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    A nutrient-agar method without liquid overlay has been developed for cultivation of ciliates. Three species of Tetrahymena-T. pyriformis strain W, T. rostrata strain UNI, and T. vorax strain V/sub 2/S, representing the 3 main groups of Tetrahymena species, were used; however the method should apply to other ciliates. Growth on the surface of the agar was facilitated by an optimal surface-to-volume ratio yielding a high density of ciliates and short generation times. At the highest density achieved, the cells became irregularly hexagonal and formed a monolayer tissue on the agar. Ciliates grown on agar were like those in liquid culture, typical oral ciliature, food-vacuole formation, and typical cortical patterns being retained. Advantages of this method include high cell density, easy recovery, and optimal O/sub 2/ supply. The organisms can also be cultivated on the surface of sterile cellulose-nitrate filters, facilitating in situ fixation and staining as well as transfer into different media by transfer of filters with cells, without prior centrifugation and resuspension.

  5. Hyperspectral Imaging for Detecting Pathogens Grown on Agar Plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth...

  6. Recovery of Sublethally Injured Bacteria Using Selective Agar Overlays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.

    2001-01-01

    This experiment subjects bacteria in a food sample and an environmental sample to conditions of sublethal stress in order to assess the effectiveness of the agar overlay method to recover sublethally injured cells compared to direct plating onto the appropriate selective medium. (SAH)

  7. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  8. Total Antioxidant Capacity of Serum Determined Using the Potassium Permanganate Agar Method Based on Serum Diffusion in Agar

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Meijuan; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a new method for determining total antioxidants in serum and to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of organisms. Design and Methods. Sodium hyposulfite (Na2S2O3) and serum were used to evaluate the linearity and precision of the potassium permanganate agar method. The area of serum diffusion in samples from 30 intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with 44 healthy subjects was determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. Results. The linearity (R2 in the linear experiment of Na2S2O3 was 0.994; R2 in the linear experiment of serum was 0.987) and precision (coefficient of variation of area of high level serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day and coefficient of variation of area of low serum diffusion within-run, between-run, and between-day were all less than 10%) were acceptable using the potassium permanganate agar method. Total antioxidants of serum between the ICU group and the healthy group were different (p = 0.002, two tailed). Conclusions. Total antioxidants in serum can be determined by the potassium permanganate agar method. The total antioxidant capacity of an organism can be evaluated by the amount of total antioxidants in serum. PMID:26347595

  9. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. PMID:25126968

  10. Detection of bacterioplankton in immersed cadavers using selective agar plates.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Eiji; Kozawa, Shuji; Tashiro, Noriko; Sakai, Masahiro; Yukawa, Nobuhiro

    2009-04-01

    We measured bacterioplankton in blood from cadavers retrieved from the sea (n=12), near estuaries (n=4), rivers (fresh water, n=8) and from bathtubs (n=4) as well as from non-drowned victims (n=10) discovered near aquatic environments. Blood from 11 victims drowned in seawater developed bioluminescent and/or blue colonies (oxidase test positive) on selective media containing 2-4% NaCl. Homology analyses of the 16S rRNA gene showed that all of them were marine bacteria (genera: Photobacterium, Vibrio, Shewanella, Psychrobacter). Blood from all victims drowned in rivers generated blue colonies on plates containing 3%, but not 4% NaCl. Homology analyses showed that the blue colonies were generated from bacteria that inhabit fresh water (Aeromonas). None of the blood samples from victims that drowned in bathtubs generated bioluminescent and blue colonies. However, all cadavers contained bacteria that produced unstained colonies (Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Escherichia, etc.). Among non-drowned victims, blood from two gave rise to blue colonies on plates containing < or =3% NaCl (Pseudomonas). Of the cadavers found near estuaries, bioluminescent and blue colonies developed from two of them on media containing 2-4% NaCl (Photobacterium, Vibrio, Listonella), but not from two others on plates containing 4% NaCl (at < or =3%; blue colonies, Aeromonas; unstained colonies, Citrobacter, Vagococcus, Proteus, Enterobacter). These results suggested that the presence of numerous bacterioplankton in immersed cadavers could support a conclusion of death by drowning. PMID:19261520

  11. [Technological aspects of agar-hydrocolloid impression materials].

    PubMed

    Davidson, C L; Bekke-Hoekstra, I S

    1979-01-01

    Physical properties with clinical relevance has been tested on a number of agar hydrocolloid impression materials For 1 hour an almost perfect dimensional stability can be maintained when the impression is stored in water. Elasticity and strength are poor. Only the use of much bulk material may prevent damage during manipulation of the gel. The detail reproduceability meets all standards. A good compatibility with dental stone subsequently allows sharp details in the model. PMID:293792

  12. Acriflavine violet red bile agar for the isolation of Klebsiella.

    PubMed

    Fung, D Y; Niemiec, M

    1977-10-01

    A medium for the isolation and detection of Klebsiella is described. It contains 0.06% Acriflavine in Violet Red Bile agar (Difco). Klebsiella appeared as 5 to 7 mm mucoid (24 h at 37 degrees C) golden-yellow colonies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp. appeared as small, brown to dark brown colonies. Escherichia coli as well as many other gram negative organisms and gram positive organisms did not grow on this medium. PMID:334697

  13. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  14. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples. PMID:25217723

  15. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-01-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M.luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (Tc) for growth of M.luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at Tc was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156?g mL?1, and Tc was determined to be 7h. Good agreement (R2=0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  16. Code Blue: The Blues as Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, W. Randolph

    1994-01-01

    Explores the basic features and background of "the blues" as a musical tool, or archetype, for understanding the universal condition of human suffering, for confronting diseases of disability and separation, and for coping or adapting to such suffering. Offers the blues as a method for looking at the spirit of human tragedy and potentially

  17. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Blue-green algae might slow blood clotting. Taking blue-green algae along with medications that ...

  18. Greening the Blue Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Whitney E.; Noble, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Compares the revised Blue Bottle formulation to the classical Blue Bottle. Indicates that the revised formulation gives a somewhat bluer solution, but initially slower reduction when compared to the classical formulation. (Author/KHR)

  19. Methylene blue test

    MedlinePLUS

    The methylene blue test is a test to determine the type of methemoglobinemia , a blood disorder. ... tourniquet are removed. A dark green powder called methylene blue goes through the tube into your vein. The ...

  20. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by an electrospinning technique using water as the solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operated at 50 deg C, to avoid agar gelation. Pure agar solution 1% (w/w) showed inadequ...

  1. Agar-Gel Precipitin-Inhibition Test for Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, John G.; Converse, John L.

    1967-01-01

    In this study of saprophytic and parasitic growth-phase extracts of Coccidioides immitis, an antigen from the spherule culture supernatant fluid detected a specific antibody in heretofore serologically negative suspect coccidioidomycosis human sera when diffused in agar-gel. This antigen-antibody reaction occurred also in some of the serologically positive human coccidioidomycosis sera. This study indicates that this antigen-antibody reaction should be utilized as a possible routine serological test for complete serodiagnosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:4964065

  2. Evaluation of agar diffusion bioassay for nisin quantification.

    PubMed

    Pongtharangkul, T; Demirci, A

    2004-08-01

    The agar diffusion bioassay is the most widely used method for the quantification of nisin, due to its high sensitivity, simplicity, and cost-effectiveness. This method is based on the measurement of the inhibition zone produced in nisin-sensitive microorganisms. The size of the zone is affected by many factors, such as nisin-sensitive strain, amount of added agar and surfactant, and pre-diffusion step. This research aims to evaluate the effects of nisin-sensitive strains and pre-diffusion on the accuracy and precision of nisin quantification. Three strains of nisin-sensitive microorganisms (Micrococcus luteus, Lactobacillus sakei, Brochothrix thermosphacta) were tested along with three different incubation processes. The best combination was the method using L. sakei as an indicator strain with pre-diffusion at 4 degrees C for 24 h. Compared with M. luteus and B. thermosphacta, L. sakei gave more accurate and reproducible results. Moreover, the pre-diffusion step resulted in larger inhibition zones and more precise results. Finally, the best combination was validated and compared with the method that is usually used and the result showed that the method using L. sakei with pre-diffusion gave more accurate and precise results. PMID:14963617

  3. Borelli's lactritmel agar induces conidiation in rare-macroconidia producing dermatophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ilkit, Macit; Gmral, Ramazan; D?en, Aylin

    2012-10-01

    Macroconidia are among the most important indicators used to identify dermatophytic fungi, but several do not usually sporulate and/or produce macroconidia on Sabouraud glucose agar. Specifically, Microsporum audouinii, M. ferrugineum, Trichophyton concentricum, T. schoenleinii, T. verrucosum, and T. violaceum (including T. soudanense and T. yaoundei) rarely form macroconidia and, therefore, cannot be easily identified. In this study, we investigated the production of macroconidia on nine common laboratory media, including Borelli's lactritmel agar (BLA), modified Borelli's lactritmel agar (MBLA), brain heart infusion agar (BHIA), Christensen's urease agar in Petri dishes (UPA), cornmeal dextrose agar (CMDA), Lowenstein-Jensen agar (LJA), malt extract agar (MEA), oatmeal agar (OA), and potato dextrose agar (PDA). The performance of these media was evaluated using 18 rare-macroconidia producing isolates, including representative of the six species mentioned above. All cultures in this study were incubated at 26C on the bench, and conidia formation on each was investigated at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 days of incubation. BLA apparently improved macroconidia production after 15 days and was the most useful nutrient agar medium to induce these phenotypic characters in daily practice, closely followed by OA, PDA, and MBLA. PMID:22563856

  4. Wetting dynamics of colloidal dispersions on agar gel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seino, Eri; Chida, Shigeki; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2014-10-01

    The effects of silica particle addition on the wetting velocity on flat and fractal agar gel surfaces were analyzed along with the applicability of such particles for controlling the wetting dynamics of water. The contact angles (?D) of the colloidal dispersions obeyed the power law, i.e., ?D?t(-x), where t is time and x is a constant. Wetting was inhibited by the addition of a suitable amount of 20-nm-diameter silica particles. Specifically, the exponent x reached a minimum value for a silica composition of 0.1wt%. However, such inhibition effects were not observed upon the addition of silica particles with diameters of 100, 550, and, 1000nm. The mechanism of the inhibition of the liquid wetting on gel surfaces may be attributed to a slight increase in local viscosity around the contact line during wetting. PMID:25016539

  5. Primer on Agar-Based Microbial Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jane Y.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; Simkovsky, Ryan; Watrous, Jeramie D.; Trial, Rachelle M.; Fleming, Tinya C.; Wenter, Roland; Moore, Bradley S.; Golden, Susan S.; Pogliano, Kit

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionizationtime of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) applied directly to microbes on agar-based medium captures global information about microbial molecules, allowing for direct correlation of chemotypes to phenotypes. This tool was developed to investigate metabolic exchange factors of intraspecies, interspecies, and polymicrobial interactions. Based on our experience of the thousands of images we have generated in the laboratory, we present five steps of microbial IMS: culturing, matrix application, dehydration of the sample, data acquisition, and data analysis/interpretation. We also address the common challenges encountered during sample preparation, matrix selection and application, and sample adherence to the MALDI target plate. With the practical guidelines described herein, microbial IMS use can be extended to bio-based agricultural, biofuel, diagnostic, and therapeutic discovery applications. PMID:22821974

  6. Comparison of Rambach agar, SM-ID medium, and Hektoen Enteric agar for primary isolation of non-typhi salmonellae from stool samples.

    PubMed Central

    Dusch, H; Altwegg, M

    1993-01-01

    Stool samples (n = 504) were streaked simultaneously onto Rambach agar (R agar; E. Merck, Darmstadt, Germany), SM-ID medium (bioMrieux S.A., Montalieu-Vercieu, France), and Hektoen Enteric (HE) agar (BBL Becton-Dickinson, Baltimore, Md.) in order to evaluate the performances of the first two media in comparison with that of the well-established HE agar. Following overnight cultivation at 37 degrees C, 29 samples (5.8%) were positive for non-typhi salmonellae on at least one of the three media. Sensitivities and specificities were 69 and 98%, 79 and 85%, and 100 and 79% for R, SM-ID, and HE agars, respectively. On the basis of the poor sensitivities, R and SM-ID agars are not recommended as primary plating media when screening for non-typhi salmonellae. However, the high specificity of R agar may help to reduce the work load when this medium is used for plating after enrichment. PMID:8432827

  7. Effect of Different Commerical Agar Preparations on the Inhibitory Activities of Phenols

    PubMed Central

    Sands, J. G.; Bennett, E. O.

    1966-01-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations of 11 phenolic inhibitors were compared in five commercial agars and in nutrient broth. It was found that the brand of agar affected the end point obtained for a particular inhibitor, and that the degree of antagonism varied with each compound studied. The results indicate that there are at least two deleterious factors present in agar, one of which is water-soluble and one which is not. The major portion of the total antagonism was due to the water-soluble factor, which could be removed by washing the agar in warm distilled water prior to use in the test medium. PMID:5959856

  8. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  9. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  10. List 47: blue honeysuckle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This summary presents the descriptions of a newly released blue honeysuckle (Lonicera cerulea L.) cultivar for the List of New Fruit and Nut Cultivars. This blue honeysuckle cultivar was released in Canada in 2012 and has pending Plant Breeders Rights Certification with Agriculture Canada. The cult...

  11. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  12. FROM BLUE JEANS TO BLUE GENES

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue in color and vary in size, number and location, and account for the majority of consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important as they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. Dr Mulliken envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of two young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for-gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in the field of vascular anomalies. Two blue genes mutations were discovered, which account for the majority, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved thanks to Dr Mulliken, who inspired two young investigators in blue jeans to find two blue genes. PMID:19190503

  13. Glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin agar, an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar for enumeration of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, J M; Börjesson, A C; Laskowski, L; Kurasz, A B; Testa, M

    1984-10-01

    An agar medium for selective recovery and enumeration of Streptococcus mutans was developed as an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin (MSB) agar. Combinations of dyes, antibiotics, and tellurite were added to a nonselective medium which, because of its sucrose content, allowed easy recognition of S. mutans colonies. Candle jar incubation for 2 days, by comparison with anaerobic incubation, reduced background flora but did not diminish S. mutans recoveries from clinical samples. Quantitative comparisons were made of the simultaneous recoveries of a number of authentic S. mutans serotype representatives and fresh clinical isolates, using various glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin (GSTB) formulations and mitis salivarius, MSB, and blood agars. Mitis salivarius counts were not detectably different from blood counts, but counts on MSB were distinctly lower. A formulation of the new medium containing 5% glucose 5% sucrose, 0.001% potassium tellurite, 0.3 U of bacitracin per ml (hence GSTB), and 2% agar gave recoveries nearly equal to those on mitis salivarius agar and much greater than those on MSB. The medium yielded readily recognized S. mutans colonies and facilitated detection of intracellular polysaccharide formers upon flooding with I2 reagent. Freshly isolated serotype c, E, and f colonies could often be distinguished from serotype d and g colonies, a distinction made reliable by testing for intracellular polysaccharide. A study of 300 salivary samples revealed GSTB to give significantly higher recoveries than MSB. About 72% of all samples were substantially underestimated for S. mutans with MSB, and 6.7% of samples were falsely negative for S. mutans with MSB. Recovery of background flora on GSTB was as low or lower than on MSB, and both types of agar could be stored for at least 9 weeks without notable change of selectivity. Thus, GSTB agar appears to be simple and reliable to use and requires no anaerobic incubation. Caution is voiced about interpretation of data previously reported which evaluated S. mutans on MSB agar. PMID:6490852

  14. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Rene

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades. PMID:15559577

  15. Thermodynamically Stable Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castles, F.; Morris, S. M.; Terentjev, E. M.; Coles, H. J.

    2010-04-01

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric bimesogenic and bent-core materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  16. Ceftibuten-containing agar plate for detecting group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS).

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Chitose; Kimura, Kouji; Doyama, Yo; Miyazaki, Akira; Morimoto, Makiko; Banno, Hirotsugu; Nagano, Noriyuki; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-08-01

    Penicillins remain first-line agents for treatment of group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae; GBS) infections; however, several reports have confirmed the existence of GBS with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS). Because no selective agar plates for detection of PRGBS are available to date, in this investigation, we developed the selective agar plate for detection of PRGBS. We used 19 genetically well-confirmed PRGBS isolates and 38 penicillin-susceptible GBS isolates identified in Japan. For preparation of trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, we added 1 of antimicrobial agents (among oxacillin, ceftizoxime, and ceftibuten) to a well-established GBS-selective agar plate. Among 12 trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, Muller-Hinton agar containing 128 ?g/mL ceftibuten with 5% sheep blood, 8 ?g/mL gentamicin, and 12 ?g/mL nalidixic acid was the most appropriate selective agar for PRGBS, showing 100% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity. In cases of potential nosocomial spread of PRGBS, the selective agar plate could be useful and reliable. PMID:25959629

  17. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans strains by different mitis-salivarius agar preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Staat, R H

    1976-01-01

    Several Streptococcus mutans strains were markedly inhibited by mitis-salivarius agar manufactured by Baltimore Biological Laboratories, but little, if any, inhibition was noted using Difco Laboratories' mitis-salivarius agar. Supplementation of the basic medium with sucrose and bacitracin for specific selection of S. mutans resulted in suppression of representative S. mutans type a strains regardless of manufacturer. PMID:1270597

  18. Improved agar bottle plate for isolation of methanogens or other anaerobes in a defined gas atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, M.; Noll, K.M.; Wolfe, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    A bottle plate for the cultivation of methanogens or other organisms in a defined pressurized-gas atmosphere was developed. The bottle provides the convenience of an agar streak plate, solves the problem of the water exudate from agar medium, and provides a convenient way of adding or sampling a defined gas atmosphere.

  19. Evaluation of fluorogenic TSC agar for recovering Clostridium perfringens in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gmez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is widely recognised as a reliable water pollution indicator. Since several media can be employed for the membrane filtration enumeration of this microorganism, the main aim of this work was to investigate the ability of fluorocult-supplemented TSC-agar (Merck) for recovering Cl. perfringens from public springs used for direct human consumption. Cl. perfringens recovery was also performed on mCP agar (Cultimed) according to Directive 98/83 as well as on TSC-Agar (Merck), TSN-Agar (Merck) and SPS-Agar (BBL) media. Variance analysis of data obtained showed no statistically significant differences in the counts obtained among all media employed in this work. However, the Cl. perfringens recovery efficiencies with TSC and fluorogenic TSC agars were significantly greater (P = < 0.05) than the corresponding values of mCP and TSN media. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for Cl. perfringens recovery in groundwater samples (85.3% of typical colonies and 82.8% of atypical colonies confirmed). In summary, the membrane filtration technique with fluorogenic TSC agar showed the best performance characteristics of all the media tested as judged by their recovery efficiency and specificity in these water samples. PMID:11464756

  20. Lithium chloride-sodium propionate agar for the enumeration of bifidobacteria in fermented dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, L; Undeland, P; Cox, L J

    1992-05-01

    Lithium chloride-sodium propionate agar has been developed for the enumeration of bifidobacteria in fermented dairy products. The medium contains lithium chloride and sodium propionate to inhibit the growth of other lactic acid bacteria. Pure cultures of bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, and streptococci were tested for growth in this medium. With one exception, all bifidobacteria were able to grow in this medium and in a nonselective agar with a difference not exceeding .4 log units. However, none of the lactobacilli tested and only one strain each of Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris grew in lithium chloride-sodium propionate agar. In those cases, the numbers of colonies were lower in lithium chloride-sodium propionate agar by 1.26 and 2.51 log units, respectively, compared with a nonselective agar. Bifidobacteria were also selectively isolated from all fermented milks and cheeses analyzed. PMID:1317893

  1. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C.neoformans colony forming unit (cfu) per plate were found as 51, 57 and 48 (median values) on simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar, respectively, while tobacco agar has lower performance with 33 cfu/petri. No statistically significant difference were found between simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar's performances for C.neoformans isolations from the nature (p=0.71). In conclusion, easily prepared eggplant agar is as functional as widely used media such as simplified Staib agar and Pal's agar for the isolation of C.neoformans from the natural environment. PMID:24819266

  2. Continuous degradation of maltose: improvement in stability and catalytic properties of maltase (?-glucosidase) through immobilization using agar-agar gel as a support.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Karim, Asad; Aman, Afsheen; Marchetti, Roberta; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maltose degrading enzyme was immobilized within agar-agar support via entrapment method due to its industrial utilization. The maximum immobilization efficiency (82.77%) was achieved using 4.0% agar-agar keeping the diameter of bead up to 3.0 mm. The matrix entrapment showed maximum catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and temperature 65 C. Substrate saturation kinetics showed that the K m of immobilized enzyme increased from 1.717 to 2.117 mM ml(-1) where as Vmax decreased from 8,411 to 7,450 U ml(-1 )min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. The immobilization significantly increased the stability of maltase against various temperatures and immobilized maltase retain 100% of its original activity after 2 h at 50 C, whereas the free maltase only showed 60% residual activity under same condition. The reusability of entrapped maltase showed activity up to 12 cycles and retained 50% of activity even after 5th cycle. Storage stability of agar entrapped maltase retain 73% of its initial activity even after 2 months when stored at 30 C while free enzyme showed only 37% activity at same storage conditions. PMID:25326060

  3. Factors Affecting Selectivity of Brilliant Green-Phenol Red Agar for Salmonellae

    PubMed Central

    Moats, W. A.; Kinner, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Commercial brilliant green (BG)-sulfa agar was found to be nonselective toward a test series of Enterobacteriaceae. Various formulations of BG were prepared by using Trypticase soy agar (BBL) as a base. Results were more reproducible when BG dye was added after sterilization than before. Sulfonamides improved selectivity as compared with brilliant green alone. Sulfanilamide (SN) was slightly more selective for salmonellae than other sulfonamides tested. Bile salts and sodium dodecyl sulfate markedly reduced the toxicity of BG to all the test bacteria. Enterobacter strains were most difficult to inhibit. A combination of 5 mg of BG and 1 g of SN/liter prevented growth of Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli and retarded growth of Enterobacter strains. The BG-SN agars were superior in selectivity to a series of commercial agars tested, and numbers of salmonellae recovered on BG-SN agar and Trypticase soy agar (BBL) were the same. Brilliant green agars with various degrees of selectivity are described. PMID:4589120

  4. Detection of Agar, by Analysis of Sugar Markers, Associated with Bacillus Anthracis Spores, After Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Colburn, Heather A.; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F.; Harley, William M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived from agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artefactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) lead to the search for alternative sugar markers. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.

  5. On the properties of agar gel containing ionic and non-ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K; Rakshit, A K; Bhattacharya, Amit; Ghosh, Pushpito K

    2005-04-01

    Rheological and thermal properties of agar sol and gel in presence of various cationic, anionic and non-ionic surfactants are reported. The agar used was from the red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa. The gel strength, viscosity, rigidity (G'), gelling temperature and melting temperature were observed to decrease in presence of non-ionic surfactants whereas these were enhanced in presence of ionic surfactants. TGA studies showed that 1.5% agar gels containing non-ionic surfactants lose water at a lower temperature than the control agar gel whereas gels containing ionic surfactants hold on to water more tenaciously. DSC studies, on the other hand, show that the gel to sol transition occurs at lower temperatures in presence of non-ionic surfactants and at higher temperature in presence of ionic surfactants when compared with the control gel. The non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-100 and Brij 35, enabled relatively concentrated agar extractive to be filtered readily, as a result of which water usage in the process could be reduced by 50%. The surfactant was subsequently removed through freeze-thaw operations to restore the gelling capacity of the agar. The finding that 0.3-0.4% (w/v) sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) lowers the sol-gel transition temperature from 41 to 36 degrees C without adversely affecting gel strength is another useful outcome of the study that may enable better formulations of bacteriological agar to be prepared. PMID:15811467

  6. A hidden pitfall in the preparation of agar media undermines microorganism cultivability.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the "great plate count anomaly," that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27(T) and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. PMID:25281372

  7. A Hidden Pitfall in the Preparation of Agar Media Undermines Microorganism Cultivability

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the great plate count anomaly, that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27T and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. PMID:25281372

  8. A note on a selective agar medium for the enumeration of Flavobacterium species in water.

    PubMed

    Flint, K P

    1985-12-01

    A selective nutrient agar medium containing kanamycin at 50 micrograms/ml was developed for the isolation and enumeration of yellow-pigmented colonies from the River Sowe, Coventry. Such organisms were shown to be members of the heterogeneous genus Flavobacterium. Typically, yellow pigmented colonies constituted less than 10% of the colonies on nutrient agar alone but up to 70% on nutrient agar plus kanamycin. This medium is a useful addition to the range of media available for the isolation and further ecological study of particular species of this important group of micro-organisms. PMID:3831005

  9. Agar impression materials, dimensional stability and surface detail sharpness following treatment with disinfectant solutions.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S; Bergman, B; Bergman, M

    1987-01-01

    The influence of seven dissimilar disinfectants on the dimensional stability and the surface detail sharpness of two agar impression materials was studied. Two methods for treatment with disinfectant solutions were tested--immersion for 1 hour and spraying. In contrast to immersion the spraying method had no obvious influence on the agar material. It is concluded that if the disinfection method necessitates immersion of the impression in a solution for 1 hour or more the use of agar impression materials should be avoided. PMID:3480616

  10. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates. PMID:26355542

  11. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mario; Mller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures. PMID:24607793

  12. Physicochemical properties and bacterial resistance of biodegradable milk protein films containing agar and pectin.

    PubMed

    Letendre, M; D'Aprano, G; Lacroix, M; Salmieri, S; St-Gelais, D

    2002-10-01

    Free-standing sterilized edible films based on milk proteins, namely calcium caseinate and whey protein isolate, and polysaccharides, namely pectin and agar, were developed. Cross-linking of the proteins was achieved by the combination of thermal and radiative treatments. Autoclaving pectin and agar prior to their addition to the protein solutions generated films with an improved (P < or = 0.05) puncture strength. The presence of proteins and pectin-agar in the film formulation enhanced (P < or = 0.05) the moisture barrier of the films by 18%. A strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was used to assess the biodegradability behavior of the cross-linked films. Microbiological counts and soluble nitrogen analysis confirmed the biodegradability property of the milk protein films containing autoclaved pectin and agar. PMID:12358474

  13. Proton beam writing of microstructures in Agar gel for patterned cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larisch, Wolfgang; Koal, Torsten; Werner, Ronald; Hohlweg, Marcus; Reinert, Tilo; Butz, Tilman

    2011-10-01

    A rather useful prerequisite for many biological and biophysical studies, e.g., for cell-cell communication or neuronal networks, is confined cell growth on micro-structured surfaces. Solidified Agar layers have smooth surfaces which are electrically neutral and thus inhibit receptor binding and cell adhesion. For the first time, Agar microstructures have been manufactured using proton beam writing (PBW). In the irradiated Agar material the polysaccharides are split into oligosaccharides which can easily be washed off leaving Agar-free areas for cell adhesion. The beam diameter of 1 μm allows the fabrication of compartments accommodating single cells which are connected by micrometer-sized channels. Using the external beam the production process is very fast. Up to 50 Petri dishes can be produced per day which makes this technique very suitable for biological investigations which require large throughputs.

  14. Evaluation of a new chromogenic agar medium for the identification of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Willinger, B; Manafi, M

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the performance of CPS ID2 (bioMrieux) compared to that of conventionally used selective agar for the identification of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. This medium detects bacterial enzymes using chromogenic substrates. Two hundred and nineteen samples of urine were tested in order to evaluate new CPS ID2 in comparison to blood agar and MacConkey agar. According to our results, the CPS ID2 agar is an easy, rapid and sensitive method for the screening of colonies suspected of being Escherichia coli, reducing the number of biochemical tests needed. Also, enterococci and Proteae can be easily detected. Other micro-organisms require further identification. The greatest value of this medium is the accurate identification of polymicrobial cultures. PMID:7766230

  15. Agar and broth dilution methods to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial substances.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Irith; Hilpert, Kai; Hancock, Robert E W

    2008-01-01

    The aim of broth and agar dilution methods is to determine the lowest concentration of the assayed antimicrobial agent (minimal inhibitory concentration, MIC) that, under defined test conditions, inhibits the visible growth of the bacterium being investigated. MIC values are used to determine susceptibilities of bacteria to drugs and also to evaluate the activity of new antimicrobial agents. Agar dilution involves the incorporation of different concentrations of the antimicrobial substance into a nutrient agar medium followed by the application of a standardized number of cells to the surface of the agar plate. For broth dilution, often determined in 96-well microtiter plate format, bacteria are inoculated into a liquid growth medium in the presence of different concentrations of an antimicrobial agent. Growth is assessed after incubation for a defined period of time (16-20 h) and the MIC value is read. This protocol applies only to aerobic bacteria and can be completed in 3 d. PMID:18274517

  16. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruner, Susan V.; Slone, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2–6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30°C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  17. Agars of Gelidiella acerosa of west and southeast coasts of India.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K; Ganesan, M; Ramavat, B K; Jha, B; Ghosh, Pushpito K

    2007-07-01

    Seventeen agar samples were extracted from Gelidiella acerosa (Forsskal) Feldmann and Hamel (Rhodophyta, Gelidiales) specimens collected from nine different sites on the Indian coast-five from southeast coast and four from the west coast. The agar samples were analysed. The stability characteristics of the gels of selected agar samples were studied by rheometry under applied stress conditions, i.e. variation of the storage (G') and loss moduli (G'') were studied under varying frequency and duration (time) of the stress applied. Yield, apparent and dynamic viscosities, gelling and melting temperatures, 3,6-anhydrogalactose (3,6-AG), sulphate contents and TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis) measurements of the products were done. It was observed that the best quality agar was produced by G. acerosa occurring in the Gulf of Mannar region in the southeast coast. The gel strengths and the viscosities of agars extracted from Gelidiella acerosa occurring in the Gulf of Mannar ranged from 500 to 700gcm(-2) and 33 to 45cP for 2001 collections and for 2002 collections the corresponding values were 450 to 845gcm(-2) and 55 to 67cP respectively. On the other hand, for the agar samples extracted from the west coast of India, the gel strength and viscosities values ranged from 225 to 400gcm(-2) and from 15 to 30cP, respectively. The agars obtained from G. acerosa collected from southeast coast have been found to be suitable for bacterial culture and molecular biology. This is the first report of superior quality of agar from the Indian agarophytes. PMID:16949817

  18. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.F.; Aubert, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  19. [GROWTH OF MICROMYCETES FROM DIFFERENT ECOLOGICAL NICHES ON AGAR NUTRIENT MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Yurieva, E M; Voychuk, S I

    2015-01-01

    Radial growth rate of (K(r)) 153 strains 6 species of micromycetes from different ecological niches was studied on 7 agar media: three standard (malt extract agar, potato-dextrose agar, Czapek's agar), and on agar media with plant polymers (carboxymethylcellulose, xylan, soluble starch and apple pectin). Endophytic and plant pathogenic strains (biotrophs) of all studied species did not differ significantly in their ability to grow on nutrient media of different composition--average values of K(r) for these two groups were the same (0,200 and 0,199 mm/h, respectively). Soil micromycetes (saprophytes) characterized by the lowest average growth rate (0,169 mm/h) and significantly differed from the endophytic and plant pathogenic ones. Average of the radial growth rates of studied microscopic fungi were higher on standard nutrient media than with plant polymers ones. Growth parameters of endophytes and plant pathogens of all studied species on various agar media differed from the soil strains. High growth rate of endophytic and plant pathogenic strains of Fusarium poae, Alternaria alternata and Ceratocystis sp. provides them the rapid colonization of plants. Penicillium funiculosum strains equally can exist as saprophytes in soil and as endophytic plant symbionts. A wide range of K(r) variation of endophytic dark pigmented Mycelia sterilia indicates the presence in this group of different species of micromycetes, which have no sporulation. PMID:26638483

  20. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro gastrointestinal digestibility of oil-in-water emulsion-agar gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Neves, Marcos A; Kobayashi, Isao; Uemura, Kunihiko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion-agar gel samples were prepared and their digestibility evaluated by using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model. Emulsion-agar sols were obtained by mixing the prepared O/W emulsions with a 1.5 wt % agar solution at 60 C, and their subsequent cooling at 5 C for 1 h formed emulsion-agar gels. Their gel strength values increased with increasing degree of polymerization of the emulsifiers, and the relative gel strength increased in the case of droplets with an average diameter smaller than 700 nm. Flocculation and coalescence of the released emulsion droplets depended strongly on the emulsifier type; however, the emulsifier type hardly affected the ?-potential of emulsion droplets released from the emulsion-agar gels during in vitro digestion. The total FFA content released from each emulsion towards the end of the digestion period was nearly twice that released from the emulsion-agar gel, indicating that gelation of the O/W emulsion may have delayed lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23470750

  1. Complex impedance and conductivity of agar-based ion-conducting polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwanya, A. C.; Amaechi, C. I.; Udounwa, A. E.; Osuji, R. U.; Maaza, M.; Ezema, F. I.

    2015-04-01

    Agar-based electrolyte standing films with different salts and weak acids as ion and proton conductors were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, photoluminescence emission spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The salts used are lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) and potassium perchlorate (KClO4), while the weak acids used are acetic acid (CH3COOH) and lactic acid (C3H6O3). The values of the ion conductivity obtained for the agar-based polymer films are 6.54 × 10-8, 9.12 × 10-8, 3.53 × 10-8, 2.24 × 10-8 S/cm for the agar/acetic acid, agar/lactic acid, agar/LiClO4 and agar/KClO4 polymer films, respectively. As a function of temperature, the ion conductivity exhibits an Arrhenius behavior and the estimated activation energy is ≈0.1 eV for all the samples. The samples depicted high values of dielectric permittivity toward low frequencies which is due mostly to electrode polarization effect. The samples showed very high transparency (85-98 %) in the visible region, and this high transparency is one of the major requirements for application in electrochromic devices (ECD). The values of conductivity and activation energy obtained indicate that the electrolytes are good materials for application in ECD.

  2. Comparative dermatology: blue nevus.

    PubMed

    Barros, Jefferson Alfredo de; Kafler, Cristiane Calcidoni; Barros, Juliano Cesar de; Proto, Rodrigo Sestito; Priscila dos Santos, Costa; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida

    2012-01-01

    There are elements in nature that may be compared to some dermatological lesions, such as the black pearl, which is very similar to a cellular blue nevus observed in the gluteus region of a 31-year-old male patient. PMID:22892793

  3. Blue honeysuckle list 47

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript summarizes descriptions for two newly released Lonicera caerulea L., blue honeysuckle, cultivars released for northern production. This fruit is popular in Russia and in Japan, particularly Hokkaido. It has possibility as a new fruit cultivar for North America. The University of Sask...

  4. Great Blue Heron

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Great Blue Herons are found throughout much of North America, but are always associated with water. Because they fish by sight, they need relatively shallow water. Release of too much water through the canals north of the Everglades can interfere with their ability to find food....

