Science.gov

Sample records for canberra tokamak

  1. Canberra Deep Dish Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    View of Canberra 70m (230 ft.) antenna with flags from the three Deep Space Network sites. The Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, located outside Canberra, Australia, is one of the three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network. The other complexes are located in Goldstone, California, and Madrid, Spain.

  2. Canberra

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... a pale, ephemeral lake in the upper left-hand corner (Lake George). Several smoke plumes originate within the eastern part of the ... Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space ...

  3. Space Radar Image of Canberra, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Australia's capital city, Canberra, is shown in the center of this spaceborne radar image. Images like this can help urban planners assess land use patterns. Heavily developed areas appear in bright patchwork patterns of orange, yellow and blue. Dense vegetation appears bright green, while cleared areas appear in dark blue or black. Located in southeastern Australia, the site of Canberra was selected as the capital in 1901 as a geographic compromise between Sydney and Melbourne. Design and construction of the city began in 1908 under the supervision of American architect Walter Burley-Griffin. Lake Burley-Griffin is located above and to the left of the center of the image. The bright pink area is the Parliament House. The city streets, lined with government buildings, radiate like spokes from the Parliament House. The bright purple cross in the lower left corner of the image is a reflection from one of the large dish-shaped radio antennas at the Tidbinbilla, Canberra Deep Space Network Communication Complex, operated jointly by NASA and the Australian Space Office. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 10, 1994, onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The image is 28 kilometers by 25 kilometers (17 miles by 15 miles) and is centered at 35.35 degrees south latitude, 149.17 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Office of Mission to Planet Earth.

  4. Canberra Alpha Sentry Installation Functional Design Criteria (FDC)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, W.F.

    1999-12-16

    This document provides the functional design criteria for the installation of the Canberra Alpha Sentry System at selected locations within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The equipment being installed is identified by part number in Section 3 and the locations are given in Section 5. The design, procurement and installation are assigned to Fluor Federal Services.

  5. Pu-238 assay performance with the Canberra IQ3 system

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, L.; Gillespie, B.; Seaman, G.

    1997-11-01

    Canberra Industries has recently completed a demonstration project at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRC) to characterize 55-gallon drums containing Pu-238 contaminated waste. The goal of this project was to detect and quantify Pu-238 contaminated waste. The goal of this project was to detect and quantify Pu-238 waste to detection limits of less than 50 nCi/g using gamma assay techniques. This would permit reclassification of these drums from transuranic (TRU) waste to low-level waste (LLW). The instrument used for this assay was a Canberra IQ3 high sensitivity gamma assay system, mounted in a trailer. The results of the measurements demonstrate achievement of detection levels as low as 1 nCi/g for low density waste drums, and good correlation with known concentrations in several test drums. In addition, the data demonstrates significant advantages for using large area low-energy germanium detectors for achieving the lowest possible MDAs for gamma rays in the 80-250 keV range. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Report of the Canberra Commission on the elimination of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-14

    The Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons, convened in November 1995 by the Government of Australia, says the threat of nuclear terrorism and political uncertainties in the post-Cold War world make it imperative that nuclear weapons should be abolished.

  7. Canberra Commission outlines steps to rid the world of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-14

    The Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons, convened in November 1995 by the Government of Australia, says the threat of nuclear terrorism and political uncertainties in the post-Cold War world make it imperative that nuclear weapons should be abolished.

  8. A Personal Memoir of Policy Failure: The Failed Merger of ANU and the Canberra CAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The more immediate context of the events the author describes in this article is needed in order to identify the policy framework within which the Australian National University (ANU)-Canberra CAE (CCAE) merger was placed as a component of a wider public policy initiative undertaken by John Dawkins. There were four major components in that wider…

  9. ECH tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M.A.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    A small steady-state tokamak capable of producing power in the 100 to 300 MWe range and relying on electron cyclotron RF heating (ECH) for both heating and current drive is described. Working in the first MHD stability regime for tokamaks, the approach adheres to the recently discovered maximum beta limit. An appropriate figure of merit is the ratio of the fusion power to absorbed RF power. Efficient devices are feasible at both small and large values of fusion power, thereby pointing to a development path for an attractive commercial fusion reactor.

  10. Calibration and Use of the Canberra iSolo 300G

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T; Graham, C L; Sundsmo, T; Shingleton, K L

    2010-11-24

    This procedure provides instructions for the calibration and use of the Canberra iSolo Low Background Alpha/Beta Counting System (iSolo) that is used for counting air filters and swipe samples. This detector is capable of providing radioisotope identification (e.g., it can discriminate between radon daughters and plutonium). This procedure includes step-by-step instructions for: (1) Performing periodic or daily 'Background' and 'Efficiency QC' checks; (2) Setting-up the iSolo for counting swipes and air filters; (3) Counting swipes and air filters for alpha and beta activity; and (4) Annual calibration.

  11. Characterization of Canberra's Tomographic Gamma-Ray Can Scanner ('Can-TGS') - 13311

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, P.J.; Lagana, J.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Nakazawa, D.; Smith, S. Kane; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M.; Young, B.M.

    2013-07-01

    The Tomographic Gamma-ray Scanner (TGS) for large volume drummed waste has been successfully commercialized by Canberra over the last several years. As part of an R and D effort to continually improve this technology, we have developed a scaled down version of the standard commercial product (Can-TGS). The Can-TGS is able to accommodate cans and pails of various sizes, ranging from sub-liter to 20 liter volumes with densities of up to 4 g/cc. The Can-TGS has three diamond-shaped collimators (6.35 mm [0.25''], 12.7 mm [0.5''], and 25.4 mm [1'']) to facilitate a range of container volumes and heights. As with the standard TGS, the Can-TGS has a transmission source sub-system, where the transmission source can be easily swapped between sources of various strengths and type. The acquisition portion of the Can-TGS is powered by the Canberra Lynx{sup R} MCA which accommodates both multi-spectral scaling (MSS) and list-mode. Recently, the Can-TGS has been successfully characterized for an 18.93 L [5-gallon] container for the 25.4 mm diamond-shaped collimator. In principle, a single measurement (with good statistics) is required for each configuration in order to characterize the system. However, for this study, measurements were performed for several different matrices. For each matrix used, 6 different measurements were acquired. For each of these measurements, the drum was rotated 60 deg. with respect to the previous starting position. This procedure was followed in order to average out any radial bias that might be produced from just a single measurement. A description of the Can-TGS system is given. The details of the recent characterization measurements and the associated data analysis and results are presented. TGS results are compared with Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) results for the same source configuration. Additionally, the future outlook for Canberra's R and D efforts with this system is discussed. These efforts include TGS algorithm optimization, improving

  12. Downscaling approach to develop future sub-daily IDF relations for Canberra Airport Region, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herath, H. M. S. M.; Sarukkalige, P. R.; Nguyen, V. T. V.

    2015-06-01

    Downscaling of climate projections is the most adopted method to assess the impacts of climate change at regional and local scale. In the last decade, downscaling techniques which provide reasonable improvement to resolution of General Circulation Models' (GCMs) output are developed in notable manner. Most of these techniques are limited to spatial downscaling of GCMs' output and still there is a high demand to develop temporal downscaling approaches. As the main objective of this study, combined approach of spatial and temporal downscaling is developed to improve the resolution of rainfall predicted by GCMs. Canberra airport region is subjected to this study and the applicability of proposed downscaling approach is evaluated for Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Darwin regions. Statistical Downscaling Model (SDSM) is used to spatial downscaling and numerical model based on scaling invariant concept is used to temporal downscaling of rainfalls. National Centre of Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data is used in SDSM model calibration and validation. Regression based bias correction function is used to improve the accuracy of downscaled annual maximum rainfalls using HadCM3-A2. By analysing the non-central moments of observed rainfalls, single time regime (from 30 min to 24 h) is identified which exist scaling behaviour and it is used to estimate the sub daily extreme rainfall depths from daily downscaled rainfalls. Finally, as the major output of this study, Intensity Duration Frequency (IDF) relations are developed for the future periods of 2020s, 2050s and 2080s in the context of climate change.

  13. Background frequency of Bacillus species at the Canberra Airport: A 12 month study.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Michelle E; Thomas, Rory; Rossi, Rebecca; Nelson, Michelle; Roffey, Paul; Richardson, Michelle M; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, is a naturally occurring disease in Australia. Whilst mainly limited to livestock in grazing regions of Victoria and New South Wales, movement of people, stock and vehicles means B. anthracis could be present outside this region. Of particular interest is the "background" prevalence of B. anthracis at transport hubs including airports. The aim of this study was to determine the background frequency of B. anthracis and the commonly used hoax agent Bacillus thuringiensis at the Canberra Airport over a 12 month period. Samples were collected daily for seven days each month from August 2011-July 2012 and analyzed using species specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen samples (of a total of 575) were positive for the B. anthracis PL3 genomic marker, 24 for the cya (pXO1) plasmid marker and five for the capB (pXO2) plasmid marker. Whilst five samples were positive for both PL3 and cya, no samples were positive for all three markers hence there is no evidence to suggest the presence of pathogenic B. anthracis strains. B. anthracis targets were detected primarily in February 2012 and B. thuringiensis peaked in October and November 2011 and again in April and May 2012. This study provides a rapid method to screen for, and differentiate, Bacillus species. Armed with this information investigators will be able to discriminate a "threat" from "background" frequencies should the need arise. PMID:26298416

  14. An outbreak of gastroenteritis linked to a buffet lunch served at a Canberra restaurant.

    PubMed

    Sloan-Gardner, Timothy S; Glynn-Robinson, Anna-Jane; Roberts-Witteveen, April; Krsteski, Radomir; Rogers, Keith; Kaye, Andrew; Moffatt, Cameron R M

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness occurred following a buffet lunch at a restaurant in Canberra. An investigation was conducted to identify the cause of illness and to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent further disease. We conducted a retrospective cohort study via telephone interviews, using a structured questionnaire developed from the restaurant buffet menu. A case was defined as someone who ate the buffet lunch at the restaurant on the implicated date and developed any symptoms of gastrointestinal illness (such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain and nausea) following the consumption of food. A total of 74% (225/303) of known attendees were interviewed, of whom 56% (125/225) had become ill. The median incubation period and duration of illness were 13 and 19 hours respectively. The most commonly reported symptoms were diarrhoea (94%, 118/125) and abdominal pain (82%, 103/125). A toxin-mediated gastrointestinal illness was suspected based on the incubation period, duration of illness and the symptoms. The environmental health investigation identified a lack of designated hand washing facilities in the kitchen, an absence of thermometers for measuring food temperatures and several maintenance and minor cleaning issues. A number of food samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Multivariable analysis showed that illness was significantly associated with consuming curried prawns (OR 18.4, 95% CI 8.6-39.3, P < 0.001) and Caesar salad (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.8-7.5, P 0.001). Enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus were identified in leftover samples of cooked buffet food, but this food was not epidemiologically implicated. The investigation suggested that a breakdown in cleanliness, temperature control and food handling practices may have resulted in contamination of the buffet food. In order to prevent such outbreaks in the future, caterers and restaurateurs need to ensure they have the appropriate facilities and

  15. Geochemical and microbiological fingerprinting of airborne dust that fell in Canberra, Australia, in October 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Deckker, Patrick; Abed, Raeid M. M.; de Beer, Dirk; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; O'Loingsigh, Tadhg; Schefuß, Enno; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Tapper, Nigel J.; van der Kaars, Sander

    2008-12-01

    During the night of 22-23 October 2002, a large amount of airborne dust fell with rain over Canberra, located some 200 km from Australia's east coast, and at an average altitude of 650 m. It is estimated that during that night about 6 g m-2 of aeolian dust fell. We have conducted a vast number of analyses to "fingerprint" some of the dust and used the following techniques: grain size analysis; scanning electron microscope imagery; major, trace, and rare earth elemental, plus Sr and Nd isotopic analyses; organic compound analyses with respective compound-specific isotope analyses; pollen extraction to identify the vegetation sources; and molecular cloning of 16S rRNA genes in order to identify dust bacterial composition. DNA analyses show that most obtained 16S rRNA sequences belong mainly to three groups: Proteobacteria (25%), Bacteriodetes (23%), and gram-positive bacteria (23%). In addition, we investigated the meteorological conditions that led to the dust mobilization and transport using model and satellite data. Grain sizes of the mineral dust show a bimodal distribution typical of proximal dust, rather than what is found over oceans, and the bimodal aspect of size distribution confirms wet deposition by rain droplets. The inorganic geochemistry points to a source along/near the Darling River in NW New South Wales, a region that is characteristically semiarid, and both the organic chemistry and palynoflora of the dust confirm the location of this source area. Meteorological reconstructions of the event again clearly identify the area near Bourke-Cobar as being the source of the dust. This study paves the way for determining the export of Australian airborne dust both in the oceans and other continents.

  16. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  17. Atmospheric Array Loss Statistics for the Goldstone and Canberra DSN Sites Derived from Site Test Interferometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.; D'Addario, L. R.

    2014-02-01

    NASA is interested in using the technique of arraying smaller-diameter antennas to increase effective aperture in order to replace aging monolithic 70-m structures of the Deep Space Network (DSN). Downlink arraying using the 34-m-diameter and 70-m-diameter antennas is routinely performed by the DSN for certain missions. Future scenarios will include extending the technique to uplink arraying where a downlink signal may not necessarily be available for phasing the signals at the individual stations of the array. Atmospheric decorrelation degrades the arrayed signal, and it becomes more severe in high-frequency bands such as the uplink allocations near 34 GHz and 40 GHz. This article provides sufficient information for a flight project to statistically account for this effect in the design of a telecommunications link involving arrayed antennas in the DSN. The annual and monthly cumulative distributions of expected phasing loss have been derived from the data acquired by site test interferometers at the Goldstone and Canberra complexes. These phasing loss statistics have then been mapped into two-element and three-element amplitude fade (dB loss) statistics referenced at the DSN uplink frequencies of 7.15 GHz and 34.5 GHz and at an elevation angle of 20 deg for both Goldstone and Canberra DSN sites. We also discuss validation tests that ensure the integrity of the data.

  18. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Tien-Fang

    1988-01-01

    A modular tokamak system comprised of a plurality of interlocking moldules. Each module is comprised of a vacuum vessel section, a toroidal field coil, moldular saddle coils which generate a poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating coils.

  19. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  20. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  1. Interference estimate around Canberra DSN Station at 2.04 GHz during Huygens release phase from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian M.

    2005-01-01

    During the descent phase of the Huygens Probe released from the Cassini spacecraft and inserted at Titan, the Deep Space Network (DSN) Canberra Deep Space Station (DSS) 43 (with its 70-m antenna) is being considered as a backup station to directly receive the Huygens Probe data being transmitted at 2.04 GHz. This study provides an assessment on the interference level from the major nearby transmitters operating in this frequency band. The minimum trans-horizon attenuations are calculated using terrain topographic data and the Trans-Horizon Interference Propagation Loss (THIPL) Computing Program recently developed based on ITU-R P.452, and the calculations take into account all propagation modes under a 0.1% of time exceeded. We find that there are five terrestrial transmitters within 100 km of DSS 43. Transmitter 1 is the closest to DSS 43, and needs to be coordinated to avoid interference. The rest of the four transmitters will not interfere with DSS 43. The interference levels from these transmitters are all below the DSN protection criteria of 99.9% of time.

  2. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic £elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi£cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  3. Transport in gyrokinetic tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Parker, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transport in full-volume gyrokinetic (gk) simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in core tokamak plasmas is presented. Though this ``gyrokinetic tokamak`` is much simpler than experimental tokamaks, such simplicity is an asset, because a dependable nonlinear transport theory for such systems should be more attainable. Toward this end, we pursue two related lines of inquiry. (1) We study the scalings of gk tokamaks with respect to important system parameters. In contrast to real machines, the scalings of larger gk systems (a/{rho}{sub s} {approx_gt} 64) with minor radius, with current, and with a/{rho}{sub s} are roughly consistent with the approximate theoretical expectations for electrostatic turbulent transport which exist as yet. Smaller systems manifest quite different scalings, which aids in interpreting differing mass-scaling results in other work. (2) With the goal of developing a first-principles theory of gk transport, we use the gk data to infer the underlying transport physics. The data indicate that, of the many modes k present in the simulation, only a modest number (N{sub k} {approximately} 10) of k dominate the transport, and for each, only a handful (N{sub p} {approximately} 5) of couplings to other modes p appear to be significant, implying that the essential transport physics may be described by a far simpler system than would have been expected on the basis of earlier nonlinear theory alone. Part of this analysis is the inference of the coupling coefficients M{sub kpq} governing the nonlinear mode interactions, whose measurement from tokamak simulation data is presented here for the first time.