  5. Sensitivity of Salmonella typhimurium TA97a to the type of agar used for preparation of Vogel-Bonner plates.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, P; Wedd, D J; Williams, W R; Mee, C D; O'Donovan, M R

    1992-01-01

    Recent problems with the supply of Difco bacto agar have forced some laboratories to evaluate alternative agars for use in the Salmonella/microsome assay. This led to the independent observation in two laboratories (Boots and Glaxo) that Salmonella typhimurium TA97a is sensitive to certain types of agar that may be used to prepare Vogel-Bonner minimal medium plates. A programme of work was, therefore, undertaken to investigate this phenomenon; 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride (at Boots) and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (at Glaxo) were tested against TA1537 and TA97a using Vogel-Bonner plates prepared with a number of different agars. Three agars (Lab M, Difco Bi-tek and Beckton Dickinson granulated) were identified which, although supporting normal growth of TA1537 revertant colonies, gave much reduced control counts and responses to the mutagens with TA97a. One agar, Becton Dickinson grade A, gave poor responses with TA1537 but produced satisfactory results with TA97a. In contrast to the Vogel-Bonner plates, varying the type of agar used in the top agar overlays had little effect on the responses obtained. On the basis of these comparisons, Becton Dickinson purified agar was selected as a suitable alternative to Difco bacto and it was concluded that laboratories using agars other than these, or purchasing pre-poured plates without specifying the type of agar, should be made aware of potential problems with TA97a. PMID:1635450

  6. The Blues at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Kenkel, P J

    1992-12-14

    The nation's Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans may be facing the greatest challenges in the association's 60-year history with the prospects of radical changes in the nation's healthcare system. The Blues, still the nation's largest insurer despite consolidation and growing competition, are dealing with such thorny issues as negative publicity over the operation of some plans and disputes over public ownership of Blues affiliates. PMID:10122596

  7. Evaluation of modified dichloran 18% glycerol (DG18) agar for enumerating fungi in wheat flour: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R; Hwang, C A

    1996-04-01

    Dichloran 18% glycerol agar base supplemented with 100 micrograms of chloramphenicol ml-1 (DG18 agar) was compared to DG18 agar supplemented with 100 micrograms of Triton X-301 ml-1 (DG18T) and DG18 agar supplemented with 1 microgram of iprodione [3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-(1-methyl-ethyl)-2,4-dioxo-1-imidazolidine- carboxamide] ml-1 (DG18I agar) for enumeration of fungi in ten brands of wheat flour. As the flours contained low fungal populations, all were inoculated with two to four strains of xerophilic fungi (Aspergillus candidus, A. penicillioides, Eurotium amstelodami, E. intermedium, E. repens, E. rubrum, E. tonophilum, E. umbrosum and Wallemia sebi), after which counts ranged from 3.87 to 6.37 log10 CFU g-1. Significantly higher populations (p < 0.05) were detected in four flours: three were on DG18T compared to DG18 and DG18I agar. A. candidus had been inoculated into all three flours. E. amstelodami, E. intermedium, E. repens or E. tonophilum had also been inoculated into at least one of the three flours showing significantly higher numbers of CFU on DG18T agar. Analysis of collapsed data from all samples showed that DG18T agar was significantly better than DG18 or DG18I agars at p < 0.10 but not at p < 0.05. Coefficients of variation for reproducibility (among-laboratory variation) were 8.4%, 7.5% and 8.6%, respectively, for DG18, DG18T and DG18I agars. DG18I agar restricted colony development most, especially for Eurotium species. Naturally occurring Penicillium species grew equally well on DG18 and DG18T agars, whereas W. sebi grew well on all three media. DG18T agar was judged to be superior to DG18 and DG18I agars for enumerating fungi in wheat flours. PMID:8796418

  8. Mass production of spores of lactic acid-producing Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 on agar plate.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of sporangiospores (spores) of Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 (identical to NRRL 395 and ATCC 9363) on potato-dextrose-agar medium was studied aiming at starting its L(+)-lactic acid fermentation directly from spore inoculation. Various parameters including harvest time, sowed spore density, size of agar plate, height of air space, and incubation mode of plate (agar-on-bottom or agar-on-top) were studied. Ordinarily used shallow Petri dishes were found out to be unsuitable for the full growth of R. oryzae sporangiophores. In a very wide range of the sowed spore density, the smaller it was, the greater the number of the harvested spores was. It was also interesting to find out that R. oryzae grown downward vertically with a deep air space in an agar-on-top mode gave larger amount of spores than in an agar-on-bottom mode at 30C for 7-day cultivation. Scale-up of the agar plate culture from 26.4 to 292 cm(2) was studied, resulting in the proportional relationship between the number of the harvested spores/plate and the plate area in the deep Petri dishes. The number of plates of 50 cm in diameter needed for 100 m(3) industrial submerged fermentation started directly from 2 10(5) spores/mL inoculum size was estimated as about 6, from which it was inferred that such a fermentation would be feasible. Designing a 50 cm plate and a method of spreading and collecting the spores were suggested. Bioprocess technological significance of the "full-scale industrial submerged fermentation started directly from spore inoculation omitting pre-culture" has been discussed. PMID:23658025

  9. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples. PMID:23816139

  10. The Blue Emu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descalzi, Doug; Gillett, John; Gordon, Carlton; Keener, ED; Novak, Ken; Puente, Laura

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal in designing the Blue Emu was to provide an airline with a cost efficient and profitable means of transporting passengers between the major cities in Aeroworld. The design attacks the market where a demand for inexpensive transportation exists and for this reason the Blue Emu is an attractive investment for any airline. In order to provide a profitable aircraft, special attention was paid to cost and economics. For example, in manufacturing, simplicity was stressed in structural design to reduce construction time and cost. Aerodynamic design employed a tapered wing which reduced the induced drag coefficient while also reducing the weight of the wing. Even the propulsion system was selected with cost effectiveness in mind, yet also to maintain the marketability of the aircraft. Thus, in every aspect of the design, consideration was given to economics and marketability of the final product.

  11. The blue brain project.

    PubMed

    Markram, Henry

    2006-02-01

    IBM's Blue Gene supercomputer allows a quantum leap in the level of detail at which the brain can be modelled. I argue that the time is right to begin assimilating the wealth of data that has been accumulated over the past century and start building biologically accurate models of the brain from first principles to aid our understanding of brain function and dysfunction. PMID:16429124

  12. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  13. New Blue Pigment Produced by Pantoea agglomerans and Its Production Characteristics at Various Temperatures ?

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Akimoto, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    A bacterium capable of producing a deep blue pigment was isolated from the environment and identified as Pantoea agglomerans. The pigment production characteristics of the bacterium under various conditions were studied. The optimal agar plate ingredients for pigment production by the bacterium were first studied: the optimal ingredients were 5 g/liter glucose, 10 g/liter tryptic soy broth, and 40 g/liter glycerol at pH 6.4. Bacterial cells grew on the agar plate during the incubation, while the pigment spread into the agar plate, meaning that it is water soluble. Pigment production was affected by the initial cell density. Namely, at higher initial cell densities ranging from 106.3 to 108.2 CFU/cm2 on the agar plate, faster pigment production was observed, but no blue pigment was produced at a very high initial density of 109.1 CFU/cm2. Thus, the cell population of 108.2 CFU/cm2 was used for subsequent study. Although the bacterium was capable of growing at temperatures above and below 10C, it could produce the pigment only at temperatures of ?10C. Moreover, the pigment production was faster at higher temperatures in the range of 10 to 20C. Pigment production at various temperature patterns was well described by a new logistic model. These results suggested that the bacterium could be used in the development of a microbial temperature indicator for the low-temperature-storage management of foods and clinical materials. To our knowledge, there is no other P. agglomerans strain capable of producing a blue pigment and the pigment is a new one of microbial origin. PMID:20971865

  14. New blue pigment produced by Pantoea agglomerans and its production characteristics at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Akimoto, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    A bacterium capable of producing a deep blue pigment was isolated from the environment and identified as Pantoea agglomerans. The pigment production characteristics of the bacterium under various conditions were studied. The optimal agar plate ingredients for pigment production by the bacterium were first studied: the optimal ingredients were 5 g/liter glucose, 10 g/liter tryptic soy broth, and 40 g/liter glycerol at pH 6.4. Bacterial cells grew on the agar plate during the incubation, while the pigment spread into the agar plate, meaning that it is water soluble. Pigment production was affected by the initial cell density. Namely, at higher initial cell densities ranging from 10(6.3) to 10(8.2) CFU/cm(2) on the agar plate, faster pigment production was observed, but no blue pigment was produced at a very high initial density of 10(9.1) CFU/cm(2). Thus, the cell population of 10(8.2) CFU/cm(2) was used for subsequent study. Although the bacterium was capable of growing at temperatures above and below 10C, it could produce the pigment only at temperatures of ?10C. Moreover, the pigment production was faster at higher temperatures in the range of 10 to 20C. Pigment production at various temperature patterns was well described by a new logistic model. These results suggested that the bacterium could be used in the development of a microbial temperature indicator for the low-temperature-storage management of foods and clinical materials. To our knowledge, there is no other P. agglomerans strain capable of producing a blue pigment and the pigment is a new one of microbial origin. PMID:20971865

  15. Migration of chemotactic bacteria in soft agar: role of gel concentration.

    PubMed

    Croze, Ottavio A; Ferguson, Gail P; Cates, Michael E; Poon, Wilson C K

    2011-08-01

    We study the migration of chemotactic wild-type Escherichia coli populations in semisolid (soft) agar in the concentration range C = 0.15-0.5% (w/v). For C≲0.35%, expanding bacterial colonies display characteristic chemotactic rings. At C = 0.35%, however, bacteria migrate as broad circular bands rather than sharp rings. These are growth/diffusion waves arising because of suppression of chemotaxis by the agar and have not been previously reported experimentally to our knowledge. For C = 0.4-0.5%, expanding colonies do not span the depth of the agar and develop pronounced front instabilities. The migration front speed is weakly dependent on agar concentration at C < 0.25%, but decreases sharply above this value. We discuss these observations in terms of an extended Keller-Segel model for which we derived novel transport parameter expressions accounting for perturbations of the chemotactic response by collisions with the agar. The model makes it possible to fit the observed front speed decay in the range C = 0.15-0.35%, and its solutions qualitatively reproduce the observed transition from chemotactic to growth/diffusion bands. We discuss the implications of our results for the study of bacteria in porous media and for the design of improved bacteriological chemotaxis assays. PMID:21806920

  16. Migration of Chemotactic Bacteria in Soft Agar: Role of Gel Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Croze, Ottavio A.; Ferguson, Gail P.; Cates, Michael E.; Poon, Wilson C.K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the migration of chemotactic wild-type Escherichia coli populations in semisolid (soft) agar in the concentration range C = 0.15–0.5% (w/v). For C≲0.35%, expanding bacterial colonies display characteristic chemotactic rings. At C = 0.35%, however, bacteria migrate as broad circular bands rather than sharp rings. These are growth/diffusion waves arising because of suppression of chemotaxis by the agar and have not been previously reported experimentally to our knowledge. For C = 0.4–0.5%, expanding colonies do not span the depth of the agar and develop pronounced front instabilities. The migration front speed is weakly dependent on agar concentration at C < 0.25%, but decreases sharply above this value. We discuss these observations in terms of an extended Keller-Segel model for which we derived novel transport parameter expressions accounting for perturbations of the chemotactic response by collisions with the agar. The model makes it possible to fit the observed front speed decay in the range C = 0.15–0.35%, and its solutions qualitatively reproduce the observed transition from chemotactic to growth/diffusion bands. We discuss the implications of our results for the study of bacteria in porous media and for the design of improved bacteriological chemotaxis assays. PMID:21806920

  17. Novel grafted agar disks for the covalent immobilization of ?-D-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Marwa I; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2015-12-01

    Novel grafted agar disks were prepared for the covalent immobilization of ?-D-galactosidase (?-gal). The agar disks were activated through reacting with ethylenediamine or different molecular weights of Polyethyleneimine (PEI), followed by glutaraldehyde (GA). The modification of the agar gel and the binding of the enzyme were verified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Moreover, the agar's activation process was optimized, and the amount of immobilized enzyme increased 3.44 folds, from 38.1 to 131.2 U/g gel, during the course of the optimization process. The immobilization of ?-gal onto the activated agar disks caused its optimum temperature to increase from 45C to 45-55C. The optimum pH of the enzyme was also shifted towards the acidic side (3.6-4.6) after its immobilization. Additionally, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) increased for the immobilized ?-gal as compared to its free counterpart whereas the maximum reaction rate (Vmax ) decreased. The immobilized enzyme was also shown to retain 92.99% of its initial activity after being used for 15 consecutive times. PMID:26043937

  18. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Soto-Reyes, Nohem; Temis-Prez, Ana L; Lpez-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, Mara Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (?'), loss factor (?"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 C. The ?' and ?" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. PMID:25827444

  19. Effect of agargelatin compositions on the release of salbutamol tablets

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anita; Tahir, Abu; Kaloti, Mandeep; Ali, Javed; Bohidar, Himadri B

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed for the development of salbutamol-modified release tablet using various polymer composition of agar, gelatin A and gelatin B. The purpose is to observe the role of polymer composition on the modified dissolution rate of salbutamol. Pre-formulation trials were initiated by comprising different ratios of polymer blend in the tablets. Formulations were optimized based on their invitro release performed in enzyme free simulated gastric fluid (0.1 N HCl, pH 1.2). Dissolution profiles of tablets were compared among the tablets made of agar, gelatin A, gelatin B and their blends agar-gelatin A, agar-gelatin B, gelatin A-gelatin B and agar-gelatin A-gelatin B in 1:1 ratio. Polymer compositions were fixed based on our desired sustaining activity of the tablet which showed a biphasic release profile with immediate release followed by sustained release. Polymer blends were more effective in controlling drug release. The better controlling behavior of polymer blends was explained by specific interaction between polymer components, their network structure and polymerdrug interaction. PMID:23071927

  20. Strategies to improve the mechanical strength and water resistance of agar films for food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Gonalves, Maria P

    2015-11-01

    Agar films possess several properties adequate for food packaging applications. However, their high cost-production and quality variations caused by physiological and environmental factors affecting wild seaweeds make them less attractive for industries. In this work, native (NA) and alkali-modified (AA) agars obtained from sustainably grown seaweeds (integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) were mixed with locust bean gum (LBG) to make 'knife-coated' films with fixed final concentration (1 wt%) and variable agar/LBG ratios. Agar films were easier to process upon LBG addition (viscosity increase and gelling character decrease of the film-forming solutions observed by dynamic oscillatory and steady shear measurements). The mechanical properties and water resistance were optimal for films with 50 and/or 75% LBG contents and best in the case of NA (cheaper to extract). These findings can help reduce the cost-production of agar packaging films. Moreover, the controlled cultivation of seaweeds can provide continuous and reliable feedstock for transformation industries. PMID:26256341

  1. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 ?g/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food. PMID:24507339

  2. Effects of disinfection of combined agar/alginate impressions on the dimensional accuracy of stone casts.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Nakagawa, Hisami; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Nishiyama, Minoru

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of disinfection of combined agar/alginate impressions on the dimensional accuracy of resultant stone casts. Impressions of a master cast designed to simulate an abutment tooth were prepared by combining each of two brands of cartridge-form agar impression materials with an alginate impression material. The impressions were immersed in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes or 2% glutaraldehyde for 30 minutes. The remaining impressions were sprayed with these two disinfectants and then stored in sealed bags for 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. Stone casts obtained from the non-disinfected impressions were also prepared as control. Changes in diameter of the stone casts were then measured. Results indicated that storage for 10 minutes after spraying with 1% sodium hypochlorite was an appropriate disinfection method for combined agar/alginate impressions, as well as immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes. PMID:17694758

  3. Blood agar to detect virulence factors in tap water heterotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Payment, P; Coffin, E; Paquette, G

    1994-01-01

    Cytolytic colonies were found in 57% of tap water samples, and up to 6% of samples were found to contain bacteria having three or more virulence factors. The factors evaluated were cytotoxicity, hemolysis, cell adherence, and cell invasiveness. Overall, 17% of the samples contained cytolytic colonies that were adherent and hemolytic. Among the media tested, tryptic soy agar with sheep blood (incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h) was the best medium for the detection of cytolytic colonies. Of the colonies growing on this medium, 13% were cytolytic, whereas on medium R2A, less than 3% were cytolytic. Furthermore, when tryptic soy agar with blood was used, 24% of the samples contained colonies with at least three virulence factors whereas only 5% were positive with R2A. Routine monitoring by using tryptic soy agar with sheep blood is suggested as an appropriate procedure for the detection of bacteria with pathogenic potential in drinking water. PMID:8017913

  4. [DNA and chemical analyses of commercial fly agaric-related products].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukiharu, Toshimitsu; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Makino, Yukiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2005-04-01

    Since June 6, 2002, psilocin and psilocybin-containing fungi (commonly called "magic mushrooms") have been regulated by the Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law in Japan. However, various fly agaric-related products are now entering the Japanese market via the internet. In this study, fly agaric-related products available in this way were investigated for raw materials by DNA analysis and for additives by chemical analysis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rDNA region suggested that these fly agaric-related products originate from A. muscaria or A. muscaria var. persicina. Furthermore, they were classified into three strains based on the ITS2-LSU nucleotide sequence. Harmine derivatives and/or tryptamine derivatives were detected in some of these products by LC/MS analysis. In accordance with this, the matK gene of Peganum harmala was found in all of the harmine derivative-containing samples. PMID:16018591

  5. Double-layer agar cell cultures as a method of studying cell growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepantseva, E.A.; Shevlyagin, V.Ya.; Al'tshtein, A.D.

    1986-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a method of double-layer agar cell cultures which can be conveniently used to study the ability of some donor cells to produce tumor growth factors for other recipient or test cells. The donor and recipient cells are placed in different layers of agar, separated by an intermediate layer. Under a microscope, the two cell layers can be distinguished and assessed in relation to colony formation. Hamster cells were used in the experiments. The role of proliferation in manifestation of the donor properties of the cells was assessed, using donor cells seeded in different amounts of agar and also cells irradiated with gamma-rays and which had lost their ability to divide. The cells were compared and results are presented.

  6. Growth and plating efficiency of methanococci on agar media. [Methanococcus maripaludis and M. voltae

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.W.; Whitman, W.B.; Fields, R.D.; Wolfe, R.S.

    1983-07-01

    Plating techniques for cultivation of methanogenic bacteria have been optimized for two members of the genus Methanococcus. Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanococcus voltae were cultivated on aerobically and anaerobically prepared agar media. Maintenance of O/sub 2/ levels below 5 mu l/liter within an anaerobic glove box was necessary during plating and incubation for 90% recovery of plated cells. Under an atmosphere of H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/S (79:20:1), 2 to 3 days of incubation at 37 degrees C were sufficient for the formation of visible colonies. The viability of plated cells was significantly affected by the growth phase of the culture, H/sub 2/S concentration, and the volume of medium per plate. In addition, colony size of methanococci was affected by agar type, as well as by the concentrations of agar, H/sub 2/S, and bicarbonate. 12 references

  7. Eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection in commercial dairy herds using the agar gel immunodiffusion test.

    PubMed Central

    Shettigara, P T; Samagh, B S; Lobinowich, E M

    1986-01-01

    Demands for bovine leukemia virus test negative breeding cattle and for semen from bovine leukemia virus test negative bulls by several countries have encouraged the eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection from selected herds in Canada. This project was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of the agar gel immunodiffusion test, standardized to detect anti-bovine leukemia virus glycoprotein antibodies, for eradication of bovine leukemia virus from commercial dairy herds. Of nine participating herds, the prevalence rate of bovine leukemia virus infection was low (less than 10%) in three, medium (11-30%) in four and high (greater than 30%) in two. The herds were tested by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, reactors were removed and the herds were then retested at regular intervals. The results indicate that it is possible to eliminate bovine leukemia virus infection from the herds after two to three cycles of agar gel immunodiffusion tests and prompt removal of the reactors. PMID:3019498

  8. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26297185

  9. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  10. Production of a Blue Pigment (Glaukothalin) by Marine Rheinheimera spp.

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Thorwest, Marc; Plitzko, Inken; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Zeeck, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Two ?-Proteobacteria strains, that is, HP1 and HP9, which both produce a diffusible deep blue pigment, were isolated from the German Wadden Sea and from the resund, Denmark, respectively. Both strains affiliate with the genus Rheinheimera. Small amounts of the pigment could be extracted from HP1 grown in a 50 L fermenter and were purified chromatographically. Chemical analysis of the pigment including NMR and mass spectrometry led to a molecular formula of C34H56N4O4 (m.w. 584.85) which has not yet been reported in literature. The molecule is highly symmetrically and consists of two heterocyclic halves to which aliphatic side chains are attached. The pigment has been named glaukothalin due to its blue color and its marine origin (glaukos, gr. = blue, thalatta, gr. = sea). Production of glaukothalin on MB2216 agar plates by our Rheinheimera strains is affected in the presence of other bacterial strains either increasing or decreasing pigment production. The addition of a single amino acid, arginine (5 gl?1), greatly increases pigment production by our Rheinheimera strains. Even though the production of glaukothalin leads to inhibitory activity against three bacterial strains from marine particles, our Rheinheimera isolates are inhibited by various bacteria of different phylogenetic groups. The ecological role of glaukothalin production by Rheinheimera strains, however, remains largely unknown. PMID:20016676

  11. Assessment of Etest as an Alternative to Agar Dilution for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Thomas H.; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-01-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest. PMID:24554750

  12. Agar-polydimethylsiloxane devices for quantitative investigation of oviposition behaviour of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacob C K; Taylor-Kamall, Rhodri W; Hilliker, Arthur J; Rezai, Pouya

    2015-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a model organism and its behaviours including oviposition (egg-laying) on agar substrates have been widely used for assessment of a variety of biological processes in flies. Physical and chemical properties of the substrate are the dominant factors affecting Drosophila's oviposition, but they have not been investigated precisely and parametrically with the existing manual approaches. As a result, many behavioral questions about Drosophila oviposition, such as the combined effects of the aforementioned substrate properties (e.g., exposure area, sugar content, and stiffness) on oviposition and viability, and their threshold values, are yet to be answered. In this paper, we have devised a simple, easily implementable, and novel methodology that allows for modification of physical and chemical composition of agar substrates in order to quantitatively study survival and oviposition of adult fruit flies in an accurate and repeatable manner. Agar substrates have been modified by surface patterning using single and hexagonally arrayed through-hole polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with various diameters and interspacing, as well as by substrate stiffness and sugar content modification via alteration of chemical components. While pure PDMS substrates showed a significant lethal effect on flies, a 0.5?mm diameter through-hole access to agar was found to abruptly increase the survival of adult flies to more than 93%. Flies avoided ovipositing on pure PDMS and on top of substrates with 0.5?mm diameter agar exposure areas. At a hole diameter of 2?mm (i.e., 0.25% exposure area) or larger, eggs were observed to be laid predominately inside the through-holes and along the edges of the PDMS-agar interface, showing a trending increase in site selection with 4?mm (i.e., 1% exposure area threshold) demonstrating natural oviposition rates similar to pure agar. The surface-modified agar-PDMS hybrid devices and the threshold values reported for the substrate physical and chemical conditions affecting oviposition are novel; therefore, we advocate their use for future in-depth studies of oviposition behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster with accuracy and repeatability. The technique is also useful for development of novel assays for learning and decision-making studies as well as miniaturized devices for self-assembly of eggs and embryonic developmental investigations. PMID:26180569

  13. Agar transfer devices for environmental sampling in the compounding pharmacy: science and compliance.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Anthony; Sutton, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the results of a study evaluating the sampling efficiency of a flat paddle sampling device against a round surface sampling device in controlled studies. Each device is supplied with identical microbial-growth media, and laboratory studies document equivalent performance of the media in the devices. Both devices perform sampling by the same process (agar transfer of microorganisms from the facility surface to the agar surface), and the performance of the two devices was shown to be equivalent in laboratory studies. Either the commonly used flat paddle sampler or the round contact plate is suitable for surface monitoring in the compounding pharmacy. PMID:25902625

  14. The Blue Marble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 'blue marble' image is based on the most detailed collection of true-color imagery of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. Most of the information contained in this image came from MODIS, illustrating MODIS' outstanding capacity to act as an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of this image is based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the satellite's view on any single day. Global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data was used to simulate the ocean surface. MODIS doesn't measure 3-D features of the Earth, so the surface observations were draped over topographic data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR sensor-the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of MODIS imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. A large collection of imagery based on the blue marble in a variety of sizes and formats, including animations and the full (1 km) resolution imagery, is available at the Blue Marble page. Image by Reto Stockli, Render by Robert Simmon. Based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  15. Blue ocean leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets. PMID:24956870

  16. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of chelating agents using the agar diffusion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of 2 metal chelators. Concentrations of 0 to 40 mM of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) were prepared in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to 1...

  17. Alternative plasticizers for the production of thermo-compressed agar films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully Electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  18. EFFECT OF IMPACT STRESS ON MICROBIAL RECOVERY ON AN AGAR SURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial stress due to the impaction of microorganisms onto an agar collection surface was studied experimentally. he relative recovery rates of aerosolized Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus luteus were determined as a function of the impaction velocity by using a moving a...

  19. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance sp...

  20. A modified micro chamber agar spot slide culture technique for microscopic examination of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Bhargava, Kanika

    2016-04-01

    The slide culture technique aids in the study of undisturbed microscopic morphological details of filamentous fungi. The existing methods for setting up of slide culture are quite cumbersome, time-consuming and require elaborate preparation. We describe a modified and easy to perform micro chamber agar spot slide culture technique. PMID:26924158

  1. Rapid diagnosis of acanthamoeba keratitis using non-nutrient agar with a lawn of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient presented with a corneal foreign body in his only eye. He was treated with prophylactic antibiotics and sent home, but deteriorated. Findings He returned to the hospital 5 days later, and on slit-lamp examination, there was ciliary injection, corneal oedema and a 1 mm 1 mm corneal abscess with mild anterior uveitis. Corneal scrapings were taken for culture on a non-nutrient agar with a lawn of Escherichia coli, on chocolate agar and on blood agar. He was treated with fortified gentamicin and cefazolin drops. He improved and was discharged 4 days after admission. On day 5, the culture results showed acanthamoeba. He was brought back to the hospital and treated with hourly chlorhexidine drops, ofloxacin six times daily and neomycin/dexamethasone drops once daily. On day 7, he was discharged to continue treatment at home, at which time his visual acuity in that eye was 6/9, and slit-lamp examination showed punctate keratitis and a stromal opacity with mild peripheral infiltration. Conclusions Culture on non-nutrient agar with a lawn of E. coli is a rapid, reliable and less invasive alternative to corneal biopsy for the diagnosis of acanthamoeba infection. We suggest using this method where acanthamoeba is suspected. Owing to the risk of corneal abscess, orthokeratology should be avoided in an amblyopic patient or an only eye. Acanthamoeba infection may be masked by other eye diseases. PMID:23514313

  2. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for salmonella enteritidis and typhimurium on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a common cause of foodborne disease resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products. Although a direct plating method is widely used for presumptive positive screening of pathogenic Salmonella colonies on agar plates, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and also prone to...

  3. Applying Agar's Concept of "Languaculture" to Explain Asian Students' Experiences in the Australian Tertiary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Lindy; Tsedendamba, Nara

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports part of a broader qualitative case study of Asian students "translation" (Agar, 2006) to study in an Australian university. The paper is concerned with the experiences of eight participants and their involvement in a training programme in the use of language learning strategies (LLS) to support their engagement with…

  4. Mercury in fruiting bodies of Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria (L.: Fr.) Pers. collected from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falandysz, J.; Lipka, K.

    2003-05-01

    Total mercury concentrations were determined in the fruiting bodies of Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria (L.: FL) Pers. and underlying soil substrate collected from several sites in Poland in 1993-2000 to evaluate mercury status as contaminant and bioindicating features of this species. The samples were collected from the spatially distant sites such as: Zaborski Landscape Park, Mierzeja Wiślana Landscape Park, Wdzydzki Landscape Park, Borecka Forest, Tucholskie Forest, Wieluńska Upland, the communities of Gubin, Manowo, Lubiana and Morag. Total mercury content of caps and stalks of Fly agaric varied widely depending on the sites examined. The range of the mean mercury concentrations for all 17 sites was between 96±10 and 1900±1400 ng/g dry wt for the caps and between 6l±32 and 920±760 ng/g dry wt for the stalks, while between 4.4±3.1 and 150±20 ng/g were noted for soil substrate samples from 9 sites examined. Fly agaric independently of the site examined showed relatively good capacity to accumulate total mercury and BCF values varied between 16±10 and 74±15 for the caps and between 11±8 and 42±10 for the stalks. Nevertheless, relatively high bioconcentration potential of mercury by Fly agaric seems to be specific for that species and under soil mercury concentrations noted no bioindication properties of this mushroom could be observed.

  5. THE MICROGARDENING COOKBOOK, DIRECTIONS FOR PREPARING DISHES AND TUBES OF STERILE NUTRIENT AGAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, MARION N.

    THIS BOOKLET WAS PREPARED FOR TEACHER USE IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT "MICROGARDENING." IT CONTAINS DIRECTIONS FOR PREPARING CULTURE DISHES AND TUBES OF NUTRIENT STERILE AGAR FOR FUNGAL AND/OR BACTERIAL GROWTH. IT INCLUDES (1) LISTS OF NEEDED SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT, (2) DIRECTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION AND STERILIZATION OF

  6. MODIFIED AGAR MEDIUM FOR DETECTING ENVIRONMENTAL SALMONELLAE BY THE MOST-PROBABLE-NUMBER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonellae in the environment remain a potential source of disease. Low numbers of salmonellae have been detected and enumerated from environmental samples by most probable number methods that require careful colony selection from plated agar medium. A modified xylose lysine bri...

  7. Evolutionary consequences of putative intra- and interspecific hybridization in agaric fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agaric fungi of the southern Appalachians including the Great Smoky Mountains National Park are often heterozygous for the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) with >42% of collections showing some level of heterozygosity for indels and/or base-pair substitutions. For these collections, int...

  8. Production of microbial medium from defatted brebra (Milletia ferruginea) seed flour to substitute commercial peptone agar

    PubMed Central

    Andualem, Berhanu; Gessesse, Amare

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate and optimize microbial media that substitute peptone agar using brebra seed defatted flour. Methods 'Defatted process, inoculums preparation, evaluation of bacterial growth, preparation of cooked and hydrolyzed media and growth turbidity of tested bacteria were determined. Results Two percent defatted flour was found to be suitable concentration for the growth of pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Salmonella (NCTC 8385) and Shigella flexneri (ATCC 12022) (S. flexneri), while 3% defatted flour was suitable for Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) (S. aureus). E. coli (93±1) and S. flexneri (524±1) colony count were significantly (P≤0.05) greater in defatted flour without supplement than in supplemented medium. E. coli [(3.72×109±2) CFU/mL], S. aureus [(7.4×109±2) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(4.03×109±2) CFU/mL] and Salmonella [(2.37×109±1) CFU/mL] in non-hydrolyzed sample were statistically (P≤0.05) greater than hydrolyzed one and commercial peptone agar. Colony count of Salmonella [(4.55×109±3) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(5.40×109±3) CFU/mL] and Lyesria moncytogenes (ATCC 19116) [(5.4×109±3) CFU/mL] on raw defatted flour agar was significantly (P≤0.05) greater than cooked defatted flour and commercial peptone agar. Biomass of E. coli, S. aureus, Salmonella and Enterococcus faecalis in non-hydrolyzed defatted flour is highly increased over hydrolyzed defatted flour and commercial peptone broth. Conclusions The defatted flour agar was found to be better microbial media or comparable with peptone agar. The substances in it can serve as sources of carbon, nitrogen, vitamins and minerals that are essential to support the growth of microorganisms without any supplements. Currently, all supplements of peptone agar are very expensive in the market. PMID:24075344

  9. Effect of impact stress on microbial recovery on an agar surface.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, S L; Grinshpun, S A; Willeke, K; Terzieva, S; Ulevicius, V; Donnelly, J

    1995-01-01

    Microbial stress due to the impaction of microorganisms onto an agar collection surface was studied experimentally. The relative recovery rates of aerosolized Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus luteus were determined as a function of the impaction velocity by using a moving agar slide impactor operating over a flow rate range from 3.8 to 40 liters/min yielding impaction velocities from 24 to 250 m/s. As a reference, the sixth stage of the Andersen Six-Stage Viable Particle Sizing Sampler was used at its operating flow rate of 28.3 liters/min (24 m/s). At a collection efficiency of close to 100% for the agar slide impactor, an increase in sampling flow rate and, therefore, in impaction velocity produced a significant decline in the percentage of microorganisms recovered. Conversely, when the collection efficiency was less than 100%, greater recovery and lower injury rates occurred. The highest relative rate of recovery (approximately 51% for P. fluorescens and approximately 62% for M. luteus) was obtained on the complete (Trypticase soy agar) medium at 40 and 24 m/s (6.4 and 3.8 liters/min), respectively. M. luteus demonstrated less damage than P. fluorescens, suggesting the hardy nature of the gram-positive strain versus that of the gram-negative microorganism. Comparison of results from the agar slide and Andersen impactors at the same sampling velocity showed that recovery and injury due to collection depends not only on the magnitude of the impaction velocity but also on the degree to which the microorganisms may be embedded in the collection medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7747946

  10. Effect of lignin on water vapor barrier, mechanical, and structural properties of agar/lignin composite films.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable composite films were prepared using two renewable resources based biopolymers, agar and lignin alkali. The lignin was used as a reinforcing material and agar as a biopolymer matrix. The effect of lignin concentration (1, 3, 5, and 10wt%) on the performance of the composite films was studied. In addition, the mechanical, water vapor barrier, UV light barrier properties, FE-SEM, and TGA of the films were analyzed. The agar/lignin films exhibited higher mechanical and UV barrier properties along with lower water vapor permeability compared to the neat agar film. The FTIR and SEM results showed the compatibility of lignin with agar polymer. The swelling ratio and moisture content of agar/lignin composite films were decreased with increase in lignin content. The thermostability and char content of agar/lignin composite films increased with increased lignin content. The results suggested that agar/lignin films have a potential to be used as a UV barrier food packaging material for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food. PMID:26271435

  11. Differentiating non-0157:H7 STEC serogroups from ground beef plated on agar media by hyperspetral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The development of an assay to detect and confirm a positive non-O157:H7 isolate is challenging when mixed morphologically results are obtained from the serogroups growing on Rainbow agar. Rainbow agar is only claimed by the manufacturer to be very specific for E.coli O157:H7 strain...

  12. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H. J. H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  13. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  14. Agar-block microcosms for controlled plant tissue decomposition by aerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jonathan S; Jacobson, K Brook

    2011-01-01

    The two principal methods for studying fungal biodegradation of lignocellulosic plant tissues were developed for wood preservative testing (soil-block; agar-block). It is well-accepted that soil-block microcosms yield higher decay rates, fewer moisture issues, lower variability among studies, and higher thresholds of preservative toxicity. Soil-block testing is thus the more utilized technique and has been standardized by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (method D 1413-07). The soil-block design has drawbacks, however, using locally-variable soil sources and in limiting the control of nutrients external (exogenous) to the decaying tissues. These drawbacks have emerged as a problem in applying this method to other, increasingly popular research aims. These modern aims include degrading lignocellulosics for bioenergy research, testing bioremediation of co-metabolized toxics, evaluating oxidative mechanisms, and tracking translocated elements along hyphal networks. Soil-blocks do not lend enough control in these applications. A refined agar-block approach is necessary. Here, we use the brown rot wood-degrading fungus Serpula lacrymans to degrade wood in agar-block microcosms, using deep Petri dishes with low-calcium agar. We test the role of exogenous gypsum on decay in a time-series, to demonstrate the utility and expected variability. Blocks from a single board rip (longitudinal cut) are conditioned, weighed, autoclaved, and introduced aseptically atop plastic mesh. Fungal inoculations are at each block face, with exogenous gypsum added at interfaces. Harvests are aseptic until the final destructive harvest. These microcosms are designed to avoid block contact with agar or Petri dish walls. Condensation is minimized during plate pours and during incubation. Finally, inoculum/gypsum/wood spacing is minimized but without allowing contact. These less technical aspects of agar-block design are also the most common causes of failure and the key source of variability among studies. Video publication is therefore useful in this case, and we demonstrate low-variability, high-quality results. PMID:21339715

  15. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation. PMID:24663457

  16. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  17. Colony morphotype on Sabouraud-triphenyltetrazolium agar: a simple and inexpensive method for Candida subspecies discrimination.

    PubMed Central

    Quinds, G; Fernndez-Rodrguez, M; Burgos, A; Tellaetxe, M; Cisterna, R; Pontn, J

    1992-01-01

    A new method of Candida subspecies discrimination on Sabouraud-triphenyltetrazolium agar is reported. Five hundred sixty-two strains of Candida and Torulopsis glabrata, previously identified by conventional mycological methods, were studied. Each strain received a three-letter code and a number based on its colonial morphology. Sixteen morphotypes were found for Candida albicans, 6 were found for Candida parapsilosis, 4 were found for both Candida guilliermondii and Candida krusei, and 12 were found for Candida tropicalis. None of the 56 T. glabrata strains studied grew on this agar. A reproducibility of 95% was found for C. albicans. The simplicity and low cost could make this method useful for typing Candida spp. Images PMID:1400981

  18. Synthesis and applications of poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) grafted agar: a microwave based approach.

    PubMed

    Rani, G Usha; Mishra, Sumit; Pathak, Gopal; Jha, Usha; Sen, Gautam

    2013-10-01

    Synthesis of graft copolymers under the influence of microwave radiation alone is a rapid, efficient, clean, cheap, convenient, energy-saving and green method. Grafting of poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) on agar backbone was carried out under the influence of microwave radiation. The synthesis is optimized in terms of percentage grafting and intrinsic viscosity, by varying the microwave irradiation time and monomer (2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) concentration. The synthesized graft copolymers have been characterized by intrinsic viscosity measurement, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, elemental analysis (C, H, N, & S), thermal studies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flocculation efficacy of the synthesized graft copolymers was studied in 0.25% kaolin and 1% coal fine suspension, through 'jar test' procedure. Further, flocculation efficacy of the best grade, coagulant (alum) and agar were studied for possible application in remediation of metals from river water. PMID:23850679

  19. Blue-Fluorescent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Anton; Matsushita, Masayuki; Juban, Eric A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H. Z.; Hoffman, Timothy Z.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Taylor, Matthew J.; Wirsching, Peter; Rettig, Wolfgang; McCusker, James K.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Millar, David P.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Janda, Kim D.

    2000-10-01

    The forte of catalytic antibodies has resided in the control of the ground-state reaction coordinate. A principle and method are now described in which antibodies can direct the outcome of photophysical and photochemical events that take place on excited-state potential energy surfaces. The key component is a chemically reactive optical sensor that provides a direct report of the dynamic interplay between protein and ligand at the active site. To illustrate the concept, we used a trans-stilbene hapten to elicit a panel of monoclonal antibodies that displayed a range of fluorescent spectral behavior when bound to a trans-stilbene substrate. Several antibodies yielded a blue fluorescence indicative of an excited-state complex or ``exciplex'' between trans-stilbene and the antibody. The antibodies controlled the isomerization coordinate of trans-stilbene and dynamically coupled this manifold with an active-site residue. A step was taken toward the use of antibody-based photochemical sensors for diagnostic and clinical applications.

  20. Blue metal complex pigments involved in blue flower color.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kosaku

    2006-05-01

    The blue pigment of cornflower, protocyanin, has been investigated for a long time, but its precise structure was not entirely explained until recently. The molecular structure of the pigment was recently shown to be a metal complex of six molecules each of anthocyanin and flavone glycoside, with one ferric iron, one magnesium and two calcium ions by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The studies provided the answer to the question posed in the early part of the last century, "why is the cornflower blue and rose red when both flowers contain the same anthocyanin?" This work was achieved on the basis of the results of long years of the studies made by many researchers. In this review, the author focuses on the investigations of the blue metal complex pigments involved in the bluing of flowers, commelinin from Commelina commusis, protocyanin from Centaurea cyanus, protodelphin from Salvia patens and hydrangea blue pigment. PMID:25792777

  1. Blue metal complex pigments involved in blue flower color

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kosaku

    2006-01-01

    The blue pigment of cornflower, protocyanin, has been investigated for a long time, but its precise structure was not entirely explained until recently. The molecular structure of the pigment was recently shown to be a metal complex of six molecules each of anthocyanin and flavone glycoside, with one ferric iron, one magnesium and two calcium ions by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The studies provided the answer to the question posed in the early part of the last century, why is the cornflower blue and rose red when both flowers contain the same anthocyanin? This work was achieved on the basis of the results of long years of the studies made by many researchers. In this review, the author focuses on the investigations of the blue metal complex pigments involved in the bluing of flowers, commelinin from Commelina commusis, protocyanin from Centaurea cyanus, protodelphin from Salvia patens and hydrangea blue pigment. PMID:25792777

  2. Enhancing bioaerosol sampling by Andersen impactors using mineral-oil-spread agar plate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 L) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ?100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high volume portable samplers for bioaerosol monitoring. PMID:23460818

  3. Enhancing Bioaerosol Sampling by Andersen Impactors Using Mineral-Oil-Spread Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 L) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05). The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20%) were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ?100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high volume portable samplers for bioaerosol monitoring. PMID:23460818

  4. Co-precipitation with PVP and Agar to Improve Physicomechanical Properties of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Kiafar, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Ibuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting due to its viscoelastic properties. Additionally its high cohesivity results in low flowability. In this study, co-precipitation of ibuprofen with varying concentration of agar and PVP to optimize properties of Ibuprofen was carried out. Materials and Methods: Co-precipitates of ibuprofen- PVP or agar were prepared by solvent evaporation technique under vacuum condition. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X -ray diffraction of powder (XRDP) and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to investigate the solid state characteristics of the co-precipitates. The dissolution behavior, flowability, particle size and compaction properties of various batches were also studied. Results: Co-precipitation of drug with agar led to a change in habit from needle to plate shape crystals, while drug –PVP co-precipitates had agglomerated structure and consisted of numerous crystals which had been aggregated together. The co-precipitates showed improved flow properties compared with ibuprofen alone. Precipitation of ibuprofen with these additives led to modification in the dissolution of the drug. Agar in 1% w/w improved slightly the dissolution rate of drug while PVP had a negative impact and led to reduction in the dissolution rate of drug to less than that of pure drug. The all obtained co-precipitates exhibited significantly improved tableting behavior compared with drug crystals alone. This may be due to this fact that, the polymer covering the drug particles increases and changes the nature of the surface area available for interparticulate bonds between particles. DSC, XRDP and FT-IR experiments showed that drug particles, in co-precipitates samples, did not undergo polymorphic modifications. Conclusion: The study highlights the influence of polymeric additives on crystallization process leading to modified performance. PMID:24250942

  5. Co-precipitation with PVP and Agar to Improve Physicomechanical Properties of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Kiafar, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Ibuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting due to its viscoelastic properties. Additionally its high cohesivity results in low flowability. In this study, co-precipitation of ibuprofen with varying concentration of agar and PVP to optimize properties of Ibuprofen was carried out. Materials and Methods: Co-precipitates of ibuprofen- PVP or agar were prepared by solvent evaporation technique under vacuum condition. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X -ray diffraction of powder (XRDP) and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to investigate the solid state characteristics of the co-precipitates. The dissolution behavior, flowability, particle size and compaction properties of various batches were also studied. Results: Co-precipitation of drug with agar led to a change in habit from needle to plate shape crystals, while drug –PVP co-precipitates had agglomerated structure and consisted of numerous crystals which had been aggregated together. The co-precipitates showed improved flow properties compared with ibuprofen alone. Precipitation of ibuprofen with these additives led to modification in the dissolution of the drug. Agar in 1% w/w improved slightly the dissolution rate of drug while PVP had a negative impact and led to reduction in the dissolution rate of drug to less than that of pure drug. The all obtained co-precipitates exhibited significantly improved tableting behavior compared with drug crystals alone. This may be due to this fact that, the polymer covering the drug particles increases and changes the nature of the surface area available for interparticulate bonds between particles. DSC, XRDP and FT-IR experiments showed that drug particles, in co-precipitates samples, did not undergo polymorphic modifications. Conclusion: The study highlights the influence of polymeric additives on crystallization process leading to modified performance. PMID:24250936

  6. Incidence of thymidine-dependent enterococci detected on Mueller-Hinton agar with low thymidine content.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiner, R C; Migneault, P C; Robertson, R G

    1980-01-01

    It was observed that 10% of urine culture isolates of enterococci tested for antimicrobial susceptibility failed to grow on commercially prepared Mueller-Hinton agar with low levels of thymidine and thymine. All strains could utilize exogenous thymidine and thymine and required only low levels (0.4-microgram disk) to support growth. All thymidine-thymine-requiring strains were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:6775593

  7. Qualitative and quantitative agar invasion test based on bacterial colony/biofilm.

    PubMed

    Corcuera, Mara Teresa; Gmez-Aguado, Fernando; Gmez-Lus, Mara Luisa; Ramos, Carmen; de la Parte, Mara Antonia; Alonso, Mara Jos; Prieto, Jos

    2013-09-01

    Invasion of the culture medium is a feature frequently studied in yeasts, in which it has been related to a greater virulence, but it is practically unknown in bacteria. Recently, it has been demonstrated that several clinically relevant bacterial species were also able of invading agar media, so it was necessary to design a microbiological assay to study the expression of this character in bacteria. Accordingly, a bacterial agar invasion test based on colony/biofilm development was designed, which allows qualitative and quantitative characterization of bacterial growth into the agar culture medium. Once the culture conditions were optimized, the test was applied to 90 strains from nine bacterial species, validating its usefulness for differentiating invasive strains (positive) from those non invasive (negative). The test also allows sorting invasive strains according to agar invasion intensity (low, moderate, high) and topographic invasion pattern (peripheral, homogeneous, mixed). Moreover, an image analysis routine to quantify the invasion was developed. Implemented method enables direct measuring of two invasion parameters (invasion area and number of invasion dots), automated calculation of three relative variables (invasion relative area, invasion dots relative density, and invasion dot average area), and the establishment of strain specific frequency histograms. This new methodology is simple, fast, reproducible, objective, inexpensive and can be used to study a great number of specimens simultaneously, all of which make it suitable for incorporation to the routine of any microbiology laboratory. It could also be a useful tool for additional studies related to clinical aspects of bacterial isolates such as virulence and antimicrobial response. PMID:23838131

  8. Evaluation of cephamycins as supplements to selective agar for detecting Campylobacter spp. in chicken carcass rinses.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Young-Ji; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Song, Kwang-Young; Sung, Kidon; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-04-16

    Although cefoperazone is the most commonly used antibiotic in Campylobacter-selective media, the distribution of cefoperazone-resistant bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is increasing. Here we evaluated the potential of cephamycins for use as supplements to improve modified charcoal-cefoperazone-deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) by replacing cefoperazone with the same concentrations (32mg/L) of cefotetan (modified charcoal-cefotetan-deoxycholate agar, mCCtDA) and cefoxitin (modified charcoal-cefoxitin-deoxycholate agar, mCCxDA). In chicken carcass rinse samples, the number of mCCDA plates detecting for Campylobacter (18/70, 26%) was significantly lower than that of mCCtDA (42/70, 60%) or mCCxDA plates (40/70, 57%). The number of mCCDA plates (70/70, 100%) that were contaminated with non-Campylobacter species was significantly higher than that of mCCtDA (20/70, 29%) or mCCxDA plates (21/70, 30%). The most common competing species identified using mCCDA was ESBL-producing E. coli, while Pseudomonas species frequently appeared on mCCtDA and mCCxDA. PMID:26915052

  9. Strain competition and agar affect the interaction of rhizobia with rice.

    PubMed

    Perrine-Walker, Francine M; Hynes, Michael F; Rolfe, Barry G; Hocart, Charles H

    2009-10-01

    Competition assays with Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 and its GFP-labelled pSymA cured and deleted derivatives, SmA818 and SmA146, demonstrated that Sm1021 could still inhibit rice seedling growth even when outnumbered by a large excess of the noninhibitory cured or deleted strain. The wild-type strain Sm1021 also inhibited the growth of its noninhibitory pSymA-cured strain SmA818(gfp) and its pSymA-deleted strain SmA146(gfp) in a manner suggesting that Sm1021 produced a bacteriocin-like substance. The production of, and resistance to, this substance seemed to be pSymA-associated, but it was not the cause of killing in competition experiments on rice, suggesting that the killing of SmA818(gfp) and SmA146(gfp) was medium dependent. The addition of agar in liquid F10 medium at concentrations < or = 0.4% (m/v) abolished the rice growth inhibition of strain Sm1021 and Sm1021(gfp). The increased medium viscosity at higher agar concentrations decreased the diffusion of gases and small molecules through the media. Thus, the low agar concentrations may mimic waterlogged soil conditions leading to the production of inhibitory compounds by the bacterial strains under microaerobic conditions. PMID:19935894

  10. A rapid agar-diffusion test for quantifying the toxic effects of copper on microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rzycki, H

    1992-01-01

    The rapid agar diffusion test for quantifying the toxic effects of copper on microorganisms was elaborated. The assay was run in standard Petri dishes containing Czapek Solution Agar (Difco). Immediately after inoculation with the organism tested 3.2 mm diameter wells were punched in the agar. Wells were filled (20 microliters) with distilled water (control) and a range of solutions containing 128 to 4096 ppm Cu2+ (as CuSO4). After incubation (2-5 days, 26 degrees C) the diameters of Cu-inhibition zones were measured. Cu-sensitivity indices (ICu's) were calculated according to the formula: ICu = a2/(3.2-b), where: a--slope of the linear regression equation: log [Cu] (x)--inhibition zone diameter (y), b--intercept of the same equation. Additionally for characterization of Cu-sensitivity of the organism tested the predicted highest non-inhibitory Cu concentration (10c) was calculated, where: c = (3.2-b)/a. Both ICu's and adjusted average diameters of Cu-inhibition zones characterized well the Cu-sensitivity in organisms tested, as indicated by the statistical analyses. ICu's correlated very well (negative correlation) with 50% effective doses (Ed50's) of Cu2+ for mycelial growth of Cylindrocarpon destructans. The applicability of the elaborated assay in ecotoxicological studies was discussed. PMID:1283491

  11. Use of an agar culture technique for establishing lymphoid cell lines from Marek's disease lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Payne, L N; Howes, K; Rennie, M; Bumstead, J M; Kidd, A W

    1981-12-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Marek's disease (MD) lymphomas have been established with difficulty by a number of workers. We have compared with conventional liquid culture methods the efficiency of a new technique for establishing lymphoid cell lines in which lymphoma cells were cultured initially in agar medium. Cells from 39/79 lymphomas gave rise to loose lymphoid colonies in the seeded agar after 7 days' incubation at 41 degrees C. Two types of macrophage colony also developed. When lymphoid colonies in agar were transferred to liquid culture, 23/39 gave rise to permanent lymphoid cell lines, compared with 8/33 comparable cultures initiated in liquid medium. Twenty-nine new cell lines have been developed from Rhode Island Red, line 6 and line 7 chickens. All carry T-cell markers and the MD tumour-associated surface antigen (MATSA) and showed variable but low responsiveness to lectin mitogens. The new cell lines, when first established, consisted mainly of small, lymphocytoid cells, but, after varying times, these changed into typical lymphoblastoid lines and an increased expression of an embryonic antigen was associated with this change. The lymphocytoid line cells were more slowly growing and density-dependent than were the lymphoblastoid cells, and lymphocytoid lines grew better at 41 degrees C and lymphoblastoid lines better at 37 degrees C. MD virus could be rescued from some of the lines but others appeared to be true non-producers. PMID:7199514

  12. Alternative plasticizers for the production of thermo-compressed agar films.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hilia K S; Liu, LinShu; Gonalves, Maria P

    2015-05-01

    Agar films were produced by thermo-compression using choline chloride (ChCl) as a plasticizer with urea. The three solid components were mixed together with the salt and urea (minor components) added to agar (main component) according to a fixed mass ratio of, respectively, 1.16:1:5. A central composite rotatable design (CCRD) with three parameters, 2(3), was used to evaluate the effects of temperature (X1; C), time (X2; min) and applied load (X3; kN) of heat-pressing on the maximum tensile strength (TS) of the films (Y; MPa). Mixtures of urea and agar prepared at a mass ratio of 1:5 did not form homogeneous films suggesting the important plasticizing role of the salt. Heat-pressing the mixtures at more draconian conditions led to much darker and opaque films, with better mechanical resistance (higher values of TS). The most resistant film (? 15 MPa) was obtained at 140C, 20 min and 176 kN. Selected films, including the optimal, showed similar water sorption profiles and close values of water vapor permeability (? 2.5-3.7 10(-9)gm(-1)s(-1)Pa(-1)). The fracture behavior and mechanical properties of the films were greatly affected by additional water plasticization when the films were stored at different conditions of relative humidity. PMID:25727746

  13. Mode of Action of an Inhibitor from Agar on Growth and Hemagglutination of Group A Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Julio I.; Idoine, Jane B.; Brand, Orville M.; Costlow, Richard D.

    1965-01-01

    Colón, Julio I. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Jane B. Idoine, Orville M. Brand, and Richard D. Costlow. Mode of action of an inhibitor from agar on growth and hemagglutination of group A arboviruses. J. Bacteriol. 90:172–179. 1965.—A polysaccharide obtained from agar, and having properties similar to a previously described sulfated polysaccharide, was observed to inhibit growth and hemagglutination of some group A arboviruses. The evidence presented confirms that the inhibitory activity, in part, is the result of direct interaction between the agar polysaccharide (AP) and free virus particles. Additional evidence indicates that inhibition of viral growth also occurs as the result of interaction between AP and the chick-fibroblast cells used for propagation of the virus. The possibility was considered, therefore, that at least two different inhibitors could be present in AP—one that reacts directly with the virus particle and another that reacts with host cells. AP does not induce the production of interferon in the test system used. PMID:16562015

  14. Susceptibility testing of Propionibacterium acnes comparing agar dilution with E test.

    PubMed

    Smith, M A; Alperstein, P; France, K; Vellozzi, E M; Isenberg, H D

    1996-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been identified as a significant agent of nosocomial infections, including endophthalmitis. Data concerning susceptibility of P. acnes to newer beta-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones are limited. Recent reports suggest that quinolones have activity against these organisms sufficient to warrant further study. We undertook a study to select appropriate antimicrobial agents for use in a rabbit model of P. acnes endophthalmitis. We compared the antibiotic susceptibilities of P. acnes by using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards method of agar dilution with the E test. Thirteen clinical isolates obtained from eye specimens and three American Type Culture Collection control strains were tested against 14 antibiotics. All the clinical isolates were susceptible by both methods to piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, cefotaxime, cefotetan, ceftriaxone, cefoxitin, and imipenem in addition to clindamycin but were resistant to metronidazole. The clinical P. acnes isolates also displayed high-level susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and ofloxacin. Almost all the P. acnes strains demonstrated E-test MICs within 2 dilutions of the MICs observed by the agar dilution method. Those few strains for which discrepancies were noted exhibited E-test susceptibilities three- to fivefold dilutions lower than the agar dilution method susceptibilities but only with ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and/or clindamycin. On the basis of our study, all of clinical eye isolates were susceptible to these newer antimicrobial agents and the two methods demonstrated similar susceptibility patterns. PMID:8815076

  15. How do microorganisms influence trace element uptake by plants? Screening in an agar model rhizosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Robinson, B. H.; Evangelou, M. W. H.; Vachey, A.; Schwitzguebel, J. P.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Trace elements (TE) are essential for humans and plants, but they may be toxic if their concentration is too high. For this reason, the management of TE in soils is very important. In some cases it may be necessary to increase the uptake of nutrients or TE by plants, for example in a biofortification perspective. Conversely, in some other cases TE uptake by plants should be decreased, for instance to avoid heavy metals entering the food chain via edible crops. Microorganisms living in the rhizosphere affect trace element (TE) uptake by plants. However, due to the complexity of this space and the variety of microorganisms that occur there, it is difficult to isolate the effect of any particular strain. To overcome this hurdle, we developed a system in which we grew plants under sterile conditions in agar and inoculated their rhizosphere with a single, well-defined microbial strain. For many years, agar has been used as a growth substrate for microorganisms and plant tissues. It is cheap, easy to use, and can be autoclaved to ensure its sterility. Because of its widespread use, an experiment conducted using this substrate can be reproduced under the same conditions in any laboratory. In contrast to soil, there is little interaction between the trace elements and the agar matrix. There are many studies investigating the influence of microorganisms on TE uptake by plants. However, so far only a small variety of microorganisms has been tested on few plant species. Therefore, the first objective of our research was to develop a method to rapidly screen a large variety of microorganisms on various plant species. Once this goal was achieved, we sought to study the effect of single, well-defined microbial strains on TE uptake by sunflower and wheat. The substrate for plants growth was a 10% agar solution prepared with modified Hoagland's solution and a TE solution containing 1 mg/kg Pb and molar equivalents of Cu, Ni and Zn. The agar solution was autoclaved and poured into sterile, transparent plastic boxes, whose lid was equipped with a filter allowing gas exchanges without contamination by external microorganisms. The seed surface was sterilised and the plants grew one week in agar before their rhizosphere was inoculated with LB broth containing a pure bacterial strain or agar plugs colonized by fungal hyphae. We tested 14 strains, with 5 replicates per treatment and a control where the system was inoculated with sterile LB broth. The plants grew for 2 weeks in a climate chamber and their shoots were analysed for their TEs by ICP-OES. Samples of agar and roots were collected to confirm microbial colonization of the rhizosphere, respectively sterile conditions in the control treatments. Concerning the method development, the plants grew without visible toxicity in all the boxes, and the analysis of root and agar samples indicated that the controls were sterile and the strains inoculated were growing along the roots. More than 90% of the TE and nutrients added to the system were in the liquid fraction of the agar medium, thus available for root uptake. The screening showed that the microorganisms in general decreased TE uptake by wheat and sunflower, although some of them had an opposite effect on the plants. However, with the same plant species, the microorganisms had a consistent effect on all TE tested, i.e. a given single strain caused the same effect (increase or decrease of TE uptake) on all TE tested. In sunflower, 3 microorganisms (Paenibacillus polymyxa, Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani) decreased Cu and Zn uptake by 50% compared to the control treatment. These three species are common soil microorganisms. All three are known to exude auxin, a phytohormone. This hormone can modify root morphology and physiology and thus may affect TE uptake by plants. R. solani and P. ultimum are root pathogens. Their effect was opposite to what we expected. If roots are damaged, TE should have flooded into the plant and accumulate in the tissues, but this was not the case. One explanation could be the biosorption of TE by these microorganisms, reducing the uptake by plant. Conversely to sunflower, none of the microorganisms tested showed a significant effect on TE uptake by wheat. With our research, we created an agar system allowing the screening of several microbial strains for their effect on plant TE uptake. Future work will involve screening of several other strains in a wide range of conditions in agar. A method validation with a pot experiment is also needed, as some interactions in this artificial rhizosphere may be different from those that would take place in soil. We will also pursue the investigation of two interesting mechanisms revealed by the screening: the effect of pathogens and phytohormone-exuding microorganisms on TE uptake by plants.

  16. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from faecal specimens--a comparison of chromID C. difficile agar and cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar.

    PubMed

    Carson, Kerry C; Boseiwaqa, Lusiana V; Thean, Sara K; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-09-01

    The culture of toxigenic Clostridium difficile from stool specimens is still seen as the gold standard for the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). bioMrieux have released ChromID Cdiff chromogenic agar (CDIF) for the isolation and identification of C. difficile in 24 h. In this study, we compared CDIF to pre-reduced cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar with sodium taurocholate (TCCFA) in the examination of glutamate dehydrogenase-positive faecal specimens that were either GeneOhm positive or negative, using direct culture or culture following alcohol shock. Direct culture on CDIF had a sensitivity of 100 % and recovery of 94 % while for TCCFA these were 87 % and 82 %, respectively. For GeneOhm-positive alcohol-shocked faecal samples, sensitivity and recovery on CDIF was similar to direct culture while on TCCFA they were about 10 % higher. For direct culture, there was a significant difference between growth on CDIF at 24 h and TCCFA at 48 h (P = 0.001) and between the two media at 48 h (P<0.001). A total of 142 strains of C. difficile were recovered in pure culture from all GeneOhm-positive samples used in this study and 11 (7.7 %) of these were A(-)B(-)CDT(-) and may represent mixed infections of toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile. The most dominant ribotype was UK 014 (14.7 %) followed by 002 (11.9 %) and 020 (11.9 %), and 36 % of toxigenic isolates, including an A(-)B(+)CDT(-) strain, could not be assigned a UK ribotype. CDIF outperformed pre-reduced TCCFA by negating the need for alcohol shock treatment and by giving a time saving of 24 h in the isolation of C. difficile. CDIF plates were also more selective than TCCFA and C. difficile colonies were easy to identify and subculture prior to strain typing. PMID:23579394

  17. AgarTrap-mediated genetic transformation using intact gemmae/gemmalings of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama-Tanaka, Shoko; Kodama, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    The dioecious liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L., is an emerging model plant. Various molecular biological techniques have been optimized for M. polymorpha for the past several years, and recently we reported a simplified Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using sporelings (immature thalli from spores) of M. polymorpha. This method, termed AgarTrap (Agar-utilized Transformation with Pouring Solutions), completed by exchanging appropriate solutions on a single Petri dish to produce a sufficient number of independent transgenic sporelings. However, because spores are produced by crosses between males and females, the genetic backgrounds of resulting transgenic sporelings are not uniform. To easily produce transgenic liverworts with a uniform genetic background using AgarTrap, we developed an AgarTrap-mediated transformation method using intact gemmae/gemmalings produced by asexual reproduction. Using AgarTrap with male and female gemmae/gemmalings produced a sufficient number of independent transgenic gemmalings with uniform genetic backgrounds. The optimized transformation efficiencies were approximately 30 and 50 % in males and females, respectively. As with AgarTrap using sporelings, AgarTrap using intact gemmae/gemmalings will be useful in promoting studies of the molecular biology of M. polymorpha. PMID:25663453

  18. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 3B serotype O3 inhibited on cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin agar.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, H; Gomyoda, M

    1986-01-01

    A total of 169 strains of Yersinia spp. were analyzed for their ability to grow on two different kinds of cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar containing 15 or 4 micrograms of cefsulodin per ml, on salmonella-shigella agar, and on MacConkey agar. CIN media inhibited the growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 3B serotype O3 (3B/O3) but not the growth of the other Yersinia organisms used. Relative to growth on Trypticase soy agar (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) with 6% yeast extract, 48 and 44% of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica 3B/O3 strains, respectively, were inhibited on CIN I agar (low cefsulodin concentration), and 83 and 54%, respectively, were inhibited on CIN II agar (high cefsulodin concentration) after incubation for 24 h at 32 degrees C. The inhibition of Y. pseudotuberculosis growth was significantly more extensive on CIN II agar than on CIN I agar. The MICs of cefsulodin and novobiocin clearly indicated a higher susceptibility for Y. pseudotuberculosis than for the other Yersinia organisms at 32 degrees C. All Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were susceptible to cefsulodin at 15 micrograms/ml (the approximate concentration used in CIN II agar). Y. enterocolitica 3B/O3 strains were resistant to cefsulodin, Irgasan, and novobiocin at the concentrations used in CIN media. These findings show that cefsulodin inhibits the growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis at the concentration used in CIN media and that growth inhibition of Y. enterocolitica 3B/O3 is related to a component of the CIN Base. PMID:3722357

  19. Comparative evaluation of chromogenic agar medium and conventional culture system for isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Laila; Haque, Rezwana; Salam, Md. Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Urine is the most frequent specimen received for culture/sensitivity by clinical laboratories. The microbiological performance of HiCrome UTI agar medium was compared with Blood agar and MacConkey agar for isolation and presumptive identification of bacteria from urine culture. Methods: A total of 443 consecutively collected midstream and/or catheter-catch urine samples from patients attending the Islami Bank Medical College Hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during January to December, 2012 were cultured. Urine samples showing pus cells ? 5/HPF were inoculated on to Blood agar (BA), MacConkey agar (MAC) and HiCrome UTI agar (CA) media simultaneously and incubated overnight aerobically at 370C. Rate of isolation and presumptive identification of bacterial species were compared for different media. Results: Culture yielded a total of 199 bacterial isolates from 189 (42.67%) positive plates including 179 (40.40%) unimicrobial and 10 (2.26%) polymicrobial (mixed growth of pair of bacteria) growths. Both HiCrome UTI agar and Blood agar media supported 100% growths while 151 (75.88%) growths were observed on MacConkey agar. The rate of presumptive identification was found significantly higher on HiCrome UTI agar (97.49%) than MAC agar (67.34%) (P<0.001) as primary urine culture medium. Of 199 isolates, E. coli was found to be the leading uropathogen isolated from 118 (59.30%) samples with its presumptive identification rate of 95.76%, 93.22% and 5.93% on CA, MAC and BA respectively. All 10 (100%) polymicrobial growths were demonstrated distinctly on CA against only 01(10%) on each BA and MAC. Conclusion: HiCrome UTI agar was found to be more useful as primary urine culture medium in both higher rate of isolation and presumptive identification of uropathogens in comparison to conventional media. Its inherent characteristics in demonstrating polymicrobial growth and ease of rapid identification by distinct colony colour are unique. PMID:25225521

  20. Comparison of performance of the novel chromogenic spectra VRE agar to that of bile esculin azide and Campylobacter agars for detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S G; Raskoshina, L; Schuetz, A N

    2011-11-01

    A total of 142 stool specimens were evaluated for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). Twenty-four-hour sensitivities and specificities, respectively, were 98% and 95% for Spectra VRE chromogenic agar (Remel, Lenexa, KS), 86% and 92% for bile esculin azide with vancomycin (BEAV; Remel), and 96.5% and 92% for Campylobacter agar (CAMPY; Remel). Spectra VRE and CAMPY are significantly more sensitive at 24 h than BEAV. PMID:21880967

  1. INTERLABORATORY EVALUATION OF MI AGAR AND THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY-APPROVED MEMBRANE FILTER METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF TOTAL COLIFORMS AND ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new membrane filter (MF) medium, MI agar, recently validated for use in recovering chlorine-damaged total coloiforms (TC) and Escherichia coli from drinking water, was compared to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved MF method(mEndo agar and nutrient agar suppl...

  2. Variation in capacity for anchorage-independent growth among agar-derived clones of spontaneously transformed BALB/3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Romerdahl, C.A.; Rubin, H.

    1984-12-01

    A subline of cloned spontaneously transformed BALB/3T3 cells had a colony-forming efficiency (CFE) in agar of 5 to 20%. Individual agar colonies isolated and reseeded into agar were not significantly more efficient at initiating colonies than the original unselected subline. Four successive cycles of agar growth and selection also failed to increase the mean CFE in agar. Randomly selected clones isolated on a plastic surface all had the capacity to grow in agar. These results suggest that the failure of the majority of the cells to grow in agar is not the result of an intrinsic or heritable inability to do so. The ability to initiate a colony in agar seems to vary phenotypically from cell to cell. In contrast, agar colonies isolated from some tumor cell lines (originating from related spontaneously transformed 3T3 cells) and reseeded in agar had a higher CFE than the unselected tumor cell lines. In one case, this increased CFE in agar was lost when the cells were passaged on plastic without further selection for agar growth. Thus, expression of the anchorage-independent phenotype may vary, even among related cloned populations of transformed cells. 39 references, 3 tables.

  3. Preparation of an agar-silver nanoparticles (A-AgNp) film for increasing the shelf-life of fruits.

    PubMed

    Gudadhe, Janhavi A; Yadav, Alka; Gade, Aniket; Marcato, Priscyla D; Durn, Nelson; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-12-01

    Preparation of protective coating possessing antimicrobial properties is present day need as they increase the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. In the present study, preparation of agar-silver nanoparticle film for increasing the shelf life of fruits is reported. Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) biosynthesised using an extract of Ocimum sanctum leaves, were mixed with agar-agar to prepare an agar-silver nanoparticles (A-AgNp) film. This film was surface-coated over the fruits, Citrus aurantifolium (Thornless lime) and Pyrus malus (Apple), and evaluated for the determination of antimicrobial activity of A-AgNp films using disc diffusion method, weight loss and shelf life of fruits. This study demonstrates that these A-AgNp films possess antimicrobial activity and also increase the shelf life of fruits. PMID:25429496

  4. AgarTrap: a simplified Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method for sporelings of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama, Shoko; Kodama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. is being developed as an emerging model plant, and several transformation techniques were recently reported. Examples are biolistic- and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods. Here, we report a simplified method for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of sporelings, and it is termed Agar-utilized Transformation with Pouring Solutions (AgarTrap). The procedure of the AgarTrap was carried out by simply exchanging appropriate solutions in a Petri dish, and completed within a week, successfully yielding sufficient numbers of independent transformants for molecular analysis (e.g. characterization of gene/protein function) in a single experiment. The AgarTrap method will promote future molecular biological study in M. polymorpha. PMID:24259681

  5. "Clothed in triple blues": sorting out the Italian blues.

    PubMed

    Bimler, David; Uuskla, Mari

    2014-04-01

    Cross-cultural comparisons of color perception and cognition often feature versions of the "similarity sorting" procedure. By interpreting the assignment of two color samples to different groups as an indication that the dissimilarity between them exceeds some threshold, sorting data can be regarded as low-resolution similarity judgments. Here we analyze sorting data from speakers of Italian, Russian, and English, applying multidimensional scaling to delineate the boundaries between perceptual categories while highlighting differences between the three populations. Stimuli were 55 color swatches, predominantly from the blue region. Results suggest that at least two Italian words for "blue" are basic, a similar situation to Russian, in contrast to English where a single "blue" term is basic. PMID:24695190

  6. Trace Amounts of Furan-2-Carboxylic Acids Determine the Quality of Solid Agar Plates for Bacterial Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Shintaro; Isoda, Reika; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background Many investigators have recognised that a significant proportion of environmental bacteria exist in a viable but non-culturable state on agar plates, and some researchers have also noticed that some of such bacteria clearly recover their growth on matrices other than agar. However, the reason why agar is unsuitable for the growth of some bacteria has not been addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings According to the guide of a bioassay for swarming inhibition, we identified 5-hydroxymethylfuran-2-carboxylic acid (5-HMFA) and furan-2-carboxylic acid (FA) as factors that inhibit bacterial swarming and likely inhibit extracellular polysaccharide production on agar. The furan-2-carboxylic acids 5-HMFA and FA effectively inhibited the swarming and swimming of several environmental bacteria at concentrations of 1.8 and 2.3 g L?1 (13 and 21 nmol L?1), respectively, which are equivalent to the concentrations of these compounds in 0.3% agar. On Luria-Bertani (LB) plates containing 1.0% agar that had been previously washed with MeOH, a mixture of 5-HMFA and FA in amounts equivalent to their original concentrations in the unwashed agar repressed the swarming of Escherichia coli K12 strain W3110, a representative swarming bacterium. Conclusions/Significance Agar that contains trace amounts of 5-HMFA and FA inhibits the proliferation of some slow-growing or difficult-to-culture bacteria on the plates, but it is useful for single colony isolation due to the ease of identification of swarmable bacteria as the non-swarmed colonies. PMID:22848437

  7. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  8. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery. PMID:25716689

  9. Coma in the course of severe poisoning after consumption of red fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata A; Pankowska, Sylwestra; Janiak, Marek; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Łazowski, Tomasz; Jankowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Red fly agaric poisoning is rare. It can be consumed for suicidal purposes or its psychedelic effect. The paper describes the case of a young men, who fell into a coma after ingestion of the red toadstools. Quick identification of the poison, early use of gastric lavage and symptomatic treatment resulted in regression of symptoms and lead to the patient's discharge from the hospital on the third day after intoxication. Authors discussing the poisonous alkaloids contained in the red toadtools: ibotenic acid, muscimol, muscasone and muscarine and theirs properties, responsible for the symptoms of intoxication. PMID:26828668

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Grown on Vancomycin-Supplemented Screening Agar Displays Enhanced Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenjiao; Ding, Ding; Zhang, Shanshan; Dai, Yuanyuan; Pan, Qing; Lu, Huaiwei; Luo, Qingli; Shen, Jilong; Ma, Xiaoling

    2015-12-01

    Brain heart infusion agar containing 3 mg/liter vancomycin (BHI-V3) was used to screen for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA). There was markedly greater biofilm formation by isolates that grew on BHI-V3 than by strains that did not grow on BHI-V3. Increased biofilm formation by hVISA may be mediated by FnbA- and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent pathways, and upregulation of atlA and sarA may also contribute to enhanced biofilm formation by hVISA upon prolonged exposure to vancomycin. PMID:26459889

  11. Three-dimensional characterization of bacterial microcolonies on solid agar-based culture media.

    PubMed

    Drazek, Laurent; Tournoud, Maud; Derepas, Frdric; Guicherd, Maryse; Mah, Pierre; Pinston, Frdric; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Chatellier, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    For the last century, in vitro diagnostic process in microbiology has mainly relied on the growth of bacteria on the surface of a solid agar medium. Nevertheless, few studies focused in the past on the dynamics of microcolonies growth on agar surface before 8 to 10h of incubation. In this article, chromatic confocal microscopy has been applied to characterize the early development of a bacterial colony. This technology relies on a differential focusing depth of the white light. It allows one to fully measure the tridimensional shape of microcolonies more quickly than classical confocal microscopy but with the same spatial resolution. Placing the device in an incubator, the method was able to individually track colonies growing on an agar plate, and to follow the evolution of their surface or volume. Using an appropriate statistical modeling framework, for a given microorganism, the doubling time has been estimated for each individual colony, as well as its variability between colonies, both within and between agar plates. A proof of concept led on four bacterial strains of four distinct species demonstrated the feasibility and the interest of the approach. It showed in particular that doubling times derived from early tri-dimensional measurements on microcolonies differed from classical measurements in micro-dilutions based on optical diffusion. Such a precise characterization of the tri-dimensional shape of microcolonies in their late-lag to early-exponential phase could be beneficial in terms of in vitro diagnostics. Indeed, real-time monitoring of the biomass available in a colony could allow to run well established microbial identification workflows like, for instance, MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, as soon as a sufficient quantity of material is available, thereby reducing the time needed to provide a diagnostic. Moreover, as done for pre-identification of macro-colonies, morphological indicators such as three-dimensional growth profiles derived from microcolonies could be used to perform a first pre-identification step, but in a shorten time. PMID:25533218

  12. Energy response of agar-alanine free radical dosimetry to therapeutic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, B.; Reinstein, L.E.; Meek, A.G.; Wielopolski, L. )

    1993-09-01

    Calculations of the energy response of an agar-alanine phantom dosimeter (AAPD) to electrons in the energy range of 0.15--20 MeV together with experimental results at 16 MeV are presented. It is shown that the sensitivity of the EPR dosimeter (EPR signal/Gray) is independent of alanine crystal size and varies less than 2%, in the electron energy range indicated. Thus, the measured free radical density distribution may be used directly as an indication of the absorbed dose distribution in an irradiated phantom.