  4. High Beta Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.

    1998-11-14

    Perhaps the ideal tokamak would have high {beta} ({beta} {approx}> 1) and classical confinement. Such a tokamak has not been found, and we do not know if one does exist. We have searched for such a possibility, so far without success. In 1990, we obtained analytic equilibrium solutions for large aspect ratio tokamaks at {beta} {approx} {Omicron}(1) [1]. These solutions and the extension at high {beta} poloidal to finite aspect ratio [2] provided a basis for the study of high {beta} tokamaks. We have shown that these configurations can be stable to short scale MHD modes [3], and that they have reduced neoclassical transport [4]. Microinstabilities (such as the {del}T{sub i} mode) seem to be stabilized at high {beta} [5] - this is due to the large local shear [3] and the magnetic well. We have some concerns about modes associated with the compressional branch which may appear at high {beta}. Bill Dorland and Mike Kotschenreuther have studied this issue and our concerns may be unfounded. It is certainly tantalizing, especially given the lowered neoclassical transport values, that these configurations could have no microinstabilities and, one could assume, no anomalous transport. Unfortunately, while this work is encouraging, the key question for high {beta} tokamaks is the stability to large scale kink modes. The MHD {beta} limit (Troyon limit) for kink modes at large aspect ratio is problematically low. There is ample evidence from computations that the limit exists. However, it is not known if stable equilibria exist at much higher {beta}--none have been found. We have explored this question in the asymptotic high {beta} poloidal limit. Unfortunately, we are unable to find stable equilibrium and also unable to show that they don't exist. The results of these calculations will be published when a more definitive answer is found.

  5. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  6. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  7. Polarization spectroscopy of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wroblewski, D.

    1991-09-01

    Measurements of polarization of spectral lines emitted by tokamak plasmas provide information about the plasma internal magnetic field and the current density profile. The methods of polarization spectroscopy, as applied to the tokamak diagnostic, are reviewed with emphasis on the polarimetry of motional Stark effect in hydrogenic neutral beam emissions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  8. The tokamak as a neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  10. ITER tokamak device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-07-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER, a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fueling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (1) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (2) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (3) first wall, (4) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (5) blanket/shield system, (6) maintenance equipment, (7) current drive and heating, (8) fuel cycle system, and (9) diagnostics.

  11. Sawtooth oscillation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear toroidal full MHD code, MH3D, has been used to study sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The profile evolution during the sawtooth crash phase compares well with experiment, but only if neoclassical resistivity is used in the rise phase. (Classical resistivity has been used in most of the previous theoretical sawtooth studies.) With neoclassical resistivity, the q value at the axis drops from 1 to about 0.8 before the crash phase, and then resets to 1 through a Kadomtsev-type complete reconnection process. This ..delta..q/sub 0/ approx. = 0.2 is much larger than ..delta..q/sub o/ approx. = 0.01, which is obtained if classical resistivity is used. The current profile is strongly peaked at the axis with a flat region around the singular surface, and is similar to the Textor profile. To understand this behavior, approximate formulas for the time behavior of current and q values are derived. A functional dependence of sawtooth period scaling is also derived. A semi-empirical scaling is found which fits the experimental data from various tokamaks. Some evidence is presented which indicates that the fast crash time is due to enhanced effective resistivity inside the singular current sheet, generated by, e.g., microinstability and electron parallel viscosity with stochastic fields at the x-point. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Causes of major tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Monticello, D.A.

    1980-07-01

    The nonlinear saturation theory of the tearing mode is used to examine the necessary conditions for the occurrence of a major tokamak disruption. The results are compared with full three-dimensional numerical simulations, and with experimental data.

  13. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  14. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  15. Status of tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.H.

    1996-03-01

    Plasma-wall interaction, heat removal and ash exhaust have emerged as the dominant problems still to be solved in order to achieve ignition and - even more difficult - to maintain a state of self-sustained thermo-nuclear burn. This is of particular delicacy, since those operational regimes which yield the best energy confinement correspond to an even better particle confinement and confinement of impurities, which then tend to accumulate in the plasma core and to result in disruption or degradation of the tokamak discharge. Therefore, plasma-wall interaction, heat removal and particle exhaust will determine not only the structure and configuration of the plasma edge region, of the wall system and of the materials facing the plasma, but also the final choice of useful confinement regimes. Moreover, the potential effect of powerful {alpha}-particle heating on plasma stability and confinement has to be kept below critical values. For the latter requirement, a final answer can only be obtained in an ITER-type device where ignition and burn will become accessible. 72 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed.

  17. Tokamak coordinate conventions: COCOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    Dealing with electromagnetic fields, in particular current and related magnetic fields, yields "natural" physical vector relations in 3-D. However, when it comes to choosing local coordinate systems, the "usual" right-handed systems are not necessarily the best choices, which means that there are several options being chosen. In the magnetic fusion community such a difficulty exists for the choices of the cylindrical and of the toroidal coordinate systems. In addition many codes depend on knowledge of an equilibrium. In particular, the Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric equilibrium solution for tokamak plasmas, ψ, does not depend on the sign of the plasma current Ip nor that of the magnetic field B0. This often results in ill-defined conventions. Moreover the sign, amplitude and offset of ψ are of less importance, since the free sources in the equation depend on the normalized radial coordinate. The signs of the free sources, dp/dψ and dF2/dψ (p being the pressure, ψ the poloidal magnetic flux and F=RBφ), must be consistent to generate the current density profile. For example, RF and CD calculations (Radio Frequency heating and Current Drive) require an exact sign convention in order to calculate a co- or counter-CD component. It is shown that there are over 16 different coordinate conventions. This paper proposes a unique identifier, the COCOS convention, to distinguish between the 16 most-commonly used options. Given the present worldwide efforts towards code integration, the proposed new index COCOS defining uniquely the COordinate COnventionS required as input by a given code or module is particularly useful. As codes use different conventions, it is useful to allow different sign conventions for equilibrium code input and output, equilibrium being at the core of any calculations in magnetic fusion. Additionally, given two different COCOS conventions, it becomes simple to transform between them. The relevant transformations are described in detail.

  18. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (n{tau}{sub E}) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f{sub RAD} {approximately} 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the n{tau}{sub E} transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  20. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  1. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: Overview and status

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-03

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

  3. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Maxwell; Stacey, Weston

    2013-10-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamaks, especially those used as a neutron source for fusion-fission hybrid reactors, such as the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) concept. At Georgia Tech, we are developing a new burning plasma dynamics code to investigate passive safety mechanisms that could prevent power excursions in tokamak reactors. This code solves the coupled set of balance equations governing burning plasmas in conjunction with a two-point SOL-divertor model. Predictions have been benchmarked against data from DIII-D. We are examining several potential negative feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instabilities, iii) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement resulting from ripples in the toroidal field, iv) modifications to the radial current profile, v) ``divertor choking'' and vi) Type 1 ELMs.

  4. MHD stability of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. Sun, Y.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Okabayashi, M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper will give an overview of the some of the methods which are used to simulate the ideal MHD properties of tokamak plasmas. A great deal of the research in this field is necessarily numerical and the substantial progress made during the past several years has roughly paralleled the continuing availability of more advanced supercomputers. These have become essential to accurately model the complex configurations necessary for achieving MHD stable reactor grade conditions. Appropriate tokamak MHD equilibria will be described. Then the stability properties is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the difficulties of obtaining stable high {beta} discharges in plasmas in which the current is mainly ohmically driven and thus demonstrating the need for tailoring the current and pressure profiles of the plasma away from the ohmic state. The outline of this paper will roughly follow the physics development to attain the second region of stability in the PBX-M device at The Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory.

  5. Density limit disruptions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Drake, J. F.

    1991-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic simulations are presented which reproduce the rapid drop in the central temperature observed during density limit disruptions in tokamaks. The loss of central confinement is triggered by edge radiation which destabilizes a q=1 kink mode. A bubble of cold plasma is injected from the edge into the center by the q=1 kink. This bubble bears a striking resemblance to the cold plasma that is observed to move from the edge into the center during density limit disruptions on the JET tokamak [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 433], initiating the loss of central confinement. The bubble profile produced by the q=1 kink is unstable to a broad spectrum of modes which progressively reduce the magnetic shear between the q=2 surface and the center. The q=2 mode then grows across the center, broadening the current and throwing the hot plasma to the wall.

  6. Gyrosheath near the tokamak edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Xiao, H.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the structure of the radial electric field profile in the edge during the H-mode is proposed. Charge separation caused by the difference between electron and ion gyromotion, or more importantly in a tokamak, the banana motion (halo effect) can self-consistently produce an electric dipole moment that causes the sheared radial electric field. The calculated results based on the model are consistent with D-III D and TEXTOR experimental results.

  7. Neoclassical magnetic microislands in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalishen, E.A.; Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Botov, P.V.; Shirokov, M.S.; Konovalov, S.V.; Tsypin, V.S.; Galvao, R.M.O.

    2005-09-15

    Possibility of existence of neoclassical magnetic microislands (island width smaller than the ion Larmor radius) in a tokamak in the banana regime is shown. The rotation frequency of such islands is found. It is shown that for the case of positive electron temperature gradient, the bootstrap current destabilizes the microislands while the polarization current leads to their stabilization. Maximally possible neoclassical microisland width is estimated.

  8. Magnetic island formation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1989-04-01

    The size of a magnetic island created by a perturbing helical field in a tokamak is estimated. A helical equilibrium of a current- carrying plasma is found in a helical coordinate and the helically flowing current in the cylinder that borders the plasma is calculated. From that solution, it is concluded that the helical perturbation of /approximately/10/sup /minus/4/ of the total plasma current is sufficient to cause an island width of approximately 5% of the plasma radius. 6 refs.

  9. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  10. Numerical tokamak turbulence project (OFES grand challenge)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M; Cohen, B I; Crotinger, J; Dawson, J; Decyk, V; Dimits, A M; Dorland, W D; Hammett, G W; Kerbel, G D; Leboeuf, J N; Lee, W W; Lin, Z; Nevins, W M; Reynders, J; Shumaker, D E; Smith, S; Sydora, R; Waltz, R E; Williams, T

    1999-08-27

    The primary research objective of the Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Project (NTTP) is to develop a predictive ability in modeling turbulent transport due to drift-type instabilities in the core of tokamak fusion experiments, through the use of three-dimensional kinetic and fluid simulations and the derivation of reduced models.

  11. Steady State Tokamak Equilibria without Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    Steady state tokamak equilibria without current drive are found. This is made possible by including the potato bootstrap current close to the magnetic axis. Tokamaks with this class of equilibria do not need seed current or current drive, and are intrinsically steady state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Physics of compact ignition tokamak designs

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P.; Bateman, G.; Seidl, F.; Sugihara, M.

    1986-03-01

    Models for predicting plasma performance in compact ignition experiments are constructed on the basis of theoretical and empirical constraints and data from tokamak experiments. Emphasis is placed on finding transport and confinement models which reproduce results of both ohmically and auxiliary heated tokamak data. Illustrations of the application of the models to compact ignition designs are given.

  13. Advanced tokamak research on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the planned research in advanced tokamak development on DIII-D at General Atomics, San Diego, USA. is to establish improved tokamak operation through significant improvements in the stability factor, confinement quality, and bootstrap current fraction using localized radio frequency (rf) current profile control, rf and neutral beam heating for pressure profile control, as well as control of plasma rotation and optimization of the plasma boundary conditions. Recent research results in H-mode confinement, modifications of current profiles to achieve higher confinement and higher {beta}, a new regime of improved confinement (VH-mode), and rf noninductive current drive are encouraging. In this talk, arguments will be presented supporting the need for improved performance in tokamak reactors. Experimentally observed advanced performance regimes on DIII-D will be discussed. Confinement improvement up to H = 4, where H is the ratio of energy confinement time to the ITER89-P scaling H{triple_bond} {Tau}{sub E}/{Tau}{sub E-ITER89-P}, has been achieved. In other discharges {beta}{sub N} = {beta}/(I/aB),[%-m{center_dot}{Tau}/MA] {approx_gt} 6 has been obtained. These values have so far been achieved transiently and independently. Techniques, will be described which can extend the high performance to quasi-steady-state and sustain the high H and {beta}{sub N} values simultaneously. Two high performance regimes, one in first stable regime and the other in second stable regime, have been simulated br self-consistently evolving a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium-transport code. Finally, experimental program plans and outstanding important physics issues will be discussed.

  14. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Transport equations in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2010-05-15

    Tokamak plasma transport equations are usually obtained by flux surface averaging the collisional Braginskii equations. However, tokamak plasmas are not in collisional regimes. Also, ad hoc terms are added for neoclassical effects on the parallel Ohm's law, fluctuation-induced transport, heating, current-drive and flow sources and sinks, small magnetic field nonaxisymmetries, magnetic field transients, etc. A set of self-consistent second order in gyroradius fluid-moment-based transport equations for nearly axisymmetric tokamak plasmas has been developed using a kinetic-based approach. The derivation uses neoclassical-based parallel viscous force closures, and includes all the effects noted above. Plasma processes on successive time scales and constraints they impose are considered sequentially: compressional Alfven waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium, ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along field lines, incompressible flows within a flux surface), and collisions (electrons, parallel Ohm's law; ions, damping of poloidal flow). Radial particle fluxes are driven by the many second order in gyroradius toroidal angular torques on a plasma species: seven ambipolar collision-based ones (classical, neoclassical, etc.) and eight nonambipolar ones (fluctuation-induced, polarization flows from toroidal rotation transients, etc.). The plasma toroidal rotation equation results from setting to zero the net radial current induced by the nonambipolar fluxes. The radial particle flux consists of the collision-based intrinsically ambipolar fluxes plus the nonambipolar fluxes evaluated at the ambipolarity-enforcing toroidal plasma rotation (radial electric field). The energy transport equations do not involve an ambipolar constraint and hence are more directly obtained. The 'mean field' effects of microturbulence on the parallel Ohm's law, poloidal ion flow, particle fluxes, and toroidal momentum and energy transport are all included self-consistently. The

  16. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Lang, D.D.; Nevins, W.M.

    1987-10-02

    A new experimental facility is being assembled at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for studying microwave propagation and absorption in high density plasmas. A unique feature of the facility is the free electron laser (FEL) used to generate high peak power microwaves at 250 GHz, at a repetition rate so as to produce up to 2 MW of average power for up to 30 s. Called the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), the facility will be used for studies of plasma heating, current drive, and confinement.

  17. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  18. Predictive Modeling of Tokamak Configurations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, T. A.; Lodestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Bulmer, R. H.; Jong, R. A.; Kaiser, T. B.; Moller, J. M.

    2001-10-01

    The Corsica code provides comprehensive toroidal plasma simulation and design capabilities with current applications [1] to tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and spheromak configurations. It calculates fixed and free boundary equilibria coupled to Ohm's law, sources, transport models and MHD stability modules. We are exploring operations scenarios for both the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks. We will present simulations of the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) relevant to the Quiescent Double Barrier (QDB) regime on DIII-D exploring long pulse operation issues. KSTAR simulations using ECH/ECCD in negative central shear configurations explore evolution to steady state while shape evolution studies during current ramp up using a hyper-resistivity model investigate startup scenarios and limitations. Studies of high bootstrap fraction operation stimulated by recent ECH/ECCD experiments on DIIID will also be presented. [1] Pearlstein, L.D., et al, Predictive Modeling of Axisymmetric Toroidal Configurations, 28th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Madeira, Portugal, June 18-22, 2001. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Superconducting magnet system for the TPX Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Chaplin, M.R.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-09-15

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will be the first Tokamak using superconducting magnets for both the poloidal and toroidal field. It is designed for advanced Tokamak physics experiments in steady-state and long-pulse operation. The TPX superconducting magnets use an advanced cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to that developed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The toroidal field magnets provide 4.0 T at 2.25 m with a stored energy of 1.05 GJ. The poloidal field magnets provide 18.0 V-s to ohmically start and control long burns of a 2.0 MA plasma.

  20. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  1. Power and particle exhaust in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The status of power and particle exhaust research in tokamaks is reviewed in the light of ITER requirements. There is a sound basis for ITER`s nominal design positions; important directions for further research are identified.

  2. Control of Dust Inventory in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; Taylor, N.; Furlan, J.

    2008-09-07

    Particles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 {mu}m are produced in tokamaks by the interaction of the plasma with the first wall materials and divertor. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because their quantities are small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, they could represent operational and potential safety issues. The aim of this paper is thus to describe the dust creation processes in the tokamak environment. The diagnostics and removal techniques that are needed to be implemented to measure and minimise the dust inventory are also presented. The integration of these techniques into a tokamak environment is also discussed.