  13. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  14. Amino acid mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and preparation of antimicrobial agar/silver nanoparticles composite films.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using amino acids (tyrosine and tryptophan) as reducing and capping agents, and they were incorporated into the agar to prepare antimicrobial composite films. The AgNPs solutions exhibited characteristic absorption peak at 420 nm that showed a red shift to ∼434 nm after forming composite with agar. XRD data demonstrated the crystalline structure of AgNPs with dominant (111) facet. Apparent surface color and transmittance of agar films were greatly influenced by the AgNPs. The incorporation of AgNPs into agar did not exhibit any change in chemical structure, thermal stability, moisture content, and water vapor permeability. The water contact angle, tensile strength, and modulus decreased slightly, but elongation at break increased after AgNPs incorporation. The agar/AgNPs nanocomposite films possessed strong antibacterial activity against Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. The agar/AgNPs film could be applied to the active food packaging by controlling the food-borne pathogens. PMID:26076636

  15. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  16. The blue-collar brain.

    PubMed

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  17. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Faulkner, George E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  18. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  19. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); King, Christopher N. (Portland, OR); Tuenge, Richard T. (Hillsboro, OR)

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  20. The Blue-Collar Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body’s tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  1. Evaluation of a Modified Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin Agar for Isolation of Yersinia spp

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lai Kuan; Ooi, Peck Toung; Carniel, Elisabeth; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are important food borne pathogens. However, the presence of competitive microbiota makes the isolation of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis from naturally contaminated foods difficult. We attempted to evaluate the performance of a modified Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin (CIN) agar in the differentiation of Y. enterocolitica from non-Yersinia species, particularly the natural intestinal microbiota. The modified CIN enabled the growth of Y. enterocolitica colonies with the same efficiency as CIN and Luria-Bertani agar. The detection limits of the modified CIN for Y. enterocolitica in culture medium (10 cfu/ml) and in artificially contaminated pork (104 cfu/ml) were also comparable to those of CIN. However, the modified CIN provided a better discrimination of Yersinia colonies from other bacteria exhibiting Yersinia-like colonies on CIN (H2S-producing Citrobacter freundii, C. braakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Aeromonas hydrophila, Providencia rettgeri, and Morganella morganii). The modified CIN exhibited a higher recovery rate of Y. enterocolitica from artificially prepared bacterial cultures and naturally contaminated samples compared with CIN. Our results thus demonstrated that the use of modified CIN may be a valuable means to increase the recovery rate of food borne Yersinia from natural samples, which are usually contaminated by multiple types of bacteria. PMID:25170941

  2. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: Application to Blood Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Comparative plate counts were made of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes growing on blood agar supplemented with individual chemicals to abolish the swarming of Proteus. B-phenylethanol, sodium azide, and p-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) were used as anti-swarm agents. Each anti-swarm agent effectively abolished swarming for 24 h, but azide failed to control swarming for longer periods of incubation. In addition, azide displayed growth inhibition towards the staphylococci and streptococci resulting in no hemolysis and reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci. Phenylethanol showed reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci and unreliable hemolytic reactions. At 0.1 to 0.3 mM, PNPG proved to be a superior anti-swarm agent in that it showed no growth inhibition and allowed normal hemolysis, but abolished swarming for extended periods of time. When laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae were screened on a blood agar medium containing 0.1 mm PNPG, they displayed similar growth and hemolytic characteristics to the identical medium without PNPG. PMID:4715553

  3. Starch-Ampicillin Agar for the Quantitative Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, S A; Maxino, F; Williams, A C; Buchanan, R L; Thayer, D W

    1985-10-01

    Interest in Aeromonas hydrophila as a food-borne and human pathogen is increasing. Isolation media from the clinical laboratory were evaluated for food use and either did not give quantitative recovery of A. hydrophila or did not permit ready differentiation of A. hydrophila from the background microflora. A new medium was developed which permitted quantitative recovery of A. hydrophila from foods. The medium consisted of phenol red agar base (Difco Laboratories), soluble starch (10 g/liter), and ampicillin (10 mg/liter). All foods surveyed contained A. hydrophila. Foods sampled included red meats, chicken, raw milk, and seafood (fish, shrimp, scallops, crab, and oysters). The count of A. hydrophila at the time of purchase ranged from 1 x 10/g (lower limit of detection) to 5 x 10/g. In most instances, the count of A. hydrophila increased during 1 week of storage at 5 degrees C. The starch-ampicillin agar developed permitted rapid quantitative recovery of A. hydrophila from foods in the presence of very large numbers of competing microflora. PMID:16346899

  4. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  5. Mitis salivarius-bacitracin 10% sacarose agar for oral streptococci and Streptococcus mutans counts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez de Annan, S; Ruíz de Valladares, R E; Benito de Cárdenas, I L

    1997-01-01

    The MSB Agar (mitis salivarius-bacitracin) 20% sacarose medium is frequently used for the isolation and count of total streptococci and Streptococcus mutans. Although it is considered a selective culture medium for this micro-organism, S. mutans recovery in this medium is much lower than in this Mitis Salivarius Agar (MSA). Because the number of S. mutans in saliva is used for estimating caries risk and activity from a microbiological stand point, the aim of this work was to find a modification of the MSB 20% sacarose medium so that it would offer not only selectivity in the isolation but also maximum recovery. This would detect people at risk more efficiency and would evaluate the preventive odontological treatments more accurately. The results show that: 1) the greatest recovery of total streptococci and S. mutans is obtained in the MSB 10% sacarose medium, 2) S. mutans must be incubated in aerobiosis and the total streptococci in a candle jar (10% CO2). MSB 10% sacarose medium is proposed as a choice medium for the microbiological estimation of cariogenic risk and activity, to detect infection levels and evaluate preventive odontological treatments. PMID:11885081

  6. Preparation and characterization agar-based nanocomposite film reinforced by nanocrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Atef, Maryam; Rezaei, Masoud; Behrooz, Rabi

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was prepared from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) with particle size of 24.7 ?m using sulfuric acid hydrolysis technique. The obtained NCC revealed size of 0-100 nm, which the major part of them was about 30 nm. Then different contents (2.5, 5 and 10 wt%) of these NCC incorporated in agar film solution and the morphology, structure, and properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mechanical, physical and optical testing. Results showed that the water vapor permeability (WVP) and water solubility (WS) of the agar-based nanocomposite films significantly (P<0.05) decreased about 13% and 21%, respectively, upon increasing the NCC content to 10%. Tensile strength (TS) and Young's modulus (YM) values of nanocomposite films significantly increased (P?0.05) with addition of NCC, whereas the elongation percent (E%) decreased not significantly (P>0.05). In addition, swelling percentage, transparency and light transmission of the films were decreased by incorporating NCC into polymer matrix. PMID:25036597

  7. Methylene blue adsorption by algal biomass based materials: biosorbents characterization and process behaviour.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vtor J P; Botelho, Cidlia M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-08-17

    Dead algal biomass is a natural material that serves as a basis for developing a new family of sorbent materials potentially suitable for many industrial applications. In this work an algal industrial waste from agar extraction process, algae Gelidium and a composite material obtained by immobilization of the algal waste with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were physical characterized and used as biosorbents for dyes removal using methylene blue as model. The apparent and real densities and the porosity of biosorbents particles were determined by mercury porosimetry and helium picnometry. The methylene blue adsorption in the liquid phase was the method chosen to calculate the specific surface area of biosorbent particles as it seems to reproduce better the surface area accessible to metal ions in the biosorption process than the N2 adsorption-desorption dry method. The porous texture of the biosorbents particles was also studied. Equilibrium isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equation, giving maximum uptake capacities of 171, 104 and 74 mg g(-1), respectively for algae, algal waste and composite material. Kinetic experiments at different initial methylene blue concentrations were performed to evaluate the equilibrium time and the importance of the driving force to overcome mass transfer resistances. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models adequately describe the kinetic data. The biosorbents used in this work proved to be promising materials for removing methylene blue from aqueous solutions. PMID:17240055

  8. Roughness-controlled self-assembly of mannitol/LB agar microparticles by polymorphic transformation for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengying; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Quynh; Tay, Bao Hui; Mendyk, Aleksander; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Lau, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Novel roughness-controlled mannitol/LB Agar microparticles were synthesized by polymorphic transformation and self-assembly method using hexane as the polymorphic transformation reagent and spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles as the starting material. As-prepared microparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI). The XRD and DSC results indicate that after immersing spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles in hexane, ?-mannitol was completely transformed to ?-mannitol in 1 h, and all the ?-mannitol was transformed to ? form after 14 days. SEM shows that during the transformation the nanobelts on the spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles become more dispersed and the contour of the individual nanobelts becomes more noticeable. Afterward, the nanobelts self-assemble to nanorods and result in rod-covered mannitol/LB Agar microparticles. FTIR indicates new hydrogen bonds were formed among mannitol, LB Agar, and hexane. SEM images coupled with image analysis software reveal that different surface morphology of the microparticles have different drug adhesion mechanisms. Comparison of ACI results and image analysis of SEM images shows that an increase in the particle surface roughness can increase the fine particle fractions (FPFs) using the rod-covered mannitol microparticles as drug carriers. Transformed microparticles show higher FPFs than commercially available lactose carriers. An FPF of 28.6 2.4% was achieved by microparticles transformed from spray-dried microparticles using 2% mannitol(w/v)/LB Agar as feed solution. It is comparable to the highest FPF reported in the literature using lactose and spray-dried mannitol as carriers. PMID:25423614

  9. Can the diagnosis of recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis be improved by use of vaginal lavage samples and cultures on chromogenic agar?

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, N; Rodrigues, A; Mrdh, P A

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if introital and vaginal flushing samples inoculated on chromogenic agar could increase the recovery rate and rapid identification of Candida and non-albicans species, as compared to culture of posterior vaginal fornix samples on Sabouraud agar and speciation of isolates by biochemical tests. METHODS: Samples from the introitus and the posterior vaginal fornix and vaginal lavage samples were collected from 91 women with a history suggestive of recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis (RVVC), and with a suspected new attack of the condition. The specimens were cultured on Sabouraud and CHROMagar. Speciation of yeast isolates was made on the chromogenic agar by API 32C kits and by an atomized system (Vitek). RESULTS: Forty-six (51%) women were positive for Candida from one or more of the samples. The introital cultures were positive in 43 (47%) women, both on Sabouraud and chromogenic agar. From the posterior vaginal fomix, 42 (46%) women were positive on the Sabouraud and 43 (47%) on chromogenic agar cultures, while the vaginal lavage cultures yielded Candida on those two media in 40 (44%) and 41 (45%) cases, respectively. Candida albicans was the most frequent species recovered, from 40 (87%) cases, followed by C. krusei in 4 (9%), C. glabrata in 2 (4%), and C. parapsilosis in one case. There was only one woman who had a mixed yeast infection, by C. albicans and C. krusei. There was only one discrepancy in the speciation as demonstrated by mean of chromogenic agar and API 32C kit. CONCLUSIONS: Neither cultures of introital nor of vaginal lavage samples increases the detection rate of Candida in RVVC cases as compared to cultures of posterior vaginal fornix samples. Use of chromogenic agar is a convenient and reliable means to detect colonization by Candida and differentiate between C. albicans and non-albicans species. PMID:12530485

  10. Optically Modulatable Blue Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Amy E.; Vegh, Russell B.; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Bommarius, Bettina; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Bommarius, Andreas S.; Tolbert, Laren M.; Dickson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Blue fluorescent proteins (BFPs) offer visualization of protein location and behavior, but often suffer from high autofluorescent background and poor signal discrimination. Through dual-laser excitation of bright and photoinduced dark states, mutations to the residues surrounding the BFP chromophore enable long-wavelength optical modulation of BFP emission. Such dark state engineering enables violet-excited blue emission to be increased upon lower energy, green co-illumination. Turning this green co-illumination on and off at a specific frequency dynamically modulates collected blue fluorescence without generating additional background. Interpreted as transient photoconversion between neutral cis- and anionic trans- chromophoric forms, mutations tune photoisomerization and ground state tautomerizations to enable long-wavelength depopulation of the millisecond-lived, spectrally shifted dark states. Single mutations to the tyrosine-based blue fluorescent protein T203V/S205V exhibit enhanced modulation depth and varied frequency. Importantly, analogous single point mutations in the non-modulatable BFP, mKalama1, creates a modulatable variant. Building modulatable BFPs offers opportunities for improved BFP signal discrimination vs. background, greatly enhancing their utility. PMID:24099419

  11. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  12. Singing' the Black and Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane

    2004-01-01

    It is so obvious that the sky is blue in the daytime and black at night, but it took the smartest humans thousands of years of observation, thought, discussion, conjecture, and analysis to finally come up with answers that make scientific sense as to why the sky is these colors. This article discusses light and the scientific research…

  13. The Blues in Black Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Elizabeth

    1971-01-01

    The literature of black America repeatedly reflects a native rootlessness and its creators' yearning for a home. The black writer settles his work in an ethos, which has evolved from an older African heritage, primarily in response to an omnipresent white society. In this document, one of these ethnic expressions--the blues--is examined as a means

  14. Singing' the Black and Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane

    2004-01-01

    It is so obvious that the sky is blue in the daytime and black at night, but it took the smartest humans thousands of years of observation, thought, discussion, conjecture, and analysis to finally come up with answers that make scientific sense as to why the sky is these colors. This article discusses light and the scientific research

  15. The Blues Poetry of Langston Hughes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Edward E.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the criteria of the blues as an American art form. He then shows how Langston Hughes captures the mood, the feeling, the rhythm and the impact of the blues in his poetry. (Author/LF)

  16. Bacterial culture detection and identification in blood agar plates with an optoelectronic nose.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung H; Mix, Samantha; Anikst, Victoria; Budvytiene, Indre; Eiden, Michael; Churi, Yair; Queralto, Nuria; Berliner, Anders; Martino, Raymond A; Rhodes, Paul A; Banaei, Niaz

    2016-02-01

    Clinical microbiology automation is currently limited by the lack of an in-plate culture identification system. Using an inexpensive, printed, disposable colorimetric sensor array (CSA) responsive to the volatiles emitted into plate headspace by microorganisms during growth, we report here that not only the presence but the species of bacteria growing in plate was identified before colonies are visible. In 1894 trials, 15 pathogenic bacterial species cultured on blood agar were identified with 91.0% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity within 3 hours of detection. The results indicate CSAs integrated into Petri dish lids present a novel paradigm to speciate microorganisms, well-suited to integration into automated plate handling systems. PMID:26753182

  17. Agar hydrogel with silver nanoparticles to prolong the shelf life of Fior di Latte cheese.

    PubMed

    Incoronato, A L; Conte, A; Buonocore, G G; Del Nobile, M A

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an antimicrobial packaging system containing active nanoparticles on the quality deterioration of Fior di Latte cheese. To this aim, 3 concentrations of silver montmorillonite embedded in agar were used. The cell loads of spoilage and useful microorganisms were monitored during a refrigerated storage period. Moreover, cheese sensory quality (i.e., odor, color, consistency, and overall quality) was evaluated by means of a panel test. Results showed that the active packaging system markedly increased the shelf life of Fior di Latte cheese, due to the ability of silver cations to control microbial proliferation, without affecting the functional dairy microbiota and the sensory characteristics of the product. The active packaging system developed in this work could be used to prolong the shelf life of Fior di Latte and boost its distribution beyond local market borders. PMID:21426957

  18. Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) Agar

    PubMed Central

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Langla, Sayan; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) agar was used to develop a disk diffusion assay for Leptospira spp. Ten pathogenic Leptospira isolates were tested, all of which were susceptible to 17 antimicrobial agents (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, amoxicillin, azithromycin, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doripenem, doxycycline, gentamicin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, penicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, and tetracycline). All 10 isolates had no zone of growth inhibition for four antimicrobials (fosfomycin, nalidixic acid, rifampicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole). Of the ten Leptospira, seven had a growth inhibition zone of ? 21 mm for aztreonam, the zone diameter susceptibility break point for Enterobacteriaceae. This assay could find utility as a simple screening method during the epidemiological surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Leptospira spp. PMID:26055750

  19. Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) Agar.

    PubMed

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Langla, Sayan; White, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J

    2015-08-01

    Leptospira Vanaporn Wuthiekanun (LVW) agar was used to develop a disk diffusion assay for Leptospira spp. Ten pathogenic Leptospira isolates were tested, all of which were susceptible to 17 antimicrobial agents (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, amoxicillin, azithromycin, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doripenem, doxycycline, gentamicin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, penicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, and tetracycline). All 10 isolates had no zone of growth inhibition for four antimicrobials (fosfomycin, nalidixic acid, rifampicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole). Of the ten Leptospira, seven had a growth inhibition zone of ≤ 21 mm for aztreonam, the zone diameter susceptibility break point for Enterobacteriaceae. This assay could find utility as a simple screening method during the epidemiological surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Leptospira spp. PMID:26055750

  20. Injection of Acanthaster planci with thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS). I. Disease induction.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Posada, J A; Pratchett, M; Cano-Gmez, A; Arango-Gmez, J D; Owens, L

    2011-12-01

    This is the first report of the successful induction of a transmissible disease in the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci (COTS). Injection of thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS) culture medium into COTS induced a disease characterized by discoloured and necrotic skin, ulcerations, loss of body turgor, accumulation of colourless mucus on many spines especially at their tip, and loss of spines. Blisters on the dorsal integument broke through the skin surface and resulted in large, open sores that exposed the internal organs. Oedema and reddened digestive tissues and destruction of connective fibers were common. Moreover, healthy COTS in contact with these infected animals also displayed signs of disease and died within 24 h. TCBS induced 100% mortality in injected starfish. There was no introduction of new pathogens into the marine environment. TCBS promoted the growth of COTS' naturally occurring Vibrionales to high densities with subsequent symbiont imbalance followed by disease and death. PMID:22303625

  1. Stimulating growth and xylindein production of Chlorociboria aeruginascens in agar-based systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Four isolates of Chlorociboria aeruginascens were tested for possible stimulatory effects when grown on malt agar media containing wood additives. The addition of any of the four types of test wood (Acer saccharum, Populus tremuloides, spalted P. tremuloides, and Ailanthus altissima), stimulated colony growth and xylindein production in C. aeruginascens. Addition of any amount of wood produced more growth than no wood additions, while ground wood produced more growth than chopped wood. Of the wood types tested, A. saccharum wood stimulated all four isolates, while spalted Populus tremuloides stimulated three of the four isolates. High glucose and sucrose amounts may be partially responsible for the greater stimulatory affect of some woods over others. The development of this simple and reliable method for growth and pigment stimulation of C. aeruginascens in laboratory conditions will allow for further development of this fungus for decorative and commercial use. PMID:22409931

  2. Evaluation of agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to determine the disinfectant susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyan; Yang, Qianru; Long, Mei; Guo, Lijuan; Li, Bei; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Anyun; Wang, Hongning; Liu, Shuliang; Zou, Likou

    2015-11-01

    A variety of disinfectants have been widely used in veterinary hygiene, food industries and environments, which could induce the development of bacterial resistance to disinfectants. The methods used to investigate antimicrobial effects of disinfectant vary considerably among studies, making comparisons difficult. In this study, agar dilution and broth microdilution methods were used to compare the antimicrobial activities of four quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) against foodborne and zoonotic pathogens. The potential relationship between the presence of QACs resistance genes and phenotypic resistance to QACs was also investigated. Our results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by two methods might be different depended upon different QACs and bacteria applied. Regardless of the testing methods, Klebsiella pneumoniae was more tolerant among Gram-negative strains to four QACs, followed by Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The agreement between MICs obtained by the two methods was good, for benzalkonium chloride (78.15%), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) (82.35%), cetylpyridinium chloride (CTPC) (97.48%) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (99.16%), respectively. Among all Gram-negative bacteria, 94.55% (n=52) of qacEΔ1-positive strains showed higher MICs (512 mg l(-1)) to CTAB. The qacEΔ1 gene was highly associated (P<0.05) with the high MICs of QACs (⩾512 mg l(-1)). In addition, DDAC remained as the most effective disinfectant against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is the first study that compared the agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to assess the antimicrobial activity of QACs. The study demonstrated the need to standardize method that would be used in evaluating QACs antimicrobial properties in the future. PMID:25944532

  3. On Seeing Reddish Green and Yellowish Blue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Hewitt D.; Piantanida, Thomas P.

    1983-01-01

    Stabilization of the retinal image of the boundary between a pair of red/green or yellow/blue stripes, but not their outer edges, results in the entire region being perceived simultaneously as both red/green or yellow/blue. This suggests that the percepts of reddish-green/yellowish-blue apparently are possible in corticocortical color vision…

  4. On Seeing Reddish Green and Yellowish Blue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Hewitt D.; Piantanida, Thomas P.

    1983-01-01

    Stabilization of the retinal image of the boundary between a pair of red/green or yellow/blue stripes, but not their outer edges, results in the entire region being perceived simultaneously as both red/green or yellow/blue. This suggests that the percepts of reddish-green/yellowish-blue apparently are possible in corticocortical color vision

  5. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Blue Shield Plan Physician Participation

    PubMed Central

    Yett, Donald E.; Der, William; Ernst, Richard L.; Hay, Joel W.

    1981-01-01

    Many Blue Shield Plans offer participation agreements to physicians that are structurally similar to the participation provisions of Medicaid programs. This paper examines physicians' participation decisions in two such Blue Shield Plans where the participation agreements were on an all-or-nothing basis. The major results show that increases in the Plans' reasonable fees or fee schedules significantly raise the probability of participation, and that physicians with characteristics associated with low quality are significantly more likely to participate than are physicians with characteristics associated with high quality. In this sense the results highlight the tradeoff that must be faced in administering governmental health insurance policy. On the one hand, restricting reasonable and scheduled fees is the principal current tool for containing expenditures on physicians' services. Yet these restrictions tend to depress physicians' willingness to participate in government programs, thereby reducing access to high quality care by the populations those programs were designed to serve. PMID:10309468

  7. The Physics of the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  8. Hair Sheep Blood, Citrated or Defibrinated, Fulfills All Requirements of Blood Agar for Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ellen; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Banaei, Niaz; Baron, Ellen Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood agar is used for the identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of many bacterial pathogens. In the developing world, microbiologists use human blood agar because of the high cost and inhospitable conditions for raising wool sheep or horses to supply blood. Many pathogens either fail to grow entirely or exhibit morphologies and hemolytic patterns on human blood agar that confound colony recognition. Furthermore, human blood can be hazardous to handle due to HIV and hepatitis [1], [2]. This study investigated whether blood from hair sheep, a hardy, low-maintenance variety of sheep adapted for hot climates, was suitable for routine clinical microbiology studies. Methods and Findings Hair sheep blood obtained by jugular venipuncture was anticoagulated by either manual defibrination or collection in human blood bank bags containing citrate-phosphate-dextrose. Trypticase soy 5% blood agar was made from both forms of hair sheep blood and commercial defibrinated wool sheep blood. Growth characteristics, colony morphologies, and hemolytic patterns of selected human pathogens, including several streptococcal species, were evaluated. Specialized identification tests, including CAMP test, reverse CAMP test, and satellite colony formation with Haemophilus influenzae and Abiotrophia defectiva were also performed. Mueller-Hinton blood agar plates prepared from the three blood types were compared in antibiotic susceptibility tests by disk diffusion and E-test. Conclusions The results of all studies showed that blood agar prepared from citrated hair sheep blood is suitable for microbiological tests used in routine identification and susceptibility profiling of human pathogens. The validation of citrated hair sheep blood eliminates the labor-intensive and equipment-requiring process of manual defibrination. Use of hair sheep blood, in lieu of human blood currently used by many developing world laboratories and as an alternative to cost-prohibitive commercial sheep blood, offers the opportunity to dramatically improve the safety and accuracy of laboratory diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria in resource-poor countries. PMID:19578541

  9. Impaction onto a Glass Slide or Agar versus Impingement into a Liquid for the Collection and Recovery of Airborne Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Juozaitis, Arvydas; Willeke, Klaus; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Donnelly, Jean

    1994-01-01

    To study impaction versus impingement for the collection and recovery of viable airborne microorganisms, three new bioaerosol samplers have been designed and built. They differ from each other by the medium onto which the bioaerosol particles are collected (glass, agar, and liquid) but have the same inlet and collection geometries and the same sampling flow rate. The bioaerosol concentrations recorded by three different collection techniques have been compared with each other: impaction onto a glass slide, impaction onto an agar medium, and impingement into a liquid. It was found that the particle collection efficiency of agar slide impaction depends on the concentration of agar in the collection medium and on the sampling time, when samples are collected on a nonmoving agar slide. Impingement into a liquid showed anomalous behavior with respect to the sampling flow rate. Optimal sampling conditions in which all three new samplers exhibit the same overall sampling efficiency for nonbiological particles have been established. Inlet and collection efficiencies of about 100% have been achieved for all three devices at a sampling flow rate of 10 liters/min. The new agar slide impactor and the new impinger were then used to study the biological factors affecting the overall sampling efficiency. Laboratory experiments on the total recovery of a typical environmental microorganism, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525, showed that both sampling methods, impaction and impingement, provided essentially the same total recovery when relatively nonstressed microorganisms were sampled under optimal sampling conditions. Comparison tests of the newly developed bioaerosol samplers with those commercially available showed that the incorporation of our research findings into the design of the new samplers yields better performance data than data from currently available samplers. PMID:16349217

  10. Determination of O-isopropyl methylphosphonic acid in living microorganism-agar matrixes using ion chromatography conductivity detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Alaa F.; Lucas, Samuel V.; Thomas, Susan A. )

    1999-01-01

    A direct an anion exchange, ion chromatography (IC)-based method for the detection of the chemical warfare agent surrogate O-isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) in agar medium has been developed. This is the first report of the systematic development and validation of an IC-based method for the analysis of the chemical warfare agent degradation product, IMPA, in Petri dishes containing the agar medium with 10, 100 and 1000 mg/mL IMPA. Samples were prepared by dilution of the agar medium with deionized water followed by sonication and then filtration before the analysis by IC/conductivity detection. Using this method, the amount of IMPA in the Petri dishes was measured. Excellent separation efficiency and freedom from interference due to common anions such as phosphate and sulfate was obtained in the developed methods. Retention time precision is less than 1.0% relative standard deviation (%RSD) and the detection limit is 0.1 mg/mL. Three calibration curves were performed over the range 1-100 mg/mL using blank agar matrices spiked with five IMPA concentrations; with correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) of 0.993, 0.991, and 0.992 for the calibration standard without dilution of agar matrix, at 4-times dilution and at 40-times dilution, respectively. Using three different samples at three IMPA spike levels, analysis accuracy was assessed by spiking the actual agar samples with IMPA. Average recoveries were 76, 79, and 84% for 10, 100, and 1000 mg/mL, respectively.

  11. Ol' Blue Eyes, in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Scholarly books with "identity" and "culture" in the title have loomed large on academic publishing lists for several years. Scholarly books with "Sinatra" in the title are a more recent phenomenon. Despite his six-decade career as the Voice (the 1940s), the Chairman of the Board (the 50s and 60s), and Ol' Blue Eyes (the 70s through his death, in

  12. The Cryptochrome Blue Light Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuhong; Liu, Hongtao; Klejnot, John; Lin, Chentao

    2010-01-01

    Cryptochromes are photolyase-like blue light receptors originally discovered in Arabidopsis but later found in other plants, microbes, and animals. Arabidopsis has two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, which mediate primarily blue light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and photoperiodic control of floral initiation, respectively. In addition, cryptochromes also regulate over a dozen other light responses, including circadian rhythms, tropic growth, stomata opening, guard cell development, root development, bacterial and viral pathogen responses, abiotic stress responses, cell cycles, programmed cell death, apical dominance, fruit and ovule development, seed dormancy, and magnetoreception. Cryptochromes have two domains, the N-terminal PHR (Photolyase-Homologous Region) domain that bind the chromophore FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the CCE (CRY C-terminal Extension) domain that appears intrinsically unstructured but critical to the function and regulation of cryptochromes. Most cryptochromes accumulate in the nucleus, and they undergo blue light-dependent phosphorylation or ubiquitination. It is hypothesized that photons excite electrons of the flavin molecule, resulting in redox reaction or circular electron shuttle and conformational changes of the photoreceptors. The photoexcited cryptochrome are phosphorylated to adopt an open conformation, which interacts with signaling partner proteins to alter gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and consequently the metabolic and developmental programs of plants. PMID:21841916

  13. Models of Individual Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Alison

    This chapter describes the current state of models of individual blue stragglers. Stellar collisions, binary mergers (or coalescence), and partial or ongoing mass transfer have all been studied in some detail. The products of stellar collisions retain memory of their parent stars and are not fully mixed. Very high initial rotation rates must be reduced by an unknown process to allow the stars to collapse to the main sequence. The more massive collision products have shorter lifetimes than normal stars of the same mass, while products between low mass stars are long-lived and look very much like normal stars of their mass. Mass transfer can result in a merger, or can produce another binary system with a blue straggler and the remnant of the original primary. The products of binary mass transfer cover a larger portion of the colour-magnitude diagram than collision products for two reasons: there are more possible configurations which produce blue stragglers, and there are differing contributions to the blended light of the system. The effects of rotation may be substantial in both collision and merger products, and could result in significant mixing unless angular momentum is lost shortly after the formation event. Surface abundances may provide ways to distinguish between the formation mechanisms, but care must be taken to model the various mixing mechanisms properly before drawing strong conclusions. Avenues for future work are outlined.

  14. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  15. Appressorium-mediated penetration of Magnaporthe oryzae and Colletotrichum orbiculare into surface-cross-linked agar media.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-05-01

    Many phytopathogenic fungi form appressoria on some artificial substances. However, it is difficult to induce appressorium-mediated penetration into artificial substances. In the present study, novel artificial agar media were developed to investigate the in vitro penetration process of phytopathogenic fungi. The media contained sodium carboxymethyl cellulose or sodium alginate, and the surfaces were subjected to ionic cross-linking using trivalent metal ions. The hemibiotrophic phytopathogenic fungi, rice blast fungus and cucurbit anthracnose fungus, formed appressoria and penetrated into the surface cross-linked artificial agar media from the base of appressoria. These artificial media appeared to induce fungal infection behaviour that occurred on host plants. PMID:25877547

  16. Population Analysis of Escherichia coli Isolates with Discordant Resistance Levels by Piperacillin-Tazobactam Broth Microdilution and Agar Dilution Testing

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Jen; Creely, David; van Belkum, Alex; Gayral, Jean Pierre; Dunne, William Michael; Zambardi, Gilles; Shortridge, Dee

    2014-01-01

    Population analysis was performed for 42 Escherichia coli isolates to determine whether heterogeneity of resistance was a factor in piperacillin-tazobactam category differences between agar dilution and broth microdilution. Of 20 isolates discordant between methods, 80% were heterogeneous. Of 22 isolates in agreement, 59% were homogeneous. Heterogeneity and homogeneity rates for those in agreement were significantly different from those that were discordant (P value, 0.010). Heterogeneity of resistance expression appears to be an important factor in category differences observed between broth microdilution and agar dilution for piperacillin-tazobactam. PMID:24342642

  17. Inflation and alternatives with blue tensor spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Xue, Wei E-mail: wei.xue@sissa.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the tilt of the primordial gravitational waves spectrum. A hint of blue tilt is shown from analyzing the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR data. Motivated by this, we explore the possibilities of blue tensor spectra from the very early universe cosmology models, including null energy condition violating inflation, inflation with general initial conditions, and string gas cosmology, etc. For the simplest G-inflation, blue tensor spectrum also implies blue scalar spectrum. In general, the inflation models with blue tensor spectra indicate large non-Gaussianities. On the other hand, string gas cosmology predicts blue tensor spectrum with highly Gaussian fluctuations. If further experiments do confirm the blue tensor spectrum, non-Gaussianity becomes a distinguishing test between inflation and alternatives.

  18. Polish Terms for "Blue" in the Perspective of Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanulewicz, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    The Polish set of terms for blue includes, inter alia, the following adjectives: "niebieski" "blue", "blekitny" "(sky) blue", "granatowy" "navy blue", "lazurowy" "azure", "modry" "(intense) blue" and "siny" "(grey) violet-blue". The adjective "niebieski" is the basic term; however, it shares some of its functions with "blekitny", which is

  19. Polish Terms for "Blue" in the Perspective of Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanulewicz, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    The Polish set of terms for blue includes, inter alia, the following adjectives: "niebieski" "blue", "blekitny" "(sky) blue", "granatowy" "navy blue", "lazurowy" "azure", "modry" "(intense) blue" and "siny" "(grey) violet-blue". The adjective "niebieski" is the basic term; however, it shares some of its functions with "blekitny", which is…

  20. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  1. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by ?-chitin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by ?-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ?50nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R (2) values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R (2) values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  2. Properties and characterization of agar/CuNP bionanocomposite films prepared with different copper salts and reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Teng, Xinnan; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-12-19

    Various types of agar-based bio-nanocomposite (BNC) films were prepared by blending agar and six different copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with different shapes and sizes obtained from three different sources of copper salts and two different reducing agents. The BNC films were characterized by UV-visible, FE-SEM, FT-IR, and XRD. The thermogravimetric study showed that the melting point of BNC films was increased when ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent for CuNPs synthesis. Apparent surface color and transmittance of agar film was greatly influenced by the reinforcement of CuNPs. However, mechanical and water vapor barrier properties did not change significantly (p>0.05) by blending with CuNPs. Tensile modulus and tensile strength decreased slightly for all types of CuNPs reinforced while elongation at break slightly increased when CuNPs produced by ascorbic acid were blended. The agar bio-nanocomposite films showed profound antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25263917

  3. Choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as tool for the fabrication of agar films with improved mechanical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present paper, we test the suitability of Choline-Cl/urea (DES-U) and Choline-Cl/glycerol (DES-G) eutectic mixtures at 1:2 molar ratios for the production of agar biodegradable films. A three-step process is proposed: pre-solubilization of polymer in DES followed by compression-molding and s...

  4. Multi-chamber electroosmosis using textile reinforced agar membranes - A promising concept for the future of hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Markus; Lenninger, Margit; Mayer, Gert; Neuwirt, Hannes; Grimm, Michael; Bechtold, Thomas

    2016-01-20

    Renal replacement therapy options are limited to hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis (70% of US patients) or renal transplantation. Diffusion processes are the main physico-chemical principle behind hemodialysis. An alternative way to achieve liquid flow through membranes bases on the electroosmotic flow which is observed as electrokinetic phenomenon in porous membranes which bear surface charges. Agar consists of the non-ionic agarose and the negatively charged agaropectine thus an electroosmotic flux is observed in analytical electrophoresis. In this study the potential electroosmosis on textile reinforced agar membranes as separation method was investigated. Using a five-chamber electrolysis cell and an agar membrane/cellulose fabric composite an intensive electroosmotic flow of 1-2mlcm(2)h(-1) at 100mA cell current could be observed. The movement of cations in the negatively charged agar structure led to an intensive electroosmotic flux, which also transported uncharged molecules such as urea, glucose through the membrane. Separation of uncharged low molecular weight molecules is determined by the membrane characteristic. The transport of ions (K(+), PO4(3-), creatinine) and uncharged molecules (urea, glucose) in electroosmotic separation experiments was monitored using a pH 5.5 phosphate electrolyte with the aim to assess the overall transport processes in the electrochemical cell. The results demonstrate the potential of the method for filtration of biological fluids in the absence of external pressure or high shear rates. PMID:26572331

  5. Effects of immersion disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of stone casts.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Hiraguchi, Hisako; Iwasaki, Eriko; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of the resulting stone casts. Two brands of cartridge-form agar impression material and one alginate impression material were used. Agar-alginate combined impressions of smooth glass plates were prepared. The impressions were immersed in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution or 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 1, 3, 5 and 10 min. A stone cast made with an impression that had not been immersed was prepared as a control. The surface roughness (Ra) of the stone casts was measured, and the cast surfaces were observed by SEM. Immersion of agar-alginate combined impressions in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for up to 10 min had no serious adverse effects on the surface properties of the stone casts. In contrast, even 1 min of immersion in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution caused deterioration of the cast surface properties. PMID:26843442

  6. Hydrogen-bond-mediated in situ fabrication of AgNPs/agar/PAN electrospun nanofibers as reproducible SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Yang, Hui; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-28

    Reproducibility in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements is a challenge. This work developed a facile way to make highly dispersed uniform silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) loaded in the agar/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by the coupling the electrospinning technology from metal complex-containing polymer solution and in situ photoreductive technique. Agar, as hydrophilic component, was introduced into the electrospinning solution considering that its abundant hydroxyl group sites could greatly improve the contents of silver ions in the polymers because of the rich silver ion chelated with the hydroxyl group, whereas hydrophilic agar was integrated with hydrophobic PAN by -OH···N≡C- hydrogen bonds as a bridge. Meanwhile, the in situ photoreductive reaction was made under different light irradiations such as desk lamp, 365 nm UV-lamp, and 254 nm UV-lamp. High yield of stable AgNPs with highly uniform and dispersion are available in the agar/PAN nanofibers after the in situ photoreductive reaction, supplying the possibility of reproducible SERS signals. To identify that concept of proof, a facile approach for the determination of malachite green (MG) in three environmental practical samples was demonstrated by using the composite nanofibrous material irradiated by 365 nm UV-lamp, giving the minimum detection concentration of MG as low as 0.1 μmol/L with a good linear response ranging from 0.1-100 μmol/L (R(2) = 0.9960). PMID:25546719

  7. [Clinical assessment of novel ChromID ESBL agar plates for detection of ESBL producers in the family Enterobacteriaceae].