  3. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. A.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamak reactors, in particular fusion-fission hybrid reactors, e.g. the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor. We are developing a burning plasma dynamics code to explore various aspects of burn control, with the intent to identify feedback mechanisms that would prevent power excursions. This code solves the coupled set of global density and temperature equations, using scaling relations from experimental fits. Predictions of densities and temperatures have been benchmarked against DIII-D data. We are examining several potential feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instability density limits, iii) MHD instability limits, iv) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement, v) modifications to the radial current profile, vi) ``divertor choking'' and vii) Type 1 ELMs. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. Dust measurements in tokamaks (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Moyer, R. A.; Muller, S. H.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rosenberg, M.; Smirnov, R. D.; West, W. P.; Boivin, R. L.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Hyatt, A. W.; Wong, C. P. C.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.; Solomon, W. M.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2008-10-15

    Dust production and accumulation present potential safety and operational issues for the ITER. Dust diagnostics can be divided into two groups: diagnostics of dust on surfaces and diagnostics of dust in plasma. Diagnostics from both groups are employed in contemporary tokamaks; new diagnostics suitable for ITER are also being developed and tested. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g., between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In the DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering is able to resolve particles between 0.16 and 1.6 {mu}m in diameter; using these data the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in two-dimension with a single camera or three-dimension using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is challenging. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, precharacterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase in carbon line (CI, CII, C{sub 2} dimer) and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  5. Plasma Physics Regimes in Tokamaks with Li Walls

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharo; N.N. Gorelenkov; R.B. White; S.I. Krasheninnikov; G.V. Pereverzev

    2003-08-21

    Low recycling regimes with a plasma limited by a lithium wall surface suggest enhanced stability and energy confinement, both necessary for tokamak reactors. These regimes could make ignition feasible in compact tokamaks. Ignited Spherical Tokamaks (IST), self-sufficient in the bootstrap current, are introduced as a necessary step for development of the physics and technology of power reactors.

  6. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  7. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Kritz, A. H.; Luo, L.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  8. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks.

  9. Global gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, G.; Horton, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T. |

    1998-10-01

    A kinetic simulation code based on the gyrokinetic ion dynamics in global general metric (including a tokamak with circular or noncircular cross-section) has been developed. This gyrokinetic simulation is capable of examining the global and semi-global driftwave structures and their associated transport in a tokamak plasma. The authors investigate the property of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or {eta}{sub i}({eta}{sub i} {equivalent_to} {partial_derivative}{ell}nT{sub i}/{partial_derivative}{ell}n n{sub i}) driven drift waves in a tokamak plasma. The emergent semi-global drift wave modes give rise to thermal transport characterized by the Bohm scaling.

  10. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M.; Kogi, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  12. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  13. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  14. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration. PMID:21033954

  15. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-15

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity v{sub a}(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, v{sub k}, where v{sub a}(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, v{sub pl}=v{sub a}+v{sub k}, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy {delta}{phi}<{+-}{pi}/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  16. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-01

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity va(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, vk, where va(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, vpl=va+vk, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy δϕ <±π/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  17. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2000-08-07

    The stabilization theory of free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated. While the conventional, wall-locked, resistive wall mode can be well suppressed by the flow, a new, stream-locked mode determines the limits of the flow stabilization.

  18. Transformer Recharging with Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch

    2009-12-21

    Transformer recharging with lower hybrid waves in tokamaks can give low average auxiliary power if the resistivity is kept high enough during the radio frequency (rf) recharging stage. At the same time, operation in the hot ion mode via alpha channeling increases the effective fusion reactivity. This paper will address the extent to which these two large cost saving steps are compatible. __________________________________________________

  19. Banana drift transport in tokamaks with ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.; Boozer, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Ripple transport in tokamaks is discussed for the ''banana drift'' collisionality regime, which lies below the ripple plateau regime treated earlier. The physical mechanisms that dominate banana drift transport are found to differ from those considered in previous work on this regime, and consequently the resulting transport coefficients can differ by several orders of magnitude.

  20. Banana drift transport in tokamaks with ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.; Boozer, A.H.

    1981-04-01

    Ripple transport in tokamaks is discussed for the banana drift collisionality regime, which lies below the ripple plateau regime treated earlier. The physical mechanisms that dominate banana drift transport are found to differ from those considered in previous work on this regime, and the resulting transport coefficients can consequently differ by several orders of magnitude.

  1. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Robert John

    2014-02-04

    The results of UCLA experimental fusion program are summarized. Starting with smaller devices like Microtor, Macrotor, CCT and ending the research on the large (5 m) Electric Tokamak. CCT was the most diagnosed device for H-mode like physics and the effects of rotation induced radial fields. ICRF heating was also studied but plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the seconds range. However, it presented very good particle confinement due to an "electric particle pinch". This effect prevented us from reaching a quasi steady state. This particle accumulation effect was numerically explained by Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on particle pinching at nominal average densities. The US fusion research program did not study particle transport effects due to its undue focus on the physics of energy confinement time. Energy confinement time is not an issue for energy producing tokamaks. Controlling the ash flow will be very expensive.

  2. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  3. Elementary Processes Underlying Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    NM.J. Fisch

    2012-06-15

    Alpha channeling in tokamaks is speculative, but also extraordinarily attractive. Waves that can accomplish this effect have been identified. Key aspects of the theory now enjoy experimental confirmation. This paper will review the elementary processes of wave-particle interactions in plasma that underlie the alpha channeling effect

  4. Compact tokamak reactors. Part 1 (analytic results)

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-09-13

    We discuss the possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First we review and summarize the existing literature. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamak power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field, and considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. The analytic results will be augmented by a numerical calculation which permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency; the results of which will be presented in Part II. Third, a scaling from any given reference reactor design to a copper toroidal field coil device is discussed. Throughout the paper the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculating electric power. We conclude that the latest published reactor studies, which show little advantage in using low aspect ratio unless remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, can be reproduced with the analytic model.

  5. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  7. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  8. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  9. Spontaneous generation of rotation in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Parra Diaz, Felix

    2013-12-24

    Three different aspects of intrinsic rotation have been treated. i) A new, first principles model for intrinsic rotation [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has been implemented in the gyrokinetic code GS2. The results obtained with the code are consistent with several experimental observations, namely the rotation peaking observed after an L-H transition, the rotation reversal observed in Ohmic plasmas, and the change in rotation that follows Lower Hybrid wave injection. ii) The model in [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has several simplifying assumptions that seem to be satisfied in most tokamaks. To check the importance of these hypotheses, first principles equations that do not rely on these simplifying assumptions have been derived, and a version of these new equations has been implemented in GS2 as well. iii) A tokamak cross-section that drives large intrinsic rotation has been proposed for future large tokamaks. In large tokamaks, intrinsic rotation is expected to be very small unless some up-down asymmetry is introduced. The research conducted under this contract indicates that tilted ellipticity is the most efficient way to drive intrinsic rotation.

  10. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Garcia, J.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.

    2009-05-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  11. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  12. The physics of tokamak start-upa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.

    2013-05-01

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases, inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection, and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  13. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives.

  14. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  15. Nonambipolar transport by trapped particles in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H; Menard, Jonathan E

    2009-02-13

    Small nonaxisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field can greatly change the performance of tokamaks through nonambipolar transport. A number of theories have been developed, but the predictions were not consistent with experimental observations in tokamaks. This Letter provides a resolution, with a generalized analytic treatment of the nonambipolar transport. It is shown that the discrepancy between theory and experiment can be greatly reduced by two effects: (1) the small fraction of trapped particles for which the bounce and precession rates resonate; (2) the nonaxisymmetric variation in the field strength along the perturbed magnetic field lines rather than along the unperturbed magnetic field lines. The expected sensitivity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor to nonaxisymmetries is also discussed. PMID:19257595

  16. Microtearing modes in spherical and conventional tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Guttenfelder, W.; Fülöp, T.; Mollén, A.

    2013-06-01

    The onset and characteristics of microtearing modes (MTM) in the core of spherical (NSTX) and conventional tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade and JET) are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). For experimentally relevant core plasma parameters in the NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks, in agreement with previous works, we find MTMs as the dominant linear instability. Also, for JET-like core parameters considered in our study an MTM is found as the most unstable mode. In all of these plasmas, finite collisionality is needed for MTMs to become unstable and the electron temperature gradient is found to be the fundamental drive. However, a significant difference is observed in the dependence of the linear growth rate of MTMs on electron temperature gradient. While it varies weakly and non-monotonically in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, in NSTX it increases with the electron temperature gradient.

  17. Tritium Retention and Removal in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Charles H.

    2009-02-19

    Management of tritium inventory remains one of the grand challenges in the development of fusion energy. Tritium is an important source term in safety assessments, it is expensive and in short supply. Tritium can be continuously retained in a tokamak by codeposition with eroded carbon or beryllium and JET and TFTR with carbon plasma facing components showed a tritium retention level that would be unacceptable in ITER or future fusion reactors. Asdex-U and Alcator C-mod have shown reduced hydrogenic retention with tungsten clad and molybdenum plasma facing components. Once the tritium inventory approaches the administrative limit, tritium must be removed to permit continued D-T plasma operations. Several candidate techniques are being considered and need to be proven at a relevant speed and efficiency in contemporary tokamaks. Projections for ITER are discussed.

  18. The Physics of Tokamak Start-up

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller

    2012-11-13

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. ITER, the National Spherical Torus eXperiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  19. The physics of tokamak start-up

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.

    2013-05-15

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases, inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection, and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  20. A low aspect ratio tokamak transmutation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, L. J.; Wu, Y. C.; Xiao, B. J.; Xu, Q.; Huang, Q. Y.; Wu, B.; Chen, Y. X.; Xu, W. N.; Chen, Y. P.; Liu, X. P.

    2000-03-01

    A low aspect ratio tokamak transmutation system is proposed as an alternative application of fusion energy on the basis of a review of previous studies. This system includes: (1) a low aspect ratio tokamak as fusion neutron driver, (2) a radioactivity-clean nuclear power system as blanket, and (3) a novel concept of liquid metal centre conductor post as part of the toroidal field coils. In the conceptual design, a driver of 100 MW fusion power under 1 MW/m2 neutron wall loading can transmute the amount of high level waste (including minor actinides and fission products) produced by ten standard pressurized water reactors of 1 GW electrical power output. Meanwhile, the system can produce tritium on a self-sustaining basis and an output of about 2 GW of electrical energy. After 30 years of operation, the biological hazard potential level of the whole system will decrease by two orders of magnitude.

  1. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  2. System studies of Compact Ignition Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Blackfield, D.T.

    1986-11-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code is used to perform trade studies in accordance with the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) physics and engineering guidelines. The authors examine various toroidal field coil (TFC) configurations, preload levels, and coil materials. Use of Inconel-copper composite material results in the smallest sized devices for both bucked and wedged TFCs and wedged-only TFCs. Preload levels of 23 Mkg are needed for the minimum sized devices, and for the lower strength materials, the minimum size is sensitive to the preload level. Results from these trade studies help lead to the choice of the baseline CIT point at R = 1.25 m and B = 10.4 T.

  3. First Engineering Commissioning of EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuanxi; Li, Jiangang; Weng, Peide; EAST Team

    2006-05-01

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak. The first commissioning started on Feb. 1st of 2006 and finished on March 30th of 2006 at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It consists of leakage testing at both room temperature and low temperature, pumping down, cooling down all coils, current leads, bus bar and the thermal shielding, exciting all the coils, measuring magnetic configuration and warming up the magnets. The electromagnetic, thermal hydraulic and mechanical performance of EAST Toroidal Field (TF) and Poloidal Field (PF) magnets have also been tested. All sub-systems, including pumping system, cryogenic system, PF& TF power supply systems, magnet instrumentation system, quench detection and protection system, water cooling system, data acquisition system, main control system, plasma control system (PCS), interlock and safety system have been successfully tested.

  4. First Results of the ETE Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, G. O.; del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J. G.; Barroso, J. J.; Berni, L. A.; Oliveira, R. M.

    2001-10-01

    First tokamak plasma discharges were obtained in the ETE Spherical Tokamak Experiment (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) by November 2000. ETE is a medium size machine (major radius R=0.30m) with a compact design and good access for diagnostics. During the first phase of operation a plasma current of 200kA (t=15ms) will be produced in a 1.5 aspect ratio configuration with a toroidal magnetic field up to 0.4T. The ultimate values are limited by mechanical stresses in the joints of the toroidal field coil (B<0.8T), and by stresses and heating in the solenoid (0.24Wb, 30kA, 0.2s) for a maximum plasma current of about 400kA. Presently the experiments are focused on plasma formation, vacuum conditioning and diagnostics implementation. The machine was constructed in accordance with stringent design specifications. The assembly has an overall precision better than 2mm. Vacuum conditioning is being improved with baking, glow discharge cleaning and usual tokamak operation. Breakdown is easily obtained even without the pre-ionization provided by a hot filament electron emitter and by an ultraviolet lamp. Preliminary measurements of stray magnetic fields were carried out and eddy current effects are being modeled. Energy of the capacitor banks is being continuously increased to achieve the design parameters. A fast neutral lithium beam probe for plasma edge studies and a 6.7GHz high-power monotron for pre-ionization and electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating experiments are under development.

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  6. Neoclassical transport in high [beta] tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.

    1992-12-01

    Neoclassical, transport in high [beta] large aspect ratio tokamaks is calculated. The variational method introduced by Rosenbluth, et al., is used to calculate the full Onsager matrix in the banana regime. These results are part of a continuing study of the high [beta] large aspect ratio equilibria introduced in Cowley, et al. All the neoclassical coefficients are reduced from their nominal low [beta] values by a factor ([var epsilon]/q[sup 2][beta])[sup [1/2

  7. High beta plasmas in the PBX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bol, K.; Buchenauer, D.; Chance, M.; Couture, P.; Fishman, H.; Fonck, R.; Gammel, G.; Grek, B.; Ida, K.; Itami, K.

    1986-04-01

    Bean-shaped configurations favorable for high ..beta.. discharges have been investigated in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) tokamak. Strongly indented bean-shaped plasmas have been successfully formed, and beta values of over 5% have been obtained with 5 MW of injected neutral beam power. These high beta discharges still lie in the first stability regime for ballooning modes, and MHD stability analysis implicates the external kink as responsible for the present ..beta.. limit.

  8. Neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-08-01

    Linear tearing instability is studied in the banana collisionality regime in tokamak geometry. Neoclassical effects produce significant modifications of Ohm's law and the vorticity equation so that the growth rate of tearing modes driven by ..delta..' is dramatically reduced compared to the usual resistive MHD value. Consequences of this result, regarding the presence of pressure-gradient-driven neoclassical resistive interchange instabilities and the evolution of magnetic islands in the Rutherford regime, are discussed. 10 refs.

  9. Neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-12-01

    Linear tearing instability is studied in the banana collisionality regime in tokamak geometry. Neoclassical effects produce significant modifications of Ohm's law and the vorticity equation, so that the growth rate of tearing modes driven by ..delta..' is dramatically reduced compared to the usual resistive magnetohydrodynamic values. Consequences of this result, regarding the presence of pressure-gradient-driven neoclassical resistive interchange instabilities and the evolution of magnetic islands in the Rutherford regime, are discussed.

  10. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S. C.; Ferraro, N.; Krebs, I.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to nonlinearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary nonsawtoothing "hybrid" discharges, often referred to as "flux pumping."

  11. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition.

  12. Plasma filamentation in the Rijnhuizen tokamak RTP

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Schueller, F.C.; Barth, C.J.; Chu, C.C.; Pijper, F.J.; Lok, J.; Oomens, A.A.M. )

    1994-07-11

    Evidence for small scale magnetic structures in the Rijnhuizen tokamak RTP is presented. These are manifest through steps and peaks in the electron temperature and pressure, measured with multiposition Thomson scattering. During central electron cyclotron heating, several filaments of high pressure are found in the power deposition region. They live hundreds of microseconds. Near the sawtooth inversion radius a step'' in the temperature profile occurs. Further out, quasiperiodic structures are observed, in both Ohmic and heated discharges.

  13. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Jardin, S C; Ferraro, N; Krebs, I

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to nonlinearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary nonsawtoothing "hybrid" discharges, often referred to as "flux pumping." PMID:26636854

  14. Comparison of tokamak burn cycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental confirmation of noninductive current drive has spawned a number of suggestions as to how this technique can be used to extend the fusion burn period and improve the reactor prospects of tokamaks. Several distinct burn cycles, which employ various combinations of Ohmic and noninductive current generation, are possible, and we will study their relative costs and benefits for both a commerical reactor as well as an INTOR-class device. We begin with a review of the burn cycle options.

  15. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Development of a free-boundary tokamak equilibrium solver for advanced study of tokamak equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young Mu

    2015-09-01

    A free-boundary Tokamak equilibrium solver (TES), developed for advanced study of tokamak equilibra, is described with two distinctive features. One is a generalized method to resolve the intrinsic axisymmetric instability, which is encountered in all equilibrium calculations with a freeboundary condition. The other is an extension to deal with a new divertor geometry such as snowflake or X divertors. For validations, the uniqueness of a solution is confirmed by the independence of variations in the computational domain, the mathematical correctness and accuracy of equilibrium profiles are checked by using a direct comparison with an analytic equilibrium known as a generalized Solov'ev equilibrium, and the governing force balance relation is tested by examining the intrinsic axisymmetric instabilities. As an application of an advanced equilibrium study, a snow-flake divertor configuration that requires a second-order zero of the poloidal magnetic flux is discussed in the circumstance of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) coil system.

  17. Tokamaks: from A D Sakharov to the present (the 60-year history of tokamaks)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizov, E. A.

    2012-02-01

    The paper is prepared on the basis of the report presented at the session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) at the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 25 May 2011, devoted to the 90-year jubilee of Academician Andrei D Sakharov - the initiator of controlled nuclear fusion research in the USSR. The 60-year history of plasma research work in toroidal devices with a longitudinal magnetic field suggested by Andrei D Sakharov and Igor E Tamm in 1950 for the confinement of fusion plasma and known at present as tokamaks is described in brief. The recent (2006) agreement among Russia, the EU, the USA, Japan, China, the Republic of Korea, and India on the joint construction of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) in France based on the tokamak concept is discussed. Prospects for using the tokamak as a thermonuclear (14 MeV) neutron source are examined.

  18. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  19. Management and protection system for superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszczyk, B.; Wojenski, A.; Zienkiewicz, P.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K.; Romaniuk, R.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes system for a diagnostics of a high-voltage power supply section of tokamaks. System is designed to assure reliability and safety of power supply subsystems. It is divided into two main components: remote and local. Remote part is located near tokamak, whereas local part can be localised away from the tokamak area. The remote side consists of custom, standalone devices. On the other hand, the local device is based on the uTCA.4 architecture. Components are connected with an optic fibre over a link-layer protocol which provides high throughput, low latency and transmission redundancy. All main operations ie. data processing, transmission etc. are performed on the FPGA devices. At the local side there is one device treated as a master device. It implements sort of a routing table which connects consecutive system inputs and outputs. It also provides possibility for some user defined data processing. This document contains general system overview, short description of hardware used in the project and gateware implementation.

  20. Spherical tokamaks with plasma centre-post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The metal centre-post (MCP) in tokamaks is a structure which carries the total toroidal field current and also houses the Ohmic heating solenoid in conventional or low aspect ratio (Spherical)(ST) tokamaks. The MCP and solenoid are critical components for producing the toroidal field and for the limited Ohmic flux in STs. Constraints for a ST reactor related to these limitations lead to a minimum plasma aspect ratio of 1.4 which reduces the benefit of operation at higher betas in a more compact ST reactor. Replacing the MCP is of great interest for reactor-based ST studies since the device is simplified, compactness increased, and maintenance reduced. An experiment to show the feasibility of using a plasma centre-post (PCP) is being currently under construction and involves a high level of complexity. A preliminary study of a very simple PCP, which is ECR(Electron Cyclotron Resonance)-assisted and which includes an innovative fuelling system based on pellet injection, has recently been reported. This is highly suitable for an ultra-low aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) device. Advances on this PCP ECR-assisted concept within a ULART and the associated fuelling system are presented here, and will include the field topology for the PCP ECR-assisted scheme, pellet ablation modeling, and a possible global equilibrium simulation. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contr.17592, National Instruments-Costa Rica.

  1. Remote feedback stabilization of tokamak instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K. )

    1994-05-01

    A novel remote suppressor consisting of an injected ion beam has been used for the stabilization of plasma instabilities. A collisionless curvature-driven trapped-particle instability, an [bold E][times][bold B] flute mode and an ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability have been successfully suppressed down to noise levels using this scheme. Furthermore, the first experimental demonstration of a multimode feedback stabilization with a single sensor--suppressor pair has been achieved. Two modes (an [bold E][times][bold B] flute and an ITG mode) were simultaneously stabilized with a simple state-feedback-type method where more state'' information was generated from a single-sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing. The above experiments may be considered as paradigms for controlling several important tokamak instabilities. First, feedback suppression of edge fluctuations in a tokamak with a suitable form of insulated segmented poloidal limiter sections used as Langmuir-probe-like suppressors is proposed. Other feedback control schemes are proposed for the suppression of electrostatic core fluctuations via appropriately phased ion density input from a modulated neutral beam. Most importantly, a scheme to control major disruptions in tokamaks via feedback suppression of kink (and possibly) tearing modes is discussed. This may be accomplished by using a modulated neutral beam suppressor in a feedback loop, which will supply a momentum input of appropriate phase and amplitude. Simple theoretical models predict modest levels of beam energy, current, and power.

  2. Edge-localized-modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A. W.

    2014-09-15

    Edge-localized-modes (ELMs) are a ubiquitous feature of H-mode in tokamaks. When gradients in the H-mode transport barrier grow to exceed the MHD stability limit the ELM instability grows explosively, rapidly transporting energy and particles onto open field lines and material surfaces. Though ELMs provide additional particle and impurity transport through the H-mode transport barrier, enabling steady operation, the resulting heat flux transients to plasma facing surfaces project to large amplitude in future low collisionality burning plasma tokamaks. Measurements of the ELM heat flux deposition onto material surfaces in the divertor and main chamber indicate significant broadening compared to inter-ELM heat flux, with a timescale for energy deposition that is consistent with sonic ion flow and numerical simulation. Comprehensive ELM simulation is highlighting the important physics processes of ELM transport including parallel transport due to magnetic reconnection and turbulence resulting from collapse of the H-mode transport barrier. Encouraging prospects for ELM control and/or suppression in future tokamaks include intrinsic modes of ELM free operation, ELM triggering with frequent small pellet injection and the application of 3D magnetic fields.

  3. Forced Magnetic Reconnection In A Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of forced magnetic field reconnection induced by an externally imposed resonant magnetic perturbation usually uses a sheared slab or cylindrical magnetic field model and often focuses on the potential time-asymptotic induced magnetic island state. However, tokamak plasmas have significant magnetic geometry and dynamical plasma toroidal rotation screening effects. Also, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) and banana width (FBW) effects can damp and thus limit the width of a nascent magnetic island. A theory that is more applicable for tokamak plasmas is being developed. This new model of the dynamics of forced magnetic reconnection considers a single helicity magnetic perturbation in the tokamak magnetic field geometry, uses a kinetically-derived collisional parallel electron flow response, and employs a comprehensive dynamical equation for the plasma toroidal rotation frequency. It is being used to explore the dynamics of bifurcation into a magnetically reconnected state in the thin singular layer around the rational surface, evolution into a generalized Rutherford regime where the island width exceeds the singular layer width, and assess the island width limiting effects of FLR and FBW polarization currents. Support by DoE grants DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-FG02-92ER54139.

  4. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, C.; Salvador, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Munoz, O.; Tapia, A.; Arredondo, V.; Chavez, R.; Nieto, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Garza, A.; Estrada, I.; Jasso, E.; Acosta, C.; Briones, C.; Cavazos, G.; Martinez, J.; Morones, J.; Almaguer, J.; Fonck, R.

    2011-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R < 0.14m, a < 0.10m, BT < 0.5T, Ip < 40kA, 3ms pulse) is currently being recomissioned at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, as part of an agreement between the Faculties of Mech.-Elect. Eng. and Phy. Sci.-Maths. The main objective for having MEDUSA is to train students in plasma physics & technical related issues, aiming a full design of a medium size device (e.g. Tokamak-T). Details of technical modifications and a preliminary scientific programme will be presented. MEDUSA-MX will also benefit any developments in the existing Mexican Fusion Network. Strong liaison within national and international plasma physics communities is expected. New activities on plasma & engineering modeling are expected to be developed in parallel by using the existing facilities such as a multi-platform computer (Silicon Graphics Altix XE250, 128G RAM, 3.7TB HD, 2.7GHz, quad-core processor), ancillary graph system (NVIDIA Quadro FE 2000/1GB GDDR-5 PCI X16 128, 3.2GHz), and COMSOL Multiphysics-Solid Works programs.

  5. Nonlinear Simulation Studies of Tokamaks and STs

    SciTech Connect

    W. Park; J. Breslau; J. Chen; G.Y. Fu; S.C. Jardin; S. Klasky; J. Menard; A. Pletzer; B.C. Stratton; D. Stutman; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Sugiyama

    2003-07-07

    The multilevel physics, massively parallel plasma simulation code, M3D, has been used to study spherical tori (STs) and tokamaks. The magnitude of outboard shift of density profiles relative to electron temperature profiles seen in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] under strong toroidal flow is explained. Internal reconnection events in ST discharges can be classified depending on the crash mechanism, just as in tokamak discharges; a sawtooth crash, disruption due to stochasticity, or high-beta disruption. Toroidal shear flow can reduce linear growth of internal kink. It has a strong stabilizing effect nonlinearly and causes mode saturation if its profile is maintained, e.g., through a fast momentum source. Normally, however, the flow profile itself flattens during the reconnection process, allowing a complete reconnection to occur. In some cases, the maximum density and pressure spontaneously occur inside the island and cause mode saturation. Gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid studies of NSTX show the effects of fluid compression on a fast-ion-driven n = 1 mode. MHD studies of recent tokamak experiments with a central current hole indicate that the current clamping is due to sawtooth-like crashes, but with n = 0.

  6. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  7. Numerical investigations of plasma parameters in the COMPASS tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Havlickova, E.; Zagorski, R.; Panek, R.

    2008-09-15

    A numerical investigation of plasma parameters in a diverter configuration of COMPASS tokamak is presented. The plasma parameters in the device are analyzed in the frame of the self-consistent description of the central plasma and edge region. The possibility of achieving high recycling and detached regimes in the boundary layer of the COMPASS tokamak is discussed.

  8. Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

  9. Physics design requirements for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G.H.; Goldston, R.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Reiersen, W.T.; Nevins, W.M.; Porkolab, M.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-11-01

    The design of TPX is driven by physics requirements that follow from its mission. The tokamak and heating systems provide the performance and profile controls needed to study advanced steady state tokamak operating modes. The magnetic control systems provide substantial flexibility for the study of regimes with high beta and bootstrap current. The divertor is designed for high steady state power and particle exhaust.

  10. Fokker-Planck/Transport model for neutral beam driven tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.; Mirin, A.A.; McCoy, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The application of nonlinear Fokker-Planck models to the study of beam-driven plasmas is briefly reviewed. This evolution of models has led to a Fokker-Planck/Transport (FPT) model for neutral-beam-driven Tokamaks, which is described in detail. The FPT code has been applied to the PLT, PDX, and TFTR Tokamaks, and some representative results are presented.

  11. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-04-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

  12. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-12-31

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%.

  13. Neoclassical Transport Properties of Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weyssow, B.

    2004-03-15

    The classical transport theory is strictly valid for a plasma in a homogeneous and stationary magnetic field. In the '60, experiments have shown that this theory does not apply as a local theory of transport in Tokamaks. It was shown that global geometric characteristics of the confining elements have a strong influence on the transport. Three regimes of collisionality are characteristic of the neoclassical transport theory: the banana regime (the electronic diffusion coefficient increases starting from zero), the plateau regime (the diffusion coefficient is almost independent of the collisionality) and the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime (the electronic diffusion coefficient again increases with the collisionality)

  14. Electrostatic analysis of the tokamak edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1981-07-01

    The intrusion of an equipotential poloidal limiter into the edge plasma of a circular tokamak discharge distorts the axisymmetry in two ways: (1) it (partially) shorts out the top-to-bottom Pfirsch-Schlueter driving potentials, and (2) it creates zones of back current flow into the limiter. The resulting boundary mismatch between the outer layers and the inner axisymmetric Pfirsch-Schlueter layer provides free energy to drive the edge plasma unstable. Special limiters are proposed to symmetrize the edge plasma and thereby reduce the electrical and MHD activity in the boundary layer.

  15. Tokamak Equilibria with Reversed Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, A. A.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Villard, L.

    2003-08-01

    Observations of nearly zero toroidal current in the central region of tokamaks (the “current hole”) raises the question of the existence of toroidal equilibria with very low or reversed current in the core. The solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equilibrium equation with hollow toroidal current density profile including negative current density in the plasma center are investigated. Solutions of the corresponding eigenvalue problem provide simple examples of such equilibrium configurations. More realistic equilibria with toroidal current density reversal are computed using a new equilibrium problem formu­lation and computational algorithm which do not assume nested magnetic surfaces.

  16. Dust divertor for a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X Z; Delzanno, G L

    2009-01-01

    Micron-size tungsten particulates find equilibrium position in the magnetized plasma sheath in the normal direction of the divertor surface, but are convected poloidally and toroidally by the sonic-ion-flow drag parallel to the divertor surface. The natural circulation of dust particles in the magnetized plasma sheath can be used to set up a flowing dust shield that absorbs and exhausts most of the tokamak heat flux to the divertor. The size of the particulates and the choice of materials offer substantial room for optimization.

  17. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S. C.; Ferraro, N.; Krebs, I.

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to non-linearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary non-sawtoothing “hybrid” discharges, often referred to as “flux-pumping”.

  18. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  19. Calculation of rf current drive in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2008-11-01

    The toroidal plasma current is a key parameter for controlling MHD stability and fusion performances in tokamaks. Among the various methods for driving current, rf waves are a flexible and powerful tool. Therefore, their role in the design and optimization of advanced scenarios is considerable. The universal ray-tracing code C3PO coupled with the fully implicit linearized 3-D bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck solver LUKE is an illustration of the present day effort for performing fast and realistic calculations of the rf driven plasma current. The versatility of this tool is highlighted by simulations concerning the lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves.

  20. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  1. Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented.

  2. Anomalous thermal confinement in ohmically heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, F.; Tang, W.M.; White, R.B.

    1986-02-01

    A model is proposed to explain the behavior of the gross energy confinement time in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas. The analysis takes into account the effect of the anomalous thermal conductivity due to small scale turbulence and of the macroscopic MHD behavior, which provides some constraints on the temperature profile. Results indicate that the thermal conductivity associated with the dissipative trapped-electron mode and with the ion temperature gradient (eta/sub i/) mode can account, respectively, for the Neo-Alcator scaling and the saturation of the energy confinement time with density. Comparisons with experimental results show reasonable agreement. 32 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, W. M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the 'short radial gradient scale length' (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates.

  4. Equilibrium reconstruction in the START tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, L. C.; Bevir, M. K.; Walsh, M. J.

    2001-02-01

    The computation of magnetic equilibria in the START spherical tokamak is more difficult than those in more conventional large aspect ratio tokamaks. This difficulty arises partly as a result of the use of induction compression to generate high current plasma, as this precludes the positioning of magnetic diagnostics close to the outboard side of the plasma. In addition, the effect of a conducting wall with a high, but finite, conductivity must be included. A method is presented for obtaining plasma equilibrium reconstructions based on the EFIT code. New constraints are used to relate isoflux surface locations deduced from radial profile measurements of electron temperature. A model of flux diffusion through the vessel wall is developed. It is shown that neglecting flux diffusion in the vessel wall can lead to a significant underestimate in the calculation of the plasma βt. Using a relatively sparse set of magnetic signals, βt can be obtained to within a fractional error of +/-10%. Using constraints to relate isoflux surface locations, the principle involved in determining the internal q profile is demonstrated.

  5. Plasma transport in a compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P; Bateman, G.

    1987-02-01

    Nominal predicted plasma conditions in a compact ignition tokamak are illustrated by transport simulations using experimentally calibrated plasma transport models. The range of uncertainty in these predictions is explored by using various models which have given almost equally good fits to experimental data. Using a transport model which best fits the data, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a Compact Ignition Tokamak design with major radius 1.32 m, plasma half-width 0.43 m, elongation 2.0, and toroidal field and plasma current ramped in six seconds from 1.7 to 10.4 T and 0.7 to 10 MA, respectively. Ignition is facilitated by 20 MW of heating deposited off the magnetic axis near the /sup 3/He minority cyclotron resonance layer. Under these conditions, sawtooth oscillations are small and have little impact on ignition. Tritium inventory is minimized by preconditioning most discharges with deuterium. Tritium is injected, in large frozen pellets, only after minority resonance preheating. Variations of the transport model, impurity influx, heating profile, and pellet ablation rates, have a large effect on ignition and on the maximum beta that can be achieved.

  6. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  7. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/S/q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    PubMed

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions. PMID:19044600

  9. Modular pump limiter systems for large tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, T.; Klepper, C. C.; Mioduszewski, P. K.; McGrath, R. T.