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Eriko; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Hidaka, Eiko; Oguchi, Harumi; Kanai, Shinichiro; Oana, Kozue; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Honda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-producers in the family Enterobacteriaceae are recognized worldwide as nosocomial pathogens, however it is difficult to screen them in the routine laboratory processing. ChromID ESBL agar newly developed for screening ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was released in Japan in April, 2007. We evaluated the clinical assessment of ChromID ESBL agar in routine microbiology laboratory. The 47 strains investigated were clinical isolates belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae with the MICs of cefpodoxime greater than 2 mug/ml. The 27 ESBL-producers examined were comprising of 19 Escherichia coli, 3 Klebsiella oxytoca, 1 Citrobacter freundii, 3 Enterobacter cloacae, and 1 S. marcescens (ESBL group) and 20 ESBL non-producers consiating of 5 K. oxytoca, 1 Proteus mirabilis, 1 P. vlugaris, 2 Serratia marcescens, 8 C. freundii, 2 Enterobacter cloacae, and 1 E. aerogenes (non-ESBL group). Characterization of beta-lactamase genes was carried out by use of polymerase chain reaction. As the results, the sensitivity and the specificity of ChromID ESBL agar plates after incubation for 18 hours was 100% and 20%, respectively. It should be noted that the values of specificity was extremely low compared with those of the sensitivity. These findings clearly suggested that in cases of utilizing ChromID ESBL agar plates, it should be important to consider its characteristic properties, as even the ESBL-non-producers could grow on these media only when they were resistant to CPDX. PMID:20528091

  8. Uncovering blue diffuse dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-04-01

    Extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies are known to be very rare, despite the large numbers of low-mass galaxies predicted by the local galaxy luminosity function. This paper presents a subsample of galaxies that were selected via a morphology-based search on Sloan Digital Sky Survey images with the aim of finding these elusive XMP galaxies. By using the recently discovered XMP galaxy, Leo P, as a guide, we obtained a collection of faint, blue systems, each with isolated H II regions embedded in a diffuse continuum, that have remained optically undetected until now. Here we show the first results from optical spectroscopic follow-up observations of 12 of 100 of these blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies yielded by our search algorithm. Oxygen abundances were obtained via the direct method for eight galaxies, and found to be in the range 7.45 < 12 + log (O/H) < 8.0, with two galaxies being classified as XMPs. All BDDs were found to currently have a young star-forming population (<10 Myr) and relatively high ionization parameters of their H II regions. Despite their low luminosities (-11 ? MB ? -18) and low surface brightnesses (23-25 mag arcsec-2), the galaxies were found to be actively star forming, with current star formation rates between 0.0003 and 0.078 M? yr-1. From our current subsample, BDD galaxies appear to be a population of non-quiescent dwarf irregular galaxies, or the diffuse counterparts to blue compact galaxies and as such may bridge the gap between these two populations. Our search algorithm demonstrates that morphology-based searches are successful in uncovering more diffuse metal-poor star-forming galaxies, which traditional emission-line-based searches overlook.

  9. Spectroscopy of blue stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Warnock, A., III; Nations, H. L.; Barden, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra have been obtained for the brightest objects from a list of blue stellar objects found in a Palomar Schmidt field centered on Kapteyn Selected Area 28. Four of the objects presented here comprise a complete sample of objects with UV excess and magnitudes brighter than or equal to B = 16.3 mag. The object with the largest UV excess is a previously undiscovered quasar of redshift 0.25 and cataloged B magnitude of 15.6 mag. The object shows some evidence of variability. Spectroscopy for one bright object in a companion field centered on Selected Area 29 is also presented.

  10. The mixing of blue stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella; De Propris, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution spectroscopy for a sample of 17 blue stragglers in M67, in order to measure abundances of Beryllium, Carbon, Oxygen and the Carbon isotope (13C/12C) abundance ratio. The main aim of this project is to measure indications of deep mixing and therefore elucidate the processes responsible for the formation of these stars, whether stellar collisions, WUMa type mass transfer or Algol-like binary evolution. The data will also allow us to measure the importance of magnetic fields and search for faint companions via their effect on other spectral lines

  11. Spectral filtering for improved pulsed photothermal temperature profiling in agar tissue phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Milani?, Matija; Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal temperature profiling utilizing the customary spectral band of the InSb radiation detector (?=3.0 to 5.6 ?m) and a narrowed acquisition band (4.5 to 5.6 ?m). We use custom tissue phantoms composed of agar gel layers separated by thin absorbing layers. The laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed within the customary monochromatic approximation, using a custom minimization algorithm. In a detailed numerical simulation of the experimental procedure, we consider several acquisition spectral bands with the lower wavelength limit varied between 3.0 and 5.0 ?m (imitating application of different long-pass filters). The simulated PPTR signals contain noise with amplitude and spectral characteristics consistent with our experimental system. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that spectral filtering reduces reconstruction error and broadening of temperature peaks, especially for shallower and more complex absorbing structures. For the simulated PPTR system and watery tissues, numerical results indicate an optimal lower wavelength limit of 3.8 to 4.2 ?m. PMID:19123649

  12. Effects of pulsed lasers on agar model simulation of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Asada, M; Kvasnicka, J; Geschwind, H J

    1993-01-01

    Coronary laser angioplasty is limited by a high rate of dissection and the occurrence of abrupt closure and perforation. The aim of this study was to visualize the mechanical effects of pulsed lasers on two chamber in vitro models. These models consisted of 1 or 2 agar layers and calcium carbonate inclusions (1-layer model) or lipid (2-layer model) simulating lipid or calcified tissue. The inclusions were irradiated with a holmium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho-YAG) laser or a xenon chloride excimer laser. The Ho-YAG laser demonstrated dissection-like expansions of the target and perforation-like cracks. The size of dissection was obtained using an the empirical formula of energy (E) and the maximal expansion distance (Dmax) of the targets, Dmax = 0.15E0,87-1,17. The excimer laser showed rare and short perforation-like cracks and little dissection-like expansion of the gaseous products originating from the ablation of material. Ho-YAG laser ablation is likely to induce target tissue dissections and/or perforations. Excimer laser-ablates targets with less traumatic effects than Ho-YAG laser. PMID:8366739

  13. Development and validation of a microbiological agar assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Cleber A; Agarrayua, Danielle A; Laporta, Luciane V; Machado, Jaison C; Manfio, Maria L; Bittencourt, Celso F

    2009-06-01

    Cefuroxime (CFU) is a semi-synthetic cephalosporin with a relatively broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and belongs to the second generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for determination of cefuroxime sodium in pharmaceutical formulations has not been reported yet. With this purpose, this paper reports the development and validation of a simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify CFU sodium in injectable formulations. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of CFU upon the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r=0.9998) in the selected range of 8.0-32.0 microg/ml; precise [repeatability: relative standard deviation (RSD)=1.56%; intermediate precision: between-day RSD=1.27%; between analyst RSD=1.13%] and accurate (101.58%). The bioassay specificity was studied by evaluation of degraded sample at 50 degrees C with analysis at 0, 24 and 48 h in parallel with the pharmacopeial liquid chromatography method for CFU. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable quantitation of CFU sodium in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:19344741

  14. Mercury and its bioconcentration factors in fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) from spatially distant sites in Poland.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Lipka, K; Mazur, A

    2007-09-01

    Total mercury content has been determined in the fruiting bodies of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and topsoil layer (0-10 cm) collected from 14 spatially distant sites across Poland. Mercury was measured by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) after nitric acid (mushrooms) or nitric acid and sulfuric acid (soil) digestion of the samples. The caps, depending on the site, contained total mercury at mean concentrations from 0.24+/-0.13 to 1.4+/-0.6 microg/g dm (median 0.19-1.4 microg/g dm), and stalks from 0.18+/-0.06 to 0.71+/-0.26 microg/g dm (median 0.18-0.67 microg/g dm). An overall-mean the total mercury content for 204 caps and stalks was, respectively, 0.73+/-0.55 (0.05-3.3 microg/g dm) and 0.43+/-0.33 (0.09-2.3 microg/g dm). PMID:17849304

  15. Characterisation of Elastic and Acoustic Properties of an Agar-Based Tissue Mimicking Material.

    PubMed

    Brewin, M P; Birch, M J; Mehta, D J; Reeves, J W; Shaw, S; Kruse, C; Whiteman, J R; Hu, S; Kenz, Z R; Banks, H T; Greenwald, S E

    2015-10-01

    As a first step towards an acoustic localisation device for coronary stenosis to provide a non-invasive means of diagnosing arterial disease, measurements are reported for an agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) of the shear wave propagation velocity, attenuation and viscoelastic constants, together with one dimensional quasi-static elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio. Phase velocity and attenuation coefficients, determined by generating and detecting shear waves piezo-electrically in the range 300 Hz-2 kHz, were 3.2-7.5 ms(-1) and 320 dBm(-1). Quasi-static Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio, obtained by compressive or shear loading of cylindrical specimens were 150-160 kPa; 54-56 kPa and 0.37-0.44. The dynamic Young's and shear moduli, derived from fitting viscoelastic internal variables by an iterative statistical inverse solver to freely oscillating specimens were 230 and 33 kPa and the corresponding relaxation times, 0.046 and 0.036 s. The results were self-consistent, repeatable and provide baseline data required for the computational modelling of wave propagation in a phantom. PMID:25773982

  16. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2016-01-15

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs. PMID:26312739

  17. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  18. Tissue-mimicking agar/gelatin materials for use in heterogeneous elastography phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L; Hobson, Maritza A; Shi, Hairong; Varghese, Tomy; Frank, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Five 9 cm 9 cm 9 cm phantoms, each with a 2-cm-diameter cylindrical inclusion, were produced with various dry-weight concentrations of agar and gelatin. Elastic contrasts ranged from 1.5 to 4.6, and values of the storage modulus (real part of the complex Youngs modulus) were all in the soft tissue range. Additives assured immunity from bacterial invasion and can produce tissue-mimicking ultrasound and NMR properties. Monitoring of strain ratios over a 7 to 10 month period indicated that the mechanical properties of the phantoms were stable, allowing about 1 month for the phantom to reach chemical equilibrium. The only dependable method for determining the storage moduli of the inclusions is to make measurements on samples excised from the phantoms. If it is desired to produce and accurately characterize a phantom with small inclusions with other shapes, such as an array of small spheres, an auxiliary phantom with the geometry of the cylindrical inclusion phantoms or the equivalent should be made at the same time using the same materials. The elastic contrast can then be determined using samples excised from the auxiliary phantom. A small increase of about 10% in volume of the cylindrical inclusions occurreda tolerable increase. Interestingly, the smallest increase (about 5%) occurred in the phantom with the largest elastic contrast. PMID:16306655

  19. Fungistatic activity of flaxseed in potato dextrose agar and a fresh noodle system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingying; Hall, Clifford; Wolf-Hall, Charlene; Manthey, Frank

    2008-02-10

    Although numerous researchers have studied flaxseed as a food ingredient for its health benefits, flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) has never been considered as a food preservative. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of flaxseed flour (FF) concentration (0, 6, 9, 12, and 15% wt/wt), cultivar ('Omega' and brown) and source (four seed companies located in Minnesota and North Dakota) on flaxseed fungistatic activity. Fungal radial growth was used to assess the fungistatic activity of FF in both potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium and a fresh noodle system. Strains of Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium graminearum, and a Penicillium sp. isolated from molded noodles were used as the test microorganisms. Results showed that growth of F. graminearum was completely inhibited at all FF concentrations in PDA, and the inhibition of the other three test microorganisms increased with increasing FF concentrations. In the model noodle system, FF concentration at 9% or higher significantly reduced the mold count of fresh noodle during storage. In the inoculated noodle system, 6% FF addition was sufficient to significantly inhibit the growth of F. graminearum and A. flavus, whereas 9% FF concentrations showed fungistatic activity against P. chrysogenum and the Penicillium sp. isolate. Differences in the degree of mold inhibition were found among FFs obtained from different sources and cultivars. Results suggested that flaxseed possesses fungistatic activity and could be used as a multifunctional food ingredient. PMID:18077042

  20. Injection of Acanthaster planci with thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS). II. Histopathological changes.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Posada, J A; Pratchett, M; Owens, L

    2011-12-01

    We assessed histological changes in the tissues of the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci (COTS) after injection of thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS) which was used as a disease inducer (potential outbreak control method), by conventional and scanning electron microscopy. Digestive glands were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin to describe the histological architecture of the intestinal epithelium. Subsequently comparison of healthy versus infected tissues and Gram stains were carried out to confirm bacterial occurrence on infected tissues, characterize the structural changes induced by bacterial communities in COTS tissues, and to determine if the histopathological changes of intestinal tissues were consistent with vibrio infection. TCBS injections induced marked epithelial desquamation, hypertrophy and hypersecretion of glandular cells, epithelial cell destruction, pyknosis, reduction of thickness and disorganization of connective tissue and associated nerve plexus, presence of bacterial colonies, irregular eosinophilic foci in glandular cells, brush border disruption, atrophy and detachment of intestinal microvilli and cell debris in the lumen. All these changes were attributed to a fulminating systemic dysbiosis and were consistent with vibrio infections. PMID:22303626

  1. Cation concentration variability of four distinct Mueller-Hinton agar brands influences polymyxin B susceptibility results.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Raquel; Bispo, Paulo J M; Yamanaka, Tiago M; Gales, Ana C

    2012-07-01

    Polymyxins have been the only alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. For this reason, it is of crucial importance that susceptibility tests provide accurate results when testing these drug-pathogen combinations. In this study, the effect of cation concentration variability found on different commercial brands of Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) for testing polymyxin B susceptibility was evaluated. The polymyxin B susceptibilities determined using Etest and disk diffusion were compared to those determined by the CLSI reference broth microdilution method. In general, the polymyxin B MIC values were higher when determined by Etest than when determined by broth microdilution against both A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates. A high very major error rate (10%) was observed, as well as a trend toward lower MICs, compared to those determined by broth microdilution when the Merck MHA was tested by Etest. Poor essential agreement rates (10 to 70%) were observed for P. aeruginosa when all MHA brands were tested by Etest. Although an excellent categorical agreement rate (100%) was seen between the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods for P. aeruginosa, larger zones of inhibition were shown obtained using the Merck MHA. The high cation concentration variability found for the MHA brands tested correlated to the low accuracy, and discrepancies in the polymyxin B MICs were determined by Etest method, particularly for P. aeruginosa isolates. PMID:22553247

  2. Functional properties of edible agar-based and starch-based films for food quality preservation.

    PubMed

    Phan, The D; Debeaufort, F; Luu, D; Voilley, A

    2005-02-23

    Edible films made of agar (AG), cassava starch (CAS), normal rice starch (NRS), and waxy (glutinous) rice starch (WRS) were elaborated and tested for a potential use as edible packaging or coating. Their water vapor permeabilities (WVP) were comparable with those of most of the polysaccharide-based films and with some protein-based films. Depending on the environmental moisture pressure, the WVP of the films varies and remains constant when the relative humidity (RH) is >84%. Equilibrium sorption isotherms of these films have been measured; the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) model was used to describe the sorption isotherm and contributed to a better knowledge of hydration properties. Surface hydrophobicity and wettability of these films were also investigated using the sessile drop contact angle method. The results obtained suggested the migration of the lipid fraction toward evaporation surface during film drying. Among these polysaccharide-based films, AG-based film and CAS-based film displayed more interesting mechanical properties: they are transparent, clear, homogeneous, flexible, and easily handled. NRS- and WRS-based films were relatively brittle and have a low tension resistance. Microstructure of film cross section was observed by environmental scanning electron microscopy to better understand the effect of the structure on the functional properties. The results suggest that AG-based film and CAS-based films, which show better functional properties, are promising systems to be used as food packaging or coating instead of NRS- and WRS-based films. PMID:15713008

  3. A comparison of two commercially irradiated Trypticase Soy Agars containing lecithin and polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Marsik, F; Fowler, J

    1992-01-01

    Gamma-radiation sterilized Trypticase Soy Agar containing lecithin and polysorbate 80 (TSA++) (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, MD) and irradiated TSA++ (Adams Scientific, West Warwick, RI) were tested by a quantitative spread plate method. Four bacteria Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 10145, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 and the yeast Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were tested in two separate experiments using different lots of media. A strain of Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, was tested by a qualitative streak plate method. The Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems (BDMS) irradiated TSA++ overall recovered a greater number of organisms than the Adams Scientific TSA++ in both experiments and allowed for the earlier recovery of S. pyogenes ATCC 19615. The growth of A. niger ATCC 16404, was comparable on both media. Efficacy of the media to neutralize 1, 2 and 3% phenol as well as 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BC) solutions was done by a disk diffusion method using 2 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative bacteria. Both media showed complete neutralization of the 0.001 and 0.01% BC solutions and partial neutralization of the 0.1% BC solution. The BDMS TSA++ showed better neutralization of the 2 and 3% phenol solutions than the Adams Scientific TSA++. This data indicates that not all irradiated TSA++ media perform in an equivalent manner. PMID:1453282

  4. Evaluation of Brilliance ESBL Agar, a Novel Chromogenic Medium for Detection of Extended-Spectrum-Beta- Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Te-Din; Bogaerts, Pierre; Berhin, Catherine; Guisset, Amelie; Glupczynski, Youri

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of Brilliance ESBL agar (OX; Oxoid, Basingstoke, United Kingdom), a novel chromogenic agar for the selective isolation and the presumptive identification of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A panel of 200 clinical Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenting isolates with defined resistance mechanisms was inoculated onto OX and onto ChromID ESBL agar (BM; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) chromogenic medium in the first part of the study to evaluate the growth selectivity and chromogenic features of these two media. Of the 156 Enterobacteriaceae challenge isolates, 8 fully susceptible isolates were inhibited, all 98 ESBL producers were detected, and 50 isolates harboring other resistance mechanisms were recovered on both chromogenic agars. In the second phase, 528 clinical samples (including 344 fecal specimens) were plated onto OX, BM, and MacConkey agar with a ceftazidime disk (MCC) for the screening of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Growth on at least one medium was observed with 144 (27%) of the clinical samples screened. A total of 182 isolates, including 109 (60%) of Enterobacteriaceae, were recovered and 70 of these (from 59 specimens) were confirmed as ESBL-producing isolates. The sensitivities of MCC, BM, and OX were 74.6%, 94.9%, and 94.9%, respectively. The specificities of MCC, BM, and OX by specimens reached 94.9%, 95.5%, and 95.7%, respectively, when only colored colonies were considered on the two selective chromogenic media. The high negative predictive value (99.3%) found for OX suggests that this medium may constitute an excellent screening tool for the rapid exclusion of patients not carrying ESBL producers. PMID:20410342

  5. Blue Photoluminescence From Silacyclobutene Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernisz, Udo

    1999-04-01

    Organosilicon compounds in which the Si atom is bound to an aromatic moiety such as a phenyl group, exhibit strong blue photoluminescence when excited with UV light (for example at a wavelength of 337 nm). This phenomenon was investigated quantitatively at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (78 K) by measuring the emission and excitation spectra of the total luminescence, and of the phosphorescence, for a silacyclobutene compound in which two phenyl groups are joined across the C=C double bond of the ring. The effect of a series of organic substituents on the Si atom was investigated as well as the time dependence of the phosphorescence intensity decay for this class of materials. A tentative model of the energy levels in this compound is proposed. The observation of visible blue emission -- in contrast to photoluminescence in the UV from the aromatic groups -- is explained by the Si-C bond lowering the energy of the molecular orbitals, an effect that is currently under study for a range of Si-containing compounds. Synthesis of the silacyclobutene compounds was performed at the laboratory of Prof. N. Auner, now at J.W. Goethe Universitt, Frankfurt, Germany. His contributions, and those of his collaborators, to the work reported here are gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Methylene blue diffusion in skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-07-01

    The study of Methylene Blue penetration in both skin and subcutaneous fat is presented. Experiments have been carried out with both rat skin and human adipose tissue in vitro at room temperature. Microscopic analysis with digital imaging system has been applied for visualizing and investigation of the Methylene Blue diffusion in the epidermal, dermal and adipose tissue. Diffusion coefficient of Methylene Blue in skin in vitro has been estimated.

  7. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  8. Optically tuneable blue phase photonic band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Lin, T.-H.; Liu, J.-H.

    2010-03-22

    This study investigates an optically switchable band gap of photonic crystal that is based on an azobenzene-doped liquid crystal blue phase. The trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene deforms the cubic unit cell of the blue phase and shifts the photonic band gap. The fast back-isomerization of azobenzene was induced by irradiation with different wavelengths light. The crystal structure is verified using Kossel diffraction diagram. An optically addressable blue phase display, based on Bragg reflection from the photonic band gap, is also demonstrated. The tunable ranges are around red, green, and blue wavelengths and exhibit a bright saturated color.

  9. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  10. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  11. Comparison of Six Chromogenic Agar Media for the Isolation of a Broad Variety of Non-O157 Shigatoxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of non-O157 STEC from food samples has proved to be challenging. The selection of a suitable selective isolation agar remains problematic. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate six chromogenic agar media for the isolation of STEC: Tryptone Bile X-glucuronide agar (TBX), Rainbow® Agar O157 (RB), Rapid E. coli O157:H7 (RE), Modified MacConkey Agar (mMac), CHROMagarTM STEC (Chr ST) and chromIDTM EHEC (Chr ID). During this study, 45 E. coli strains were used, including 39 STEC strains belonging to 16 different O serogroups and 6 non-STEC E. coli. All E. coli strains were able to grow on TBX and RB, whereas one STEC strain was unable to grow on Chr ID and a number of other STEC strains did not grow on mMac, CHROMagar STEC and Rapid E. coli O157:H7. However, only the latter three agars were selective enough to completely inhibit the growth of the non-STEC E. coli. Our conclusion was that paired use of a more selective agar such as CHROMagar STEC together with a less selective agar like TBX or Chr ID might be the best solution for isolating non-O157 STEC from food. PMID:26090610

  12. Screening for ligninolytic enzymes from autochthonous fungi and applications for decolorization of Remazole Marine Blue

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Emre; Ucar, M. Cigdem; Gezer, Tekin; Pazarlioglu, Nurdan Kasikara

    2009-01-01

    This study presents new and alternative fungal strains for the production of ligninolytic enzymes which have great potential to use in industrial and biotechnological processes. Thirty autochthonous fungal strains were harvested from Bornova-Izmir in Turkiye. In the fresh fruitbody extracts laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase activities, which are the principal enzymes responsible for ligninocellulose degradation by Basidiomycetes, were screened. Spores of some of the basidiomycetes species such as Cortinarius sp., Trametes versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, Abortiporus biennis, Lyophyllum subglobisporium, Ramaria stricta, Ganoderma carnosum, Lactarius delicious ve Lepista nuda were isolated and investigated optimum cultivation conditions in submerged fermentation for high yields of ligninolytic enzyme production. In addition, isolated fungal strains were monitored on agar plates whether having the capability of decolorization of a textile dye Remazol Marine Blue. PMID:24031371

  13. Preparation and application of agar/alginate/collagen ternary blend functional food packaging films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-Feng; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-09-01

    Ternary blend agar/alginate/collagen (A/A/C) hydrogel films with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and grapefruit seed extract (GSE) were prepared. Their performance properties, transparency, tensile strength (TS), water vapor permeability (WVP), water contact angle (CA), water swelling ratio (SR), water solubility (WS), and antimicrobial activity were determined. The A/A/C film was highly transparent, and both AgNPs and GSE incorporated blend films (A/A/C(AgNPs) and A/A/C(GSE)) exhibited UV-screening effect, especially, the A/A/C(GSE) film had high UV-screening effect without sacrificing the transmittance. In addition, the A/A/C blend films formed efficient hydrogel film with the water holding capacity of 23.6 times of their weight. Both A/A/C(AgNPs) and A/A/C(GSE) composite films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) food-borne pathogenic bacteria. The test results of fresh potatoes packaging revealed that all the A/A/C ternary blend films prevented forming of condensed water on the packaged film surface, both A/A/C(AgNPs) and A/A/C(GSE) composite films prevented greening of potatoes during storage. The results indicate that the ternary blend hydrogel films incorporated with AgNPs or GSE can be used not only as antifogging packaging films for highly respiring fresh agriculture produce, but also as an active food packaging system utilizing their strong antimicrobial activity. PMID:26187189

  14. Evaluation of the antibacterial effects of vancomycin hydrochloride released from agar-gelatin-bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneira, Josefina; Di Virgilio, Ana Laura; Audisio, M Carina; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Gorustovich, Alejandro A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the perfomance of agar-gelatin (AG) composites and AG-containing 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) microparticles (AGBG) in relation to their water uptake capacity, sustained release of a drug over time, and antibacterial effects. The composites were fabricated by the gel-casting method. To impart the local drug release capacity, vancomycin hydrochloride (VC) was loaded in the composites in concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mg ml(-1). VC release was assessed in distilled water at 37 °C up to 72 h and quantified spectrophotometrically. The antibacterial activity of composites was evaluated by the inhibition zone test and the plate count method. The experiments were performed in vitro up to 48 h on three staphylococcus strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213, S. aureus ATCC6538 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC12228. The results showed that the addition of BG to AG composites did not affect the degree of water uptake. The release of VC was significantly affected by the presence of BG. VC release was higher from AGBGVC films than from AGVC ones over prolonged incubation times. Bacterial inhibition zones were found around the composites. The halos were larger when the cells were put in contact with AGVC composites than when they were put in contact with AGBGVC ones. Nevertheless, the viable count method demonstrated that the composites inhibited Staphylococcus cell growth with no statistical differences. In conclusion, the addition of BG did not reflect an improvement in the parameters studied. On the other hand, composites loaded with VC would have a role in prophylaxis against bacterial infection. PMID:25586240

  15. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strains using agar diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis is a common soil saprotroph and has been isolated from air, organic waste and also from plant, animal and human tissues. Scopulariopsis has mainly been associated in humans with superficial mycoses, but it has also been described as the cause of subcutaneous and invasive infections. The most common aetiological agent of infections in humans is Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. This species has been reported to be resistant in vitro to broad-spectrum antifungal agents available today. The aim of the study was to establish in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 35 S. brevicaulis strains against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (CAS), terbinafine (TER), ciclopirox (CIC), voriconazole (VOR), clotrimazole (CTR), miconazole (MCZ), econazole (ECO), ketoconazole (KET), itraconazole (ITR), and fluconazole (FLU). Antifungal susceptibility tests were evaluated by an agar diffusion method (Neo-Sensitabs, Rosco, Denmark). AMB, FC, CAS, ITR and FLU showed no antifungal activity against S. brevicaulis. TER, CIC, CTR, KET, VOR, ECO, and MCZ revealed inhibitory activity for S. brevicaulis, but it varied for each of the drugs. The best antifungal effect was observed for TER and CIC. All isolates had large inhibition zones for TER and CIC. CTR was also inhibitory for all tested S. brevicaulis isolates, but the diameters of inhibition zones were smaller than for TER and CIC. Nearly 89% isolates showed inhibition zones for KET and the mean diameter of the inhibition zone was comparable to CTR. The least antifungal activity exhibited VQR, ECO and MCZ. Because of the multiresistance of S. brevicaulis, infections due to this species may not respond to particular antifungal treatment and other therapeutic approaches should be considered, e.g., combined therapy and/or surgery. PMID:21682097

  16. Wispy Blue Clouds Over Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These are more wispy blue clouds from Sol 39 as seen by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The bright clouds near the bottom are about 10 degrees above the horizon. The clouds are believed to be at an altitude of 10 to 15 km, and are thought to be made of small water ice particles. The picture was taken about 40 minutes before sunrise.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. Methylthymol blue in Fricke gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K. I.; Mequanint, K.

    2015-01-01

    The initial trial of methylthymol blue (MTB) as a chelator for ferric iron in Fricke gel dosimeters, used for three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry in cancer radiotherapy, is reported. MTB is a structural analogue of the conventionally used xylenol orange (XO); however, the absorbance spectrum of the ferric-MTB complex is shifted to higher wavelengths, which should allow for lower amount of light scattering during gel scanning. In this study, two gelatin substrates, two sources of XO and one source of MTB have been compared. The MTB- containing gels exhibited similar dose response and diffusion coefficient to the XO-containing gels at their wavelengths of maximum absorption (620 and 585 nm, respectively). In addition, the MTB gels gave an excellent dose response at 633 nm, which is an important wavelength that is already used with other 3D dosimeters.

  18. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  19. Preparation of agar nanospheres: comparison of response surface and artificial neural network modeling by a genetic algorithm approach.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mohammad Reza; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Fathi, Milad

    2015-05-20

    Multivariate nature of drug loaded nanospheres manufacturing in term of multiplicity of involved factors makes it a time consuming and expensive process. In this study genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural network (ANN), two tools inspired by natural process, were employed to optimize and simulate the manufacturing process of agar nanospheres. The efficiency of GA was evaluated against the response surface methodology (RSM). The studied responses included particle size, poly dispersity index, zeta potential, drug loading and release efficiency. GA predicted greater extremum values for response factors compared to RSM. However, real values showed some deviations from predicted data. Appropriate agreement was found between ANN model predicted and real values for all five response factors with high correlation coefficients. GA was more successful than RSM in optimization and along with ANN were efficient tools in optimizing and modeling the fabrication process of drug loaded in agar nanospheres. PMID:25817674

  20. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  1. Use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet agar plates for selective recovery of bacteriophages from natural environments

    SciTech Connect

    Asghari, A.; Farrah, S.R.; Bitton, G. )

    1992-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivated bacteriophages and bacteria at different rates. A concentration of 0.1% hydrogen peroxide reduced the numbers of several bacteria by an average of 94% but caused an average of 25% inactivation in the numbers of bacteriophages tested. Treating natural samples with hydrogen peroxide selectively reduced the indigenous bacterial flora and permitted better visualization of plaques of lawns of Escherichia coli C-3000. In some cases indigenous gram-positive bacteria were relatively resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but their growth could be limited by incorporation of crystal violet into the bottom agar used for plaque assays. The use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet-containing plates permitted recovery of more phages from natural samples than did other procedures, such as chloroform pretreatment or the use of selective plating agar such as EC medium.

  2. Diffusion in immobilized-cell agar layers: influence of bacterial growth on the diffusivity of potassium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mignot, L; Junter, G A

    1990-05-01

    The diffusivity of potassium chloride in composite agar slab/microporous membrane structures loaded with various amounts of Escherichia coli whole cells was determined using both time-lag and steady-state methods. The diffusion coefficient of KCl decreased linearly with the logarithm of the immobilized-cell content. The effect exerted by bacterial growth inside the immobilization matrices on KCl diffusivity was then investigated. The diffusion coefficient of KCl obtained by time-lag analysis decreased during incubation of the immobilized-cell structures, whereas less consistent results arose from the steady-state method. An apparent doubling time for immobilized E. coli, increasing with the initial cell content of the gel, was obtained from the calibration relationship between KCl diffusivity and the number of organisms in agar. PMID:1366531

  3. Cytological comparison of leaves and stems of Prunus avium L. shoots cultured on a solid medium with agar or gelrite.

    PubMed

    Franck, T; Crvecoeur, M; Wuest, J; Greppin, H; Gaspar, T

    1998-01-01

    An axillary proliferating clone of Prunus avium L. was subcultured every four weeks on solid MS medium with agar as the gelling agent. Vitrification (hyperhydricity) of shoots was induced in one four week cycle with the same medium except that agar was replaced by gelrite. During culture on the vitrifying medium, the water content of the shoots progressively increased with a parallel decrease in chlorophyll content. Cytological differences between the leaves and stems of the vitrified and normal shoots were detected by light and electron (both transmission and scanning) microscopy. Leaves of vitrified shoots were characterized by lower number of chloroplasts in the palisade parenchyma and by a defective cuticle. The stems of vitrified shoots had a less developed and lignifled xylem tissue, lacked sclerenchymatic areas and showed hypertrophy of the cortical parenchyma. More intense vacuolar activity with evaginations of the chloroplast envelope into the vacuole was noted in cells of vitrified leaves. PMID:9554582

  4. [Formation of polar bundles of pili on a cell and the behavior of Azospirillum brasilense in semiliquid agar].

    PubMed

    Shelud'ko, A V; Katsy, E I

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the formation of single polar bundles of pili on Azospirillum brasilense cells, the twitching motility of cell aggregates, and a new type of social behavior--the dispersal of bacterial cells in semiliquid agar associated with the formation of granular inclusions (the so-called Gri+ phenotype)--which is an alternative to swarming (the Swa+ phenotype). The wild-type A. brasilense cells occurring in a semiliquid agar may show either the Swa+Gri-, or Swa-Gri-, or Swa-Gri+ phenotype. The formation of single polar flagella (Fla) or polar bundles of pili may reflect two alternative states of A. brasilense cells. The components of the Fla system may be involved in the regulation of the phenotypic variation of azospirilla. PMID:11763787

  5. [Clinical symptoms and circumastances of acute poisonings with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina)].

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Druzdz, Artur; Naskret, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Mushroom poisonings in Poland are quite common, especially in summer and autumn, but fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina) are rather rare cause of these intoxications. Fly agaric is a cause of deliberate poisoning, whereas panther cap poisoning also happens accidentally. The main toxins of these two mushrooms are ibotenic acid (pantherine, agarine), muscimol, muscazone and muscaridine. The other bioactive substances are stizolobic and stizolobinic acids and aminodicarboxyethylthiopropanoic acids. All these compounds are responsible for diverse picture of intoxication. An analysis of patients with Amanita muscaria and Amanita pantherina poisoning hospitalized in the Poznan Departament of Toxicology revealed that symptoms occurred after 30 minutes to 2 hours with vomiting, hallucinations, restlessness, increased psychomotor drive and central nervous system depression. Other antycholinergic symptoms like tachycardia and increased blood pressure, mydriasis, dry and red skin were seen only in a few cases. Acute respiratory failure was the most dangerous symptom observed in the course of poisoning. PMID:22010435

  6. Effect of EDTA on Pb(II) Uptake and Translocation by Tumbleweed (Salsola Kali): Agar and Hydroponics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rosa, Guadalupe; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Aldrich, Mary

    2004-03-31

    Environmental accumulation of Pb represents a worldwide health hazard. While conventional cleanup techniques are generally expensive and soil disturbing, phytoremediation represents an inexpensive friendly option for the removal of contaminants from soil and water. In this research, tumbleweed (Salsola kali) plants exposed for 15 days to Pb(NO3)2 at 80 and 125 ppm in hydroponics and agar media, demonstrated a high capacity to uptake lead. The results showed that the plants cultivated in agar accumulated 25563, 5534 and 2185 mg Pb kg-1 DW in roots, stems and leaves, respectively. Moreover, Pb concentrations found in hydroponically grown tumbleweed plants tissues were 30744, 1511 and 1421 mg kg-1 DW in roots, stems and leaves, respectively. It was observed that EDTA enhanced Pb translocation. No Pb phytotoxic effects were observed during the experimental time period. Cellular structural features were also observed using TEM.

  7. HOW TO MANAGE THE BLUE ORCHARD BEE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book explains how to raise blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria) populations for orchard pollination. The book starts with an overview of orchard pollination requirements, followed by a detailed account on the natural history of the blue orchard bee. The following chapters describe how to build nes...

  8. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of

  9. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  10. Morpho-blue reproduced by nanocasting lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Nakajima, Masaki; Miyamura, Yusuke; Sogo, Kenji; Ishikawa, Yoko; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2006-08-01

    The brilliant metallic blue in wings of Morpho butterflies has a mysterious feature. The blue luster is produced from the butterfly's scale, which does not contain a blue pigment at all. The origin of the coloration is then attributed to a microscopic structure that can also explain its high reflectivity. However, its optical characteristics on the scattered wavelength contradicts obviously the grating or multilayer, because it appears blue from wide angle. The mystery of the lack of multi-coloration has recently been explained using a model with a peculiar optical structure, and experimentally proven by fabricating the optical film by controlling the parameters in nanoscale. The reproduced Morpho-blue was found to be important from viewpoint of a wide variety of applications. However, the fabrication process of the nano- structure is too costly due to conventional lithography method. To solve the problem, nano-casting lithography (NCL) was newly applied using UV curable polymer to replicate the nanostructure and improve heat-resistance for the following process of deposition. After fabrication of the nano-patterned polymer structure by the NCL, TiO II and SiO II layers were deposited and the Morpho-blue structure was successfully replicated in low cost. The reflective characteristic of the replicated structure was found to reproduce the basic properties of the natural Morpho-blue, as well as the originally fabricated Morpho-blue.

  11. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and carbon at temperatures above 700 C. Sodium sulfate and silica may also be incorporated in the mixture in order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and carbon at temperatures above 700 C. Sodium sulfate and silica may also be incorporated in the mixture in order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and carbon at temperatures above 700 C. Sodium sulfate and silica may also be incorporated in the mixture in order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and carbon at temperatures above 700 C. Sodium sulfate and silica may also be incorporated in the mixture in order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  15. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and carbon at temperatures above 700 C. Sodium sulfate and silica may also be incorporated in the mixture in order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  16. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  17. Delta Blues Scholarship and Imperialist Nostalgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, William P.