    1987-09-01

    Long-pulse (greater than 10-s) operation of large tokamaks with high-power (greater than 10-MW) heating and extensive external fueling will require correspondingly efficient particle exhaust for density control. A pump limiter can provide the needed exhaust capability by removing a small percentage of the particles, which would otherwise be recycled. Single pump limiter modules have been operated successfully on ISX-B, PDX, TEXTOR, and PLT. An axisymmetric pump limiter is now being installed and will be studied in TEXTOR. A third type of pump limiter is a system that consists of several modules and exhibits performance different from that of a single module. To take advantage of the flexibility of a modular pump limiter system in a high-power, long-pulse device, the power load must be distributed among a number of modules. Because each added module changes the performance of all the others, a set of design criteria must be defined for the overall limiter system. The design parameters for the modules are then determined from the system requirements for particle and power removal. Design criteria and parameters are presented, and the impact on module design of the state of the art in engineering technolgy is discussed. The relationship between modules is considered from the standpoint of flux coverage and shadowing effects. The results are applied to the Tore Supra tokamak. A preliminary conceptual design for the Tore Supra pump limiter system is discussed, and the design parameters of the limiter modules are presented.

  10. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso; Vargas, Ivan; Guadamuz, Saul; Mora, Jaime; Ansejo, Jose; Zamora, Esteban; Herrera, Julio; Chaves, Esteban; Romero, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak (ST) MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R<0.14m, a<0.10m, BT<0.5T, Ip<40kA, 3ms pulse)[1] is in a process of donation to Costa Rica Institute of Technology. The main objective of MEDUSA is to train students in plasma physics /technical related issues which will help all tasks of the very low aspect ratio stellarator SCR-1(A≡R/>=3.6, under design[2]) and also the ongoing activities in low temperature plasmas. Courses in plasma physics at undergraduate and post-graduate joint programme levels are regularly conducted. The scientific programme is intend to clarify several issues in relevant physics for conventional and mainly STs, including transport, heating and current drive via Alfv'en wave, and natural divertor STs with ergodic magnetic limiter[3,4]. [1] G.D.Garstka, PhD thesis, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1997 [2] L.Barillas et al., Proc. 19^th Int. Conf. Nucl. Eng., Japan, 2011 [3] C.Ribeiro et al., IEEJ Trans. Electrical and Electronic Eng., 2012(accepted) [4] C.Ribeiro et al., Proc. 39^th EPS Conf. Contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Sweden, 2012

  11. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Blackfield, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    A new version of the FEDC Tokamak System Code (TSC) has been developed to analyze the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). These proposed experiments have small (major radius F 1.5m) and high magnetic fields (B J 10T), and are characterized by reduced cost. Key design constraints of CIT include limits to the high stress levels in the magnetic coils, limits to the large temperature rises in the coils and on the first wall or divertor plate, minimizing power supply requirements, and assuring adequate plasma performance in fusion ignition and burn time consistent with the latest physics understanding. We present systems code level studies of CIT parameter space here for a range of design options with various design constraints. The present version of the TSC incorporates new models for key components of CIT. For example, new algorithms have been incorporated for calculating stress levels in the TFC and ohmic solenoid, temperature rise in the magnetic coils, peak power requirements, plasma MHD equilibrium and volt-second capability. The code also incorporates a numerical optimizer to find combinations of engineering quantities (device size, coil sizes, coil current densities etc.) and physics quantities (plasma density temperature, and beta, etc.) which satisfy all the constraints and can minimize or maximize a figure of merit (e.g., the major radius). This method was recently used in a mirror reactor system code (3) for the Minimara concept development.

  12. Superconducting CICC for SST-1 tokamak magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Saxena, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The SST-1 tokamak is being designed for steady state operation with plasma durations in the range of 100--1,000s. Both the toroidal field coils (TFC) and the poloidal field coils (PFC) in the SST-1 tokamak are superconducting. TF coils are required to produce a magnetic field of 3 T at 1.05 m from machine axis. The maximum field seen by the TF coil conductor will be {le} 4.3 T. The cable for the TF coils has, therefore, been designed for a field of 5 T at the conductor. The PFC are used for plasma shaping and equilibrium and the magnetic field on the PFC conductor is estimated to be {le} 3.2 T. Hence a cable designed for 5 T operation will be suitable for PFC also subjected to the stability against the disturbances generated by the current ramping in the PFC. The authors have designed two Cable-in-conduit-conductor (CICC) type cables, one with copper conduit (to be preferably used with the TFC) and the other with Stainless Steel conduit to be used with PFC. They describe some design aspects of these cables and discuss the stability of these cables against disturbances.

  13. Critical issues for modeling dust transport in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Bacharis, Minas; Coppins, Michael; Allen, John E

    2010-08-01

    Dust produced in tokamaks is an important issue for fusion. Dust particles can introduce health and safety issues when in the same time can have an impact on reactor performance. Apart from the associated problems there are also potential benefits that make the better understanding of their behavior important. In this work the dust transport code Dust in TOKamakS will be used to explore the effect that variations in the plasma background and the physical model, describing the plasma-dust interaction, have on their predicted trajectories. PMID:20866922

  14. /sup 3/He functions in tokamak-pumped laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    /sup 3/He placed in an annular cell around a tokamak fusion generator can convert moderated fusion neutrons to energetic ions by the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction, and thereby excite gaseous lasants mixed with the /sup 3/He while simultaneously breeding tritium. The total /sup 3/He inventory is about 4 kg for large tokamak devices. Special configurations of toroidal-field magnets, neutron moderators and beryllium reflectors are required to permit nearly uniform neutron current into the laser cell with minimal attenuation. The annular laser radiation can be combined into a single output beam at the top of the tokamak.

  15. Nonneutralized charge effects on tokamak edge magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Linjin; Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Shi, T. H.; Wang, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the large ion orbits, excessive electrons can accumulate at tokamak edge. We find that the nonneutralized electrons at tokamak edge can contribute an electric compressive stress in the direction parallel to magnetic field by their mutual repulsive force. By extending the Chew-Goldburger-Low theory (Chew et al., 1956 [13]), it is shown that this newly recognized compressive stress can significantly change the plasma average magnetic well, so that a stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes in the pedestal can result. This linear stability regime helps to explain why in certain parameter regimes the tokamak high confinement can be rather quiet as observed experimentally.

  16. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Byers, J.A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hooper, E.G.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L. ); Makowski, M.A. )

    1990-08-09

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single rf pulses generated using the ETA-II accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50-cm-diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5kHz pulse rate, and {bar P} > 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW cw or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of rf generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  17. A review of ELMs in divertor tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.

    1996-05-23

    This paper reviews what is known about edge localized modes (ELMs), with an emphasis on their effect on the scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas. ELM effects have been measured in the ASDEX-U, C-Mod, COMPASS-D, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M,JT-60U, and TCV tokamaks and are reported here. At least three types of ELMs have been identified and their salient features determined. Type-1 giant ELMs can cause the sudden loss of up to 10-15% of the plasma stored energy but their amplitude ({Delta}W/W) does not increase with increasing power. Type- 3 ELMs are observed near the H-mode power threshold and produce small energy dumps (1-3% of the stored energy). All ELMs increase the scrape- off layer plasma and produce particle fluxes on the divertor targets which are as much as ten times larger that the quiescent phase between ELMs. The divertor heat pulse is largest on the inner target, unlike that of L-Mode or quiescent H-mode; some tokamaks report radial structure in the heat flux profile which is suggestive of islands or helical structures. The power scaling of Type-1 ELM amplitude and frequency have been measured in several tokamaks and has recently been applied to predictions of the ELM Size in ITER. Concern over the expected ELM amplitude has led to a number of experiments aimed at demonstrating active control of ELMs. Impurity gas injection with feedback control on the radiation loss in ASDEX-U suggests that a promising mode of operation (the CDH-mode) with a very small type-3 ELMs can be maintained with heating power sell above the H-mode threshold, where giant type-1 ELMs can be maintained with heating power well above the H-mode threshold, where Giant type-1 ELMs are normally observed. While ELMs have many potential negative effects, the beneficial effect of ELMs in providing density control and limiting the core plasma impurity content in high confinement H- mode discharges should not be overlooked.

  18. Development of tokamak reactor system analysis code NEW-TORSAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Masao; Ida, Toshio; Nishikawa, Masana; Kameari, Akihisa; Nishio, Satoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1987-07-01

    A systems analysis code named NEW-TORSAC (TOkamak Reactor Systems Analysis Code) has been developed by modifying the TORSAC which had been already developed by us. The NEW-TORSAC is available for tokamak reactor designs and evaluations from experimental machines to commercial reactor plants. It has functions to design tokamaks automatically from plasma parameter setting to determining configurations of reactor equipments and calculating main characteristics parameters of auxiliary systems and the capital costs. In the case of analyzing tokamak reactor plants, the code can calculate busbar energy costs. In addition to numerical output, some output of this code such as a reactor configuration, plasma equilibrium, electro-magnetic forces, etc., are graphically displayed. The code has been successfully applied to the scoping studies of the next generation machines and commercial reactor plants.

  19. Improvement of tokamak performance by injection of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki

    1992-12-01

    Concepts for improving tokamak performance by utilizing injection of hot electrons are discussed. Motivation of this paper is to introduce the research work being performed in this area and to refer the interested readers to the literature for more detail. The electron injection based concepts presented here have been developed in the CDX, CCT, and CDX-U tokamak facilities. The following three promising application areas of electron injection are described here: 1. Non-inductive current drive, 2. Plasma preionization for tokamak start-up assist, and 3. Charging-up of tokamak flux surfaces for improved plasma confinement. The main motivation for the dc-helicity injection current drive is in its efficiency that, in theory, is independent of plasma density. This property makes it attractive for driving currents in high density reactor plasmas.

  20. Neutral beam injector performance on the PLT and PDX tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G.; Ashcroft, D.L.; Eubank, H.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Kozub, T.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Rossmassler, J.; Williams, M.D.

    1981-02-01

    An overall injector system description is presented first, and this will be followed by a detailed discussion of those problems unique to multiple injector operation on the tokamaks, i.e., power transmission, conditioning, reliability, and failures.

  1. TFTR/JET INTOR workshop on plasma transport tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a Workshop on transport models for prediction and analysis of tokamak plasma confinement. Summaries of papers on theory, predictive modeling, and data analysis are included.

  2. Requirements for neutral beam current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Dory, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraphs on the use of neutral beam current drive in future tokamaks. Current profiles, slowing down distributions, beam destabilization of alfven waves and plasma parameters are some items covered in this paper. (DWL)

  3. Heavy ion beam probe systems for tight aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.V.; Zimeleva, L.G.; Krupnik, L.I.; Nedzelskij, I.S.; Trofimenko, Y.V.; Minaev, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the specific features of the application of heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) systems to tight aspect ratio tokamaks. We present and compare the HIBP projects for the TUMAN-3, GLOBUS, and COMPASS, where the inner part of the plasma is not available for regular chord diagnostics, so the HIBP becomes very desirable. All existing tight aspect ratio facilities and projects have a low (less than 1.9 T) toroidal field that requires a comparatively low beam energy range. The natural elongation and triangularity in tight aspect ratio tokamaks require an accurate calculation of the three-dimensional magnetic field for probing optimization. In comparison with traditional tokamaks, the detector grids have a wider energy interval. In general, the trajectories and detector grids for tight aspect ratio tokamaks become similar to the stellarator ones. Traditional and new probing schemes are suggested and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Reliability of initial-value MHD calculations of Tokamak disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, H. R.; Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Holmes, J. A.

    1984-06-01

    The nonlinear coupling of resistive tearing modes was proposed as the mechanism for some Tokamak disruptions. This is based primarily on initial value resistive magnetohydrodynamic calculations performed with a finite difference grid in minor radius and Fourier series expansion in the poloidal and toroidal angles. The calculations show that, for certain q profiles, the nonlinear interaction of tearing modes of different helicities leads to the rapid destabilization of other modes. The resulting effects and the time scale are consistent with the Tokamak disruption.

  5. Neoclassical diffusion of heavy impurities in a rotating tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1987-08-01

    Particle orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma are calculated from the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is found that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster, resulting in a diffusion coefficient much larger than that for a stationary plasma. Particle simulation is carried out and the results offer a qualitative explanation for some experimental data from the Tokamak Test Reactor (TFTR). 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Computer simulation of transport driven current in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, W. J.; Dawson, J. M.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated transport driven current in tokamaks via 2+1/2 dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations. These have demonstrated a steady increase of toroidal current in centrally fueled plasmas. Neoclassical theory predicts that the bootstrap current vanishes at large aspect ratio, but we see equal or greater current growth in straight cylindrical plasmas. These results indicate that a centrally fueled and heated tokamak may sustain its toroidal current, even without the ``seed current'' which the neoclassical bootstrap theory requires.

  7. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  8. Summer Research Experiences with a Laboratory Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, N.; Mauel, M.; Navratil, G.; Cates, C.; Maurer, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Shilov, M.; Taylor, E.

    1998-11-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Secondary School Science Teachers seeks to improve middle and high school student understanding of science. The Program enhances science teachers' understanding of the practice of science by having them participate for two consecutive summers as members of laboratory research teams led by Columbia University faculty. In this poster, we report the research and educational activities of two summer internships with the HBT-EP research tokamak. Research activities have included (1) computer data acquisition and the representation of complex plasma wave phenomena as audible sounds, and (2) the design and construction of pulsed microwave systems to experience the design and testing of special-purpose equipment in order to achieve a specific technical goal. We also present an overview of the positive impact this type of plasma research involvement has had on high school science teaching.

  9. Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.H.; Balka, L.J.; Kulovitz, E.E.; Magill, S.R.; McGhee, D.G.; Moretti, A.; Praeg, W.F.

    1981-03-01

    The Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak was designed to provide hot plasmas for reactor-relevant experiments with rf heating (current drive) and plasma wall experiments, principally in-situ low-Z wall coating and maintenance. The device, sized to produce energetic plasmas at minimum cost, is small (R = 51 cm, r = 15 cm) but capable of high currents (100 kA) and long pulse durations (100 ms). A design using an iron central core with no return legs, pure tension tapewound toroidal field coils, digital radial position control, and UHV vacuum technology was used. Diagnostics include monochrometers, x-ray detectors, and a microwave interferometer and radiometer for density and temperature measurements. Stable 100 ms shots were produced with electron temperatures in the range 500 to 1000 eV. Initial results included studies of thermal desorption and recoating of wall materials.

  10. Nonlinear lower hybrid modeling in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.

    2014-02-12

    We present here new results concerning the nonlinear mechanism underlying the observed spectral broadening produced by parametric instabilities occurring at the edge of tokamak plasmas in present day LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) experiments. Low frequency (LF) ion-sound evanescent modes (quasi-modes) are the main parametric decay channel which drives a nonlinear mode coupling of lower hybrid (LH) waves. The spectrum of the LF fluctuations is calculated here considering the beating of the launched LH wave at the radiofrequency (RF) operating line frequency (pump wave) with the noisy background of the RF power generator. This spectrum is calculated in the frame of the kinetic theory, following a perturbative approach. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear LH wave equation show the evolution of the nonlinear mode coupling in condition of a finite depletion of the pump power. The role of the presence of heavy ions in a Deuterium plasma in mitigating the nonlinear effects is analyzed.

  11. DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Research Overview

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Chan; C.M. Greenfield; L.L. Lao; T.C. Luce; C.C. Petty; G.M. Staebler

    1999-12-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of long-pulse, high performance discharges on the DIII-D tokamak. It is highlighted by a discharge achieving simultaneously {beta}{sub N}H of 9, bootstrap current fraction of 0.5, noninductive current fraction of 0.75, and sustained for 16 energy confinement times. The physics challenge has changed in the long-pulse regime. Non-ideal MHD modes are limiting the stability, fast ion driven modes may play a role in fast ion transport which limits the stored energy and plasma edge behavior can affect the global performance. New control tools are being developed to address these issues.

  12. Toroidal microinstability studies of high temperature tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-07-01

    Results from comprehensive kinetic microinstability calculations are presented showing the effects of toroidicity on the ion temperature gradient mode and its relationship to the trapped-electron mode in high-temperature tokamak plasmas. The corresponding particle and energy fluxes have also been computed. It is found that, although drift-type microinstabilities persist over a wide range of values of the ion temperature gradient parameter /eta//sub i/ /equivalent to/ (dlnT/sub i//dr)/(dlnn/sub i//dr), the characteristic features of the dominant mode are those of the /eta//sub i/-type instability when /eta//sub i/ > /eta//sub ic/ /approximately/1.2 to 1.4 and of the trapped-electron mode when /eta//sub i/ < /eta//sub ic/. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Transport Bifurcation in a Rotating Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Parra, F. I.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2010-11-19

    The effect of flow shear on turbulent transport in tokamaks is studied numerically in the experimentally relevant limit of zero magnetic shear. It is found that the plasma is linearly stable for all nonzero flow shear values, but that subcritical turbulence can be sustained nonlinearly at a wide range of temperature gradients. Flow shear increases the nonlinear temperature gradient threshold for turbulence but also increases the sensitivity of the heat flux to changes in the temperature gradient, except over a small range near the threshold where the sensitivity is decreased. A bifurcation in the equilibrium gradients is found: for a given input of heat, it is possible, by varying the applied torque, to trigger a transition to significantly higher temperature and flow gradients.

  14. Fast tomographic methods for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P. J.; Coelho, R.; Neto, A.; Pereira, T.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Gori, S.; Toussaint, U. v.

    2008-04-07

    The achievement of long duration, alternating current discharges on the tokamak IST-TOK requires a real-time plasma position control system. The plasma position determination based on magnetic probes system has been found to be inadequate during the current inversion due to the reduced plasma current. A tomography diagnostic has been therefore installed to supply the required feedback to the control system. Several tomographic methods are available for soft X-ray or bolo-metric tomography, among which the Cormack and Neural networks methods stand out due to their inherent speed of up to 1000 reconstructions per second, with currently available technology. This paper discusses the application of these algorithms on fusion devices while comparing performance and reliability of the results. It has been found that although the Cormack based inversion proved to be faster, the neural networks reconstruction has fewer artifacts and is more accurate.

  15. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  16. Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) with the baseline liquid nitrogen cooling system was analyzed. On the basis of this analysis and present knowledge of the two-phase heat transfer, the current baseline CIT can be cooled down in about 1.5 h. An extensive heat transfer test program is recommended to reduce uncertainty in the heat transfer performance and to explore methods for minimizing the cooldown time. An alternate CIT cooldown system is described which uses a pressurized gaseous helium coolant in a closed-loop system. It is shown analytically that this system will cool down the CIT well within 1 h. Confidence in this analysis is sufficiently high that a heat transfer test program would not be necessary. The added cost of this alternate system is estimated to be about $5.3 million. This helium cooling system represents a reasonable backup approach to liquid nitrogen cooling of the CIT. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Radiation power measurement on the ADITYA tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Jha, Ratneshwar; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Doshi, Kalpesh; Rathod, Vipal; Hansalia, Chandresh; ADITYA Team

    2009-08-01

    The radiation power loss and its variation with plasma density and current are studied in the ADITYA tokamak. The radiation power loss varies from 20% to 40% of the input power for different discharges. The radiation fraction decreases with increasing plasma current but it increases with increasing line-averaged central density. The radiated power behavior has also been studied in discharges with short pulses of molecular beam injection (MBI) and gas puff (GP). The increase in radiation loss is limited to the edge chords in the case of GP, but it extends to the core region for MBI fueling. The MBI seems to indicate reduction in the edge recycling. It is observed that during the density limit disruption, the radiated power loss is more in the current quench phase as compared with the thermal quench phase and comes mainly from the plasma edge.

  18. 'Snowflake' H Mode in a Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piras, F.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Marki, J.; Moret, J.-M.; Pitzschke, A.; Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2010-10-08

    An edge-localized mode (ELM) H-mode regime, supported by electron cyclotron heating, has been successfully established in a 'snowflake' (second-order null) divertor configuration for the first time in the TCV tokamak. This regime exhibits 2 to 3 times lower ELM frequency and 20%-30% increased normalized ELM energy ({Delta}W{sub ELM}/W{sub p}) compared to an identically shaped, conventional single-null diverted H mode. Enhanced stability of mid- to high-toroidal-mode-number ideal modes is consistent with the different snowflake ELM phenomenology. The capability of the snowflake to redistribute the edge power on the additional strike points has been confirmed experimentally.

  19. Status of ECRH project on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wu, Dajun; Li, Bo; Zhang, Jiang; Huang, Yiyun; Wei, Wei; Tang, Yunying; Xu, Weiye; Hu, Huaichuan; Wang, Jian; Xu, Li

    2014-02-01

    A 140GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (EC H&CD) project for EAST Tokamak is launched in 2011 with a total power of 4MW and pulse length of 100 s. The main objectives of the system are to provide central H&CD, assist start-up and control of MHD activities. The system comprises four gyrotrons each with nominal output power of 1MW at 140GHz. The RF power, transmitted through four evacuated corrugated waveguides will be injected into plasma from the low field side (radial port). The front steering equatorial launcher directs the RF beam over ±25° toroidally and scans over 38° poloidally. At present, the construction of the first 1MW system is undergoing for the expected campaign in the end of 2013. In this paper, the current status of the development and the design of the 140-GHz ECRH system are presented.

  20. Status of ECRH project on EAST Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wu, Dajun; Li, Bo; Zhang, Jiang; Huang, Yiyun; Tang, Yunying; Xu, Weiye; Hu, Huaichuan; Wang, Jian; Xu, Li; Wei, Wei

    2014-02-12

    A 140GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (EC H and CD) project for EAST Tokamak is launched in 2011 with a total power of 4MW and pulse length of 100 s. The main objectives of the system are to provide central H and CD, assist start-up and control of MHD activities. The system comprises four gyrotrons each with nominal output power of 1MW at 140GHz. The RF power, transmitted through four evacuated corrugated waveguides will be injected into plasma from the low field side (radial port). The front steering equatorial launcher directs the RF beam over ±25° toroidally and scans over 38° poloidally. At present, the construction of the first 1MW system is undergoing for the expected campaign in the end of 2013. In this paper, the current status of the development and the design of the 140-GHz ECRH system are presented.

  1. Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Becraft, W.R.; Golzy, J.; Houlberg, W.A.; Kukielka, C.A.; Onega R.J.; Raju, G.V.S.; Stone, R.S.

    1980-10-01

    The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented.

  2. Stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-02-01

    The stability properties of m {ge} 2 tearing instabilities in tokamak plasmas are analyzed. A boundary layer theory is used to find asymptotic solutions to the ideal external kink equation which are used to obtain a simple analytic expression for the tearing instability parameter {Delta}{prime}. This calculation generalizes previous work on this topic by considering more general toroidal equilibria (however, toroidal coupling effects are ignored). Constructions of {Delta}{prime} are obtained for plasmas with finite beta and for islands that have nonzero width. A simple heuristic estimate is given for the value of the saturated island width when the instability criterion is violated. A connection is made between the calculation of the asymptotic matching parameter in the finite beta and island width case to the nonlinear analog of the Glasser effect.

  3. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    A new {Delta}{sup {prime}} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon}{le}0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of the finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth {ital et al.} [H. P. Furth {ital et al.}, Phys. Fluids {bold 16}, 1054 (1973)] results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{sup {prime}}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric elements, stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low-{beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  5. Anisotropic pressure tokamak equilibrium and stability considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Salberta, E.R.; Grimm, R.C.; Johnson, J.L.; Manickam, J.; Tang, W.M.

    1987-02-01

    Investigation of the effect of pressure anisotropy on tokamak equilibrium and stability is made with an MHD model. Realistic perpendicular and parallel pressure distributions, P/sub perpendicular/(psi,B) and P/sub parallel/(psi,B), are obtained by solving a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for neutral beam injection to find a distribution function f(E, v/sub parallel//v) at the position of minimum field on each magnetic surface and then using invariance of the magnetic moment to determine its value at each point on the surface. The shift of the surfaces of constant perpendicular and parallel pressure from the flux surfaces depends strongly on the angle of injection. This shift explains the observed increase or decrease in the stability conditions. Estimates of the stabilizing effect of hot trapped ions indicates that a large fraction must be nonresonant and thus decoupled from the bad curvature before it becomes important.

  6. ITER tokamak buildings and equipment layout

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, C.E.; Dilling, D.A.; Ishimoto, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Stoner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design has evolved to a level of maturity that has enabled the building designers to define the major dimensions and characteristics of the cluster of buildings that contain the tokamak and adjacent support equipment. Three-dimensional building models developed in a CATIA database provide the framework for the equipment layout. This article describes the preliminary layout of all major pieces of equipment, large bore pipes, ducts, busbars and other services. It is anticipated that some features of the layout will change as equipment design is advanced and future decisions are made, but these changes are not expected to alter the basic building design and any necessary changes are facilitated by the 3-D CATIA models. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  7. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D L; West, W P; Groth, M; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Hollmann, E M; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R; Solomon, W M; Wong, C C

    2008-04-15

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  8. Plasma diagnostics for the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1988-06-01

    The primary mission of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is to study the physics of alpha-particle heating in an ignited D-T plasma. A burn time of about 10 /tau//sub E/ is projected in a divertor configuration with baseline machine design parameters of R=2.10 m, 1=0.65 m, b=1.30 m, I/sub p/=11 MA, B/sub T/=10 T and 10-20 MW of auxiliary rf heating. Plasma temperatures and density are expected to reach T/sub e/(O) /approximately/20 keV, T/sub i/(O) /approximately/30 keV, and n/sub e/(O) /approximately/ 1 /times/ 10/sup 21/m/sup /minus/3/. The combined effects of restricted port access to the plasma, the presence of severe neutron and gamma radiation backgrounds, and the necessity for remote of in-cell components create challenging design problems for all of the conventional diagnostic associated with tokamak operations. In addition, new techniques must be developed to diagnose the evolution in space, time, and energy of the confined alpha distribution as well as potential plasma instabilities driven by collective alpha-particle effects. The design effort for CIT diagnostics is presently in the conceptual phase with activity being focused on the selection of a viable diagnostic set and the identification of essential research and development projects to support this process. A review of these design issues and other aspects impacting the selection of diagnostic techniques for the CIT experiment will be presented. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Moyer, R. A.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Smirnov, R.; West, W. P.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Hyatt, A. W.; Wong, C. P. C.; Groth, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-09-07

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  10. Self-organized stationary states of tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We report here on a nonlinear mechanism that forms and maintains a self-organized stationary (sawtooth free) state in tokamaks. This process was discovered by way of extensive long-time simulations using the M3D-C1 3D extended MHD code in which new physics diagnostics have been added. It is well known that most high-performance modes of tokamak operation undergo ``sawtooth'' cycles, in which the peaking of the toroidal current density triggers a periodic core instability which redistributes the current density. However, certain modes of operation are known, such as the ``hybrid'' mode in DIII-D, ASDEX-U, JT-60U and JET, and the long-lived modes in NSTX and MAST, which do not experience this cycle of instability. Empirically, it is observed that these modes maintain a non-axisymmetric equilibrium which somehow limits the peaking of the toroidal current density. The physical mechanism responsible for this has not previously been understood, but is often referred to as ``flux-pumping,'' in which poloidal flux is redistributed in order to maintain q0 >1. In this talk, we show that in long-time simulations of inductively driven plasmas, a steady-state magnetic equilibrium may be obtained in which the condition q0 >1 is maintained by a dynamo driven by a stationary marginal core interchange mode. This interchange mode, unstable because of the pressure gradient in the ultra-low shear region in the center region, causes a (1,1) perturbation in both the electrostatic potential and the magnetic field, which nonlinearly cause a (0,0) component in the loop voltage that acts to sustain the configuration. This hybrid mode may be a preferred mode of operation for ITER. We present parameter scans that indicate when this sawtooth-free operation can be expected.

  11. Tokamak foundation in USSR/Russia 1950-1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    In the USSR, nuclear fusion research began in 1950 with the work of I.E. Tamm, A.D. Sakharov and colleagues. They formulated the principles of magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas, that would allow the development of a thermonuclear reactor. Following this, experimental research on plasma initiation and heating in toroidal systems began in 1951 at the Kurchatov Institute. From the very first devices with vessels made of glass, porcelain or metal with insulating inserts, work progressed to the operation of the first tokamak, T-1, in 1958. More machines followed and the first international collaboration in nuclear fusion, on the T-3 tokamak, established the tokamak as a promising option for magnetic confinement. Experiments continued and specialized machines were developed to test separately improvements to the tokamak concept needed for the production of energy. At the same time, research into plasma physics and tokamak theory was being undertaken which provides the basis for modern theoretical work. Since then, the tokamak concept has been refined by a world-wide effort and today we look forward to the successful operation of ITER.

  12. Resistive edge mode instability in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M.; Weiland, J.

    2008-09-15

    Geometrical effects on linear stability of electrostatic resistive edge modes are investigated in the three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis, Nucl. Fusion 7, S1, S285 (2007)]-like equilibria. An advanced fluid model is used for the ions together with the reduced Braghinskii equations for the electrons. Using the ballooning mode representation, the drift wave problem is set as an eigenvalue equation along a field line and is solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. A significantly larger magnetic shear and a less unfavorable normal curvature in the tokamak equilibrium are found to give a stronger finite-Larmor radius stabilization and a more narrow mode spectrum than in the stellarator. The effect of negative global magnetic shear in the tokamak is found to be stabilizing. The growth rate on a tokamak magnetic flux surface is found to be comparable to that on a stellarator surface with the same global magnetic shear but the eigenfunction in the tokamak is broader than in the stellarator due to the presence of large negative local magnetic shear (LMS) on the tokamak surface. A large absolute value of the LMS in a region of unfavorable normal curvature is found to be stabilizing in the stellarator, while in the tokamak case, negative LMS is found to be stabilizing and positive LMS destabilizing.

  13. LONG PULSE ADVANCED TOKAMAK DISCHARGES IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    P.I. PETERSEN

    2002-06-01

    One of the main goals for the DIII-D research program is to establish an advanced tokamak plasma with high bootstrap current fraction that can be sustained in-principle steady-state. Substantial progress has been made in several areas during the last year. The resistive wall mode stabilization has been done with spinning plasmas in which the plasma pressure has been extended well above the no-wall beta limit. The 3/2 neoclassical tearing mode has been stabilized by the injection of ECH into the magnetic islands, which drives current to substitute the missing bootstrap current. In these experiments either the plasma was moved or the toroidal field was changed to overlap the ECCD resonance with the location of the NTMs. Effective disruption mitigation has been obtained by massive noble gas injection into shots where disruptions were deliberately triggered. The massive gas puff causes a fast and clean current quench with essentially all the plasma energy radiated fairly uniformly to the vessel walls. The run-away electrons that are normally seen accompanying disruptions are suppressed by the large density of electrons still bound on the impurity nuclei. Major elements required to establish integrated, long-pulse, advanced tokamak operations have been achieved in DIII-D: {beta}{sub T} = 4.2%, {beta}{sub p} = 2, f{sub BS} = 65%, and {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} = 10 for 600 ms ({approx} 4{tau}{sub E}). The next challenge is to integrate the different elements, which will be the goal for the next five years when additional control will be available. Twelve resistive wall mode coils are scheduled to be installed in DIII-D during the summer of 2003. The future plans include upgrading the tokamak pulse length capability and increasing the ECH power, to control the current profile evolution.

  14. The Science of Spherical Tokamak Plasmas: Progress and Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Alan

    2008-11-01

    The talk will summarize the development of the low aspect ratio `Spherical' Tokamak (ST) from early linear magnetic confinement devices, through toroidal pinches, to the emergence of the tokamak in the 1960's. Theoretical predictions given by Peng and Strickler of the exciting physics of extreme low aspect ratio tokamaks (supported by early experiments involving centre rods inserted into existing Rotamaks, Spheromaks and other small-scale experiments), led to the pioneering START experiment at Culham which convincingly demonstrated the potential of the ST concept. There are now many STs world-wide. The largest among these are MA-scale devices NSTX and MAST with plasmas of cross-section comparable to DIII-D and Asdex-Upgrade. The major results include development of start-up methods; the refinement of scaling laws; improved understanding of general tokamak phenomena such as Edge Localised Modes and development of heating and current drive schemes. ST research on over 20 devices has extended the tokamak plasma regime in many ways, notably a factor 4 increase in stable toroidal average beta, and large increases in the Alfven Mach number and ExB flow shear. By exploiting such features, joint experiments with tokamaks of conventional aspect ratio are resolving several key degeneracies of interest to ITER, DEMO and larger future ST devices. Present STs have low toroidal fields sufficient for most physics studies, but for high fusion yield or energy production higher fields are required; importantly, studies on both NSTX and MAST indicate a stronger than expected improvement of performance with toroidal field. Both devices are planning exciting upgrades which feature a considerable increase of toroidal field. Recent designs for a D-T Component Test Facility based on the Spherical Tokamak show the promise of low Tritium consumption and minimum build cost. Such a facility would provide valuable R&D on the scientific and technical issues of fusion power.