    When Delta blues are considered to be "folk music," the genre is inextricably tied to the neocolonial, sharecropping system of cotton production characteristic of the Mississippi Delta region between the Civil War and World War II. "Imperialist nostalgia," then, arises in accounts which pay primary and positive tribute to blues performances

  18. Liofilchem() O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D'Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem() O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

  19. Production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by Staphylococcus aureus as determined by tampon disk-membrane-agar method.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, R N; Reiser, R F; Hehl, G L; Bergdoll, M S

    1987-01-01

    The influence of 17 commercially available tampons on production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) by Staphylococcus aureus was investigated by using a tampon disk method. Filter membranes overlaying agar medium (with or without blood) in small petri dishes were spread inoculated with a TSST-1-producing strain of S. aureus. Disks cut from unrolled tampons were pressed and laid on the inoculated membranes; incubation was for 19 h at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 in air. CFU on the membranes and in the disks were enumerated, and the presence of TSST-1 in the disks and in the agar layers was determined. Tampons made of different materials supported characteristic levels of cell growth and toxin production in the tampon. Colonization of the interface surface of the tampon disks was heavy. The number of CFU extracted from the tampon disks ranged from 5 X 10(10) to 82 X 10(10). There was little variation in the CFU recovered from the membranes ([1.9 +/- 0.4] X 10(11)). Sixty to 170 micrograms of TSST-1 was recoverable from the agar, with an additional 10 to 90 micrograms recoverable from tampon disks, depending on the type of tampon disk. The amount of toxin in the agar layer from the various tampon disks was relatively constant and indicated an important contribution of toxin from vaginal S. aureus cells not growing in the tampon. The main role of tampons in toxic shock syndrome may be that of providing a fibrous surface for heavy colonization and sufficient air for TSST-1 production. PMID:3624442

  20. Isolation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Ground Beef Using Multiple Combinations of Enrichment Broths and Selective Agars.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Padola, Nora L; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2016-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens, and beef cattle are recognized as the principal reservoir. The aims of this study were (1) to identify the most sensitive combination of selective enrichment broths and agars for STEC isolation in artificially inoculated ground beef samples, and (2) to evaluate the most efficient combination(s) of methods for naturally contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 192 ground beef samples were artificially inoculated with STEC and non-stx bacterial strains. A combination of four enrichment broths and three agars were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for STEC isolation from experimentally inoculated samples. Enrichments with either modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) containing 8 mg/L novobiocin (mTSB-8) or modified Escherichia coli (mEC) broth followed by isolation in MacConkey agar were the most sensitive combinations for STEC isolation of artificially inoculated samples. Independently, both enrichments media followed by isolation in MacConkey were used to evaluate ground beef samples from 43 retail stores, yielding 65.1% and 58.1% stx-positive samples by RT-PCR, respectively. No difference was observed in the isolate proportions between these two methods (8/25 [32%] and 8/28 [28.6%]). Identical serotypes and stx genotypes were observed in STEC strains isolated from the same samples by either method. In this study, no single enrichment protocol was sufficient to detect all STEC in artificially inoculated samples and had considerable variation in detection ability with naturally contaminated samples. Moreover, none of the single or combinations of multiple isolation agars used were capable of identifying all STEC serogroups in either artificially inoculated or naturally occurring STEC-contaminated ground beef. Therefore, it may be prudent to conclude that there is no single method or combination of isolation methods capable of identifying all STEC serogroups. PMID:26836701

  1. Wrinkly-Spreader fitness in the two-dimensional agar plate microcosm: maladaptation, compensation and ecological success.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation to new environments often leads to the establishment of new genotypes with significantly altered phenotypes. In the Wrinkly Spreader (WS), ecological success in static liquid microcosms was through the rapid colonisation of the air-liquid interface by the production of a cellulose-based biofilm. Rapid surface spreading was also seen on agar plates, but in this two-dimensional environment the WS appears maladapted and rapidly reverts to the ancestral smooth (SM)-like colony genotype. In this work, the fitness of WS relative to SM in mixed colonies was found to be low, confirming the WS instability on agar plates. By examining defined WS mutants, the maladaptive characteristic was found to be the expression of cellulose. SM-like revertants had a higher growth rate than WS and no longer expressed significant amounts of cellulose, further confirming that the expression of this high-cost polymer was the basis of maladaptation and the target of compensatory mutation in developing colonies. However, examination of the fate of WS-founded populations in either multiple-colony or single mega-colony agar plate microcosms demonstrated that the loss of WS lineages could be reduced under conditions in which the rapid spreading colony phenotype could dominate nutrient and oxygen access more effectively than competing SM/SM-like genotypes. WS-like isolates recovered from such populations showed increased WS phenotype stability as well as changes in the degree of colony spreading, confirming that the WS was adapting to the two-dimensional agar plate microcosm. PMID:17710140

  2. [An observation on the histological structure of Oncomelania hupensis soft tissue by agar-paraffin double-embedding method].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ping; Zhang, Jie; Li, Qing; Yu, Zhi-jun

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the histological structure of Oncomelania hupensis soft tissue, the fixed soft tissues of O. hupensis were pre-embedded in the agar and made blocks, then dehydrated, transparentized, immersed in paraffin, sectioned, and stained with haematoxylin-eosin (HE). Permanent slides of O. hupensis soft tissue were obtained. The histological structure of soft tissues was clear under the microscope. PMID:25902672

  3. Epidemiology of Klebsiella oxytoca-associated diarrhea detected by Simmons citrate agar supplemented with inositol, tryptophan, and bile salts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Tsang, Lee-Lee; Yau, Miranda C Y; Siu, Gilman K H; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Hung, Ivan F N; Tai, Josepha W M; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-05-01

    We studied the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of Klebsiella oxytoca-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients in Hong Kong. Between 1 November 2009 and 30 April 2011, all inositol-fermenting colonies found on Simmons citrate agar supplemented with inositol, tryptophan, and bile salts (SCITB agar) used for the culturing of diarrheal stool samples were screened by a spot indole test for K. oxytoca. The overall sensitivity of SCITB agar plus the spot indole test (93.3%) for the detection of K. oxytoca in stool samples was superior to that of MacConkey agar (63.3%), while the specificities were 100% and 60.4%, respectively. The former achieved a 23-fold reduction in the workload and cost of subsequent standard biochemical identifications. Cytotoxin production and the clonality of K. oxytoca were determined by a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay using HEp-2 cells and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Of 5,581 stool samples from 3,537 patients, K. oxytoca was cultured from 117/5,581 (2.1%) stool samples from 104/3,537 (2.9%) patients. Seventy-six of 104 (73.1%) patients with K. oxytoca had no copathogens in their diarrheal stool samples. Twenty-four (31.6%) of 76 patients carried cytotoxin-producing strains, which were significantly associated with antibiotic therapy after hospital admission (50% versus 21.2%; P = 0.01). Health care-associated diarrhea was found in 44 (42%) of 104 patients with K. oxytoca, but there was no epidemiological linkage suggestive of a nosocomial outbreak, and PFGE showed a diverse pattern. None of the patients with cytotoxin-producing K. oxytoca developed antibiotic-associated hemorrhagic colitis, suggesting that K. oxytoca can cause a mild disease manifesting as uncomplicated antibiotic-associated diarrhea with winter seasonality. PMID:22357507

  4. Elementary theorems regarding blue isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-04-01

    Blue CDM-photon isocurvature perturbations are attractive in terms of observability and may be typical from the perspective of generic mass relations in supergravity. We present and apply three theorems useful for blue isocurvature perturbations arising from linear spectator scalar fields. In the process, we give a more precise formula for the blue spectrum associated with the axion model of Kasuya and Kawasaki [Axion Isocurvature Fluctuations with Extremely Blue Spectrum, Phys. Rev. D 80, 023516 (2009).], which can in a parametric corner give a factor of O (10 ) correction. We explain how a conserved current associated with Peccei-Quinn symmetry plays a crucial role and explicitly plot several example spectra including the breaks in the spectra. We also resolve a little puzzle arising from a naive multiplication of isocurvature expression that sheds light on the gravitational imprint of the adiabatic perturbations on the fields responsible for blue isocurvature fluctuations.

  5. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  6. Nutrient limitation leads to penetrative growth into agar and affects aroma formation in Pichia fabianii, P. kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijck, Irma M H; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith C M; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-01-01

    Among fermentative yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is most frequently used as a model organism, although other yeast species may have special features that make them interesting candidates to apply in food-fermentation processes. In this study, we used three yeast species isolated from fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit, S. cerevisiae 131, Pichia fabianii 65 and Pichia kudriavzevii 129, and determined the impact of nitrogen and/or glucose limitation on surface growth mode and the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All three species displayed significant changes in growth mode in all nutrient-limited conditions, signified by the formation of metafilaments or pseudohyphae. The timing of the transition was found to be species-specific. Transition in growth mode is suggested to be linked to the production of certain fusel alcohols, such as phenylethyl alcohol, which serve as quorum-sensing molecules. Interestingly, we did not observe concomitant increased production of phenylethyl alcohol and filamentous growth. Notably, a broader range of esters was found only for the Pichia spp. grown on nitrogen-limited agar for 21?days compared to nutrient-rich agar, and when grown on glucose- and glucose- plus nitrogen-limited agar. Our data suggest that for the Pichia spp., the formation of esters may play an important role in the switch in growth mode upon nitrogen limitation. Further biological or ecological implications of ester formation are discussed. PMID:25308873

  7. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  8. A new locus in Cytophaga hutchinsonii involved in colony spreading on agar surfaces and individual cell gliding.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Sen; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Weican; Lu, Xuemei

    2015-07-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii glides rapidly over surfaces by an unknown mechanism without flagella and type IV pili and it can degrade crystalline cellulose efficiently by a novel mechanism. Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis was used to identify a new gene, CHU_1798, essential for colony spreading on agar surfaces. Further study showed that disruption of CHU_1798 caused non-spreading colonies on both soft and hard agar surfaces and individual cells were partially deficient in gliding on glass surfaces. The CHU_1798 mutant could digest cellulose as long as the cells were in direct contact with the cellulose, but it could not degrade cellulose powder buried in the agar plate. Scanning electron microscopy showed that individual mutant cells arranged irregularly on the cellulose fiber surface at an early stage of incubation, but later showed a regular parallel arrangement when there were plenty of cells and could spread along the cellulose fibers. These results suggest that CHU_1798 plays an important role in the motility of C. hutchinsonii and provide insight into the relation between cell motility and cellulose degradation. PMID:26066317

  9. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R; Ideker, Trey

    2015-08-15

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  10. Choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as tool for the fabrication of agar films with improved mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hilia K S; Latona, Nicholas; Liu, Cheng-Kung; Gonalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2014-10-13

    In the present paper, we test the suitability of ChCl/urea (DES-U) and ChCl/glycerol (DES-G) eutectic mixtures, each one prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, for the production of agar films. A three-step process is proposed: pre-solubilization of polymer in DES followed by compression-molding and subsequent drying. The mechanical properties, water resistance and microstructure of the films were evaluated at different polymer concentrations (i.e. 2-6%, w/w). DES-U showed by far, the best film forming ability. Agreeing with the diffusion and SEM data, films with the best mechanical properties were found at the lowest and highest agar concentrations (tensile strengths of 24.2-42 MPa and elongations of 15.4-38.9%). The water sorption and contact angle studies suggested increased hydrophilicity for the film containing the lowest concentration of agar. The use of choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as solvent and plasticizer might be a promising tool for the development of new non-aqueous materials based on seaweed polysaccharides. PMID:25037344

  11. Mechanical touch responses of Arabidopsis TCH1-3 mutant roots on inclined hard-agar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guodong; Wang, Bochu; Liu, Junyu; Yan, Jie; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Xingyan

    2016-01-01

    The gravity-induced mechanical touch stimulus can affect plant root architecture. Mechanical touch responses of plant roots are an important aspect of plant root growth and development. Previous studies have reported that Arabidopsis TCH1-3 genes are involved in mechano-related events, how-ever, the physiological functions of TCH1-3 genes in Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses remain unclear. In the present study, we applied an inclined hard agar plate method to produce mechanical touch stimulus, and provided evidence that altered mechanical environment could influence root growth. Furthermore, tch1-3 Arabidopsis mutants were investigated on inclined agar surfaces to explore the functions of TCH1-3 genes on Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses. The results showed that two tch2 mutants, cml24-2 and cml24-4, exhibited significantly reduced root length, biased skewing, and decreased density of lateral root. In addition, primary root length and density of lateral root of tch3 (cml12-2) was significantly decreased on inclined agar surfaces. This study indicates that the tch2 and tch3 mutants are hypersensitive to mechanical touch stimulus, and TCH2 (CML24-2 and CML24-4) and TCH3 (CML12-2) genes may participate in the mechanical touch response of Arabidopsis roots.

  12. Ammoniibacillus agariperforans gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, agar-degrading bacterium isolated from compost.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masao; Deguchi, Daigo; Hosoda, Akifumi; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Ikenaga, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    A thermophilic, agar-degrading bacterium, strain FAB2(T), was isolated from sewage sludge compost. According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain FAB2(T) belonged to the family Paenibacillaceae within the phylum Firmicutes. However, FAB2(T) was different enough at the genus level from closely related species. The percentages of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with related organisms were 90.4 % for Thermobacillus xylanilyticus, 91.8 % for Paenibacillus barengoltzii, 89.4 % for Cohnella lupini, 90.1 % for Fontibacillus aquaticus, and 89.0 % for Saccharibacillus sacchari. Morphological and physiological analyses revealed that the strain was motile, rod-shaped, Gram-stain-positive, aerobic and able to form oval endospores in swollen sporangia. Ammonium was required as a nitrogen source while nitrate, nitrite, urea and glutamate were not utilized. Catalase and oxidase activities were weakly positive and positive, respectively. The bacterium grew in the temperature range of 50-65 C and in media with pH 7.5 to 9.0. Optimal growth occurred at 60 C and pH 8.0-8.6. Growth was inhibited at pH?7.0 and NaCl concentrations ?2.5 % (w/v). In chemotaxonomic characterization, MK-7 was identified as the dominant menaquinone. Major fatty acids were iso-C16 : 0 and C16 : 0. Dominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Phosphatidylcholine was present in a moderate amount. The diamino acid in the cell wall was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 49.5 mol% in a nucleic acid study. On the basis of genetic and phenotypic characteristics, strain FAB2(T) (?= NBRC 109510(T)?= KCTC 33130(T)) showed characteristics suitable for classification as the type strain of a novel species of a new genus in the family Paenibacillaceae, for which the name Ammoniibacillus agariperforans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:25404482

  13. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO BLUE RIDGE TUNNEL (LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO BLUE RIDGE TUNNEL (LEFT) FROM SOUTHEAST. ORIGINAL BLUE RIDGE R.R. (CROZET) TUNNEL IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT. - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Blue Ridge Tunnel, Highway 250 at Rockfish Gap, Afton, Nelson County, VA

  14. Optimization of reproduced Morpho-blue coloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Ishikawa, Yoko; Miyamura, Yusuke; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    Morpho butterfly's metallic blue luster, which is produced from the butterfly's scale, has a mysterious feature. Since the scale does not contain a blue pigment, the origin of the coloration is attributed to a microscopic structure that can also explain its high reflectivity. However, it appears blue from wide angular range, which contradicts obviously the grating or multilayer. The mystery of the lack of multi-coloration has recently been explained with a peculiar nano-structure, and experimentally proven by fabricating the optical film by controlling the parameters in nanoscale. The reproduced Morpho-blue was found to be important from viewpoint of a wide variety of applications. However, optical properties of the fabricated film were found to contain still some differences with that of the Morpho-butterfly, although the basic characteristics of the Morpho-blue itself was reproduced. In order to make the artificial Morpho-blue closer to the natural one than the prototype, we attempted to optimize the artificial film structure by controlling fabrication parameters. In this process, optical simulations and micro-structural observations were taken in account. By comparing a series of films fabricated with different nano-patterns, optimized parameters were semi-empirically obtained. Also the relationship between the structural parameters and the optical properties was analyzed. The reflective characteristics of the optimized film were found to reproduce the optical properties more closely to the natural Morpho-blue than the prototypes.

  15. Blue light hazard in rat.

    PubMed

    van Norren, D; Schellekens, P

    1990-01-01

    Rats have been extensively used in light damage studies. Retinal damage threshold for white light were found at 1-10 J/cm2, and the action spectrum resembled the absorption spectrum of visual pigment. We wished to answer the question whether a different class of light damage, the "blue light hazard", with white light damage thresholds at about 300 J/cm2, and an action spectrum peaking in the ultra-violet, could also be demonstrated in rat. To that purpose 5 deg patches of retina were exposed to white xenon light with exposure times between 10 sec and 1 hr. We found that for funduscopic threshold damage the product of irradiance and exposure time was constant at a level of 315 J/cm2. Thereafter, the action spectrum was measured by exposing rat eyes to narrow band spectral lights. Threshold irradiant dose ranged from 4 J/cm2 at 379 nm to 2000 J/cm2 at 559 nm. Thus, susceptibility for damage sharply increased towards the ultra-violet, just like in earlier monkey studies. We conclude that in similar experimental conditions susceptibility to photic injury in rat is comparable to that in primates. Rat is the first species for which two different action spectra of photochemical damage have been established. PMID:2247961

  16. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; Sulentic, J. W.; Stirpe, G. M.; Dultzin, D.; Del Olmo, A.; Martnez-Carballo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    [OIII]? 5007 "blue outliers"that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasarsappear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40~% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate z sample of 52 sources qualify as "blue outliers" (i.e., quasars with [OIII]?? 4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of "blue outliers" to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  17. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  18. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-07-14

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  19. Prussian Blue as a Prebiotic Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Bermejo, M.; Menor-Salvn, C.; Osuna-Esteban, S.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2009-12-01

    Ferrocyanide has been proposed as a potential prebiotic reagent and the complex salt Prussian Blue, Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3, might be an important reservoir of HCN, in the early Earth. HCN is considered the main precursor of amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases under prebiotic conditions. Recently, we observed the formation of Prussian Blue in spark discharge experiments using saline solutions of ferrous chloride, FeCl2. Using Prussian Blue as starting material in ammonium suspensions, we obtained organic compounds containing nitrogen. These results seem to indicate that Prussian Blue could have been first, a sink of HCN, and then in subsequent reactions, triggered by pH fluctuations, it might have lead to organic life precursors.

  20. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-09-01

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  1. Studies on plasma processing of blue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, S. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Mishra, B.

    2015-02-01

    Plasma smelting was carried out using blue dust and petroleum coke mixtures for five different compositions. By altering percentage of reductant and type of plasma forming gas, recovery rate and degree of metallization were calculated in order to examine the extent of reduction of blue dust. The products were characterized by XRD and optical microscopy techniques. The results of these investigations exhibited that highest degree of metallization and recovery rate of about 98% and 86% respectively, were achieved for nitrogen plasma smelted products.

  2. Stylish or safe blue-block eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciosek, Jerzy

    1998-10-01

    The subject of modern, save and stylish eyewear is entertaining not only to people with unwell eyesight. Many people use glasses with anti-UV or blue-block coatings, glasses for driving or working with a computer. There were investigated the blue-block eyewear. There were analyzed reflected radiation at 300 - 400 nm wavelengths with cross- incidence. The traditional eyewear with classical or stylish frame may not protect sight against the UV radiation.

  3. Barium Enhancement in NGC 6819 Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliman, Katelyn; Mathieu, Robert D.; Schuler, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Possible formation pathways for blue straggler stars include mergers in hierarchical triple systems, stellar collisions during dynamical encounters, and mass transfer from a giant companion. Extensive work on the blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 188 (7 Gyr) has led to exciting discoveries including a binary secondary mass distribution peaked at 0.5 MSolar and the detection of three young white dwarf binary companions. These indicate that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star is the dominant mechanism for blue straggler formation in open clusters. Such mass transfer events should pollute the surface abundance of the blue straggler with nucleosynthesis products from the evolved donor. The other formation pathways, mergers and collisions, are predicted to produce no such enhancements. In an effort to move beyond NGC 188 and into other open clusters we present the first results of a surface abundance study of the blue stragglers in the intermediate-aged open cluster NGC 6819 (2.5 Gyr) using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. This part of our study centers on the s-process element barium as a tracer of formation via mass transfer. We compare the blue straggler surface abundance of barium to that of a sample of main-sequence stars in NGC 6819 and find multiple blue stragglers with anomalous abundances. Surprising, most of the blue stragglers with barium anomalies show no radial-velocity evidence for a companion. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation under grant AST- 0908082 and the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium.

  4. MitoBlue: A Nontoxic and Photostable Blue-Emitting Dye That Selectively Labels Functional Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a fluorogenic dye, N1,N3-di(2-aminidonaphthalen-6-yl) propane-1,3-diamine, MitoBlue, which selectively stains functional mitochondria while displaying low toxicity, bright blue emission, and high resistance to photobleaching. Additionally, we show that a biotin-labeled MitoBlue derivative can be used as a handle for the delivery of streptavidin-tagged species to the mitochondria. PMID:25325672

  5. Reliability of the agar based method to assess the production of degradative enzymes in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Paula Tamião; Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Santezi, Carolina; Barbeiro, Camila de Oliveira; Reina, Bárbara Donadon; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a reproducible protocol using the methodology of hyaline zones around the colonies on specific agar plates for phospholipase and proteinase production. This was an in vitro double-blind experiment, in which the dependent variables were the enzymatic activity measurements (Pz) for the production of phospholipase (Pz-ph) and the production of secreted aspartyl proteinases (Pz-sap). Three independent variables give rise to different measurement protocols. All measurements were carried out at two different moments by four examiners (E1, E2, E3, and E4). The minimum sample size was 30 Candida albicans clinical isolates. Specific agar plates for phospholipase and SAPs production were prepared according the literature. The intra-and inter-examiner reproducibility for each protocol was estimated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and its confidence interval (95% CI). Based on the results obtained for both phospholipase and SAPs, there appears to be no consensus on the protocol chosen for each particular examiner. Measuring the colonies in triplicate may be the main factor associated with the increase in measurement accuracy and should therefore take precedence over measuring only one colony. When only one examiner is responsible for taking measurements, a standard protocol should be put in place and the statistical calibration of this researcher should be done prior to data collection. However, if two or more researchers are involved in the assessment of agar plates, our results suggest that the protocols using software to undertake plate reading is preferred. PMID:26705836

  6. Performance of an Agar Dilution Method and a Vitek 2 Card for Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus spp.?

    PubMed Central

    Lavalle, Christian; Rouleau, Danielle; Gaudreau, Christiane; Roger, Michel; Tsimiklis, Catherine; Locas, Marie-Claude; Gagnon, Simon; Delorme, Jocelyn; Labb, Annie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The D-zone test detects inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus spp. Two other methods not described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are available to test for this resistance mechanism: an agar dilution method and new Vitek 2 cards. This study evaluated the performance of both methods in detecting inducible clindamycin resistance. Nonduplicate clinical strains of Staphylococcus spp. (111 Staphylococcus aureus and 52 coagulase-negative staphylococcus strains), intermediate or resistant to erythromycin but susceptible to clindamycin, were obtained from three hospitals in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Molecular analysis to detect resistance genes was conducted on all strains. A Mueller-Hinton agar containing 1 mg of erythromycin and 0.5 mg of clindamycin/liter was used for the dilution method, and two inocula were tested: 104 and 105 CFU per spot. Plates were read at 24 and 48 h. The Vitek 2 AST-P580 card was used according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The results were compared to those of the D-zone test. The D-zone test was positive in 134 of 163 (82%) strains. With the 104 CFU inoculum, the sensitivities were 84 and 99% at 24 and 48 h, respectively. The 105 CFU inoculum increased the sensitivities at 24 and 48 h to 91 and 100%, respectively. The specificity was 100% for the 104 CFU inoculum at 24 h and 97% for the other combinations. The sensitivity and specificity for the Vitek 2 card were 93 and 100%, respectively. The performance of both the agar dilution method and the Vitek 2 card was good, but these methods were not as sensitive as the D-zone test at 24 h. PMID:20164285

  7. On the blue coloration of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Joseph T; Fernandez, Philip J; Fujii, Royozo

    2007-02-01

    Although the various vertebrate classes, from fishes to mammals are each distinctive, they possess many common features making it important to understand their comparative biology. One general feature that has long commanded interest is the integumental pigmentary system. Thus, much is known about particular pigment cells; however, the basis for some specific colors, such as blue, has escaped the scrutiny of the comparative approach. Regardless of Class, blue is almost always a structural color based upon incoherent or coherent scatter of blue wavelengths from the animal surface. The source of scatter may be intracellular or extra-cellular. A main intracellular scatterer is the surface of reflecting platelets of iridophores of lower vertebrates. Extra-cellular scatter is widespread and thought to occur from ordered dermal collagen arrays in primitive fishes, birds and mammals including humans. Among birds, feather structures provide major means for extra-cellular light scatter. There is only one known example of blue color deriving from a blue pigment found within a pigment cell. For amphibians, reptiles and birds, the scatter of blue wavelengths, together with the presence of yellow pigmentation, is fundamental for the expression of green coloration. PMID:17250544

  8. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  9. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. PMID:26238330

  10. High internal phase agar hydrogel dispersions in cocoa butter and chocolate as a route towards reducing fat content.

    PubMed

    Skelhon, Thomas S; Olsson, Patrik K A; Morgan, Adam R; Bon, Stefan A F

    2013-09-01

    Reducing the fat content of chocolate formulations is a major challenge for the confectionery industry. We report the suspension of aqueous microgel agar particles of up to 80% v/v within sunflower oil, cocoa butter, and ultimately chocolate. The optimised emulsification process involves a shear-cooling step. We demonstrate the versatility of our method when applied to white, milk, and dark chocolate formulations, whilst preserving the desired polymorph V of the cocoa butter matrix. In addition, we show that this technology can be used as a strategy to disperse alcoholic beverages into chocolate confectionery. PMID:23799607

  11. Multicenter clinical evaluation of VRESelect agar for identification of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil W; Buchan, Blake W; Young, Carol L; Newton, Duane W; Brenke, Connie; Lapsley, Linda; Granato, Paul A; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2013-08-01

    A chromogenic medium for identification of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, VRESelect, was compared to bile esculin azide agar with 6 ?g/ml vancomycin (BEAV) for the isolation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from stool specimens. At 24 to 28 h, VRESelect demonstrated 98.7% (confidence interval [CI], 96.1 to 99.7%) sensitivity and 99.0% (CI, 98.0 to 99.6%) specificity versus 85.1% (CI, 79.8 to 89.5%) and 90.1% (CI, 79.8 to 89.5%) sensitivity and specificity, respectively, for BEAV. PMID:23761153

  12. Enumeration of coagulase and thermonuclease-positive Staphylococcus spp. in raw milk and fresh soft cheese: an evaluation of Baird-Parker agar, Rabbit Plasma Fibrinogen agar and the Petrifilm Staph Express count system.

    PubMed

    Viosa, Gabriela Nogueira; Moraes, Paula Mendona; Yamazi, Anderson Keizo; Nero, Lus Augusto

    2010-06-01

    Staphylococcus spp. are microorganisms that are naturally present in milk and dairy products and are often associated with food-borne diseases outbreaks due to the ability of some strains to produce thermostable enterotoxins. This ability is usually associated with coagulase and thermonuclease production, characteristics that are considered in the microbiological analyses for the control of such microorganisms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture media and the methodologies used for the enumeration of coagulase and thermonuclease-positive Staphylococcus spp. in raw milk and fresh soft cheese. Samples of artificially contaminated milk (with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus reference strains) and samples of naturally contaminated raw milk and cheese were submitted for enumeration in Baird-Parker agar (BP), Rabbit Plasma Fibrinogen agar (RPFA) and in the Petrifilm Staph Express count system (STX). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the mean counts obtained in all of the evaluated culture media. RPFA and STX had good correlation indices between the total and typical colony counts as well as with coagulase and the thermonuclease-positive colony counts. Thus, there is a better association between coagulase and thermonuclease production to typical colony morphology developed on these culture media, leading to more accurate and reliable results than with BP, which demonstrated lower correlation indices between these counts. PMID:20417392

  13. Methemoglobinemia induced by methylene blue pertubation during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, H; Ozcan, B; Bilgin, T

    1998-05-01

    Methylene blue is used to check tubal patency during laparoscopy. A case of methemoglobinemia which was induced by methylene blue is presented. Methemoglobinemia is usually treated with methylene blue; however, in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, methylene blue can induce methemoglobinemia. PMID:9605379

  14. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  15. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  16. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  17. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  18. 49 CFR 218.23 - Blue signal display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blue signal display. 218.23 Section 218.23..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Blue Signal Protection of Workers 218.23 Blue signal display. (a) Blue signals displayed in accordance with 218.25, 218.27, or 218.29 signify...

  19. Comparison of Alcian Blue, Trypan Blue, and Toluidine Blue for Visualization of the Primo Vascular System Floating in Lymph Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Un; Han, Jae Won; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Cha, Richard; Chang, Byung-Soo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS), floating in lymph ducts, was too transparent to be observed by using a stereomicroscope. It was only detectable with the aid of staining dyes, for instance, Alcian blue, which was injected into the lymph nodes. Some dyes were absorbed preferentially by the PVS than the lymph wall. It remains a standing problem to know what dyes are absorbed better by the PVS than the lymph walls. Such information would be useful to unravel the biochemical properties of the PVS that are badly in need for obtaining large amount of PVS specimens. In the current work we tried two other familiar dyes which were used in PVS research before. We found that Trypan blue and toluidine blue did not visualize the PVS. Trypan blue was cleared by the natural washing. Toluidine blue did not stain the PVS, but it did leave stained spots in the lymph wall and its surrounding tissues, and it leaked out of the lymph wall to stain surrounding connective tissues. These completely different behaviors of the three dyes were found for the first time in the current work and provide valuable information to elucidate the mechanism through which some special dyes stained the PVS preferentially compared to the lymphatic wall. PMID:26379749

  20. Determination of in vitro synergy for dual antimicrobial therapy against resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae using Etest and agar dilution.

    PubMed

    Wind, Carolien M; de Vries, Henry J C; van Dam, Alje P

    2015-03-01

    In response to antimicrobial resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to last-resort extended-spectrum cephalosporins, combination therapy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone is now recommended. Dual therapy can be effective to treat monoresistant strains as well as multidrug-resistant strains, preferably employing the effect of in vitro synergy. As reports on in vitro synergy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone in N. gonorrhoeae are conflicting, in this study an evaluation of this combination was performed using a cross-wise Etest method and agar dilution. Synergy was defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ?0.5. To identify other dual treatment options for gonorrhoea, in vitro synergy was evaluated for 65 dual antimicrobial combinations using Etest. Azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, colistin, ertapenem, fosfomycin, gentamicin, minocycline, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, spectinomycin and tigecycline were screened for synergy in all possible combinations. No synergy or antagonism was found for any of the 65 combinations. The geometric mean FICI ranged from 0.82 to 2.00. The mean FICI of azithromycin+ceftriaxone was 1.18 (Etest) and 0.55 (agar dilution). The difference between both methods did not result in a difference in interpretation of synergy. Ceftriaxone-resistant strain F89 was tested in all combinations and no synergy was found for any of them. Most importantly, the ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentration of F89 was not decreased below the breakpoint with any concentration of azithromycin. PMID:25532741

  1. Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels by light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering and rheology.

    PubMed

    Santinath Singh, S; Aswal, V K; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-01

    Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were investigated as a function of their volumetric mixing ratio, [Formula: see text] , 1.0 and 2.0 using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheology. The degree of non-ergodicity ( X = 0.2 0.02) , which was extracted as a heterodyne contribution from the measured dynamic structure factor data remained less than that of homogeneous solutions where ergodicity is expected (X = 10. The static structure factor, I(q) , results obtained from SANS were interpreted in the Guinier regime (low-q , which implied the existence of ? 250 nm long rod-like structures (double-helix bundles), and the power law (intermediate-q regions) yielded I (q) ~ q(??) with ? = 2.3 , 1.8 and 1.6 for r = 0.5 , 1.0 and 2.0. This is indicative of the presence of Gaussian chains at low r , while at r = 2 there was a propensity of rod-shaped structures. The gel strength and transition temperatures measured from frequency sweep and temperature ramp studies were suggestive of the presence of a stronger association between the two biopolymer networks at higher r . The results indicate that the internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were highly dependent on the volumetric mixing ratio. PMID:21706280

  2. In vitro fermentation and prebiotic potential of novel low molecular weight polysaccharides derived from agar and alginate seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Ramnani, Priya; Chitarrari, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran; Grant, John; Hotchkiss, Sarah; Philp, Kevin; Campbell, Ross; Gill, Chris; Rowland, Ian

    2012-02-01

    Fermentation properties and prebiotic potential of novel low molecular weight polysaccharides (LMWPs) derived from agar and alginate bearing seaweeds was investigated. Ten LMWPs were supplemented to pH, temperature controlled anaerobic batch cultures inoculated with human feces from three donors, in triplicate. Microbiota changes were monitored using Fluorescent in-situ hybridization and short chain fatty acids, the fermentation end products were analysed using gas chromatography. Of the ten LMWPs tested, Gelidium seaweed CC2253 of molecular weight 64.64 KDa showed a significant increase in bifidobacterial populations from log(10) 8.06 at 0 h to log(10) 8.55 at 24 h (p = 0.018). For total bacterial populations, alginate powder CC2238 produced a significant increase from log(10) 9.01 at 0 h to log(10) 9.58 at 24 h (p = 0.032). No changes were observed in the other bacterial groups tested viz. Bacteroides, Lactobacilli/Enterococci, Eubacterium rectale/Clostridium coccoides and Clostridium histolyticum. The polysaccharides also showed significant increases in total SCFA production, particularly acetic and propionic acids, indicating that they were readily fermented. In conclusion, some LMWPs derived from agar and alginate bearing seaweeds were fermented by gut bacteria and exhibited potential to be used a novel source of prebiotics. PMID:21924371

  3. Agar-Silica-Gel Heating Phantom May Be Suitable for Long-Term Quality Assurance of MRgHIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Ari

    2009-04-01

    In MRgHIFU, the purpose of frequent quality assurance is to detect changes in system performance to prevent adverse effects during treatments. Due to high ultrasound intensities in MRgHIFU, it is essential to assure that the procedure is safe and efficacious and that image-based guidance of the treatment is reliable. We aimed to develop a guideline for MRgHIFU QA by acquiring MR temperature maps during ultrasonic heating of an agar-silica-gel phantom over a four month-period using three separate MRgHIFU uterine leiomyoma treatment systems. From this data, the stability of the maximum temperature elevation, the targeting accuracy, and the dimensions of the heated volume were analyzed. Additionally, we studied the sensitivity of these parameters to reveal hypothetical decrease in HIFU performance. After calibration, the mean targeting offsets of the heated volume were observed to be less than 2 mm in the three orthogonal directions. The measured maximum temperature elevation and the length and the width of the heated volume remained consistent throughout the four-month period. Furthermore, it was found that the parameters under investigation were sensitive to reveal the decreased HIFU performance. We conclude that an agar-silica -based phantom is suitable for targeting accuracy and heating properties QA of MRgHIFU system even in long-term use. Moreover, this simple QA method may be used to reveal small changes in HIFU performance assuring consistent functionality and safety of the MRgHIFU system.

  4. An evaluation of the CHO/HGPRT mutation assay involving suspension cultures and soft agar cloning: results for 33 chemicals.

    PubMed

    Oberly, T J; Rexroat, M A; Bewsey, B J; Richardson, K K; Michaelis, K C

    1990-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary cell assay (CHO), which measures forward mutation of the HGPRT locus, is used in several laboratories for the detection of mutagens. A procedure involving treatment of CHO cells in suspension culture and mutant selection in soft agar cloning has been developed (Oberly TJ, Bewsey BJ, Probst GS (1987): Mutat Res 182:99-111). In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these modifications, 33 chemicals representing six chemical classes were tested, and the results were compared to findings obtained in other tests for genotoxicity at Lilly Research Laboratories (LRL). A positive response was obtained with 21 chemicals, all of which are recognized mutagens. Of the 12 compounds that produced negative results, 4 were considered to be mutagens and/or carcinogens. Twelve of the compounds mentioned in this report have been previously tested in the CHO/HGPRT assay by other laboratories, and the results showed strong agreement between laboratories. These findings support the conclusion that the use of suspension cultures and soft agar cloning in the CHO assay provides a sensitive test for the identification of mutagens and is a viable alternative to the traditional monolayer procedure of O'Neill et al. (O'Neill JP, Couch DB, Machanoff R, San Sebastian JR, Brimer PA, Hsie AW (1977): Mutat Res 45:103-109). PMID:2253605

  5. Malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar, a suitable medium for enumeration and isolation of fungi from silage.