  15. Plasma Confinement in the UCLA Electric Tokamak.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert J.

    2001-10-01

    The main goal of the newly constructed large Electric Tokamak (R = 5 m, a = 1 m, BT < 0.25 T) is to access an omnigeneous, unity beta(S.C. Cowley, P.K. Kaw, R.S. Kelly, R.M. Kulsrud, Phys. fluids B 3 (1991) 2066.) plasma regime. The design goal was to achieve good confinement at low magnetic fields, consistent with the high beta goal. To keep the program cost down, we adopted the use of ICRF as the primary heating source. Consequently, antenna surfaces covering 1/2 of the surface of the tokamak has been prepared for heating and current drive. Very clean hydrogenic plasmas have been achieved with loop voltage below 0.7 volt and densities 3 times above the Murakami limit, n(0) > 8 x 10^12 cm-3 when there is no MHD activity. The electron temperature, derived from the plasma conductivity is > 250 eV with a central electron energy confinement time > 350 msec in ohmic conditions. The sawteeth period is 50 msec. Edge plasma rotation is induced by plasma biasing via electron injection in an analogous manner to that seen in CCT(R.J. Taylor, M.L. Brown, B.D. Fried, H. Grote, J.R. Liberati, G.J. Morales, P. Pribyl, D. Darrow, and M. Ono. Phys. Rev Lett. 63 2365 1989.) and the neoclassical bifurcation is close to that described by Shaing et al(K.C. Shaing and E.C. Crume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 2369 (1989).). In the ohmic phase the confinement tends to be MHD limited. The ICRF heating eliminates the MHD disturbances. Under second harmonic heating conditions, we observe an internal confinement peaking characterized by doubling of the core density and a corresponding increase in the central electron temperature. Charge exchange data, Doppler data in visible H-alpha light, and EC radiation all indicate that ICRF heating works much better than expected. The major effort is focused on increasing the power input and controlling the resulting equilibrium. This task appears to be easy since our current pulses are approaching the 3 second mark without RF heating or current drive. Our

  16. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  17. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  18. Electromagnetic Torque in Tokamaks with Toroidal Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Nikolas Christopher

    Toroidal rotation and rotation shear strongly influences stability and confinement in tokamaks. Breaking of the toroidal symmetry by fields orders of magnitude smaller than the axisymmetric field can, however, produce electromagnetic torques that significantly affect the plasma rotation, stability and confinement. These electromagnetic torques are the study of this thesis. There are two typical types of electromagnetic torques in tokamaks: 1) "resonant torques" for which a plasma current defined by a single toroidal and single poloidal harmonic interact with external currents and 2) "nonresonant torques" for which the global plasma response to nonaxisymmetric fields is phase shifted by kinetic effects that drive the rotation towards a neoclassical offset. This work describes the diagnostics and analysis necessary to evaluate the torque by measuring the rate of momentum transfer per unit area in the vacuum region between the plasma and external currents using localized magnetic sensors to measure the Maxwell stress. These measurements provide model independent quantification of both the resonant and nonresonant electromagnetic torques, enabling direct verification of theoretical models. Measured values of the nonresonant torque are shown to agree well with the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code calculation of torque from cross field transport in nonaxisymmetric equilibria. A combined neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory, valid across a wide range of kinetic regimes, is fully implemented for the first time in general aspect ratio and shaped plasmas. The code captures pitch angle resonances, reproducing previously inaccessible collisionality limits in the model. The complete treatment of the model enables benchmarking to the hybrid kinetic MHD stability codes MARS-K and MISK, confirming the energy-torque equivalency principle in perturbed equilibria. Experimental validations of PENT results confirm the torque applied by nonaxisymmetric

  19. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to

  20. Power supplies and quench protection for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First plasma is scheduled for the year 2000. TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This is a new feature which requires not only a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes but also that ultra-reliable quench protection devices be used to rapidly discharge the stored energy from the magnets in the event of a quench. This paper describes the plan and basis for the adaptation and augmentation of the PPPL/TFTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Following a description of the basic operational requirements, four major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF power supply, the PF power supply, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems.

  1. External Kink Mode in Diverted Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Hanson, J. M.; Turco, F.; Piovesan, P.

    2014-10-01

    In a straight tokamak model, the external kink mode with toroidal mode number n and poloidal mode number m is predicted to be unstable when the edge safety factor, qedge , lies just below a rational value. In a torus, the picture is essentially unchanged and the 2/1 instability in particular is always encountered when qedge = 2 . For a diverted plasma, the edge q is infinite, but, the experimental limit is then q95 = 2 , where q95 is at the 95% flux surface. However, no theoretical basis has been established for the importance of q95 and ideal predictions indicate stability with qedge > 2 and q95 < 2 instability is found only when the actual q at the edge is below 2. Two possible solutions present themselves. The observed mode may be destabilized as a result of small 3D error fields. Alternatively, the observed mode may be destabilized by the rapidly increased resistivity at the plasma edge. Both possibilities are examined using ideal and resistive MHD tools in two and three dimensions. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-FG02-04ER54761, and DE-FG02-07ER54917.

  2. Multiscale coherent structures in tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W.; Yang, Q. W.; Wang, L.; Wen, Y. Z.

    2006-10-15

    A 12-tip poloidal probe array is used on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak [Li, Wan, and Mao, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 135 (2000)] to measure plasma turbulence in the edge region. Some statistical analysis techniques are used to characterize the turbulence structures. It is found that the plasma turbulence is composed of multiscale coherent structures, i.e., turbulent eddies and there is self-similarity in a relative short scale range. The presence of the self-similarity is found due to the structural similarity of these eddies between different scales. These turbulent eddies constitute the basic convection cells, so the self-similar range is just the dominant scale range relevant to transport. The experimental results also indicate that the plasma turbulence is dominated by low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuation components and its dispersion relation shows typical electron-drift-wave characteristics. Some large-scale coherent structures intermittently burst out and exhibit a very long poloidal extent, even longer than 6 cm. It is found that these large-scale coherent structures are mainly contributed by the low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuating components and their presence is responsible for the observations of long-range correlations, i.e., the correlation in the scale range much longer than the turbulence decorrelation scale. These experimental observations suggest that the coexistence of multiscale coherent structures results in the self-similar turbulent state.

  3. Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) ohmic heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.C. )

    1989-09-13

    The ohmic heating system for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides both the voltage for the initial breakdown phase and the energy to drive the plasma current to a value of 400 kA or greater. Providing this voltage and flux swing requires a one-turn loop voltage of about 25 volts (11 kV across the coil) and a magnetic flux swing of 2 volt- seconds. This voltage and flux swing are accomplished by charging the ohmic heating coils to 20 kA, at which point the current is commutated off into a resistor generating the 11 kV across the coil. When the current passes through zero, another power supply drives the current in the opposite polarity to 20 kA, thus completing the full 2 volt-second flux swing. This paper describes the design features and performance of the ohmic heating circuit, with emphasis on the commutation circuit. In addition, the paper describes the use of the ohmic heating system for discharge cleaning and the changeover procedure. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Neoclassical transport in high {beta} tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.

    1992-12-01

    Neoclassical, transport in high {beta} large aspect ratio tokamaks is calculated. The variational method introduced by Rosenbluth, et al., is used to calculate the full Onsager matrix in the banana regime. These results are part of a continuing study of the high {beta} large aspect ratio equilibria introduced in Cowley, et al. All the neoclassical coefficients are reduced from their nominal low {beta} values by a factor ({var_epsilon}/q{sup 2}{beta}){sup {1/2}} II. This factor is the ratio of plasma volume in the boundary layer to the volume in the core. The fraction of trapped particles on a given flux surface (f{sub t}) is also reduced by this factor so that {approximately} {sub ({var_epsilon}}/q{sup 2}{beta}){sup {1/2}}. Special attention is given to the current equation, since this is thought to be relevant at low 3 and therefore may also be relevant at high {beta}. The bootstrap current term is found to exceed the actual current by a factor of the square root of the aspect ratio.

  5. Impurities in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Bell, R. E.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Tritz, K.; Widmann, K.

    2014-10-01

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is designed to study the low-recycling regime through the use of close-fitting, lithium-coated, heatable shell quadrants surrounding the plasma volume. Lithium coatings can getter and bury impurities, but they can also become covered by impurity compounds. Liquefied coatings can both dissolve impurity compounds and bring them to the surface, while sputtering and evaporation rates increase strongly with temperature. Here, we use spectroscopic measurements to assess the effects of varying wall conditions on plasma impurities, mainly Li, C, and O. A passive Doppler spectroscopy system measures toroidal and poloidal impurity profiles using fixed-wavelength and variable-wavelength visible spectrometers. In addition, survey and high-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometers detect emission from higher charge states. Preliminary results show that fresh Li coatings generally reduced C and O emission. C emission decreased sharply following the first solid Li coatings. Inverted toroidal profiles in a discharge with solid Li coatings show peaked Li III emissivity and temperature profiles. Recently, experiments with fresh liquid coatings led to especially strong O reduction. Results from these and additional experiments will be presented. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  6. Experimental results from the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bloody, F.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.

    1986-10-01

    Recent experiments on TFTR have extended the operating regime of TFTR in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2 T). Initial neutral-beam-heating experiments used up to 6.3 MW of deuterium beams. With the recent installation of two additional beamlines, the power has been increased up to 11 MW. A deuterium pellet injector was used to increase the central density to 2.5 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/ in high current discharges. At the opposite extreme, by operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ approx. 0.8 MA) and low density (anti n/sub e/ approx. 1 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/), high ion temperatures (9 +- 2 keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 10/sup 5/ m/s) have been achieved during injection. In addition, plasma compression experiments have demonstrated acceleration of beam ions from 82 keV to 150 keV, in accord with expectations. The wide operating range of TFTR, together with an extensive set of diagnostics and a flexible control system, has facilitated transport and scaling studies of both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The results of these confinement studies are presented.

  7. Continuous tokamak operation with an internal transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1982-10-01

    A large improvement in efficiency of current drive in a tokamak can be obtained using neutral beam injection to drive the current in a plasma which has low density and high resistivity. The current established under such conditions acts as the primary of a transformer to drive current in an ignited high-density plasma. In the context of a model of plasma confinement and fusion reactor costs, it is shown that such transformer action has substantial advantages over strict steady-state current drive. It is also shown that cycling plasma density and fusion power is essential for effective operation of an internal transformer cycle. Fusion power loading must be periodically reduced for intervals whose duration is comparable to the maximum of the particle confinement and thermal inertia timescales for plasma fueling and heating. The design of neutron absorption blankets which can tolerate reduced power loading for such short intervals is identified as a critical problem in the design of fusion power reactors.

  8. The space potential in the tokamak text

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.Z.; Zhang, B.Z.; Wootton, A.J.; Schoch, P.M.; Richards, B.; Baldwin, D.; Brower, D.L.; Castle, G.G.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Heard, J.W.; Hickok, R.L.; Li, W.L.; Lin, H.; McCool, S.C.; Simcic, V.J.; Ritz, C.P.; Yu, C.X. )

    1991-12-01

    A heavy ion beam probe has been used to measure the plasma space potential profiles in the tokamak TEXT (Nucl. Fusion Technol. {bold 1}, 479 (1981)). The Ohmic discharges studied were perturbed by externally produced resonant magnetic fields (an ergodic magnetic limiter or EML). Without these perturbations the plasma central potential is generally consistent with the value calculated from radial ion momentum balance, using experimental values of density and ion temperature and assuming a neoclassical poloidal rotation velocity. Exceptions to the agreement are found when operating with reduced plasma parameters. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are explored, in particular, the effects of intrinsic magnetic field fluctuations, and modifications to the self-consistent radial electric sheath. With the application of the EML fields the edge electric field and potential increase during periods of magnetic island overlap. A test particle calculation of electron transport shows increases in diffusivity also occur during periods of magnetic island overlap. These calculated changes in diffusivity are interpreted in terms of a stochastic layer width, which is itself used to predict a potential change for comparison with the experimental results.

  9. Overview of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A national team has developed a baseline concept for a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). The CIT mission is to achieve ignition and provide experimental capability to study the behavior of burning plasma. The design uses large magnetic fields on axis (about 10 T) and large plasma currents (about 9-10 MA). The magnet structure derives high strength from the use of a copper-Inconel composite plate design in the nose of region of the toroidal field (TF) coil and in the ohmic heating solenoid. Inertial cooling is used;liquid nitrogen temperatures are established at the beginning of each pulse. Capability is provided to operate either with a divertor or limiter based plasma. The design is very compact (1.32-m major radius, 0.43-m plasma radius), has 16 TF coils, and has 16 major horizontal access ports, about 30 cm by 80 cm, located between TF coils. The schedule is for a construction project to be authorized for the period FY 1988-93.

  10. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic turbulence in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.

    1985-02-01

    Nonlinear two- and three-fluid equations are written for the time evolution of the perturbed electrostatic potential, densities, vector potential, and parallel ion motion of collisional and trapped electron plasmas in tokamak geometry. The nonlinear terms arise from the E x B/sub 0/ convection (d/dt = partial/partialt+v/sub E/ x del/sub perpendicular/) and magnetic flutter (del-tilde/sub parallel/ = del/sub parallel/+(B/sub perpendicular//B/sub 0/) x del/sub perpendicular/). Simplified two-dimensional (k/sub perpendicular/) mode coupling simulations with a fixed average parallel wavenumber (k/sub parallel/ = 1/Rq) and curvature drift (..omega../sub g/ = (L/sub n//R)..omega../sub asterisk/ ) characteristic of outward ballooning are performed. Homogeneous stationary turbulent states of the dissipative drift and interchange modes from 0< or =..beta..<..beta../sub crit/ for both the collisional and trapped electron plasmas are obtained. Transport coefficients associated with E x B and magnetic motions are calculated. The problem of simulating plasmas with high viscous Reynolds number is treated with an absorbing mantle at the largest wavenumbers.

  11. Multiple time scale methods in tokamak magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are discussed for integrating the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in tokamak systems on other than the fastest time scale. The dynamical grid method for simulating ideal MHD instabilities utilizes a natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines. The coordinate transformation is chosen to be free of the fast time scale motion itself, and to yield a relatively simple scalar equation for the total pressure, P = p + B/sup 2//2..mu../sub 0/, which can be integrated implicitly to average over the fast time scale oscillations. Two methods are described for the resistive time scale. The zero-mass method uses a reduced set of two-fluid transport equations obtained by expanding in the inverse magnetic Reynolds number, and in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities. The momentum equation becomes a constraint equation that forces the pressure and magnetic fields and currents to remain in force balance equilibrium as they evolve. The large mass method artificially scales up the ion mass and viscosity, thereby reducing the severe time scale disparity between wavelike and diffusionlike phenomena, but not changing the resistive time scale behavior. Other methods addressing the intermediate time scales are discussed.

  12. Pellet imaging techniques in the ASDEX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-11-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast-gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow {ital in} {ital situ} velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 ns and exposures every 50 {mu}s, the evolution of each pellet in a multipellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened {ital D}{sub {alpha}}, {ital D}{sub {beta}}, and {ital D}{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of {ital D}{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational {ital q} surfaces, but instead are a result of dynamic, nonstationary, ablation process.

  13. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1997-12-01

    A new {Delta}{prime} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon} {le} 0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth et al. results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{prime}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric element stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low {beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. Double tearing modes in toroidal geometries are examined as well. Furthermore, m {ge} 2 tearing mode stability criteria are compared with three dimensional initial value MHD simulation by the FAR code.

  14. Physics aspects of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.; Bateman, G.; Houlberg, W.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.; Colestock, P.; Hughes, M.; Ignat, D.; Izzo, R.; Jardin, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha-particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve the condition of ntau/sub E/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/ required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which improves the energy confinement, and provides a high level of ohmic heating. The present CIT design also has a gigh degree of elongation (k approx. 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and a pellet injector are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Since auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, 10 to 20 MW of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) is to be provided.

  15. Ionization balance in EBIT and tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, N. J.; Barnsley, R.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Tarbutt, M. R.; Crosby, D.; Silver, J. D.; Rainnie, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The equilibrium state in tokamak core plasmas has been studied using the relative intensities of resonance x-ray lines, for example Lyα (H-like), "w" (He-like), and "q" (Li-like) from test ions such as Ar+15, Ar+16, and Ar+17. A full spatial analysis involves comparison of the line intensities with ion diffusion calculations, including relevant atomic rates. A zero-dimensional model using a global ion loss rate approximation has also been demonstrated by comparison with the data collected from a Johann configuration spectrometer with a charged coupled device (CCD) detector. Since the lines are nearly monoenergetic, their intensities are independent of the instrument sensitivity and are directly proportional to the ion abundances. This method has recently been applied to Ar in the Oxford electron beam ion trap (EBIT) with a beam energy in the range 3-10 keV. Taking into account the cross sections for monoenergetic electron collisions and polarization effects, model calculations agree with the observed line ratios at 4.1 keV beam energy. This work will be expanded to provide nomograms of ionization state versus line intensity ratios as a function of EBIT beam energy.