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, I; Stenwig, H

    1996-01-01

    A general medium named malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar (MYSA) containing oxgall was designed. The medium was intended for the enumeration and isolation of molds and yeasts in routine examinations of animal feed stuffs. In this study MYSA was tested as a general medium for mycological examination of silage. The medium was compared with dichloran-rose bengal medium (DRBC) in an examination of more than 500 specimens of big bale grass silage. Selected characteristics of known fungal species commonly isolated from feeds were examined after growth on MYSA and DRBC and on malt extract agar, used as a noninhibitory control medium. MYSA suppressed bacterial growth, without affecting the growth of fungi common in feeds. The fungi growing on MYSA were easily recognized, and the medium seemed to slow radial growth of fungal colonies, which permitted, easy counting. The number of species found was higher on MYSA than on DRBC. When we compared MYSA with DRBC for mycological examination of grass silage samples, MYSA was found to be the medium of choice. PMID:8837416

  6. Highly efficient synthesis of exopolysaccharides by Lactobacillus curvatus DPPMA10 during growth in hydrolyzed wheat flour agar.

    PubMed

    Minervini, F; De Angelis, M; Surico, R F; Di Cagno, R; Gänzle, M; Gobbetti, M

    2010-06-30

    The aim of this study was to optimize the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) by sourdough Lactobacillus curvatus DPPMA10 for industrial application. The effects of pH, temperature, planktonic or attached cells and of some food matrices as substrates were studied. Wheat flour hydrolysate (WFH), reconstituted skimmed milk (RSM) and whey milk were supplemented with fresh yeast extract, mineral salts, and/or molasses. Non-controlled pH, starting from 5.6 to 3.5, was the optimal condition for L. curvatus DPPMA10. Temperature of 30 degrees C was also found to be optimal. Solid surfaces (agar culture media) stimulated attached bacteria to synthesize EPS (> or = of two-fold, P<0.05) with respect to planktonic cells (broth media). The highest production of EPS (ca. 46-50 g/kg of wet medium) was found during growth as attached cells in WFH agar supplemented with glucose, sucrose or molasses, mineral salts and fresh yeast extract at 30 degrees C for 48 h. As shown by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, glucose was the only hydrolysis end-product for EPS synthesized during 48 h of incubation. The EPS synthesized by L. curvatus DPPMA10 improved the quality of bread and was utilized as carbon course by intestinal strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. The synthesis of EPS by L. curvatus DPPMA10 under the conditions of this study may open new perspectives for their industrial applications. PMID:20398955

  7. Variations on the "Blue-Bottle" Demonstration Using Food Items That Contain FD&C Blue #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiger, Felicia A.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Campbell, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Erioglaucine dye (FD&C Blue #1) can be used instead of methylene blue in the classic "blue-bottle" demonstration. Food items containing FD&C Blue #1 and reducing species such as sugars can therefore be used at the heart of this demonstration, which simply requires the addition of strong base such as sodium hydroxide lye.

  8. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. (a) Description. (1) Roquefort...

  9. Structure of Blue Phase III of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, O.; Stratford, K.; Cates, M. E.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2011-03-01

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilized over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  10. Use of big data by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Helm-Murtagh, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    The health care industry is grappling with the challenges of working with and analyzing large, complex, diverse data sets. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina provides several promising examples of how big data can be used to reduce the cost of care, to predict and manage health risks, and to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:24830494

  11. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  12. "Blue and seven phenomena" among Japanese students.

    PubMed

    Saito, M

    1999-10-01

    To investigate color and number preferences in Japan, 586 university undergraduates (239 men and 347 women; M age = 20.9 yr.) were asked to name a color (Question 1), to name their preferred color (Question 2), and to name their preferred number between zero and nine (Question 3). The results showed that Japanese students chose blue (33.5%) or red (26.0%) when asked to name a color but that red was not chosen as frequently as blue as a preferred color (red: 11.1%, blue: 37.1%). Sex differences were found on both Questions 1 and 2 by chi-squared test. Black was chosen more by men, while pink was selected more by women. 22.5% subjects also selected the number seven, supporting Simon's observation of the "blue-seven phenomenon." The reasons given for the choice showed that seven was "a lucky number" and "represented happiness" among Japanese students. Four colors (blue, red, white, and black) accounted for 76.8% and 65.1% of responses to Questions 1 and 2, respectively, and odd numbers 68.4% for Question 3. PMID:10597589

  13. New aniline blue dye medium for rapid identification and isolation of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, M C; Fung, D Y; Grant, R; White, J; Brown, T

    1991-06-01

    Organic dyes have long been used in diagnostic microbiology to differentiate species by color reactions. We studied the ability of a new noninhibitory medium, YM agar containing 0.01% aniline blue WS dye, Colour Index 42780 (YMAB), to identify Candida albicans among 1,554 yeast specimens obtained from seven clinical laboratories. Appropriate American Type Culture Collection and other characterized strains served as controls. A total of 487 of the clinical strains were identified as C. albicans. The remainder were other Candida species and non-Candida yeasts. Clinical isolates and controls were grown on Sabouraud agar for 18 h at 30 degrees C and then transferred to YMAB. Plates were incubated for 12 to 18 h at 30 degrees C, and colonies were observed for yellow-green fluorescence under long-wave UV light (A365). All control strains of C. albicans and Candida stellatoidea fluoresced, as did 480 of the 490 isolates designated as C. albicans (which included 3 strains of C. stellatoidea). Cells of C. albicans grown on YMAB produced germ tubes in serum. Only five of the other 1,062 non-C. albicans yeasts fluoresced. The sensitivity and specificity were 98.0 and 99.5%, respectively, with a predictive value of 99.1%. A fluorescent metabolite was found in cell wall particulate fractions of C. albicans sonic extracts grown on YMAB but not in non-C. albicans yeasts. This metabolite showed the same spectral curve as those of metabolites from whole cells in a recording spectrofluorometer when it was excited at 400 nm and scanned from 420 to 550 nm. Thus, growth on YMAB generates the production of a fluorescent moiety that can be used to specifically identify C. albicans within 12 to 18 h. PMID:1864924

  14. Photooxidative death in blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Abeliovich, A; Shilo, M

    1972-09-01

    When incubated in the light under 100% oxygen, wild-type blue-green algae (Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus cedrorum) die out rapidly at temperatures of 4 to 15 C, and at 35 C (or at 26 C in the case of S. cedrorum) in the absence of CO(2). Photosynthesis is impaired in these cells long before they die. Blocking of photosystem II at high temperatures in the presence of CO(2) sensitizes the algae to photooxidative death. Photooxidative death and bleaching of photosynthetic pigments are separable phenomena. Photooxidative conditions were demonstrated in Israeli fish ponds using A. nidulans as the test organism during dense summer blooms, when dissolved CO(2) is low, and in winter, when water temperatures generally drop below 15 C. This finding suggests that photooxidative death may be responsible for the sudden decomposition of blue-green blooms in summer, and may be a factor in the absence of blue-green blooms in winter. PMID:4626540

  15. Blue laser devices for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenth, Wilfried; Kozlovsky, William J.; Risk, William P.

    1991-07-01

    A number of different techniques have been used for nonlinear frequency upconversion of near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers to blue wavelengths. Intracavity frequency doubling of a diode-laser-pumped 946- nm Nd:YAG laser resulted in generation of 9.5 mW of blue 473-nm power. A special electronic servo technique was devised to lock the output frequency of a single-mode GaAlAs diode laser to a monolithic KNbO3 resonator. Using this approach, 54 mW of 428-nm output were obtained with an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of approximately equals 12%. The use of nonlinear waveguide devices for frequency doubling of near- infrared diode lasers is promising for the development of miniaturized, low-cost blue laser sources.

  16. Is cosmology compatible with blue gravity waves?

    SciTech Connect

    Camerini, Roberta; Durrer, Ruth; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Riotto, Antonio

    2008-05-15

    A primordial gravitational wave background with positive (blue) spectral index is expected in several nonstandard inflationary cosmologies where the stress-energy tensor violates the null energy condition. Here we show that a sizable amount of blue gravitational waves is compatible with current cosmological and astrophysical data. So far most of the works on parameter estimation from cosmic microwave background data have assumed a negative or negligible spectral index. The present limits on cosmological parameters, especially on the scalar spectral index, widen up considerably when one allows also for blue tilts of the tensor spectrum. Since the amplitude of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization is larger in these models, future data from Planck are likely to provide crucial measurements.

  17. [Analysis of bactericidal material generated by electrical devices advertising bactericidal ability against bacteria on the agar gel plates].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2012-11-01

    Several Japanese companies sell electrical devices advertised as effective in inactivating viruses and killing bacteria by releasing special materials, e.g., Plasmacluster ions, Nanoe particle and minus ions, into the air. These companies claim that their devices killed bacteria on plates in their own experiments. We tested device effectiveness using the same experiments from the Plasmacluster ioniser SHARP Co., Japan, the Nanoe generator Panasonic Co., Japan, and the Vion KING JIM Co., Japan, to test their advertising claims. Bactericidal ability on agar plate was tested, using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, and Enterococcus faecalis as follows: the medium containing a certain amount of each bacterium was put onto an agar plate and smeared. Plates were kept in a closed chamber (inner volume 14.4 m3) or a glove box (inner volume 0.2 m), with one of the devices run for 2 hours. Plates not exposed to any device were used as controls. Each plate was retrieved and put in an incubator to count the number of bacterial colonies formed on the plate. There was no significant difference in the number of colonies on plates exposed to devices compared to control, in the number for all devices, or in all bacteria tested in experiments in the 14.4 m3 chamber. These results strongly suggest that these devices have almost no bactericidal effect, at least in space exceeding this volume. Colony formation was suppressed in the glove box in all devices and in all bacteria tested except P. aeruginosa, although the degree of suppression differed among experiments. The colony formation suppression mechanism was analyzed, and indicated that:colony formation did not change even after the removal of Plasmacluster ions, Nanoe particles, or negative ions from the air, while colony formation was decreased drastically by the removal of ozone from space, which was revealed to be generated inevitably during device operation. These results strongly suggest that the bactericidal effect seen only on the agar plate in narrow space was explained by ozone released in space as a by-product, not by special materials as advertising claimed. It is thus important to analyze the effect of special materials such as those done in this study and to suggest the involvement of ozone as the true cause, as have been done in this study, in evaluating bactericidal effect or viral inactivation as advertised by these companies. PMID:23367847

  18. Eastward migration of blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, B.

    1972-01-01

    Of 3,789 recoveries of blue-winged teal (Anas discors) banded prior to the hunting season in the prairie pothole region, 183 (4.8 percent) were recovered, due east in New England, Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces during the subsequent hunting season. Of 19 recoveries looked at in detail, all were banded as either hatching-year (flying young) or local (flightless young) birds. A blue-winged teal banded in Minnesota in September was retrapped in October in South Carolina, before being shot later that month in Colombia, South America.

  19. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available.2-5 Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of classroom demonstrations have been described for showing the effects.6-11 This paper describes how these demonstrations can be enhanced by using a spectrometer to measure the preferential scattering of the shorter wavelength light.

  20. Comparison of automated BAX PCR and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in blue Crabmeat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants.

    PubMed

    Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Parveen, Salina; Schwarz, Jurgen G; Rippen, Thomas; Luchansky, John B

    2011-11-01

    This study compared the automated BAX PCR with the standard culture method (SCM) to detect Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab processing plants. Raw crabs, crabmeat, and environmental sponge samples were collected monthly from seven processing plants during the plant operating season, May through November 2006. For detection of L. monocytogenes in raw crabs and crabmeat, enrichment was performed in Listeria enrichment broth, whereas for environmental samples, demi-Fraser broth was used, and then plating on both Oxford agar and L. monocytogenes plating medium was done. Enriched samples were also analyzed by BAX PCR. A total of 960 samples were examined; 59 were positive by BAX PCR and 43 by SCM. Overall, there was no significant difference (P ? 0.05) between the methods for detecting the presence of L. monocytogenes in samples collected from crab processing plants. Twenty-two and 18 raw crab samples were positive for L. monocytogenes by SCM and BAX PCR, respectively. Twenty and 32 environmental samples were positive for L. monocytogenes by SCM and BAX PCR, respectively, whereas only one and nine finished products were positive. The sensitivities of BAX PCR for detecting L. monocytogenes in raw crabs, crabmeat, and environmental samples were 59.1, 100, and 60%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that BAX PCR is as sensitive as SCM for detecting L. monocytogenes in crabmeat, but more sensitive than SCM for detecting this bacterium in raw crabs and environmental samples. PMID:22054196

  1. Complexation between carrageenan and methylene blue for sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yew Pei; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical studies on the methylene blue (MB)-carrageenans complexation at solution and solid states have been carried out via ultraviolet spectrophotoscopy and reflectometry methods. The equilibrium constant (Ka) of the MBcarrageenans complexation follows the order of Iota > Lambda > Kappa carrageenans, which indicated Iota-carrageenan forms a stable complex. MB-carrageenan complexation reaction showed decrease in Ka value from 210.71 ppm-1 to 114.57 ppm-1 when the reaction temperature increased from 298 K to 323 K. Le Chatelier's principle and mass action law explained that the MB-carrageenan complexation was an exothermic reaction (?H=-18.54 kJmol-1) that release heat. Thus MB-carrageenan complex was less stable at high temperature and tend to dissociate into free MB and carrageenan molecules. It was also supported by the van't Hoff equation. The reaction is a spontaneous process (?G=-13.23 kJmol-1) where the randomness of the molecules reduced (?S=-17.83 Jmol-1K-1) due to complexation. Besides, linear regression of the concentration and absorption of the MB-carrageenan reaction obeys the Beer Lambert law, which elucidated that the complexation process was not affected by any concentration dependent factors such as aggregation and self-quenching. Moreover, linear Benesi Hilderbrend plot revealed that the interaction between MB and carrageenan was a reversible and stoichiometric reaction with 1:1 ratio. However, the molar extinction coefficient (?) and molar adsorption coefficient (?a) of the MB-carrageenan complex were lower compared to free MB, described that the complex was less adsorptive. The sensor constructed based on these theoretical investigations showed response behavior that was similar with solution test as both have attraction for carrageenans in the sequence of Iota-, Lambda-, Kappa- carrageenans. Likewise, carrageenan sensor was more selective towards Iota-carrageenan than to Lambda- and Kappa-carrageenans, and no response observed when tested with agar, alginate and glucose. Therefore the sensor is able to detect carrageenans specifically and offers rapid detection without the need of sample pretreatment when compared to conventional methods.

  2. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds.

    PubMed

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  3. Production of equine herpesvirus 1 recombinant glycoprotein D and development of an agar gel immunodiffusion test for serological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Nadia; Sguazza, Guillermo; Scrochi, Mariela; Bravi, Maria; Zanuzzi, Carolina; Corva, Santiago; Gimeno, Eduardo; Pecoraro, Marcelo; Galosi, Cecilia

    2014-06-01

    Equine herpesvirus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and 4) infect most of the world's horses, causing serious clinical illness. Viral glycoproteins have been identified as the immunodominant antigens that generate the antiviral serological responses to EHV-1 and EHV-4 in infected horses. Here, glycoprotein D of EHV-1 was expressed by a recombinant baculovirus, purified and evaluated by a simple agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID). Compared with virus neutralization, serological analysis by AGID showed good specificity (100%) and sensitivity (99.5%). The estimated Kappa values for repeatability and reproducibility were satisfactory. Thus, this rapid, inexpensive, simple and highly specific AGID test seems to be a valuable alternative tool for serological detection of antibodies against both EHV-1 and EHV-4. PMID:24631347

  4. Biomimetic synthesis of hollow calcium carbonate with the existence of the agar matrix and bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianhua; Wu, Gang; Qing, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    Proteins play important roles in the process of biomineralization. Vaterite and calcite have been synthesized by the reaction of Na2CO3 and CaCl2 in the bovine serum albumin (BSA) and agar system. The samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The shape of CaCO3 crystal has been analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that calcite is a single product in the absence of BSA, but the product is a mixture of calcite and vaterite in the presence of BSA. The spheral shell of CaCO3 crystal was obtained when the concentration of BSA increased to 9.0mg/mL. PMID:26478327

  5. Some observations on the three-dimensional growth of L5178Y cell colonies in soft agar culture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalen, H.; Burki, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of spherical colonies formed by L5178Y cells grown in soft agar cultures was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Visible colonies were formed after 7 days of incubation and increased in size for more than 2 weeks. At this time the colonies contained a central core of necrotic cells surrounded by an outer shell of normal-looking cells in loose contact with each other. Cross sectional radioautographs revealed that tritiated precursors were incorporated only into those cells in the ?viable cell' shell and not in the necrotic center of the colony. It is pointed out that increased knowledge of the factors leading to this type of three-dimensional organization is of particular interest, since it is similar to the conditions found in certain types of solid tumors (Thomlinson and Gray, 1955).

  6. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  7. Identification of non-mutans streptococci organisms in dental plaques recovering on mitis-salivarius bacitracin agar medium.

    PubMed

    Yoo, So Young; Kim, Pyung Sik; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Lim, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Won; Choe, Son-Jin; Min, Byung-Moo; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to both isolate and identify non-mutans streptococci organisms (non-MSO) from dental plaques recovered on mitis-salivarius sucrose bacitracin agar (MSB) plates. The dental plaque samples, which had been collected from 63 human subjects, were diluted and plated on MSB. The bacteria growing on the MSB plates were then identified with biochemical tests, as well as with 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing techniques. Our data indicated that bacteria from 30 subjects had been recovered on the MSB plates. Among the 21 typical colonies selected from the 30 subjects, 12 colonies, derived from 10 subjects, were identified as non-MSO. These 12 colonies were determined to be Streptococcus anginosus (8 colonies), S. sanguinis (1 colony), and Pantoea agglomerans (3 colonies). These results strongly suggest that a new selective medium will be required for the reliable isolation of mutans streptococci. PMID:15880098

  8. Comparative studies of chemotherapy of human tumor cells in vitro by tritiated thymidine uptake inhibition and soft agar clonogenic assay.

    PubMed

    Zirvi, K A; Hill, G J; Hill, H Z

    1986-02-01

    A rapid nonsterile short-term assay has been investigated in which percent inhibition of incorporation of the DNA precursor (3H)-thymidine is measured following exposure of tumor cells to the test drugs. To evaluate the usefulness of the short-term assay in providing a rapid reliable assessment of chemotherapeutic response, the short-term assay was compared with the soft agar clonogenic assay. Sensitivity to five anticancer drugs was compared using three human tumor cell lines (epidermoid carcinoma of the oral cavity, pancreatic carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma). The short-term assay produced results that were similar to results of the clonogenic assay in two of the three tumors tested, for three drugs (cis-platin, doxorubicin, and BCNU), but did not detect responses to two antimetabolites (5-FU and MTX) in any tumor. Further studies of this short-term assay should focus on alkylating agents and other nonantimetabolites. PMID:3713188

  9. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on macrophage differentiation, growth, and function: comparison of liquid and agar culture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Both spaceflight and skeletal unloading suppress the haematopoietic differentiation of macrophages (Sonnenfeld et al., Aviat. Space Environ. Med., 61:648-653, 1990; Armstrong et al., J. Appl. Physiol., 75:2734-2739, 1993). The mechanism behind this reduction in haematopoiesis has yet to be elucidated. However, changes in bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM) may be involved. To further understand the role of ECM products in macrophage differentiation, we have performed experiments evaluating the effects of fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV on macrophage development and function. Bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured on four different ECM substrates in liquid culture medium showed less growth than those cultured on plastic. Significant morphological differences were seen on each of the substrates used. Phenotypically and functionally, as measured by class II major histocompatibility molecule (MHCII) expression, MAC-2 expression, and the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), these macrophages were similar. In contrast, bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in suspension, using agar, showed no difference in growth when exposed to ECM proteins. However, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion was affected by fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that the ECM products fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV have profound effects on macrophage development and function. Additionally, we suggest that an ECM-supplemented agar culture system provides an environment more analogous to in vivo bone marrow than does a traditional liquid culture system.

  10. New England's Blue Cross Blue Shield shake-out: a case study in consumer activism.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R

    1999-12-01

    For two generations, Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) insurance plans could be counted on to play a key role in the financing of every community's health care system. "The Blues" dominated the health insurance market, yet they were also a reliable "insurer of last resort." In recent years, BCBS plans have begun to re-structure to stay competitive. Four of New England's BCBS plans have proposed or completed mergers with Anthem Insurance, a mutual insurance company based in Indiana. This issue of States of Health looks at how advocates in New England are working together to protect health care consumers amid this transformation. PMID:11503595

  11. Blue Ridge: An Appalachian Community in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Berton H.

    Stressors created by social change were studied in the Appalachian community of Blue Ridge, West Virginia. Data were gathered through open-ended interviews of community informants. Informants invariably described 3 distinct ways of life; data analysis therefore provided for the possibility of different crises in each stratum. Interview topics

  12. The 1991-1992 Blue Ribbon Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Christine

    1993-01-01

    The distinctive banners flying over the 227 public and private institutions selected as 1991-92 Blue Ribbon Schools signal a two-fold achievement: national recognition for educational excellence and continuation of the award program itself. The selection process began belatedly after former Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander restored $885,000

  13. Blue nano titania made in diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Teleki, Alexandra; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-05-21

    Blue titanium suboxide nanoparticles (including Magneli phases) were formed directly without any post-processing or addition of dopants by combustion of titanium-tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) vapor at atmospheric pressure. Particle size, phase composition, rutile and anatase crystal sizes as well as the blue coloration were controlled by rapid quenching of the flame with a critical flow nozzle placed at various heights above the burner. The particles showed a broad absorption in the near-infrared region and retained their blue color upon storage in ambient atmosphere. A high concentration of paramagnetic Ti3+ centres was found in the substoichiometric particles by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Furthermore particles with controlled band gap energy from 3.2 to 3.6 eV were made by controlling the burner-nozzle-distance from 10 to 1 cm, respectively. The color robustness and extent of suboxidation could be further enhanced by co-oxidation of TTIP with hexamethyldisiloxane in the flame resulting in SiO2-coated titanium suboxide particles. The process is cost-effective and green while the particles produced can replace traditional blue colored, cobalt-containing pigments. PMID:19421486

  14. Heparin sensing: Blue-chip binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriver, Zachary; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-08-01

    Heparin is an anionic polysaccharide that has tremendous clinical importance as an anticoagulant. Several dyes have been developed that can detect heparin, and the latest example -- named Mallard Blue -- has now been shown to have excellent sensing properties under biologically relevant conditions.

  15. The Blues/Rock Group Biography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Brian

    1974-01-01

    Blues and rock groups provide vivid topics for research and writing at the secondary level. Instructional suggestions acknowledge the abundance of both fact and flack noting the need for discrimination between the two by both teacher and student in the research and evaluation processes. (JH)

  16. Visualising DNA in Classrooms Using Nile Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Christine; Roche, Scott; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Giving students the opportunity to extract, manipulate and visualise DNA molecules enhances a constructivist approach to learning about modern techniques in biology and biotechnology Visualisation usually requires agarose gel electrophoresis and staining. In this article, we report on an alternative DNA stain, Nile Blue A, that may be used in the

  17. Blue Whales Respond to Anthropogenic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Melcón, Mariana L.; Cummins, Amanda J.; Kerosky, Sara M.; Roche, Lauren K.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  18. A Code Blue Answer to Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huneycutt, Richy; Callahan, Barbara; Welch, Alexis

    2008-01-01

    Code Blue addresses the capacity challenges in healthcare training. This pilot, grant funded project, focuses on a holistic approach to selecting and educating career ready and capable students and training them to be confident and competent healthcare workers. Lessons learned from this project will be assessed and reviewed for replication.

  19. Ways to Beat the Holiday Blues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Espaol You Are Here: Home ? Latest Health News ? Article URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156207.html Ways to Beat the Holiday Blues Grief and depression can worsen at this ...

  20. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mold, Penicillium roque-fortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and...

  1. KEPONE: TOXICITY AND BIOACCUMULATION IN BLUE CRABS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two long-term studies were conducted to determine toxicity, uptake and duration of Kepone in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). In the first, Kepone was administered to crabs in seawater 0.03 or 0.3 micrograms Kepone/l or food (eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, containing 0.2...

  2. Nontraditional Blue Collar Work Among Urban Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary L.

    This study addresses itself to two questions. The first is to ascertain what, if any, social background and attitudinal differences differentiate women making traditional from nontraditional occupational choices in the semi-skilled and blue-collar occupations. A second issue relates to the relative effectiveness of various kinds of training

  3. Visualising DNA in Classrooms Using Nile Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Christine; Roche, Scott; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Giving students the opportunity to extract, manipulate and visualise DNA molecules enhances a constructivist approach to learning about modern techniques in biology and biotechnology Visualisation usually requires agarose gel electrophoresis and staining. In this article, we report on an alternative DNA stain, Nile Blue A, that may be used in the…

  4. Blue beetle-killed pine park

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Stripped bark from a dead pine tree reveals the tell-tale blue streaks of a mountain pine beetle attack. Mountain pine beetle outbreaks can result in the loss of millions of pine trees throughout western North America. The beetles lay eggs and develop in the bark of mountain trees, especially lodge...

  5. T's and Blues. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles provides basic information on abuse of Talwin, a mild prescription painkiller (T's), and Pyribenzamine, a nonprescription antihistimine (Blues). These two drugs, taken in combination, produce an effect similar to that produced by heroin. Stories from "Drug Survival News,""Emergency Medicine," and "FDA Consumer"…

  6. T's and Blues. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles provides basic information on abuse of Talwin, a mild prescription painkiller (T's), and Pyribenzamine, a nonprescription antihistimine (Blues). These two drugs, taken in combination, produce an effect similar to that produced by heroin. Stories from "Drug Survival News,""Emergency Medicine," and "FDA Consumer"

  7. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  8. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    PubMed

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  9. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The

  10. Great Blue Heron and Great Egret

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A great blue heron and great egret in the parking lot by the Big Cypress Bend boardwalk at Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve. The heron is enjoying a fish dinner thanks to the hunting skills of the egret. While the egret had initially held a fish in it's beak, the heron's squabbling caused the...

  11. Practices of Blue Ribbon Catholic Schools, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealey, Robert J., Comp.

    For almost 20 years, the U.S. Department of Education has invited schools to seek the Blue Ribbon School Award. A large number of Catholic schools have received this award. For this publication, the Department of Elementary Schools Executive Committee requested principals of awarded schools to write a short article on an exemplary school program

  12. Avoiding the Negative: Blue Jeans Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggard, Bob

    1978-01-01

    Blue Jeans Baseball, for eight- to twelve-year old children, is based on the concept that everyone plays. No coaches are allowed; everyone bats once per inning; defensive players rotate positions. These and other rules reduce the emphasis on competition and increase the emphasis on skill development. (MJB)

  13. Enumeration of sublethally injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 and Escherichia coli strain B-41560 using selective agar overlays versus commercial methods.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda R; Ellison, Alysha L; Robinson, Amanda L; Drake, Maryanne; McDowell, Susan A; Mitchell, James K; Gerard, Patrick D; Heckler, Rachel A; McKillip, John L

    2013-04-01

    Quality control procedures during food processing may involve direct inoculation of food samples onto appropriate selective media for subsequent enumeration. However, sublethally injured bacteria often fail to grow, enabling them to evade detection and intervention measures and ultimately threaten the health of consumers. This study compares traditional selective and nonselective agar-based overlays versus two commercial systems (Petrifilm and Easygel) for recovery of injured E. coli B-41560 and O157:H7 strains. Bacteria were propagated in tryptic soy broth (TSB), ground beef slurry, and infant milk formula to a density of 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml and then were stressed for 6 min either in lactic acid (pH 4.5) or heat shocked for 3 min at 60C. Samples were pour plated in basal layers of either tryptic soy agar (TSA), sorbitol MacConkey agar (SMAC), or violet red bile agar (VRB) and were resuscitated for 4 h prior to addition of agar overlays. Other stressed bacteria were plated directly onto Petrifilm and Easygel. Results indicate that selective and nonselective agar overlays recovered significantly higher numbers (greater than 1 log) of acid- and heat-injured E. coli O157:H7 from TSB, ground beef, and infant milk formula compared with direct plating onto selective media, Petrifilm, or Easygel, while no significant differences among these media combinations were observed for stressed E. coli B-41560. Nonstressed bacteria from TSB and ground beef were also recovered at densities significantly higher in nonselective TSA-TSA and in VRB-VRB and SMAC-SMAC compared with Petrifilm and Easygel. These data underscore the need to implement food safety measures that address sublethally injured pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 in order to avoid underestimation of true densities for target pathogens. PMID:23575132

  14. Agonism and dominance in female blue monkeys.

    PubMed

    Klass, Keren; Cords, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Agonistic behavior features prominently in hypotheses that explain how social variation relates to ecological factors and phylogenetic constraints. Dominance systems vary along axes of despotism, tolerance, and nepotism, and comparative studies examine cross-species patterns in these classifications. To contribute to such studies, we present a comprehensive picture of agonistic behavior and dominance relationships in wild female blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis), an arboreal guenon, with data from 9 groups spanning 18 years. We assessed where blue monkeys fall along despotic, tolerant, and nepotistic spectra, how their dominance system compares to other primates, primarily cercopithecines, and whether their agonistic behavior matches socioecological model predictions. Blue monkeys showed low rates of mainly low-intensity agonism and little counter-aggression. Rates increased with rank and group size. Dominance asymmetry varied at different organizational levels, being more pronounced at the level of interactions than dyad or group. Hierarchies were quite stable, had moderate-to-high linearity and directional consistency and moderate steepness. There was clear maternal rank inheritance, but inconsistent adherence to Kawamura's rules. There was little between-group variation, although hierarchy metrics showed considerable variation across group-years. Overall, blue monkeys have moderately despotic, moderately tolerant, and nepotistic dominance hierarchies. They resemble other cercopithecines in having significantly linear and steep hierarchies with a generally stable, matriline-based structure, suggesting a phylogenetic basis to this aspect of their social system. Blue monkeys most closely match Sterck et al.'s [1997] Resident-Nepotistic-Tolerant dominance category, although they do not fully conform to predictions of any one socioecological model. Our results suggest that socioecological models might better predict variation within than across clades, thereby incorporating both ecological variables and phylogenetic constraints. Our findings also highlight the need for clearer definitions of socioecologically relevant dominance categories, which would ideally derive from quantitative measures of dominance behavior. Intraspecific and methodological variation may, however, be a challenge. Am. J. Primatol. 77:1299-1315, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26378396

  15. Is blue light good or bad for plants?

    PubMed

    Dougher, T A; Bugbee, B G

    1998-01-01

    Blue photons are energetically expensive so the most energy-efficient lamps contain the least blue light. Blue photons are not used efficiently in photosynthesis, but blue light has dramatic effects on plant development. We studied the growth and development of soybean, wheat, and lettuce plants under high-pressure sodium and metal halide lamps with yellow filters creating five fractions of blue light (0.5%, 3.5%, 6%, 1 8%, and 26% blue) at 500 micromoles m-2 s-1 and (< 0.1%, 1.7%, 6%, 12%, and 26%) at 200 mol m-2 s-1. The response was species dependent. Lettuce was highly sensitive to blue light fraction and had an optimum dry weight and leaf area at about 6% blue, but results were complicated by sensitivity to lamp type. Wheat and soybean were less sensitive to blue light, but dry mass and leaf area decreased steadily with increasing blue light. Blue light fraction significantly affected specific leaf area (SLA, m2 kg-1) and chlorophyll in lettuce, but had no significant effect on wheat and soybeans. The data suggest that lettuce benefits from some added blue light, but soybean and wheat may not. PMID:11541668

  16. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  17. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue...

  18. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue...

  19. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue...

  20. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... National Park Service Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of proposed award of temporary concession contracts for Blue Ridge Parkway, NC/VA... Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina and Virginia, for a term not to exceed 3 years. The visitor...

  1. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  2. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  3. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  4. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  5. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  6. Maya blue: a computational and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Giustetto, Roberto; Llabrés I Xamena, Francesc X; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Bordiga, Silvia; Damin, Alessandro; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R

    2005-10-20

    Maya Blue pigment, used in pre-Colombian America by the ancient Mayas, is a complex between the clay palygorskite and the indigo dye. The pigment can be manufactured by mixing palygorskite and indigo and heating to T > 120 degrees C. The most quoted hypothesis states that the dye molecules enter the microchannels which permeate the clay structure, thus creating a stable complex. Maya Blue shows a remarkable chemical stability, presumably caused by interactions formed between indigo and clay surfaces. This work aims at studying the nature of these interactions by means of computational and spectroscopic techniques. The encapsulation of indigo inside the clay framework was tested by means of molecular modeling techniques. The calculation of the reaction energies confirmed that the formation of the clay-organic complex can occur only if palygorskite is heated at temperatures well above the water desorption step, when the release of water is entropically favored. H-bonds between the clay framework and the indigo were detected by means of spectroscopic methods. FTIR spectroscopy on outgassed palygorskite and freshly synthesized Maya Blue samples showed that the presence of indigo modifies the spectroscopic features of both structural and zeolitic water, although no clear bands of the dye groups could be observed, presumably due to its very low concentration. The positions and intensities of delta(H2O) and nu(H2O) modes showed that part of the structural water molecules interact via a hydrogen bond with the C=O or N-H groups of indigo. Micro-Raman spectra clearly evidenced the presence of indigo both in original and in freshly synthesized Maya Blue. The nu(C=O) symmetric mode of Maya Blue red-shifts with respect to pure indigo, as the result of the formation of H-bonds with the nearest clay structural water. Ab initio quantum methods were applied on the indigo molecule, both isolated and linked through H-bonds with water, to calculate the magnitude of the expected vibrational shifts. Calculated and experimental vibrational shifts appeared to be in good agreement. The presence of a peak at 17.8 ppm and the shift of the N-H signal in the 1H MAS NMR spectrum of Maya Blue provide evidence of hydrogen bond interactions between indigo and palygorskite in agreement with IR and ab initio methods. PMID:16853500

  7. Comparison of eight different agars for the recovery of clinically relevant non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from baby spinach, cilantro, alfalfa sprouts and raw milk.

    PubMed

    Kase, Julie A; Maounounen-Laasri, Anna; Son, Insook; Lin, Andrew; Hammack, Thomas S

    2015-04-01

    The FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Chapter 4a recommends several agars for isolating non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC); not all have been thoroughly tested for recovering STECs from food. Using E. coli strains representing ten clinically relevant O serogroups (O26, O45, O91, O103, O104, O111, O113, O121, O128, O145) in artificially-contaminated fresh produce--bagged baby spinach, alfalfa sprouts, cilantro, and raw milk--we evaluated the performance of 8 different agars. Performance was highly dependent upon strain used and the presence of inhibitors, but not necessarily dependent on food matrix. Tellurite resistant-negative strains, O91:-, O103:H6, O104:H21, O113:H21, and O128, grew poorly on CHROMagar STEC, Rainbow agar O157, and a modified Rainbow O157 (mRB) agar. Although adding washed sheep's blood to CHROMagar STEC and mRB agars improved overall performance; however, this also reversed the inhibition of non-target bacteria provided by original formulations. Variable colony coloration made selecting colonies from Rainbow agar O157 and mRB agars difficult. Study results support a strategy using inclusive agars (e.g. L-EMB, SHIBAM) in combination with selective agars (R & F E. coli O157:H7, CHROMagar STEC) to allow for recovery of the most STECs while increasing the probability of recovering STEC in high bacterial count matrices. PMID:25475297

  8. Strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agar and Gellan Gum used in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Alessandro; Cuccaro, Rugiada; Troia, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Agar and Gellan Gum are biocompatible polymers extensively used in several fields of tissue engineering research (e.g. tissue replacement, tissue support, tissue mimicking), due to their mechanical behaviour effectively representative of actual biological tissues. Since mechanical properties of artificial tissues are related to biocompatibility and functionality of medical implants and significantly influence adhesion, growth and differentiation of cells in tissue-engineering scaffolds, an accurate characterization of Young׳s modulus and relaxation time processes is needed. In this study, the strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agarose and one among the numerous kind of Gellan Gum commercially available, known as Phytagel(®), have been investigated. Nine hydrogel samples have been realized with different mechanical properties: the first one Agar-based as a reference material, the further eight samples Gellan Gum based in which the effect of dispersed solid particles like kieselguhr and SiC, as enhancing mechanical properties factors, have been investigated as a function of concentration. Stress-strain has been investigated in compression and relaxation time has been evaluated by means of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts time decay function. Mechanical properties have been measured as a function of temperature between 20 °C and 35 °C and at different strain rates, from ~10(-3)s(-1) and ~10(-2)s(-1) (or deformation rate from ~0.01 mms(-1) to ~0.1 mms(-1)). From experimental data, the combined temperature and strain-rate dependence of hydrogels Young׳s modulus is determined on the basis of a constitutive model. In addition to a dependence of Young׳s modulus on temperature, a remarkable influence of strain-rate has been observed, especially in the sample containing solid particles; in same ranges of temperature and strain-rate, also relaxation time variations have been monitored in order to identify a possible dependence of damping properties on temperature and strain-rate. The result is the impossibility to determine univocally mechanical properties of studied biomaterials without a proper definition of boundary conditions at which they have been obtained. PMID:26318572

  9. Colloidal particles in blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Pawsey, Anne C; Clegg, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of disorder on the phase transitions of a system already dominated by defects. Micron-sized colloidal particles are dispersed chiral nematic liquid crystals which exhibit a blue phase (BP). The colloids are a source of disorder, disrupting the liquid crystal as the system is heated from the cholesteric to the isotropic phase through the blue phase. The colloids act as a preferential site for the growth of BPI from the cholesteric; in high chirality samples BPII also forms. In both BPI and BPII the colloids lead to localised melting to the isotropic, giving rise to faceted isotropic inclusions. This is in contrast to the behaviour of a cholesteric LC where colloids lead to system spanning defects. PMID:25698218

  10. Experiencing Blues at the Crossroads: A Place-Based Method for Teaching the Geography of Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a pedagogical module that explores the geography of blues culture across the Mississippi Delta. By focusing on blues culture, rather than simply blues music itself, this project provides a forum for understanding the broader geographical conditions from which this musical form emerged. This module utilizes place-based

  11. Experiencing Blues at the Crossroads: A Place-Based Method for Teaching the Geography of Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a pedagogical module that explores the geography of blues culture across the Mississippi Delta. By focusing on blues culture, rather than simply blues music itself, this project provides a forum for understanding the broader geographical conditions from which this musical form emerged. This module utilizes place-based…

  12. Novel use of tryptose sulfite cycloserine egg yolk agar for isolation of Clostridium perfringens during an outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis in a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Kotsanas, Despina; Carson, Jolene A; Awad, Milena M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I; Jenkin, Grant A; Stuart, Rhonda L; Korman, Tony M

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens has been associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is a serious disease of neonates. Our study describes the novel use of selective tryptose sulfite cycloserine with egg yolk agar (TSC-EYA) during a nursery outbreak. This medium provides a rapid, sensitive, and accurate presumptive identification of C. perfringens. PMID:20826643

  13. Characterization of a novel alkaline arylsulfatase from Marinomonas sp. FW-1 and its application in the desulfation of red seaweed agar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyan; Duan, Delin; Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin; Fu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    A bacterial strain capable of hydrolyzing sulfate ester bonds of p-nitrophenyl sulfate (pNPS) and agar was isolated from the coast area of Qingdao, China. It was identified as Marinomonas based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and named as Marinomonas sp. FW-1. An arylsulfatase with a recovery of 13% and a fold of 12 was purified to a homogeneity using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. The enzyme was composed of a single polypeptide chain with the molecular mass of 33kDa estimated using SDS-PAGE. The optimal pH and temperature of arylsulfatase were pH 9.0 and 45, respectively. Arylsulfatase was stable over pH 8-11 and at temperature below 55C. The K m and V max of this enzyme for the hydrolysis of pNPS were determined to be 13.73 and 270.27?M/min, respectively. The desulfation ratio against agar from red seaweed Gelidium amansii and Gracilaria lemaneiformis were 86.11 and 89.61%, respectively. There was no difference between the DNA electrophoresis spectrum on the gel of the arylsulfatase-treated G. amansii agar and that of the commercial agarose. Therefore, this novel alkaline arylsulfatase might have a great potential for application in enzymatic conversion of agar to agarose. PMID:26286088

  14. Preparation, Optimization, and Screening of the Effect of Processing Variables on Agar Nanospheres Loaded with Bupropion HCl by a D-Optimal Design

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Zaki, Mohammad Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Banoozadeh, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Bupropion is an atypical antidepressant drug. Fluctuating in its serum levels following oral administration of immediate release dosage forms leads to occasional seizure. The aim of the present work was designing of sustained release bupropion HCl nanospheres suited for pulmonary delivery. Agar nanospheres were prepared by transferring the w/o emulsion to solid in oil (s/o) suspension. Calcium chloride was used as cross-linking agent and hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was used as permeability enhancer. A response surface D-optimal design was used for optimization of nanospheres. Independent factors included in the design were calcium chloride percent, speed of homogenization, agar percent, and HPβCD percent. Optimum condition was predicted to be achieved when the calcium chloride was set at 7.19%, homogenization speed at 8500 rpm, agar content at 2%, and HPβCD at 0.12%. The optimized nanoparticles showed particle size of 587 nm, zeta potential of −30.9 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38.6%, and release efficiency of 51% until 5 h. The nanospheres showed high degree of bioadhesiveness. D-optimal response surface method is a satisfactory design to optimize the fabrication of bupropion HCl loaded agar nanospheres and these nanospheres can be successively exploited to deliver bupropion in a controlled manner for a sufficiently extended period. PMID:26090423

  15. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  16. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for direct identification of thermostable direct hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Sakata, Junko; Yonekita, Taro; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of an immunochromatographic assay (NH IC TDH) in identifying thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates. The sensitivity of the NH IC TDH assay was 100% (189 samples) and its specificity was 100% (41 samples) compared with the presence of tdh. PMID:26432103

  17. A comparison of a new centrifuge sugar flotation technique with the agar method for the extraction of immature Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) life stages from salt marsh soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sampling techniques, agar extraction (AE) and centrifuge sugar flotation extraction (CSFE) were compared to determine their relative efficacy to recover immature stages of Culicoides spp from salt marsh substrates. Three types of samples (seeded with known numbers of larvae, homogenized field s...

  18. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Blue Grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  19. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  20. Genetic heterogeneity among blue-cone monochromats

    SciTech Connect

    Nathans, J.; Maumenee, I.H.; Zrenner, E.; Sadowski, B.; Sharpe, L.T.; Lewis, R.A.; Hansen, E.; Rosenberg, T.; Schwartz, M.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Traboulsi, E.; Klingaman, R.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; LaRoche, G.R.; Pagon, R.A.; Murphey, W.H.; Weleber, R.G.

    1993-11-01

    Thirty-three unrelated subjects with blue-cone monochromacy or closely related variants of blue-cone monochromacy were examined for rearrangements in the tandem array of genes encoding the red- and green-cone pigments. In 24 subjects, eight genotypes were found that would be predicted to eliminate the function of all of the genes within the array. As observed in an earlier study, the rearrangements involve either deletion of a locus control region adjacent to the gene array or loss of function via homologous recombination and point mutation. One inactivating mutation, Cy[sup 203]-to-Arg, was found in 15 probands who carry single genes and in both visual pigment genes in one subject whose array has two genes. This mutation was also found in at least one of the visual pigment genes in one subject whose array has multiple genes and in 2 of 321 control subjects, suggesting that preexisting Cys[sup 203]-to-Arg mutations constitute a reservoir of chromosomes that are predisposed to generate blue-cone-monochromat genotypes by unequal homologous recombination and/or gene conversion. Two other point mutations were identified: (a) Arg[sup 247]-to-Ter in one subject with a single red-pigment gene and (b) Pro[sup 307]-to-Leu in one subject with a single 5[prime] red-3[prime] green hybrid gene. The observed heterogeneity of genotypes points to the existence of multiple one- and two-step mutational pathways to blue-cone monochromacy. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Chitosan/Prussian blue-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiting; Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Rongjin; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lai, Zongsheng; Chen, Zongyou

    2003-06-01

    Chitosan/Prussian blue (PB) based biosensors, including a glucose sensor, a glutamate sensor and a galactose sensor have been developed. The biosensors exhibit excellent performance; in particular, the interference of ascorbic and uric acids can be avoided due to selective permeability of chitosan film and electro-catalysis of the PB layer to H2O2. The biosensors have been applied to detect glucose, galactose and glutamate in human blood serum and fermented solution.

  2. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  3. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    PubMed

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate. PMID:26627784

  4. QCD and the BlueGene

    SciTech Connect

    Vranas, P

    2007-06-18

    Quantum Chromodynamics is the theory of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. It is a celebrated theory and one of its inventors, F. Wilczek, has termed it as '... our most perfect physical theory'. Part of this is related to the fact that QCD can be numerically simulated from first principles using the methods of lattice gauge theory. The computational demands of QCD are enormous and have not only played a role in the history of supercomputers but are also helping define their future. Here I will discuss the intimate relation of QCD and massively parallel supercomputers with focus on the Blue Gene supercomputer and QCD thermodynamics. I will present results on the performance of QCD on the Blue Gene as well as physics simulation results of QCD at temperatures high enough that sub-nuclear matter transitions to a plasma state of elementary particles, the quark gluon plasma. This state of matter is thought to have existed at around 10 microseconds after the big bang. Current heavy ion experiments are in the quest of reproducing it for the first time since then. And numerical simulations of QCD on the Blue Gene systems are calculating the theoretical values of fundamental parameters so that comparisons of experiment and theory can be made.

  5. The Blue Comet: A Railroad's Astronomical Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumstay, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Between 1929 February 21 and 1941 September 27, the Central New Jersey Railroad operated a luxury passenger train between Jersey City and Atlantic City. Named The Blue Comet, the locomotive, tender, and coaches sported a unique royal blue paint scheme designed to evoke images of celestial bodies speeding through space. Inside each car were etched window panes and lampshades featuring stars and comets. And each coach sported the name of a famous comet on its side; these comets were of course named for their discoverers. Some of the astronomers honored in this unique fashion remain famous to this day, or at least their comets do. The names D'Arrest, Barnard, Encke, Faye, Giacobini, Halley, Olbers, Temple, Tuttle, and Westphal are familiar ones. But Biela, Brorsen, deVico, Spitaler, and Winnecke have now largely faded into obscurity; their stories are recounted here. Although more than sixty years have elapsed since its last run, The Blue Comet, perhaps the most famous passenger train in American history, lives on in the memories of millions of passengers and railfans. This famous train returned to the attention of millions of television viewers on the evening of 2007 June 3, in an episode of the HBO series The Sopranos. This work was supported by a faculty development grant from Valdosta State University.

  6. Nature's palette: the search for natural blue colorants.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Andrew G; Culver, Catherine A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-07-16

    The food and beverage industry is seeking to broaden the palette of naturally derived colorants. Although considerable effort has been devoted to the search for new blue colorants in fruits and vegetables, less attention has been directed toward blue compounds from other sources such as bacteria and fungi. The current work reviews known organic blue compounds from natural plant, animal, fungal, and microbial sources. The scarcity of blue-colored metabolites in the natural world relative to metabolites of other colors is discussed, and structural trends common among natural blue compounds are identified. These compounds are grouped into seven structural classes and evaluated for their potential as new color additives. PMID:24930897

  7. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics. PMID:26965233

  8. Correlation between Agar Plate Screening and Solid-State Fermentation for the Prediction of Cellulase Production by Trichoderma Strains

    PubMed Central

    Florencio, Camila; Couri, Sonia; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2012-01-01

    The viability of converting biomass into biofuels and chemicals still requires further development towards the reduction of the enzyme production costs. Thus, there is a growing demand for the development of efficient procedures for selection of cellulase-producing microorganisms. This work correlates qualitative screening using agar plate assays with quantitative measurements of cellulase production during cultivation under solid-state fermentation (SSF). The initial screening step consisted of observation of the growth of 78 preselected strains of the genus Trichoderma on plates, using microcrystalline cellulose as carbon source. The 49 strains that were able to grow on this substrate were then subjected to a second screening step using the Congo red test. From this test it was possible to select 10 strains that presented the highest enzymatic indices (EI), with values ranging from 1.51 to 1.90. SSF cultivations using sugarcane bagasse and wheat bran as substrates were performed using selected strains. The CG 104NH strain presented the highest EGase activity (25.93 UI·g−1). The EI results obtained in the screening procedure using plates were compared with cellulase production under SSF. A correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.977 was obtained between the Congo red test and SSF, demonstrating that the two methodologies were in good agreement. PMID:23227312

  9. Analysis of Keystone Enzyme in Agar Hydrolysis Provides Insight into the Degradation (of a Polysaccharide from) Red Seaweeds*

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Smyth, Leo; Yadav, Anuj; Vocadlo, David J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2012-01-01

    Agars are abundant polysaccharides from marine red algae, and their chemical structure consists of alternating d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose residues, the latter of which are presumed to make the polymer recalcitrant to degradation by most terrestrial bacteria. Here we study a family 117 glycoside hydrolase (BpGH117) encoded within a recently discovered locus from the human gut bacterium Bacteroides plebeius. Consistent with this locus being involved in agarocolloid degradation, we show that BpGH117 is an exo-acting 3,6-anhydro-α-(1,3)-l-galactosidase that removes the 3,6-anhydrogalactose from the non-reducing end of neoagaro-oligosaccharides. A Michaelis complex of BpGH117 with neoagarobiose reveals the distortion of the constrained 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose into a conformation that favors catalysis. Furthermore, this complex, supported by analysis of site-directed mutants, provides evidence for an organization of the active site and positioning of the catalytic residues that are consistent with an inverting mechanism of catalysis and suggests that a histidine residue acts as the general acid. This latter feature differs from the vast majority of glycoside hydrolases, which use a carboxylic acid, highlighting the alternative strategies that enzymes may utilize in catalyzing the cleavage of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22393053

  10. Multicenter Evaluation of MRSASelect II Chromogenic Agar for Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Wound and Nasal Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Duane W.; Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Young, Carol; Clark, Andrew E.; Connoly, Jessica; Wolk, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals strive to reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence via active surveillance of inpatient populations. Rapid and inexpensive screening methods are utilized when molecular methods are not operationally feasible. In this multisite clinical trial, the utility of Bio-Rad's MRSASelect II was evaluated for MRSA identification from remnant nares and wound swabs. The prevalence of MRSA was 11.1% (n = 1,384) from nares samples and 18.1% (n = 842) from wound samples. MRSASelect II had an overall concordance of 95.4% (confidence interval [CI] = 94.5% to 96.2%) compared to a broth-enriched reference standard. Comparisons between results, stratified by examination times, exhibited a nonsignificant trend toward increased positivity at prolonged incubation times. Cefoxitin screening of colonies directly from MRSASelect II was 96.7% (95.8% to 97.3%) concordant compared to testing of colonies following broth enrichment. A comparison of MRSASelect and MRSASelect II revealed no statistical differences; however, the latter exhibited earlier positivity, greater selectivity, and more intense indicator staining, which resulted in facilitated differentiation of positive results. MRSASelect II agar is a simple, rapid, and robust method to routinely screen patients for MRSA colonization without the need for additional testing. PMID:26582836

  11. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Commonly Encountered Bacterial Isolates to Fosfomycin Determined by Agar Dilution and Disk Diffusion Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Liu, Chia-Ying; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Teng, Lee-Jene; Turnidge, John D.; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We studied the antimicrobial activity of fosfomycin against 960 strains of commonly encountered bacteria associated with urinary tract infection using standard agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. Species studied included 3 common species of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia; methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus; and vancomycin-susceptible and resistant Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were interpreted in accordance with both the currently recommended Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria for urinary tract isolates of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria for Enterobacteriaceae. Tentative zone diameter interpretive criteria were developed for species not currently published by CLSI or EUCAST. Escherichia coli was uniformly susceptible to fosfomycin, as were most strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae. A. baumannii was resistant to fosfomycin, while the prevalence of resistance in P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia was greatly affected by the choice of MIC breakpoint. New tentative zone diameter criteria for K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, S. aureus, and E. faecium were able to be set, providing some interim laboratory guidance for disk diffusion until further breakpoint evaluations are undertaken by CLSI and EUCAST. PMID:21670185

  13. Multicenter Evaluation of MRSASelect II Chromogenic Agar for Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Wound and Nasal Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Diana R; Newton, Duane W; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Buchan, Blake; Young, Carol; Clark, Andrew E; Connoly, Jessica; Wolk, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    Hospitals strive to reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence via active surveillance of inpatient populations. Rapid and inexpensive screening methods are utilized when molecular methods are not operationally feasible. In this multisite clinical trial, the utility of Bio-Rad's MRSASelect II was evaluated for MRSA identification from remnant nares and wound swabs. The prevalence of MRSA was 11.1% (n = 1,384) from nares samples and 18.1% (n = 842) from wound samples. MRSASelect II had an overall concordance of 95.4% (confidence interval [CI] = 94.5% to 96.2%) compared to a broth-enriched reference standard. Comparisons between results, stratified by examination times, exhibited a nonsignificant trend toward increased positivity at prolonged incubation times. Cefoxitin screening of colonies directly from MRSASelect II was 96.7% (95.8% to 97.3%) concordant compared to testing of colonies following broth enrichment. A comparison of MRSASelect and MRSASelect II revealed no statistical differences; however, the latter exhibited earlier positivity, greater selectivity, and more intense indicator staining, which resulted in facilitated differentiation of positive results. MRSASelect II agar is a simple, rapid, and robust method to routinely screen patients for MRSA colonization without the need for additional testing. PMID:26582836

  14. Quantitative assessment of the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by optical coherence elastography and numerical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted on the accuracies of four analytical methods for obtaining the elasticity of soft samples by using optical coherence elastography (OCE). The results were compared to the elasticity measured by uniaxial mechanical testing. OCE has emerged as a noninvasive method for quantifying tissue biomechanical properties with spatial resolution of a few micrometers. A proper mechanical model is required for extracting the biomechanical parameters accurately from OCE measurements. In this work, tissuemimicking agar phantoms were utilized to analyze the accuracy and feasibility of four methods for reconstructing the Young's modulus from OCE-measured elastic wave which were induced by a focused airpulse. These reconstruction methods are: the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), the Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and the finite element method (FEM). The reconstructed elasticity values were also compared with uniaxial mechanical testing results. It was shown that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantifying elasticity than the other simplified models. This work may provide a reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues based on OCE measurements. Accurate reconstruction of biomechanical properties is an important issue for further developing noninvasive elastography methods.

  15. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated underdense silica aerogels and agar foams

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D.; Back, C.A.; Klein, L.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Hsieh, E.J.; Cook, R.C.; MacGowan, B.J.; Moody, J.D.; Moreno, J.C.; Kalantar, D.; Lee, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    This article presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4--9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser--solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser--plasma interaction physics. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup ?1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  17. Comparison of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Antigen Detection in Stool and Broth Cultures to That in Sorbitol-MacConkey Agar Stool Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Stapp, Jennifer R.; Jelacic, Srdjan; Yea, Yoo-Lee; Klein, Eileen J.; Fischer, Marc; Clausen, Carla R.; Qin, Xuan; Swerdlow, David L.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the Meridian IC-STAT direct fecal and broth culture antigen detection methods with samples from children infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and correlated the antigen detection results with the culture results. Stools of 16 children who had recently had stool cultures positive for this pathogen (population A) and 102 children with diarrhea of unknown cause (population B) were tested with the IC-STAT device (direct testing). Fecal broth cultures were also tested with this device (broth testing). The results were correlated to a standard of the combined yield from direct culture of stools on sorbitol-MacConkey (SMAC) agar and culture of broth on SMAC agar. Eleven (69%) of the population A stool specimens yielded E. coli O157:H7 when plated directly on SMAC agar. Two more specimens yielded this pathogen when the broth culture was similarly plated. Of these 13 stool specimens, 8 and 13 were positive by direct and broth testing (respective sensitivities, 62 and 100%). Compared to the sensitivity of a simultaneously performed SMAC agar culture, the sensitivity of direct testing was 73%. Three (3%) of the population B stool specimens contained E. coli O157:H7 on SMAC agar culture; one and three of these stool specimens were positive by direct and broth testing, respectively. The direct and broth IC-STAT tests were 100% specific with samples from children from population B. Direct IC-STAT testing of stools is rapid, easily performed, and specific but is insufficiently sensitive to exclude the possibility of infection with E. coli O157:H7. Performing the IC-STAT test with a broth culture increases its sensitivity. However, attempts to recover E. coli O157:H7 by culture should not be abandoned but, rather, should be increased when the IC-STAT test result is positive. PMID:10970391

  18. Evaluation of isolation procedures and chromogenic agar media for the detection of MRSA in nasal swabs from pigs and veal calves.

    PubMed

    Graveland, Haitske; van Duijkeren, Engeline; van Nes, Arie; Schoormans, Anky; Broekhuizen-Stins, Marian; Oosting-van Schothorst, Isabella; Heederik, Dick; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2009-10-20

    Since the emergence of MRSA in livestock, screening of animals for the detection of MRSA is widely practised. Different procedures are published for animal samples but a systematic comparison of methods has not been performed. The objective of this study was to compare three available commonly used procedures and three chromogenic agars for detecting MRSA in nasal swabs from pigs (n=70) and veal calves (n=100). Procedures 1 and 2 used a pre-enrichment comprising Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl followed by selective enrichment with 4 microg/ml oxacillin+75 microg/ml aztreonam (procedure 1) and 5 microg/ml ceftizoxime+75 microg/ml aztreonam (procedure 2) respectively. Procedure 3 used a selective enrichment broth only, containing 4% NaCl, 5 microg/ml ceftizoxime+50 microg/ml aztreonam. After selective enrichment, media were streaked on to three different chromogenic agars. Significantly more MRSA were found for pig as well as for veal calf samples with procedures 1 and 2. No significant differences were found between procedures 1 and 2. For nasal swabs from pigs significantly more MRSA-positive samples were found when MRSA Screen (Oxoid) or MRSASelect (Bio-Rad) agars were used compared to MSRA ID (bioMrieux). For calf samples no significant differences between the different agars were found. In conclusion, the results of this study show that procedures 1 and 2, both using additional high salt pre-enrichment are superior and should be recommended for MRSA detection in nasal swabs from pigs and veal calves. The preferred choice of chromogenic agar depends on the sample matrix. PMID:19559546

  19. Problems of Differential Diagnosis in Melanoma Arising from Blue Naevus.

    PubMed

    Andrei, R; Zurac, Sabina; Socoliuc, C; Mandisodza, P; Staniceanu, Florica

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma arising from blue naevus is an exceedingly rare variant of melanoma. Most of the cases are located in head and neck area, with scalp the most affected site. This type of melanoma develops on blue naevus or resembles blue naevus, most frequently cellular blue naevus. We present the case of a 52 years old female diagnosed with a pigmented melanoma of the scalp, with maximum tumoral thickness of 6.8 mm and invasion of the hypodermis, highly resembling cellular blue naevus. All criteria of malignancy were present: prominent nuclear pleomorphism, infiltrative pattern, tumoral necrosis, high mitotic rate (11 mitoses/mm2) with atypical mitosis and high Ki67 index. No lymph node or distant metastases were identified at presentation. Because of the rarity of cases, histopathological diagnosis can be difficult, differential diagnosis with blue naevi, atypical blue naevi or metastatic melanoma being the most challenging problems. Prognosis is given by tumoral thickness, frequently being more than 4 mm. PMID:26076567

  20. Blue and white organic light-emitting devices using oligo(phenylenvinylene) as a blue emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingfang; He, Feng; Cheng, Gang; Ruan, Chunyan; Lin, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yi; Ma, Yuguang; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-03-01

    Highly bright and efficient blue and white organic light-emitting devices based on oligo(phenylenvinylene) derivatives, 1,4-di(4'-N,N-diphenylaminostyryl) benzene (DPA-DSB) and 2,5,2',5'-tetrastyryl-biphenyl (TSB), are fabricated. In the blue device, using DPA-DSB doped TSB as a blue emitter, due to efficient energy transfer from TSB to DPA-DSB and depression of concentration quenching of the dopant, a maximum brightness of 17 350 cd m-2 and a maximum luminous efficiency of 12.18 cd A-1 are obtained. In the white device, DPA-DSB doped 4,4-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) acts not only as a blue emitter, but also as a blocking layer to prevent the energy transfer between the two phosphorescent layers in order to balance emissions from the three emissive layers. Combining the blue emission from it with the green and red emissions from the phosphorescent layers, white emission with a maximum brightness of 13 290 cd m-2 and a maximum luminous efficiency of 14.97 cd A-1 is obtained. The colour rendering index of the white device is 79.

  1. Excited state electric dipole moment of nile blue and brilliant cresyl blue: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Hosseini, S. E.; Moghadam, M.; Alizadeh, E.

    2012-04-01

    A solvatochromic study on the photophysical properties of two cationic oxazine dyes (brilliant cresyl blue and nile blue) was carried out. The electronic absorption and emission spectra of the dyes were recorded in various organic solvents with different polarity. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of the dyes were estimated from solvatochromic shift method. The solvent dependent spectral shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra were analyzed by the Katritzky and Kamlet-Taft multi-parameter scales. This work is characterized by detailed quantitative studies on the nature and extent of solvent-solute interactions.

  2. Excited state electric dipole moment of nile blue and brilliant cresyl blue: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gilani, A Ghanadzadeh; Hosseini, S E; Moghadam, M; Alizadeh, E

    2012-04-01

    A solvatochromic study on the photophysical properties of two cationic oxazine dyes (brilliant cresyl blue and nile blue) was carried out. The electronic absorption and emission spectra of the dyes were recorded in various organic solvents with different polarity. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of the dyes were estimated from solvatochromic shift method. The solvent dependent spectral shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra were analyzed by the Katritzky and Kamlet-Taft multi-parameter scales. This work is characterized by detailed quantitative studies on the nature and extent of solvent-solute interactions. PMID:22261111

  3. MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-11-10

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter ? in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

  4. Nile Blue derivatives as lysosomotropic photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei; Shulok, Janine R.; Kirley, S. D.; Cincotta, Louis; Foley, James W.

    1991-06-01

    The benzophenoxazines, including several Nile blue analogues, are a unique group of dyes that localize selectively in animal tumors. Chemical modifications of Nile blue A can yield derivatives with high 1O2 quantum yields. These derivatives represent a group of potentially effective photosensitizers for selective phototherapy of malignant tumors. In vitro evaluation of these derivatives has indicated that those with high 1O2 yields are very effective in mediating the photocytotoxicity of tumor cells. This photodynamic effect is most likely mediated through the action of 1O2, since photoirradiation under D2O enhanced and under hypoxic conditions diminished the photocytotoxic action. The subcellular localization of these photosensitizers in bladder tumor cells in culture was examined by light and fluorescence microscopies as well as by histochemical and biochemical studies. The results indicate that these dyes are localized primarily in the lysosome. The cellular uptake and retention of these dyes is energy- and pH-dependent. Agents such as nigericin, which alter the transmembrane pH gradient, reduced uptake and enhanced efflux of the dyes, while agents such as valinomycin, which reduce cellular membrane potential, had no effect on the uptake. These findings are consistent with having ion-trapping as the mechanism for the uptake of these dyes. Photoirradiation of sensitizer-treated cells obliterated lysosomes in a light-dose and drug-dose dependent fashion. Release of the hydrolytic enzymes may be the main cause for subsequent cell death since the cytolytic effect was reduced by a specific inhibitor of lysosomal proteolytic enzyme. A lysosomotropic photosensitization mechanism is therefore proposed for the photocytotoxic action of the Nile blue derivatives. This mechanism may provide an approach to the development of new photosensitizers for the effective and selective destruction of malignant tumors.

  5. VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay method EasySLM with ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar. Performance Tested Method 020901.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Coln-Reveles, Judith

    2009-01-01

    A method modification study was conducted for the VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay (AOAC Performance Tested Method 020901) using the EasySLM method to validate a matrix extension for peanut butter. The VIDAS EasySLM method is a simple enrichment procedure compared to traditional Salmonella methods, requiring only pre-enrichment and a single selective enrichment media, Salmonella Xpress 2 (SX2) broth. SX2 replaces the two selective broths in traditional methods and eliminates the M broth transfer, incubation, and subsequent pooling of M broths prior to VIDAS assay. The validation study was conducted under the AOAC Research Institute Emergency Response Validation program. VIDAS SLM was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) method for detection of S. enterica ser. Typhimurium in peanut butter. All peanut butter samples were prepared, blind-coded, and shipped to the method developers' laboratory by Q Laboratories. In addition, Q Laboratories performed most probable number and reference method analyses on peanut butter samples. The VIDAS EasySLM ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar was previously validated in the Performance Tested Methods program for the detection of Salmonella in roast beef, raw ground pork, turkey, pork sausage, raw chicken breast, dry pet food, whole milk, ice cream, bagged spinach, shrimp (raw, peeled), raw cod, spent irrigation water, pecans, peanut butter, dry pasta, cake mix, ground black pepper, nonfat dry milk, liquid eggs, cantaloupe, and orange juice. In the matrix extension study for peanut butter, the VIDAS EasySLM method was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference culture procedure using both buffered peptone water pre-enrichment and the FDA-BAM lactose pre-enrichment in the two-step enrichment method with SX2 media. The current study extends the validation to include peanut butter. PMID:20166608

  6. Slow-blue PanSTARRS transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Bruce, Alastair; Lawrence, Andy; Ward, Martin; Collinson, James; Elvis, Martin; Gezari, Suvi; Smartt, Steven; Smith, Ken; Wright, Darryl; Fraser, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 50 blue, nuclear "transients" in PanSTARRS-1 has revealed different types of extremely variable AGN. The majority show a gradual brightening by ~2 mag from the SDSS observation a decade ago and may represent a new class of AGN microlensed by foreground galaxies. Spectra from the William Herschel Telescope identify these as z~1 AGN with atypical spectroscopic properties. We present an analysis of their photometric and spectroscopic variability in an effort to constrain the detailed structure of the source AGN.

  7. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, P.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1998-09-08

    A laser is disclosed for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr{sup 3+} ions and Yb{sup 3+} ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output. 11 figs.

  8. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A laser for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr.sup.3+ ions and Yb.sup.3+ ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output.

  9. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  10. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  11. The curious conversion of Empire Blue Cross.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    The for-profit conversion of Empire Blue Cross in New York challenges the case law and conventional policy wisdom that financial assets from formerly nonprofit organizations should be used to endow independent charitable foundations. The appropriation of Empire's assets by state government itself, and their subsequent deployment to subsidize health care institutions and repay political obligations, changes the conversion process from one that pits nonprofits against for-profits to one that pits private, nonprofit organizations against public-sector programs in the competition for new financial resources. PMID:12889758

  12. Nonlinear Pulsation Modeling of Luminous Blue Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Despain, Kate M.; Guzik, Joyce A.; Cox, Arthur N.

    1997-12-31

    Using an updated version of the Ostlie and Cox (1993) nonlinear hydrodynamics code, we show the results of Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) envelope models based on evolution models of initial mass 50-80 M solar. including mass loss. The models use OPAL opacities, contain 60-120 Lagrangian zones, include time dependent convection, and are given an initial photospheric radial velocity amplitude of 1 km/sec. Our goal is to explain the reason for the LBV instability strip and suggest a cause for LBV outbursts observed in massive stars in our Galaxy as well as the LMC and SMC.

  13. Pathological infatuation or the Blue Angel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruno, C A

    1992-08-01

    The term masochism has undergone an evaluation since first being introduced solely in relation to sexual perversion by Kraft Ebing in 1906. Masochism can be defined as any behavior that is repetitively self destructive. Relationships in which partners sacrifice themselves and their own best interests can be considered masochistic. There is a difference between a normal pattern of falling in love and a masochistic pattern. The concept of pathological infatuation or what this author has termed the Blue Angel syndrome is presented. A case history with clinical examples is examined to further illustrate these concepts. PMID:1417079

  14. Trypan blue dye for anterior segment surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Jhanji, V; Chan, E; Das, S; Zhang, H; Vajpayee, R B

    2011-01-01

    Use of vital dyes in ophthalmic surgery has gained increased importance in the past few years. Trypan blue (TB) has been a popular choice among anterior segment surgeons mainly due to its safety, ease of availability, and remarkable ability to enable an easy surgery in difficult situations mostly related to visibility of the targeted tissue. It is being used in cataract surgery since nearly a decade and its utilization has been extended to other anterior segment surgeries like trabeculectomy and corneal transplantation. This review will discuss the techniques and outcome of TB dye-assisted anterior segment surgeries. PMID:21681214

  15. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  16. Fuzzy logic color detection: Blue areas in melanoma dermoscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Mounika; Stanley, R. Joe; Rader, Ryan K.; Hagerty, Jason; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Oliviero, Margaret; Choudhry, Iqra; Stoecker, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Fuzzy logic image analysis techniques were used to analyze three shades of blue (lavender blue, light blue, and dark blue) in dermoscopic images for melanoma detection. A logistic regression model provided up to 82.7% accuracy for melanoma discrimination for 866 images. With a support vector machines (SVM) classifier, lower accuracy was obtained for individual shades (79.980.1%) compared with up to 81.4% accuracy with multiple shades. All fuzzy blue logic alpha cuts scored higher than the crisp case. Fuzzy logic techniques applied to multiple shades of blue can assist in melanoma detection. These vector-based fuzzy logic techniques can be extended to other image analysis problems involving multiple colors or color shades. PMID:24786720

  17. Raphael Meldola, his blue and his times.

    PubMed

    Travis, A S

    2012-05-01

    Raphael Meldola (1849-1915), English industrial and academic chemist, spectroscopist, naturalist, educator and lobbyist for science, is today almost a forgotten scientist whose life is celebrated only with a medal awarded by the Royal Society of Chemistry that honors achievement by younger chemists. In the 1870-80s, however, he invented a number of important synthetic dyestuffs including the cotton dyes isamine blue and Meldola's blue, and also naphthol green B, all of which have had application in biology and medicine. I describe here the early emergence of the synthetic dye industry, the first science-based industry, Meldola's role in its development, and his own inventions. Meldola's wide ranging achievements in science led to appointments as president of important professional scientific and manufacturers' societies. He was a fervent disciple of natural selection, a correspondent of Charles Darwin, and a prominent 19(th)-century neo-Darwinian. In 1886, drawing on analogies with evolutionary theory, he warned the British that neglect of science, particularly chemistry, would lead to industrial decline and even extinction, though his message generally was ignored, at least until 1914. PMID:22148999

  18. Differential migration of Blue Grouse in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, Brian S.; Hoffman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    We examined migration of adult Blue Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) in north-central Colorado by radio tracking 13 males and 19 females. Elevational changes associated with movements to winter areas were greater for males (median = 488 m, range = 183-671 m) than females (median = 122 m, range = -61-760 m). Males (median = 10.5 km, range = 1.0-29.4 km) also moved farther than females (median = 1.0 km, range = 0.1-28.0 km), resulting in partial segregation of sexes during winter. Directional orientation of movements to wintering areas was nonrandom for long-distance (>3 km) migrants. Median elevational change (122 m) and distance (0.6 km) between the first-winter and first-breeding areas for seven juvenile females were similar to movements of adult females. Males (median = 7 July) departed breeding areas earlier than females (median = 11 August), but arrived (median = 14 October) on winter areas about the same time as females (median = 23 October). Both sexes exhibited fidelity to winter areas. The average distance between winter locations ranged from 94 to 312 m (median = 135 m) for 11 radio-marked adults, suggesting Blue Grouse were sedentary on their winter ranges.

  19. Planetary Nebulae, Blue Stragglers and Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Orsola; Jacoby, G. H.; Davies, J.; Bond, H. E.; Harrington, P.

    2011-01-01

    The plot has thickened over the origin of planetary nebulae (PN) and the role played by binary interactions. One of the outstanding questions is why the brightest PN in every galaxy is limited to the same maximum brightness (making the ensemble of PN a standard candle): in older galaxies PN should be less luminous than in younger galaxies because their central stars have lower mass and luminosity. It has been proposed that the bright end of the PN luminosity function is populated by PN descending from blue stragglers, stars that have a binary or even merger origin, making over-massive and over-luminous PN in old populations. Without blue stragglers, PN should be absent in the oldest populations such as globular clusters. There are, however, 4 PN known in the Galactic globular cluster system. We present here HST observations of two of them, JaFu1 (in Pal 6) and IRAS18333-2357 (in M22) that reveal characteristics (e.g., central star mass, nebular morphology) that support the binary origin hypothesis.

  20. Strategic blue-green communication filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, W. J.

    1984-04-01

    The project began as an effort to construct narrowband, wide-field-of-view, large-aperture, plastic, birefringent filters suitable for blue-green communications. During the course of the study we investigated the use of crystalline materials in addition to plastic films, and we studied filter design theory in order to find designs more suitable to the blue-green system requirements. In addition, we constructed a quartz, 2A filter for the 1981 SLCAIR experiment. In this report we have included an introduction to the principles of narrowband, wide-field-of-view, birefringent filters. This section is included since the subject matter is not readily available except piecemeal in technical journals. Section 3 is a discussion of the materials which were considered during this study. It contains subsections devoted to crystals, plastics and analog element, respectively. A class of new lossless filter designs is described in Section 4. These designs are expected to provide a basis for high-transmission filters in the future. The operational SLCAIR-81 filter is described in Section 5. It was part of the successful experiment which demonstrated communication to the USN Dolphin, a research submarine. Finally, in Section 6 we describe the non-vignetting filter design which was discovered during this study. It represents a significant throughput advantage for crystal filters used in non-imaging applications.