  16. Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

    2008-04-01

    The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

  17. Divertor design for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.; Braams, B.; Brooks, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the present divertor design for the planned TPX tokamak, which will explore the physics and technology of steady-state (1000s pulses) heat and particle removal in high confinement (2--4{times} L-mode), high beta ({beta}{sub N} {ge} 3) divertor plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive. The TPX device will operate in the double-null divertor configuration, with actively cooled graphite targets forming a deep (0.5 m) slot at the outer strike point. The peak heat flux on, the highly tilted (74{degrees} from normal) re-entrant (to recycle ions back toward the separatrix) will be in the range of 4--6 MW/m{sup 2} with 18 MW of neutral beams and RF heating power. The combination of active pumping and gas puffing (deuterium plus impurities), along with higher heating power (45 MW maximum) will allow testing of radiative divertor concepts at ITER-like power densities.

  18. Quasicoherent modes on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Markovic, T.; Eliseev, L. G.; Adámek, J.; Aftanas, M.; Bilkova, P.; Boehm, P.; Gryaznevich, M.; Imrisek, M.; Lysenko, S. E.; Medvedev, S. Y.; Panek, R.; Peterka, M.; Seidl, J.; Stefanikova, E.; Stockel, J.; Weinzettl, V.; the COMPASS Team

    2015-06-01

    Multiple quasicoherent electromagnetic modes with steady-state frequency and different nature and location were observed in the COMPASS tokamak (R = 0.56 m, = 0.2 m) at Bt = 1.14 T with Co-NBI (PNBI = 0.2-0.5 MW, Eb = 32 keV) at frequencies 5 kHz < f < 250 kHz. Modes were observed in both low and high confinement (L- and H-modes) plasmas. Lower frequency modes with f < 50 kHz were identified as low m tearing and kink MHD modes, while higher frequency modes with 50 kHz < f < 250 kHz were considered as having Alfvénic nature. Unexpectedly, such modes were only observed in the H-mode, both in neutral beam injector-assisted and Ohmic, so the mode driving force is not yet clear. Using the linear MHD code KINX, we initially identified the observed mode with a ballooning structure is as beta induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) with m, n < 5, while an antiballooning mode is initially identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) with m, n < 9.

  19. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator.

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, Thomas W; Dix, D.; El-GuebalyUniv. Wisco, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D. G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  20. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, T.; Dix, D.; El-Guebaly, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2011-10-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  1. Development of frequency modulation reflectometer for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Wi, H. M.; Lee, W. R.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, T. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, Jinhyung; Kang, Jin-Seob; Bog, M. G.; Yokota, Y.; Mase, A.

    2013-08-15

    Frequency modulation reflectometer has been developed to measure the plasma density profile of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. Three reflectometers are operating in extraordinary polarization mode in the frequency range of Q band (33.6–54 GHz), V band (48–72 GHz), and W band (72–108 GHz) to measure the density up to 7 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} when the toroidal magnetic field is 2 T on axis. The antenna is installed inside of the vacuum vessel. A new vacuum window is developed by using 50 μm thick mica film and 0.1 mm thick gold gasket. The filter bank of low pass filter, notch filter, and Faraday isolator is used to reject the electron cyclotron heating high power at attenuation of 60 dB. The full frequency band is swept in 20 μs. The mixer output is directly digitized with sampling rate of 100 MSamples/s. The phase is obtained by using wavelet transform. The whole hardware and software system is described in detail and the measured density profile is presented as a result.

  2. The dynamic mutation characteristics of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z 2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given. PMID:24892099

  3. Rippling modes in the edge of a Tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, B. A.; Callen, J. D.; Gaffney, P. W.; Hicks, H. R.

    1982-02-01

    A promising resistive magnetohydrodynamic candidate for the underlying cause of turbulence in the edge of a Tokamak plasma is the rippling instability. A computational model for these modes in the cylindrical Tokamak approximation was developed and the linear growth and single helicity quasilinear saturation phases of the rippling modes for parameters appropriate to the edge of a Tokamak plasma was explored. Large parallel heat conduction does not stabilize these mode. Nonlinearly, individual rippling modes are found to saturate by quasilinear flattening of the resistivity profile. The saturated amplitude of the modes scales as m/sup -1/, and the radial extent of these modes grows linearly with time due to radial Vector E x Vector B0 convection. It is found that this evolution is terminated by parallel heat conduction.

  4. Texas Experimental Tokamak. Technical progress report, April 1990--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  5. Prospects and status of low-aspect-ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1994-12-31

    The prospects for the low-aspect-ratio (A) tokamak to fulfill the requirements of viable fusion power plants are considered relative to the present status in data and modeling. Desirable physics and design features for an attractive Blanket Test Facility and power reactors are estimated for low-A tokamaks based on calculations improved with the latest data from small pioneering experiments. While these experiments have confirmed some of the recent predictions for low-A, they also identify the remaining issues that require verification before reliable projections can be made for these deuterium-tritium applications. The results show that the low-A regime of small size, modest field, and high current offers a path complementary to the standard and high A tokamaks in developing the full potential of fusion power.

  6. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-05-01

    Particle orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma are calculated from the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is found that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster with a higher bounce frequency, resulting in a diffusion coefficient much larger than that for a stationary plasma. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. Orbit effects indicate that more impurities can penetrate into a plasma rotating with counter-beam injection. Particle simulation is carried out with realistic experimental parameters and the results are in qualitative agreement with some experimental observations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). 19 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Pneumatic hydrogen pellet injection system for the ISX tokamak.

    PubMed

    Milora, S L; Foster, C A

    1979-04-01

    We describe the design and operation of the solid hydrogen pellet injection system used in plasma refueling experiments on the ISX tokamak. The gun-type injector operates on the principle of gas dynamic acceleration of cold pellets confined laterally in a tube. The device is cooled by flowing liquid helium refrigerant, and pellets are formed in situ. Room temperature helium gas at moderate pressure is used as the propellant. The prototype device injected single hydrogen pellets into the tokamak discharge at a nominal 330 m/s. The tokamak plasma fuel content was observed to increase by (0.5-1.2) x10(19) particles subsequent to pellet injection. A simple modification to the existing design has extended the performance to 1000 m/s. At higher propellant operating pressures (28 bars), the muzzle velocity is 20% less than predicted by an idealized constant area expansion process. PMID:18699536

  8. The Dynamic Mutation Characteristics of Thermonuclear Reaction in Tokamak

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given. PMID:24892099

  9. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  10. Probing spherical tokamak plasmas using charged fusion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeglin, Werner U.; Perez, Ramona V.; Darrow, Douglass S.; Cecconello, Marco; Klimek, Iwona; Allan, Scott Y.; Akers, Rob J.; Jones, Owen M.; Keeling, David L.; McClements, Ken G.; Scannell, Rory

    2015-11-01

    The detection of charged fusion products, such as protons and tritons resulting from D(d,p)t reactions, can be used to determine the fusion reaction rate profile in large spherical tokamak plasmas with neutral beam heating. The time resolution of a diagnostic of this type makes it possible to study the slowly-varying beam density profile, as well as rapid changes resulting from MHD instabilities. A 4-channel prototype proton detector (PD) was installed and operated on the MAST spherical tokamak in August/September 2013, and a new 6-channel system for the NSTX-U spherical tokamak is under construction. PD and neutron camera measurements obtained on MAST will be compared with TRANSP calculations, and the design of the new NSTX-U system will be presented, together with the first results from this diagnostic, if available. Supported in part by DOE DE-SC0001157.

  11. Driven magnetic reconnection in the COMPASS-C tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, A.W.; Carolan, P.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Hender, T.C.; Todd, T.N. , Abingdon, Oxon )

    1992-02-01

    The question of the influence of nonaxisymmetric field perturbations on tokamaks is investigated. Recent experiments in the COMPASS-C tokamak (in {ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 15{ital th} {ital Symposium} {ital on} {ital Fusion} {ital Technology}, Utrecht (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 361) with externally applied helical fields reveal that magnetic islands do not appear until the applied field exceeds a certain value, when plasma rotation and confinement are affected. A new resistive magnetohydrodynamic model including plasma rotation now provides an explanation of this threshold, and is quantitatively consistent with experimental results in Ohmic plasmas. The results indicate the tolerable error fields in future tokamaks. The effects of perturbations with various poloidal and toroidal mode numbers have been studied.

  12. Profile-turbulence interactions, magnetohydrodynamic relaxations, and transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagaraja, A.; Knight, P.J.; Baar, M.R. de; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Min, E.

    2005-09-15

    The dynamical behavior of the global, two-fluid, electromagnetic model of a tokamak plasma is explored under conditions corresponding to the Rijnhuizen tokamak project [A. J. H. Donne, Plasma Phys. Rep. 20, 192 (1994)] using the CUTIE code [A. Thyagaraja, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, B255 (2000)]. Simulations of an off-axis electron-cyclotron-heated (350 kW) hydrogen discharge and a purely Ohmic one over several resistive evolution times ({tau}{sub res}{approx_equal}15-20 ms) are described. The results illustrate profile-turbulence interactions and the spectral transfer processes implicated in the spontaneous generation and maintenance of mesoscale zonal flows and dynamo currents. Relaxation phenomena, including off- and on-axis sawteeth and periodically repeating edge ballooning instabilities mediated by these mechanisms, are presented. The CUTIE model reproduces many observed features of the experiment qualitatively and suggests that global electromagnetic simulations may play an essential role in understanding tokamak turbulence and transport.

  13. Fractal structure of films deposited in a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, V. P.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2007-04-01

    The surface of amorphous films deposited in the T-10 tokamak was studied in a scanning tunnel microscope. The surface relief on a scale from 10 nm to 100 μm showed a stochastic surface topography and revealed a hierarchy of grains. The observed variety of irregular structures of the films was studied within the framework of the concept of scale invariance using the methods of fractal geometry and statistical physics. The experimental probability density distribution functions of the surface height variations are close in shape to the Cauchy distribution. The stochastic surface topography of the films is characterized by a Hurst parameter of H = 0.68-0.85, which is evidence of a nontrivial self-similarity of the film structure. The fractal character and porous structure of deposited irregular films must be considered as an important issue related to the accumulation of tritium in the ITER project. The process of film growth on the surface of tokamak components exposed to plasma has been treated within the framework of the general concept of inhomogeneous surface growth. A strong turbulence of the edge plasma in tokamaks can give rise to fluctuations in the incident flux of particles, which leads to the growth of fractal films with grain dimensions ranging from nano-to micrometer scale. The shape of the surface of some films found in the T-10 tokamak has been interpreted using a model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The growth of films according to the discrete DLA model was simulated using statistics of fluctuations observed in a turbulent edge plasma of the T-10 tokamak. The modified DLA model reproduces well the main features of the surface of some films deposited in tokamaks.

  14. Beta optimization in the context of reactor relevant tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1990-08-01

    In a reactor relevant tokamak the appropriate definition of {beta}, the ratio of the particle and magnetic field pressures, is {beta}* {equivalent to} (2 < p{sup 2} >{sup {1/2}} /B{sup 2}), which exceeds the conventional definition by a factor dependent on the pressure peaking factor, PPF. A simple scaling is obtained which relates the two definitions, {beta}*/{beta}{approx equal}0.9 {plus} 0.15 PPF. Stability properties are determined in terms of {beta}* in a circular and dee-shaped tokamak. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Accessibility of second regions of stability in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1985-12-01

    Second regions of stability to the ideal ballooning modes have been shown to exist in large-aspect-ratio circular and small-aspect-ratio bean-shaped tokamaks. We report on the existence of these second stability regions in finite-aspect-ratio dee-shaped tokamaks. We also report on the discovery of a second-stable region with respect to the n = 1 external kink mode in a bean-shaped plasma. The role of the shear and current profile in determining these regions of parameter space are discussed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  16. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Doggett, J.N.; Johnson, B.M.; Lee, J.D.; Hoard, R.W.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs. (WRF)

  17. Reliability of initial-value MHD calculations of tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.R.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Holmes, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    We have proposed the nonlinear coupling of resistive tearing modes as the mechanism for some tokamak disruptions. This is based primarily on initial-value resistive magnetohydrodynamic calculations performed with a finite-difference grid in minor radius and Fourier series expansion in the poloidal and toroidal angles. The calculations show that, for certain q profiles, the nonlinear interaction of tearing modes of different helicities leads to the rapid destabilization of other modes. The resulting effects and the time scale are consistent with the tokamak disruption.

  18. Resistive X-point modes in tokamak boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Xu, X. Q.; Cohen, R. H.

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the boundary (edge and scrape-off-layer) plasma in a typical low (L) mode diverted tokamak discharge is unstable to a new class of modes called resistive X-point (RX) modes. The RX mode is a type of resistive ballooning mode that exploits a synergism between resistivity and the magnetic geometry of the X-point region. The RX modes are shown to give robust instabilities at moderate mode numbers, and therefore are expected to be the dominant contributors to turbulent diffusion in the boundary plasma of a diverted tokamak. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Fusion-product transport in axisymmetric tokamaks: losses and thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    High-energy fusion-product losses from an axisymmetric tokamak plasma are studied. Prompt-escape loss fluxes (i.e. prior to slowing down) are calculated including the non-separable dependence of flux as a function of poloidal angle and local angle-of-incidence at the first wall. Fusion-product (fp) thermalization and heating are calculated assuming classical slowing down. The present analytical model describes fast ion orbits and their distribution function in realistic, high-..beta.., non-circular tokamak equilibria. First-orbit losses, trapping effects, and slowing-down drifts are also treated.

  20. A Midsize Tokamak As Fast Track To Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    2010-07-14

    This paper presents a midsize tokamak as a fast track to the investigation of burning plasmas. It is shown that it could reach large values of energy gain (≥10) with only a modest improvement in confinement over the scaling that was used for designing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This could be achieved by operating in a low plasma recycling regime that experiments indicate can lead to improved plasma confinement. The possibility of reaching the necessary conditions of low recycling using a more efficient magnetic divertor than those of present tokamaks is discussed.

  1. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-19

    In this study, massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  2. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Prater, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  3. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  4. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  5. DIII-D tokamak long range plan. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1992-08-01

    The DIII-D Tokamak Long Range Plan for controlled thermonuclear magnetic fusion research will be carried out with broad national and international participation. The plan covers: (1) operation of the DIII-D tokamak to conduct research experiments to address needs of the US Magnetic Fusion Program; (2) facility modifications to allow these new experiments to be conducted; and (3) collaborations with other laboratories to integrate DIII-D research into the national and international fusion programs. The period covered by this plan is 1 November 19983 through 31 October 1998.

  6. Design and Analysis of the Thermal Shield of EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Han; Liao, Ziying

    2008-04-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operated at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied on the surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system at a minimum, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This study employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a theoretical basis for an optimization design of the structure.

  7. Kinetic energy principle and neoclassical toroidal torque in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu

    2011-11-15

    It is shown that when tokamaks are perturbed, the kinetic energy principle is closely related to the neoclassical toroidal torque by the action invariance of particles. Especially when tokamaks are perturbed from scalar pressure equilibria, the imaginary part of the potential energy in the kinetic energy principle is equivalent to the toroidal torque by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity. A unified description therefore should be made for both physics. It is also shown in this case that the potential energy operator can be self-adjoint and thus the stability calculation can be simplified by minimizing the potential energy.

  8. Kinetic Energy Principle And Neoclassical Toroidal Torque In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jong-Kyu Park

    2011-11-07

    It is shown that when tokamaks are perturbed the kinetic energy principle is closely related to the neoclassical toroidal torque by the action invariance of particles. Especially when tokamaks are perturbed from scalar pressure equilibria, the imaginary part of the potential energy in the kinetic energy principle is equivalent to the toroidal torque by the Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV). A unified description therefore should be made for both physics. It is also shown in this case that the potential energy operator can be self-adjoint and thus the stability calculation can be simplified by minimizing the potential energy

  9. The role of spherical torus in clarifying tokamak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, A. W.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1999-01-01

    The spherical tokamak (ST) provides a unique environment in which to perform complementary and exacting tests of the tokamak physics required for a burning plasma experiment of any aspect ratio, while also having the potential for long-term fusion applications in its own right. New experiments are coming on-line in the UK (MAST), USA (NSTX, Pegasus), Russia (Globus-M), Brazil (ETE) and elsewhere, and the status of these devices will be reported, along with newly-analysed data from START. Those physics issues where the ST provides an opportunity to remove degeneracy in the databases or clarify one s understanding will be emphasized.

  10. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-15

    Massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.